Science.gov

Sample records for quality evaluation procedures

  1. Modeling procedures for handling qualities evaluation of flexible aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Govindaraj, K. S.; Eulrich, B. J.; Chalk, C. R.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents simplified modeling procedures to evaluate the impact of flexible modes and the unsteady aerodynamic effects on the handling qualities of Supersonic Cruise Aircraft (SCR). The modeling procedures involve obtaining reduced order transfer function models of SCR vehicles, including the important flexible mode responses and unsteady aerodynamic effects, and conversion of the transfer function models to time domain equations for use in simulations. The use of the modeling procedures is illustrated by a simple example.

  2. Evaluation of the Indoor Air Quality Procedure for Use in Retail Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Chan, Wanyu R.; Mendell, Mark J.; Barrios, Marcella; Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Sidheswaran, Meera; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Eliseeva, Katerina; Fisk, William J.

    2013-02-01

    California's building efficiency standards (Title 24) mandate minimum prescribed ventilation rates (VRs) for commercial buildings. Title 24 standards currently include a prescriptive procedure similar to ASHRAE’s prescriptive “ventilation rate procedure”, but does not include an alternative procedure, akin to ASHRAE’s non-prescriptive “indoor air quality procedure” (IAQP). The IAQP determines minimum VRs based on objectively and subjectively evaluated indoor air quality (IAQ). The first primary goal of this study was to determine, in a set of California retail stores, the adequacy of Title 24 VRs and observed current measured VRs in providing the level of IAQ specified through an IAQP process, The second primary goal was to evaluate whether several VRs implemented experimentally in a big box store would achieve adequate IAQ, assessed objectively and subjectively. For the first goal, a list of contaminants of concern (CoCs) and reference exposure levels (RELs) were selected for evaluating IAQ. Ventilation rates and indoor and outdoor CoC concentrations were measured in 13 stores, including one “big box” store. Mass balance models were employed to calculate indoor contaminant source strengths for CoCs in each store. Using these source strengths and typical outdoor air contaminant concentrations, mass balance models were again used to calculate for each store the “IAQP” VR that would maintain indoor CoC concentrations below selected RELs. These IAQP VRs were compared to the observed VRs and to the Title 24- prescribed VRs. For the second goal, a VR intervention study was performed in the big box store to determine how objectively assessed indoor contaminant levels and subjectively assessed IAQ varied with VR. The three intervention study VRs included an approximation of the store’s current VR [0.24 air changes per hour (ACH)], the Title 24-prescribed VR [0.69 ACH], and the calculated IAQPbased VR [1.51 ACH]). Calculations of IAQP-based VRs showed

  3. The Dutch Review Process for Evaluating the Quality of Psychological Tests: History, Procedure, and Results

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Arne; Sijtsma, Klaas; Lucassen, Wouter; Meijer, Rob R.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the 2009 revision of the Dutch Rating System for Test Quality and presents the results of test ratings from almost 30 years. The rating system evaluates the quality of a test on seven criteria: theoretical basis, quality of the testing materials, comprehensiveness of the manual, norms, reliability, construct validity, and…

  4. Evaluation of ride quality measurement procedures by subjective experiments using simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klauder, L. T., Jr.; Clevenson, S. A.

    1975-01-01

    Since ride quality is, by definition, a matter of passenger response, there is need for a qualification procedure (QP) for establishing the degree to which any particular ride quality measurement procedure (RQMP) does correlate with passenger responses. Once established, such a QP will provide very useful guidance for optimal adjustment of the various parameters which any given RQMP contains. A QP is proposed based on use of a ride motion simulator and on test subject responses to recordings of actual vehicle motions. Test subject responses are used to determine simulator gain settings for the individual recordings such as to make all of the simulated rides equally uncomfortable to the test subjects. Simulator platform accelerations vs. time are recorded with each ride at its equal discomfort gain setting. The equal discomfort platform acceleration recordings are then digitzed.

  5. Determining the Quality of Competence Assessment Programs: A Self-Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baartman, Liesbeth K. J.; Prins, Frans J.; Kirschner, Paul A.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2007-01-01

    As assessment methods are changing, the way to determine their quality needs to be changed accordingly. This article argues for the use Competence Assessment Programs (CAPs), combinations of traditional tests and new assessment methods which involve both formative and summative assessments. To assist schools in evaluating their CAPs, a…

  6. Assessing the quality of classification models: Performance measures and evaluation procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichosz, Paweł

    2011-06-01

    This article systematically reviews techniques used for the evaluation of classification models and provides guidelines for their proper application. This includes performance measures assessing the model's performance on a particular dataset and evaluation procedures applying the former to appropriately selected data subsets to produce estimates of their expected values on new data. Their common purpose is to assess model generalization capabilities, which are crucial for judging the applicability and usefulness of both classification and any other data mining models. The review presented in this article is expected to be sufficiently in-depth and complete for most practical needs, while remaining clear and easy to follow with little prior knowledge. Issues that receive special attention include incorporating instance weights to performance measures, combining the same set of evaluation procedures with arbitrary performance measures, and avoiding pitfalls related to separating data subsets used for evaluation from those used for model creation. With the classification task unquestionably being one of the central data mining tasks and the vastly increasing number of data mining applications — not only in business, but also in engineering and research — this is expected to be interesting and useful for a wide audience. All presented techniques are accompanied by simple R language implementations and usage examples, which — whereas created to serve the illustration purpose mostly — can be actually used in practice.

  7. The evaluation of waste, surface and ground water quality using the Allium test procedure.

    PubMed

    Smaka-Kincl, V; Stegnar, P; Lovka, M; Toman, M J

    1996-07-05

    The bulbs of Allium cepa were grown in test liquids of various pollution levels as follows: undiluted industrial and municipal waste water; biological treatment plant output water; water from the Drava river upstream and downstream of the city of Maribor; and non-chlorinated drinking water as a negative control test. The paper presents the response of the Allium cepa genetic material to the presence of potential cytotoxic and genotoxic substances in test liquids and the suitability of the Allium cepa testing procedure as a method for short-term determination of water pollution level. The suitability of the Allium test procedure as a system for environmental monitoring is presented. The influence of water pollution on macroscopic and cytologic parameters of the common onion by application of the biological testing method was examined. The macroscopic parameter was inhibition of root growth. The cytological parameters were: aberrant cells in metaphase and anaphase, index of micronuclei appearance and inhibition of cell division. The possibility of categorization the different polluted test liquids into quality classes is presented according to the influence of the test liquids on macroscopic and cytologic parameters. Test liquids are divided into 8 quality classes: the first class is the least polluted surface waters, the second and the third classes are more polluted surface water, the fourth and the fifth classes are biological treatment plant output waters, the sixth till the eighth quality classes are untreated waste waters. The most polluted test liquids (untreated industrial and municipal waste waters) caused sublethal and even lethal effects. The most polluted tested liquids cause the inhibition of root growth over 50% (even up to 74%), decrease of mitotic index over 36% (even up to 66%), increase of presence of interphase cells with micronuclei over 3% and increase of presence of aberrant cells for more than 10 times in comparison to control test.

