Science.gov

Sample records for quality evaluation procedures

  1. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  2. A novel quality control procedure for the evaluation of laser scanning data segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lari, Z.; Al-Durgham, K.; Habib, A.

    2014-11-01

    Over the past few years, laser scanning systems have been acknowledged as the leading tools for the collection of high density 3D point cloud over physical surfaces for many different applications. However, no interpretation and scene classification is performed during the acquisition of these datasets. Consequently, the collected data must be processed to extract the required information. The segmentation procedure is usually considered as the fundamental step in information extraction from laser scanning data. So far, various approaches have been developed for the segmentation of 3D laser scanning data. However, none of them is exempted from possible anomalies due to disregarding the internal characteristics of laser scanning data, improper selection of the segmentation thresholds, or other problems during the segmentation procedure. Therefore, quality control procedures are required to evaluate the segmentation outcome and report the frequency of instances of expected problems. A few quality control techniques have been proposed for the evaluation of laser scanning segmentation. These approaches usually require reference data and user intervention for the assessment of segmentation results. In order to resolve these problems, a new quality control procedure is introduced in this paper. This procedure makes hypotheses regarding potential problems that might take place in the segmentation process, detects instances of such problems, quantifies the frequency of these problems, and suggests possible actions to remedy them. The feasibility of the proposed approach is verified through quantitative evaluation of planar and linear/cylindrical segmentation outcome from two recently-developed parameter-domain and spatial-domain segmentation techniques.

  3. The Dutch Review Process for Evaluating the Quality of Psychological Tests: History, Procedure, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Arne; Sijtsma, Klaas; Lucassen, Wouter; Meijer, Rob R.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the 2009 revision of the Dutch Rating System for Test Quality and presents the results of test ratings from almost 30 years. The rating system evaluates the quality of a test on seven criteria: theoretical basis, quality of the testing materials, comprehensiveness of the manual, norms, reliability, construct validity, and…

  4. Nondestructive Evaluation Quality Procedure: Personnel Qualification and Certification Radiographic Testing-Levels I& II

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, K; Rikard, R D; Rodriquez, J

    2003-07-01

    This Operational Procedure establishes the minimum requirements for the qualification and certification/recertification of Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) personnel in the nondestructive testing (NDT) radiographic testing (RT) method. This document is in accordance with the American Society for Nondestructive Testing Recommended Practice SNT-TC-1A, 1996, except as amended herein.

  5. Assessing the quality of classification models: Performance measures and evaluation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichosz, Paweł

    2011-06-01

    This article systematically reviews techniques used for the evaluation of classification models and provides guidelines for their proper application. This includes performance measures assessing the model's performance on a particular dataset and evaluation procedures applying the former to appropriately selected data subsets to produce estimates of their expected values on new data. Their common purpose is to assess model generalization capabilities, which are crucial for judging the applicability and usefulness of both classification and any other data mining models. The review presented in this article is expected to be sufficiently in-depth and complete for most practical needs, while remaining clear and easy to follow with little prior knowledge. Issues that receive special attention include incorporating instance weights to performance measures, combining the same set of evaluation procedures with arbitrary performance measures, and avoiding pitfalls related to separating data subsets used for evaluation from those used for model creation. With the classification task unquestionably being one of the central data mining tasks and the vastly increasing number of data mining applications — not only in business, but also in engineering and research — this is expected to be interesting and useful for a wide audience. All presented techniques are accompanied by simple R language implementations and usage examples, which — whereas created to serve the illustration purpose mostly — can be actually used in practice.

  6. Evaluation of the indoor air quality minimum ventilation rate procedure for use in California retail buildings.

    PubMed

    Dutton, S M; Mendell, M J; Chan, W R; Barrios, M; Sidheswaran, M A; Sullivan, D P; Eliseeva, E A; Fisk, W J

    2015-02-01

    This research assesses benefits of adding to California Title-24 ventilation rate (VR) standards a performance-based option, similar to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers 'Indoor Air Quality Procedure' (IAQP) for retail spaces. Ventilation rates and concentrations of contaminants of concern (CoC) were measured in 13 stores. Mass balance models were used to estimate 'IAQP-based' VRs that would maintain concentrations of all CoCs below health- or odor-based reference concentration limits. An intervention study in a 'big box' store assessed how the current VR, the Title 24-prescribed VR, and the IAQP-based VR (0.24, 0.69, and 1.51 air changes per hour) influenced measured IAQ and perceived of IAQ. Neither current VRs nor Title 24-prescribed VRs would maintain all CoCs below reference limits in 12 of 13 stores. In the big box store, the IAQP-based VR kept all CoCs below limits. More than 80% of subjects reported acceptable air quality at all three VRs. In 11 of 13 buildings, saving energy through lower VRs while maintaining acceptable IAQ would require source reduction or gas-phase air cleaning for CoCs. In only one of the 13 retail stores surveyed, application of the IAQP would have allowed reduced VRs without additional contaminant-reduction strategies.

  7. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A modeling procedure to evaluate the coherence of independently derived environmental quality objectives for air, water and soil

    SciTech Connect

    Meent, D. van de . Lab. for Ecotoxicology); Bruijn, J.H.M. de . Directorate for Chemicals, Safety and Radiation Protection)

    1995-01-01

    Sets of independently derived environmental quality objectives (EQOs) for air, water, and soil may not be coherent in that maintaining the concentration at EQO level in one compartment may lead to exceeding EQO levels in other compartments. A methodology to evaluate this coherence is suggested. Starting from a steady concentration in the compartment of focus (the primary compartment), steady-state concentrations in the adjacent (secondary) compartments are estimated using a multimedia fate model. If air is the primary compartment, steady-state concentrations in water and soil close to the equilibrium concentrations can be expected, and coherence of EQOs can be evaluated easily by means of an extended equilibrium partitioning procedure. If water or soil is the primary compartment, the steady-state concentrate in air is usually well below the equilibrium concentration. Subequilibrium steady-state concentrations are sensitive to assumed model parameters. The procedure is illustrated with the results of a coherence analysis for seven chemicals for The Netherlands.

  9. Flight Evaluation Procedures and Quality Control of Training. Technical Report 68-3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caro, Paul W., Jr.

    Research at the United States Army Aviation School, Fort Rucker, Alabama, sought to improve the school-wide training quality control system. Investigators studied: 1) the relation between the grades a student received from instructors and those he received from a checkpilot; 2) the effect of checkpilots' prior information about students' progress…

  10. [Quality evaluation of the orthodontic practice for certification by ISO 9001. A procedure beneficial for medical, medico-dental or hospital service].

    PubMed

    Becker, G

    2001-01-01

    The accreditation of the ISO 9001 certification (ISO = International Standard Organization) is an external evaluation procedure carried out by independent experts, whose object is the analysis of the operational methods and practices of a medical care facility (e.g. hospital, private clinic, general practitioner's or dentist's practice) which decided to assume the concept, implementation and control of its own quality policy. The whole accreditation procedure represents the basic structure of a continuous dynamic progressiveness within a cabinet eager to offer outstanding quality. Moreover, it guarantees active and voluntary participation of every single member of the medical administration or technical team involved in the realization of this primary objective. In other words, we are talking about a very strong dynamic innovation leading to a change of views and the improvement of communication means, while simultaneously enhancing the security and quality aspects of medical care. The continuous guarantee of high quality medical care calls for precise planning and systematization of actions. First of all, these actions are defined, analyzed and listed in precise work procedures. As they are defined with the agreement of the whole team, they implicate respect and self control. This requires of course transparency of the treatment methods, whose different steps and procedures are described in detail in a logogramm set up in common.

  11. Formation evaluation: Geological procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    This volume goes beyond a discussion of petroleum geology and the techniques of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) logging as a reservoir evaluation tool. It provides the logging geologist with a review of geological techniques and classification systems that will ensure the maximum development of communicable geological information. Contents include: 1. Introduction--cuttings recovery, cutting sampling, core sampling, rock classification; 2. Detrital rocks--classification, description; 3. Carbonate rocks--classification, description; 4. Chemical rocks-introduction, siliceous rocks, ferruginous rocks, aluminous rocks, phosphatic rocks, aluminous rocks, carbonaceous rocks; 5. Igneous and metamorpbic rocks; Appendix; References and Index.

  12. A comparative study between evaluation methods for quality control procedures for determining the accuracy of PET/CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Min Kyoung; Ko, Hyun Soo; Jung, Woo Young; Ryu, Jae Kwang; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-08-01

    The Accuracy of registration between positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images is one of the important factors for reliable diagnosis in PET/CT examinations. Although quality control (QC) for checking alignment of PET and CT images should be performed periodically, the procedures have not been fully established. The aim of this study is to determine optimal quality control (QC) procedures that can be performed at the user level to ensure the accuracy of PET/CT registration. Two phantoms were used to carry out this study: the American college of Radiology (ACR)-approved PET phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) body phantom, containing fillable spheres. All PET/CT images were acquired on a Biograph TruePoint 40 PET/CT scanner using routine protocols. To measure registration error, the spatial coordinates of the estimated centers of the target slice (spheres) was calculated independently for the PET and the CT images in two ways. We compared the images from the ACR-approved PET phantom to that from the NEMA IEC body phantom. Also, we measured the total time required from phantom preparation to image analysis. The first analysis method showed a total difference of 0.636 ± 0.11 mm for the largest hot sphere and 0.198 ± 0.09 mm for the largest cold sphere in the case of the ACR-approved PET phantom. In the NEMA IEC body phantom, the total difference was 3.720 ± 0.97 mm for the largest hot sphere and 4.800 ± 0.85 mm for the largest cold sphere. The second analysis method showed that the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (1.33, 1.33) mm for a bone lesion, (-1.26, -1.33) mm for an air lesion and (-1.67, -1.60) mm for a hot sphere lesion for the ACR-approved PET phantom. For the NEMA IEC body phantom, the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (-1.33, 4.00) mm for the air

  13. Influence of processing procedure on the quality of Radix Scrophulariae: a quantitative evaluation of the main compounds obtained by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Li, Qinglin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang; Zhu, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with accelerated solvent extraction method was used to simultaneously determine six compounds in crude and processed Radix Scrophulariae samples. Accelerated solvent extraction parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, number of cycles, and analysis procedure were systematically optimized. The results indicated that compared with crude Radix Scrophulariae samples, the processed samples had lower contents of harpagide and harpagoside but higher contents of catalpol, acteoside, angoroside C, and cinnamic acid. The established method was sufficiently rapid and reliable for the global quality evaluation of crude and processed herbal medicines.

  14. Evaluating Prevention and Intervention Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Arthur P.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    States the process-outcome research and evaluation paradigm applied to alcohol and substance abuse prevention and intervention programs. Shows its application to efforts to improve students' and patients' self-esteem to be deficient in certain aspects and advocates additions to the evaluation procedures, most notably analysis of in-session change.…

  15. SFCHECK: a unified set of procedures for evaluating the quality of macromolecular structure-factor data and their agreement with the atomic model.

    PubMed

    Vaguine, A A; Richelle, J; Wodak, S J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present SFCHECK, a stand-alone software package that features a unified set of procedures for evaluating the structure-factor data obtained from X-ray diffraction experiments and for assessing the agreement of the atomic coordinates with these data. The evaluation is performed completely automatically, and produces a concise PostScript pictorial output similar to that of PROCHECK [Laskowski, MacArthur, Moss & Thornton (1993). J. Appl. Cryst. 26, 283-291], greatly facilitating visual inspection of the results. The required inputs are the structure-factor amplitudes and the atomic coordinates. Having those, the program summarizes relevant information on the deposited structure factors and evaluates their quality using criteria such as data completeness, structure-factor uncertainty and the optical resolution computed from the Patterson origin peak. The dependence of various parameters on the nominal resolution (d spacing) is also given. To evaluate the global agreement of the atomic model with the experimental data, the program recomputes the R factor, the correlation coefficient between observed and calculated structure-factor amplitudes and Rfree (when appropriate). In addition, it gives several estimates of the average error in the atomic coordinates. The local agreement between the model and the electron-density map is evaluated on a per-residue basis, considering separately the macromolecule backbone and side-chain atoms, as well as solvent atoms and heterogroups. Among the criteria are the normalized average atomic displacement, the local density correlation coefficient and the polymer chain connectivity. The possibility of computing these criteria using the omit-map procedure is also provided. The described software should be a valuable tool in monitoring the refinement procedure and in assessing structures deposited in databases.

  16. Influences on Evaluation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooksy, Leslie J.; Mark, Melvin M.

    2012-01-01

    Attention to evaluation quality is commonplace, even if sometimes implicit. Drawing on her 2010 Presidential Address to the American Evaluation Association, Leslie Cooksy suggests that evaluation quality depends, at least in part, on the intersection of three factors: (a) evaluator competency, (b) aspects of the evaluation environment or context,…

  17. 48 CFR 45.202 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation procedures. 45... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 45.202 Evaluation procedures. (a) The... evaluation purposes only, a rental equivalent evaluation factor. (b) The contracting officer shall ensure...

  18. 48 CFR 45.202 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Evaluation procedures. 45... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 45.202 Evaluation procedures. (a) The... evaluation purposes only, a rental equivalent evaluation factor. (b) The contracting officer shall ensure...

  19. 48 CFR 45.202 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Evaluation procedures. 45... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY Solicitation and Evaluation Procedures 45.202 Evaluation procedures. (a) The... applying, for evaluation purposes only, a rental equivalent evaluation factor as specified in FAR...

  20. Procedures for evaluating technical specifications

    SciTech Connect

    Boccio, J.L.; Robinson, R.C.; Samanta, P.K.; Vesely, W.E.

    1987-01-01

    The Procedures for Evaluating Technical Specifications (PETS) Program being conducted by Brookhaven National Laboratory for the Office of Research, US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), is developing various risk-based approaches for modifying Technical Specifications (TS). This paper highlights the various risk-based issues being addressed by the program and presents examples that exemplify the use of PRA models for modifying TS, primarily elements of the Limiting Condition of Operation (LCOs) and Surveillance Requirements (SRs). PETS approaches to TS modification using more detailed analysis are presented in a companion paper.

  1. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  2. 34 CFR 300.304 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Evaluation procedures. 300.304 Section 300.304... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Evaluations, Eligibility Determinations, Individualized Education Programs, and Educational Placements Evaluations and Reevaluations § 300.304 Evaluation procedures. (a) Notice. The...

  3. Evaluation of the resident-species procedure for developing site-specific water quality criteria for copper in Blaine Creek, Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Dobbs, M.G.; Farris, J.L.; Cherry, D.S.; Cairns, J. . Dept. of Biology); Reash, R.J. . Environmental Engineering Div.)

    1994-06-01

    Acute toxicity tests were performed on each of nine different organisms in Blaine Creek (Lawrence County, KY) water to determine 48-h LC50 values for copper (Cu). Blaine Creek is the receiving stream for Kentucky Power Company's Big Sandy Plant fly-ash pond discharge. Selection of the nine tested species and integration of the results were based on the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) resident-species procedure. The following LC50 ([mu]g Cu/L) values were obtained: Daphnia pulex 37; Physella sp. 109; Isonychia bicolor 223; Pimephales promelas 284; Stenonema sp. 453; Eurycea bislineata 1,120; Chironomus riparius 1,170; Orconectes sp. 2,370; Lepomis macrochirus 4,300. A final acute value (FAV) of 10.1 [mu]g Cu/L was derived using the Blaine Creek database, which is lower than the EPA's national FAV. The differences in FAVs were due to the effect of database size, not differences in the relative sensitivity of test organisms. The findings provide caution for dischargers who may choose to use the resident-species procedure for future site-specific water-quality-criteria demonstrations. The resident-species procedure, because of the inherent conservative bias of the calculation process, tends to produce more stringent criteria when used on a site-specific basis. A modified recalculation procedure, in conduction with site-specific metal bioavailability data, was judged to be the most appropriate method for deriving site-specific Cu criteria for Blaine Creek.

  4. Quality assurance procedures for V378A matrix resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Dynes, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A characterization methodology has been developed on which to base quality assurance procedures for U.S. Polymeric V378A bismaleimide matrix resin. Chemical composition is established by partition reverse phase and size exclusion liquid chromatography. Cure rheology behavior is quantitatively characterized by dynamic viscoelastic analysis using the parallel plate technique. The overall cure process is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The sensitivity of the procedures is evaluated by studying the effects of ambient out time on the chemical end behaviorial properties of the resin.

  5. Sex Bias in Job Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arvey, Richard D.

    1986-01-01

    Outlines issues pertaining to possible sex bias in job evaluation procedures and reviews relevant research. Gives attention to possible sex bias in job analysis procedures, choice and weighting of factors, and reliability and validity issues. Discusses future research needs, particularly reliability and validity aspects of job evaluation…

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality Assurance Procedures C Appendix C to Part 61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1—Determination of Adequate Chromatographic Peak Resolution In...

  7. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 60—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1. Quality Assurance Requirements for Gas Continuous... 40 CFR part 60. Procedure 1 also requires the analysis of the EPA audit samples concurrent with....1Continuous Emission Monitoring System. The total equipment required for the determination of a...

  8. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 60—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1. Quality Assurance Requirements for Gas Continuous... 40 CFR part 60. Procedure 1 also requires the analysis of the EPA audit samples concurrent with....1Continuous Emission Monitoring System. The total equipment required for the determination of a...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 60—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1. Quality Assurance Requirements for Gas Continuous... 40 CFR part 60. Procedure 1 also requires the analysis of the EPA audit samples concurrent with....1Continuous Emission Monitoring System. The total equipment required for the determination of a...

  10. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  11. Evaluation of surgical procedures for trigeminal neuralgia.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, K. S.; Keng, S. B.

    2003-01-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia is a type of facial pain that is difficult to treat. The pain can be excruciating and debilitating. The wide range of treatments currently used for trigeminal neuralgia is ample evidence that there is no simple answer to how it should be managed. This review will evaluate the current surgical procedures used for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. A critical analysis of the evidence-based studies to date was done to evaluate and compare the efficacy of the different surgical procedures. Arguments for and against the use of surgery for trigeminal neuralgia are presented. In addition, the surgical procedures were compared with other treatments for trigeminal neuralgia. PMID:14959906

  12. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures.

    PubMed

    Manghani, Kishu

    2011-01-01

    It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality management. Quality control is focused on fulfilling quality requirements, whereas quality assurance is focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are fulfilled. The quality systems must be commensurate with the Company business objectives and business model. Top management commitment and its active involvement are critical in order to ensure at all times the adequacy, suitability, effectiveness and efficiency of the quality systems. Effective and efficient quality systems can promote timely registration of drugs by eliminating waste and the need for rework with overall financial and social benefits to the Company. PMID:21584180

  13. Decision-Making Procedure and Decision Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burleson, Brant R.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Strongly confirmed the hypothesis that groups employing an interacting decision procedure would produce better decisions than groups employing procedures that are either nominal (Delphi) or "staticized" (individual judgments statistically pooled). Provides clear and consistent support for the value of social interaction in small group decision…

  14. Handling Qualities Influences on Civil Tiltrotor Terminal Operating Procedure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Simmons, Rickey C.; Tucker, George E.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The potential for tiltrotor aircraft as civil transports has been well recognized. Realization of that potential requires development of operating procedures tailored to take advantage of the tiltrotor's capabilities, including thrust vectoring independent of body pitch attitude and good low-speed control. While the tiltrotor shares flight characteristics with both fixed wing airplanes and helicopters, it must convert between those flight modes, typically within the context of precise terminal operations. A series of piloted simulation experiments has been conducted on the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to investigate the influence of tiltrotor cockpit design features on developing certification and operating criteria for civil tiltrotor transports. Handling qualities evaluations have shaped cockpit design guidelines and operating procedure development for a civil tiltrotor. In particular, four topics demonstrate the interplay of handling qualities and operations profile in the development of terminal operating procedures and cockpit or control equipment for a civil tiltrotor: conversion (airplane to helicopter mode), final approach path angle, operating profile speeds and speed changes (particularly under instrument conditions), and one engine inoperative operational considerations.

  15. Arthroscopic latarjet procedure: safety evaluation in cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Gracitelli, Mauro Emilio Conforto; Ferreira, Arnaldo Amado; Benegas, Eduardo; Malavolta, Eduardo Angeli; Sunada, Edwin Eiji; Assunção, Jorge Henrique

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the safety of arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in cadavers. METHODS : Twelve cadaveric shoulders underwent arthroscopic Latarjet procedure in our laboratory for arthroscopy, by four different surgeons. Following surgery, the specimens were subjected to radiographic examination and evaluated by an independent examiner. Nineteen parameters were evaluated, including the coracoid graft fixation, positioning and angulation of the screws, neurological damage and integrity of tendons. RESULTS : Four procedures were considered to be satisfactory, with no difference among the surgeons. The mean angulation of the screws was 27.2°. The subscapularis splitting was, on average, 17.8mm from the upper edge. The coracoid graft was properly positioned relative to equator of the glenoid in 11 cases. There was no injury to the axillary or musculocutaneous nerves. The main complications were: interposition of soft tissue, suprascapular nerve injury, articular deviation of the graft, diastasis and conjoined tendon injury. CONCLUSION : The arthroscopic Latarjet procedure is a complex technique in which each step must be precise to reduce the risk of complications. Our study showed a high risk of failure of the procedure. Level of Evidence IV, Case Series. PMID:24453657

  16. Training Procedure to Evaluate Visible Emissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Air Pollution Control Commission, Charleston.

    Described in this pamphlet is a procedure used by the West Virginia Air Pollution Control Commission to train personnel in evaluating visible emissions. For this purpose a "Smoke Observer's Training Unit" has been designed, a machine capable of generating both gray/black plumes for training in the use of Ringlemann readings and white plumes for…

  17. Faculty Ratings: Procedures for Interpreting Student Evaluations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shingles, Richard D.

    1977-01-01

    The author contends that student evaluations of faculty should be adjusted before use in tenure, salary, and promotion decisions to eliminate irrelevant course and teacher attributes which color students' opinions and confound analysis. To eliminate possible bias, a multiple regression analysis procedure for the adjustment of student evaluations…

  18. Assuring Quality in Education Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trochim, William M. K.; Visco, Ronald J.

    1986-01-01

    A number of quality assurance educational evaluation methods are illustrated. Evaluation data obtained from the Providence, Rhode Island, school district are used. The methods are: (1) from auditing, internal control; (2) from accounting, double bookkeeping; and (3) from industrial quality control, acceptance sampling and cumulative percentage…

  19. Implementing a routine outcome assessment procedure to evaluate the quality of assistive technology service delivery for children with physical or multiple disabilities: Perceived effectiveness, social cost, and user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Lorenzo; Bizzarri, Martina; Bitelli, Claudio; Roentgen, Uta; Gelderblom, Gert-Jan; de Witte, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence on the effects and quality of assistive technology service delivery (ATSD). This study presents a quasi-experimental 3-months follow-up using a pre-test/post-test design aimed at evaluating outcomes of assistive technology (AT) interventions targeting children with physical and multiple disabilities. A secondary aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the follow-up assessment adopted in this study with a view to implement the procedure in routine clinical practice. Forty-five children aged 3-17 years were included. Parents were asked to complete the Individual Prioritised Problem Assessment (IPPA) for AT effectiveness; KWAZO (Kwaliteit van Zorg [Quality of Care]) and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0 for satisfaction with ATSD; Siva Cost Analysis Instrument (SCAI) for estimating the social cost of AT interventions. At follow-up, 25 children used the AT recommended. IPPA effect sizes ranged from 1.4 to 0.7, showing a large effect of AT interventions. Overall, parents were satisfied with ATSD, but Maintenance, Professional Services, and AT Delivery were rated not satisfactory. SCAI showed more resources spent for AT intervention compared to human assistance without technological supports. AT may be an effective intervention for children with disabilities. Issues concerning responsiveness and feasibility of the IPPA and the SCAI instruments are discussed with a view to inform routine clinical practice. PMID:26479329

  20. 29 CFR 1956.22 - Procedures for evaluation and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedures for evaluation and monitoring. 1956.22 Section..., Change, Evaluation and Withdrawal of Approval Procedures § 1956.22 Procedures for evaluation and monitoring. The procedures contained in part 1954 of this chapter shall be applicable to evaluation...

  1. Quality Evaluation Through Nomographs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohlferd, Gerald

    The Quality Measurement Project of New York State, in an attempt to simplify the assessment of school effectiveness, has applied nomographic techniques to this process. Essentially a nomograph is an easy graphic method of obtaining a predicted score without the use of the original regression equation upon which it is based. In the case herein…

  2. Analytical procedure validation and the quality by design paradigm.

    PubMed

    Rozet, Eric; Lebrun, Pierre; Michiels, Jean-François; Sondag, Perceval; Scherder, Tara; Boulanger, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    Since the adoption of the ICH Q8 document concerning the development of pharmaceutical processes following a quality by design (QbD) approach, there have been many discussions on the opportunity for analytical procedure developments to follow a similar approach. While development and optimization of analytical procedure following QbD principles have been largely discussed and described, the place of analytical procedure validation in this framework has not been clarified. This article aims at showing that analytical procedure validation is fully integrated into the QbD paradigm and is an essential step in developing analytical procedures that are effectively fit for purpose. Adequate statistical methodologies have also their role to play: such as design of experiments, statistical modeling, and probabilistic statements. The outcome of analytical procedure validation is also an analytical procedure design space, and from it, control strategy can be set.

  3. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  4. Evaluation Research and Quality Assurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesta, George; Respress, Trinetia; Major, Aline K.; Arazan, Christine; Coxe, Terry

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Juvenile Justice Educational Enhancement Program's implementation of an evaluation research-driven quality assurance process for Florida's juvenile justice educational programs. Reviews the literature on juvenile justice educational practices and describes the educational quality assurance standards and annual modifications that draw…

  5. Evaluation of purification procedures of DNA from maize-meal samples by exploiting different analytical techniques for the assessment of DNA quality.

    PubMed

    Vanni, Adriano; Anfossi, Laura; Giovannoli, Cristina; Oddenino, Leila; Giraudi, Gianfranco

    2004-04-01

    Two different approaches generally applied to achieve purification of DNA extracted from cells were compared: precipitation by organic solvents and enzymatic treatments. We investigated various experimental protocols reported in literature by evaluating DNA purity, integrity and yield. Reliability of analytical techniques normally employed to assess DNA purity and quantity was studied and comments and conclusions were suggested by comparing results obtained by different analytical techniques. Enzymatic treatments prove to be unable of increasing DNA purity while determining a significant degradation. In contrast, optimised conditions for solvent precipitation enabled a sharp increase of DNA purity to be obtained, associated with the maintenance of the initial DNA integrity. The application of the optimised protocol to maize-meal samples allowed us to achieve a good PCR amplification even with those samples which gave poor amplification by following the protocol recommended by the Italian legislation in force for GMO detection in food.

  6. Image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, E. K.; Hammill, H. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new technique for image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation was developed. It was entirely objective, quantitative, and general, and should prove useful in system design and quality control. The technique and its application to determination of quality control procedures for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite NASA Data Processing Facility are described.

  7. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  8. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality Assurance Procedures C Appendix C to Part 61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) NATIONAL EMISSION STANDARDS FOR HAZARDOUS AIR POLLUTANTS Pt. 61, App. C Appendix C to Part...

  9. Factors Affecting Quality Enhancement Procedures for E-Learning Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jara, Magdalena; Mellar, Harvey

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on an empirical study exploring the way in which campus-based higher education institutions (HEIs) in the UK apply their internal quality assurance and enhancement (QA/QE) procedures to their e-learning courses. The purpose of this paper is to identify those characteristics of e-learning courses which affected the…

  10. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures B Appendix B to Part 75 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITORING Pt. 75, App. B Appendix B to Part 75—Quality...

  11. (Quality control and nondestructive test procedures for welded products)

    SciTech Connect

    Childress, C.E.

    1990-11-09

    The International Institute of Welding is composed of some 600 technical experts from 36 countries. These individuals are divided by talent and personal interest into fifteen separate groups called Commissions, each with its own charter and goals. The title, and by inference the charter, of Commission V is : Quality Control and Quality Assurance of Welded Products. In pursuit of its charter Commission V has several subcommissions engaged in the development of drafts, procedures, and standards. Those documents subsequently considered suitable may be submitted to the International Organization for Standards (ISO), an organization similar to the American Society for Testing Materials, for acceptance as international standards. All ISO Procedures and standards which have been in effect for five years must undergo review by the initiating body. The results from review of five-year-old standards and procedures and the discussion of other documents proposed for international publication are presented.

  12. Evaluating Quality in Educational Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abend, Allen; Ornstein, Sheila Walbe; Baltas, Emmanuel; de la Garza, Jaime; Watson, Chris; Lange, Kurt; von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the OECD Programme on Educational Building (PEB) organised two international experts' group meetings to discuss how countries define and evaluate quality in educational facilities. The research and experiences of six experts are presented in this article, in addition to the lessons learned from the experts' group meetings. The director of…

  13. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  14. Evaluation of quality improvement programmes

    PubMed Central

    Ovretveit, J; Gustafson, D

    2002-01-01

    

 In response to increasing concerns about quality, many countries are carrying out large scale programmes which include national quality strategies, hospital programmes, and quality accreditation, assessment and review processes. Increasing amounts of resources are being devoted to these interventions, but do they ensure or improve quality of care? There is little research evidence as to their effectiveness or the conditions for maximum effectiveness. Reasons for the lack of evaluation research include the methodological challenges of measuring outcomes and attributing causality to these complex, changing, long term social interventions to organisations or health systems, which themselves are complex and changing. However, methods are available which can be used to evaluate these programmes and which can provide decision makers with research based guidance on how to plan and implement them. This paper describes the research challenges, the methods which can be used, and gives examples and guidance for future research. It emphasises the important contribution which such research can make to improving the effectiveness of these programmes and to developing the science of quality improvement. PMID:12486994

  15. 76 FR 27016 - Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems AGENCY... assess NIST's test procedures for voting equipment. Manufacturers interested in participating in this... for certification) by the Election Assistance Commission to develop and assess NIST test protocols...

  16. Qualitative Parameters for Evaluation Procedures of Non-Formal and Informal Learning Achievements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stasiunaitiene, Egle; Kaminskiene, Lina

    2009-01-01

    The article introduces evaluation principles of non-formal and informal learning that determine the quality of evaluation, describes stages of the evaluation procedure, differentiates their qualitative parameters and defines their criteria and indicators. It also brings in the discussion that consideration of qualitative parameters for the…

  17. Quality Assurance Procedures for ModCat Database Code Files

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Devanathan, Ram; Guillen, Zoe C.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2014-04-01

    The Quality Assurance procedures used for the initial phase of the Model Catalog Project were developed to attain two objectives, referred to as “basic functionality” and “visualization.” To ensure the Monte Carlo N-Particle model input files posted into the ModCat database meet those goals, all models considered as candidates for the database are tested, revised, and re-tested.

  18. A procedure for evaluating environmental impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Clarke, F.E.; Hanshaw, B.B.; Balsley, J.R.

    1971-01-01

    The procedure does not limit the development of detail in any specific aspect of the environment; a separate expanded matrix for any environmental aspect can easily be developed within the framework provided.

  19. HANDBOOK: QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL (QA/QC) PROCEDURES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations for hazardous waste incineration require trial burns by permit applicants. uality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) must accompany a trial burn plan with appropriate quality assurance/quality control procedures. uidance on the prepa...

  20. Evaluating hospital quality for vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Andrew; Osborne, Nicholas

    2015-06-01

    Increasingly, there is a wealth of data available to aid patients in determining where to seek care for quality vascular disease. At times, these data may be difficult for the public to comprehend. Hospital rating organizations, frequently motivated by profit, are marketing directly to consumers with increasingly granular data. In this report, we examine the most popular ratings for hospitals that perform vascular surgical procedures and describe the methodology of each rating system, as well as the validity of the data underscoring these ratings. Understanding how hospital quality is being evaluated and what outcomes measures are being collated allows vascular surgeons to take appropriate actions to ensure the validity of their own hospital ratings. PMID:26655048

  1. Quality control procedures in MISH-MASH systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szentimrey, T.; Bihari, Z.; Lakatos, M.

    2010-09-01

    The automatic quality control (QC) procedures in order to indicate or filter out the wrong data are indispensable in the databases. However the development of such software systems is impossible without adequate and advanced mathematical fundament. During the last years we developed some software systems that are MASH (Multiple Analysis of Series for Homogenization) and MISH (Meteorological Interpolation based on Surface Homogenized Data Basis), with special attention for the strong mathematical basis. The MASH system can be used for homogenization of daily and monthly series, furthermore in the system also a quality control (QC) unit has been built for the daily data. Such QC can be an essential part of the homogenization methods which are examined nowadays within the COSTES0601 HOME action. The principle of the QC procedure built in MASH is certain multiple comparisons of the data by spatial interpolation technique and the analysis of interpolation errors for detection of wrong data is based on confidence intervals. In MASH system the necessary climate statistical parameters, such as expected values, spatial and temporal covariance structure, are estimated on the basis of examined data series by classic statistical way. The reason of development of the newer MISH system was that the usual applied interpolation methods built in GIS are able to use only a single realization in time for modelling the climate statistical parameters, while in meteorology we have long data series which form a sample in time and space as well. Nowadays we plan to implement the MASH QC procedure in MISH system as well. The main modification in MISH will be that modelled statistical parameters will be used during the QC procedure but in this case the quality control can be operated also for arbitrary single observation realization in time without long data series.

  2. A Procedure for Evaluating Environmental Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Luna B.; And Others

    This report contains one of the first procedures available to environmental impact statements. The heart of the system is a matrix which is general enough to be used as a reference checklist or a reminder of the full range of actions and impacts on the environment that may relate to any proposed action. This comparatively simple system is intended…

  3. Quality and quality improvement in forensic mental health evaluations.

    PubMed

    Wettstein, Robert M

    2005-01-01

    Despite the growing attention to quality and quality improvement in health care in the United States, forensic psychiatry has yet to incorporate relevant developments and information and make quality an important item on the agenda. This article reviews the empirical research regarding the perceived quality of forensic evaluations, which has primarily examined criminal rather than civil forensic evaluations. Beyond the available research, many important policy and empirical questions must be addressed, including the definition of a quality forensic evaluation, the process used to access quality, the indicators and measures used, the methods that provide incentives for performing quality evaluations, the role of forensic psychiatry training programs, and the role of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law (AAPL) or other professional organizations in the quality improvement enterprise.

  4. Accountability Procedures Manual for On-Site Evaluations, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This Accountability Procedures Manual (APM) is designed to be used by Texas Education Agency staff and other education system personnel as a guide for on-site evaluations. It is the responsibility of each member of an on-site peer review team to become familiar with the contents of the APM. Quality peer review evaluations demand consistency,…

  5. Evaluation of the computerized procedures Manual II (COPMA II)

    SciTech Connect

    Converse, S.A.

    1995-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a computerized procedure system, the Computerized Procedure Manual II (COPMA-II), on the performance and mental workload of licensed reactor operators. To evaluate COPMA-II, eight teams of two operators were trained to operate a scaled pressurized water reactor facility (SPWRF) with traditional paper procedures and with COPMA-II. Following training, each team operated the SPWRF under normal operating conditions with both paper procedures and COPMA-II. The teams then performed one of two accident scenarios with paper procedures, but performed the remaining accident scenario with COPMA-II. Performance measures and subjective estimates of mental workload were recorded for each performance trial. The most important finding of the study was that the operators committed only half as many errors during the accident scenarios with COPMA-II as they committed with paper procedures. However, time to initiate a procedure was fastest for paper procedures for accident scenario trials. For performance under normal operating conditions, there was no difference in time to initiate or to complete a procedure, or in the number of errors committed with paper procedures and with COPMA-II. There were no consistent differences in the mental workload ratings operators recorded for trials with paper procedures and COPMA-II.

  6. 34 CFR 300.304 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... and other evaluation materials include those tailored to assess specific areas of educational need and... comprehensive to identify all of the child's special education and related services needs, whether or not... Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL...

  7. 34 CFR 300.304 - Evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... evaluation materials include those tailored to assess specific areas of educational need and not merely those... the child's special education and related services needs, whether or not commonly linked to the... relevant information that directly assists persons in determining the educational needs of the child...

  8. Program Review/Evaluation Policy and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Northwestern Community Coll., Rangely.

    At Colorado Northwestern Community College (CNCC), all educational programs, as well as student services and support functions, are formally reviewed/evaluated in depth at least once every five years. This nine-part outline, providing a step-by-step description of the program review process at CNCC, includes the following sections: (1) the value…

  9. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  10. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  11. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  12. Evaluating Univariate, Bivariate, and Multivariate Normality Using Graphical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdenski, Thomas K., Jr.

    This paper reviews graphical and nongraphical procedures for evaluating multivariate normality by guiding the reader through univariate and bivariate procedures that are necessary, but insufficient, indications of a multivariate normal distribution. A data set using three dependent variables for two groups provided by D. George and P. Mallery…

  13. 43 CFR 10005.20 - Project evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Project evaluation procedures. 10005.20 Section 10005.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING THE...

  14. 43 CFR 10005.20 - Project evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Project evaluation procedures. 10005.20 Section 10005.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING THE...

  15. 43 CFR 10005.20 - Project evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Project evaluation procedures. 10005.20 Section 10005.20 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) UTAH RECLAMATION MITIGATION AND CONSERVATION COMMISSION POLICIES AND PROCEDURES FOR DEVELOPING AND IMPLEMENTING THE...

  16. 42 CFR 422.502 - Evaluation and determination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 422.502 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.502 Evaluation and determination procedures. (a) Basis...

  17. Evaluation of lens absorbed dose with Cone Beam IGRT procedures.

    PubMed

    Palomo, R; Pujades, M C; Gimeno-Olmos, J; Carmona, V; Lliso, F; Candela-Juan, C; Vijande, J; Ballester, F; Perez-Calatayud, J

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this work is to evaluate the absorbed dose to the eye lenses due to the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) system used to accurately position the patient during head-and-neck image guided procedures. The on-board imaging (OBI) systems (v.1.5) of Clinac iX and TrueBeam (Varian) accelerators were used to evaluate the imparted dose to the eye lenses and some additional points of the head. All CBCT scans were acquired with the Standard-Dose Head protocol from Varian. Doses were measured using thermoluminescence dosimeters (TLDs) placed in an anthropomorphic phantom. TLDs were calibrated at the beam quality used to reduce their energy dependence. Average dose to the lens due to the OBI systems of the Clinac iX and the TrueBeam were 0.71  ±  0.07 mGy/CBCT and 0.70  ±  0.08 mGy/CBCT, respectively. The extra absorbed dose received by the eye lenses due to one CBCT acquisition with the studied protocol is far below the 500 mGy threshold established by ICRP for cataract formation (ICRP 2011 Statement on Tissue Reactions). However, the incremental effect of several CBCT acquisitions during the whole treatment should be taken into account. PMID:26457404

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  1. Statistical scoring procedures applicable to laboratory performance evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Streets, W Elane

    2008-11-01

    Two statistical scoring procedures based on p-values have been developed to evaluate the overall performance of analytical laboratories performing environmental measurements. The overall scores of bias and standing are used to determine how consistently a laboratory is able to measure the true (unknown) value correctly over time. The overall scores of precision and standing are used to determine how well a laboratory is able to reproduce its measurements in the long run. Criteria are established for qualitatively labeling measurements as Acceptable, Warning, and Not Acceptable and for identifying areas where laboratories should re-evaluate their measurement procedures. These statistical scoring procedures are applied to two real environmental data sets.

  2. Evaluating evaluation: implications for assessing quality.

    PubMed

    McCoy, M; Hargie, O D

    2001-01-01

    Aims to review the literature on evaluation and to examine research, theory and practice in relation to two key questions: What is evaluation and What is its contribution? Evaluation is increasingly a contemporary concern owing to growing demand for verification of programme results and the current political and economic climate. With the growth in evaluation activity in diverse fields, especially within new domains, those involved in health-care delivery can benefit from an overview of the universal fundamentals of research and theory that translate into improved practice. To evaluate effectively, there is a need for a full understanding of evaluation's nature, purposes and concepts. Identifies and reviews the key subdomains of evaluation, namely: definitions; theoretical underpinning; formulation of goals and objectives; specification of the programme; and cost-benefit analysis.

  3. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  4. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  5. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  6. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  7. 14 CFR § 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. § 1216.205 Section § 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action...

  8. Analogizing Teacher Evaluation Policies and Procedures with Case Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Kay Holden; Jarvis, Melvin E.

    Teacher evaluation procedures, if ineptly accomplished, are potentially vulnerable to litigation (which most school districts can ill afford), because there is no consensus as to what constitutes effective teaching; hence the validity of rating systems and/or reliability of observations is open to challenge. Accordingly, the evaluation policies…

  9. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  10. Evaluation Procedures for Training Psychotherapists in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevron, Eve S.; And Others

    The training of psychotherapists has been an ongoing process in psychiatry and clinical psychology. Recently, however, a growing demand to operationalize competence criteria to enable independent evaluation of therapists' skills in specifically defined psychotherapies has occurred. To examine this phenomenon, evaluation procedures were developed…

  11. Development of a Quality Assurance Procedure for Dose Volume Histogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, David A.

    The role of the dose-volume histogram (DVH) is rapidly expanding in radiation oncology treatment planning. DVHs are already relied upon to differentiate between two similar plans and evaluate organ-at-risk dosage. Their role will become even more important as progress continues towards implementing biologically based treatment planning systems. Therefore it is imperative that the accuracy of DVHs is evaluated and reappraised after any major software or hardware upgrades, affecting a treatment planning system (TPS). The purpose of this work is to create and implement a comprehensive quality assurance procedure evaluating dose volume histograms to insure their accuracy while satisfying American College of Radiology guidelines. Virtual phantoms of known volumes were created in Pinnacle TPS and exposed to different beam arrangements. Variables including grid size and slice thickness were varied and their effects were analyzed. The resulting DVHs were evaluated by comparison to the commissioned percent depth dose values using a custom Excel spreadsheet. After determining the uncertainty of the DVH based on these variables, multiple second check calculations were performed using MIM Maestro and Matlab software packages. The uncertainties of the DVHs were shown to be less than +/- 3%. The average uncertainty was shown to be less than +/- 1%. The second check procedures resulted in mean percent differences less than 1% which confirms the accuracy of DVH calculation in Pinnacle and the effectiveness of the quality assurance template. The importance of knowing the limits of accuracy of the DVHs, which are routinely used to assess the quality of clinical treatment plans, cannot be overestimated. The developed comprehensive QA procedure evaluating the accuracy of the DVH statistical analysis will become a part of our clinical arsenal for periodic tests of the treatment planning system. It will also be performed at the time of commissioning and after any major software

  12. Evaluating Quality Management in University Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becket, Nina; Brookes, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the abundance of research on quality management there is no universal consensus on how best to measure quality in higher education. This paper undertakes a critical evaluation of the different methods used to assess the quality of provision in higher education departments in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on relevant…

  13. Subjective voice quality evaluation in a satellite communications environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinholt, E. V.; Lavalley, R. W.; Hardy, W. C.

    The development of a subjective test procedure for evaluating voice quality is described. The technical characteristics of the satellite communication system are analyzed in order to identify the factors that impair voice quality. The factors that affect the system are: (1) low volume, (2) constant noise, (3) busting noise, (4) noise on speech, (5) speech distortion, (6) incomplete words, (7) garbling, (8) mutual interpretation, and (9) echo. The communication system was rated by test callers based on the occurrence of each noise impairment, the effect of the impairments on the call quality, and the overall quality of the call. Analysis of the data reveals that it is feasible to develop a voice quality evaluation system based on electronic measurements of parameters that predict the occurrence and severity of the nine impairments.

  14. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  15. Simulator Evaluation of a New Cockpit Descent Procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crane, Barry; Palmer, Everett; Smith, Nancy; Rosekind, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate flight crew performance of the "Precision Descent," a new cockpit procedure designed to support the Descent Advisor (DA), one of the components in a new air traffic control advisory system called the "Center-TRACON Automation System" (CTAS). The DA predicts when aircraft will reach a specific waypoint on the arrival route, and presents controllers with clearance advisories designed to improve the sequencing of arriving aircraft. The effectiveness of the DA depends on the aircraft's descent trajectory: where it begins descent, what speed it maintains, how fast and at what altitude it crosses the bottom-of-descent waypoint. The Precision Descent allows controllers to assign these descent parameters to the flight crew. A Field Evaluation of the DA was conducted in Denver in 1995. Three separate clearances using standard ATC phraseology were used to support the cockpit descent procedure during this evaluation. The number and length of these clearances caused problems for both controllers and flight crews, causing readback errors, repeat requests and procedure misunderstandings. These observations led to a focus group meeting in which controller and pilot participants in the 1995 FE assisted in the redesign of the procedure. The Precision Descent eliminates one clearance used in the earlier study, and greatly reduces the length of the remaining clearances. This was accomplished by using non-standard clearance phraseology that relies on a published procedure chart for correct interpretation. Eight type-rated flight crews flew eight Precision Descents in a Boeing 747-400 simulator. No training was provided: crews received either a procedure chart or a procedure chart with a flight manual bulletin describing procedure techniques. Video and digital data were recorded for each descent. Preliminary results indicate that moving information from the verbal clearance to the chart was successful: the shorter clearances and the procedure

  16. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  17. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 1, Quality assurance. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed in response to a concern expressed by the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped define responsibilities and develop procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria for quality assurance at bioassay laboratories. This report recommends elements of quality assurance and quality control responsibilities for the bioassay performance-testing laboratory program, including the qualification and performance of personnel and the calibration, certification, and performance of equipment. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 15 refs.

  18. APPLICATION OF SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES TO ENVIORNMENTAL RESEARCH INVOLVING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As EPA’s environmental research expands into new areas that involve the development of software, quality assurance concepts and procedures that were originally developed for environmental data collection may not be appropriate. Fortunately, software quality assurance is a ...

  19. [Procedure Coding System (PCS): evaluation by the Ministry of Health].

    PubMed

    Zaiss, A

    1998-01-01

    It can be assumed that the German surgical procedure coding system OPS-301 must be replaced by a new coding system at the beginning of the next millennium. The "Procedure Coding System (ICD-10-PCS)" which is presently being developed in the USA was considered the most promising system by the German Curators for questions of classification in Public Health (KKG). Therefore, a working group with members representing all organisations of the KKG was established to evaluate the PCS with special reference to the German conditions. The working group found that PCS is at the moment the best available procedure coding system. The German version of PCS has been licensed by DIMDI in December 1997 and will therefore be in the public domain. The German version will be developed in co-operation with all involved organisations for pilot studies and accompanying scientific evaluation, thus a maximum of consensus should be achieved.

  20. 34 CFR 303.166 - Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Statewide System-Application Requirements § 303.166 Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures. Each application must include information to demonstrate that the requirements in §§ 303.322 and 303.323 are met. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  1. 34 CFR 303.166 - Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... System-Application Requirements § 303.166 Evaluation, assessment, and nondiscriminatory procedures. Each application must include information to demonstrate that the requirements in §§ 303.322 and 303.323 are met. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number 1820-0550) (Authority: 20 U.S.C....

  2. 42 CFR 417.144 - Evaluation and determination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation and determination procedures. 417.144 Section 417.144 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HEALTH MAINTENANCE ORGANIZATIONS, COMPETITIVE MEDICAL PLANS,...

  3. Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This publication provides guidelines and evaluation procedures for undergraduate professional education in chemistry. Contents include: (1) "Scope and Organization of the Chemistry Program"; (2) "Financial Support"; (3) "Curriculum Requirements"; (4) "Commentary on Curriculum Requirements"; (5) "Faculty, Staff, and Facilities Requirements"; (6)…

  4. Evaluation of a Procedure for Increasing Sex-Fair Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Lucia Albino; Waldroop, James

    1978-01-01

    Students were assigned to treatment or control sections of a university course in individual counseling to evaluate the effectiveness of procedures to increase sex-fair counseling. Effectiveness was evidenced by the experimental group's more liberal attitudes toward women's roles, greater sensitivity to sex bias, and more positive clinical…

  5. Procedures for evaluating pork carcass and cut composition

    SciTech Connect

    Siemens, A.L.H.

    1989-01-01

    Five studies were completed to investigate various production and evaluation procedures related to pork carcass composition and meat quality. A comparison of market hog characteristics of pigs selected by feeder pig frame size or current USDA feeder pig standards was made. In general, feeder pig frame size did differentiate between carcass skeletal traits (i.e., carcass length, radius length). However, frame sizing did not improve on current feeder pig grades in discriminating between carcass composition characteristics. Liquid scintillation of potassium-40 was used to estimate pork carcass composition of 124 boars barrows and gilts, ranging from 23 to 114 kg live weight. Pigs were counted live, slaughtered and one side of the carcass was counted. The side was then ground and sampled for percent protein, fat and moisture. Carcass weight and {sup 40}K determined potassium of the carcass explain more of the variation in carcass composition than live animal traits. Carcass measurements were used to determine value and percentages of fat standardized lean, protein, fat and moisture in the carcass using 265 barrow and gilt carcasses. In a separate study, belly composition was estimated from carcass and belly parameters (n = 338). Ribbed carcasses measurements were almost always superior to unribbed carcass measurements when estimating carcass or belly composition. Tenth rib fat depth was the most useful single variable for predicting belly fat, protein, moisture and lean. Some precision and accuracy were lost when using parameters from unribbed carcasses to estimate carcass or belly composition as compared to including parameters from ribbed carcasses. The sensory and nutritive value of cooked pork center loin chops and roasts were investigated. Levels of fat cover and internal temperature did not greatly affect cholesterol content.

  6. Tailoring groundwater quality monitoring to vulnerability: a GIS procedure for network design.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, E; Petrangeli, A B; Giuliano, G

    2013-05-01

    Monitoring networks aiming to assess the state of groundwater quality and detect or predict changes could increase in efficiency when fitted to vulnerability and pollution risk assessment. The main purpose of this paper is to describe a methodology aiming at integrating aquifers vulnerability and actual levels of groundwater pollution in the monitoring network design. In this study carried out in a pilot area in central Italy, several factors such as hydrogeological setting, groundwater vulnerability, and natural and anthropogenic contamination levels were analyzed and used in designing a network tailored to the monitoring objectives, namely, surveying the evolution of groundwater quality relating to natural conditions as well as to polluting processes active in the area. Due to the absence of an aquifer vulnerability map for the whole area, a proxi evaluation of it was performed through a geographic information system (GIS) methodology, leading to the so called "susceptibility to groundwater quality degradation". The latter was used as a basis for the network density assessment, while water points were ranked by several factors including discharge, actual contamination levels, maintenance conditions, and accessibility for periodical sampling in order to select the most appropriate to the network. Two different GIS procedures were implemented which combine vulnerability conditions and water points suitability, producing two slightly different networks of 50 monitoring points selected out of the 121 candidate wells and springs. The results are compared with a "manual" selection of the points. The applied GIS procedures resulted capable to select the requested number of water points from the initial set, evaluating the most confident ones and an appropriate density. Moreover, it is worth underlining that the second procedure (point distance analysis [PDA]) is technically faster and simpler to be performed than the first one (GRID + PDA).

  7. Exponentially adjusted moving mean procedure for quality control. An optimized patient sample control procedure.

    PubMed

    Smith, F A; Kroft, S H

    1996-01-01

    The idea of using patient samples as the basis for control procedures elicits a continuing fascination among laboratorians, particularly in the current environment of cost restriction. Average of normals (AON) procedures, although little used, have been carefully investigated at the theoretical level. The performance characteristics of Bull's algorithm have not been thoroughly delineated, however, despite its widespread use. The authors have generalized Bull's algorithm to use variably sized batches of patient samples and a range of exponential factors. For any given batch size, there is an optimal exponential factor to maximize the overall power of error detection. The optimized exponentially adjusted moving mean (EAMM) procedure, a variant of AON and Bull's algorithm, outperforms both parent procedures. As with any AON procedure, EAMM is most useful when the ratio of population variability to analytical variability (standard deviation ratio, SDR) is low.

  8. An Underwater Color Image Quality Evaluation Metric.

    PubMed

    Yang, Miao; Sowmya, Arcot

    2015-12-01

    Quality evaluation of underwater images is a key goal of underwater video image retrieval and intelligent processing. To date, no metric has been proposed for underwater color image quality evaluation (UCIQE). The special absorption and scattering characteristics of the water medium do not allow direct application of natural color image quality metrics especially to different underwater environments. In this paper, subjective testing for underwater image quality has been organized. The statistical distribution of the underwater image pixels in the CIELab color space related to subjective evaluation indicates the sharpness and colorful factors correlate well with subjective image quality perception. Based on these, a new UCIQE metric, which is a linear combination of chroma, saturation, and contrast, is proposed to quantify the non-uniform color cast, blurring, and low-contrast that characterize underwater engineering and monitoring images. Experiments are conducted to illustrate the performance of the proposed UCIQE metric and its capability to measure the underwater image enhancement results. They show that the proposed metric has comparable performance to the leading natural color image quality metrics and the underwater grayscale image quality metrics available in the literature, and can predict with higher accuracy the relative amount of degradation with similar image content in underwater environments. Importantly, UCIQE is a simple and fast solution for real-time underwater video processing. The effectiveness of the presented measure is also demonstrated by subjective evaluation. The results show better correlation between the UCIQE and the subjective mean opinion score.

  9. [Quality evaluation of essential oils].

    PubMed

    Mori, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norikazu; Kato, Yoshiko; Minamino, Miki; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2002-03-01

    Essential oils on the market were analyzed using GC-MS and the main ingredients of each essential oil were quantified. Analysis of the essential oil of Lavandula officinalis (lavender oil) showed that each sample had a different ratio of the contents of main ingredients, such as linalool, linalyl acetate, and camphor. In addition, some commercial lavender oils were analyzed by GC-MS for comparison with the Lavandula flagrans (lavandin oil) and the reference standard. As a result of this analysis, although the components of almost all commercial lavender oils were approximately the same as those of the reference standard, there were a few products that contained more than 0.5% of the amount of camphor in lavandin oil. This suggests that some lavender oil samples are mixed with lavandin oil to lower the price. Commercial essential oils of Melaleuca alternifolia (teatree oil) and Mentha piperita (peppermint oil) were also analyzed by GC-MS. Each of the peppermint oil samples had a different ratio in the content of its main ingredient. With respect to teatree oils, the amount of terpinens in each sample differed. These results led to concern about the efficacy of essential oils. For achieve the expected efficacy of essential oils, correct information on their ingredients should be available and quality control using instrumental analysis should be introduced. PMID:11905050

  10. A Procedure for Inter-Comparing the Skill of Regional-Scale Air Quality Model Simulations of Daily Maximum 8-Hour Ozone Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational model evaluation procedure is described to quantitatively assess the relative skill among several regionalscale air quality models simulating various percentiles of the cumulative frequency distribution of observed daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations. Bootstrap ...

  11. Procedures for adjusting regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using local data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, Anne B.; Lizarraga, Joy S.

    1996-01-01

    Statistical operations termed model-adjustment procedures can be used to incorporate local data into existing regression modes to improve the predication of urban-runoff quality. Each procedure is a form of regression analysis in which the local data base is used as a calibration data set; the resulting adjusted regression models can then be used to predict storm-runoff quality at unmonitored sites. Statistical tests of the calibration data set guide selection among proposed procedures.

  12. What is the right blood hematocrit preparation procedure for standards and quality control samples for dried blood spot analysis?

    PubMed

    Koster, Remco A; Alffenaar, Jan-Willem C; Botma, Rixt; Greijdanus, Ben; Touw, Daan J; Uges, Donald R A; Kosterink, Jos G W

    2015-01-01

    Remco Koster is a research analyst and PhD candidate at the University Medical Center Groningen and University of Groningen. He has been working in the field of bioanalysis for over 13 years, where he has developed numerous analytical methods using LC-MS/MS. His main research focus is the influence of various matrices on the development and performance of analytical methods using LC-MS/MS. The development of high-speed extraction and analysis methods for drugs and drugs of abuse in human matrices like blood, plasma, hair, saliva and dried blood spots often leads to improved procedures for preparation of standards and quality control samples, sample handling and validation. Two hematocrit preparation procedures for standards and quality control samples were evaluated in order to improve the quality of procedures for dried blood spot validation and analysis.

  13. RCRA ground-water monitoring decision procedures viewed as quality control schemes.

    PubMed

    Starks, T H; Flatman, G T

    1991-01-01

    The problems of developing and comparing statistical procedures appropriate to the monitoring of ground water at hazardous waste sites are discussed. It is suggested that these decision procedures should be viewed as quality control schemes and compared in the same way that industrial quality control schemes are compared. The results of a Monte Carlo simulation study of run-length distribution of a combined Shewhart-CUSUM quality control scheme are reported.

  14. A Formal Approach for Designing and Evaluating Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael; Shafto, Michael; Remington, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Operator interaction with modern control systems is a topic of great concern in high-risk industries such as nuclear power and commercial aviation. The issues associated with such systems focus on the ability of the operators (e.g., pilots) to achieve mission goals safely while containing failures. Operators must be able to interact safely and reliably with highly automatic and complex systems across the full spectrum of possible operating conditions, including normal, abnormal, and emergency situations. In environments such as commercial aviation, operator interaction with the machine is specified through a set of standard operating procedures (SOP). A procedure represents a collective agreement on the 'best' way to perform a given task. The intent of this paper is to suggest a formal methodology, for designing and evaluating procedures, that is both reliable and systematic. Our approach involves two major elements: a model of the machine and a list of the operator's task specifications (goals). We use formal modeling paradigms for describing the system and super-imposing on it the operator's tasks. Such paradigms, based on recent frameworks such as Statecharts and Hierarchical Hybrid Machines appear to be adequate methods for analyzing operator interaction with modern control systems. To illustrate this methodology, we model and analyze the sequence of actions for an emergency procedure. The procedure, Irregular Engine Start, for a medium-range aircraft, specifies the sequence of immediate actions that must be performed by the crew to avoid an uncontrolled rise in engine temperature during start-up. A model of engine behavior during a hot start is constructed. It also describes the various actions that can be taken by the crew and the resulting outcomes. The model is then opened up as a tree of all possible action sequences. This action tree allows us to trace the correct sequences necessary to achieve the desired end-goal (secure and shut down of the engine). In

  15. Ontology Based Quality Evaluation for Spatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yılmaz, C.; Cömert, Ç.

    2015-08-01

    Many institutions will be providing data to the National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI). Current technical background of the NSDI is based on syntactic web services. It is expected that this will be replaced by semantic web services. The quality of the data provided is important in terms of the decision-making process and the accuracy of transactions. Therefore, the data quality needs to be tested. This topic has been neglected in Turkey. Data quality control for NSDI may be done by private or public "data accreditation" institutions. A methodology is required for data quality evaluation. There are studies for data quality including ISO standards, academic studies and software to evaluate spatial data quality. ISO 19157 standard defines the data quality elements. Proprietary software such as, 1Spatial's 1Validate and ESRI's Data Reviewer offers quality evaluation based on their own classification of rules. Commonly, rule based approaches are used for geospatial data quality check. In this study, we look for the technical components to devise and implement a rule based approach with ontologies using free and open source software in semantic web context. Semantic web uses ontologies to deliver well-defined web resources and make them accessible to end-users and processes. We have created an ontology conforming to the geospatial data and defined some sample rules to show how to test data with respect to data quality elements including; attribute, topo-semantic and geometrical consistency using free and open source software. To test data against rules, sample GeoSPARQL queries are created, associated with specifications.

  16. Radionuclide studies in postoperative evaluation of the Fontan procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, A.J.; Wynchank, S.; Choussat, A.; Barat, J.L.; Deville, C.; Ducassou, D.; Fontan, F.

    1984-10-01

    Radionuclide studies were performed on 12 patients who had had a Fontan operation for cyanotic congenital heart disease, six of whom had undergone a prior palliative Glenn procedure. The patients without prior Glenn anastomoses were studied by radionuclide first-pass angiocardiography, using a right antecubital vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. The patients with Glenn anastomoses required two injections, one by femoral vein to study the Fontan procedure, using bolus injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate or microspheres, and the second by right anetcubital vein to study the Glenn anastomosis and right lung, using a bolus of microspheres. Noninvasive radionuclide methods seem to be dependable in the postoperative evaluation of patients after the Fontan procedure. First-pass angiocardiography is most helpful in evaluating the dynamics and distribution of blood flow, especially the right atrial output, and gated blood-pool scintigraphy offers a better evaluation of right atrial and left ventricular contraction, so both supply complementary information.

  17. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Gas Dilution Systems for Field Instrument Calibrations,” 40 CFR 51, appendix M. Figure 1—Example... for Gas Continuous Emission Monitoring Systems Used for Compliance Determination 1. Applicability and... 40 CFR part 60. Procedure 1 also requires the analysis of the EPA audit samples concurrent...

  18. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 60 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 CFR part 60. Procedure 1 also requires the analysis of the EPA audit samples concurrent with... CFR 60.13(d), source owners and operators of CEMS must check, record, and quantify the CD at two... Recording and Reporting. As required in § 60.7(d) of this regulation (40 CFR part 60), all measurements...

  19. The University of Texas Houston Stroke Registry (UTHSR): implementation of enhanced data quality assurance procedures improves data quality

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Limited information has been published regarding standard quality assurance (QA) procedures for stroke registries. We share our experience regarding the establishment of enhanced QA procedures for the University of Texas Houston Stroke Registry (UTHSR) and evaluate whether these QA procedures have improved data quality in UTHSR. Methods All 5093 patient records that were abstracted and entered in UTHSR, between January 1, 2008 and December 31, 2011, were considered in this study. We conducted reliability and validity studies. For reliability and validity of data captured by abstractors, a random subset of 30 records was used for re-abstraction of select key variables by two abstractors. These 30 records were re-abstracted by a team of experts that included a vascular neurologist clinician as the “gold standard”. We assessed inter-rater reliability (IRR) between the two abstractors as well as validity of each abstractor with the “gold standard”. Depending on the scale of variables, IRR was assessed with Kappa or intra-class correlations (ICC) using a 2-way, random effects ANOVA. For assessment of validity of data in UTHSR we re-abstracted another set of 85 patient records for which all discrepant entries were adjudicated by a vascular neurology fellow clinician and added to the set of our “gold standard”. We assessed level of agreement between the registry data and the “gold standard” as well as sensitivity and specificity. We used logistic regression to compare error rates for different years to assess whether a significant improvement in data quality has been achieved during 2008–2011. Results The error rate dropped significantly, from 4.8% in 2008 to 2.2% in 2011 (P < 0.001). The two abstractors had an excellent IRR (Kappa or ICC ≥ 0.75) on almost all key variables checked. Agreement between data in UTHSR and the “gold standard” was excellent for almost all categorical and continuous variables. Conclusions Establishment of a

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991

  1. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

  2. Evaluating and Optimizing Fish Health and Welfare During Experimental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Westall, Lynda; Karp, Natasha A.; Hazlehurst, Diane; Kovacs, Ceri; Keeble, Rosemary; Thompson, Peter; Collins, Richard; Bussell, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many facilities house fish in separate static containers post-procedure, for example, while awaiting genotyping results. This ensures fish can be easily identified, but it does not allow for provision of continuous filtered water or diet. At the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, concern over the housing conditions led to the development of an individual housing system (GeneS) enabling feeding and water filtration. Trials to compare the water quality measures between the various systems found that fish housed in static containers experienced rapid deterioration in water quality. By day 1, measures of ammonia were outside the Institute's prescribed values and continued to rise until it was 25-fold higher than recommended levels. Nitrite levels were also outside recommended levels for all fish by day 9 and were twofold higher by the end of the trial. The water quality measures for tanks held on the recirculating system were stable even though food was provided. These results indicate that for housing zebrafish, running water or appropriately timed water changes are a critical component to ensure that the ethical obligations are met. PMID:26914790

  3. Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Gerald I.

    2007-02-01

    Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

  4. Quality Assurance and Evaluation in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Vibeke Normann; Dahler-Larsen, Peter; Pedersen, Carsten Strombaek

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, international comparisons have become a powerful lever for change in educational policies. Quality assurance and evaluation (QAE) in many forms is being incorporated in the steering and management of schools. However, the Danish use of QAE is a dynamic result of ongoing tensions and struggles both around and within QAE…

  5. Evaluation of video quality models for multimedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunnström, Kjell; Hands, David; Speranza, Filippo; Webster, Arthur

    2008-02-01

    The Video Quality Experts Group (VQEG) is a group of experts from industry, academia, government and standards organizations working in the field of video quality assessment. Over the last 10 years, VQEG has focused its efforts on the evaluation of objective video quality metrics for digital video. Objective video metrics are mathematical models that predict the picture quality as perceived by an average observer. VQEG has completed validation tests for full reference objective metrics for the Standard Definition Television (SDTV) format. From this testing, two ITU Recommendations were produced. This standardization effort is of great relevance to the video industries because objective metrics can be used for quality control of the video at various stages of the delivery chain. Currently, VQEG is undertaking several projects in parallel. The most mature project is concerned with objective measurement of multimedia content. This project is probably the largest coordinated set of video quality testing ever embarked upon. The project will involve the collection of a very large database of subjective quality data. About 40 subjective assessment experiments and more than 160,000 opinion scores will be collected. These will be used to validate the proposed objective metrics. This paper describes the test plan for the project, its current status, and one of the multimedia subjective tests.

  6. Evaluation of proposed ASHRAE energy audit form and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, J.C.; Sud, I. |

    1997-12-31

    The proposed energy audit form and procedures developed by ASHRAE SP-56 were tested, evaluated, and improved in ASHRAE Research Project RP-669. A trial database of building characteristics and energy use, based on the SP-56 form and procedures, was developed, tested, and revised. The goal was to establish forms and procedures to be used by experienced auditors in the auditing of a variety of buildings in the field and to develop a means of collecting, normalizing, and distributing information on commercial and institutional building energy consumption to the industry. Energy audit data from 100 buildings were transferred to the form. The form was modified based on input from the auditors and project monitors. Concurrent with the revision and testing of the form, a trial database was developed. The database uses the form as an input form and contains primarily the building, energy, and space function data from the form. Use of the form and database on a widespread basis would permit the collection and analysis of information for building owners, utilities, agencies, and energy analysis, including comparison of energy use of any individual building to the entire stock of buildings with similar size, space functions, climate, energy sources, and fuel costs.

  7. A procedure to evaluate environmental rehabilitation in limestone quarries.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ana Claudia; Sánchez, Luis Enrique

    2010-11-01

    A procedure to evaluate mine rehabilitation practices during the operational phase was developed and validated. It is based on a comparison of actually observed or documented practices with internationally recommended best practices (BP). A set of 150 BP statements was derived from international guides in order to establish the benchmark. The statements are arranged in six rehabilitation programs under three categories: (1) planning (2) operational and (3) management, corresponding to the adoption of the plan-do-check-act management systems model to mine rehabilitation. The procedure consists of (i) performing technical inspections guided by a series of field forms containing BP statements; (ii) classifying evidences in five categories; and (iii) calculating conformity indexes and levels. For testing and calibration purposes, the procedure was applied to nine limestone quarries and conformity indexes were calculated for the rehabilitation programs in each quarry. Most quarries featured poor planning practices, operational practices reached high conformity levels in 50% of the cases and management practices scored moderate conformity. Despite all quarries being ISO 14001 certified, their management systems pay low attention to issues pertaining to land rehabilitation and biodiversity. The best results were achieved by a quarry whose expansion was recently submitted to the environmental impact assessment process, suggesting that public scrutiny may play a positive role in enhancing rehabilitation practices. Conformity indexes and levels can be used to chart the evolution of rehabilitation practices at regular intervals, to establish corporate goals and for communication with stakeholders. PMID:20630648

  8. Evaluation of the virucidal performance of domestic laundry procedures.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Michael; Kyas, Andrea; Weide, Mirko; Breves, Roland; Bockmühl, Dirk P

    2010-09-01

    Laundering is one of the most important means to ensure a sufficient hygiene standard in the household environment. To evaluate the performance of this process, it is desirable to have methods that mimic the real-life situation as closely as possible. Although methods for the evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal efficacy of domestic laundry procedures are available, the effect of laundering on viruses is still rather unclear. As the influence of laundry process parameters such as mechanical actions, temperature dynamics or liquor ratio cannot be simulated in vitro by suspension assays, a new in situ test method allowing virus simulation tests in washing machines has been developed. Using this in situ method we could show that conventional household washing detergents have a full virucidal efficiency at 40 degrees C also against non-enveloped surrogate viruses.

  9. Effectiveness of HVAC duct cleaning procedures in improving indoor air quality.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Tansel, B; Mitrani, J D

    2001-12-01

    Indoor air quality has become one of the most serious environmental concerns as an average person spends about 22 hr indoors on a daily basis. The study reported in this article, was conducted to determine the effectiveness of three commercial HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) duct cleaning processes in reducing the level of airborne particulate matter and viable bioaerosols. The three HVAC sanitation processes were: (1) Contact method (use of conventional vacuum cleaning of interior duct surfaces); (2) Air sweep method (use of compressed air to dislodging dirt and debris); (3) Rotary brush method (insertion of a rotary brush into the ductwork to agitate and dislodge the debris). Effectiveness of these sanitation processes was evaluated in terms of airborne particulate and viable bioaerosol concentrations in residential homes. Eight identical homes were selected in the same neighborhood. Two homes were cleaned using each procedure and two were used as controls. It was found that both particle count readings and bioaerosol concentrations were higher when cleaning was being performed than before or after cleaning, which suggests that dirt, debris and other pollutants may become airborne as a result of disturbances caused by the cleaning processes. Particle count readings at 0.3 micron size were found to have increased due to cigarette smoking. Particle counts at 1.0 micron size were reduced due to HVAC duct cleaning. Post-level bioaerosol concentrations, taken two days after cleaning, were found to be lower than the pre-level concentrations suggesting that the cleaning procedures were effective to some extent. Homes cleaned with the Air Sweep procedure showed the highest degree of reduction in bioaerosol concentration among the three procedures investigated.

  10. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors: Station operation, record computation, and data reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Boulger, Robert W.; Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Smith, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common monitoring-system configuration for water-quality data collection is the four-parameter monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data. Such systems also can be configured to measure other properties, such as turbidity or fluorescence. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with chemical analyses of samples to estimate chemical loads. The sensors that are used to measure water-quality field parameters require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. This report provides guidelines for site- and monitor-selection considerations; sensor inspection and calibration methods; field procedures; data evaluation, correction, and computation; and record-review and data-reporting processes, which supersede the guidelines presented previously in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report WRIR 00-4252. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.

  11. 21 CFR 106.1 - Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL PROCEDURES... infant formula meets the safety, quality, and nutrient requirements of section 412 of the act and the..., processing, and packaging of an infant formula shall render such formula adulterated under section...

  12. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING INTERNAL FIELD AUDITS AND QUALITY CONTROL (SOP-2.25)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the method for conducting internal field audits and quality control procedures. Internal field audits will be conducted to ensure the collection of high quality data. Internal field audits will be conducted by Field Auditors (the Field QA Officer and the Field...

  13. Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge: Exploring the Gap between Knowledge Type and Knowledge Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Star, Jon R.; Stylianides, Gabriel J.

    2013-01-01

    Following Star (2005, 2007), we continue to problematize the entangling of type and quality in the use of conceptual knowledge and procedural knowledge. Although those whose work is guided by types of knowledge and those whose work is guided by qualities of knowledge seem to be referring to the same phenomena, actually they are not. This lack of…

  14. Quality assessment of the wound dressing procedure in patients at a university hospital.

    PubMed

    Nonino, Eleine Aparecida Penha Martins; Anselmi, Maria Luiza; Dalmas, José Carlos

    2008-01-01

    This observational and sectional study analyzed the quality of the wound dressing procedure performed on hospitalized patients at a medical surgical unit of a University Hospital, based on their classification according to the degree of care dependency and activity performance phases. Using a check list, 168 wound dressings were observed between October and December 2005. Procedure quality was analyzed based on the Positivity Index (IP) and values >70% were considered satisfactory. For the preparation, the IP was 68%, 63%, 73% and 75% for patients with degrees I, II, III and IV, respectively; for execution, 70%, 69%, 71% and 75% and, for unit organization, it was >70% for all degrees. However, the items: validity time frame checking, respect for aseptic principles and maintenance of logical sequence of procedures were compromised. Rigorous execution of procedures allows for risk decrease and assures beneficial results for patients, conferring quality to nursing actions.

  15. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for the Display of Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Hoffman, Ronald B.; Litaker, Harry, Jr.; Solem, Jody; Holden, Kritina; Twyford, Evan; Conlee, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Over the past year, NASA's focus has turned to crewed long duration and exploration missions. On these journeys, crewmembers will be required to execute thousands of procedures to maintain life support systems, check out space suits, conduct science experiments, and perform medical exams. To support the many complex tasks crewmembers undertake in microgravity, NASA is interested in providing crewmembers a hands-free work environment to promote more efficient operations. The overarching objective is to allow crewmembers to use both of their hands for tasks related to their mission, versus holding a paper manual or interacting with a display. The use of advanced, hands-free tools will undoubtedly make the crewmembers task easier, but they can also add to overall task complexity if not properly designed. A leading candidate technology for supporting a hands-free environment is the Head-Mounted Display (HMD). A more recent technology (e-book reader) that could be easily temp-stowed near the work area is also a potential hands-free solution. Previous work at NASA involved the evaluation of several commercially available HMDs for visual quality, comfort, and fit, as well as suitability for use in microgravity. Based on results from this work, three HMDs were selected for further evaluation (along with an e-book reader), using International Space Station (ISS)-like maintenance procedures. Two evaluations were conducted in the Space Station Mockup and Trainer Facility (SSMTF) located at the NASA Johnson Space Center (building 9). The SSMTF is a full scale, medium fidelity replica of the pressurized portions of the ISS. It supports crew training such as ingress and egress, habitability, and emergency procedures. In each of the two evaluations, the participants performed two maintenance procedures. One maintenance procedure involved inspecting air filters in a life support system and replacing them with a clean filter if one were found to be contaminated. The second

  16. Data quality evaluation in medical database watermarking.

    PubMed

    Franco-Contreras, Javier; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Massari, Philippe; Darmoni, Stefan; Cuppens-Boulahia, Nora; Cuppens, Frédéric; Roux, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The use of watermarking in the protection of medical relational databases requires that the introduced distortion does not hinder records interpretation. In this paper, we present the preliminary results of a watermarked data quality evaluation protocol developed so as to analyze the perception the practitioner has of the watermark. These results show that some attributes are more appropriate for watermarking than others and also that incoherent or unlikely records resulting from careless watermarking are easily identified by an expert.

  17. Quality assurance manual plutonium liquid scintillation methods and procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Romero, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nose swipe analysis is a very important tool for Radiation Protection personnel. Nose swipe analysis is a very fast and accurate method for (1) determining if a worker has been exposed to airborne plutonium contamination and (2) Identifying the area where there has been a possible plutonium release. Liquid scintillation analysis techniques have been effectively applied to accurately determine the plutonium alpha activity on nose swipe media. Whatman-40 paper and Q-Tips are the only two media which have been evaluated and can be used for nose swipe analysis. Presently, only Q-Tips are used by Group HSE-1 Radiation Protection Personnel. However, both swipe media will be discussed in this report.

  18. Time/Loss Analysis in the development and evaluation of emergency response procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Francis, A.A.

    1994-08-01

    Time/Loss Analysis (T/LA) provides a standard for conducting technically consistent and objective evaluations of emergency response planning and procedures. T/LA is also a sound tool for evaluating the performance of safeguards and procedures.

  19. Quality control procedures for dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Fahimian, Benjamin P.; Xing, Lei; Hristov, Dimitre H.

    2014-08-15

    In this study, the authors introduce and demonstrate quality control procedures for evaluating the geometric and dosimetric fidelity of dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving treatment couch motion synchronous with gantry and multileaf collimator (MLC). Tests were designed to evaluate positional accuracy, velocity constancy and accuracy for dynamic couch motion under a realistic weight load. A test evaluating the geometric accuracy of the system in delivering treatments over complex dynamic trajectories was also devised. Custom XML scripts that control the Varian TrueBeam™ STx (Serial #3) axes in Developer Mode were written to implement the delivery sequences for the tests. Delivered dose patterns were captured with radiographic film or the electronic portal imaging device. The couch translational accuracy in dynamic treatment mode was 0.01 cm. Rotational accuracy was within 0.3°, with 0.04 cm displacement of the rotational axis. Dose intensity profiles capturing the velocity constancy and accuracy for translations and rotation exhibited standard deviation and maximum deviations below 3%. For complex delivery involving MLC and couch motions, the overall translational accuracy for reproducing programmed patterns was within 0.06 cm. The authors conclude that in Developer Mode, TrueBeam™ is capable of delivering dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion with good geometric and dosimetric fidelity.

  20. Analytical evaluation of an improved procedure for measuring thyrotropin.

    PubMed

    González-de-la-Presa, B; Palacios, G; Bonnin, R; Martinez, J M; Navarro, M A

    1998-02-01

    The analytical characteristics of the AxSYM Ultrasensitive hTSH-II (Abbott Laboratories) procedure for quantitation of serum thyrotropin (TSH) concentration were evaluated. Within- and between-run imprecisions, functional sensitivity, analytical interval and relative inaccuracy with respect to the Enzymum-Test TSH (Boehringer Mannheim) were studied. In all cases, the within-run and between-run of coefficients variation were lower than 6.69% and 8.12% respectively. The measurement range was tested with serial dilutions of a serum with a high thyrotropin concentration, and the procedure was found to be linear up to at least 87.0 mIU/l. The functional sensitivity was 0.018 mIU/l. The relative inaccuracy study (Passing-Bablok non-parametric linear regression) produced the following linear equation: (AxSYM) = 1.02. (ES-700)-0.03 mIU/l, with 95% confidence intervals of a (-0.05; -0.01); b (0.98; 1.06).

  1. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR.

  2. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR. PMID:24922980

  3. NOTE: A rapid procedure for initial drug evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macpherson, A. K.; Neti, S.; Macpherson, P. A.

    2001-06-01

    The overall aim of this work is to develop computer simulations to aid in the selection of proposed medicines and identify those most likely to succeed. One important feature is a systems approach to simulate both the target area with which the drug is designed to interact as well as the surrounding areas where feedback mechanisms may alter the expected effect. The simulation must be rapid if it is to be used to evaluate large numbers of potential drugs. Thus the procedure simplifies many of the known complex phenomena to provide a general framework and feedback mechanisms. An example of the use of the simulation to study a drug used to treat hypertension is given. A possible use of the technique is shown using the example of the effect of varying the drug dosage on the contraction of the arteriole muscle.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  5. Evaluation of concrete cover by surface wave technique: Identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwakowski, Bogdan; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Safinowski, Paweł

    2012-05-01

    Concrete cover degradation is induced by aggressive agents in ambiance, such as moisture, chemicals or temperature variations. Due to degradation usually a thin (a few millimeters thick) surface layer has porosity slightly higher than the deeper sound material. The non destructive evaluation of concrete cover is vital to monitor the integrity of concrete structures and prevent their irreversible damage. In this paper the methodology applied by the classical technique used for ground structure recovery called Multichanel Analysis of Surface Waves is discussed as the NDT tool in civil engineering domain to characterize the concrete cover. In order to obtain the velocity as a function of sample depth the dispersion of surface waves is used as an input for solving inverse problem. The paper describes the inversion procedure and provides the practical example of use of developed system.

  6. Stepped heating procedure for experimental SAR evaluation of ferrofluids.

    PubMed

    Iacob, N; Schinteie, G; Palade, P; Ticos, C M; Kuncser, V

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to present a reliable procedure for the experimental determination of the specific absorption rate (SAR) in case of superparamagnetic Fe oxide nanoparticles dispersed in liquid environments. It is based on the acquisition of consecutive steps of time-temperature dependences along of both heating and cooling processes. Linear fitting of these recorded steps provides the heating and cooling speeds at different temperatures, which finally allow the determination of the heating profile in adiabatic-like conditions over a broad temperature range. The presented methodology represents on one hand, a useful alternative tool for the experimental evaluation of the heating capability of nanoparticulate systems for magnetic hyperthermia applications and on the other hand, gives support for a more accurate modeling of bio-heat transfer phenomena. PMID:26087918

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  8. Application and testing of a procedure to evaluate transferability of habitat suitability criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jeff A.; Bovee, Ken D.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure designed to test the transferability of habitat suitability criteria was evaluated in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado. Habitat suitability criteria were developed for active adult and juvenile rainbow trout in the South Platte River, Colorado. These criteria were tested by comparing microhabitat use predicted from the criteria with observed microhabitat use by adult rainbow trout in the Cache la Poudre River. A one-sided X2 test, using counts of occupied and unoccupied cells in each suitability classification, was used to test for non-random selection for optimum habitat use over usable habitat and for suitable over unsuitable habitat. Criteria for adult rainbow trout were judged to be transferable to the Cache la Poudre River, but juvenile criteria (applied to adults) were not transferable. Random subsampling of occupied and unoccupied cells was conducted to determine the effect of sample size on the reliability of the test procedure. The incidence of type I and type II errors increased rapidly as the sample size was reduced below 55 occupied and 200 unoccupied cells. Recommended modifications to the procedure included the adoption of a systematic or randomized sampling design and direct measurement of microhabitat variables. With these modifications, the procedure is economical, simple and reliable. Use of the procedure as a quality assurance device in routine applications of the instream flow incremental methodology was encouraged.