  8. Evaluation of the indoor air quality minimum ventilation rate procedure for use in California retail buildings.

    PubMed

    Dutton, S M; Mendell, M J; Chan, W R; Barrios, M; Sidheswaran, M A; Sullivan, D P; Eliseeva, E A; Fisk, W J

    2015-02-01

    This research assesses benefits of adding to California Title-24 ventilation rate (VR) standards a performance-based option, similar to the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air Conditioning Engineers 'Indoor Air Quality Procedure' (IAQP) for retail spaces. Ventilation rates and concentrations of contaminants of concern (CoC) were measured in 13 stores. Mass balance models were used to estimate 'IAQP-based' VRs that would maintain concentrations of all CoCs below health- or odor-based reference concentration limits. An intervention study in a 'big box' store assessed how the current VR, the Title 24-prescribed VR, and the IAQP-based VR (0.24, 0.69, and 1.51 air changes per hour) influenced measured IAQ and perceived of IAQ. Neither current VRs nor Title 24-prescribed VRs would maintain all CoCs below reference limits in 12 of 13 stores. In the big box store, the IAQP-based VR kept all CoCs below limits. More than 80% of subjects reported acceptable air quality at all three VRs. In 11 of 13 buildings, saving energy through lower VRs while maintaining acceptable IAQ would require source reduction or gas-phase air cleaning for CoCs. In only one of the 13 retail stores surveyed, application of the IAQP would have allowed reduced VRs without additional contaminant-reduction strategies.

  9. Development and application of procedures to evaluate air quality and visibility impacts of low-altitude flying operations

    SciTech Connect

    Liebsch, E.J.

    1990-08-01

    This report describes the development and application of procedures to evaluate the effects of low-altitude aircraft flights on air quality and visibility. The work summarized in this report was undertaken as part of the larger task of assessing the various potential environmental impacts associated with low-altitude military airspaces. Accomplishing the air quality/visibility analysis for the GEIS included (1) development and application of an integrated air quality model and aircraft emissions database specifically for Military Training Route (MTR) or similar flight operations, (2) selection and application of an existing air quality model to analyze the more widespread and less concentrated aircraft emissions from military Operations Areas (MOAs) and Restricted Areas (RAs), and (3) development and application of procedures to assess impacts of aircraft emissions on visibility. Existing air quality models were considered to be inadequate for predicting ground-level concentrations of pollutants emitted by aircraft along MTRs; therefore, the Single-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (SAILS) and Multiple-Aircraft Instantaneous Line Source (MAILS) models were developed to estimate potential impacts along MTRs. Furthermore, a protocol was developed and then applied in the field to determine the degree of visibility impairment caused by aircraft engine exhaust plumes. 19 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Evaluation Perspectives and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scriven, Michael

    This article on evaluation perspectives and procedures is divided into six sections. The first section briefly discusses qualitative and quantitative research and evaluation. In the second section there is an exploration of the utility and validity of a checklist that can be used to evaluate products, as an instrument for evaluating producers, for…

  11. Evaluation of variability and quality control procedures for a receptor-binding assay for paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins.

    PubMed

    Ruberu, S R; Langlois, G W; Masuda, M; Perera, S Kusum

    2012-01-01

    The receptor-binding assay (RBA) method for determining saxatoxin (STX) and its numerous analogues, which cause paralytic shellfish poisoning (PSP) in humans, was evaluated in a single laboratory study. Each step of the assay preparation procedure including the performance of the multi-detector TopCount® instrument was evaluated for its contribution to method variability. The overall inherent RBA variability was determined to be 17%. Variability within the 12 detectors was observed; however, there was no reproducible pattern in detector performance. This observed variability among detectors could be attributed to other factors, such as pipetting errors. In an attempt to reduce the number of plates rejected due to excessive variability in the method's quality control parameters, a statistical approach was evaluated using either Grubbs' test or the Student's t-test for rejecting outliers in the measurement of triplicate wells. This approach improved the ratio of accepted versus rejected plates, saving cost and time for rerunning the assay. However, the potential reduction in accuracy and the lack of improvement in precision suggests caution when using this approach. The current study has recommended an alternate quality control procedure for accepting or rejecting plates in place of the criteria currently used in the published assay, or the alternative of outlier testing. The recommended procedure involves the development of control charts to monitor the critical parameters identified in the published method (QC sample, EC₅₀, slope of calibration curve), with the addition of a fourth critical parameter which is the top value (100% binding) of the calibration curve.

  12. Evaluation of Data Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interest in assigning data quality indicators to food composition databases is expressed at a global level. The quality of analytical data needs to be determined as part of the data acquisition process. Data quality evaluation procedures developed by the USDA (Exler 1983) and recently refined and ...

  13. [Quality evaluation of the orthodontic practice for certification by ISO 9001. A procedure beneficial for medical, medico-dental or hospital service].

    PubMed

    Becker, G

    2001-01-01

    The accreditation of the ISO 9001 certification (ISO = International Standard Organization) is an external evaluation procedure carried out by independent experts, whose object is the analysis of the operational methods and practices of a medical care facility (e.g. hospital, private clinic, general practitioner's or dentist's practice) which decided to assume the concept, implementation and control of its own quality policy. The whole accreditation procedure represents the basic structure of a continuous dynamic progressiveness within a cabinet eager to offer outstanding quality. Moreover, it guarantees active and voluntary participation of every single member of the medical administration or technical team involved in the realization of this primary objective. In other words, we are talking about a very strong dynamic innovation leading to a change of views and the improvement of communication means, while simultaneously enhancing the security and quality aspects of medical care. The continuous guarantee of high quality medical care calls for precise planning and systematization of actions. First of all, these actions are defined, analyzed and listed in precise work procedures. As they are defined with the agreement of the whole team, they implicate respect and self control. This requires of course transparency of the treatment methods, whose different steps and procedures are described in detail in a logogramm set up in common.

  14. [Quality of life evaluation of the patients and parents satisfaction after Nuss procedure in the management of Pectus Excavatum].

    PubMed

    Soares, Tony R; Henriques-Coelho, Tiago; Vilaça, João; Silva, Ana Raquel; Carvalho, José Luis; Correia-Pinto, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    Pectus Excavatum is the most common congenital deformity of the chest. Although Pectus Excavatum can be associated with heart or lung problems, the main indication for surgical correction of this congenital anomaly is the body image dissatisfaction. The Nuss technique is a minimally invasive procedure that allows the placement of an intrathoracic prosthetic convex bar, previously bended, which mobilize the sternum anteriorly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the degree of satisfaction of the patients and parents after the application of the Nuss technique using the Pectus Excavatum Evaluation Questionnaire. All parameters of psychosocial character - self-image, difficulties in exposing the chest, frustration, sadness, social isolation and ridicule - found a statistically significant improvement after surgical correction of Pectus Excavatum from the perspective of patients and their parents. There was not a marked improvement and consensus regarding the overall physical performance of patients. Which is understandable, since, theoretically, the physical deformity is not responsible for significant limitations on exertion. The current surgical correction of Pectus Excavatum by the Nuss technique allows obtaining aesthetic results of the chest with the resolution of the main problems with body image. Increase awareness of health issues for psychosocial and physical factors which might be involved in this kind of deformities is important, especially when there is a satisfactory solution.

  15. Formation evaluation: Geological procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Whittaker, A.

    1985-01-01

    This volume goes beyond a discussion of petroleum geology and the techniques of hydrocarbon (oil and gas) logging as a reservoir evaluation tool. It provides the logging geologist with a review of geological techniques and classification systems that will ensure the maximum development of communicable geological information. Contents include: 1. Introduction--cuttings recovery, cutting sampling, core sampling, rock classification; 2. Detrital rocks--classification, description; 3. Carbonate rocks--classification, description; 4. Chemical rocks-introduction, siliceous rocks, ferruginous rocks, aluminous rocks, phosphatic rocks, aluminous rocks, carbonaceous rocks; 5. Igneous and metamorpbic rocks; Appendix; References and Index.