  9. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  10. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for the collection, evaluation, and use of the types of quality evaluation data specified in PGI 246.470-2....

  11. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for the collection, evaluation, and use of the types of quality evaluation data specified in PGI 246.470-2....

  12. Evaluating Water Quality in a Suburban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Garza, N.

    2008-12-01

    A water quality analysis and modeling study is currently being conducted on the Martinez Creek, a small catchment within Cibolo watershed, a sub-basin of the San Antonio River, Texas. Several other major creeks, such as Salatrillo, Escondido, and Woman Hollering merge with Martinez Creek. Land use and land cover analysis shows that the major portion of the watershed is dominated by residential development with average impervious cover percentage of approximately 40% along with a some of agricultural areas and brushlands. This catchment is characterized by the presence of three small wastewater treatment plants. Previous site visits and sampling of water quality indicate the presence of algae and fecal coliform bacteria at levels well above state standards at several locations in the catchment throughout the year. Due to the presence of livestock, residential development and wastewater treatment plants, a comprehensive understanding of water quality is important to evaluate the sources and find means to control pollution. As part of the study, a spatial and temporal water quality analyses of conventional parameters as well as emerging contaminants, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals and microbial pathogens is being conducted to identify critical locations and sources. Additionally, the Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) will be used to identify best management practices that can be incorporated given the projected growth and development and feasibility.

  13. Evaluation of the quality of duplicated radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Thunthy, K.H.; Weinberg, R.

    1981-04-01

    This experiment evaluated the image quality of duplicated radiographs made at different ultraviolet light exposures. Image quality was measured in terms of ''residual'' film fog, film density, mottle, image contrast, and resolution. The ''residual'' fog density of duplicates decreased with increases in ultraviolet exposures until it was less than the fog density of the original. The density of duplicates decreased with increases in ultraviolet exposures until it leveled off at a certain density, depending on the density of the original film. Mottle was less on lighter duplicates than on darker duplicates. Contrast of duplicates increased initially with increases in ultraviolet exposures and later decreased with further increases in ultraviolet exposures. Resolution of duplicates was nearly the same as the original as long as the duplicate had acceptable ''residual'' fog density.

  14. Learning, forgetting, and hospital quality: an empirical analysis of cardiac procedures in Maryland and Arizona.

    PubMed

    Sfekas, Andrew

    2009-06-01

    This paper sets out an empirical model of learning with forgetting and uses it to estimate how much hospital quality improves with experience. The size of the learning effect and the depreciation rate are estimated for two cardiac procedures in Maryland and Arizona. Models are estimated using patient survival as the outcome of interest. The results show that learning does not appear to be a factor in hospital quality for either procedure or for surgery generally. From a policy standpoint, based on these results, regulations in Maryland that seek to concentrate these two procedures among a small number of providers could not be justified on the grounds that higher volume would increase the quality of care.

  15. Evaluation of results of US corn and soybeans exploratory experiment: Classification procedures verification test. [Missouri, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. G.; Baird, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The classification procedure utilized in making crop proportion estimates for corn and soybeans using remotely sensed data was evaluated. The procedure was derived during the transition year of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. Analysis of variance techniques were applied to classifications performed by 3 groups of analysts who processed 25 segments selected from 4 agrophysical units (APU's). Group and APU effects were assessed to determine factors which affected the quality of the classifications. The classification results were studied to determine the effectiveness of the procedure in producing corn and soybeans proportion estimates.

  16. A calibration procedure for sonic infrared nondestructive evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Morbidini, M.; Cawley, P.

    2009-07-15

    Sonic infrared is potentially a very attractive nondestructive evaluation technique offering the possibility of rapid testing of complex components. However, at present it is difficult to be sure that sufficient excitation has been applied so that a null (no defect present) result can be trusted. This paper presents a calibration method to improve the reliability of the technique. The method uses a measurement of the vibration of the component during the test, the vibration signal being processed to give a 'heating index' which is a measure of the ability of the vibration field to generate heat at any defects of interest that are present. The calculation of the heating index and the rationale for its formulation are described. The method is then applied on two sets of beamlike specimens with cracks of different sizes. The maximum temperature rise in successive tests on a given specimen is shown to correlate well with the maximum heating index, so validating the method. The threshold heating index required to reliably detect cracks as a function of crack size is discussed and practical calibration and test procedures are proposed.

  17. Quality of Protection Evaluation of Security Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ksiezopolski, Bogdan; Zurek, Tomasz; Mokkas, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that during the design of teleinformatic system the tradeoff between the systems performance and the system protection should be made. The traditional approach assumes that the best way is to apply the strongest possible security measures. Unfortunately, the overestimation of security measures can lead to the unreasonable increase of system load. This is especially important in multimedia systems where the performance has critical character. In many cases determination of the required level of protection and adjustment of some security measures to these requirements increase system efficiency. Such an approach is achieved by means of the quality of protection models where the security measures are evaluated according to their influence on the system security. In the paper, we propose a model for QoP evaluation of security mechanisms. Owing to this model, one can quantify the influence of particular security mechanisms on ensuring security attributes. The methodology of our model preparation is described and based on it the case study analysis is presented. We support our method by the tool where the models can be defined and QoP evaluation can be performed. Finally, we have modelled TLS cryptographic protocol and presented the QoP security mechanisms evaluation for the selected versions of this protocol. PMID:25136683

  18. Quality of protection evaluation of security mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ksiezopolski, Bogdan; Zurek, Tomasz; Mokkas, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that during the design of teleinformatic system the tradeoff between the systems performance and the system protection should be made. The traditional approach assumes that the best way is to apply the strongest possible security measures. Unfortunately, the overestimation of security measures can lead to the unreasonable increase of system load. This is especially important in multimedia systems where the performance has critical character. In many cases determination of the required level of protection and adjustment of some security measures to these requirements increase system efficiency. Such an approach is achieved by means of the quality of protection models where the security measures are evaluated according to their influence on the system security. In the paper, we propose a model for QoP evaluation of security mechanisms. Owing to this model, one can quantify the influence of particular security mechanisms on ensuring security attributes. The methodology of our model preparation is described and based on it the case study analysis is presented. We support our method by the tool where the models can be defined and QoP evaluation can be performed. Finally, we have modelled TLS cryptographic protocol and presented the QoP security mechanisms evaluation for the selected versions of this protocol.

  19. Evaluation of image quality in computed radiography based mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Abhinav; Bhwaria, Vipin; Valentino, Daniel J.

    2011-03-01

    Mammography is the most widely accepted procedure for the early detection of breast cancer and Computed Radiography (CR) is a cost-effective technology for digital mammography. We have demonstrated that CR mammography image quality is viable for Digital Mammography. The image quality of mammograms acquired using Computed Radiography technology was evaluated using the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF), Noise Power Spectrum (NPS) and Detective Quantum Efficiency (DQE). The measurements were made using a 28 kVp beam (RQA M-II) using 2 mm of Al as a filter and a target/filter combination of Mo/Mo. The acquired image bit depth was 16 bits and the pixel pitch for scanning was 50 microns. A Step-Wedge phantom (to measure the Contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR)) and the CDMAM 3.4 Contrast Detail phantom were also used to assess the image quality. The CNR values were observed at varying thickness of PMMA. The CDMAM 3.4 phantom results were plotted and compared to the EUREF acceptable and achievable values. The effect on image quality was measured using the physics metrics. A lower DQE was observed even with a higher MTF. This could be possibly due to a higher noise component present due to the way the scanner was configured. The CDMAM phantom scores demonstrated a contrast-detail comparable to the EUREF values. A cost-effective CR machine was optimized for high-resolution and high-contrast imaging.

  20. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  1. User-Centered Evaluation of the Quality of Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuenchom, Sutthinan

    2011-01-01

    Blogs serve multiple purposes, resulting in several types of blogs that vary greatly in terms of quality and content. It is important to evaluate the quality of blogs, which requires appropriate evaluation criteria. Unfortunately, there are minimal studies on framework and the specific criteria and indicators for evaluating the quality of blogs.…

  2. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  3. Enhancing E-Learning Quality through the Application of the AKUE Procedure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremer, C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure model AKUE, which aims at the improvement and assurance of quality and cost efficiency in the context of the introduction of e-learning and the development of digital learning material. AKUE divides the whole planning and implementation process into four different phases: analysis, conception, implementation, and…

  4. Statistics, Measures, and Quality Standards for Assessing Digital Reference Library Services: Guidelines and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; Lankes, R. David; Gross, Melissa; Choltco-Devlin, Beverly

    This manual is a first effort to begin to identify, describe, and develop procedures for assessing various aspects of digital reference service. Its overall purpose is to improve the quality of digital reference services and assist librarians to design and implement better digital reference services. More specifically, its aim is to: assist…

  5. Evaluation of the CATSIB DIF Procedure in a Pretest Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nandakumar, Ratna; Roussos, Louis

    2004-01-01

    A new procedure, CATSIB, for assessing differential item functioning (DIF) on computerized adaptive tests (CATs) is proposed. CATSIB, a modified SIBTEST procedure, matches test takers on estimated ability and controls for impact-induced Type 1 error inflation by employing a CAT version of the IBTEST "regression correction." The performance of…

  6. Quality-assurance procedures and measurements for open-path FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douard, Mathilde; Zeutzius-Reitz, Juergen; Lamp, Torsten; Ropertz, Alexander; Weber, Konradin

    1997-05-01

    Infrared Fourier transform open-path spectroscopy becomes a more and more well-known method to monitor air pollution. Several companies are even selling instruments especially devoted to this application. Numerous campaigns have delivered interesting information and proved the usefulness of the technique. However the results still suffer from a certain mistrust. Reliability, reproducibility, stability are for instance not yet well defined. In order to fill this lack, we have performed a set of test measurements which could be carried out on any FTIR long-path system. This quality assurance protocol includes the determination of noise, return signal stability, detection limits, precision and accuracy. The procedure to estimate each of these parameters is described. The feasibility and relevance of these measurements have been tested on both monostatic and bistatic set-ups. Both instruments have been studied over a period of several months. Many of the parameters can be calculated without doing extra measurements and were evaluated whenever the instruments were in use. To determine parameters such accuracy and precision, series of spectra were especially acquired. This shows the possibility to better quantify the performance of open-path FTIR spectrometers. Further improvements are also suggested.

  7. Revisiting the Procedures for the Vector Data Quality Assurance in Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, M.; Torun, A.; Boyacı, D.

    2012-07-01

    of spatial data quality concepts into developments and application requires existence of conceptual, logical and most importantly physical existence of data model, rules and knowledge of realization in a form of geo-spatial data. The applicable metrics and thresholds are determined on this concrete base. This study discusses application of geo-spatial data quality issues and QA (quality assurance) and QC procedures in the topographic data production. Firstly we introduce MGCP (Multinational Geospatial Co-production Program) data profile of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) DFDD (DGIWG Feature Data Dictionary), the requirements of data owner, the view of data producers for both data capturing and QC and finally QA to fulfil user needs. Then, our practical and new approach which divides the quality into three phases is introduced. Finally, implementation of our approach to accomplish metrics, measures and thresholds of quality definitions is discussed. In this paper, especially geometry and semantics quality and quality control procedures that can be performed by the producers are discussed. Some applicable best-practices that we experienced on techniques of quality control, defining regulations that define the objectives and data production procedures are given in the final remarks. These quality control procedures should include the visual checks over the source data, captured vector data and printouts, some automatic checks that can be performed by software and some semi-automatic checks by the interaction with quality control personnel. Finally, these quality control procedures should ensure the geometric, semantic, attribution and metadata quality of vector data.

  8. Quality assurance in radiotherapy: from radiation physics to patient- and trial-oriented control procedures.

    PubMed

    Bernier, J; Horiot, J C; Poortmans, P

    2002-03-01

    The stepwise process of the EORTC Quality Assurance Programme in Radiotherapy is described in function of two main criteria: the targets of the quality control procedures implemented, in Radiation Physics and clinical research, by the EORTC Radiotherapy Group and the development of both trial- and patient-oriented quality systems. This exhaustive program, which started in 1982, is characterised by three main periods. The first one was fully dedicated to pioneer steps in Radiation Physics measurements, on-site audits and inventories of human resources, staff workload and department infrastructure in institutions participating to EORTC trials. During the second period, which started in the late 1980s, a series of quality systems were implemented to test the compliance of the investigators to follow protocol guidelines, through the use of standard and uniform control procedures like the dummy runs, in order to tackle systematic errors in the participating institutions. Finally, the third period, which took place in the 1990s, was essentially patient-oriented, thanks to large scale individual case reviews, to check the validity of data recording and reporting processes and trace random errors throughout the radiotherapy treatments. Most of the results collected during these two decades allowed the implementation of well codified quality control procedures which, nowadays, can be used outside the field of clinical research, by national societies or bodies willing to improve treatment standards on a large scale.

  9. Best practices for IACUCs in the evaluation of multiple major operative procedures.

    PubMed

    Petervary, Nicolette

    2013-09-01

    Evaluation of multiple major operative procedures can be a daunting task for IACUCs. Committee members need to know what a major operative procedure is, when multiple major operative procedures are permitted under the Animal Welfare Act, when permission from the Administrator of the US Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service is required for multiple major operative procedures, and what information must be included when requesting such permission. The author discusses the intent and requirements for multiple major operative procedures under the Animal Welfare Act and describes best practices that IACUCs may use in evaluating multiple major operative procedures both within and across protocols.

  10. Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development--The importance of quality control procedures.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J; Mateos-Pérez, J M; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C; Karama, Sherif

    2016-01-15

    Several reports have described cortical thickness (CTh) developmental trajectories, with conflicting results. Some studies have reported inverted-U shape curves with peaks of CTh in late childhood to adolescence, while others suggested predominant monotonic decline after age 6. In this study, we reviewed CTh developmental trajectories in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development, and in a second step, evaluated the impact of post-processing quality control (QC) procedures on identified trajectories. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual subjects with repeated scanning (1-3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models. The majority of brain regions showed linear monotonic decline of CTh. There were few areas of cubic trajectories, mostly in bilateral temporo-parietal areas and the right prefrontal cortex, in which CTh peaks were at, or prior to, age 8. When controlling for total brain volume, CTh trajectories were even more uniformly linear. The only sex difference was faster thinning of occipital areas in boys compared to girls. The best-fit model for whole brain mean thickness was a monotonic decline of 0.027mm per year. QC procedures had a significant impact on identified trajectories, with a clear shift toward more complex trajectories (i.e., quadratic or cubic) when including all scans without QC (n=954). Trajectories were almost exclusively linear when using only scans that passed the most stringent QC (n=598). The impact of QC probably relates to decreasing the inclusion of scans with CTh underestimation secondary to movement artifacts, which are more common in younger subjects. In summary, our results suggest that CTh follows a simple linear decline in most cortical areas by age 5, and all areas by age 8. This study further supports the crucial importance of implementing post-processing QC in CTh studies

  11. Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development--The importance of quality control procedures.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J; Mateos-Pérez, J M; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C; Karama, Sherif

    2016-01-15

    Several reports have described cortical thickness (CTh) developmental trajectories, with conflicting results. Some studies have reported inverted-U shape curves with peaks of CTh in late childhood to adolescence, while others suggested predominant monotonic decline after age 6. In this study, we reviewed CTh developmental trajectories in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development, and in a second step, evaluated the impact of post-processing quality control (QC) procedures on identified trajectories. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual subjects with repeated scanning (1-3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models. The majority of brain regions showed linear monotonic decline of CTh. There were few areas of cubic trajectories, mostly in bilateral temporo-parietal areas and the right prefrontal cortex, in which CTh peaks were at, or prior to, age 8. When controlling for total brain volume, CTh trajectories were even more uniformly linear. The only sex difference was faster thinning of occipital areas in boys compared to girls. The best-fit model for whole brain mean thickness was a monotonic decline of 0.027mm per year. QC procedures had a significant impact on identified trajectories, with a clear shift toward more complex trajectories (i.e., quadratic or cubic) when including all scans without QC (n=954). Trajectories were almost exclusively linear when using only scans that passed the most stringent QC (n=598). The impact of QC probably relates to decreasing the inclusion of scans with CTh underestimation secondary to movement artifacts, which are more common in younger subjects. In summary, our results suggest that CTh follows a simple linear decline in most cortical areas by age 5, and all areas by age 8. This study further supports the crucial importance of implementing post-processing QC in CTh studies

  12. Outlining a selection procedure for Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from grape marc to improve fermentation process and distillate quality.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Barbara; Carlot, Milena; Fontana, Federico; Lombardi, Angiolella; Soligo, Stefano; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays grape marc represents one of the main by-product of winemaking. Many South Europe countries valorize this ligno-cellulosic waste through fermentation and distillation for industrial alcoholic beverage production. The storage of marcs is a crucial phase in the distillation process, due to the physicochemical transformations ascribed to microbial activity. Among the methods adopted by distillers to improve the quality of spirits, the use of selected yeasts has not been explored so far, therefore in this work we evaluated the selection criteria of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for grape marc fermentation. The proposed selection procedure included three steps: characterization of phenotypical traits, evaluation of selected strains on pasteurised grape marc at lab-scale (100 g) and pilot-scale fermentation (350 kg). This selection process was applied on 104 strains isolated from grape marcs of different origins and technological treatment. Among physiological traits, β-glucosidase activity level as quality trait seems to be only partially involved in increasing varietal flavour. More effective in describing yeast impact on distillate quality is the ratio higher alcohols/esters that indicates strain ability to increase positive flavours. Finally, evaluating grape marc as source of selected yeasts, industrial treatment rather than varietal origin seems to shape strain technological and quality traits. PMID:25475330

  13. Calibration procedure for a laser triangulation scanner with uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Gianfranco; Minetola, Paolo; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-11-01

    Most of low cost 3D scanning devices that are nowadays available on the market are sold without a user calibration procedure to correct measurement errors related to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, there is no specific international standard defining a procedure to check the performance of a 3D scanner along time. This paper aims at detailing a thorough methodology to calibrate a 3D scanner and assess its measurement uncertainty. The proposed procedure is based on the use of a reference ball plate and applied to a triangulation laser scanner. Experimental results show that the metrological performance of the instrument can be greatly improved by the application of the calibration procedure that corrects systematic errors and reduces the device's measurement uncertainty.

  14. USGS Blind Sample Project: monitoring and evaluating laboratory analytical quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludtke, Amy S.; Woodworth, Mark T.

    1997-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collects and disseminates information about the Nation's water resources. Surface- and ground-water samples are collected and sent to USGS laboratories for chemical analyses. The laboratories identify and quantify the constituents in the water samples. Random and systematic errors occur during sample handling, chemical analysis, and data processing. Although all errors cannot be eliminated from measurements, the magnitude of their uncertainty can be estimated and tracked over time. Since 1981, the USGS has operated an independent, external, quality-assurance project called the Blind Sample Project (BSP). The purpose of the BSP is to monitor and evaluate the quality of laboratory analytical results through the use of double-blind quality-control (QC) samples. The information provided by the BSP assists the laboratories in detecting and correcting problems in the analytical procedures. The information also can aid laboratory users in estimating the extent that laboratory errors contribute to the overall errors in their environmental data.

  15. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  16. Quality control evaluation of Keshamasi, Keshanjana and Keshamasi eye ointment

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Kartar Singh; Shukla, Vinay J.; Bhalodia, Nayan R.; Sharma, Vinay R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Keshanjana (collyrium) is a well known Ayurvedic preparation prepared out of Keshamasi (ash prepared by scalp hairs) mixed with Goghrita (cow's ghee). This medicine is indicated for the treatment of Shushkakshipaka (dry eye syndrome) in the classical literature of Ayurveda; hence, it was under taken for standardization and clinical evaluation in an extra-mural research project from Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences, Department of AYUSH, New Delhi. Aim: To develop standard quality parameters for the Keshamasi, Keshanjana and Keshamasi ointment. Materials and Methods: Scalp hairs of male and females collected from saloons were converted to classical Masi Kalpana and mixed with cow ghee and petrolatum in the ratio of 1:5 to prepare the Keshanjana and Keshamasi ointment respectively. Standard Operation Procedure (SOP) were adopted and recorded accordingly. The raw material, furnished products and plain Goghrita were subjected for quality control parameters i.e., physico-chemical evaluation, anti-microbial study, particle size analysis, heavy metal analysis through inductive couple plasma spectroscopy with high performance thin layer liquid chromatography fingerprints. Results: Rancidity was negative in all the samples, indicating that the physico-chemical parameters are in acceptable range. Lead and zinc were present in most of the samples; while all samples are were free from microbial contamination. Conclusion: As no standards are available to compare the results of the current study, the observations cannot be compared. Thus the profile generated in the current study can be considered as standard to refer in future studies. PMID:25364202

  17. Postoperative evaluation of pylorus-preserving procedures compared with conventional distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hotta, T; Taniguchi, K; Kobayashi, Y; Johata, K; Sahara, M; Naka, T; Terashita, S; Yokoyama, S; Matsuyama, K

    2001-01-01

    We evaluated postoperative function in 98 patients who underwent surgery for early gastric cancer between 1995 and 1998 to compare the results of pylorus-preserving procedures to those of conventional distal gastrectomy with Billroth I (B-I). The pylorus-preserving procedures included endoscopic mucosal resection (EMR), performed in 12 patients; local resection (Local), performed in 14 patients; segmental resection (Seg), performed in 8 patients; and pylorus-preserving gastrectomy (PPG), performed in 19 patients. B-I was performed in 45 patients. The nutritional status and serum albumin (Alb) levels after PPG, the hemoglobin (Hb) levels after EMR, Local, and PPG, and the present/preoperative body weight ratios after EMR, Local, Seg, and PPG were superior to those after B-I. The time before oral intake was recommenced after EMR and Local, the volume of oral intake tolerated after EMR, Local, Seg, and PPG, and the postoperative hospital stay after EMR were all superior to those after B-I. Moreover, significantly fewer patients suffered reflux symptoms after EMR, Local, and PPG, abdominal fullness after EMR, and early dumping syndrome after EMR, Local, and PPG than after B-I. There was also less evidence of gastritis after EMR, Local, and PPG, and of bile reflux after EMR, Local, and PPG, than after B-I. These findings indicate that pylorus-preserving procedures may result in a better postoperative quality of life for selected patients with early gastric cancer.

  18. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  19. Indicators for the evaluation of diet quality.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ángel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; Olza, Josune

    2015-01-01

    The role of diet quality and physical activity in reducing the progression of chronic disease is becoming increasingly important. Dietary Quality Indices or Indicators (DQIs) are algorithms aiming to evaluate the overall diet and categorize individuals according to the extent to which their eating behaviour is "healthy". Predefined indexes assess dietary patterns based on current nutrition knowledge and they have been developed primarily for nutritional epidemiology to assess dietary risk factors for non-communicable diseases. There are many different types of DQIs. There are three major categories of DQIs: a) nutrient-based indicators; b) food/food group based indicators; and c) combination indexes, the vast majority of DQIs, which often include a measure of diet variety within and across food groups, a measure of adequacy i.e. nutrients (compared to requirements) or food groups (quantities or servings), a measure of nutrients/foods to consume in moderation, and an overall balance of macronutrients. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI), the Diet Quality Index (DQI), the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) are the four 'original' diet quality scores that have been referred to and validated most extensively. Several indexes have been adapted and modified from those originals. In particular, many variations on the MDS have been proposed, included different alternate MDS and Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Primary data source of DQI's are individual dietary data collection tools, namely 24 h quantitative intake recalls, dietary records and food frequency questionnaires. Nutrients found in many scores are total fat, saturated fatty acids or the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids or the latter SFA to polyunsaturated fatty acids. Cholesterol, protein content and quality, complex carbohydrates, mono- and disaccharides, dietary fibre and sodium are also found in various scores. All DQIs, except those that

  20. Indicators for the evaluation of diet quality.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ángel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; Olza, Josune

    2015-02-26

    The role of diet quality and physical activity in reducing the progression of chronic disease is becoming increasingly important. Dietary Quality Indices or Indicators (DQIs) are algorithms aiming to evaluate the overall diet and categorize individuals according to the extent to which their eating behaviour is "healthy". Predefined indexes assess dietary patterns based on current nutrition knowledge and they have been developed primarily for nutritional epidemiology to assess dietary risk factors for non-communicable diseases. There are many different types of DQIs. There are three major categories of DQIs: a) nutrient-based indicators; b) food/food group based indicators; and c) combination indexes, the vast majority of DQIs, which often include a measure of diet variety within and across food groups, a measure of adequacy i.e. nutrients (compared to requirements) or food groups (quantities or servings), a measure of nutrients/foods to consume in moderation, and an overall balance of macronutrients. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI), the Diet Quality Index (DQI), the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) are the four 'original' diet quality scores that have been referred to and validated most extensively. Several indexes have been adapted and modified from those originals. In particular, many variations on the MDS have been proposed, included different alternate MDS and Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Primary data source of DQI's are individual dietary data collection tools, namely 24 h quantitative intake recalls, dietary records and food frequency questionnaires. Nutrients found in many scores are total fat, saturated fatty acids or the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids or the latter SFA to polyunsaturated fatty acids. Cholesterol, protein content and quality, complex carbohydrates, mono- and disaccharides, dietary fibre and sodium are also found in various scores. All DQIs, except those that

  1. Medicare's Hospital Compare quality reports appear to have slowed price increases for two major procedures.

    PubMed

    Dor, Avi; Encinosa, William E; Carey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that Hospital Compare, Medicare's public reporting initiative, has had little impact on patient outcomes. However, little is known about the initiative's impact on hospital prices, which may be significant because private insurers are generally well positioned to respond to quality information when negotiating prices with hospitals. We estimated difference-in-differences models of the effects of Hospital Compare quality reporting on transaction prices for two major cardiac procedures, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). States that had mandated their own public reporting systems before the implementation of Hospital Compare formed the control group. We found that prices for these procedures continued to increase overall after the initiation of Hospital Compare quality scores, but the rate of increase was significantly lower in states with no quality reporting metrics of their own before Hospital Compare, when compared to the control states (annual rates of increase of 4.4 percent versus 8.7 percent for PCI, and 3.9 percent versus 10.6 percent for CABG, adjusted for overall inflation). This finding implies that Hospital Compare provided leverage to purchasers in moderating price increases, while adding competitive pressures on hospitals. Providing accurate quality information on both hospitals and health plans could benefit consumers. PMID:25561646

  2. Medicare's Hospital Compare quality reports appear to have slowed price increases for two major procedures.

    PubMed

    Dor, Avi; Encinosa, William E; Carey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that Hospital Compare, Medicare's public reporting initiative, has had little impact on patient outcomes. However, little is known about the initiative's impact on hospital prices, which may be significant because private insurers are generally well positioned to respond to quality information when negotiating prices with hospitals. We estimated difference-in-differences models of the effects of Hospital Compare quality reporting on transaction prices for two major cardiac procedures, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). States that had mandated their own public reporting systems before the implementation of Hospital Compare formed the control group. We found that prices for these procedures continued to increase overall after the initiation of Hospital Compare quality scores, but the rate of increase was significantly lower in states with no quality reporting metrics of their own before Hospital Compare, when compared to the control states (annual rates of increase of 4.4 percent versus 8.7 percent for PCI, and 3.9 percent versus 10.6 percent for CABG, adjusted for overall inflation). This finding implies that Hospital Compare provided leverage to purchasers in moderating price increases, while adding competitive pressures on hospitals. Providing accurate quality information on both hospitals and health plans could benefit consumers.

  3. Characteristics to Evaluate the Quality Assurance Workforce.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Craig Otis

    Quality assurance is a vital part of any Navy contract administration activity. It is essential that the personnel involved in quality assurance be of extremely high caliber. The purpose of the paper is to develop a model of the educational background of an ideal quality assurance man. The paper outlines the functions which might be required of…

  4. Statistical Procedures in Evaluation Models for Selection-Biased Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarzmueller, E. Beth; And Others

    Statistical procedures of the regression discontinuity and regression projection designs were compared to determine which design was more able to detect treatment effect in remedial or gifted programs. Neither test was more precise in all situations. Tables list the more precise test usder specific conditions. The regression projection model…

  5. A suite of RS/1 procedures for chemical laboratory statistical quality control and Shewhart control charting

    SciTech Connect

    Shanahan, K.L.

    1990-09-01

    A suite of RS/1 procedures for Shewhart control charting in chemical laboratories is described. The suite uses the RS series product QCA (Quality Control Analysis) for chart construction and analysis. The suite prompts users for data in a user friendly fashion and adds the data to or creates the control charts. All activities are time stamped. Facilities for generating monthly or contiguous time segment summary charts are included. The suite is currently in use at Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

  6. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  7. Against the Rules: Procedural Problems in Institutional Self-Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simons, Helen

    This paper addresses the problem of how to introduce new forms of evaluation into school organization without a damaging loss of trust. The evaluators here are teachers engaged in curriculum policy evaluation within the schools in which they work. One way of conceptualizing and rooting contemporary activity under the label of school…

  8. Judging Transitional Justice: A New Criterion for Evaluating Truth Revelation Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaminski, Marek M.; Nalepa, Monika

    2006-01-01

    Truth revelation procedures are evaluated according to various normative criteria. The authors find the concepts of false conviction and false acquittal more adequate for such evaluation than the conformity with the rule of law and apply a useful classification of truth revelation procedures into incentive-based (ITRs) and evidence-based ones…

  9. 40 CFR 63.8687 - What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use? (a) You must conduct each... 40 Protection of Environment 13 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What performance tests, design evaluations, and other procedures must I use? 63.8687 Section 63.8687 Protection of Environment...

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  12. Standard procedures and quality-control practices for the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program from 1982 through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates the National Field Quality Assurance Program to provide quality- assurance reference samples to field personnel who make water-quality field measurements. The program monitors the accuracy and precision of pH, specific conductance, and alkalinity field measurements. This report documents the operational procedures and quality-control techniques used in operating the quality-assurance program.

  13. A procedural evaluation of an analytic-deliberative process: the Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Aimee Guglielmo; Leschine, Thomas M

    2002-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Columbia River Comprehensive Impact Assessment (CRCIA) was an ambitious attempt to direct its cleanup of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation toward the most significant risks to the Columbia River resulting from past plutonium production. DOE's approach was uncommonly open, including tribal, regulatory agency, and other Hanford interest group representatives on the board that was to develop the assessment approach. The CRCIA process had attributes of the "analytic-deliberative" process for risk assessment recommended by the National Research Council. Nevertheless, differences between the DOE and other participants over what was meant by the term "comprehensive" in the group's charge, coupled with differing perceptions of the likely effectiveness of remediation efforts in reducing risks, were never resolved. The CRCIA effort became increasingly fragmented and the role its products were to play in influencing future clean-up decisions increasingly ambiguous. A procedural evaluation of the CRCIA process, based on Thomas Webler's procedural normative model of public participation, reveals numerous instances in which theoretical-normative discourse disconnects occurred. These had negative implications for both the basic procedural dimensions of Webler's model-fairness and competence. Tribal and other interest group representatives lacked the technical resources necessary to make or challenge what philosopher Jurgens Habermas terms cognitive validity claims, while DOE and its contractors did not challenge normative claims made by tribal representatives. The results are cautionary for implementation of the analytic-deliberative process. They highlight the importance of bringing rigor to the evaluation of the quality of the deliberation component of risk characterization via the analytic-deliberative process, as well as to the analytic component.

  14. Evaluations of the Optimal Discovery Procedure for Multiple Testing.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B

    2016-05-01

    The Optimal Discovery Procedure (ODP) is a method for simultaneous hypothesis testing that attempts to gain power relative to more standard techniques by exploiting multivariate structure [1]. Specializing to the example of testing whether components of a Gaussian mean vector are zero, we compare the power of the ODP to a Bonferroni-style method and to the Benjamini-Hochberg method when the testing procedures aim to respectively control certain Type I error rate measures, such as the expected number of false positives or the false discovery rate. We show through theoretical results, numerical comparisons, and two microarray examples that when the rejection regions for the ODP test statistics are chosen such that the procedure is guaranteed to uniformly control a Type I error rate measure, the technique is generally less powerful than competing methods. We contrast and explain these results in light of previously proven optimality theory for the ODP. We also compare the ordering given by the ODP test statistics to the standard rankings based on sorting univariate p-values from smallest to largest. In the cases we considered the standard ordering was superior, and ODP rankings were adversely impacted by correlation.

  15. Evaluations of the Optimal Discovery Procedure for Multiple Testing.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Daniel B

    2016-05-01

    The Optimal Discovery Procedure (ODP) is a method for simultaneous hypothesis testing that attempts to gain power relative to more standard techniques by exploiting multivariate structure [1]. Specializing to the example of testing whether components of a Gaussian mean vector are zero, we compare the power of the ODP to a Bonferroni-style method and to the Benjamini-Hochberg method when the testing procedures aim to respectively control certain Type I error rate measures, such as the expected number of false positives or the false discovery rate. We show through theoretical results, numerical comparisons, and two microarray examples that when the rejection regions for the ODP test statistics are chosen such that the procedure is guaranteed to uniformly control a Type I error rate measure, the technique is generally less powerful than competing methods. We contrast and explain these results in light of previously proven optimality theory for the ODP. We also compare the ordering given by the ODP test statistics to the standard rankings based on sorting univariate p-values from smallest to largest. In the cases we considered the standard ordering was superior, and ODP rankings were adversely impacted by correlation. PMID:27227716

  16. Manual for the certification of laboratories analyzing drinking water. Criteria and procedures quality assurance (third edition)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    Contents: introduction; responsibilities; implementation--(regional laboratories and programs; principal state laboratories; local laboratories; other considerations for certification; requirements for maintaining certification status; criteria and procedures for downgrading/revoking certification status; reciprocity; training; technical services; and alternate analytical techniques); chemistry--(personnel; laboratory facilities; laboratory equipment and instrumentation; general laboratory practices; analytical methodology; sample collection, handling, and preservation; quality assurance; records and data reporting; and action response to laboratory); microbiology--(personnel; laboratory facilities; laboratory equipment and instrumentation; general laboratory practices; analytical methodology; sample collection, handling, and preservation; quality assurance; records and data reporting; and action response to laboratory); radiochemistry--(personnel; laboratory facilities; laboratory equipment and instrumentation; general laboratory practices; analytical methodology; sample collection, handling, and preservation; quality assurance; records and data reporting; and action response to laboratory); appendices.

  17. Academic research groups: evaluation of their quality and quality of their evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, Bertrand; Holovatch, Yuri; Kenna, Ralph; Mryglod, Olesya

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, evaluation of the quality of academic research has become an increasingly important and influential business. It determines, often to a large extent, the amount of research funding flowing into universities and similar institutes from governmental agencies and it impacts upon academic careers. Policy makers are becoming increasingly reliant upon, and influenced by, the outcomes of such evaluations. In response, university managers are increasingly attracted to simple metrics as guides to the dynamics of the positions of their various institutions in league tables. However, these league tables are invariably drawn up by inexpert bodies such as newspapers and magazines, using arbitrary measures and criteria. Terms such as “critical mass” and “h-index” are bandied about without understanding of what they actually mean. Rather than accepting the rise and fall of universities, departments and individuals on a turbulent sea of arbitrary measures, we suggest it is incumbent upon the scientific community itself to clarify their nature. Here we report on recent attempts to do that by properly defining critical mass and showing how group size influences research quality. We also examine currently predominant metrics and show that these fail as reliable indicators of group research quality.

  18. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed.

  19. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  20. Evaluation Manual for CIP Courses: Objectives and Implementation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siri, Carmen

    This manual has been designed to guide courses on potato production sponsored by the International Potato Center (CIP) in Lima (Peru). It describes the CIP Course Evaluation System that is presently used and provides guidelines on how to use feedback more effectively for improving training. CIP evaluations are largely formative. The CIP focuses on…

  1. A Systematic Procedure for Assigning Uncertainties to Data Evaluations

    SciTech Connect

    Younes, W

    2007-02-20

    In this report, an algorithm that automatically constructs an uncertainty band around any evaluation curve is described. Given an evaluation curve and a corresponding set of experimental data points with x and y error bars, the algorithm expands a symmetric region around the evaluation curve until 68.3% of a set of points, randomly sampled from the experimental data, fall within the region. For a given evaluation curve, the region expanded in this way represents, by definition, a one-standard-deviation interval about the evaluation that accounts for the experimental data. The algorithm is tested against several benchmarks, and is shown to be well-behaved, even when there are large gaps in the available experimental data. The performance of the algorithm is assessed quantitatively using the tools of statistical-inference theory.

  2. A combined GIS-HEC procedure for flood hazard evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.

    1993-09-01

    A technique is described for incorporating a drainage recognition capability into a graphical information system (GIS) database. This capability is then utilized to export digital topographic profiles of stream-channel cross-sectional geometries to the Hydrologic Engineering Center`s Water Surface Profile (HEC-2) model. This model is typically used in conjunction with the Flood Hydrograph (HEC-1) package to define floodplain boundaries in complex watersheds. Once these floodplain boundaries are imported back into the GIS framework, they can be uniquely referenced to the New Mexico state plane coordinate system. A combined GIS-HEC application in ungaged watersheds at Los Alamos National Laboratory is demonstrated. This floodplain mapping procedure uses topographic data from the Laboratory`s MOSS database. Targeted stream channel segments are initially specified in the MOSS system, and topographic profiles along stream-channel cross-sections am extracted automatically. This procedure is initiated at a convenient downstream location within each watershed, and proceeds upstream to a selected termination point. HEC-2 utilizes these MOSS channel data and HEC-1 generated storm hydrographs to uniquely define the floodplain. The computed water surface elevations at each channel section am then read back into the MOSS system. In this particular application, 13 separate elongated watersheds traverse Laboratory lands, with individual channels ranging up to 11 miles in length. The 50, 100, and 500-year floods, and the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) are quantified in HEC-1. Individual floodplains are then defined for each channel segment in HEC-2 at 250 foot intervals, and detailed 1:4800 scale maps am generated. Over 100 channel miles were mapped using this combined GIS-HEC procedure.

  3. SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. Volume 38; SeaWiFS Calibration and Validation Quality Control Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); McClain, Charles R.; Darzi, Michael; Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E.; Firestone, James K.; Patt, Frederick S.; Robinson, Wayne D.; Schieber, Brian D.; Woodward, Robert H.; Yeh, Eueng-nan

    1996-01-01

    This document provides five brief reports that address several quality control procedures under the auspices of the Calibration and Validation Element (CVE) within the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project. Chapter 1 describes analyses of the 32 sensor engineering telemetry streams. Anomalies in any of the values may impact sensor performance in direct or indirect ways. The analyses are primarily examinations of parameter time series combined with statistical methods such as auto- and cross-correlation functions. Chapter 2 describes how the various onboard (solar and lunar) and vicarious (in situ) calibration data will be analyzed to quantify sensor degradation, if present. The analyses also include methods for detecting the influence of charged particles on sensor performance such as might be expected in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Chapter 3 discusses the quality control of the ancillary environmental data that are routinely received from other agencies or projects which are used in the atmospheric correction algorithm (total ozone, surface wind velocity, and surface pressure; surface relative humidity is also obtained, but is not used in the initial operational algorithm). Chapter 4 explains the procedures for screening level-, level-2, and level-3 products. These quality control operations incorporate both automated and interactive procedures which check for file format errors (all levels), navigation offsets (level-1), mask and flag performance (level-2), and product anomalies (all levels). Finally, Chapter 5 discusses the match-up data set development for comparing SeaWiFS level-2 derived products with in situ observations, as well as the subsequent outlier analyses that will be used for evaluating error sources.

  4. Federated Quality Control Procedure for CMIP5 / IPCC-AR5 Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockhause, M.; Höck, H.; Kurtz, M.; Lautenschlager, M.; Toussaint, F.

    2012-04-01

    The International Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) aims to advance the knowledge of climate change and climate variability. The results collected within the Climate Model Intercomparison Project No. 5 (CMIP5) are intended to underlie the coming fifth assessment report (IPCC-AR5). In comparison with the CMIP3 (IPCC-AR4) three main improvements have been implemented in the data infrastructure: Decentral data storage on local data nodes of the Earth System Grid (ESG, http://pcmdi3.llnl.gov/esgcet) and replication of the most important data (relevant for IPCC-AR5) among the three primary CMIP5 archive centers, PCMDI (Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison), BADC (British Atmospheric Data Centre), and WDCC (World Data Center for Climate) at DKRZ. Detailed descriptions of numerical climate models and the simulations using the CIM (Common Information Model) developed by METAFOR (http://metaforclimate.eu). Data curation was improved by introducing a versioning concept and a quality assessment process providing a uniform identification of datasets as well as a persistent identifier DOI (Digital Object Identifier) for data citation in scientific publications (http://cmip5qc.wdc-climate.de). The quality control (QC) concept was developed on the background of the existing federated data infrastructure of the ESG and the external metadata source. For this reason as well as for sharing the work load of the quality checks a federated / distributed quality control procedure was developed, consisting of: a QC repository for QC result and information storage and exchange within the QC process, a QC checker tool, and a QC service package to support QC repository storage, QC result analyses, QC information access for QC managers as well as for data users. For CMIP5 the quality control procedure consists of three quality levels. With increasing quality level the checks are performed more centralized: QC level 1 Separate technical QC checks on data (CMOR2, ESG conformance

  5. [Analysis on evaluation tool for literature quality in clinical study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhai, Wei; Tan, Ya-qin; Huang, Juan

    2014-09-01

    The tools used for the literature quality evaluation are introduced. The common evaluation tools that are publicly and extensively used for the evaluation of clinical trial literature quality in the world are analyzed, including Jadad scale, Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement and Grades of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system and the others. Additionally, the present development, updates and applications of these tools are involved in analysis.

  6. Analytical procedure for evaluating speckle-effect instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1977-01-01

    A general analysis suitable for developing speckle effect instruments and a simplified analysis suitable for evaluating laser speckle instrumentation are presented. The simplified analysis is summarized as a list of equations. Several sample applications are discussed.

  7. Auditing quality control procedures in a chemical pathology laboratory--a multiple regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Tillyer, C R; Gobin, P T; Ray, A K; Rimanova, H

    1992-07-01

    We undertook a retrospective analysis of the monthly test rejection rates and the monthly external quality assessment scheme performance indices for our laboratory's two automated analysers, and examined the association of these variables with measures of laboratory workload, manpower, staff training, instrument servicing, seasonal and temporal factors and changes of calibration, method and assigned internal quality control values. Using multiple linear regression and stepwise multiple linear regression, we found that test rejection rates differed significantly between instruments, and were highest on the instrument performing the widest variety and lowest volume of tests. On that instrument, rejection rates were significantly associated with the introduction of new staff and laboratory manpower levels, and also showed a highly significant trend upwards over the study period, independent of the effects of the other variables examined. External quality assessment scheme performance indices showed small trends over the study period. They were not related to the test rejection rates on either analyser but also showed a significant association with the introduction of new staff and a small but significant association with laboratory workload. We conclude that the training and introduction of new staff and decreased laboratory manpower levels may significantly increase the level of test rejection, and adherence to appropriate quality control protocols effectively maintains the quality of the laboratory's results, but may not be completely successful in filtering out the effects of some assignable causes of variation in test results. It is suggested that clinical laboratories use the statistical approach adopted here to identify factors which may be adversely affecting quality performance and running costs and to provide evidence that quality control procedures are both cost- and quality-effective.

  8. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality evaluation data. 246.470-2 Section 246.470-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality...

  9. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality evaluation data. 246.470-2 Section 246.470-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality...

  10. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quality evaluation data. 246.470-2 Section 246.470-2 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality...

  11. Hardware Testing and System Evaluation: Procedures to Evaluate Commodity Hardware for Production Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, J

    2004-02-27

    Without stable hardware any program will fail. The frustration and expense of supporting bad hardware can drain an organization, delay progress, and frustrate everyone involved. At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we have created a testing method that helps our group, SLAC Computer Services (SCS), weed out potentially bad hardware and purchase the best hardware at the best possible cost. Commodity hardware changes often, so new evaluations happen periodically each time we purchase systems and minor re-evaluations happen for revised systems for our clusters, about twice a year. This general framework helps SCS perform correct, efficient evaluations. This article outlines SCS's computer testing methods and our system acceptance criteria. We expanded the basic ideas to other evaluations such as storage, and we think the methods outlined in this article has helped us choose hardware that is much more stable and supportable than our previous purchases. We have found that commodity hardware ranges in quality, so systematic method and tools for hardware evaluation were necessary. This article is based on one instance of a hardware purchase, but the guidelines apply to the general problem of purchasing commodity computer systems for production computational work.

  12. Using Student Evaluations to Improve Individual and Department Teaching Qualities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Mary R.; Webber, Don J.

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations can be seen as an opportunity for students to vent their views on the quality of teaching that they receive, and sometimes instructors trivialise the importance of this opportunity for dialogue with students and colleagues and reflection on teaching practice. This paper takes student evaluations of teaching quality seriously…

  13. Application of wavelets to the evaluation of phantom images for mammography quality control.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M; Pina, D R; Miranda, J R A; Duarte, S B

    2012-11-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology for the computed analysis of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic phantom images, to be used in a quality control (QC) program of mammographic services. Discrete wavelet transform processing was applied to enhance the quality of images from the ACR mammographic phantom and to allow a lower dose for automatic evaluations of equipment performance in a QC program. Regions of interest (ROIs) containing phantom test objects (e.g., masses, fibers and specks) were focalized for appropriate wavelet processing, which highlighted the characteristics of structures present in each ROI. To minimize false-positive detection, each ROI in the image was submitted to pattern recognition tests, which identified structural details of the focalized test objects. Geometric and morphologic parameters of the processed test object images were used to quantify the final level of image quality. The final purpose of this work was to establish the main computational procedures for algorithms of quality evaluation of ACR phantom images. These procedures were implemented, and satisfactory agreement was obtained when the algorithm scores for image quality were compared with the results of assessments by three experienced radiologists. An exploratory study of a potential dose reduction was performed based on the radiologist scores and on the algorithm evaluation of images treated by wavelet processing. The results were comparable with both methods, although the algorithm had a tendency to provide a lower dose reduction than the evaluation by observers. Nevertheless, the objective and more precise criteria used by the algorithm to score image quality gave the computational result a higher degree of confidence. The developed algorithm demonstrates the potential use of the wavelet image processing approach for objectively evaluating the mammographic image quality level in routine QC tests. The implemented computational procedures

  14. Evaluation model considering static-temporal quality degradation and human memory for SSCQE video quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horita, Yuukou; Miyata, Takamichi; Gunawan, Irwan P.; Murai, Tadakuni; Ghanbari, Mohammed

    2003-06-01

    To perform Quality of Service (QoS) control of video communication more efficiently, it is necessary to develop an objective quality evaluation method for coded video. Many proposed conventional methods to obtain video quality require the availability of both reference and processed video sequence. However, in case of re-encoding the coded video stream at the receiver side where reference video sequence is not present, it is impossible to do such a full-reference evaluation. Therefore, we have developed a video quality evaluation model by using reduced reference for evaluated value obtained by SSCQE method. In this approach, we use some features extracted from reference video. It is called reduced-reference method by VQEG. Transmitting these features with coded video, the proposed model can estimate the video quality, even in the absent of the full original video in the decoder side. The video quality rating obtained from the proposed model shows good agreement with subjective quality.

  15. Quality of Instruction Improved by Evaluation and Consultation of Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindermann, Heiner; Kohler, Jurgen; Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    One aim of student evaluation of instruction is the improvement of teaching quality, but there is little evidence that student assessment of instruction alone improves teaching. This study tried to improve the effects of evaluation by combining evaluation with individual counselling in an institutional development approach. Evaluation was…

  16. A procedure for testing the quality of LANDSAT atmospheric correction algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, L. A. V. (Principal Investigator); Vijaykumar, N. L.; Neto, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    There are two basic methods for testing the quality of an algorithm to minimize atmospheric effects on LANDSAT imagery: (1) test the results a posteriori, using ground truth or control points; (2) use a method based on image data plus estimation of additional ground and/or atmospheric parameters. A procedure based on the second method is described. In order to select the parameters, initially the image contrast is examined for a series of parameter combinations. The contrast improves for better corrections. In addition the correlation coefficient between two subimages, taken at different times, of the same scene is used for parameter's selection. The regions to be correlated should not have changed considerably in time. A few examples using this proposed procedure are presented.

  17. Quality in Learning Objects: Evaluating Compliance with Metadata Standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal, C. Christian; Segura, N. Alejandra; Campos, S. Pedro; Sánchez-Alonso, Salvador

    Ensuring a certain level of quality of learning objects used in e-learning is crucial to increase the chances of success of automated systems in recommending or finding these resources. This paper aims to present a proposal for implementation of a quality model for learning objects based on ISO 9126 international standard for the evaluation of software quality. Features indicators associated with the conformance sub-characteristic are defined. Some instruments for feature evaluation are advised, which allow collecting expert opinion on evaluation items. Other quality model features are evaluated using only the information from its metadata using semantic web technologies. Finally, we propose an ontology-based application that allows automatic evaluation of a quality feature. IEEE LOM metadata standard was used in experimentation, and the results shown that most of learning objects analyzed do not complain the standard.

  18. Evaluating quality in managed care networks.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, D

    1995-10-01

    If managed care is to succeed, methods for evaluating individual networks are essential. The author outlines crucial areas of the evaluation process, including rights, responsibilities, and ethics; continuum of care; education and communication; network leadership; human resources management; management of information; and performance improvement. Public disclosure of such evaluations is necessary to ensure their efficacy.

  19. Development of an Evaluative Procedure for Clinical Clerkships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    And Others; Pancorbo, Salvador

    1980-01-01

    In order to evaluate the clinical competencies of graduate pharmacy students upon the completion of a medicine rotation, an oral examination has been developed that requires students to present data and defend decisions. Objectives, responsibilities, and competencies required by the rotation and nine sample exam questions are appended. (JMD)

  20. Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Provided are guidelines for evaluating undergraduate professional education in chemistry. The guidelines summarize an approved program as including: 400 hours of classroom work; 500 hours of laboratory work; a core curriculum covering principles of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry; 1 year of advanced work in chemistry or…

  1. Evaluation of Identification and Preassessment Procedures in Kansas. Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka. Special Education Administration Section.

    The research evaluation project attempted to assess the effectiveness of new state (Kansas) guidelines for determining eligibility and placement of students in the areas of learning disabilities (LD), behavioral disorders (BD), and speech/language; and to assess the effectiveness of preassessment instructional programming options and screening…

  2. Vital Signs of Program Effectiveness: Program Evaluation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Catania, James C.

    Program evaluation at Waukesha County Technical Institute consists of two phases: a review of student enrollment, job placement, and program costs, which occurs every two years; and a comprehensive review of program content, student job performance, and instructional effectiveness, which occurs every five years. A schedule for conducting program…

  3. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  4. A Procedure for Evaluating Student Services in Community Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tullar, V. Philip

    Following introductory material noting demands for accountability within student services programs, this paper describes an evaluation system that involves administrators, faculty, student affairs practitioners, and students in an assessment of the college's overall student services effort. The paper first discusses the 60-item opinionnaire used…

  5. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  6. Evaluation of NCHEMS Costing Procedures. NACUBO Special Report 76-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of College and University Business Officers, Washington, DC.

    The Costing Standards Committee of the National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO) recently completed an evaluation of the "Cost Analysis Manual" (CAM) and the cost study procedures portion of the "Information Exchange Procedures Manual" (IEP), prepared by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems…

  7. The Importance of Strong Evaluation Standards and Procedures for Training Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Short, Judith P.

    1993-01-01

    Evaluation procedures and standards for a sound, strong evaluation process for medical residents are described, criteria for academic probation and due process when a resident is performing unacceptably are proposed, and the medical school administration's role in evaluation is examined. Statistics on dismissal of graduate medical students are…

  8. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  9. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  10. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child referred to... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... PROGRAM FOR INFANTS AND TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Child Find, Evaluations and Assessments,...

  11. Adolescent-evaluated quality of life: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ward-Smith, Peggy; McCaskie, Becki; Rhoton, Shannon

    2007-01-01

    Opportunities for adolescents with cancer to interact with each other are few. This project provided a weekend retreat for adolescents with cancer and obtained longitudinal self-evaluated quality of life data. Data were collected using the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument, which is a 16-item Likert-scaled survey that assesses quality of life. Twenty-two adolescents attended the weekend, and 17 participated in the study. Evaluations of the weekend retreat were positive, with "making friends" and "meeting others like me" the most frequent comments. Data from the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument revealed that for this population, quality of life was unchanged directly after the weekend and was statistically worse 1 month later. Enrollment methods skewed study participation toward individuals receiving treatment, which may explain these results. The reliability of the Adolescent Quality of Life instrument remained stable over time, and it appears to accurately assess and reflect changes in quality of life.

  12. Quality evaluation of fruit by hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter presents new applications of hyperspectral imaging for measuring the optical properties of fruits and assessing their quality attributes. A brief overview is given of current techniques for measuring optical properties of turbid and opaque biological materials. Then a detailed descripti...

  13. Evaluation of wheat-grain quality attributes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat is a leading source of food for humankind. Nearly all wheat is processed to varying degrees, and made into a limitless array of foods. As such, “quality” is a subjective assessment of suitability for a given process, food or use. Quality variation derives from compositional and physical attrib...

  14. Statistical procedures for evaluating daily and monthly hydrologic model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffey, M.E.; Workman, S.R.; Taraba, J.L.; Fogle, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The overall study objective was to evaluate the applicability of different qualitative and quantitative methods for comparing daily and monthly SWAT computer model hydrologic streamflow predictions to observed data, and to recommend statistical methods for use in future model evaluations. Statistical methods were tested using daily streamflows and monthly equivalent runoff depths. The statistical techniques included linear regression, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, nonparametric tests, t-test, objective functions, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation. None of the methods specifically applied to the non-normal distribution and dependence between data points for the daily predicted and observed data. Of the tested methods, median objective functions, sign test, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation were most applicable for the daily data. The robust coefficient of determination (CD*) and robust modeling efficiency (EF*) objective functions were the preferred methods for daily model results due to the ease of comparing these values with a fixed ideal reference value of one. Predicted and observed monthly totals were more normally distributed, and there was less dependence between individual monthly totals than was observed for the corresponding predicted and observed daily values. More statistical methods were available for comparing SWAT model-predicted and observed monthly totals. The 1995 monthly SWAT model predictions and observed data had a regression Rr2 of 0.70, a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.41, and the t-test failed to reject the equal data means hypothesis. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and the R r2 coefficient were the preferred methods for monthly results due to the ability to compare these coefficients to a set ideal value of one.

  15. 7 CFR 999.500 - Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates... § 999.500 Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and... or Native Americans on reservations; or (2) Walnuts which are: green walnuts (so immature that...

  16. 7 CFR 999.500 - Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates... § 999.500 Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and... or Native Americans on reservations; or (2) Walnuts which are: green walnuts (so immature that...

  17. 7 CFR 999.500 - Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates... § 999.500 Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and... or Native Americans on reservations; or (2) Walnuts which are: green walnuts (so immature that...

  18. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  19. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  20. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and... imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption by charitable institutions or distribution...

  1. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  2. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  3. Application of EPA quality assurance procedures to a soil characterization study at the DOE Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, K.E.; Byers, G.E.; Van Remortel, R.D.; Gustafson, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The transfer, modification, and application of well formulated and tested quality assurance (QA) procedures from one project to another deserves consideration. The use of a proven QA program design could result in cost savings and the collection of data with a greater degree of confidence. To test this thesis, a QA program, originally developed for large nationwide Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) programs, was adapted and implemented in a site characterization study at the Department of Energy (DOE) Nevada Test Site to ensure that laboratory data satisfied pre-determined measurement quality objectives (MQOs). The QA Program was adapted from EPA programs such as the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program, the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program, and to a lesser degree, the Comprehensive Environmental Recovery, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) Program. The QA design adopted the batch or lot concept, in which samples are organized into groups of quality samples (non-blinds, blinds, and double-blinds), which were included in each batch to evaluate and control measurement uncertainty and to address sample preparation. Detectability was assessed using instrument detection limits and precision data for low-concentration samples. Precision was assessed using data from reference samples under a two-tiered system based on concentration ranges. Accuracy was investigated in terms of bias with respect to reference values. The results showed that QA concepts developed for previous nationwide EPA programs were successfully adapted for the site-specific DOE project.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-11-01

    On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  10. Continuous quality control of the blood sampling procedure using a structured observation scheme

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, Tine Lindberg; Nybo, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An observational study was conducted using a structured observation scheme to assess compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline, to identify necessary focus items, and to investigate whether adherence to the phlebotomy guideline improved. Materials and methods The questionnaire from the EFLM Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase was adapted to local procedures. A pilot study of three months duration was conducted. Based on this, corrective actions were implemented and a follow-up study was conducted. All phlebotomists at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology were observed. Three blood collections by each phlebotomist were observed at each session conducted at the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards, respectively. Error frequencies were calculated for the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards and for the two study phases. Results A total of 126 blood drawings by 39 phlebotomists were observed in the pilot study, while 84 blood drawings by 34 phlebotomists were observed in the follow-up study. In the pilot study, the three major error items were hand hygiene (42% error), mixing of samples (22%), and order of draw (21%). Minor significant differences were found between the two settings. After focus on the major aspects, the follow-up study showed significant improvement for all three items at both settings (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Continuous quality control of the phlebotomy procedure revealed a number of items not conducted in compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline. It supported significant improvements in the adherence to the recommended phlebotomy procedures and facilitated documentation of the phlebotomy quality. PMID:27812302

  11. SU-E-J-162: Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Bone Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop and verify our quality assurance (QA) procedures to ensure the safety and efficacy of MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of bone metastases. Methods: A practical QA program was developed. Monthly and daily QA (DQA) procedures were performed. The major QA items included the checks of the machine hardware, software and patient safety features. Briefly, these checks/tests include: 1) the cooling system reservoir and treatment table; 2) power to the treatment table; 3) the MR coil; 4) the transducer position with MRI; 5) image display on the treatment work station; 6) the effective focal spot in 3 directions using MR thermometry; and 7) all the safety devices including a sonication lamp, and the emergency stop-sonication switches. In order to avoid patient skin burn, it is important to remove gas bubbles in the interfaces between the treatment table and the gel pad, and the gel pad and patients skin during the patient setup. Our QA procedures have been verified and evaluated through patient treatments. Seven patients with scapula, humeral head, sacrum, ilium, pubic ramus and acetabular bone metastases were treated using MRgFUS. Results: Our study showed that all seven patients tolerated the MRgFUS treatment well. No skin toxicity or other complications were observed. The pain score (0–10) using the visual analog scale (VAS) was significantly reduced from 8.0 ± 1.1 before treatment to 4.7 ± 3.0, 3.0 ± 1.5, 3.2 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 1.5 at one day, one month, two months and three months after the MRgFUS treatment, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrated that with the appropriate QA procedures, MRgFUS is a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment modality for palliation of bone metastases.

  12. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  13. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2006-07-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's NUREG-1400 addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present two detailed examples of the implementation of qualitative air flow studies at different scales using guidelines established by NUREG-1400. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within the transfer area of the 105 KE Basin, located on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The purpose of the study was to determine appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment in support of sludge water pumping activities. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an air flow study, the stagnant layer would not have been identified, and could have resulted in locating samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test.

  14. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Brad G; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P

    2006-08-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's guide, NUREG-1400, addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present detailed examples of the methodology used to conduct two qualitative airflow studies at different sites. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within a high-bay building for the purpose of determining appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an airflow study, the stagnant layer may not have been identified and could have resulted in placement of samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test. The methods described in this article can be applied at most facilities where determination of airflow patterns or the verification of suspected airflow patterns is required. PMID:16823267

  15. An evaluation of procedures for assessing competency to stand trial.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, J; Roesch, R; Golding, S

    1987-01-01

    In a field experiment involving 120 defendants at Bridgewater State Hospital in Massachusetts, the authors evaluated three instruments for assessing competency to stand trial: the Competency Screening Test (CST), Competency Assessment Instrument (CAI), and Interdisciplinary Fitness Interview (IFI). The CST (a paper-and-pencil test) was administered by a research assistant and scored by trained graduate students. Lawyers, psychologists, and social workers were recruited and trained in the use of the other instruments, then assigned as individuals (CAI) or teams (IFI) to conduct interviews and assess subjects. The performance of the project interviewers was compared against two yardsticks: (1) actual decisions reached by the regular Bridgewater staff, and (2) a consensus of two nationally respected experts who reviewed the cases and formed independent competency judgments. Both the CAI and IFI performed well under these conditions, indicating that one-time interviews by well-trained persons can lead to accurate competency decisions in the majority of cases. The authors conclude that hospitalization for competency assessment is rarely necessary.

  16. Evaluation of computer-aided procedure for detecting surface water. [using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results from an evaluation of a computer-aided procedure for processing ERTS-1 data to detect and locate surface water are presented. The procedure was evaluated using data from a study area in the vicinity of the Lake Somerville area in Washington County, Texas. The procedure consisted of (1) selecting water training fields, (2) aggregating the training samples together and clustering them into unimodal clusters, (3) computing the mean vector and covariance matrix for each cluster, (4) classifying all of the study area into classes corresponding to the clusters using the maximum likelihood classifier, and (5) thresholding out the nonwater pixels.

  17. Multivariate Bias Correction Procedures for Improving Water Quality Predictions using Mechanistic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libera, D.; Arumugam, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water quality observations are usually not available on a continuous basis because of the expensive cost and labor requirements so calibrating and validating a mechanistic model is often difficult. Further, any model predictions inherently have bias (i.e., under/over estimation) and require techniques that preserve the long-term mean monthly attributes. This study suggests and compares two multivariate bias-correction techniques to improve the performance of the SWAT model in predicting daily streamflow, TN Loads across the southeast based on split-sample validation. The first approach is a dimension reduction technique, canonical correlation analysis that regresses the observed multivariate attributes with the SWAT model simulated values. The second approach is from signal processing, importance weighting, that applies a weight based off the ratio of the observed and model densities to the model data to shift the mean, variance, and cross-correlation towards the observed values. These procedures were applied to 3 watersheds chosen from the Water Quality Network in the Southeast Region; specifically watersheds with sufficiently large drainage areas and number of observed data points. The performance of these two approaches are also compared with independent estimates from the USGS LOADEST model. Uncertainties in the bias-corrected estimates due to limited water quality observations are also discussed.

  18. Toward the quality evaluation of complex information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todoran, Ion-George; Lecornu, Laurent; Khenchaf, Ali; Le Caillec, Jean-Marc

    2014-06-01

    Recent technological evolutions and developments allow gathering huge amounts of data stemmed from different types of sensors, social networks, intelligence reports, distributed databases, etc. Data quantity and heterogeneity imposed the evolution necessity of the information systems. Nowadays the information systems are based on complex information processing techniques at multiple processing stages. Unfortunately, possessing large quantities of data and being able to implement complex algorithms do not guarantee that the extracted information will be of good quality. The decision-makers need good quality information in the process of decision-making. We insist that for a decision-maker the information and the information quality, viewed as a meta-information, are of great importance. A system not proposing to its user the information quality is in danger of not being correctly used or in more dramatic cases not to be used at all. In literature, especially in organizations management and in information retrieval, can be found some information quality evaluation methodologies. But none of these do not allow the information quality evaluation in complex and changing environments. We propose a new information quality methodology capable of estimating the information quality dynamically with data changes and/or with the information system inner changes. Our methodology is able to instantaneously update the system's output quality. For capturing the information quality changes through the system, we introduce the notion of quality transfer function. It is equivalent to the signal processing transfer function but working on the quality level. The quality transfer function describes the influence of a processing module over the information quality. We also present two different views over the notion of information quality: a global one, characterizing the entire system and a local one, for each processing module.

  19. Incorporating principal component analysis into air quality model evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of standard air quality model evaluation techniques is becoming compromised as the simulation periods continue to lengthen in response to ever increasing computing capacity. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a statistical approach called Princi...

  20. Does the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme Contribute to Quality Improvement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavares, Diana Amado; Rosa, Maria Joao; Amaral, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to reflect on the relevance of the Institutional Evaluation Programme (IEP) of the European University Association (EUA) to universities' quality improvement. It aims to analyse IEP follow-up reports to determine whether the programme contributes to the development of a quality improvement culture.…

  1. Conceptualising and Evaluating Teacher Quality: Substantive and Methodological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingvarson, Lawrence; Rowe, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Whereas findings from recent research highlight the importance of teacher quality in improving students' academic performances and experiences of schooling, substantive and methodological issues surrounding the conceptualisation and evaluation of "teacher quality" are not well understood. Such deficiencies are particularly evident in claims for…

  2. Methodology for Evaluating Quality and Reusability of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Bireniene, Virginija; Serikoviene, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the scientific model and several methods for the expert evaluation of quality of learning objects (LOs) paying especial attention to LOs reusability level. The activities of eQNet Quality Network for a European Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) aimed to improve reusability of LOs of European Schoolnet's LRE…

  3. Evaluation as Story: The Narrative Quality of Educational Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wachtman, Edward L.

    The author presents his opinion that educational evaluation has much similarity to the nonfiction narrative, (defined as a series of events ordered in time), particularly as it relates a current situation to future possibilities. He refers to Stake's statement that evaluation is concerned not only with outcomes but also with antecedents and with…

  4. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors : site selection, field operation, calibration, record computation, and reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Mattraw, H.C.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess variations in the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common system configuration for data collection is the four-parameter water-quality monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data, although systems can be configured to measure other properties such as turbidity or chlorophyll. The sensors that are used to measure these water properties require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with collected samples and chemical analyses to estimate chemical loads. This report provides guidelines for site-selection considerations, sensor test methods, field procedures, error correction, data computation, and review and publication processes. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.

  5. The Pan European Phenological Database PEP725: Data Content and Data Quality Control Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, Anita; Hübner, Thomas; Koch, Elisabeth; Lipa, Wolfgang; Scheifinger, Helfried; Ungersböck, Markus; Zach-Hermann, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Phenology - the study of the timing of recurring biological events in the animal and plant world - has become an important approach for climate change impact studies in recent years. It is therefore a "conditio sine qua non" to collect, archive, digitize, control and update phenological datasets. Thus and with regard to cross-border cooperation and activities it was necessary to establish, operate and promote a pan European phenological database (PEP725). Such a database - designed and tested under cost action 725 in 2004 and further developed and maintained in the framework of the EUMETNET program PEP725 - collects data from different European governmental and nongovernmental institutions and thus offers a unique compilation of plant phenological observations. The data follows the same classification scheme - the so called BBCH coding system - that makes datasets comparable. Europe had a long tradition in the observation of phenological events: the history of collecting phenological data and their usage in climatology began in 1751. The first datasets in PEP725 date back to 1868. However, there are only a few observations available until 1950. From 1951 onwards, the phenological networks all over Europe developed rapidly: Currently, PEP725 provides about 9 million records from 23 European countries (covering approximately 50% of Europe). To supply the data in a good and uniform quality it is essential and worthwhile to establish and develop data quality control procedures. Consequently, one of the main tasks within PEP725 is the conception of a multi-stage-quality control. Currently the tests are stepwise composed: completeness -, plausibility -, time consistency -, climatological - and statistical checks. In a nutshell: The poster exemplifies the status quo of the data content of the PEP725 database and incipient stages of used and planned quality controls, respectively. For more details, we would also like to promote and refer to the PEP725 website (http

  6. Parameter Trending, Geolocation Quality Control and the Procedures to Support Preparation of Next Versions of the TRMM Reprocessing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2004-01-01

    TRMM has been an imminently successful mission from an engineering standpoint but even more from a science standpoint. An important part of this science success has been the careful quality control of the TRMM standard products. This paper will present the quality monitoring efforts that the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) conducts on a routine basis. The paper will detail parameter trending, geolocation quality control and the procedures to support the preparation of next versions of the algorithm used for reprocessing.

  7. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites.

    PubMed

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to 'flag' TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking.

  8. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J.; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to ‘flag’ TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking. PMID:26204119

  9. Pilot evaluation of sailplane handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The evaluation sailplanes were found generally deficient in the area of cockpit layout. The pilots indicated general dissatisfaction with high pitch sensitivity especially when coupled with inertially induced stick forces. While all sailplanes were judged satisfactory for centering thermals and in the ease of speed control in circling flight, pilot opinions diverged on the maneuvering response, pull-out characteristics from a dive, and on phugoid damping. Lateral-directional control problems were noted mainly during takeoff and landing for most sailplanes with the landing wheel ahead of center of gravity. Pilot opinion of in-flight lateral-directional stability and control was generally satisfactory. Five of the evaluation sailplanes exhibited a very narrow airspeed band in which perceptible stall warning buffet occurred. However, this characteristic was considered not objectionable when stall recovery was easy. The pilots objected to the characteristics of a wide airspeed band of stall warning followed by a stall with yawing and rolling tendency and substantial loss of altitude during the stall. Glide path control for the evaluation sailplanes was found to be generally objectionable.

  10. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  11. Evaluating the Effects of a Video Prompt in a System of Least Prompts Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katie A.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Mechling, Linda C.; Alexander, Jennifer L.; Mataras, Theologia K.; Shepley, Sally B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a system of least prompts procedure with a video prompt serving as the model in teaching office tasks to three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. A multiple probe across behaviors design replicated across participants was used to evaluate the intervention. The…

  12. 48 CFR 1352.213-70 - Evaluation utilizing simplified acquisition procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 1352.213-70 Evaluation utilizing simplified acquisition procedures. As prescribed in 48 CFR 1313... offeror whose quotation results in the best value to the Government, considering both price and non-price... be evaluated to determine, as appropriate, successful performance of contract requirements,...

  13. 42 CFR 85.3 - Procedures for requesting health hazard evaluations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for requesting health hazard evaluations. 85.3 Section 85.3 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES REQUESTS FOR HEALTH HAZARD EVALUATIONS §...

  14. The Evaluation of Educational Goals, Instructional Procedures and Outcomes or The Iceman Cometh.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    A model checklist conceptualizing the evaluation process is presented and discussed. It is quite general and is intended to apply to the evaluation of educational products, procedures and most outcomes. The Pathway Comparison Model consists of the following: (1) characterization--how generally or specifically to describe the "treatment"; (2)…

  15. 34 CFR 303.342 - Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... development, review, and evaluation. (a) Meeting to develop initial IFSP—timelines. For a child who has been... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Procedures for IFSP development, review, and evaluation... child and the child's family must be conducted every six months, or more frequently if...

  16. Image quality evaluation and control of computer-generated holograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Takeshi; Uetake, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    Image quality of the computer-generated holograms are usually evaluated subjectively. For example, the re- constructed image from the hologram is compared with other holograms, or evaluated by the double-stimulus impairment scale method to compare with the original image. This paper proposes an objective image quality evaluation of a computer-generated hologram by evaluating both diffraction efficiency and peak signal-to-noise ratio. Theory and numerical experimental results are shown on Fourier transform transmission hologram of both amplitude and phase modulation. Results without the optimized random phase show that the amplitude transmission hologram gives better peak signal-to noise ratio, but the phase transmission hologram provides about 10 times higher diffraction efficiency to the amplitude type. As an optimized phase hologram, Kinoform is evaluated. In addition, we investigate to control image quality by non-linear operation.

  17. Using Third Party Data to Update a Reference Dataset in a Quality Evaluation Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, E. M. A.; Ariza-López, F. J.; Ureña-Cámara, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays it is easy to find many data sources for various regions around the globe. In this 'data overload' scenario there are few, if any, information available about the quality of these data sources. In order to easily provide these data quality information we presented the architecture of a web service for the automation of quality control of spatial datasets running over a Web Processing Service (WPS). For quality procedures that require an external reference dataset, like positional accuracy or completeness, the architecture permits using a reference dataset. However, this reference dataset is not ageless, since it suffers the natural time degradation inherent to geospatial features. In order to mitigate this problem we propose the Time Degradation & Updating Module which intends to apply assessed data as a tool to maintain the reference database updated. The main idea is to utilize datasets sent to the quality evaluation service as a source of 'candidate data elements' for the updating of the reference database. After the evaluation, if some elements of a candidate dataset reach a determined quality level, they can be used as input data to improve the current reference database. In this work we present the first design of the Time Degradation & Updating Module. We believe that the outcomes can be applied in the search of a full-automatic on-line quality evaluation platform.

  18. The Evaluation of Published Indexes, and Abstract Journals:, Criteria and Possible Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, F. W.

    1971-01-01

    This paper describes possible criteria by which the effectiveness of a published index may be evaluated and suggest procedures that might be used to conduct an evaluation of a published index. The procedures were developed for the National Library of Medicine and relate specifically to the recurring bibliographies produced by MEDLARS in various specialized areas of biomedicine. The methods described should, however, be applicable to other printed indexes and abstract journals. Factors affecting the performance of a published index are also discussed and some research projects relevant to the evaluation of published indexes are reviewed. PMID:5146770

  19. A Comparison of Procedures for Evaluation of Vocational Education Programs. Research Series No. 45.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Juanita D.

    The study compares two methods of evaluating vocational programs in Tennessee: an on-site instrument used by the Tennessee State Division of Vocational Education and a self-evaluation method using Ray's Self-Checklist of Quality Vocational-Technical Programs. The study evaluates vocational programs in office occupations and distributive,…

  20. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  1. Evaluation of screening procedures for bioconcentratable organic chemicals in effluents and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, L.P.; Sheedy, B.R.

    1995-04-01

    Screening procedures have been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to isolate and tentatively identify nonpolar organic chemicals in effluent and sediment samples with high potential to form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. The objective of this study was to determine if the sample components tentatively identified by the effluent- and sediment-screening procedures actually form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. This evaluation consisted of analyzing effluent and sediment samples from a field site with discharges from two coke-manufacturing facilities using the screening procedures. Effluent, sediment, crayfish (Decapoda), and sunfish (Lepomis sp.) samples from the field site were also prepared using conventional sample preparation procedures and analyzed for the tentatively identified chemicals (TIDs) reported by the screening procedures. Results of the screening procedures were then compared to the results of the analyses on the samples prepared using the conventional sample preparation procedures. For the effluent-screening procedure, 182 of 183 TIDs in Coke Plant 1 effluent and all of the 7 TIDs in Coke Plant 2 effluent were found in the crayfish, sunfish, and/or sediment samples downstream of the discharges. For the sediment-screening procedure, 92 of 93 TIDs and all of 47 TIDs in sediment samples from two sampling stations downstream of the discharges were found in the crayfish and/or sunfish samples.

  2. Field test of a bioassay procedure for assessing habitat quality on fish spawning grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Jude, David J.; Eshenroder, Randy L.

    1989-01-01

    A bioassay procedure to assess habitat quality was tested on Port Austin reef in southern Lake Huron, a spawning area of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. In 1986, Plexiglas incubators filled with fertilized lake trout eggs were buried by scuba divers in rock rubble at two sites. The incubators then were attached to chains between large trap-net anchors on the bottom and left over winter. At one site, egg hatch rate was significantly higher in incubators that remained buried in substrate (24%) than in incubators that were dislodged out onto the substrate (13%). At the other, more exposed site, no significant difference was found in percent hatch between eggs that incubated in (10%) and on (8%) the substrate. Percent hatch at both sites was significantly lower than that (40%) of eggs from the same source that were incubated in controlled laboratory conditions. In autumn, concentrations of dissolved ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrate near bottom and in the substrate posed no threat to lake trout embryos and were not correlated with hatch rate; concentrations differed significantly between the two sites. During winter, 15 cm of sediment settled from the water onto the reef but did not accumulate or smother the eggs. The bioassay procedure is easy to implement, is recommended for use in the Great Lakes, and could be adapted easily for use elsewhere.

  3. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  4. Data envelopment analysis in service quality evaluation: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Seyedvahid; Saati, Saber; Tavana, Madjid

    2015-10-01

    Service quality is often conceptualized as the comparison between service expectations and the actual performance perceptions. It enhances customer satisfaction, decreases customer defection, and promotes customer loyalty. Substantial literature has examined the concept of service quality, its dimensions, and measurement methods. We introduce the perceived service quality index (PSQI) as a single measure for evaluating the multiple-item service quality construct based on the SERVQUAL model. A slack-based measure (SBM) of efficiency with constant inputs is used to calculate the PSQI. In addition, a non-linear programming model based on the SBM is proposed to delineate an improvement guideline and improve service quality. An empirical study is conducted to assess the applicability of the method proposed in this study. A large number of studies have used DEA as a benchmarking tool to measure service quality. These models do not propose a coherent performance evaluation construct and consequently fail to deliver improvement guidelines for improving service quality. The DEA models proposed in this study are designed to evaluate and improve service quality within a comprehensive framework and without any dependency on external data.

  5. Evaluation of military field-water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Selleck, R.E.; Ungun, Z.; Chesler, G.; Diyamandoglu, V.; Marinas, B. . Sanitary Engineering and Environmental Health Research Lab.); Daniels, J.I. )

    1990-05-01

    A comparison is made between the performances of the 600-gph Reverse Osmosis Water Purification Unit (ROWPU) operated in the bypass mode and the Mobile Water Purification Unit (MWPU, frequently referred to as an ERDLATOR because the equipment was developed at the Engineer Research and Development Laboratory at Fort Belvoir, VA.) Generally, the performance of the MWPU is significantly better than the pretreatment units of the ROWPU in terms of removing both turbidity and pathogenic organisms. It is recommended that the practice of bypassing the reverse osmosis (RO) components of the ROWPU be avoided unless it can be demonstrated clearly that the cartridge filters will remove the cysts of infectious organisms effectively and reliably. If the ROWPU must be operated in the bypass mode, it is recommended that the dose of disinfectant used be made equal to that currently employed in the field for untreated raw water. The analytical methods used to determine total dissolved solids (TDS) and residual free chlorine with the new Water-Quality Monitor (WQM) are also reviewed briefly. The limitations of the methods used to calibrate the TDS and free-chlorine probes of the new WQM are discussed. 98 refs., 19 figs., 16 tabs.

  6. Ground-Water Data-Collection Protocols and Procedures for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Collection and Documentation of Water-Quality Samples and Related Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koterba, Michael T.; Wilde, Franceska D.; Lapham, Wayne W.

    1995-01-01

    Protocols for ground-water sampling are described in a report written in 1989 as part of the pilot program for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These protocols have been reviewed and revised to address the needs of the full-scale implementation of the NAWQA Program that began in 1991. This report, which is a collaborative effort between the NAWQA Program and the USGS Office of Water Quality, is the result of that review and revision. This report describes protocols and recommended procedures for the collection of water-quality samples and related data from wells for the NAWQA Program. Protocols and recommended procedures discussed include (1) equipment setup and other preparations for data collection; (2) well purging and field measurements; (3) collecting and processing ground-water-quality samples; (4) equipment decontamination; (5) quality-control sampling; and (6) sample handling and shipping.

  7. Evaluating the Role of Content in Subjective Video Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Vrgovic, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Video quality as perceived by human observers is the ground truth when Video Quality Assessment (VQA) is in question. It is dependent on many variables, one of them being the content of the video that is being evaluated. Despite the evidence that content has an impact on the quality score the sequence receives from human evaluators, currently available VQA databases mostly comprise of sequences which fail to take this into account. In this paper, we aim to identify and analyze differences between human cognitive, affective, and conative responses to a set of videos commonly used for VQA and a set of videos specifically chosen to include video content which might affect the judgment of evaluators when perceived video quality is in question. Our findings indicate that considerable differences exist between the two sets on selected factors, which leads us to conclude that videos starring a different type of content than the currently employed ones might be more appropriate for VQA. PMID:24523643

  8. Computer–Based Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers: Preliminary Results from Two Evaluation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna H Oxstrand

    2013-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conducted to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.