  16. A comparative study between evaluation methods for quality control procedures for determining the accuracy of PET/CT registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cha, Min Kyoung; Ko, Hyun Soo; Jung, Woo Young; Ryu, Jae Kwang; Choe, Bo-Young

    2015-08-01

    The Accuracy of registration between positron emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT) images is one of the important factors for reliable diagnosis in PET/CT examinations. Although quality control (QC) for checking alignment of PET and CT images should be performed periodically, the procedures have not been fully established. The aim of this study is to determine optimal quality control (QC) procedures that can be performed at the user level to ensure the accuracy of PET/CT registration. Two phantoms were used to carry out this study: the American college of Radiology (ACR)-approved PET phantom and National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) body phantom, containing fillable spheres. All PET/CT images were acquired on a Biograph TruePoint 40 PET/CT scanner using routine protocols. To measure registration error, the spatial coordinates of the estimated centers of the target slice (spheres) was calculated independently for the PET and the CT images in two ways. We compared the images from the ACR-approved PET phantom to that from the NEMA IEC body phantom. Also, we measured the total time required from phantom preparation to image analysis. The first analysis method showed a total difference of 0.636 ± 0.11 mm for the largest hot sphere and 0.198 ± 0.09 mm for the largest cold sphere in the case of the ACR-approved PET phantom. In the NEMA IEC body phantom, the total difference was 3.720 ± 0.97 mm for the largest hot sphere and 4.800 ± 0.85 mm for the largest cold sphere. The second analysis method showed that the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (1.33, 1.33) mm for a bone lesion, (-1.26, -1.33) mm for an air lesion and (-1.67, -1.60) mm for a hot sphere lesion for the ACR-approved PET phantom. For the NEMA IEC body phantom, the differences in the x location at the line profile of the lesion on PET and CT were (-1.33, 4.00) mm for the air

  17. Influence of processing procedure on the quality of Radix Scrophulariae: a quantitative evaluation of the main compounds obtained by accelerated solvent extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gang; Wu, Xin; Li, Qinglin; Cai, Hao; Cai, Baochang; Zhu, Xuemei

    2015-02-01

    An improved high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with accelerated solvent extraction method was used to simultaneously determine six compounds in crude and processed Radix Scrophulariae samples. Accelerated solvent extraction parameters such as extraction solvent, temperature, number of cycles, and analysis procedure were systematically optimized. The results indicated that compared with crude Radix Scrophulariae samples, the processed samples had lower contents of harpagide and harpagoside but higher contents of catalpol, acteoside, angoroside C, and cinnamic acid. The established method was sufficiently rapid and reliable for the global quality evaluation of crude and processed herbal medicines.

  18. Influences on Evaluation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooksy, Leslie J.; Mark, Melvin M.

    2012-01-01

    Attention to evaluation quality is commonplace, even if sometimes implicit. Drawing on her 2010 Presidential Address to the American Evaluation Association, Leslie Cooksy suggests that evaluation quality depends, at least in part, on the intersection of three factors: (a) evaluator competency, (b) aspects of the evaluation environment or context,…

  19. Toward standardising gamma camera quality control procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkhorayef, M. A.; Alnaaimi, M. A.; Alduaij, M. A.; Mohamed, M. O.; Ibahim, S. Y.; Alkandari, F. A.; Bradley, D. A.

    2015-11-01

    Attaining high standards of efficiency and reliability in the practice of nuclear medicine requires appropriate quality control (QC) programs. For instance, the regular evaluation and comparison of extrinsic and intrinsic flood-field uniformity enables the quick correction of many gamma camera problems. Whereas QC tests for uniformity are usually performed by exposing the gamma camera crystal to a uniform flux of gamma radiation from a source of known activity, such protocols can vary significantly. Thus, there is a need for optimization and standardization, in part to allow direct comparison between gamma cameras from different vendors. In the present study, intrinsic uniformity was examined as a function of source distance, source activity, source volume and number of counts. The extrinsic uniformity and spatial resolution were also examined. Proper standard QC procedures need to be implemented because of the continual development of nuclear medicine imaging technology and the rapid expansion and increasing complexity of hybrid imaging system data. The present work seeks to promote a set of standard testing procedures to contribute to the delivery of safe and effective nuclear medicine services.

  20. A procedure for high resolution satellite imagery quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites.

  1. A Procedure for High Resolution Satellite Imagery Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Crespi, Mattia; De Vendictis, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Data products generated from High Resolution Satellite Imagery (HRSI) are routinely evaluated during the so-called in-orbit test period, in order to verify if their quality fits the desired features and, if necessary, to obtain the image correction parameters to be used at the ground processing center. Nevertheless, it is often useful to have tools to evaluate image quality also at the final user level. Image quality is defined by some parameters, such as the radiometric resolution and its accuracy, represented by the noise level, and the geometric resolution and sharpness, described by the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). This paper proposes a procedure to evaluate these image quality parameters; the procedure was implemented in a suitable software and tested on high resolution imagery acquired by the QuickBird, WorldView-1 and Cartosat-1 satellites. PMID:22412312

  2. Software component quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, A. J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes a software inspection process that can be used to evaluate the quality of software components. Quality criteria, process application, independent testing of the process and proposed associated tool support are covered. Early results indicate that this technique is well suited for assessing software component quality in a standardized fashion. With automated machine assistance to facilitate both the evaluation and selection of software components, such a technique should promote effective reuse of software components.

  3. STANDARD EVALUATION PROCEDURES FOR SUBMITTED ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    As a NAFTA-inspired multi-governmental initiative, experts from the US EPA (Office of Research and Development, Office of Pesticide Program, or OPP) and the PMRA (Pest Management Regulatory Agency) of Health Canada formed a working group to create a document that would serve as an internal guidance document for regulatory evaluators. The resulting standard evaluation procedures address each of the neurobehavioral endpoints in developmental neurotoxicology studies conducted according to US EPA and OECD test guidelines. For each, there is a description of the behavior itself followed by pragmatic explanations of what to look for and what it can mean. The information is meant to inform interpretation by the reviewer which may influence policy, but not to dictate policy itself. While this was initially termed an internal guidance document for regulatory evaluators, it has since become apparent that it may be made publicly available by Health Canada, NAFTA, and/or OPP. To assist regulatory evaluators in their interpretation of developmental neurotoxicity data.

  4. ALMA quality assurance: concepts, procedures, and tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavan, A. M.; Tanne, S. L.; Akiyama, E.; Kurowski, R.; Randall, S.; Vila Vilaro, B.; Villard, E.

    2016-07-01

    Data produced by ALMA for the community undergoes a rigorous quality assurance (QA) process, from the initial observation ("QA0") to the final science-ready data products ("QA2"), to the QA feedback given by the Principal Investigators (PIs) when they receive the data products ("QA3"). Calibration data is analyzed to measure the performance of the observatory and predict the trend of its evolution ("QA1"). The procedure develops over different steps and involves several actors across all ALMA locations; it is made possible by the support given by dedicated software tools and a complex database of science data, meta-data and operational parameters. The life-cycle of each involved entity is well-defined, and it prevents for instance that "bad" data (that is, data not meeting the minimum quality standards) is ever processed by the ALMA pipeline. This paper describes ALMA's quality assurance concepts and procedures, including the main enabling software components.

  5. Evaluation of Quality Assurance Programs for Externships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruskiewicz, Joseph

    1982-01-01

    The procedures of the Pennsylvania College of Optometry's Office of External Educational Programs are reviewed to show how quality assurance techniques can be categorized. The format was designed to evaluate quality assurance procedures for both the educational and service aspects of eye care. (MLW)

  6. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality Assurance Procedures C Appendix...—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1—Determination of Adequate Chromatographic Peak Resolution In this....” Procedure 2—Procedure for Field Auditing GC Analysis Responsibilities of audit supervisor and analyst at...