  9. Seismic Evaluation Procedure for Glove Boxes at U.S. Department of Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, S C

    2001-06-01

    At U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, safety analyses and facility-specific actions require the evaluation of mechanical and electrical equipment subjected to seismic hazards. A seismic evaluation procedure has been developed by the DOE to provide comprehensive guidance for consistent seismic evaluations of equipment and distribution systems in DOE facilities using experience data from past seismic events and shake table tests. The DOE Seismic Evaluation Procedure (SEP) is adapted from the Seismic Qualification Utility Group (SQUG) Generic Implementation Procedure (GIP) used by the nuclear power industry. The DOE SEP builds on the procedures and screening criteria in the SQUG GIP by incorporating DOE-specific requirements and guidance and broadening the application of the experience-based methodology to equipment classes which are either unique to DOE facilities or not contained in the SQUG GIP. These equipment classes include piping systems, HEPA filters, glove boxes, underground tanks, canisters and gas cylinders, WAC ducts, storage racks, etc. This paper addresses the seismic evaluation procedures developed uniquely for glove boxes.

  10. A proposal for an alternative quality control test procedure for inactivated vaccines against food-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Molin-Capeti, K C; Sepulveda, L; Terra, F; Torres-Pioli, M F; Costa-Casagrande, T; França, S C; Thomaz-Soccol, V

    2013-02-18

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) control in Brazil includes a strict mandatory vaccination program with vaccines produced in certified laboratories subject to inspection by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock, and Food Supply (MAPA). The FMD vaccine's potency is tested through antibodies titration against structural viral proteins in sera from cattle that have not had any exposure to food-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV), at 28 days post-vaccination. Biological product testing using large animals is expensive and unwieldy. Thus, alternative testing procedures using laboratory animals have been proposed for quality control of these products. Such biological methods for vaccine evaluation using animals from vivarium facilities can have a significant impact through reduced costs, easier handling, and shorter testing times. The present study was designed to access Balb/C mice's humoral immune responses to a FMDV experimental vaccine, the composition of which contains three virus serotypes of FMDV (O1 Campos, A24 Cruzeiro, and C3 Indaial). Balb/C mice were immunized at doses that were 5% and 10% of the vaccine volume administered in cattle. Immunized mice had their antibody titers probed at 14, 21, and 28 DPV (days post vaccination). The results obtained were compared to those previously known from cattle's immune responses to the FMDV vaccine. An adequate immune response to the vaccine was seen with 10% formulation at 21 DPV. The study results are encouraging and indicate that the mouse model can be used for quality control in experimental vaccine testing.

  11. A Coherent System of Teacher Evaluation for Quality Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tammie; Aguilar, Elena; Berg, Ellen; Cismowski, Liane; Cody, Anthony; Cohen, David B.; Dean, Sandra; Formigli, Lynn; Fung, Jane; Lee, Cliff; Marshall, Kathie; Skorko, Nancy; White, Silver

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the questions, "How should we evaluate the quality of teaching?" and "What kind of evaluation system will move all California teachers on a path of improvement throughout their careers?" The article, adapted from a report written by a group of accomplished California teachers, recommends seven core…

  12. Taking Teacher Quality Seriously: A Collaborative Approach to Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Stan

    2012-01-01

    If narrow, test-based evaluation of teachers is unfair, unreliable, and has negative effects on kids, classrooms, and curricula, what's a better approach? By demonizing teachers and unions, and sharply polarizing the education debate, the corporate reform movement has actually undermined serious efforts to improve teacher quality and evaluation.…

  13. AQMEII: A New International Initiative on Air Quality Model Evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    We provide a conceptual view of the process of evaluating regional-scale three-dimensional numerical photochemical air quality modeling system, based on an examination of existing approached to the evaluation of such systems as they are currently used in a variety of application....

  14. Quality evaluation of tandem mass spectral libraries.

    PubMed

    Oberacher, Herbert; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Dresen, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are gaining more and more importance for the identification of unknowns in different fields of research, including metabolomics, forensics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. Particularly, the recent invention of reliable, robust, and transferable libraries has increased the general acceptance of these tools. Herein, we report on results obtained from thorough evaluation of the match reliabilities of two tandem mass spectral libraries: the MSforID library established by the Oberacher group in Innsbruck and the Weinmann library established by the Weinmann group in Freiburg. Three different experiments were performed: (1) Spectra of the libraries were searched against their corresponding library after excluding either this single compound-specific spectrum or all compound-specific spectra prior to searching; (2) the libraries were searched against each other using either library as reference set or sample set; (3) spectra acquired on different mass spectrometric instruments were matched to both libraries. Almost 13,000 tandem mass spectra were included in this study. The MSforID search algorithm was used for spectral matching. Statistical evaluation of the library search results revealed that principally both libraries enable the sensitive and specific identification of compounds. Due to higher mass accuracy of the QqTOF compared with the QTrap instrument, matches to the MSforID library were more reliable when comparing spectra with both libraries. Furthermore, only the MSforID library was shown to be efficiently transferable to different kinds of tandem mass spectrometers, including "tandem-in-time" instruments; this is due to the coverage of a large range of different collision energy settings-including the very low range-which is an outstanding characteristics of the MSforID library.

  15. Comparing catchment sediment fingerprinting procedures using an auto-evaluation approach with virtual sample mixtures.

    PubMed

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, William H; Smith, Hugh G; Navas, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Information on sediment sources in river catchments is required for effective sediment control strategies, to understand sediment, nutrient and pollutant transport, and for developing soil erosion management plans. Sediment fingerprinting procedures are employed to quantify sediment source contributions and have become a widely used tool. As fingerprinting procedures are naturally variable and locally dependant, there are different applications of the procedure. Here, the auto-evaluation of different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures is proposed to support the selection of the fingerprinting procedure with the best capacity for source discrimination and apportionment. Surface samples from four land uses from a Central Spanish Pyrenean catchment were used i) as sources to generate the virtual sample mixtures and ii) to characterise the sources for the fingerprinting procedures. The auto-evaluation approach involved comparing fingerprinting procedures based on four optimum composite fingerprints selected by three statistical tests, three source characterisations (mean, median and corrected mean) and two types of objective functions for the mixing model. A total of 24 fingerprinting procedures were assessed by this new approach which were solved by Monte Carlo simulations and compared using the root mean squared error (RMSE) between known and assessed source ascriptions for the virtual sample mixtures. It was found that the source ascriptions with the highest accuracy were achieved using the corrected mean source characterisations for the composite fingerprints selected by the Kruskal Wallis H-test and principal components analysis. Based on the RMSE results, high goodness of fit (GOF) values were not always indicative of accurate source apportionment results, and care should be taken when using GOF to assess mixing model performance. The proposed approach to test different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures provides an

  16. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: the procedure, the evaluated systems and the evaluation tools.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, M; de Greef, K; Brinkman, D; Cinar, M U; Dourmad, J Y; Edge, H L; Fàbrega, E; Gonzàlez, J; Houwers, H W J; Hviid, M; Ilari-Antoine, E; Klauke, T N; Phatsara, C; Rydhmer, L; van der Oever, B; Zimmer, C; Edwards, S A

    2014-12-01

    Although a few studies consider the sustainability of animal farming systems along the three classical main pillars (economy, environment and society), most studies on pig farming systems address only one of these pillars. The present paper is the introduction to a series of companion papers presenting the results of a study undertaken within the EU-supported project Q-PorkChains, aiming at building a comprehensive tool for the evaluation of pig farming systems, which is robust to accommodate the large variability of systems existing in Europe. The tool is mostly based on questions to farmers and comprises a total of 37 dimensions distributed along eight themes: Animal Welfare, Animal Health, Breeding Programmes, Environmental Sustainability, Meat Safety, Market Conformity, Economy and Working Conditions. The paper describes the procedure that was used for building the tool, using it on 15 contrasted pig farming systems and analysing the results. The evaluated systems are briefly described and a short overview of the dimensions is provided. Detailed descriptions of the theme-wise tools and results, as well as the results of an integrated evaluation, are available in the companion papers.

  17. Surface Wind Observational Database in North Eastern North America: Quality Control Procedure and Climatological Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucio-Eceiza, Etor E.; Fidel González-Rouco, J.; Navarro, Jorge; Hidalgo, Ángela; Conte, Jorge; Beltrami, Hugo

    2015-04-01

    This work summarizes the design and application of a Quality Control (QC) procedure for an observational surface wind database located in North Eastern North America. It also presents some insights of the long-term climatological variability over the region. The database consists of 527 sites (487 land stations and 40 buoys) with varying resolutions of hourly, 3 hourly and 6 hourly data, compiled from three different source institutions. The records span from 1940 to 2010 and cover an approximate spatial extension of 2.2 × 106 km2. The QC process is composed of different phases focused either on problems related with the providing source institutions or measurement errors. Due to the size of the data set, a great effort has been made on the automation of the procedures. A number of problems are associated with data management and data conventions: unification of measurement units and recording times due to the variety of institutional sources; detection of erroneous data sequence duplications within a station or among different ones; and detection of errors related with physically unrealistic data measurements. From the other hand there is a variety of treated instrumental errors: problems related with low variability, placing particular emphasis on the detection of unrealistic low wind speed records with the help of regional references; high variability related erroneous records; wind speed biases on week to monthly timescales and homogenization of wind direction records. As a result, around 1.7% of wind speed records and 0.4% of wind direction records have been deleted, making a combined total of 1.9% of removed records. Around 2.4% of wind direction data have been also corrected. The already quality controlled database allows for subsequent climatological analyses. The intra and inter decadal variability of the monthly surface wind field in such a vast and orographically complex region as the North Eastern North America is explored. Several decades of quality

  18. TOGA COARE Upper-Air Sounding Data Archive: Development and Quality Control Procedures.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loehrer, Scot M.; Edmands, Todd A.; Moore, James A.

    1996-11-01

    the community with a sounding dataset that has been found to be useful in certain modeling studies.The processed TOGA COARE sounding data, as well as statistical output from the OFPS spatial quality control procedures, are available on-line via the Internet using the World Wide Web (WWW) through the OFPS data management system. Access via the WWW allows a full range of on-line data browsing and ordering capabilities.

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  20. Evaluating supplier quality performance using fuzzy analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazihah; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Rajoo, Shanmugam Sundram Kalimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Evaluating supplier quality performance is vital in ensuring continuous supply chain improvement, reducing the operational costs and risks towards meeting customer's expectation. This paper aims to illustrate an application of Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process to prioritize the evaluation criteria in a context of automotive manufacturing in Malaysia. Five main criteria were identified which were quality, cost, delivery, customer serviceand technology support. These criteria had been arranged into hierarchical structure and evaluated by an expert. The relative importance of each criteria was determined by using linguistic variables which were represented as triangular fuzzy numbers. The Center of Gravity defuzzification method was used to convert the fuzzy evaluations into their corresponding crisps values. Such fuzzy evaluation can be used as a systematic tool to overcome the uncertainty evaluation of suppliers' performance which usually associated with human being subjective judgments.

  1. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing: is standardisation possible?

    PubMed

    Retamar, Pilar; Martín, M Luisa; Molina, José; del Arco, Alfonso

    2013-09-01

    The quality of antimicrobial prescribing refers to the optimal way to use antibiotics in regard to their benefits, safety (e.g., resistance generation and toxicity) and cost. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing in a way that focuses not only on reducing antimicrobial consumption but also on using them in a more optimal way allows us to understand patterns of use and to identify targets for intervention. The lack of standardisation is the primary problem to be addressed when planning an evaluation of antimicrobial prescribing. There is little information specifically describing an evaluation methodology. Information related to prescription evaluation can be obtained from the guidelines of Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs (ASPs) and from local and international experience. The criteria used to evaluate the quality of prescription should include the indication for antimicrobial therapy, the timeliness of initiation, the correct antibiotic choice (according to local guidelines), the dosing, the duration, the route of administration and the time at which to switch to oral administration. A locally developed guideline on antimicrobial therapy should preferably be the gold standard by which to evaluate the appropriatenes of prescriptions. Various approaches used to carry out the evaluations have been described in the literature. Repeated point-prevalence surveys (PPS) have been proven to be effective in identifying targets for quality improvement. Continuous prospective monitoring allows the identification of more precise intervention points at different times during prescription. The design of the study chosen to perform the evaluation should be adapted according to the resources available in each centre. Evaluating the quality of antimicrobial prescribing should be the first step to designing ASPs, as well as to evaluating their impact and the changes in prescribing trends over time.

  2. Report on objective ride quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambold, J. C.; Park, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The correlation of absorbed power as an objective ride measure to the subjective evaluation for the bus data was investigated. For some individual bus rides the correlations were poor, but when a sufficient number of rides was used to give reasonable sample base, an excellent correlation was obtained. The following logarithmical function was derived: S = 1.7245 1n (39.6849 AP), where S = one subjective rating of the ride; and AP = the absorbed power in watts. A six-degree-of-freedom method developed for aircraft data was completed. Preliminary correlation of absorbed power with ISO standards further enhances the bus ride and absorbed power correlation numbers since the AP's obtained are of the same order of magnitude for both correlations. While it would then appear that one could just use ISO standards, there is no way to add the effect of three degrees of freedom. The absorbed power provides a method of adding the effects due to the three major directions plus the pitch and roll.

  3. Test and evaluation procedures for Sandia's Teraflops Operating System (TOS) on Janus.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, Daniel Wayne

    2005-10-01

    This report describes the test and evaluation methods by which the Teraflops Operating System, or TOS, that resides on Sandia's massively-parallel computer Janus is verified for production release. Also discussed are methods used to build TOS before testing and evaluating, miscellaneous utility scripts, a sample test plan, and a proposed post-test method for quickly examining the large number of test results. The purpose of the report is threefold: (1) to provide a guide to T&E procedures, (2) to aid and guide others who will run T&E procedures on the new ASCI Red Storm machine, and (3) to document some of the history of evaluation and testing of TOS. This report is not intended to serve as an exhaustive manual for testers to conduct T&E procedures.

  4. Evaluation of the EIA system performance in Greece, using quality indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Androulidakis, Ioannis . E-mail: iandroul@civil.auth.gr; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2006-04-15

    Greece was among the last countries in the European Union to adopt the EU Directives on Environmental Impact Assessment, upgrading the previously existing legislative framework. The aim of the present paper was to appraise the quality of a randomly selected sample of EISs using non-obligatory but quality-related indicators and to evaluate the overall quality of these studies produced in Greece during the last decade (1993-2003). It was found that the majority of these EISs performed rather poorly in respect of most indicators used and there was little evidence of improvement with time. It is concluded that the authorities in charge still have little experience in coping with the increasing bulk of project submissions and are primarily interested in conformity with formal requirements rather than in reliable predictions and in overall quality of the EIA procedure.

  5. Evaluating supplier quality performance using analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalimuthu Rajoo, Shanmugam Sundram; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Ahmad, Nazihah

    2013-09-01

    This paper elaborates the importance of evaluating supplier quality performance to an organization. Supplier quality performance evaluation reflects the actual performance of the supplier exhibited at customer's end. It is critical in enabling the organization to determine the area of improvement and thereafter works with supplier to close the gaps. Success of the customer partly depends on supplier's quality performance. Key criteria as quality, cost, delivery, technology support and customer service are categorized as main factors in contributing to supplier's quality performance. 18 suppliers' who were manufacturing automotive application parts evaluated in year 2010 using weight point system. There were few suppliers with common rating which led to common ranking observed by few suppliers'. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), a user friendly decision making tool for complex and multi criteria problems was used to evaluate the supplier's quality performance challenging the weight point system that was used for 18 suppliers'. The consistency ratio was checked for criteria and sub-criteria. Final results of AHP obtained with no overlap ratings, therefore yielded a better decision making methodology as compared to weight point rating system.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while

  7. [Quality evaluation for pharmaceutical products and medical supplies: proper use].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Etsuko

    2014-01-01

      In the proper use of medicine, the quality of medical supplies is an important factor. Use of generic products not only reduces drug costs for the patient, but also offers substantial advantages for governments in reducing medical expenses. When evaluation of the quality of generic products is centered on tablets, products with qualities that are unstable over time may be encountered. Some dosage forms require suitable pharmaceutical tests, processes, and apparatuses, such as those for evaluating orally disintegrating tablets or cutaneous preparations. For example, although simple test equipment has been proposed for patches, a unified method is required. The pharmacist plays an important role in choosing high-quality generic products; however, a substantial amount of information needs to be made available to the public in order to achieve that goal.

  8. Post-Mission Quality Assurance Procedure for Survey-Grade Mobile Mapping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstinga, A. P.; Friess, P.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) consist of terrestrial-based moving platforms that integrate a set of imaging sensors (typically digital cameras and laser scanners) and a Position and Orientation System (POS), designed to collect data of the surrounding environment. MMS can be classified as "mapping-grade" or "survey-grade" depending on the system's attainable accuracy. Mapping-grade MMS produce geospatial data suitable for GIS applications (e.g., asset management) while survey-grade systems should satisfy high-accuracy applications such as engineering/design projects. The delivered accuracy of an MMS is dependent on several factors such as the accuracy of the system measurements and calibration parameters. It is critical, especially for survey-grade systems, to implement a robust Quality Assurance (QA) procedure to ensure the achievement of the expected accuracy. In this paper, a new post-mission QA procedure is presented. The presented method consists of a fully-automated self-calibration process that allows for the estimation of corrections to the system calibration parameters (e.g., boresight angles and lever-arm offsets relating the lidar sensor(s) to the IMU body frame) as well as corrections to the system measurements (e.g., post-processed trajectory position and orientation, scan angles and ranges). As for the system measurements, the major challenge for MMS is related to the trajectory determination in the presence of multipath signals and GNSS outages caused by buildings, underpasses and high vegetation. In the proposed self-calibration method, trajectory position errors are properly modelled while utilizing an efficient/meaningful trajectory segmentation technique. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using a dataset collected under unfavorable GNSS conditions.

  9. [Systematic economic assessment and quality evaluation for traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Guo, Li-ping; Shang, Hong-cai; Ren, Ming; Lei, Xiang

    2015-05-01

    To learn about the economic studies on traditional Chinese medicines in domestic literatures, in order to analyze the current economic assessment of traditional Chinese medicines and explore the existing problems. Efforts were made to search CNKI, VIP, Wanfang database and CBM by computer and include all literatures about economic assessment of traditional Chinese medicines published on professional domestic journals in the systematic assessment and quality evaluation. Finally, 50 articles were included in the study, and the systematic assessment and quality evaluation were made for them in terms of titles, year, authors' identity, expense source, disease type, study perspective, study design type, study target, study target source, time limit, cost calculation, effect indicator, analytical technique and sensitivity analysis. The finally quality score was 0.74, which is very low. The results of the study showed insufficient studies on economics of traditional Chinese medicines, short study duration and simple evaluation methods, which will be solved through unremitting efforts in the future.

  10. [Systematic economic assessment and quality evaluation for traditional Chinese medicines].

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiao; Guo, Li-ping; Shang, Hong-cai; Ren, Ming; Lei, Xiang

    2015-05-01

    To learn about the economic studies on traditional Chinese medicines in domestic literatures, in order to analyze the current economic assessment of traditional Chinese medicines and explore the existing problems. Efforts were made to search CNKI, VIP, Wanfang database and CBM by computer and include all literatures about economic assessment of traditional Chinese medicines published on professional domestic journals in the systematic assessment and quality evaluation. Finally, 50 articles were included in the study, and the systematic assessment and quality evaluation were made for them in terms of titles, year, authors' identity, expense source, disease type, study perspective, study design type, study target, study target source, time limit, cost calculation, effect indicator, analytical technique and sensitivity analysis. The finally quality score was 0.74, which is very low. The results of the study showed insufficient studies on economics of traditional Chinese medicines, short study duration and simple evaluation methods, which will be solved through unremitting efforts in the future. PMID:26390672

  11. Scatterscore : A reconnaissance method to evaluate changes in water quality

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, A.G.; Cardone, C.R.

    2005-12-01

    Water quality data collected in periodic monitoring programs are often difficult to evaluate, especially if the number of parameters is large, the sampling schedule varies, and values are of different orders of magnitude. The Scatterscore Water Quality Evaluation was developed to yield a quantitative score, based on all measured variables in periodic water quality reports, indicating positive, negative or random change. This new methodology calculates a reconnaissance score based on the differences between up-gradient (control) versus down-gradient (treatment) water quality data sets. All parameters measured over a period of time at two or more sampling points are compared. The relationship between the ranges of measured values and the ratio of the medians for each parameter produces a data point that falls into one of four sections on a scattergram. The number and average values of positive, negative and random change points is used to calculate a Scatterscore that indicates the magnitude and direction of overall change in water quality. The Scatterscore Water Quality Evaluation, a reconnaissance method to track general changes, has been applied to 20 sites at which coal utilization by-products (CUB) were used to control acid mine drainage (AMD).

  12. Quality evaluation and indicator comparison in health care.

    PubMed

    Øvretveit, J

    2001-01-01

    By 2005 all healthcare organizations in Europe will be required to take part in a quality evaluation scheme and to collect data about the quality of their service. Hospitals and doctors will need to prove they are safe--quality is no longer assumed. These were the predictions of a recent workshop of Nordic quality experts. The pressures to assess quality are increasing, and there are many assessment, certification, accreditation and measurement schemes in use. Which is best? What evidence is there that any have been effective? How should a hospital or region introduce such a scheme? There are many proponents for different schemes, and an increasing amount of experience to help answer these questions, but little research. This paper provides an overview for non-specialists of the different quality evaluation and indicator schemes for inspection and improvement. It draws on the experiences of quality specialists and leaders in each Nordic country who have applied the schemes in public hospitals and healthcare services. How a scheme is introduced and used may be more important than which particular scheme is chosen. This is one conclusion of the Nordic workshop. Other conclusions are that there is a need for clinicians to be involved, a need to balance simplicity and low cost with scientific validity and credibility with clinicians, and a need for research into different schemes to discover their costs and benefits in healthcare.

  13. Metrics for the Evaluation the Utility of Air Quality Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo, T. M.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Global warming is expected to lead to higher levels of air pollution and therefore the forecasting of both long-term and daily air quality is an important component for the assessment of the costs of climate change and its impact on human health. Some of the risks associated with poor air quality days (where the Air Pollution Index is greater than 100), include hospital visits and mortality. Accurate air quality forecasting has the potential to allow sensitive groups to take appropriate precautions. This research builds metrics for evaluating the utility of air quality forecasting in terms of its potential impacts. Our analysis of air quality models focuses on the Washington, DC/Baltimore, MD region over the summertime ozone seasons between 2010 and 2012. The metrics that are relevant to our analysis include: (1) The number of times that a high ozone or particulate matter (PM) episode is correctly forecasted, (2) the number of times that high ozone or PM episode is forecasted when it does not occur and (3) the number of times when the air quality forecast predicts a cleaner air episode when the air was observed to have high ozone or PM. Our evaluation of the performance of air quality forecasts include those forecasts of ozone and particulate matter and data available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s AIRNOW. We also examined observational ozone and particulate matter data available from Clean Air Partners. Overall the forecast models perform well for our region and time interval.

  14. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic elements of…

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

    1999-01-01

    Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

  16. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J.; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  17. Verification procedure for the wavefront quality of the primary mirrors for the MRO interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Eric J.; Olivares, Andres; Schmell, Reed A.; Schmell, Rodney A.; Gartner, Darren; Jaramillo, Anthony; Romero, Kelly; Rael, Andres; Lewis, Jeff

    2009-08-01

    We present the verification procedure for the 1.4 meter primary mirrors of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer (MROI). Six mirrors are in mass production at Optical Surface Technologies (OST) in Albuquerque. The six identical parabolic mirrors will have a radius of curvature of 6300 mm and a final surface wavefront quality of 29 nm rms. The mirrors will be tested in a tower using a computer generated hologram, and the Intellium⢠H2000 interferometer from Engineering Synthesis Design, Inc. (ESDI). The mirror fabrication activities are currently in the early stage of polishing and have already delivered some promising results with the interferometer. A complex passive whiffle tree has been designed and fabricated by Advanced Mechanical and Optical Systems (AMOS, Belgium) that takes into account the gravity loading for an alt-alt mount. The final testing of the primary mirrors will be completed with the mirror cells that will be used in the telescopes. In addition we report on shear tests performed on the mirror cell pads on the back of the primary mirrors. These pads are glued to the mirror. The shear test has demonstrated that the glue can withstand at least 4.9 kilo Newton. This is within the requirements.

  18. Automating Data Abstraction in a Quality Improvement Platform for Surgical and Interventional Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Yetisgen, Meliha; Klassen, Prescott; Tarczy-Hornoch, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This paper describes a text processing system designed to automate the manual data abstraction process in a quality improvement (QI) program. The Surgical Care and Outcomes Assessment Program (SCOAP) is a clinician-led, statewide performance benchmarking QI platform for surgical and interventional procedures. The data elements abstracted as part of this program cover a wide range of clinical information from patient medical history to details of surgical interventions. Methods: Statistical and rule-based extractors were developed to automatically abstract data elements. A preprocessing pipeline was created to chunk free-text notes into its sections, sentences, and tokens. The information extracted in this preprocessing step was used by the statistical and rule-based extractors as features. Findings: Performance results for 25 extractors (14 statistical, 11 rule based) are presented. The average f1-scores for 11 rule-based extractors and 14 statistical extractors are 0.785 (min=0.576,max=0.931,std-dev=0.113) and 0.812 (min=0.571,max=0.993,std-dev=0.135) respectively. Discussion: Our error analysis revealed that most extraction errors were due either to data imbalance in the data set or the way the gold standard had been created. Conclusion: As future work, more experiments will be conducted with a more comprehensive data set from multiple institutions contributing to the QI project. PMID:25848598

  19. On Quality Control Procedures Being Adopted for TRMM LBA and KWAJEX Soundings Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, B.; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) held in Amazonia (Brazil) in the period January- February, 1999, and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) held in the Republic of Marshall Islands in the period between August-September, 1999, extensive radiosonde observations (raob) were collected using VIZ and Vaisala sondes which have different response characteristics. In all, 320 raob for LBA and 972 fixed raob for KWAJEX have been obtained and are being processed. Most atmospheric sensible heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) budget studies are based on sounding data, and the accuracy of the raob is important especially in regions of deep moist convection. A data quality control (QC) project has been initiated at GSFC by the principal investigator (JBH), and this paper addresses some of the quantitative findings for the level I and II QC procedures. Based on these quantitative assessment of sensor (or system) biases associated with each type of sonde, the initial data repair work will be started. Evidence of moisture biases between the two different sondes (VIZ and Vaisala) has been shown earlier by Halverson et al. (2000). Vaisala humidity sensors are found to have a low-level dry bias in the boundary layer, whereas above 600 mb the VIZ sensor tends to register a dryer atmosphere. All raob data were subjected to a limit check based on an algorithm already well tested for the raob data obtained during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA-COARE).

  20. A Functional-Analytic Model of Analogy Using the Relational Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ian; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Roche, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is conceptualized by Relational Frame Theory as responding in accordance with an equivalence relation between equivalence or other types of derived stimulus relations. The purpose of this study was to provide an empirical demonstration of analogy using the Relational Evaluation Procedure (REP), a recently developed technique…

  1. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  2. An Evaluation of Patron Perceptions of Library Space Using the Role Repertory Grid Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potthoff, Joy K.; Weis, David L.; Montanelli, Dale S.; Murbach, Matthew M.

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the Role Repertory Grid Procedure, a technique derived from personal construct theory, for its practicality and validity as a way of gathering patron perceptions about the effectiveness and efficiency of academic library space. Concludes that further research regarding validity and reliability is needed. (Author/LRW)

  3. EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Evaluation of Environmental Hazard Assessment Procedures for Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (Abstract). To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the the Australasian Society of Ecotoxicology, July 2004, Gold Coast, Australia. 1 p. (ERL,GB R98...

  4. 48 CFR 1552.215-70 - EPA source evaluation and selection procedures-negotiated procurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... selection procedures-negotiated procurements. 1552.215-70 Section 1552.215-70 Federal Acquisition...—negotiated procurements. As prescribed in 1515.209(a), insert the following provision: EPA Source Evaluation and Selection Procedures—Negotiated Procurements (AUG 1999) (a) The Government will perform...

  5. Evaluation of the California Youth Authority Ward Grievance Procedure. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EMT Associates, Inc., Sacramento, CA.

    This document presents the findings and recommendations of the evaluation of the California Department of the Youth Authority Ward Grievance Procedure (WGP), which is a four-tiered conflict resolution system for wards in California institutions and camps. The information contained in this report was obtained through site visits to five…

  6. Evaluation of the Cloze Procedure as a Teaching Device for Improving Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Billie Jean

    This study evaluated the effect of the cloze procedure in the development of comprehension, vocabulary, and speed of reading by comparing the scores on the Cooperative English Tests; Reading Comprehension of a group receiving cloze reading comprehension exercises, a group receiving conventional reading comprehension exercises, and a group…

  7. Manual of Procedures for Evaluation Visits under Standards for Accreditation, 1972. Revised 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Library Association, Chicago, IL. Committee on Accreditation.

    This fully revised manual of procedures for evaluation visits presents guidelines for site visits to library schools seeking accreditation for their programs of study. Visits to such schools provide the Committee on Accreditation with data to assist in reaching a judgment whether to grant accredited status. The area of responsibility for the…

  8. Novel test procedure to evaluate the treatability of wastewater with ozone.

    PubMed

    Schindler Wildhaber, Yael; Mestankova, Hana; Schärer, Michael; Schirmer, Kristin; Salhi, Elisabeth; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-05-15

    Organic micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, estrogens or pesticides enter the environment continuously through the effluent of municipal wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs). Enhanced treatment of wastewater (WW) by ozone (O3) is probably one of the simplest measures for abatement of organic micropollutants to avoid their discharge to the aquatic environment. During ozonation most organic micropollutants present in treated WW are oxidized either by a direct reaction with O3 or by secondarily formed hydroxyl radicals (OH). However, undesired oxidation by-products from the oxidative transformation of matrix components can also be formed. A modular laboratory decision tool based on the findings of previous investigations is presented to test the feasibility of ozonation as an option to upgrade specific WWTPs. These modules consist of investigations to assess (i) the matrix effects on ozone stability, (ii) the efficiency of micropollutant removal, (iii) the oxidation by-product formation, as well as (iv) bioassays to measure specific and unspecific toxicity of the treated WWs. Matrix effects on ozone stability (quantified as O3 and OH exposures) can give first indications on the suitability of an ozonation step. Ozonation of WWs yielding O3 and OH exposures and micropollutant abatement similar to reference values evoked a significant improvement of the water quality as indicated by a broad range of bioassays. Irregular behavior of the ozonation points towards unknown compounds, possibly leading to the formation of undesired degradation products. It has been observed that in such WWs ozonation partly enhanced toxicity. In summary, the presented tiered laboratory test procedure represents a relatively cheap and straight-forward methodology to evaluate the feasibility of ozonation to upgrade specific WWTPs for micropollutant removal based on chemical and biological measurements. PMID:25827671

  9. Evaluating the sound quality of reproduction systems and performance spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griesinger, David

    2003-10-01

    Evaluation of sound reproduction systems through rapid A/B tests has led to enormous and rapid progress in system design. The sound quality of performance spaces is almost always evaluated through long term listening, and spaces are compared through remembered characteristics. Progress has not been rapid. This paper will present methods for rapid A/B comparisons of spaces and will demonstrate the results of such comparisons. The results can be very different from remembered impressions.

  10. Application of a 3D volumetric display for radiation therapy treatment planning I: quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Kirk, Michael Collins; Napoli, Josh; Stutsman, Sandy; Zusag, Tom; Khelashvili, Gocha; Chu, James

    2009-07-17

    To design and implement a set of quality assurance tests for an innovative 3D volumetric display for radiation treatment planning applications. A genuine 3D display (Perspecta Spatial 3D, Actuality-Systems Inc., Bedford, MA) has been integrated with the Pinnacle TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Madison WI), for treatment planning. The Perspecta 3D display renders a 25 cm diameter volume that is viewable from any side, floating within a translucent dome. In addition to displaying all 3D data exported from Pinnacle, the system provides a 3D mouse to define beam angles and apertures and to measure distance. The focus of this work is the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for 3D displays and specific 3D planning issues as guided by AAPM Task Group Report 53. A series of acceptance and quality assurance tests have been designed to evaluate the accuracy of CT images, contours, beams, and dose distributions as displayed on Perspecta. Three-dimensional matrices, rulers and phantoms with known spatial dimensions were used to check Perspecta's absolute spatial accuracy. In addition, a system of tests was designed to confirm Perspecta's ability to import and display Pinnacle data consistently. CT scans of phantoms were used to confirm beam field size, divergence, and gantry and couch angular accuracy as displayed on Perspecta. Beam angles were verified through Cartesian coordinate system measurements and by CT scans of phantoms rotated at known angles. Beams designed on Perspecta were exported to Pinnacle and checked for accuracy. Dose at sampled points were checked for consistency with Pinnacle and agreed within 1% or 1 mm. All data exported from Pinnacle to Perspecta was displayed consistently. The 3D spatial display of images, contours, and dose distributions were consistent with Pinnacle display. When measured by the 3D ruler, the distances between any two points calculated using Perspecta agreed with Pinnacle within the measurement error.

  11. Impact Evaluation from Quality Assurance Agencies' Perspectives: Methodological Approaches, Experiences and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajaste, Matti; Prades, Anna; Scheuthle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the main objective of external quality assurance (EQA) procedures to assure and improve the quality of higher education institutions and its provisions, the paper examines expected impacts of EQA procedures on institutions from the perspectives of three European quality assurance agencies. First, the paper examines the expected…

  12. Personnel exposure from flood phantoms and point sources during quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    La Fontaine, R; Graham, L S; Behrendt, D; Greenwell, K

    1983-07-01

    Nuclear medicine technologists routinely use flood phantoms containing 5 to 10 mCi (185-370 MBq) of Tc-99m to perform quality assurance tests on scintillation cameras. This paper presents the results of a study that measured the radiation exposure received by three individuals from a Tc-99m flood phantom during the daily performance of flood-field uniformity tests on three scintillation cameras. The extrapolated annual personnel exposure to the anterior trunk and the back of the hand were 172 mR and 220 mR, respectively. Additional measurements indicate that personnel performing these tests with a 10-mCi Co-57 flood disk source or a 200-muCi point source would receive approximately 25% and 1%, respectively, of the exposure from a 10-mCi Tc-99m flood phantom. These exposure levels should be considered when evaluating personnel radiation exposure in a nuclear medicine clinic.

  13. An NCME Instructional Module on Quality Control Procedures in the Scoring, Equating, and Reporting of Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allalouf, Avi

    2007-01-01

    There is significant potential for error in long production processes that consist of sequential stages, each of which is heavily dependent on the previous stage, such as the SER (Scoring, Equating, and Reporting) process. Quality control procedures are required in order to monitor this process and to reduce the number of mistakes to a minimum. In…

  14. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  15. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  16. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  17. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  18. 42 CFR 457.495 - State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... appropriateness of care provided under the plan, including how the State will assure: (a) Access to well-baby care... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false State assurance of access to care and procedures to assure quality and appropriateness of care. 457.495 Section 457.495 Public Health CENTERS FOR...

  19. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  20. Evaluation of spiking procedures for the introduction of poorly water soluble contaminants into soil

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, B.J.; Northcott, G.L.; Jones, K.C.; Semple, K.T.

    1998-10-15

    There is currently considerable interest in the fate and behavior of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) within the soil environment. Processes such as sorption, desorption, subsurface transport, and biodegradation have been the focus of much attention. The purpose of this study was to assess the suitability of various spiking procedures for the introduction of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) into soil environments. {sup 14}C-radiolabeled analogues of two representative polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), phenanthrene (Phe), and benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), were introduced into soil using different spiking techniques, and the homogeneity of compound distribution in subsamples was assessed. It was established that under analogous spiking procedures dry soil could be spiked with greater homogeneity than wet soil. The procedure which gave the most homogeneous distribution of compound involved a single spiking/rehydration operation conducted on dry soil. Relative standard deviations of 2.40% for {sup 14}C-9-Phe and 3.65% for {sup 14}C-7-B[a]P were obtained for this procedure. An optimum procedure for the spiking of wet soil was established, giving relative standard deviations of 4.1% for {sup 14}C-9-Phe and 3.7% for {sup 14}C-7-B[a]P. This procedure employed a highly spiked wet soil inoculum to distribute the compound throughout the soil system. The influence of carrier solvent on microbial cell numbers determined as colony forming units was also evaluated and shown to have a dramatic negative impact at high volumes.

  1. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  2. Weld quality evaluation using a high temperature SQUID array

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, D. D.; Espy, M. A.; Kraus, Robert H., Jr.; Matlachov, A. N.; Lamb, J. S.

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents preliminary data for evaluating weld quality using high temperature SQUIDS. The SQUIDS are integrated into an instrument known as the SQUID Array Microscope, or SAMi. The array consists of ll SQUIDs evenly distributed over an 8.25 mm baseline. Welds are detected using SAMi by using an on board coil to induce eddy currents in a conducting sample and measuring the resulting magnetic fields. The concept is that the induced magnetic fields will differ in parts of varying weld quality. The data presented here was collected from three stainless steel parts using SAMi. Each part was either solid, included a good weld, or included a bad weld. The induced magnetic field's magnitude and phase relative to the induction signal were measured. For each sample considered, both the magnitude and phase data were measurably different than the other two samples. These results indicate that it is possible to use SAMi to evaluate weld quality.

  3. Evaluating Quality in Associate Degree Culinary Arts Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzman, Jean; Ackerman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine which categories and indicators of quality are best suited to evaluating associate degree culinary arts programs (ADCAP). Design/methodology/approach: The researchers surveyed a national sample of culinary educators and industry chefs in the USA. The instrument asked the participants to rate the…

  4. A General Framework for the Evaluation of Clinical Trial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.; Alperson, Sunny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Flawed evaluation of clinical trial quality allows flawed trials to thrive (get funded, obtain IRB approval, get published, serve as the basis of regulatory approval, and set policy). A reasonable evaluation of clinical trial quality must recognize that any one of a large number of potential biases could by itself completely invalidate the trial results. In addition, clever new ways to distort trial results toward a favored outcome may be devised at any time. Finally, the vested financial and other interests of those conducting the experiments and publishing the reports must cast suspicion on any inadequately reported aspect of clinical trial quality. Putting these ideas together, we see that an adequate evaluation of clinical quality would need to enumerate all known biases, update this list periodically, score the trial with regard to each potential bias on a scale of 0% to 100%, offer partial credit for only that which can be substantiated, and then multiply (not add) the component scores to obtain an overall score between 0% and 100%. We will demonstrate that current evaluations fall well short of these ideals. PMID:19463104

  5. EPA Research Evaluating CAFO Impacts on Ground Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of several projects will be presented on a research program currently underway at ORD’s Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) to evaluate CAFO impacts on ground water quality. The overall research objectives are to characterize the potential for gro...

  6. Evaluating Service Quality in Universities: A Service Department Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gareth; Smith, Alison; Clarke, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to report on an in-depth exploration of service quality in an Information Technology service department in a Higher Education Institute (HEI) and to evaluate the instrument used. Design/methodology/approach: The study surveys customers using the SERVQUAL instrument, which is one of the most widely used and…

  7. Sensory and quality evaluation of selected citrus hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly consumers are becoming more sophisticated in their demand for diversity of products, greater health potential and good eating quality. The evaluation of a population of mandarin citrus (Citrus reticulata) and mandarin hybrids, was initiated in 2006-2007 with the goal of establishing bas...

  8. Airborne Ultrasonics for Nondestructive Evaluation of Leather Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent research has shown that besides Acoustic Emission (AE), Airborne Ultrasonics (AU) can also be applied for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of leather quality. Implementation of these methods in the manufacturing process could save a considerable amount of money, decrease the use of ch...