  7. Evaluating Teaching Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Jacqueline; Douglas, Alex

    2006-01-01

    A comparison is made of student feedback questionnaires, peer review and the potential use of mystery students as a means of evaluating the quality of teaching and learning and providing a vehicle for continuous improvement. The available literature and primary data obtained via semi-structured interviews conducted with staff within a UK business…

  8. Quality assurance procedures for V378A matrix resin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamermesh, C. L.; Dynes, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    A characterization methodology has been developed on which to base quality assurance procedures for U.S. Polymeric V378A bismaleimide matrix resin. Chemical composition is established by partition reverse phase and size exclusion liquid chromatography. Cure rheology behavior is quantitatively characterized by dynamic viscoelastic analysis using the parallel plate technique. The overall cure process is characterized by differential scanning calorimetry. The sensitivity of the procedures is evaluated by studying the effects of ambient out time on the chemical end behaviorial properties of the resin.

  9. 40 CFR Appendix C to Part 61 - Quality Assurance Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality Assurance Procedures C Appendix C to Part 61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS...—Quality Assurance Procedures Procedure 1—Determination of Adequate Chromatographic Peak Resolution In...

  10. National Home Start Evaluation: Field Procedures Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nauta, Marrit J.

    This field procedures manual for community interviewers and site coordinators, one of a series of documents on the evaluation of the National Home Start program (NHS), describes specific testing procedures for collecting family data. A federally funded demonstration program, NHS is aimed at providing home-based services (such as health, education,…

  11. Evaluating EOPS: A User Oriented Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alkin, Marvin C.; Stecher, Brian M.

    This seven-part report presents a recommended plan for state-wide evaluation of the Extended Opportunity Programs and Services (EOPS) program in the California Community College System. Chapter I describes the procedures used by Educational Evaluation Associates in devising the plan, discusses the role played by evaluation study groups,…

  12. 1994 Ergonomics Program Quality Evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Longbotham, L.; Miller, D.P.

    1995-06-01

    A telephone survey was conducted to evaluate the quality of service provided to the primary customers of the Corporate Ergonomics Group (CEG). One hundred clients who received services between October 1993 and June 1994 were asked questions on their expectations, implementation of ergonomic recommendations, follow-ups, time required, productivity improvements, symptom alleviation, and satisfaction. Suggestions on how processes could be improved were also solicited. In general, recommendations are being implemented, worksite evaluations are going smoothly, and customers are satisfied with the process. The CEG was pleased to learn that half of the people who implemented recommendations experienced improvements in productivity, and four out of five symptomatic customers experienced partial or complete relief. Through analysis of the data and by studying clients` suggestions for process improvement, the CEG has developed a strategy for changing and improving current procedures and practices. These plans can be found in the last section of this report.

  13. A design procedure and handling quality criteria for lateral directional flight control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, G.; Henke, A. H.

    1972-01-01

    A practical design procedure for aircraft augmentation systems is described based on quadratic optimal control technology and handling-quality-oriented cost functionals. The procedure is applied to the design of a lateral-directional control system for the F4C aircraft. The design criteria, design procedure, and final control system are validated with a program of formal pilot evaluation experiments.

  14. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures.

    PubMed

    Manghani, Kishu

    2011-01-01

    It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality management. Quality control is focused on fulfilling quality requirements, whereas quality assurance is focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are fulfilled. The quality systems must be commensurate with the Company business objectives and business model. Top management commitment and its active involvement are critical in order to ensure at all times the adequacy, suitability, effectiveness and efficiency of the quality systems. Effective and efficient quality systems can promote timely registration of drugs by eliminating waste and the need for rework with overall financial and social benefits to the Company.

  15. Quality assurance: Importance of systems and standard operating procedures

    PubMed Central

    Manghani, Kishu

    2011-01-01

    It is mandatory for sponsors of clinical trials and contract research organizations alike to establish, manage and monitor their quality control and quality assurance systems and their integral standard operating procedures and other quality documents to provide high-quality products and services to fully satisfy customer needs and expectations. Quality control and quality assurance systems together constitute the key quality systems. Quality control and quality assurance are parts of quality management. Quality control is focused on fulfilling quality requirements, whereas quality assurance is focused on providing confidence that quality requirements are fulfilled. The quality systems must be commensurate with the Company business objectives and business model. Top management commitment and its active involvement are critical in order to ensure at all times the adequacy, suitability, effectiveness and efficiency of the quality systems. Effective and efficient quality systems can promote timely registration of drugs by eliminating waste and the need for rework with overall financial and social benefits to the Company. PMID:21584180

  16. Medical evaluation for outpatient dental procedures.

    PubMed

    Webb, B W

    1978-05-01

    Family physicians are often consulted to evaluate medically a patient for various dental procedures. The majority of the referrals are for diseases of the cardiovascular system. General guidelines have been established at the University of Maryland Family Health Center for the evaluation of these patients. These guidelines pertain to the use of local anesthetics and prophylaxis for endocarditis, as well as to the evaluation of patients with cardiac disease, hypertension, pulmonary disease, endocrine disease, neurological disease, hepatic disease, pregnancy, and anticoagulant therapy.

  17. Handling Qualities Influences on Civil Tiltrotor Terminal Operating Procedure Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, William A.; Simmons, Rickey C.; Tucker, George E.; Aiken, Edwin W. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The potential for tiltrotor aircraft as civil transports has been well recognized. Realization of that potential requires development of operating procedures tailored to take advantage of the tiltrotor's capabilities, including thrust vectoring independent of body pitch attitude and good low-speed control. While the tiltrotor shares flight characteristics with both fixed wing airplanes and helicopters, it must convert between those flight modes, typically within the context of precise terminal operations. A series of piloted simulation experiments has been conducted on the NASA Ames Research Center Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) to investigate the influence of tiltrotor cockpit design features on developing certification and operating criteria for civil tiltrotor transports. Handling qualities evaluations have shaped cockpit design guidelines and operating procedure development for a civil tiltrotor. In particular, four topics demonstrate the interplay of handling qualities and operations profile in the development of terminal operating procedures and cockpit or control equipment for a civil tiltrotor: conversion (airplane to helicopter mode), final approach path angle, operating profile speeds and speed changes (particularly under instrument conditions), and one engine inoperative operational considerations.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality Assurance and Quality Control... and Quality Control Procedures 1. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program Develop and implement a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for the continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quality Assurance and Quality Control... and Quality Control Procedures 1. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program Develop and implement a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for the continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  20. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quality Assurance and Quality Control... and Quality Control Procedures 1. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program Develop and implement a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for the continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  1. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quality Assurance and Quality Control... and Quality Control Procedures 1. Quality Assurance/Quality Control Program Develop and implement a quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program for the continuous emission monitoring systems,...

  2. Impacts of Climate Policy on Regional Air Quality, Health, and Air Quality Regulatory Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, T. M.; Selin, N. E.

    2011-12-01

    Both the changing climate, and the policy implemented to address climate change can impact regional air quality. We evaluate the impacts of potential selected climate policies on modeled regional air quality with respect to national pollution standards, human health and the sensitivity of health uncertainty ranges. To assess changes in air quality due to climate policy, we couple output from a regional computable general equilibrium economic model (the US Regional Energy Policy [USREP] model), with a regional air quality model (the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions [CAMx]). USREP uses economic variables to determine how potential future U.S. climate policy would change emissions of regional pollutants (CO, VOC, NOx, SO2, NH3, black carbon, and organic carbon) from ten emissions-heavy sectors of the economy (electricity, coal, gas, crude oil, refined oil, energy intensive industry, other industry, service, agriculture, and transportation [light duty and heavy duty]). Changes in emissions are then modeled using CAMx to determine the impact on air quality in several cities in the Northeast US. We first calculate the impact of climate policy by using regulatory procedures used to show attainment with National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for ozone and particulate matter. Building on previous work, we compare those results with the calculated results and uncertainties associated with human health impacts due to climate policy. This work addresses a potential disconnect between NAAQS regulatory procedures and the cost/benefit analysis required for and by the Clean Air Act.