  9. Ensuring Data Quality in Extension Research and Evaluation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radhakrishna, Rama; Tobin, Daniel; Brennan, Mark; Thomson, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a checklist as a guide for Extension professionals to use in research and evaluation studies they carry out. A total of 40 statements grouped under eight data quality components--relevance, objectivity, validity, reliability, integrity, generalizability, completeness, and utility--are identified to ensure that research…

  10. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  11. Evaluation of quality of life related to nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta; Castelló-Botia, Isabel; Guardiola-Wanden-Berghe, Rocio

    2009-04-01

    The way in which the quality of life related to health (HRQoL) is affected by the nutritional status of the patient is a subject of constant interest and permanent debate. The purpose of the present paper is to review those studies that relate HRQoL to nutritional status and examine the tools (questionnaires) that they use to investigate this relationship. A critical review of published studies was carried out via an investigation of the following databases: MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE; The Cochrane Library; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS); Spanish Health Sciences Bibliographic Index (IBECS). The search was carried out from the earliest date possible until July 2007.The medical subject heading terms used were 'quality of life', 'nutritional status' and 'questionnaires'. The articles had to contain at least one questionnaire that evaluated quality of life. Twenty-eight documents fulfilling the inclusion criteria were accepted, although none of them used a specific questionnaire to evaluate HRQoL related to nutritional status. However, some of them used a combination of generic questionnaires with the intention of evaluating the same. Only three studies selectively addressed the relationship between nutritional status and quality of life, this evaluation being performed not by means of specific questionnaires but by statistical analysis of data obtained via validated questionnaires.

  12. Evaluating the service quality of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan--using quality function deployment.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2004-05-01

    This study applies quality function deployment (QFD) techniques to evaluate the quality of service of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan from the perspective of nursing students. Survey data from 560 undergraduate nursing students at four Taiwanese universities were subjected to QFD analysis in order to identify the quality characteristics most highly valued by students, the elements of educational service they consider most important and least important, and relationships/discrepancies between student quality requirements and institutional service elements. Results show that students value traditional elements of nursing education - clinical practice and lectures - more highly than recent additions such as computer-aided instruction and multimedia teaching. Results also show that students are looking for quality primarily in the area of faculty characteristics. The implication is that institutions which provide nursing education should not neglect the importance of investing in faculty when they are seeking to upgrade the quality of their programs. Further QFD studies are recommended to evaluate the quality of nursing education from the perspective of preceptors and nurses who help to train students in clinical settings.

  13. Evaluating the service quality of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan--using quality function deployment.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shieu-Ming

    2004-05-01

    This study applies quality function deployment (QFD) techniques to evaluate the quality of service of undergraduate nursing education in Taiwan from the perspective of nursing students. Survey data from 560 undergraduate nursing students at four Taiwanese universities were subjected to QFD analysis in order to identify the quality characteristics most highly valued by students, the elements of educational service they consider most important and least important, and relationships/discrepancies between student quality requirements and institutional service elements. Results show that students value traditional elements of nursing education - clinical practice and lectures - more highly than recent additions such as computer-aided instruction and multimedia teaching. Results also show that students are looking for quality primarily in the area of faculty characteristics. The implication is that institutions which provide nursing education should not neglect the importance of investing in faculty when they are seeking to upgrade the quality of their programs. Further QFD studies are recommended to evaluate the quality of nursing education from the perspective of preceptors and nurses who help to train students in clinical settings. PMID:15110441

  14. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  15. Non invasive evaluation of cardiomechanics in patients undergoing MitrClip procedure

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In the last recent years a new percutaneous procedure, the MitraClip, has been validated for the treatment of mitral regurgitation. MitraClip procedure is a promising alternative for patients unsuitable for surgery as it reduces the risk of death related to surgery ensuring a similar result. Few data are present in literature about the variation of hemodynamic parameters and ventricular coupling after Mitraclip implantation. Methods Hemodynamic data of 18 patients enrolled for MitraClip procedure were retrospectively reviewed and analyzed. Echocardiographic measurements were obtained the day before the procedure (T0) and 21 ± 3 days after the procedure (T1), including evaluation of Ejection Fraction, mitral valve regurgitation severity and mechanism, forward Stroke Volume, left atrial volume, estimated systolic pulmonary pressure, non invasive echocardiographic estimation of single beat ventricular elastance (Es(sb)), arterial elastance (Ea) measured as systolic pressure • 0.9/ Stroke Volume, ventricular arterial coupling (Ea/Es(sb) ratio). Data were expressed as median and interquartile range. Measures obtained before and after the procedure were compared using Wilcoxon non parametric test for paired samples. Results Mitraclip procedure was effective in reducing regurgitation. We observed an amelioration of echocardiographic parameters with a reduction of estimated systolic pulmonary pressure (45 to 37,5 p = 0,0002) and left atrial volume (110 to 93 p = 0,0001). Despite a few cases decreasing in ejection fraction (37 to 35 p = 0,035), the maintained ventricular arterial coupling after the procedure (P = 0,67) was associated with an increasing in forward stroke volume (60,3 to 78 p = 0,05). Conclusion MitraClip is effective in reducing mitral valve regurgitation and determines an amelioration of hemodynamic parameters with preservation of ventricular arterial coupling. PMID:23642140

  16. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio; Phase II, Evaluation of 1984 field and laboratory quality-assurance practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Childress, C.J.; Chaney, T.M.; Myers, Donna; Norris, J.M.; Hren, Janet

    1987-01-01

    Serious questions have been raised by Congress about the usefulness of water quality data for addressing issues of regional and national scope and, especially, for characterizing the current quality of the Nation 's streams and groundwater. In response, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to: (1) determine the characteristics of current (1984) water quality data collection activities of Federal, regional, State, and local agencies, and academic institutions; and (2) determine how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve the ability to answer major broad scope questions, such as: what are (or were) natural or near-natural water quality conditions; what are existing water quality conditions; and, how water quality has changed and how the changes relate to human activities. Colorado and Ohio were chosen for the pilot study largely because they represent regions with different types of water quality concerns and programs. The study has been divided into three phases, the objectives of which are: Phase I - Inventory water quality data collection programs, including costs, and identify those programs that met a set of broad criteria for producing data that are potentially appropriate for water quality assessments of regional and national scope. Phase II - Evaluate the quality assurance of field and laboratory procedures used in producing the data from programs that met the broad criteria of Phase I. Phase III - Compile the qualifying data and evaluate the adequacy of this data base for addressing selected water quality questions of regional and national scope. (Author 's abstract)

  17. Clinically evaluated procedure for the reconstruction of vocal fold vibrations from endoscopic digital high-speed videos.

    PubMed

    Lohscheller, Jörg; Toy, Hikmet; Rosanowski, Frank; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Döllinger, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Investigation of voice disorders requires the examination of vocal fold vibrations. State of the art is the recording of endoscopic high-speed movies which capture vocal fold vibrations in real-time. It enables investigating the interrelation between disturbances of vocal fold vibrations and voice disorders. However, the lack of clinical studies and of a standardized procedure to reconstruct vocal fold vibrations from high-speed videos constrain the clinical acceptance of the high-speed technique. An image processing approach is presented that extracts the vibrating vocal fold edges from digital high-speed movies. The initial segmentation is principally based on a seeded region-growing algorithm. Even in movies with low image quality the algorithm segments successfully the glottal area by an introduced two-dimensional threshold matrix. Following segmentation, the vocal fold edges are reconstructed from the computed time-varying glottal area. The performance of the procedure was objectively evaluated within a study comprising 372 high-speed recordings. The accuracy of vocal fold reconstruction exceeds manual segmentation results obtained by clinical experts. The algorithm reaches an information flow-rate of up to 98 images per second. The robustness and high accuracy of the procedure makes it suitable for the application in clinical routine. It enables an objective and highly accurate description of vocal fold vibrations which is essential to realize extensive clinical studies which focus on the classification of voice disorders.

  18. Intra- and inter-examiner variability in evaluating preclinical pediatric dentistry operative procedures.

    PubMed

    Sharaf, Aly A; AbdelAziz, Amr M; El Meligy, Omar A S

    2007-04-01

    Many investigators have reported attempts to develop reliable laboratory and clinic evaluation systems. However, few studies, regardless of level of success, have used an analytic procedure to identify those components of the evaluation system that, if refined further, could improve reliability. The purpose of this study was to compare intra- and inter-examiner variability in two evaluation methods: glance and grade (global), and checklist and criteria (analytical). Three faculty staff members with more than ten years of clinical and teaching experience evaluated operative procedures performed on plastic teeth representing the primary teeth by thirty dental students in pediatric dentistry preclinical laboratory sessions. The preparations were graded blindly by each of the three evaluators (A, B, and C) three times without magnification. The values were statistically analyzed using Wilcoxon signed rank test and Friedman test setting value of significance at 5 percent. The study revealed that, among the three examiners, the intra-examiner variability was nonsignificant in most situations. On the other hand, there was statistically significant variability between evaluators (i.e., inter-examiner) for almost all preparations. Neither cutting off the scores nor using either evaluation method (glance and grade or criteria and checklist) caused an improvement in variability. The problem of inter-examiner reliability and variability still existed.

  19. Evaluating Library Buildings: Principles and Procedures for Post-Occupancy Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    This manual provides the steps in planning a post-occupancy evaluation of library facilities to determine how effective the designed environment is for users. Evaluating a building provides a feedback loop to the planning process and can help fine tune the building or help others. The first actions of the planners are to clarify the purpose; gain…

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  2. Objective evaluation method of steering comfort based on movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yiyong; Liu, Yahui; Wang, Man; Ji, Run; Ji, Xuewu

    2014-09-01

    The existing research of steering comfort mainly focuses on the subjective evaluation, aiming at designing and optimizing the steering system. In the development of steering system, especially the evaluation of steering comfort, the objective evaluation methods considered the kinematic characteristics of driver steering maneuver are not proposed, which means that the objective evaluation of steering cannot be conducted with the evaluation of kinematic characteristics of driver in steering maneuver. In order to propose the objective evaluation methods of steering comfort, the evaluation of steering movement quality of driver is developed on the basis of the study of the kinematic characteristics of steering maneuver. First, the steering motion trajectories of the driver in both comfortable and certain extreme uncomfortable operation conditions are detected using the Vicon motion capture system. The operation conditions are under the restrictions of the vertical height and horizontal distance between steering wheel center and the H-point of driver, and the steering resisting torque else. Next, the movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver is assessed using twelve kinds of evaluation indices based on the kinematic analyses of the steering motion trajectories to propose an objective evaluation method. Finally, an integrated discomfort index of steering maneuver is proposed on the basis of the regression analysis of subjective evaluation rating and the movement quality evaluation indices, including the Jerk, Discomfort and Joint Torque indices. The test results show that the proposed integrated discomfort index gives a good fitting with the subjective evaluation of discomfort, which means it can be used to evaluate or predict the discomfort level of steering maneuver. This paper proposes an objective evaluation method of steering comfort based on the movement quality evaluation of driver steering maneuver.

  3. Tools used for evaluation of Brazilian children's quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Souza, João Gabriel S.; Pamponet, Marcela Antunes; Souza, Tamirys Caroline S.; Pereira, Alessandra Ribeiro; Souza, Andrey George S.; Martins, Andréa Maria E. de B. L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the available tools to evaluate children's quality of life validated for Brazilian language and culture. DATA SOURCES: Search of scientific articles in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases using the combination of descriptors "quality of life", "child" and "questionnaires" in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Among the tools designed to assess children's quality of life validated for the Brazilian language and culture, the Auto questionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé (AUQEI), the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL(tm)) version 4.0 and the Kidscreen-52 are highlighted. Some tools do not include all range of ages and some lack domains that are currently considered relevant in the context of childhood, such as bullying. Moreover, due to the cultural diversity of Brazil, it may be necessary to adapt some instruments or to validate other tools. CONCLUSIONS: There are validated instruments to evaluate children's quality of life in Brazil. However, the validation or the adaptation of other international tools have to be considered in order to overcome current deficiencies. PMID:25119761

  4. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for Space Habitat Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. B.; Twyford, E.; Conlee, C. S.; Litaker, H. L.; Solemn, J. A.; Holden

    2007-01-01

    Currently, International Space Station (ISS) crews use a laptop computer to display procedures for performing onboard maintenance tasks. This approach has been determined to be suboptimal. A heuristic evaluation and two studies have been completed to test commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) "near-eye" heads up displays (HUDs) for support of these types of maintenance tasks. In both studies, subjects worked through electronic procedures to perform simple maintenance tasks. As a result of the Phase I study, three HUDs were down-selected to one. In the Phase II study, the HUD was compared against two other electronic display devices - a laptop computer and an e-book reader. Results suggested that adjustability and stability of the HUD display were the most significant acceptability factors to consider for near-eye displays. The Phase II study uncovered a number of advantages and disadvantages of the HUD relative to the laptop and e-book reader for interacting with electronic procedures.

  5. A quantitative method for visual phantom image quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Dev P.; Liu, Xiong; O'Shea, Michael; Toto, Lawrence C.

    2000-04-01

    This work presents an image quality evaluation technique for uniform-background target-object phantom images. The Degradation-Comparison-Threshold (DCT) method involves degrading the image quality of a target-containing region with a blocking processing and comparing the resulting image to a similarly degraded target-free region. The threshold degradation needed for 92% correct detection of the target region is the image quality measure of the target. Images of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammography accreditation program phantom were acquired under varying x-ray conditions on a digital mammography machine. Five observers performed ACR and DCT evaluations of the images. A figure-of-merit (FOM) of an evaluation method was defined which takes into account measurement noise and the change of the measure as a function of x-ray exposure to the phantom. The FOM of the DCT method was 4.1 times that of the ACR method for the specks, 2.7 times better for the fibers and 1.4 times better for the masses. For the specks, inter-reader correlations on the same image set increased significantly from 87% for the ACR method to 97% for the DCT method. The viewing time per target for the DCT method was 3 - 5 minutes. The observed greater sensitivity of the DCT method could lead to more precise Quality Control (QC) testing of digital images, which should improve the sensitivity of the QC process to genuine image quality variations. Another benefit of the method is that it can measure the image quality of high detectability target objects, which is impractical by existing methods.

  6. Scientific evaluation and pricing of medical devices and associated procedures in France.

    PubMed

    Gilard, Martine; Debroucker, Frederique; Dubray, Claude; Allioux, Yves; Aper, Eliane; Barat-Leonhardt, Valérie; Brami, Michèle; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Coqueblin, Claire; Fare, Sandrine; Giri, Isabelle; Goehrs, Jean-Marie; Levesque, Karine; Maugendre, Philippe; Parquin, François; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Szwarcensztein, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices are many and various, ranging from tongue spatulas to implantable or invasive devices and imaging machines; their lifetimes are short, between 18 months and 5 years, due to incessant incremental innovation; and they are operator-dependent: in general, the clinical user performs a fitting procedure (hip implant or pacemaker), a therapeutic procedure using a non-implantable invasive device (arrhythmic site ablation probe, angioplasty balloon, extension spondyloplasty system, etc.) or follow-up of an active implanted device (long-term follow-up of an implanted cardiac defibrillator or of a deep brain stimulator in Parkinson's patients). A round-table held during the XXVIII(th) Giens Workshops meeting focused on the methodology of scientific evaluation of medical devices and the associated procedures with a view to their pricing and financing by the French National Health Insurance system. The working hypothesis was that the available data-set was sufficient for and compatible with scientific evaluation with clinical benefit. Post-registration studies, although contributing to the continuity of assessment, were not dealt with. Moreover, the focus was restricted to devices used in health establishments, where the association between devices and technical medical procedures is optimally representative. An update of the multiple regulatory protocols governing medical devices and procedures is provided. Issues more specifically related to procedures as such, to non-implantable devices and to innovative devices are then dealt with, and the proposals and discussion points raised at the round-table for each of these three areas are presented.

  7. Does post-identification feedback affect evaluations of eyewitness testimony and identification procedures?

    PubMed

    Douglass, Amy Bradfield; Neuschatz, Jeffrey S; Imrich, Jennifer; Wilkinson, Miranda

    2010-08-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test whether post-identification feedback affects evaluations of eyewitnesses. In Experiment 1 (N = 156), evaluators viewed eyewitness testimony. They evaluated witnesses who received confirming post-identification feedback as more accurate and more confident, among other judgments, compared with witnesses who received disconfirming post-identification feedback or no feedback. This pattern persisted regardless of whether the witness's confidence statement was included in the testimony. In Experiment 2 (N = 161), witness evaluators viewed the actual identification procedure in which feedback was delivered. Instructions to disregard the feedback were manipulated. Again, witnesses who received confirming feedback were assessed more positively. This pattern occurred even when witness evaluators received instructions to disregard the feedback. These experiments are the first to confirm researchers' assumptions that feedback effects on witnesses translate to changes in judgments of those witnesses. PMID:19585229

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  9. Modified application of HS-SPME for quality evaluation of essential oil plant materials.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Szewczyk, Joanna; Dybowski, Michal P

    2016-01-01

    The main limitation in the standard application of head space analysis employing solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME) for the evaluation of plants as sources of essential oils (EOs) are different quantitative relations of EO components from those obtained by direct analysis of EO which was got in the steam distillation (SD) process from the same plant (EO/SD). The results presented in the paper for thyme, mint, sage, basil, savory, and marjoram prove that the quantitative relations of EO components established by HS-SPME procedure and direct analysis of EO/SD are similar when the plant material in the HS-SPME process is replaced by its suspension in oil of the same physicochemical character as that of SPME fiber coating. The observed differences in the thyme EO composition estimated by both procedures are insignificant (F(exp)procedure, the application of the new HS-SPME procedure proposed in this paper substantially shortens the evaluation time of plant material quality and thus may improve the efficiency of analytical laboratories. PMID:26695252

  10. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure.

  11. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement.

  12. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement. PMID:15070450

  13. Evaluation of Early and Intermediate Outcomes of Cryo-MazeProcedure for Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Yaghoubi, Alireza; Rostamzadeh, Mohsen; Pezeshkian, Masoud; Parvizi, Rezayat; Imani, Shahin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained cardiac arrhythmia in patients with mitral valve disease affecting 50% of patients undergoing mitral valve surgery, contributing to increased risks of systemic embolization, anticoagulant- related hemorrhage and mortality. The maze procedure is an effective way to treat AF. Over the last several years, cryoablation was substituted for atrial incision in many reports to simplify the maze procedure. However, few studies have been carried out to evaluate the results of cryoablation surgery. In the present study we evaluated the results of this procedure. Methods: In this cross sectional study, 47 AF patients were treated with Cryo-Maze surgery method. Rhythm assessment using electrocardiographic and echocardiographic survey was performed in all patients before surgery, during the patients’ hospital stay, on discharge and after six months. Results: Survival rate of the studied patients at six months was 93.6%. Sinus rhythm restoration rate in Cryo-Maze patients was 72.1% on discharge and 76.7% six months after their operation. Conclusion: The present study revealed that Cryo-Maze procedure is an effective and safe therapeutic modality in AF while normal sinus rhythm can be achieved in patients following this intervention. PMID:24251012

  14. Proceduralism and its role in economic evaluation and priority setting in health.

    PubMed

    Jan, Stephen

    2014-05-01

    This paper provides a critical overview of Gavin Mooney's proceduralist approach to economic evaluation and priority setting in health. Proceduralism is the notion that the social value attached to alternative courses of action should be determined not only by outcomes, but also processes. Mooney's brand of proceduralism was unique and couched within a broader critique of 'neo-liberal' economics. It operated on a number of levels. At the micro level of the individual program, he pioneered the notion that 'process utility' could be valued and measured within economic evaluation. At a macro level, he developed a framework in which the social objective of equity was defined by procedural justice in which communitarian values were used as the basis for judging how resources should be allocated across the health system. Finally, he applied the notion of procedural justice to further our understanding of the political economy of resource allocation; highlighting how fairness in decision making processes can overcome the sometimes intractable zero-sum resource allocation problem. In summary, his contributions to this field have set the stage for innovative programs of research to help in developing health policies and programs that are both in alignment with community values and implementable. PMID:24647102

  15. Criteria for the Evaluation of Quality Improvement Programs and the Use of Quality Improvement Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides a set of criteria to be used by psychologists in evaluating quality improvement programs (QIPs) that have been promulgated by health care organizations, government agencies, professional associations, or other entities. These criteria also address the privacy and confidentiality issues evoked by the intended use of patient…

  16. Survival and quality of life after portal blood flow preserving procedures in patients with portal hypertension and liver cirrhosis.

    PubMed

    Orozco, H; Mercado, M A; Takahashi, T; Rojas, G; Hernández, J; Tielve, M

    1994-07-01

    Between 1979 and 1991, 156 patients with histologically proven liver cirrhosis, good liver function, and bleeding portal hypertension underwent operation with portal blood flow preserving procedures (selective shunts: 101; Sugiura-Futagawa: 55). Long-term results of the procedures and the quality of life of the 145 patients who survived the operation were studied. During the observation period (range 3 to 156 months), 28 patients died. The main causes of death were liver failure and hepatoma. Twenty-three patients were lost for follow-up. Twenty-six patients (18%) developed 1 or more encephalopathic episodes. Four patients (3%) experienced rebleeding. One hundred eight patients (74%) had a good quality of life, and 26 (18%) had a poor quality of life. Eleven (15%) of 73 patients with a history of alcoholism continued drinking. Five-year survival for the selective shunt group was 81% and for the devascularization group was 83%. In 81% of the patients, portal blood flow was maintained. It is concluded that both procedures are effective in the long-term. Most patients are able to rehabilitate from the use of alcohol, and most of them have a good quality of life. For patients with good liver function (whose main problem is bleeding), surgery is the best choice of treatment. PMID:8024091

  17. Overview of quality in cardiovascular imaging and procedures for clinicians: focus on appropriate-use-criteria guidelines.

    PubMed

    Stainback, Raymond F

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging and procedures have experienced exponential growth over the past 20 years in terms of new modalities, procedure volume, technological sophistication, and cost. As a result, related quality improvement tools have become multifaceted works in progress. This article briefly summarizes the evolution of the time-honored American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association clinical practice guidelines versus the newer American College of Cardiology Foundation appropriate-use-criteria guidelines and how these may interact with emerging performance measures, clinical data registries, and cardiovascular laboratory accreditation initiatives.

  18. A prospective quality evaluation of single donor platelets (SDP) - an experience of a tertiary healthcare center in India.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Prashant; Tiwari, Aseem Kumar; Sharma, Jyoti; Singh, Mukesh Bikram; Dixit, Surbhi; Raina, Vimarsh

    2012-04-01

    Quality assurance of single donor platelets (SDP) is incomplete unless clinical response to platelet transfusion is measured. The primary objective of the study was to evaluate the quality of SDP derived from plateletpheresis procedures and to evaluate the response to platelet transfusion. Procedures were performed on 2287 accepted donors while 271 donors were deferred. Platelet count <1.5 lac/μl and hemoglobin <12.5 g/dl were the leading cause of deferral. The median platelet yield in a SDP bag was found to be 3.1×10(11). The median corrected count increment (CCI) and post-transfusion platelet recovery (PPR) were found to be 10110×m(2)/μl and 24.5%, respectively. In India, the criteria for the selection of plateletpheresis donors should be revisited. Based on quality parameters, the Fresenius COM.TEC cell separator is comparable to other cell separators.

  19. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  20. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  1. Landing flying qualities evaluation criteria for augmented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, R. C.; Smith, R.; Bailey, R.

    1980-01-01

    The criteria evaluated were: Calspan Neal-Smith; Onstott (Northrop Time Domain); McDonnell-Douglas Equivalent System Approach; R. H. Smith Criterion. Each criterion was applied to the same set of longitudinal approach and landing flying qualities data. A revised version of the Neal-Smith criterion which is applicable to the landing task was developed and tested against other landing flying qualities data. Results indicated that both the revised Neal-Smith criterion and the Equivalent System Approach are good discriminators of pitch landing flying qualities; Neal-Smith has particular merit as a design guide, while the Equivalent System Approach is well suited for development of appropriate military specification requirements applicable to highly augmented aircraft.

  2. [Evaluation of quality of life in elders undergoing hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Angélica Yukari; Okubo, Patrícia; Bedendo, João; Carreira, Lígia

    2011-06-01

    Hemodialysis affects not only physical but psychological and social aspects, with repercussions on personal and family life. Considering the increase in the elderly population in Brazil, this study aims to evaluate the quality of life of elderly patients with chronic renal failure undergoing hemodialysis. This is a quantitative, descriptive exploratory study with elderly patients held in a facility specializing in hemodialysis in Guarapuava, Paraná, Brazil. The data were collected between May and June 2010, through a structured instrument and were submitted to the statistical software Statistica 7.1. Analyzing the domains of the questionnaire the highest score refers to the social domain (70.42) and the lowest, to the physical domain (49.37). Thus, the quality of life of these elderly had to be low, with variations according to the analyzed field. Researches aimed at assessing quality of life are relevant and instrumentalize the daily practice of care.

  3. Impact of data quality and quantity and the calibration procedure on crop growth model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Crop growth models are a commonly used tool for impact assessment of climate variability and climate change on crop yields and water use. Process-based crop models rely on algorithms that approximate the main physiological plant processes by a set of equations containing several calibration parameters as well as basic underlying assumptions. It is well recognized that model calibration is essential to improve the accuracy and reliability of model predictions. However, model calibration and validation is often hindered by a limited quantity and quality of available data. Recent studies suggest that crop model parameters can only be derived from field experiments in which plant growth and development processes have been measured. To be able to achieve a reliable prediction of crop growth under irrigation or drought stress, the correct characterization of the whole soil-plant-atmosphere system is essential. In this context is the accurate simulation of crop development, yield and the soil water dynamics plays an important role. In this study we aim to investigate the importance of a site and cultivar-specific model calibration based on experimental data using the SVAT model Daisy. We investigate to which extent different data sets and different parameter estimation procedures affect particularly yield estimates, irrigation water demand and the soil water dynamics. The comprehensive experimental data has been derived from an experiment conducted in Germany where five irrigation regimes were imposed on cabbage. Data collection included continuous measurements of soil tension and soil water content in two plots at three depths, weekly measurements of LAI, plant heights, leaf-N-content, stomatal conductivity, biomass partitioning, rooting depth as well as harvested yields and duration of growing period. Three crop growth calibration strategies were compared: (1) manual calibration based on yield and duration of growing period, (2) manual calibration based on yield

  4. Procedures to evaluate the efficiency of protective clothing worn by operators applying pesticide.

    PubMed

    Espanhol-Soares, Melina; Nociti, Leticia A S; Machado-Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2013-10-01

    The evaluation of the efficiency of whole-body protective clothing against pesticides has already been carried out through field tests and procedures defined by international standards, but there is a need to determine the useful life of these garments to ensure worker safety. The aim of this article is to compare the procedures for evaluating efficiency of two whole-body protective garments, both new and previously used by applicators of herbicides, using a laboratory test with a mannequin and in the field with the operator. The evaluation of the efficiency of protective clothing used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, leading to a proposal for classification according to efficiency, and determination of the useful life of protective clothing for use against pesticides, based on a quantitative assessment. The procedures used were in accordance with the standards of the modified American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1359:2007 and International Organization for Standardization 17491-4. The protocol used in the field was World Health Organization Vector Biology and Control (VBC)/82.1. Clothing tested was personal water repellent and pesticide protective. Two varieties of fabric were tested: Beige (100% cotton) and Camouflaged (31% polyester and 69% cotton). The efficiency in exposure control of the personal protective clothing was measured before use and after 5, 10, 20, and 30 uses and washes under field conditions. Personal protective clothing was worn by workers in the field during the application of the herbicide glyphosate on weed species in mature sugar cane plantations using a knapsack sprayer. The modified ASTM 1359:2007 procedure was chosen as the most appropriate due to its greater repeatability (lower coefficient of variation). This procedure provides quantitative evaluation needed to determine the efficiency and useful life of individual protective clothing, not just at specific points of failure, but according to dermal

  5. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  6. A ruggedness evaluation of procedures for damage threshold testing optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Wise, Stephanie A.; Tappan, Nina D.

    1995-01-01

    A ruggedness evaluation of approaches to damage threshold testing was performed to determine the influence of three procedural variables on damage threshold data. The differences between the number of test sites evaluated at an applied fluence level (1 site versus 10 sites), the number of laser pulses at each test site (1 pulse versus 200 pulses), and the beam diameter (0.35 mm versus 0.70 mm) were all found to significantly influence the damage threshold data over a 99-percent confidence interval.

  7. Bibliometric indicators for evaluating the quality of scientifc publications.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Medha A

    2014-01-01

    Evaluation of quality and quantity of publications can be done using a set of statistical and mathematical indices called bibliometric indicators. Two major categories of indicators are (1) quantitative indicators that measure the research productivity of a researcher and (2) performance indicators that evaluate the quality of publications. Bibliometric indicators are important for both the individual researcher and organizations. They are widely used to compare the performance of the individual researchers, journals and universities. Many of the appointments, promotions and allocation of research funds are based on these indicators. This review article describes some of the currently used bibliometric indicators such as journal impact factor, crown indicator, h-index and it's variants. It is suggested that for comparison of scientific impact and scientific output of researchers due consideration should be given to various factors affecting theses indicators. PMID:25095854

  8. Bibliometric indicators for evaluating the quality of scientifc publications.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Medha A

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of quality and quantity of publications can be done using a set of statistical and mathematical indices called bibliometric indicators. Two major categories of indicators are (1) quantitative indicators that measure the research productivity of a researcher and (2) performance indicators that evaluate the quality of publications. Bibliometric indicators are important for both the individual researcher and organizations. They are widely used to compare the performance of the individual researchers, journals and universities. Many of the appointments, promotions and allocation of research funds are based on these indicators. This review article describes some of the currently used bibliometric indicators such as journal impact factor, crown indicator, h-index and it's variants. It is suggested that for comparison of scientific impact and scientific output of researchers due consideration should be given to various factors affecting theses indicators.

  9. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  10. [Evaluation of the quality of birth registration data in Brazil].

    PubMed

    Gadelha, R J

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary evaluation of the quality of data published in "Estatisticas do Registro Civil, 1974-79" (Vital Registration Statistics, 1974-79) concerning children ever born in Brazil and its states is presented. Qualitative analysis of these variables is included: time period between date of birth and date of registration, mother's permanent place of birth, type of delivery, sex, and mother's age at time of delivery. (author's modified)

  11. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  12. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  13. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  14. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  15. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  16. Evaluating bone quality in patients with chronic kidney disease

    PubMed Central

    Malluche, Hartmut H.; Porter, Daniel S.; Pienkowski, David

    2013-01-01

    Bone of normal quality and quantity can successfully endure physiologically imposed mechanical loads. Chronic kidney disease–mineral and bone disorder (CKD–MBD) adversely affects bone quality through alterations in bone turnover and mineralization, whereas bone quantity is affected through changes in bone volume. Changes in bone quality can be associated with altered bone material, structure, or microdamage, which can result in an elevated rate of fracture in patients with CKD–MBD. Fractures cannot always be explained by reduced bone quantity and, therefore, bone quality should be assessed with a variety of techniques from the macro-organ level to the nanoscale level. In this Review, we demonstrate the importance of evaluating bone from multiple perspectives and hierarchical levels to understand CKD–MBD-related abnormalities in bone quality. Understanding the relationships between variations in material, structure, microdamage, and mechanical properties of bone in patients with CKD–MBD should aid in the development of new modalities to prevent, or treat, these abnormalities. PMID:24100399

  17. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student “t” Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening. PMID:22969804

  18. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student "t" Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  19. Evaluation of subjective and objective cyclodeviation following oblique muscle weakening procedures

    PubMed Central

    Thanikachalam, S; Kedar, Sachin; Bhola, Rahul

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the subjective and objective cyclodeviational changes following different weakening procedures on superior and inferior oblique muscles Design: Comparative case series Materials and Methods: In a prospective institution based study, 16 cases of A pattern horizontal strabismus having superior oblique overaction were randomized to superior oblique weakening procedures: either silicon expander or translational-recession. Similarly, 20 cases of V pattern horizontal strabismus with inferior oblique overaction were randomized for inferior oblique weakening procedures: either 10 mm Fink′s recession or modified Elliot and Nankin′s anteropositioning. Cyclodeviation was assessed subjectively with the synoptophore and objectively using the fundus photograph before surgery and 3 months postoperatively. Change in cyclodeviation was measured by subjective and objective methods. The index of surgical effect (ISE) was defined as the net torsional change postoperatively. Results: The difference between the extorsional change induced by the two superior oblique procedures, silicone expander (-6°) and translational recession (-11.3°), was statistically significant (P=0.001). Translational recession caused more extorsional change (ISE=296%) than silicone expander surgery (ISE=107%). The two inferior oblique weakening procedures, Fink′s recession (+2.5°) and modified Elliot and Nankin′s anteropositioning (+4.7°) produced equitable amount of intorsional shift with no statistical difference (P=0.93). Objective measurements were significantly more than the subjective measurements. Conclusions: Different weakening procedures on oblique muscles produce different changes in cyclodeviation, which persists even up to 3 months. Subjective cyclodeviation is less than the objective measurements indicating partial compensation by sensorial adaptations. PMID:18158402

  20. Evaluation of Operational Procedures for Using a Time-Based Airborne Inter-arrival Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Abbott, Terence S.; Eischeid, Todd M.

    2002-01-01

    An airborne tool has been developed based on the concept of an aircraft maintaining a time-based spacing interval from the preceding aircraft. The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) aircraft state data to compute a speed command for the ATAAS-equipped aircraft to obtain a required time interval behind another aircraft. The tool and candidate operational procedures were tested in a high-fidelity, full mission simulator with active airline subject pilots flying an arrival scenario using three different modes for speed control. The objectives of this study were to validate the results of a prior Monte Carlo analysis of the ATAAS algorithm and to evaluate the concept from the standpoint of pilot acceptability and workload. Results showed that the aircraft was able to consistently achieve the target spacing interval within one second (the equivalent of approximately 220 ft at a final approach speed of 130 kt) when the ATAAS speed guidance was autothrottle-coupled, and a slightly greater (4-5 seconds), but consistent interval with the pilot-controlled speed modes. The subject pilots generally rated the workload level with the ATAAS procedure as similar to that with standard procedures, and also rated most aspects of the procedure high in terms of acceptability. Although pilots indicated that the head-down time was higher with ATAAS, the acceptability of head-down time was rated high. Oculometer data indicated slight changes in instrument scan patterns, but no significant change in the amount of time spent looking out the window between the ATAAS procedure versus standard procedures.

  1. A matter of taste: evaluating the quality of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-06-01

    Driven by an impetus to standardize, numerous checklists have been devised to address quality in qualitative research, but these standards and the mindset driving them offer no language with which to speak about taste, or the aesthetic sensibilities that play such a key role in evaluating the goodness of any object. In this article, quality appraisal in qualitative research is considered in the context of taste, that is, in the discernment involved in judging the value of research and in the recognition of the key role reviewer preferences, sensibilities and membership in one or more taste communities play in these judgements. The evaluation of a study is accomplished by evaluating one or more reports from that study, and such reports may be conceived as art forms amenable to the same criteria for appraisal as poems or paintings. Taste implies judgements about the quality of objects and a person's ability to sift through and select from a store of knowledge that knowledge appropriate to judge its value. What binds a community of practitioners (here reviewers of qualitative studies) together is taste-making, or the constant refinements of judgements concerning what constitutes good and bad practice.

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native

  4. Guidelines and standard procedures for studies of ground-water quality; selection and installation of wells, and supporting documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, W.W.; Wilde, F.D.; Koterba, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part report to document guidelines and standard procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey for the acquisition of data in ground-water-quality studies. This report provides guidelines and procedures for the selection and installation of wells for water-quality studies/*, and the required or recommended supporting documentation of these activities. Topics include (1) documentation needed for well files, field folders, and electronic files; (2) criteria and information needed for the selection of water-supply and observation wells, including site inventory and data collection during field reconnaissance; and (3) criteria and preparation for installation of monitoring wells, including the effects of equipment and materials on the chemistry of ground-water samples, a summary of drilling and coring methods, and information concerning well completion, development, and disposition.

  5. [Clinical pathway, quality circle and standard operating procedures as tools for quality management in the trauma suite].

    PubMed

    Wurmb, Thomas; Frühwald, Peter; Roewer, Norbert; Brederlau, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    In each hospital the trauma resuscitation room in emergency departments is one of the areas with the highest rate of critical incidents. Delayed and insufficient medical interventions have a high impact on negative patient outcomes. Anticipating and dealing with critical situations might reduce preventable errors in the treatment process. This can be achieved by implementing an algorithm-based structured work flow. In this context some elements of quality management are well-established in clinical practice. In the present study we describe the implementation of a clinical pathway and an interdisciplinary quality circle to improve management of the trauma patient.

  6. Development of a toxicity identification evaluation procedure for characterizing metal toxicity in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Cook, H.F.; Kuhn, A.

    2000-04-01

    A multiagency effort is underway to develop whole sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods. Whole sediment TIE methods will be critical tools for characterizing toxicity at hazardous waste sites and in the conduct of environmental risk assessments. The research approach is based on the predominance of three classes of toxicants in sediments: ammonia, nonpolar organic chemicals, and metals. Here the authors describe a procedure for characterizing acute toxicity caused by metals in whole marine sediments. The procedure involves adding a chelating resin to sediments, resulting in the sequestration of bioavailable metal while not stressing testing organisms. Within the testing chambers, the presence of resin resulted in statistically significant reductions in the overlying and interstitial water concentrations of five metals (cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc) generally by factors of 40 and 200. Toxicity to both the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and mysid Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia) of sediments spiked with the five metals was decreased by approximately a factor of four when resin was present. While very effective at reducing the concentrations and toxicity of metals, the resin has only minor ameliorative effects on the toxicity of ammonia and a representative nonpolar toxicant (Endosulfan). Resin and accumulated metal were easily isolated from the testing system following exposures allowing for the initiation of phase II TIE (identification) procedures. This procedure using the addition of a chelating resin provides an approach for determining the importance of metals to the toxicity of marine sediments. Work is continuing to validate the method with environmentally contaminated sediments.

  7. Quality evaluation of plateletpheresis using the new AMICUS (Baxter) cell separator: evolution of CD 62 expression.

    PubMed

    Laurencet, F M; Doucet, A; Lydiate, V; Jacquier, M C; Mermillod, B; Andersen, S; Chapuis, B

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the new AMICUS (Baxter-Fenwal Division) cell separator in terms of donor safety, efficiency, and quality of the product obtained. One hundred eighty-three single-donor plateletpheresis procedures were performed, using a collection of 4-4.5 x 10(11) platelets as endpoint. During the first part of the study, the mean volume processed was 3,225 ml and the mean procedure duration 69.5 min. During the second part, after a software change, the mean volume and mean procedure time were 3,071 ml and 68.3 min, respectively. According to local policy, every collection bag was separated into two therapeutic units each containing a mean of 1.87 (1.83) x 10(11) platelets. The white blood cell (WBC) contamination per therapeutic unit was less than 5 x 10(6) in 91% of phereses performed in part one of the study and in 98% of phereses performed in part two. During the recommended 5 days storage, sequential in vitro analyses were performed in 27 units, showing limited platelet activation according to CD62 expression and morphological changes on electron microscopy (EM). Furthermore, there was a correlation between CD62 expression and the degree of WBC contamination (P = 0.03). In conclusion, platelet collection with the new Amicus allows for high platelet yields of adequate quality as judged by WBC content, CD62 expression, and electron microscopic morphological changes.

  8. Reducing the cost of evaluating the committor by a fitting procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2015-11-01

    Correct identification of reaction coordinates in complex systems is essential for understanding the mechanisms of their reaction dynamics. Existing methods for identifying reaction coordinates typically require knowledge of the committor—the probability of a given configuration to reach the product basin. The high computational cost of evaluating committors has limited applications of methods for identifying reaction coordinates. We proposed a fitting procedure that can reduce the cost of evaluating committors by an order of magnitude or more. The method only requires evaluating the committors of a few configurations in a transition path by the standard and costly shooting procedure. The committors of the other configurations are then estimated with great accuracy by a sigmoid function derived from fitting the few numerically evaluated committors. The method has been systematically tested on a model system of a Brownian particle moving in a one-dimensional double-well potential, and a small biomolecular system—the isomerization of alanine dipeptide in vacuum and in explicit water.