  3. Teacher Reaction to ICP Quality Assurance Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Ann

    An integral part of the Quality Assurance Manual developed by Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) to accompany the Kindergarten Program is the end-of-program assessment of the Instructional Concepts Program (ICP). Following completion of ICP Quality Assurance assessment, four teachers were interviewed in order to gather information pertinent to…

  4. Evaluating a President: Criteria and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Garry D.

    1976-01-01

    Part II of the Minnesota Plan is presented. Criteria include problem solving and decision-making, personnel, academic planning and administration, fiscal management, student affairs, external relations, and relationship to the board. Procedures include the evaluation team, presidential self-assessment, institutional visit, exit interviews, and…

  5. Implementing a routine outcome assessment procedure to evaluate the quality of assistive technology service delivery for children with physical or multiple disabilities: Perceived effectiveness, social cost, and user satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Desideri, Lorenzo; Bizzarri, Martina; Bitelli, Claudio; Roentgen, Uta; Gelderblom, Gert-Jan; de Witte, Luc

    2016-01-01

    There is a lack of evidence on the effects and quality of assistive technology service delivery (ATSD). This study presents a quasi-experimental 3-months follow-up using a pre-test/post-test design aimed at evaluating outcomes of assistive technology (AT) interventions targeting children with physical and multiple disabilities. A secondary aim was to evaluate the feasibility of the follow-up assessment adopted in this study with a view to implement the procedure in routine clinical practice. Forty-five children aged 3-17 years were included. Parents were asked to complete the Individual Prioritised Problem Assessment (IPPA) for AT effectiveness; KWAZO (Kwaliteit van Zorg [Quality of Care]) and Quebec User Evaluation of Satisfaction with Assistive Technology (QUEST) 2.0 for satisfaction with ATSD; Siva Cost Analysis Instrument (SCAI) for estimating the social cost of AT interventions. At follow-up, 25 children used the AT recommended. IPPA effect sizes ranged from 1.4 to 0.7, showing a large effect of AT interventions. Overall, parents were satisfied with ATSD, but Maintenance, Professional Services, and AT Delivery were rated not satisfactory. SCAI showed more resources spent for AT intervention compared to human assistance without technological supports. AT may be an effective intervention for children with disabilities. Issues concerning responsiveness and feasibility of the IPPA and the SCAI instruments are discussed with a view to inform routine clinical practice.

  6. The challenge of evaluating surgical procedures.

    PubMed Central

    Stirrat, G. M.; Farrow, S. C.; Farndon, J.; Dwyer, N.

    1992-01-01

    All new interventions and procedures must be properly assessed in comparison to the currently accepted method(s). It is unethical not to do so. The optimum method is by Randomised Controlled Trial (RCT). This is ideally suited to the testing of drugs because the trial can usually be double blind and placebo controlled. RCTs are less commonly used for the evaluation of new surgical techniques. There are valid and invalid reasons for this and these are discussed. PMID:1567147

  7. Improving system quality through software evaluation.

    PubMed

    McDaniel, James G

    2002-05-01

    The role of evaluation is examined with respect to quality of software in healthcare. Of particular note is the failure of the Therac-25 radiation therapy machine. This example provides evidence of several types of defect which could have been detected and corrected using appropriate evaluation procedures. The field of software engineering has developed metrics and guidelines to assist in software evaluation but this example indicates that software evaluation must be extended beyond the formally defined interfaces of the software to its real-life operating context.

  8. Sensitivity of health risk estimates to air quality adjustment procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Whitfield, R.G.

    1997-06-30

    This letter is a summary of risk results associated with exposure estimates using two-parameter Weibull and quadratic air quality adjustment procedures (AQAPs). New exposure estimates were developed for children and child-occurrences, six urban areas, and five alternative air quality scenarios. In all cases, the Weibull and quadratic results are compared to previous results, which are based on a proportional AQAP.

  9. 42 CFR 422.502 - Evaluation and determination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.502 Evaluation and determination procedures. (a) Basis...

  10. 42 CFR 422.502 - Evaluation and determination procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Application Procedures and Contracts for Medicare Advantage Organizations § 422.502 Evaluation and determination procedures. (a) Basis...

  11. Evaluating Academic Productivity and Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilmore, Jeffrey L.; To, Duc-Le

    1992-01-01

    Results of two empirical studies of factors affecting academic quality give insight into ways in which educational costs, quality factors, and institutional structure increase or restrict productivity. It is found that evaluation of academic productivity is complex because of difficulties in determining inputs and outputs. Useful improvement…

  12. Quality-control standard operating procedures-an essential tool for developing quality preparations.

    PubMed

    Ashworth, Lisa D

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining quality in compounded preparations must be a top priority of top management, and it must involve all pharmacy employees. Pharmacy compounding requires the development and maintenance of standard operating procedures to ensure quality and minimize compounding errors. Standard operating procedures are detailed instructions initiated by the pharmacist-in-charge or the quality control officer for the purpose of assuring the reliable, consistent performance of routine tasks involved in formulation development, purchasing, compounding, testing, maintenance, materials handling, quality assurance, and dispensing. Maintaining written standard operation procedures is an important step in assuring that a phamacy has developed a quality compounding practice that meets and/or exceeds United States Pharmacopeial standards.

  13. Quality Indicators for Colonoscopy Procedures: A Prospective Multicentre Method for Endoscopy Units

    PubMed Central

    Coriat, Romain; Lecler, Augustin; Lamarque, Dominique; Deyra, Jacques; Roche, Hervé; Nizou, Catherine; Berretta, Olivier; Mesnard, Bruno; Bouygues, Martin; Soupison, Alain; Monnin, Jean-Luc; Podevin, Philippe; Cassaz, Carole; Sautereau, Denis; Prat, Frédéric; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Healthcare professionals are required to conduct quality control of endoscopy procedures, and yet there is no standardised method for assessing quality. The topic of the present study was to validate the applicability of the procedure in daily practice, giving physicians the ability to define areas for continuous quality improvement. Methods In ten endoscopy units in France, 200 patients per centre undergoing colonoscopy were enrolled in the study. An evaluation was carried out based on a prospectively developed checklist of 10 quality-control indicators including five dependent upon and five independent of the colonoscopy procedure. Results Of the 2000 procedures, 30% were done at general hospitals, 20% at university hospitals, and 50% in private practices. The colonoscopies were carried out for a valid indication for 95.9% (range 92.5–100). Colon preparation was insufficient in 3.7% (range 1–10.5). Colonoscopies were successful in 95.3% (range 81–99). Adenoma detection rate was 0.31 (range 0.17–0.45) in successful colonoscopies. Conclusion This tool for evaluating the quality of colonoscopy procedures in healthcare units is based on standard endoscopy and patient criteria. It is an easy and feasible procedure giving the ability to detect suboptimal practice and differences between endoscopy-units. It will enable individual units to assess the quality of their colonoscopy techniques. PMID:22509267

  14. Image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, E. K.; Hammill, H. B. (Principal Investigator)

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A new technique for image processing system performance prediction and product quality evaluation was developed. It was entirely objective, quantitative, and general, and should prove useful in system design and quality control. The technique and its application to determination of quality control procedures for the Earth Resources Technology Satellite NASA Data Processing Facility are described.

  15. Mutual Recognition of the Food and Drug Administration and European Community Member State Conformity Assessment Procedures; pharmaceutical GMP inspection reports, medical device quality system evaluation reports, and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports--FDA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-04-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations pursuant to an international agreement that is expected to be concluded between the United States and the European Community (EC) (Ref. 1). Under the terms of that agreement, FDA may normally endorse good manufacturing practice (GMP) inspection reports for pharmaceuticals provided by equivalent EC Member State regulatory authorities and medical device quality system evaluation reports and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports provided by equivalent conformity assessment bodies. FDA is taking this action to enhance its ability to ensure the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals and medical devices through more efficient and effective utilization of its regulatory resources. The agency is requesting comments on the proposed rule.

  16. Post-procedural evaluation of catheter contact force characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Martin; Brost, Alexander; Kiraly, Atilla; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-03-01

    Minimally invasive catheter ablation of electric foci, performed in electrophysiology labs, is an attractive treatment option for atrial fibrillation (AF) - in particular if drug therapy is no longer effective or tolerated. There are different strategies to eliminate the electric foci inducing the arrhythmia. Independent of the particular strategy, it is essential to place transmural lesions. The impact of catheter contact force on the generated lesion quality has been investigated recently, and first results are promising. There are different approaches to measure catheter-tissue contact. Besides traditional haptic feedback, there are new technologies either relying on catheter tip-to-tissue contact force or on local impedance measurements at the tip of the catheter. In this paper, we present a novel tool for post-procedural ablation point evaluation and visualization of contact force characteristics. Our method is based on localizing ablation points set during AF ablation procedures. The 3-D point positions are stored together with lesion specific catheter contact force (CF) values recorded during the ablation. The force records are mapped to the spatial 3-D positions, where the energy has been applied. The tracked positions of the ablation points can be further used to generate a 3-D mesh model of the left atrium (LA). Since our approach facilitates visualization of different force characteristics for post-procedural evaluation and verification, it has the potential to improve outcome by highlighting areas where lesion quality may be less than desired.

  17. 29 CFR 1956.22 - Procedures for evaluation and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Change, Evaluation and Withdrawal of Approval Procedures § 1956.22 Procedures for evaluation and... enforcement authority under section 18(e) of the Act is not relevant to Phase II and III monitoring...

  18. 29 CFR 1956.22 - Procedures for evaluation and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Change, Evaluation and Withdrawal of Approval Procedures § 1956.22 Procedures for evaluation and... enforcement authority under section 18(e) of the Act is not relevant to Phase II and III monitoring...

  19. 29 CFR 1956.22 - Procedures for evaluation and monitoring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Change, Evaluation and Withdrawal of Approval Procedures § 1956.22 Procedures for evaluation and... enforcement authority under section 18(e) of the Act is not relevant to Phase II and III monitoring...

  20. Evaluation of aerosol contamination during debonding procedures.

    PubMed

    Toroğlu, M S; Haytaç, M C; Köksal, F

    2001-08-01

    The aim of this study was to show how the aerosol generated by the use of an air turbine handpiece during debonding procedures increases the potential risk factor for the distribution of infectious agents. A second aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a preprocedural chlorhexidine mouth rinse in reducing the number of colony forming units (CFU) found in aerosol samples. Blood agar plates were attached to the face shields and the dental chair table and were used for collecting the aerosol samples. In the first part of the study, 260 samples were collected for the baseline group in an empty room, 36 samples were collected for the control group (C), in which the orthodontist, dental assistant, and the patient were in the operatory room, and 42 samples were collected for the debonding group (DB). The microbiologic analysis showed significant differences between the baseline group and the control group (P < .05). Furthermore, aerosol contamination increased significantly during the debonding procedure when compared with the control group (P < .01). In the second part of the study, an air turbine handpiece was used to remove excess adhesive from the tooth surface on one side of the mouth and air samples were collected. The patients then were instructed to rinse their mouths with 0.2% chlorhexidine gluconate for 1 minute, and the orthodontist worked on the other side of the mouth and the air sampling was repeated. An insignificant reduction was found in the number of colony forming units following the chlorhexidine mouth rinse. Results of this study indicated that orthodontists are exposed to high levels of aerosol generation and contamination during the debonding procedure, and preprocedural chlorhexidine gluconate mouth rinse appears to be ineffective in decreasing the exposure to infectious agents. Therefore, barrier equipment should be used to prevent aerosol contamination.

  1. Evaluating Quality in Educational Facilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abend, Allen; Ornstein, Sheila Walbe; Baltas, Emmanuel; de la Garza, Jaime; Watson, Chris; Lange, Kurt; von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2006-01-01

    In 2005, the OECD Programme on Educational Building (PEB) organised two international experts' group meetings to discuss how countries define and evaluate quality in educational facilities. The research and experiences of six experts are presented in this article, in addition to the lessons learned from the experts' group meetings. The director of…

  2. Quality evaluation of poultry carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The USDA Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) has been mandated to organoleptically inspect poultry carcasses online at processing plants. For poultry quality and safety evaluation, the development of accurate and reliable instruments for online detection of unwholesomeness such as septicemia, cada...

  3. A monthly quality assurance procedure for 3D surface imaging.

    PubMed

    Wooten, H Omar; Klein, Eric E; Gokhroo, Garima; Santanam, Lakshmi

    2010-12-21

    A procedure for periodic quality assurance of a video surface imaging system is introduced. AlignRT is a video camera-based patient localization system that captures and compares images of a patient's topography to a DICOM-formatted external contour, then calculates shifts required to accurately reposition the patient. This technical note describes the tools and methods implemented in our department to verify correct and accurate operation of the AlignRT hardware and software components. The procedure described is performed monthly and complements a daily calibration of the system.

  4. Eder Acquisition 2007 Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul R.

    2008-01-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Eder acquisition in July 2007 to determine how many protection habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the project site as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams. Baseline HEP surveys generated 3,857.64 habitat units or 1.16 HUs per acre. HEP surveys also served to document general habitat conditions. Survey results indicated that the herbaceous plant community lacked forbs species, which may be due to both livestock grazing and the late timing of the surveys. Moreover, the herbaceous plant community lacked structure based on lower than expected visual obstruction readings (VOR); likely a direct result of livestock impacts. In addition, introduced herbaceous vegetation including cultivated pasture grasses, e.g. crested wheatgrass and/or invader species such as cheatgrass and mustard, were present on most areas surveyed. The shrub element within the shrubsteppe cover type was generally a mosaic of moderate to dense shrubby areas interspersed with open grassland communities while the 'steppe' component was almost entirely devoid of shrubs. Riparian shrub and forest areas were somewhat stressed by livestock. Moreover, shrub and tree communities along the lower reaches of Nine Mile Creek suffered from lack of water due to the previous landowners 'piping' water out of the stream channel.

  5. Constraint-based evaluation of sequential procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Matthew R.

    1990-01-01

    Constraining the operation of an agent requires knowledge of the restrictions to physical and temporal capabilities of that agent, as well as an inherent understanding of the desires being processed by that agent. Usually a set of constraints are available that must be adhered to in order to foster safe operations. In the worst case, violation of a constraint may be cause to terminate operation. If the agent is carrying out a plan, then a method for predicting the agent's desires, and therefore possible constraint violations, is required. The conceptualization of constraint-based reasoning used herein assumes that a system knows how to select a constraint for application as well as how to apply that constraint once it is selected. The application of constraint-based reasoning for evaluating certain kinds of plans known as sequential procedures is discussed. By decomposing these plans, it is possible to apply context dependent constraints in production system fashion without incorporating knowledge of the original planning process.

  6. 76 FR 27016 - Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-10

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Evaluating Test Procedures for Voting Systems AGENCY... assess NIST's test procedures for voting equipment. Manufacturers interested in participating in this... for certification) by the Election Assistance Commission to develop and assess NIST test protocols...

  7. Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) operating procedures handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, T.E. ); Das, S. )

    1992-08-01

    The Operating Procedures Handbook of the Environmental Quality Information Analysis Center (EQIAC) is intended to be kept current as EQIAC develops and evolves. Its purpose is to provide a comprehensive guide to the mission, infrastructure, functions, and operational procedures of EQIAC. The handbook is a training tool for new personnel and a reference manual for existing personnel. The handbook will be distributed throughout EQIAC and maintained in binders containing current dated editions of the individual sections. The handbook will be revised at least annually to reflect the current structure and operational procedures of EQIAC. The EQIAC provides information on environmental issues such as compliance, restoration, and environmental monitoring do the Air Force and DOD contractors.