  9. Evaluation of Environmental Quality Productive Ecosystem Guayas (Ecuador).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Wilson; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teófilo; Carrera, Gloria; Jordan, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2015-04-01

    Natural resources are deteriorating very rapidly in the Gulf of Guayaquil and the area of influence in the Guayas Basin due to human activity. Specific problems are generated by the mismanagement of the aquaculture industry affecting the traditional agricultural sectors: rice, banana, sugarcane, cocoa, coffee, and soya also studied, and by human and industrial settlements. The development of industrial activities such as aquaculture (shrimp building for shrimp farming in ponds) and agriculture, have increasingly contributed to the generation of waste, degrading and potentially toxic elements in high concentrations, which can have adverse effects on organisms in the ecosystems, in the health of the population and damage the ecological and environmental balance. The productive Guayas ecosystem, consists of three interrelated ecosystems, the Gulf of Guayaquil, the Guayas River estuary and the Guayas Basin buffer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental quality of the productive Guayas ecosystem (Ecuador), through operational and specific objectives: 1) Draw up the transition coastal zone in the Gulf of Guayaquil, 2) Set temporal spatial variability of soil salinity in wetlands rice, Lower Guayas Basin, 3) evaluate the heavy metals in wetland rice in the Lower Basin of Guayas. The physical and chemical parameters of the soils have been studied. These are indicators of environmental quality. The multivariate statistical method showed the relations of similarities and dissimilarities between variables and parameter studies as stable. Moreover, the boundaries of coastal transition areas, temporal spatial variability of soil salinity and heavy metals in rice cultivation in the Lower Basin of Guayas were researched. The sequential studies included and discussed represent a broad framework of fundamental issues that has been valued as a basic component of the productive Guayas ecosystem. They are determinants of the environmental quality of the Guayas

  10. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique.

  11. Operational Procedures for Collecting Water-Quality Samples at Monitoring Sites on Maple Creek Near Nickerson and the Platte River at Louisville, Eastern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Steven M.; Swanson, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype stream-monitoring sites were operated during part of 1992 in the Central Nebraska Basins (CNBR) and three other study areas of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQ) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Results from the prototype project provide information needed to operate a net- work of intensive fixed station stream-monitoring sites. This report evaluates operating procedures for two NAWQA prototype sites at Maple Creek near Nickerson and the Platte River at Louisville, eastern Nebraska. Each site was sampled intensively in the spring and late summer 1992, with less intensive sampling in midsummer. In addition, multiple samples were collected during two high- flow periods at the Maple Creek site--one early and the other late in the growing season. Water-samples analyses included determination of pesticides, nutrients, major ions, suspended sediment, and measurements of physical properties. Equipment and protocols for the water-quality sampling procedures were evaluated. Operation of the prototype stream- monitoring sites included development and comparison of onsite and laboratory sample-processing proce- dures. Onsite processing was labor intensive but allowed for immediate preservation of all sampled constituents. Laboratory processing required less field labor and decreased the risk of contamination, but allowed for no immediate preservation of the samples.

  12. Balancing stakeholder needs in the evaluation of healthcare quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Laura C; Melichar, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts affect a broader range of people than we often assume. These are the potential stakeholders for QI and its evaluation, and they have valuable perspectives to offer when they are consulted in planning, conducting and interpreting evaluations. QI practitioners are accustomed to consulting stakeholders to assess unintended consequences or assess patient experiences of care, but in many cases there are additional benefits to a broad inclusion of stakeholders. These benefits are better adherence to ethical standards, to assure that all legitimate interests take part, more useful and relevant evaluation information and better political buy-in to improve impact. Balancing various stakeholder needs for information requires skill for both politics and research management. These challenges have few pat answers, but several preferred practices, which are illustrated with practical examples. PMID:26893512

  13. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  14. ELIGIBILITY FOR THE HIP-RESURFACING ARTHROPLASTY PROCEDURE: AN EVALUATION ON 592 HIPS

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Roberto Dantas; Faria, Rafael Salomon Silva; Duarte, David Marcelo; Takano, Marcelo Itiro; Sugiyama, Mauricio Morita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the percentage of ideal patients who would be eligible for hip-resurfacing surgery at a reference service for hip arthroplasty. Methods: Out of all the cases of hip arthroplasty operated at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual de São Paulo (HSPE) between January 2009 and December 2010, we assessed a total of 592 procedures that would fit the criteria for indication for resurfacing arthroplasty, after clinical and radiological evaluation according to the criteria established by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and by Seyler et al. Results: Among the total number of hip replacement arthroplasty cases, 5.74% of the patients were eligible. Among the patients who underwent primary arthroplasty, we found that 8.23% presented ideal conditions for this procedure. Conclusion: The study demonstrated that this type of surgery still has a limited role among hip surgery methods. PMID:27047851

  15. Flight simulation of a wide-body transport aircraft to evaluate MLS-RNAV procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branstetter, James R.; Houck, Jacob A.; Guenther, Arlene D.

    1988-01-01

    In a collaborative effort between the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) NASA and the U.S. Air Force, a piloted simulation was conducted to look at the issues involved with flying a large, wide-body aircraft in the airport terminal area using Microwave Landing System Area Navigation (MLS)-RNAV procedures. A variety of approach paths, departure paths, and holding patterns were evaluated during the course of the study for operational use, flight technical errors, and safety. In addition, several methods for driving the horizontal situation indicator and flight director instruments were investigated along with needle sensitivity. The ultimate goal of the simulation was to develop and verify candidate paths and procedures prior to flight tests conducted in 1986/87. Subject pilots for the simulation study were provided by the FAA, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and the airline industry.

  16. Measuring quality of care in psychiatric emergencies: construction and evaluation of a Bayesian index.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D H; Sainfort, F; Johnson, S W; Sateia, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study was conducted to determine whether an index for measuring quality of care for psychiatric emergencies is reliable and valid. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study used primary data collected over a 12-month period from two urban hospitals in the Northeast. One had 700 inpatient beds, an inpatient psychiatric unit, and community mental health personnel located in the emergency department. The other had 300 beds but none of the other hospital's features. STUDY DESIGN. The index was developed by a panel of experts in emergency psychiatry using a subjective Bayesian statistical methodology and was evaluated in terms of its ability to: (1) predict a second panel's judgments of quality; (2) predict a specific quality-related patient outcome, i.e., compliance with follow-up recommendations; (3) provide a reliable measurement procedure; and (4) detect variations in patterns of emergency department practices. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data were collected on 2,231 randomly selected emergency psychiatric patients (psychiatric diagnosis, alcohol abuse, nonverbal patients experiencing a psychiatric emergency, and patients with somatic complaints such as life crisis) treated in the emergency departments of the two hospitals. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The index predicted physician judgments of quality, was reliable, exhibited sufficient variation in scores, and was strongly associated with patient compliance. CONCLUSIONS. The study demonstrated that a subjective Bayesian model can be used to develop a reliable and valid index for measuring quality of care, with potential for practical application in management of health services. PMID:8514497

  17. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

  18. Simplified inelastic analysis procedure to evaluate a butt-welded elbow end

    SciTech Connect

    Dhalla, A.K.

    1981-01-01

    In a thin-walled piping network, the end of an elbow welded to a straignt pipe constitutes one of the highly stressed cross-sections that require structural evaluation. Explicit rules are not provided in the ASME Code for structural evaluation of the elbow ovalization and fabrication effects at the welded end. This paper presents a conservative semi-analytical procedure that can be used with simplified inelastic analysis to evaluate the elbow cross section welded to the straight pipe. The concept of carry-over factors is used to obtain ovalization stresses or strains at the elbow end. The stresses introduced by material and geometric nonuniformities in the fabrication process are then added to the ovalization stresses to complete structural evluation of the girth butt-welded elbow joint.

  19. Student evaluation: a performance indicator of quality in nurse education.

    PubMed

    Cowman, S

    1996-09-01

    This study, which forms part of a doctoral thesis, is derived from the increasing demand for economic models of nurse education as a process within a wider economic agenda which converts inputs (e.g. training costs) into outputs (e.g. registered nurses). In such a climate the pursuance and determination of quality in nurse education should be of fundamental concern to the nursing profession. The development of models for evaluation and measurement of quality must take due cognisance of the stakeholders' interests and concerns, and student nurses, as the consumers of nurse education, must be regarded as major stakeholders. This paper describes the use of the course experience questionnaire, an instrument designed to investigate the students' perspective on teaching and learning. The study incorporates a comparative analysis between Project 2000 students in Northern Ireland and students in the apprenticeship programme in the Republic of Ireland, from general, psychiatric, sick children's and mental handicap nursing. This comparative analysis does provide the nursing profession with a level of feedback on which to make decisions in the interest of quality. Nurse teachers should examine potential reasons why their programmes are poorly or highly rated and the actions that may be required to remedy imperfections on the one hand and the actions that may be taken to promote excellence on the other. As nurse education continues to forge links with universities, nurse teachers, by adopting student evaluation as a performance indicator, can maximize an essential element in the web of public accountability. PMID:8876425

  20. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  1. Selection indices for quality evaluation in wheat breeding.

    PubMed

    Branlard, G; Pierre, J; Rousset, M

    1992-06-01

    From multilocation trials involving 125 cultivars of wheat of mainly French and European origin four tests - protein content, Pelshenke, modified Zeleny and the mixograph - were used to establish six selection indices. Three of these indices - IW1, IW2 and IW3 - were calculated in order to evaluate the genetic potentiality of the lines for dough strength as given by the Chopin alveograph. The indices IV1, IV2 and IV3 were established to evaluate loaf volume as measured by the French bread-making standard. A quality index IQ was calculated from the allelic effects of the high-molecular-weight (HMW) subunits of glutenin from 195 cultivars assessed by the Chopin alveograph and the Pelshenke test. Comparison of the relative efficiency of each of the six indices to the individual tests revealed the superiority of the indices over one or several technological parameters. The six selection indices and the quality index were compared using 30 very diverse F4 lines. Their ability to retain the good quality lines is discussed in particular. PMID:24203028

  2. The Usability of SEEQ in Quality Evaluation of Arabic Secondary Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    al-Muslim, M.; Arifin, Zamri

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of Arabic education in Malaysia needs to be conducted on a continuous basis to achieve the objectives of Arabic education. Student Evaluation of Education Quality (SEEQ) was proposed as one of the evaluation instruments of the quality of Arabic education. This study aimed to evaluate the usability of SEEQ in the context…

  3. [Numerical evaluation of soil quality under different conservation tillage patterns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hong; Tian, Xiao-Hong; Chi, Wen-Bo; Nan, Xiong-Xiong; Yan, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Rui-Xiang; Tong, Yan-An

    2010-06-01

    A 9-year field experiment was conducted on the Guanzhong Plain of Shaanxi Province to study the effects of subsoiling, rotary tillage, straw return, no-till seeding, and traditional tillage on the soil physical and chemical properties and the grain yield in a winter wheat-summer maize rotation system, and a comprehensive evaluation was made on the soil quality under these tillage patterns by the method of principal components analysis (PCA). Comparing with traditional tillage, all the conservation tillage patterns improved soil fertility quality and soil physical properties. Under conservative tillage, the activities of soil urease and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly, soil quality index increased by 19.8%-44.0%, and the grain yield of winter wheat and summer maize (expect that under no till seeding with straw covering) increased by 13%-28% and 3%-12%, respectively. Subsoiling every other year, straw-chopping combined with rotary tillage, and straw-mulching combined with subsoiling not only increased crop yield, but also improved soil quality. Based on the economic and ecological benefits, the practices of subsoiling and straw return should be promoted.

  4. [Numerical evaluation of soil quality under different conservation tillage patterns].

    PubMed

    Wu, Yu-Hong; Tian, Xiao-Hong; Chi, Wen-Bo; Nan, Xiong-Xiong; Yan, Xiao-Li; Zhu, Rui-Xiang; Tong, Yan-An

    2010-06-01

    A 9-year field experiment was conducted on the Guanzhong Plain of Shaanxi Province to study the effects of subsoiling, rotary tillage, straw return, no-till seeding, and traditional tillage on the soil physical and chemical properties and the grain yield in a winter wheat-summer maize rotation system, and a comprehensive evaluation was made on the soil quality under these tillage patterns by the method of principal components analysis (PCA). Comparing with traditional tillage, all the conservation tillage patterns improved soil fertility quality and soil physical properties. Under conservative tillage, the activities of soil urease and alkaline phosphatase increased significantly, soil quality index increased by 19.8%-44.0%, and the grain yield of winter wheat and summer maize (expect that under no till seeding with straw covering) increased by 13%-28% and 3%-12%, respectively. Subsoiling every other year, straw-chopping combined with rotary tillage, and straw-mulching combined with subsoiling not only increased crop yield, but also improved soil quality. Based on the economic and ecological benefits, the practices of subsoiling and straw return should be promoted. PMID:20873622

  5. Evaluating Core Quality for a Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Budney, C.; Shiraishi, L.; Klein, K.

    2012-01-01

    Sample return missions, including the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, propose to collect core samples from scientifically valuable sites on Mars. These core samples would undergo extreme forces during the drilling process, and during the reentry process if the EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) performed a hard landing on Earth. Because of the foreseen damage to the stratigraphy of the cores, it is important to evaluate each core for rock quality. However, because no core sample return mission has yet been conducted to another planetary body, it remains unclear as to how to assess the cores for rock quality. In this report, we describe the development of a metric designed to quantitatively assess the mechanical quality of any rock cores returned from Mars (or other planetary bodies). We report on the process by which we tested the metric on core samples of Mars analogue materials, and the effectiveness of the core assessment metric (CAM) in assessing rock core quality before and after the cores were subjected to shocking (g forces representative of an EEV landing).

  6. A model to evaluate quality and effectiveness of disease management.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, K M M; Nieboer, A P; van Schayck, C P; Asin, J D; Huijsman, R

    2008-12-01

    Disease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control healthcare costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. Although current models define the concept of disease management, they do not provide a systematic development or an explanatory theory of how disease management affects the outcomes of care. The objective of this paper is to present a framework for valid evaluation of disease-management initiatives. The evaluation model is built on two pillars of disease management: patient-related and professional-directed interventions. The effectiveness of these interventions is thought to be affected by the organisational design of the healthcare system. Disease management requires a multifaceted approach; hence disease-management programme evaluations should focus on the effects of multiple interventions, namely patient-related, professional-directed and organisational interventions. The framework has been built upon the conceptualisation of these disease-management interventions. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms of these interventions revealed that learning and behavioural theories support the core assumptions of disease management. The evaluation model can be used to identify the components of disease-management programmes and the mechanisms behind them, making valid comparison feasible. In addition, this model links the programme interventions to indicators that can be used to evaluate the disease-management programme. Consistent use of this framework will enable comparisons among disease-management programmes and outcomes in evaluation research.

  7. Control of Risks Through the Use of Procedures: A Method for Evaluating the Change in Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praino, Gregory T.; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    not. The model used for describing the Failure Likelihood considers how well a task was established by evaluating that task on five components. The components selected to define a well established task are: that it be defined, assigned to someone capable, that they be trained appropriately, that the actions be organized to enable proper completion and that some form of independent monitoring be performed. Validation of the method was based on the information provided by a group of experts in Space Shuttle ground processing when they were presented with 5 scenarios that identified a clause from a procedure. For each scenario, they recorded their perception of how important the associated rule was and how likely it was to fail. They then rated the components of Control Value and Failure Likelihood for all the scenarios. The order in which each reviewer ranked the scenarios Control Value and Failure Likelihood was compared to the order in which they ranked the scenarios for each of the associated components; inevitability and opportunity for Control Value and definition, assignment, training, organization and monitoring for Failure Likelihood. This order comparison showed how the components contributed to a relative relationship to the substitute risk element. With the relationship established for Space Shuttle ground processing, this method can be used to gauge if the introduction or removal of a particular rule will increase or decrease the .risk associated with the hazard it is intended to control.

  8. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  9. The effects of lairage time and handling procedure prior to slaughter on stress and meat quality parameters in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dokmanović, M; Velarde, A; Tomović, V; Glamočlija, N; Marković, R; Janjić, J; Baltić, M Ž

    2014-10-01

    Lairage time (short - 8min to 2.7h, n=28 vs. long - 14 to 21.5h, n=72) and pig handling (gentle - no use of stick or electric prod, pig not slipping, falling, nor emitting high-pitched vocalizations vs. rough - where any of these occurred) effects on pig stress and meat quality were measured. Blood lactate and cortisol, plus post-mortem pH (pH60min; pH24h), temperature (T60min), drip loss, sensory and instrumental color and meat quality for the longissimus dorsi, pars lumbalis derived meat were determined. Carcass rigor mortis and skin damages were measured. Lairage time significantly affected blood lactate, carcass rigor mortis, skin damages, drip loss, color and meat quality. Handling procedure influenced blood lactate, pH60min and T60min. Long lairage was more stressful, and was detrimental to carcass quality, but caused better meat quality compared to short lairage. Rough handling was related to higher lactate and lower meat quality. PMID:24971810

  10. The effects of lairage time and handling procedure prior to slaughter on stress and meat quality parameters in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dokmanović, M; Velarde, A; Tomović, V; Glamočlija, N; Marković, R; Janjić, J; Baltić, M Ž

    2014-10-01

    Lairage time (short - 8min to 2.7h, n=28 vs. long - 14 to 21.5h, n=72) and pig handling (gentle - no use of stick or electric prod, pig not slipping, falling, nor emitting high-pitched vocalizations vs. rough - where any of these occurred) effects on pig stress and meat quality were measured. Blood lactate and cortisol, plus post-mortem pH (pH60min; pH24h), temperature (T60min), drip loss, sensory and instrumental color and meat quality for the longissimus dorsi, pars lumbalis derived meat were determined. Carcass rigor mortis and skin damages were measured. Lairage time significantly affected blood lactate, carcass rigor mortis, skin damages, drip loss, color and meat quality. Handling procedure influenced blood lactate, pH60min and T60min. Long lairage was more stressful, and was detrimental to carcass quality, but caused better meat quality compared to short lairage. Rough handling was related to higher lactate and lower meat quality.

  11. A quality assurance framework for the fully automated and objective evaluation of image quality in cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Steiding, Christian; Kolditz, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Thousands of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners for vascular, maxillofacial, neurological, and body imaging are in clinical use today, but there is no consensus on uniform acceptance and constancy testing for image quality (IQ) and dose yet. The authors developed a quality assurance (QA) framework for fully automated and time-efficient performance evaluation of these systems. In addition, the dependence of objective Fourier-based IQ metrics on direction and position in 3D volumes was investigated for CBCT. Methods: The authors designed a dedicated QA phantom 10 cm in length consisting of five compartments, each with a diameter of 10 cm, and an optional extension ring 16 cm in diameter. A homogeneous section of water-equivalent material allows measuring CT value accuracy, image noise and uniformity, and multidimensional global and local noise power spectra (NPS). For the quantitative determination of 3D high-contrast spatial resolution, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of centrally and peripherally positioned aluminum spheres was computed from edge profiles. Additional in-plane and axial resolution patterns were used to assess resolution qualitatively. The characterization of low-contrast detectability as well as CT value linearity and artifact behavior was tested by utilizing sections with soft-tissue-equivalent and metallic inserts. For an automated QA procedure, a phantom detection algorithm was implemented. All tests used in the dedicated QA program were initially verified in simulation studies and experimentally confirmed on a clinical dental CBCT system. Results: The automated IQ evaluation of volume data sets of the dental CBCT system was achieved with the proposed phantom requiring only one scan for the determination of all desired parameters. Typically, less than 5 min were needed for phantom set-up, scanning, and data analysis. Quantitative evaluation of system performance over time by comparison to previous examinations was also

  12. Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

  13. Nondestructive methods for quality evaluation of livestock products.

    PubMed

    Narsaiah, K; Jha, Shyam N

    2012-06-01

    The muscles derived from livestock are highly perishable. Rapid and nondestructive methods are essential for quality assurance of such products. Potential nondestructive methods, which can supplement or replace many of traditional time consuming destructive methods, include colour and computer image analysis, NIR spectroscopy, NMRI, electronic nose, ultrasound, X-ray imaging and biosensors. These methods are briefly described and the research work involving them for products derived from livestock is reviewed. These methods will be helpful in rapid screening of large number of samples, monitoring distribution networks, quick product recall and enhance traceability in the value chain of livestock products. With new developments in the areas of basic science related to these methods, colour, image processing, NIR spectroscopy, biosensors and ultrasonic analysis are expected to be widespread and cost effective for large scale meat quality evaluation in near future.

  14. A unified procedure for meta-analytic evaluation of surrogate end points in randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Dai, James Y; Hughes, James P

    2012-09-01

    The meta-analytic approach to evaluating surrogate end points assesses the predictiveness of treatment effect on the surrogate toward treatment effect on the clinical end point based on multiple clinical trials. Definition and estimation of the correlation of treatment effects were developed in linear mixed models and later extended to binary or failure time outcomes on a case-by-case basis. In a general regression setting that covers nonnormal outcomes, we discuss in this paper several metrics that are useful in the meta-analytic evaluation of surrogacy. We propose a unified 3-step procedure to assess these metrics in settings with binary end points, time-to-event outcomes, or repeated measures. First, the joint distribution of estimated treatment effects is ascertained by an estimating equation approach; second, the restricted maximum likelihood method is used to estimate the means and the variance components of the random treatment effects; finally, confidence intervals are constructed by a parametric bootstrap procedure. The proposed method is evaluated by simulations and applications to 2 clinical trials.

  15. Laboratory study of the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study was used to evaluate the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Fourteen insecticides, one degradation product, and one synergist were spiked into organic-grade water and carried through toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Concentrations of each compound were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. During Phase I, the water sample was pumped through a C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with methanol. Dimethoate was not removed by the extraction, but remained in the rinsate. In contrast, permethrin was removed by the extraction, but was not recovered by the methanol elution, and 80 percent of the permethrin remained on the cartridge, teflon tubing, and glassware. Chlorpyrifos also was not recovered completely with the methanol elution (only 62 percent was recovered). The other insecticides were extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and recovered by elution with methanol (80 percent or greater). During Phase II, a new spiked water sample was extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with varying concentrations of methanol and water into different fractions. Each methanol:water fraction was analyzed for the added compounds. Most of the insecticides eluted in two fractions, with concentrations of 10 percent or greater. The largest number of insecticides eluted in the 75 percent methanol:water fraction.

  16. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures. PMID:26078779

  17. Eco-environmental quality evaluation of Huaibei Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Lü, H.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Chen, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, the destruction of the ecological environment in Huaibei Plain has limited the development of the economy. Doing research on eco-environment quality evaluation methods may be helpful to the recovery of the eco-environment in Huaibei Plain and the construction of ecological civilization. A new assessment system was introduced in this paper on the basis of a traditional eco-environmental evaluation method; the NPP index was used to replace biological abundance index and vegetation coverage index. This new method was used to evaluate the eco-environment quality of Huaibei Plain. Results indicate that: (a) the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain has been getting worse since 1990, but has improved since 2000; (b) the water-network density index is the key factor which affects the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain; (c) If human activities, pollution control, land degradation and urban area development are not taken into consideration, the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain in dry years will be serious.

  18. Evaluation of Topographic Error and Quality with Stereophotoclinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Weirich, John; Campbell, Tanner; Lambert, Diane; Drozd, Kristofer

    2016-10-01

    One of the primary means to evaluate the accuracy of a shape model is to measure the deviation between a truth model (if available) and the shape model. Typically, this is done by calculating the square root of the average error squared of all the points, i.e the root mean squared error (RMS).This technique provides valuable insight into the error distribution of a shape model, as well as providing an objective measurement of deviations. However, it does not fully explain the error and especially the quality of a digital terrain model. Systematic errors can obscure poorly performing regions and may over-report errors.We have begun an extensive analysis of using normalized cross-correlation to evaluate the quality of shape models compared to truth topography, as well as the agreement between images rendered from the model with the original images. This technique provides a tool to differentiate between local accuracy and global accuracy. It also provides an effective way to decompose the error vector into horizontal and vertical displacements. It is especially useful for stereophotoclinometry (SPC) because it allows a clear determination of the quality of the model at the resolution of the source images (i.e. if the source images have a 5cm pixel size, it shows how well the SPC solution is at 5cm). Additionally, it demonstrates how essential a good imaging plan is to the quality of the shape model.We are using these techniques in support of the OSIRIS-REx mission to the asteroid Bennu.

  19. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  20. Teaching Surgical Procedures with Movies: Tips for High-quality Video Clips

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemart, Mathieu; Bouletreau, Pierre; Breton, Pierre; Mojallal, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Video must now be considered as a precious tool for learning surgery. However, the medium does present production challenges, and currently, quality movies are not always accessible. We developed a series of 7 surgical videos and made them available on a publicly accessible internet website. Our videos have been viewed by thousands of people worldwide. High-quality educational movies must respect strategic and technical points to be reliable. PMID:27757342

  1. 77 FR 235 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Colorado; Procedural Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ...)(2)(E)(ii) of the CAA. We previously proposed approval, 76 FR 28707, of this portion as part of our... on July 22, 2011, 76 FR 43906, EPA did not complete approval of the submittal with respect to Section... Colorado's procedural rules for approval into the SIP (76 FR 4268). Due to this error, EPA disapproved...

  2. Quality Evaluation By Acousto-Ultrasonic Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Promising nondestructive-testing method based on ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. Report reviews acousto-ultrasonic technology for nondestructive testing. Discusses principles, suggests advanced signal-analysis schemes for development, and presents potential applications. Acousto-ultrasonics applied principally to assess defects in laminated and filament-wound fiber-reinforced composite materials. Technique used to determine variations in such properties as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and reductions in strength and toughness caused by defects. Also used to evaluate states of cure, porosities, orientation of fibers, volume fractions of fibers, bonding between fibers and matrices, and qualities of interlaminar bonds.

  3. The imprecise science of evaluating scholarly performance: utilizing broad quality categories for an assessment of business and management journals.

    PubMed

    Lange, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    In a growing number of countries, government-appointed assessment panels develop ranks on the basis of the quality of scholarly outputs to apportion budgets in recognition of evaluated performance and to justify public funds for future R&D activities. When business and management journals are being grouped in broad quality categories, a recent study has noted that this procedure was placing the same journals in essentially the same categories. Drawing on journal quality categorizations by several German- and English-speaking business departments and academic associations, the author performs nonparametric tests and correlations to analyze whether this claim can be substantiated. In particular, he examines the ability of broad quality categorizations to add value to governmental, administrative, and academic decision making by withstanding the criticism traditionally levied at research quality assessments.

  4. Quality Procedures in the European Higher Education Area and Beyond--Visions for the Future: Third ENQA Survey. ENQA Occasional Papers 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grifoll, Josep; Hopbach, Achim; Kekalainen, Helka; Lugano, Nathalie; Rozsnyai, Christina; Shopov, Todor

    2012-01-01

    Higher education reforms over the last decade, resulting in the establishment of the European Higher Education Area, with new social demands and expectations, have greatly impacted quality assurance in higher education. As a follow-up activity to two previous surveys on external quality procedures, the European Association for Quality Assurance in…

  5. Multi-function microsystem for cells migration analysis and evaluation of photodynamic therapy procedure in coculture

    PubMed Central

    Jastrzebska (Jedrych), Elzbieta; Grabowska-Jadach, Ilona; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2012-01-01

    Cell migration is an important physiological process, which is involved in cancer metastasis. Therefore, the investigation of cell migration may lead to the development of novel therapeutic approaches. In this study, we have successfully developed a microsystem for culture of two cell types (non-malignant and carcinoma) and for analysis of cell migration dependence on distance between them. Finally, we studied quantitatively the influence of photodynamic therapy (PDT) procedures on the viability of pairs of non-malignant (MRC5 or Balb/3T3) and carcinoma (A549) cells coculture. The proposed geometry of the microsystem allowed for separate introduction of two cell lines and analysis of cells migration dependence on distance between the cells. We found that a length of connecting microchannel has an influence on cell migration and viability of non-malignant cells after PDT procedure. Summarizing, the developed microsystem can constitute a new tool for carrying out experiments, which offers a few functions: cell migration analysis, carcinoma and non-malignant cells coculture, and evaluation of PDT procedure in the various steps of cell migration. PMID:24339849

  6. Evaluation of the effect of skin cleaning procedures on the dermal absorption of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Dennerlein, Kathrin; Jäger, Thomas; Göen, Thomas; Kilo, Sonja; Schaller, Karl Heinz; Drexler, Hans; Korinth, Gintautas

    2015-08-01

    To reduce the internal exposure, skin decontamination is the most important measure after dermal contact to chemicals. However, no harmonized skin cleaning procedure for experimental ex vivo studies is published. In our study, the impact of two skin cleaning techniques on dermal penetration kinetics and intradermal deposition of 1,4-dioxane, 5% hydrofluoric acid (HF, detected in terms of fluoride ions), and anisole was evaluated to develop a reliable ex vivo skin cleaning method using the diffusion cell technique. After exposure (duration: 3 min (HF); 1h (1,4-dioxane and anisole)) of excised human skin (n=6-8) decontamination was performed by (I) water-soaked cotton swabs or (II) direct application of water on the exposure area. The effect of skin cleaning was investigated by analysing the concentration time course of chemicals in the receptor fluid of diffusion cells and by determining the deposition in skin. Both skin cleaning procedures reduced the amount of fluoride in the skin compartments (p<0.05) and the receptor fluid (p<0.1). However, the effect of cleaning on the dermal absorption of the organic test compounds was not significant. The results demonstrate the suitability of the applied ex vivo protocol for investigating the effectiveness of skin cleaning measures following dermal exposure. In addition, data reveal that the determination of test compounds in both, skin compartments as well as receptor fluid as equivalent for the systemic uptake needs to be considered in studies assessing the effectiveness of skin decontamination procedures.

  7. Space-Time Analysis of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 1 Air Quality Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents an evaluation of summertime daily maximum ozone concentrations over North America (NA) and Europe (EU) using the database generated during Phase 1 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The analysis focuses on identifying tempor...

  8. Concrete Construction Employees: When does procedural fairness shape self-evaluations?

    PubMed

    Smith, Heather J; Thomas, Timothy R; Tyler, Tom R

    2006-03-01

    According to the Group Value Model, group authorities and procedures communicate symbolic information to people about whether the group values or respects them. Employees for a concrete construction company completed a questionnaire about their work experiences in either English or Spanish. Among employees who identified more strongly with the concrete construction company, the quality of supervisor treatment predicted employees' feelings of respect and personal self-efficacy. Further, for employees who identified with the company, feeling respected by their colleagues mediated the relationship between fair treatment by a single supervisor and self-efficacy. Even when the working context encourages short term and instrumental goals, these results suggest that employees who identify with the company still care about fair treatment because of the self-relevant information it communicates to them. PMID:17364008

  9. Integrating standard operating procedures and industry notebook standards to evaluate students in laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Wallert, Mark A; Provost, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the preparedness of graduates from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology (BCBT) Major at Minnesota State University Moorhead for employment in the bioscience industry we have developed a new Industry certificate program. The BCBT Industry Certificate was developed to address specific skill sets that local, regional, and national industry experts identified as lacking in new B.S. and B.A. biochemistry graduates. The industry certificate addresses concerns related to working in a regulated industry such as Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, and working in a Quality System. In this article we specifically describe how we developed a validation course that uses Standard Operating Procedures to describe grading policy and laboratory notebook requirements in an effort to better prepare students to transition into industry careers.

  10. Integrating standard operating procedures and industry notebook standards to evaluate students in laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Wallert, Mark A; Provost, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the preparedness of graduates from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology (BCBT) Major at Minnesota State University Moorhead for employment in the bioscience industry we have developed a new Industry certificate program. The BCBT Industry Certificate was developed to address specific skill sets that local, regional, and national industry experts identified as lacking in new B.S. and B.A. biochemistry graduates. The industry certificate addresses concerns related to working in a regulated industry such as Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, and working in a Quality System. In this article we specifically describe how we developed a validation course that uses Standard Operating Procedures to describe grading policy and laboratory notebook requirements in an effort to better prepare students to transition into industry careers. PMID:24376028

  11. Limitations of ambient air quality standards in evaluating indoor environments

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.E. )

    1992-03-01

    Analysis of the kinds of data used for the derivation of ambient air quality standards (AAQSs) for carbon monoxide and ozone shows that these values are based on the toxicology of the materials and thus are suitable for evaluating potential health effects of indoor environments, especially on the very young, the aged, and the infirm. A similar analysis shows that the AAQSs for suspended particulate matter, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide are strictly empirical and that they should not be used for any but their first, intended purpose. The AAQSs for non-methane hydrocarbons are based on photochemical smog production, not injury of any kind, and have no utility for indoor environment evaluation.

  12. Optimizing experimental procedures for quantitative evaluation of crop plant performance in high throughput phenotyping systems

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Astrid; Muraya, Moses M.; Weigelt-Fischer, Kathleen; Arana-Ceballos, Fernando; Klukas, Christian; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Riewe, David; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Detailed and standardized protocols for plant cultivation in environmentally controlled conditions are an essential prerequisite to conduct reproducible experiments with precisely defined treatments. Setting up appropriate and well defined experimental procedures is thus crucial for the generation of solid evidence and indispensable for successful plant research. Non-invasive and high throughput (HT) phenotyping technologies offer the opportunity to monitor and quantify performance dynamics of several hundreds of plants at a time. Compared to small scale plant cultivations, HT systems have much higher demands, from a conceptual and a logistic point of view, on experimental design, as well as the actual plant cultivation conditions, and the image analysis and statistical methods for data evaluation. Furthermore, cultivation conditions need to be designed that elicit plant performance characteristics corresponding to those under natural conditions. This manuscript describes critical steps in the optimization of procedures for HT plant phenotyping systems. Starting with the model plant Arabidopsis, HT-compatible methods were tested, and optimized with regard to growth substrate, soil coverage, watering regime, experimental design (considering environmental inhomogeneities) in automated plant cultivation and imaging systems. As revealed by metabolite profiling, plant movement did not affect the plants' physiological status. Based on these results, procedures for maize HT cultivation and monitoring were established. Variation of maize vegetative growth in the HT phenotyping system did match well with that observed in the field. The presented results outline important issues to be considered in the design of HT phenotyping experiments for model and crop plants. It thereby provides guidelines for the setup of HT experimental procedures, which are required for the generation of reliable and reproducible data of phenotypic variation for a broad range of applications. PMID

  13. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940’s, and during the last 10–15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence. PMID:26009706

  14. Qualitative evaluation of the supporting system for diagnosis procedure combination code selection.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Kazuya; Uchiyama, Toshio; Takemura, Tadamasa; Kume, Naoto; Adachi, Takayuki; Kuroda, Tomohiro; Uchiyama, Tadasu; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    In Japan, medical staff must select a diagnosis procedure combination (DPC) code for each inpatient upon admission. We report on the development and evaluation of a supporting system for DPC code selection. This system, based on a machine learning method developed by Okamoto et al., makes DPC code suggestions that are derived from medical practice information pertaining to inpatients. The use of the suggestions helps medical staff select an appropriate DPC code for each inpatient. We asked health information management professionals to evaluate the system and to compare the suggested DPC codes with those selected by doctors. They reported that the system was generally useful and that using this system they could find some cases of hospitalized patients whose DPC codes needed correction. However, they also determined the precision of the system needs improvement.

  15. A universal procedure for evaluation and application of surge-protective devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The source, nature, and frequency of occurrence of transients must be identified and a representative standard test wave chosen for proof testing. The performance of candidate suppressor devices then can be evaluated against the withstand goals set for the equipment. The various suppressors divide into two classes of generic behavior. The key to a universal procedure for evaluating both classes lies in representing transients as quasi-current sources of defined current impulse duration. The available surge current is established by the Thevenin equivalent transient voltage and source impedance. A load line drawn on the V-I characteristic graph of the suppressor quickly determines the clamping voltage and peak current. These values then can be compared to the requirement. The deposited energy and average power dissipation for multiple transients also can be calculated. The method is illustrated with a design example for motor vehicle alternator load dump suppression.

  16. Soil contamination evaluations: Earthworms as indicators of soil quality

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, G.; Wilbom, D.

    1995-12-31

    Earthworms have frequently been evaluated in the field and laboratory as representatives of the soil community that are indicative of their habitat`s quality. Within a landscape or at a contaminated site, soil quality, or soil health, has become increasingly critical to cleanup-related issues that revolve around questions of ``how clean is clean`` and the bioaccumulation of soil contaminants. Through an overview of numerous field and laboratory studies, the role that earthworms have played in evaluating soil contamination will be reviewed with a particular focus on evaluations of the bioaccumulation potential of chemicals in soil. Within ecological contexts, earthworms can provide information regarding immediately observable adverse affects related, for example, to acute toxicity. Additionally, earthworms can provide information directly related to the bioaccumulation potential of a chemical and trophic transfer of environmental chemicals, especially through the food-chain. Within the decision-making process, soil contamination evaluations must consider future land-use, as well as current and future expressions of adverse biological and ecological effects under field conditions, potentially following remediation. Through integrated field and laboratory studies using earthworms, the authors have been able to identify adversely affected soil communities and have been able to provide information for assessing adverse ecological effects potentially caused by contaminants. Field surveys and on-site or in situ biological testing with earthworms, however, can not alone identify causes of effects. As such, standardized biological tests have been routinely completed in the laboratory so linkages between expression of effects and contaminants could be more readily addressed in conjunction with appropriate chemical data from the field.

  17. 5 CFR 531.508 - Evaluation of quality step increase authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Evaluation of quality step increase... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Quality Step Increases § 531.508 Evaluation of quality step... grant quality step increases. The agency shall take any corrective action required by the Office....

  18. 5 CFR 531.508 - Evaluation of quality step increase authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Evaluation of quality step increase... REGULATIONS PAY UNDER THE GENERAL SCHEDULE Quality Step Increases § 531.508 Evaluation of quality step... grant quality step increases. The agency shall take any corrective action required by the Office....

  19. Quality assurance and quality control data validation procedures used for the Love Canal and Dallas lead soil monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, K W; Black, S C

    1983-06-01

    Public awareness of soils contamination has increased in recent years due in part to the notoriety associated with the indiscriminate release, packaging, transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. In 1980, and again in 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was responsible for designing, implementing and conducting environmental monitoring programs at Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York, and in Dallas, Texas, that dealt with suspected contaminated soils. Both of these monitoring programs were conducted over a relatively short time with the collection and analysis of over 4000 soil samples. The methods employed by the Environmental Protection Agency for providing soil data that was scientifically valid and of defensible quality for each of these monitoring programs are presented. Also, methods for identifying data bias, its precision and its uncertainty are identified. PMID:24258929

  20. INCITS W1.1 standards for perceptual evaluation of text and line quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalal, Edul N.; Barney Smith, Elisa H.; Gaykema, Frans; Haley, Allan; Kirk, Kerry; Kozak, Don; Robb, Mark; Qian, Tim; Tse, Ming-Kai

    2009-01-01

    INCITS W1.1 is a project chartered to develop an appearance-based image quality standard. This paper summarizes the work to date of the W1.1 Text and Line Quality ad hoc team, and describes the progress made in developing a Text Quality test pattern and an analysis procedure based on experience with previous perceptual rating experiments.

  1. Evaluation of Acid Digestion Procedures to Estimate Mineral Contents in Materials from Animal Trials

    PubMed Central

    Palma, M. N. N.; Rocha, G. C.; Valadares Filho, S. C.; Detmann, E.

    2015-01-01

    Rigorously standardized laboratory protocols are essential for meaningful comparison of data from multiple sites. Considering that interactions of minerals with organic matrices may vary depending on the material nature, there could be peculiar demands for each material with respect to digestion procedure. Acid digestion procedures were evaluated using different nitric to perchloric acid ratios and one- or two-step digestion to estimate the concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in samples of carcass, bone, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Six procedures were evaluated: ratio of nitric to perchloric acid at 2:1, 3:1, and 4:1 v/v in a one- or two-step digestion. There were no direct or interaction effects (p>0.01) of nitric to perchloric acid ratio or number of digestion steps on magnesium and zinc contents. Calcium and phosphorus contents presented a significant (p<0.01) interaction between sample type and nitric to perchloric acid ratio. Digestion solution of 2:1 v/v provided greater (p<0.01) recovery of calcium and phosphorus from bone samples than 3:1 and 4:1 v/v ratio. Different acid ratios did not affect (p>0.01) calcium or phosphorus contents in carcass, excreta, concentrate, forage, and feces. Number of digestion steps did not affect mineral content (p>0.01). Estimated concentration of calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, and zinc in carcass, excreta, concentrated, forage, and feces samples can be performed using digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 4:1 v/v in a one-step digestion. However, samples of bones demand a stronger digestion solution to analyze the mineral contents, which is represented by an increased proportion of perchloric acid, being recommended a digestion solution of nitric to perchloric acid 2:1 v/v in a one-step digestion. PMID:26333671

  2. Resected specimen evaluation, anorectal manometry, endoanal ultrasonography and clinical follow-up after STARR procedures

    PubMed Central

    Naldini, Gabriele; Cerullo, Guido; Menconi, Claudia; Martellucci, Jacopo; Orlandi, Simone; Romano, Nicola; Rossi, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To investigate stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) procedures as surgical techniques for obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS) by analyzing specimen evaluation, anorectal manometry, endoanal ultrasonography and clinical follow-up. METHODS: From January to December 2007, we have treated 30 patients. Fifteen treated with double PPH-01 staplers and 15 treated using new CCS 30 contour. Resected specimen were measured with respect to average surface and volume. All patients have been evaluated at 24 mo with clinical examination, anorectal manometry and endoanal ultrasonography. RESULTS: Average surface in the CCS 30 group was 54.5 cm2 statistically different when compared to the STARR group (36.92 cm2). The average volume in the CCS 30 group was 29.8 cc, while in the PPH-01 it was 23.8 cc and difference was statistically significant. The mean hospital stay in the CCS 30 group was 3.1 d, while in the PPH-01 group the median hospital stay was 3.4 d. As regards the long-term follow-up, an overall satisfactory rate of 83.3% (25/30) was achieved. Endoanal ultrasonography performed 1 year following surgery was considered normal in both of the studied groups. Mean resting pressure was higher than the preoperative value (67.2 mmHg in the STARR group and 65.7 mmHg in the CCS30 group vs 54.7 mmHg and 55.3 mmHg, respectively). Resting and squeezing pressures were lower in those patients not satisfied, but data are not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The STARR procedure with two PPH-01 is a safe surgical procedure to correct ODS. The new Contour CCS 30 could help to increase the amount of the resected tissue without differences in early complications, post-operative pain and in hospital stay compared to the STARR with two PPH-01 technique. PMID:21633641

  3. Calibration procedures for evaluation of in-flight radiometry performance of thermal infrared satellite sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schott, John R.; Gallagher, Timothy W.; Barsi, Julia A.