  8. Quality Assurance Procedures for ModCat Database Code Files

    SciTech Connect

    Siciliano, Edward R.; Devanathan, Ram; Guillen, Zoe C.; Kouzes, Richard T.; Schweppe, John E.

    2014-04-01

    The Quality Assurance procedures used for the initial phase of the Model Catalog Project were developed to attain two objectives, referred to as “basic functionality” and “visualization.” To ensure the Monte Carlo N-Particle model input files posted into the ModCat database meet those goals, all models considered as candidates for the database are tested, revised, and re-tested.

  9. HANDBOOK: QUALITY ASSURANCE/QUALITY CONTROL (QA/QC) PROCEDURES FOR HAZARDOUS WASTE INCINERATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations for hazardous waste incineration require trial burns by permit applicants. uality Assurance Project Plan (QAPjP) must accompany a trial burn plan with appropriate quality assurance/quality control procedures. uidance on the prepa...

  10. A procedure for evaluating environmental impact

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Luna Bergere; Clarke, Frank Eldridge; Hanshaw, Bruce B.; Balsley, James R.

    1971-01-01

    The procedure does not limit the development of detail in any specific aspect of the environment; a separate expanded matrix for any environmental aspect can easily be developed within the framework provided.

  11. The Development of Classroom Observation Procedures for Evaluating Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Ralph; And Others

    This report describes the procedures followed in developing classroom observation procedures for use in evaluating the First Year Communication Skills Program (FYCSP) and Instructional Concepts Program (ICP) training systems. The procedures cover the identification of the variables to be measured, development of scales to measure these variables,…

  12. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for...

  13. 28 CFR 104.31 - Procedure for claims evaluation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Procedure for claims evaluation. 104.31 Section 104.31 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) SEPTEMBER 11TH VICTIM COMPENSATION FUND OF 2001 Claim Intake, Assistance, and Review Procedures § 104.31 Procedure for...

  14. A Procedure for Evaluating Environmental Impact.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, Luna B.; And Others

    This report contains one of the first procedures available to environmental impact statements. The heart of the system is a matrix which is general enough to be used as a reference checklist or a reminder of the full range of actions and impacts on the environment that may relate to any proposed action. This comparatively simple system is intended…

  15. Procedure for assessing visual quality for landscape planning and management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gimblett, H. Randal; Fitzgibbon, John E.; Bechard, Kevin P.; Wightman, J. A.; Itami, Robert M.

    1987-07-01

    Incorporation of aesthetic considerations in the process of landscape planning and development has frequently met with poor results due to its lack of theoretical basis, public involvement, and failure to deal with spatial implications. This problem has been especially evident when dealing with large areas, for example, the Adirondacks, Scenic Highways, and National Forests and Parks. This study made use of public participation to evaluate scenic quality in a portion of the Niagara Escarpment in Southern Ontario, Canada. The results of this study were analyzed using the visual management model proposed by Brown and Itami (1982) as a means of assessing and evaluating scenic quality. The map analysis package formulated by Tomlin (1980) was then applied to this assessment for the purpose of spatial mapping of visual impact. The results of this study illustrate that it is possible to assess visual quality for landscape/management, preservation, and protection using a theoretical basis, public participation, and a systematic spatial mapping process.

  16. A Successful Revision of a Faculty Evaluation Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, James W.

    In 1979, El Camino College revised its faculty evaluation procedure, impelled by concerns over the severe consequences and resultant rarity of unsatisfactory ratings, the reluctance of faculty to evaluate their peers, and the high requirements of faculty time. The new procedure includes the following components: (1) options allowing tenured…

  17. Evaluation of a Noise Reduction Procedure for Chest Radiography

    PubMed Central

    Fukui, Ryohei; Ishii, Rie; Kodani, Kazuhiko; Kanasaki, Yoshiko; Suyama, Hisashi; Watanabe, Masanari; Nakamoto, Masaki; Fukuoka, Yasushi

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of noise reduction procedure (NRP), a function in the new image processing for chest radiography. Methods A CXDI-50G Portable Digital Radiography System (Canon) was used for X-ray detection. Image noise was analyzed with a noise power spectrum (NPS) and a burger phantom was used for evaluation of density resolution. The usefulness of NRP was evaluated by chest phantom images and clinical chest radiography. We employed the Bureau of Radiological Health Method for scoring chest images while carrying out our observations. Results NPS through the use of NRP was improved compared with conventional image processing (CIP). The results in image quality showed high-density resolution through the use of NRP, so that chest radiography examination can be performed with a low dose of radiation. Scores were significantly higher than for CIP. Conclusion In this study, use of NRP led to a high evaluation in these so we are able to confirm the usefulness of NRP for clinical chest radiography. PMID:24574577

  18. Topical Hazard Evaluation Program Procedural Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-01-01

    conditions and are percent (w/v) Oil of tion reaction under test not expected to cause a Bergamot solution conditions. photochemical irritation...photochemical skin irritant ( Bergamot oil). d. All compounds-are handled with caution. Current test procedures cannot eliminate the possibility of individual...percent ethyl alcohol. One additional compound applied along with the test compounds is a 10 percent solution (w/v) of Bergamot oil" in 95 percent ethyl

  19. Accountability Procedures Manual for On-Site Evaluations, 2002-2003.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This Accountability Procedures Manual (APM) is designed to be used by Texas Education Agency staff and other education system personnel as a guide for on-site evaluations. It is the responsibility of each member of an on-site peer review team to become familiar with the contents of the APM. Quality peer review evaluations demand consistency,…

  20. 77 FR 21451 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Colorado; Procedural Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ...: EPA is approving Section 1.11 of Colorado's procedural rules as adopted by the Air Quality Control... Commission means the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission. I. Summary of SIP Revisions Colorado adopted..., 1999. Colorado's procedural rules govern all procedures and hearings before the Air Quality...

  1. Teacher Evaluation: Relevant Concepts and Related Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Robert V.; Park, Richard

    The present purposes of teacher evaluation commonly include: (1) professional growth for improvement of instruction; (2) clarifying goals and objectives; (3) measuring progress toward those goals; (4) clarifying inservice needs; (5) judging the contribution of the teacher to pupil progress; (6) determining salary; and (7) determining employment…

  2. The study of surgical image quality evaluation system by subjective quality factor method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian J.; Xuan, Jason R.; Yang, Xirong; Yu, Honggang; Koullick, Edouard

    2016-03-01

    GreenLightTM procedure is an effective and economical way of treatment of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH); there are almost a million of patients treated with GreenLightTM worldwide. During the surgical procedure, the surgeon or physician will rely on the monitoring video system to survey and confirm the surgical progress. There are a few obstructions that could greatly affect the image quality of the monitoring video, like laser glare by the tissue and body fluid, air bubbles and debris generated by tissue evaporation, and bleeding, just to name a few. In order to improve the physician's visual experience of a laser surgical procedure, the system performance parameter related to image quality needs to be well defined. However, since image quality is the integrated set of perceptions of the overall degree of excellence of an image, or in other words, image quality is the perceptually weighted combination of significant attributes (contrast, graininess …) of an image when considered in its marketplace or application, there is no standard definition on overall image or video quality especially for the no-reference case (without a standard chart as reference). In this study, Subjective Quality Factor (SQF) and acutance are used for no-reference image quality evaluation. Basic image quality parameters, like sharpness, color accuracy, size of obstruction and transmission of obstruction, are used as subparameter to define the rating scale for image quality evaluation or comparison. Sample image groups were evaluated by human observers according to the rating scale. Surveys of physician groups were also conducted with lab generated sample videos. The study shows that human subjective perception is a trustworthy way of image quality evaluation. More systematic investigation on the relationship between video quality and image quality of each frame will be conducted as a future study.