    1997-12-01

    With the impending launch of several new satellite sensors with thermal channels, there is a renewed interest in evaluating the in-flight calibration of these sensors using ground truth or under flight validation techniques. The relatively rapid temporal variation of surface temperatures, coupled with the increased calibration requirements levied by some of the science applications, place a considerable burden on the calibration team. This paper addresses procedures under development to ensure the rigorous in-flight calibration of satellite sensors in the thermal region. These efforts are directed at Landsat 7, but are intended for use with any thermal sensor and particularly address sensors with multiple spectral channels. The paper addresses laboratory calibration techniques for calibration of transfer radiometers, laboratory calibration of reference blackbodies for use in field or under flight applications, calibration of under flight instrumentation and under flight (vicarious) methods for calibration of space-based instrumentation. The methods are presented in the context of the more limited procedures that were used for under flight calibration of the HCMM and Landsat 4 and 5 sensors. A particular emphasis is placed on the importance of spectral structure in the calibration process which is critical for multi-wavelength or narrow wavelength sensors. The calibration facility at RIT for calibration of the modular imaging spectrometer instrument that will under fly Landsat 7 is described in detail, along with full calibration procedures. Issues associated with selection of target surfaces (size, emissivity, and temporal stability) for vicarious calibration also are discussed, along with our approach for addressing these issues to evaluate the in-flight performance of Landsat 7. Previous efforts have demonstrated that calibration using similar approaches could achieve expected errors of approximately 1 K. This paper addresses refinements designed to significantly

  4. Evaluation of two extraction procedures for the recovery of organic chemicals from spiked soils

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, H.J.; Brown, K.W.; Donnelly, K.C.; He, L.Y.

    1994-12-31

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiencies of the automatic Soxtec and US EPA SW846 Soxhlet soil extraction methods. In phases one and two of the experiment, extractions were performed on silicon dioxide matrices and silt-loam soils spiked with benz(a)pyrene, pentachlorophenol, and naphthalene at three concentration levels. Each test sample contained either an individual chemical or a 1:1:1 mixture of all three chemicals. Phase three consisted of extractions performed on a silt-loam soil spiked with a coal tar complex mixture. Soxtec samples were sequentially extracted with dichloromethane and methanol while Soxhlet samples were extracted with dichloromethane. Gas chromatographic results obtained from sample extract analysis were used to calculate percent recoveries of the chemicals. The recoveries of benz(a)pyrene and pentachlorophenol in the Soxtec procedure ranged from 55--88% and 49--88%, respectively. For the Soxhlet method, the recoveries ranges from 46--73% and 52--87%, respectively. Complex mixture recoveries ranged from 50--60% for both procedures. The mutagenic potentials of the solvent extracts were evaluated using Salmonella typhimurium strain TA98 with and without metabolic activation.

  5. A design procedure for the handling qualities optimization of the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Cox, Timothy H.

    1989-01-01

    A design technique for handling qualities improvement was developed for the X-29A aircraft. As with any new aircraft, the X-29A control law designers were presented with a relatively high degree of uncertainty in their mathematical models. The presence of uncertainties, and the high level of static instability of the X-29A caused the control law designers to stress stability and robustness over handling qualities. During flight test, the mathematical models of the vehicle were validated or corrected to match the vehicle dynamic behavior. The updated models were then used to fine tune the control system to provide fighter-like handling characteristics. A design methodology was developed which works within the existing control system architecture to provide improved handling qualities and acceptable stability with a minimum of cost in both implementation as well as software verification and validation.

  6. Quality evaluation of onion bulbs during low temperature drying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaeni, M.; Asiah, N.; Wibowo, Y. P.; Yusron, D. A. A.

    2016-06-01

    A drying technology must be designed carefully by evaluating the foods' final quality properties as a dried material. Thermal processing should be operated with the minimum chance of substantial flavour, taste, color and nutrient loss. The main objective of this research was to evaluate the quality parameters of quercetin content, color, non-enzymatic browning and antioxidant activity. The experiments showed that heating at different temperatures for several drying times resulted in a percentage of quercetin being generally constant. The quercetin content maintained at the value of ±1.2 % (dry basis). The color of onion bulbs was measured by CIE standard illuminant C. The red color (a*) of the outer layer of onion bulbs changed significantly when the drying temperature was increased. However the value of L* and b* changed in a fluctuating way based on the temperature. The change of onion colors was influenced by temperature and moisture content during the drying process. The higher the temperature, the higher it affects the rate of non-enzymatic browning reaction. The correlation between temperature and reaction rate constant was described as Arrhenius equation. The rate of non-enzymatic browning increases along with the increase of drying temperature. The results showed that higher drying temperatures were followed by a lower IC10. This condition indicated the increase of antioxidant activity after the drying process.

  7. [Evaluation of the quality of proteins of various vegetable grains used in various biological methods].

    PubMed

    Bressani, R; Elías, L G

    1976-09-01

    The protein value of different legume foods was studied in weanling rats by determining Net protein Utilization (NPU), Protein Efficiency Ratio (PER), Biological Value (BV), Nitrogen Balance (NB) and digestibility of the protein. NPU was determined by carcass analysis and by nitrogen determination in one of the hind legs of the experimental animals. All samples were evaluated at a 10% protein level in the ration, with and without a methionine suplement. The effect of protein concentration in the diet on the protein quality determinations used was also studied in the black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) sample. Results showed a good correlation among the several values of protein quality evaluation determined by the different methods used, indicating that any of these procedures can differentiate protein quality between samples. Likewise, it was confirmed that NPU can be as accurately calculated by nitrogen carcass analysis as by determining the nitrogen content in the hind leg of the animals. Due to its low cost and the small amount of sample required for the determination, the modified NPU method using the traditional 10-day experimental period could be very useful in determing NPU in programs dealing with the nutritional improvement of food legumes.

  8. Evaluation of an Enhanced Stimulus-Stimulus Pairing Procedure to Increase Early Vocalizations of Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Esch, Barbara E.; Carr, James E.; Grow, Laura L.

    2009-01-01

    Evidence to support stimulus-stimulus pairing (SSP) in speech acquisition is less than robust, calling into question the ability of SSP to reliably establish automatically reinforcing properties of speech and limiting the procedure's clinical utility for increasing vocalizations. We evaluated the effects of a modified SSP procedure on…

  9. Evaluation of selected surface-water-quality stations in Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rucker, S.J.; DeLong, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Wyoming Department of Agriculture, has conducted a surface-water-quality program in Wyoming since 1965. The purpose has been to determine the chemical quality of the water in terms of the major dissolved constituents (salinity). Changing agricultural techniques and energy development have stimulated a need for an expanded program involving additional types of data. This report determines the adequacy of the data collected thus far to describe the chemical quality. The sampling program was evaluated by determining how well the data describe the dissolved-solids load of the streams. Monthly mean loads were estimated at 16 stations throughout the network where daily streamflow and daily specific conductance were available. Monthly loads were then compared with loads estimated from daily streamflow and data derived from analyses of samples collected on a monthly basis at these same stations. Agreement was good. Solute-load hydrographs were constructed for 37 stations and from some reaches where streamflow records were available. Because stations where no discharge records are available are not amenable to this type of analysis, data collected at these stations are of limited usefulness. This report covers analyses of data for all qualifying sites in Wyoming except those in the Green River Basin, which were analyzed in U.S. Geological Survey Water Resources Investigations 77-103. The salinity in most of the streams evaluated is adequately described by the data collected. Reduced sampling is feasible, and time and money can be diverted to collecting other data. (USGS)

  10. Multiple Criteria Evaluation of Quality and Optimisation of e-Learning System Components

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Dagiene, Valentina

    2010-01-01

    The main research object of the paper is investigation and proposal of the comprehensive Learning Object Repositories (LORs) quality evaluation tool suitable for their multiple criteria decision analysis, evaluation and optimisation. Both LORs "internal quality" and "quality in use" evaluation (decision making) criteria are analysed in the paper.…

  11. Research on Evaluation Indicator System for Teaching Quality of College Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wen, Shuhong; Wang, Xiaohong

    2008-01-01

    This paper conducts research on the connotations and characteristics of evaluation indicator system for teaching quality of college teachers, constructs the contents of the evaluation indicator system for teaching quality of college teachers and applies the contents in the practice of teaching quality monitoring and evaluation so as to prove their…

  12. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  13. Quality Management Procedures Influence the Food Safety Practices at Childcare Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enke, Allison A.; Briley, Margaret E.; Curtis, Suzanne R.; Greninger, Sue A.; Staskel, Deanna M.

    2007-01-01

    Childcare in the United States (US) has become a necessary part of life for most working parents with the increased use of center-based childcare over the past three decades. Approximately 13 million preschoolers attend some form of childcare. Literature indicates the main predictors of quality childcare programs are adequate experience and…

  14. Experience Gained from the Application of Basic Quality Assurance Procedures in a Greek University Engineering Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stamatelos, A. M.

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, significant funding has become available to Greek public universities to support the convergence to the common European space of higher education. In a number of departments, this funding was wisely invested in the development of a quality culture, covering not only the educational process, but also the services offered by…

  15. Water Quality & Pollutant Source Monitoring: Field and Laboratory Procedures. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Water Program Operations (EPA), Cincinnati, OH. National Training and Operational Technology Center.

    This training manual presents material on techniques and instrumentation used to develop data in field monitoring programs and related laboratory operations concerned with water quality and pollution monitoring. Topics include: collection and handling of samples; bacteriological, biological, and chemical field and laboratory methods; field…

  16. Evaluation of air quality in Chengdu, Sichuan Basin, China: are China's air quality standards sufficient yet?

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Jaffe, Daniel; Tang, Ya; Bresnahan, Meaghan; Song, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Air quality evaluation is important in order to inform the public about the risk level of air pollution to human health. To better assess air quality, China released its new national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS-2012) and the new method to classify air quality level (AQL) in 2012. In this study, we examined the performance of China's NAAQS-2012 and AQL classification method through applying them, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, and the US AQL classification method to evaluate air quality in Chengdu, the largest city in southwestern China. The results show that annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀, PM₂.₅, SO₂, NO₂, and O₃ at the seven urban sites were in the ranges of 138-161, 87-98, 18-32, 54-70, and 42-57 μg/m(3), respectively, and the annual mean concentrations of CO were in the range of 1.09-1.28 mg/m(3). Chengdu is located in one of the four largest regions affected by haze in China, and PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ were the top air pollutants, with annual concentrations over 2 times of their standards in NAAQS-2012 and over 7 times of the WHO guidelines. Annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were much lower at the background site (LYS) than at the urban sites, but the annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ at LYS were 3.5 and 5.7 times of the WHO guidelines, respectively. These suggest that severe air pollution in Chengdu was largely associated with local emissions but also related to regional air pollution. The compliance rates of PM₁₀ , PM₂.₅, SO₂, and O₃ met China's NAAQS-2012 standards four times more frequently than they met the WHO guidelines, as NAAQS-2012 uses the loosest interim target (IT) standards of WHO for these four pollutants. Air pollution in Chengdu was estimated and stated to be less severe using China's classification than using the US classification, as China uses weaker concentration breakpoints and benign descriptions of AQL. Furthermore, China's AQL classification method

  17. Evaluation of air quality in Chengdu, Sichuan Basin, China: are China's air quality standards sufficient yet?

    PubMed

    Qiao, Xue; Jaffe, Daniel; Tang, Ya; Bresnahan, Meaghan; Song, Jie

    2015-05-01

    Air quality evaluation is important in order to inform the public about the risk level of air pollution to human health. To better assess air quality, China released its new national ambient air quality standards (NAAQS-2012) and the new method to classify air quality level (AQL) in 2012. In this study, we examined the performance of China's NAAQS-2012 and AQL classification method through applying them, the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines, and the US AQL classification method to evaluate air quality in Chengdu, the largest city in southwestern China. The results show that annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀, PM₂.₅, SO₂, NO₂, and O₃ at the seven urban sites were in the ranges of 138-161, 87-98, 18-32, 54-70, and 42-57 μg/m(3), respectively, and the annual mean concentrations of CO were in the range of 1.09-1.28 mg/m(3). Chengdu is located in one of the four largest regions affected by haze in China, and PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ were the top air pollutants, with annual concentrations over 2 times of their standards in NAAQS-2012 and over 7 times of the WHO guidelines. Annual mean concentrations of the pollutants were much lower at the background site (LYS) than at the urban sites, but the annual mean concentrations of PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅ at LYS were 3.5 and 5.7 times of the WHO guidelines, respectively. These suggest that severe air pollution in Chengdu was largely associated with local emissions but also related to regional air pollution. The compliance rates of PM₁₀ , PM₂.₅, SO₂, and O₃ met China's NAAQS-2012 standards four times more frequently than they met the WHO guidelines, as NAAQS-2012 uses the loosest interim target (IT) standards of WHO for these four pollutants. Air pollution in Chengdu was estimated and stated to be less severe using China's classification than using the US classification, as China uses weaker concentration breakpoints and benign descriptions of AQL. Furthermore, China's AQL classification method

  18. Enhanced job control language procedures for the SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Karavitis, G.A.

    1984-01-01

    The SIMSYS2D two-dimensional water-quality simulation system is a large-scale digital modeling software system used to simulate flow and transport of solutes in freshwater and estuarine environments. Due to the size, processing requirements, and complexity of the system, there is a need to easily move the system and its associated files between computer sites when required. A series of job control language (JCL) procedures was written to allow transferability between IBM and IBM-compatible computers. (USGS)

  19. Development of procedures to ensure quality and integrity in Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) diagnostics systems

    SciTech Connect

    Coutts, G.W.; Coon, M.L.; Hinz, A.F.; Hornady, R.S.; Lang, D.D.; Lund, N.P.

    1983-11-30

    The diagnostic systems for Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U) have grown from eleven initial systems to more than twenty systems. During operation, diagnostic system modifications are sometimes required to complete experimental objectives. Also, during operations new diagnostic systems are being developed and implemented. To ensure and maintain the quality and integrity of the data signals, a set of plans and systematic actions are being developed. This paper reviews the procedures set in place to maintain the integrity of existing data systems and ensure the performance objectives of new diagnostics being added.

  20. Evaluation of Various Radar Data Quality Control Algorithms Based on Accumulated Radar Rainfall Statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, Michael; Steiner, Matthias; Wolff, David B.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Kessinger, Cathy; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The primary function of the TRMM Ground Validation (GV) Program is to create GV rainfall products that provide basic validation of satellite-derived precipitation measurements for select primary sites. A fundamental and extremely important step in creating high-quality GV products is radar data quality control. Quality control (QC) processing of TRMM GV radar data is based on some automated procedures, but the current QC algorithm is not fully operational and requires significant human interaction to assure satisfactory results. Moreover, the TRMM GV QC algorithm, even with continuous manual tuning, still can not completely remove all types of spurious echoes. In an attempt to improve the current operational radar data QC procedures of the TRMM GV effort, an intercomparison of several QC algorithms has been conducted. This presentation will demonstrate how various radar data QC algorithms affect accumulated radar rainfall products. In all, six different QC algorithms will be applied to two months of WSR-88D radar data from Melbourne, Florida. Daily, five-day, and monthly accumulated radar rainfall maps will be produced for each quality-controlled data set. The QC algorithms will be evaluated and compared based on their ability to remove spurious echoes without removing significant precipitation. Strengths and weaknesses of each algorithm will be assessed based on, their abilit to mitigate both erroneous additions and reductions in rainfall accumulation from spurious echo contamination and true precipitation removal, respectively. Contamination from individual spurious echo categories will be quantified to further diagnose the abilities of each radar QC algorithm. Finally, a cost-benefit analysis will be conducted to determine if a more automated QC algorithm is a viable alternative to the current, labor-intensive QC algorithm employed by TRMM GV.

  1. A rapid HPLC procedure for analysis of analgesic pharmaceutical mixtures for quality assurance and drug diversion testing.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Carl E; Poklis, Alphonse

    2005-10-01

    A simple high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method that allows for the rapid identification and quantification of analgesic and anesthetic solutions typically used in surgical procedures or patient controlled analgesia is presented. The separation of bupivacaine, clonidine, fentanyl, hydromorphone, midazolam, and morphine is complete in less than 20 min. The method allows test solutions to be either directly injected or diluted prior to injection into the HPLC system. The method is useful from the standpoint that pharmaceutical preparations are usually submitted with the known drug of interest and expected concentration. The method is also useful for initial screening of solutions submitted that are either unknown or of questionable identity. The method has been successfully applied as part of hospital-based quality control and quality assurance programs to detect not only errors in the preparation of solutions of scheduled drugs, but also to uncover illegal diversion of drugs of abuse by medical personnel.

  2. A prototype of mammography CADx scheme integrated to imaging quality evaluation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiabel, Homero; Matheus, Bruno R. N.; Angelo, Michele F.; Patrocínio, Ana Claudia; Ventura, Liliane

    2011-03-01

    As all women over the age of 40 are recommended to perform mammographic exams every two years, the demands on radiologists to evaluate mammographic images in short periods of time has increased considerably. As a tool to improve quality and accelerate analysis CADe/Dx (computer-aided detection/diagnosis) schemes have been investigated, but very few complete CADe/Dx schemes have been developed and most are restricted to detection and not diagnosis. The existent ones usually are associated to specific mammographic equipment (usually DR), which makes them very expensive. So this paper describes a prototype of a complete mammography CADx scheme developed by our research group integrated to an imaging quality evaluation process. The basic structure consists of pre-processing modules based on image acquisition and digitization procedures (FFDM, CR or film + scanner), a segmentation tool to detect clustered microcalcifications and suspect masses and a classification scheme, which evaluates as the presence of microcalcifications clusters as well as possible malignant masses based on their contour. The aim is to provide enough information not only on the detected structures but also a pre-report with a BI-RADS classification. At this time the system is still lacking an interface integrating all the modules. Despite this, it is functional as a prototype for clinical practice testing, with results comparable to others reported in literature.

  3. Development of apparatus and procedures for evaluating radon-resistant construction materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pugh, T.D.; Greenfield, M.B.; MacKenzie, J.; Meijer, R.J. de

    1992-12-31

    Laboratory facilities and apparatus have been constructed to measure radon exhalation from, and radon permeability through, various construction materials. This phase of the project has focused on development of test apparatus and evaluation of instrumentation. Results indicate significant spatial variability in the radon permeability of polyethylene, even when all test samples were selected from the same roll of material, and when no visible differentiation could be made regarding sample quality. Implications for code enforcement are described, and recommendations are offered for refinement of equipment and the measurement process, prioritization of future materials testing, and specific building code provisions, based on our results.

  4. Stability assessment of QKD procedures in commercial quantum cryptography systems versus quality of dark channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacak, Monika; Melniczuk, Damian; Jacak, Janusz; Jóźwiak, Ireneusz; Gruber, Jacek; Jóźwiak, Piotr

    2015-02-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of the quantum key distribution (QKD) systems to the hacking attack including simultaneous and frequent system self-decalibrations, we analyze the stability of the QKD transmission organized in two commercially available systems. The first one employs non-entangled photons as flying qubits in the dark quantum channel for communication whereas the second one utilizes the entangled photon pairs to secretly share the cryptographic key. Applying standard methods of the statistical data analysis to the characteristic indicators of the quality of the QKD communication (the raw key exchange rate [RKER] and the quantum bit error rate [QBER]), we have estimated the pace of the self-decalibration of both systems and the repeatability rate in the case of controlled worsening of the dark channel quality.

  5. Radical Surgery for Endometriosis: Analysis of Quality of Life and Surgical Procedure

    PubMed Central

    De la Hera-Lazaro, Cristina M.; Muñoz-González, Jose L.; Perez, Reyes Oliver; Vellido-Cotelo, Rocío; Díez-Álvarez, Alvaro; Muñoz-Hernando, Leticia; Alvarez-Conejo, Carmen; Jiménez-López, Jesús S.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The main aim of this study is to determine the improvement in quality of life in patients who have undergone radical surgery because of severe endometriosis. PATIENTS AND METHODS This nonrandomized interventional study (quasi experimental) was carried out between January 2009 and September 2014. A total of 46 patients with diagnosis of severe endometriosis were included. Radical surgery, including hysterectomy, was performed. Acting as their own control group, the patients were asked to fill in a validated questionnaire of quality of life [Endometriosis Health Profile-5 (EHP-5)] and a visual analog scale of pain at the moment of the preoperative visit (one month prior to surgery) and six months after the surgery. RESULTS Radical surgery for endometriosis was performed in 46 patients at our center over the period of six years. Among the patients, 73.9% of them had undergone previous surgery for endometriosis. In 82.6% of cases, a complete laparoscopic resection was carried out. Gastrointestinal tract resection was performed in 21.7%, and urinary tract resection was necessary in 8.7%. The mean age of the patients was 38.6 years. The rate of complications was 30.4%. Six months after the surgery, all items of the EHP-5 questionnaire had a lower score, which means an improvement in all aspects of quality of life related to endometriosis. The difference obtained between the scores before and after the surgery was statistically significant. The mean visual analog scale score before the surgery was 8.5, whereas it decreased to 1.4 after the surgery (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION Performing a radical surgery is a difficult decision to make; however, it can provide optimal results in terms of improvement of quality of life and, therefore, should be considered when conservative therapy fails. PMID:26966396

  6. Evaluating North Carolina Food Pantry Food Safety-Related Operating Procedures.

    PubMed

    Chaifetz, Ashley; Chapman, Benjamin

    2015-11-01

    Almost one in seven American households were food insecure in 2012, experiencing difficulty in providing enough food for all family members due to a lack of resources. Food pantries assist a food-insecure population through emergency food provision, but there is a paucity of information on the food safety-related operating procedures used in the pantries. Food pantries operate in a variable regulatory landscape; in some jurisdictions, they are treated equivalent to restaurants, while in others, they operate outside of inspection regimes. By using a mixed methods approach to catalog the standard operating procedures related to food in 105 food pantries from 12 North Carolina counties, we evaluated their potential impact on food safety. Data collected through interviews with pantry managers were supplemented with observed food safety practices scored against a modified version of the North Carolina Food Establishment Inspection Report. Pantries partnered with organized food bank networks were compared with those that operated independently. In this exploratory research, additional comparisons were examined for pantries in metropolitan areas versus nonmetropolitan areas and pantries with managers who had received food safety training versus managers who had not. The results provide a snapshot of how North Carolina food pantries operate and document risk mitigation strategies for foodborne illness for the vulnerable populations they serve. Data analysis reveals gaps in food safety knowledge and practice, indicating that pantries would benefit from more effective food safety training, especially focusing on formalizing risk management strategies. In addition, new tools, procedures, or policy interventions might improve information actualization by food pantry personnel.

  7. Evaluating efficacy of various operative procedures done in anterior urethral stricture using urethral stricture score

    PubMed Central

    Mathur, Rajkumar; Patil, Lukesh A.; Khan, Fareed

    2016-01-01

    Context: Scoring systems have been an important tool of clinical decision making in medicine. As scoring systems like Glasgow Coma scale have made a revolutionary change in stratifying the patient, in particular, clinical scenario. Wiegand et al. in 2012 proposed UREThRAL Score a novel method to quantify anterior urethral stricture. Aims: The aim was to validate urethral stricture score (USS) for evaluating the efficacy of operative procedures. Settings and Design: Study was done in a retrospective manner and includes patients operated for anterior urethral stricture by a single surgeon in tertiary care center over the period of 2008–2014. Subjects and Methods: A total of 57 cases were included in this study who met the inclusion criteria, of these cases 7 underwent excision and primary anastomosis (EPA), 20 underwent preputial flap urethroplasty (PFUP), 22 underwent tunica albuginea urethroplasty (TAU), and rest 8 underwent scrotal flap urethroplasty (SFUP). Procedures were assigned different complexity level, and USS was compared with the particular procedure to see the relation between both. Statistical Analysis Used: Data were analyzed using ANOVA on SPSS software. Results: Mean USS for EPA, PFUP, TAU, and SFUP in our study group was found to be 6.57, 8.95, 9.00, and 10.00, respectively, with an overall USS of 9.03, with a standard deviation of 1.56. USS was significantly associated with complexity. Conclusions: Mean USS increased with increase in surgical complexity indicating that higher USS correlates with more complex surgery. Strongest association between complexity and the individual parameter was found with location and length. PMID:26834400

  8. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-11-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. The authors investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by {ge}70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  9. A Standardized Procedure for a Pre-evaluation of the IED Instance.

    PubMed

    Panepinto, Deborah; Ruffino, Barbara; Zanetti, Mariachiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a procedure, called EICS (Enterprise IPPC Compatibility Study) aimed at evaluating, by means of the calculation of three indexes, the compliance of the processes performed in an industrial plant with the guidelines provided by BREFs (BAT References) Documents. In fact, according to European Directive 2010/75/EU (concerning the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control and repealing European Directive 2008/01/EC), industrial plants must require authorizations to the competent authority stating the conformity of their activity, in order to obtain this conformity they are advised to Best Available Technologies (BAT). The aim of the BATs is to avoid or minimize the impact of an industrial activity on the environment through the prevention of the atmospheric emissions, wastewater discharge and energetic consumption, and the correct waste management thus improving the efficiency of the plant. The procedure shown in the present paper has been tested on several types of industrial plant (cement plants, secondary smelt foundries, paper-mill, and automotive industries as regards their paint lines). In this paper, the application of EICS method to a cement plant is presented: the obtained results highlight a good correlation between the index values and the real situation of the plant.

  10. A Standardized Procedure for a Pre-evaluation of the IED Instance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panepinto, Deborah; Ruffino, Barbara; Zanetti, Mariachiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a procedure, called EICS (Enterprise IPPC Compatibility Study) aimed at evaluating, by means of the calculation of three indexes, the compliance of the processes performed in an industrial plant with the guidelines provided by BREFs (BAT References) Documents. In fact, according to European Directive 2010/75/EU (concerning the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control and repealing European Directive 2008/01/EC), industrial plants must require authorizations to the competent authority stating the conformity of their activity, in order to obtain this conformity they are advised to Best Available Technologies (BAT). The aim of the BATs is to avoid or minimize the impact of an industrial activity on the environment through the prevention of the atmospheric emissions, wastewater discharge and energetic consumption, and the correct waste management thus improving the efficiency of the plant. The procedure shown in the present paper has been tested on several types of industrial plant (cement plants, secondary smelt foundries, paper-mill, and automotive industries as regards their paint lines). In this paper, the application of EICS method to a cement plant is presented: the obtained results highlight a good correlation between the index values and the real situation of the plant.

  11. Effect of zeolite on toxicity of ammonia in freshwater sediments: Implications for toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Besser, J.M.; Ingersoll, C.G.; Leonard, E.N.; Mount, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    Techniques for reducing ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments were investigated as part of a project to develop toxicity identification and evaluation (TIE) procedures for whole sediments. Although ammonia is a natural constituent of freshwater sediments, pollution can lead to ammonia concentrations that are toxic to benthic invertebrates, and ammonia can also contribute to the toxicity of sediments that contain more persistent contaminants. We investigated the use of amendments of a natural zeolite mineral, clinoptilolite, to reduce concentrations of ammonia in sediment pore water. Zeolites have been widely used for removal of ammonia in water treatment and in aqueous TIE procedures. The addition of granulated zeolite to ammonia-spiked sediments reduced pore-water ammonia concentrations and reduced ammonia toxicity to invertebrates. Amendments of 20% zeolite (v/v) reduced ammonia concentrations in pore water by ???70% in spiked sediments with ammonia concentrations typical of contaminated freshwater sediments. Zeolite amendments reduced toxicity of ammonia-spiked sediments to three taxa of benthic invertebrates (Hyalella azteca, Lumbriculus variegatus, and Chironomus tentans), despite their widely differing sensitivity to ammonia toxicity. In contrast, zeolite amendments did not reduce acute toxicity of sediments containing high concentrations of cadmium or copper or reduce concentrations of these metals in pore waters. These studies suggest that zeolite amendments, used in conjunction with toxicity tests with sensitive taxa such as H. azteca, may be an effective technique for selective reduction of ammonia toxicity in freshwater sediments.

  12. Evaluation of multiple comparison correction procedures in drug assessment studies using LORETA maps.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Joan Francesc; Romero, Sergio; Mañanas, Miguel Ángel; Rojas, Mónica; Riba, Jordi; Barbanoj, Manel José

    2015-10-01

    The identification of the brain regions involved in the neuropharmacological action is a potential procedure for drug development. These regions are commonly determined by the voxels showing significant statistical differences after comparing placebo-induced effects with drug-elicited effects. LORETA is an electroencephalography (EEG) source imaging technique frequently used to identify brain structures affected by the drug. The aim of the present study was to evaluate different methods for the correction of multiple comparisons in the LORETA maps. These methods which have been commonly used in neuroimaging and also simulated studies have been applied on a real case of pharmaco-EEG study where the effects of increasing benzodiazepine doses on the central nervous system measured by LORETA were investigated. Data consisted of EEG recordings obtained from nine volunteers who received single oral doses of alprazolam 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg, and placebo in a randomized crossover double-blind design. The identification of active regions was highly dependent on the selected multiple test correction procedure. The combined criteria approach known as cluster mass was useful to reveal that increasing drug doses led to higher intensity and spread of the pharmacologically induced changes in intracerebral current density.

  13. A Standardized Procedure for a Pre-evaluation of the IED Instance.

    PubMed

    Panepinto, Deborah; Ruffino, Barbara; Zanetti, Mariachiara; Genon, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    This study presents a procedure, called EICS (Enterprise IPPC Compatibility Study) aimed at evaluating, by means of the calculation of three indexes, the compliance of the processes performed in an industrial plant with the guidelines provided by BREFs (BAT References) Documents. In fact, according to European Directive 2010/75/EU (concerning the Integrated Pollution Prevention and Control and repealing European Directive 2008/01/EC), industrial plants must require authorizations to the competent authority stating the conformity of their activity, in order to obtain this conformity they are advised to Best Available Technologies (BAT). The aim of the BATs is to avoid or minimize the impact of an industrial activity on the environment through the prevention of the atmospheric emissions, wastewater discharge and energetic consumption, and the correct waste management thus improving the efficiency of the plant. The procedure shown in the present paper has been tested on several types of industrial plant (cement plants, secondary smelt foundries, paper-mill, and automotive industries as regards their paint lines). In this paper, the application of EICS method to a cement plant is presented: the obtained results highlight a good correlation between the index values and the real situation of the plant. PMID:26787013

  14. Evaluation of Thiel cadaveric model for MRI-guided stereotactic procedures in neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    Eljamel, Sam; Volovick, Alexander; Saliev, Timur; Eisma, Roos; Melzer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided deep brain stimulation (DBS) and high frequency focused ultrasound (FUS) is an emerging modality to treat several neurological disorders of the brain. Developing reliable models to train and assess future neurosurgeons is paramount to ensure safety and adequate training of neurosurgeons of the future. Methods: We evaluated the use of Thiel cadaveric model to practice MRI-guided DBS implantation and high frequency MRI-guided FUS in the human brain. We performed three training sessions for DBS and five sonications using high frequency MRI-guided FUS in five consecutive cadavers to assess the suitability of this model to use in training for stereotactic functional procedures. Results: We found the brains of these cadavers preserved in an excellent anatomical condition up to 15 months after embalmment and they were excellent model to use, MRI-guided DBS implantation and FUS produced the desired lesions accurately and precisely in these cadaveric brains. Conclusion: Thiel cadavers provided a very good model to perform these procedures and a potential model to train and assess neurosurgeons of the future. PMID:25289170

  15. An evaluation of microwave-assisted derivatization procedures using hyphenated mass spectrometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Damm, Markus; Rechberger, Gerald; Kollroser, Manfred; Kappe, C Oliver

    2009-07-31

    The potential of microwave-assisted derivatization techniques in systematic toxicological analysis using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was evaluated. Special emphasis was placed on the use of dedicated microwave reactors incorporating online temperature and pressure control. The use of such equipment allowed a detailed analysis of several microwave-assisted derivatization protocols comparing the efficiency of microwave and conventional heating methods utilizing a combination of GC-MS and liquid chromatography coupled with mass detection (LC-MS and LC-MS/MS) techniques. These studies revealed that for standard derivatization protocols such as acetylation (exemplified for codeine and morphine), pentafluoropropionylation (for 6-monoacetylmorphine) and trimethylsilylation (for Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol) a reaction time of 5 min at 100 degrees C in a microwave reactor was sufficient to allow for an effective derivatization. Control experiments using standard operating procedures (30 min at 60 degrees C conventional heating) indicated that the faster derivatization under microwave irradiation is a consequence of the higher reaction temperatures that can rapidly be attained in a sealed vessel and the more efficient heat transfer to the reaction mixture applying direct in core microwave dielectric heating. The results suggest that microwave derivatization procedures can significantly reduce the overall analysis time and increase sample throughput for GC-MS-based analytical methods.

  16. [Bacteriological evaluation of a procedure for disinfecting the Olympus GIF-D2 panendoscope].

    PubMed

    Ramírez Ramos, A; Domínguez, N; Makino, R; Barrera, C

    1980-01-01

    We have performed a total of 107 cultures from three critical areas of an Olympus Panendoscope Model GIF-D2 in order to evaluate bacteriologically cur system of desinfection of this endoscope. Samples were taken from the distal end, external surface and biopsy canal before and after an endoscopic examination was performed. The procedure of desinfection employed was as follows: washing of the distal end, external surface and biopsy canal with Hexaclorophel (Phisohex) diluted 50% with water and a second washing with tap water. In the middle of the study, we added a second washing of the biopsy canal with ten ml. of ether alcohol to allow for better drying. As a result of the present study we observed that in the distal end in 50% of the samples we encountered bacteria. Cultures of the external surface were positive in 20% of samples. The biopsy canal should be washed with ether alcohol to allow for complete drying, because when we did not use this method, Pseudomonas Aeruginosa was isolated. After this modification we did not isolate bacteria. The most frequent types of isolated bacteria were from the normal oropharyngeal flora. From the present study we can conclude that desinfection of the Panendespe with Hexaclorophen gives satisfactory results on the external surface of the endoscope. Biopsy canal requires additional washing with ether alcohol. However, both procedures do not assure a satisfactory desinfection of the distal end.

  17. Processing and quality evaluation of sweet potato chips.

    PubMed

    Akpapunam, M A; Abiante, D A

    1991-10-01

    A study was conducted to develop a process for producing sweet potato chips. Sweet potato tubers sliced to 0.5 by 0.5 cm size were dehydrated at 70 degrees C for various times (0, 90, 105, 120, 135, 150, 165 min). Determination of the moisture content of the dehydrated chips and sensory evaluation of the dehydrated and fried chips were carried out to establish optimum dehydration time and moisture which corresponded to optimum quality. Blanching the slices in water and 1% sodium metabisulfite solution respectively prior to the dehydration significantly (P greater than 0.05) improved the color and general acceptability of the chips over those immersed in water. The process development resulted in about 26 to 76% decrease in the ascorbic acid content of the chips. Significant changes also occurred in the total and reducing sugars of the chip following partial dehydration.

  18. Evaluation of hybrid treatments to produce high quality reuse water.

    PubMed

    Luiz, D B; Silva, G S; Vaz, E A C; José, H J; Moreira, R F P M

    2011-01-01

    Four tertiary hybrid treatments to produce high quality reused water, fulfilling Brazilian drinking water regulations, from a slaughterhouse's secondary treated effluent were evaluated. The pilot plant with a capacity of 500 L h(-1) was set up and consisted of these stages: pre-filtration system (cartridge filter 50 micron, activated carbon filter, cartridge filter 10 micron), oxidation (H2O2) or second filtration (ceramic filter, UF) followed by UV radiation (90 L h(-1)). The best combination was T4: pre-filtration followed by H2O2 addition and UV radiation (AOP H2O2/UV). Disinfection kinetics by T4 followed pseudo first-order kinetics: k(T4) = 0.00943 s(-1) or 0.00101 cm2 mJ(-1). Three different zones (A, B, C) were observed in the UV254 degradation kinetics (pseudo-first order kinetics): k' decreased over time (k'(A) > k'(B) > k'(C)).

  19. Evaluation of procedures for estimating ruminal particle turnover and diet digestibility in ruminant animals

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, R.C.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures used in estimating ruminal particle turnover and diet digestibility were evaluated in a series of independent experiments. Experiment 1 and 2 evaluated the influence of sampling site, mathematical model and intraruminal mixing on estimates of ruminal particle turnover in beef steers grazing crested wheatgrass or offered ad libitum levels of prairie hay once daily, respectively. Particle turnover rate constants were estimated by intraruminal administration (via rumen cannula) of ytterbium (Yb)-labeled forage, followed by serial collection of rumen digesta or fecal samples. Rumen Yb concentrations were transformed to natural logarithms and regressed on time. Influence of sampling site (rectum versus rumen) on turnover estimates was modified by the model used to fit fecal marker excretion curves in the grazing study. In contrast, estimated turnover rate constants from rumen sampling were smaller (P < 0.05) than rectally derived rate constants, regardless of fecal model used, when steers were fed once daily. In Experiment 3, in vitro residues subjected to acid or neutral detergent fiber extraction (IVADF and IVNDF), acid detergent fiber incubated in cellulase (ADFIC) and acid detergent lignin (ADL) were evaluated as internal markers for predicting diet digestibility. Both IVADF and IVNDF displayed variable accuracy for prediction of in vivo digestibility whereas ADL and ADFIC inaccurately predicted digestibility of all diets.

  20. Development of quality control procedures for mass produced and released Bactrocera Philippinensis (Diptera: Tephritidae) for sterile insect technique programs

    SciTech Connect

    Resilva, S.; Obra, G.; Zamora, N.; Gaitan, E.

    2007-03-15

    Quality control procedures for Bactrocera philippinensis Drew and Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) used in sterile insect technique (SIT) programs were established in the mass rearing facility at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute. Basic studies on pupal irradiation, holding/packaging systems, shipping procedures, longevity, sterility studies, and pupal eye color determination in relation to physiological development at different temperature regimes were investigated. These studies will provide baseline data for the development of quality control protocols for an expansion of B. philippinensis field programs with an SIT component in the future. (author) [Spanish] Los procedimientos de control de calidad para Bactrocera philippinensis Drew y Hancock 1994 (Diptera: Tephritidae) usados en programas de la tecnica de insecto esteril (TIE) fueron establecidos en la facilidad de cria en masa del Instituto Filipino de Investigacion Nuclear. Estudios basicos sobre la irradiacion de las pupas, sistemas de almacenaje/empaque, procedimientos del envio, longevidad, estudios de esterilidad y la determinacion del color de ojo de la pupa en relacion con el desarrollo fisiologico en regimenes diferentes de temperatura fueron investigados. Estos estudios proveeran una linea de informacion basica para el desarrollo de protocolos de control de calidad para una expansion de los programas de campo para B. philippinensis con un componente de TIS en el futuro. (author)