  3. Flight test pilot evaluation of a delayed flap approach procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bull, J. S.; Edwards, F. G.; Foster, J. D.; Hegarty, D. M.; Drinkwater, F. J., III

    1977-01-01

    Using NASA's CV-990 aircraft, a delayed flap approach procedure was demonstrated to nine guest pilots from the air transport industry. Four demonstration flights and 37 approaches were conducted under VFR weather conditions. A limited pilot evaluation of the delayed flap procedure was obtained from pilot comments and from questionaires they completed. Pilot acceptability, pilot workload, and ATC compatibility were quantitatively rated. The delayed flap procedure was shown to be feasible, and suggestions for further development work were obtained.

  4. Using short-wave infrared imaging for fruit quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dong; Lee, Dah-Jye; Desai, Alok

    2013-12-01

    Quality evaluation of agricultural and food products is important for processing, inventory control, and marketing. Fruit size and surface quality are two important quality factors for high-quality fruit such as Medjool dates. Fruit size is usually measured by length that can be done easily by simple image processing techniques. Surface quality evaluation on the other hand requires more complicated design, both in image acquisition and image processing. Skin delamination is considered a major factor that affects fruit quality and its value. This paper presents an efficient histogram analysis and image processing technique that is designed specifically for real-time surface quality evaluation of Medjool dates. This approach, based on short-wave infrared imaging, provides excellent image contrast between the fruit surface and delaminated skin, which allows significant simplification of image processing algorithm and reduction of computational power requirements. The proposed quality grading method requires very simple training procedure to obtain a gray scale image histogram for each quality level. Using histogram comparison, each date is assigned to one of the four quality levels and an optimal threshold is calculated for segmenting skin delamination areas from the fruit surface. The percentage of the fruit surface that has skin delamination can then be calculated for quality evaluation. This method has been implemented and used for commercial production and proven to be efficient and accurate.

  5. Evaluating Univariate, Bivariate, and Multivariate Normality Using Graphical Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdenski, Thomas K., Jr.

    This paper reviews graphical and nongraphical procedures for evaluating multivariate normality by guiding the reader through univariate and bivariate procedures that are necessary, but insufficient, indications of a multivariate normal distribution. A data set using three dependent variables for two groups provided by D. George and P. Mallery…

  6. A new mathematical procedure to evaluate peaks in complex chromatograms.

    PubMed

    Steffen, B; Müller, K P; Komenda, M; Koppmann, R; Schaub, A

    2005-04-15

    Automatic peak evaluation in chromatograms and subsequent quantification of compound concentrations is still a challenge in the analysis of complex samples containing hundreds or thousands of compounds. Although a number of software packages for peak evaluation exist, baseline definition and overlapping peaks of different shapes are the main reasons which prevent reliable automatic analysis of complex chromatograms. A new mathematical procedure is presented which uses peak shapes extracted from the chromatogram itself and modified by nonlinear (in fact, hyperbolic) stretching of the peak head and tail. With this approach, the peak parameters are position, height, scale of front, scale of tail, and smoothness of transition from front to tail scaling. This approach is found to give a substantially better fit than traditional analytically defined peak shapes. Together with a good peak finding heuristic and nonlinear optimization of parameters this allows a reliable automatic analysis of chromatograms with a large number of peaks, even with large groups of overlapping peaks. The analysis matches the quality of standard interactive methods, but still permits interactive refinement. This approach has been implemented and tested on a large set of data from chromatography of hydrocarbons in ambient air samples.

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Beaver Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 14, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 232.26 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 136.58 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 20.02 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetland habitat provides 7.67 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 22.69 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetlands provide 35.04 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Open water provided 10.26 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  8. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Carey Creek, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    In August 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Carey Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Carey Creek Project provides a total of 172.95 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 4.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetlands provide 52.68 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 2.82 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow and grassland meadow provide 98.13 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Emergent wetlands provide 11.53 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Open water provides 2.88 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. The objective of using HEP at the Carey Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Gamblin Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On August 12, 2003, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Gamblin Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in December 2002. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Gamblin Lake Project provides a total of 273.28 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 127.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Forested wetland habitat provides 21.06 HUs for bald eagle, black-caped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Wet meadow provides 78.05 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Emergent wetland habitat provides 46.25 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the Gamblin Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  10. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  11. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  12. 14 CFR § 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. § 1216.205 Section § 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action...

  13. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  14. 14 CFR 1216.205 - Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... impacting floodplains and wetlands. 1216.205 Section 1216.205 Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Floodplain and Wetlands Management § 1216.205 Procedures for evaluating NASA actions impacting floodplains and wetlands. (a) Before taking any action a...

  15. Development of a Quality Assurance Procedure for Dose Volume Histogram Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davenport, David A.

    The role of the dose-volume histogram (DVH) is rapidly expanding in radiation oncology treatment planning. DVHs are already relied upon to differentiate between two similar plans and evaluate organ-at-risk dosage. Their role will become even more important as progress continues towards implementing biologically based treatment planning systems. Therefore it is imperative that the accuracy of DVHs is evaluated and reappraised after any major software or hardware upgrades, affecting a treatment planning system (TPS). The purpose of this work is to create and implement a comprehensive quality assurance procedure evaluating dose volume histograms to insure their accuracy while satisfying American College of Radiology guidelines. Virtual phantoms of known volumes were created in Pinnacle TPS and exposed to different beam arrangements. Variables including grid size and slice thickness were varied and their effects were analyzed. The resulting DVHs were evaluated by comparison to the commissioned percent depth dose values using a custom Excel spreadsheet. After determining the uncertainty of the DVH based on these variables, multiple second check calculations were performed using MIM Maestro and Matlab software packages. The uncertainties of the DVHs were shown to be less than +/- 3%. The average uncertainty was shown to be less than +/- 1%. The second check procedures resulted in mean percent differences less than 1% which confirms the accuracy of DVH calculation in Pinnacle and the effectiveness of the quality assurance template. The importance of knowing the limits of accuracy of the DVHs, which are routinely used to assess the quality of clinical treatment plans, cannot be overestimated. The developed comprehensive QA procedure evaluating the accuracy of the DVH statistical analysis will become a part of our clinical arsenal for periodic tests of the treatment planning system. It will also be performed at the time of commissioning and after any major software

  16. A Self-Assessment Procedure for Use in Evaluation Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stufflebeam, Daniel L.; Wingate, Lori A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the Self-Assessment of Program Evaluation Expertise instrument and procedure developed to help participants assess their learning gains in a 3-week evaluation institute. Participants completed the instrument in a pre- and posttest format. To reduce both the threat of embarrassment from individual results and the temptation…

  17. Maintenance Procedure Display: Head Mounted Display (HMD) Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Milrian; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Solem, Jody A.; Holden, Kritina L.; Hoffman, Ronald R.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation describing maintenance procedures for head mounted displays is shown. The topics include: 1) Study Goals; 2) Near Eye Displays (HMDs); 3) Design; 4) Phase I-Evaluation Methods; 5) Phase 1 Results; 6) Improved HMD Mounting; 7) Phase 2 -Evaluation Methods; 8) Phase 2 Preliminary Results; and 9) Next Steps.

  18. Evaluation Procedures for Training Psychotherapists in Interpersonal Psychotherapy (IPT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chevron, Eve S.; And Others

    The training of psychotherapists has been an ongoing process in psychiatry and clinical psychology. Recently, however, a growing demand to operationalize competence criteria to enable independent evaluation of therapists' skills in specifically defined psychotherapies has occurred. To examine this phenomenon, evaluation procedures were developed…

  19. Estimating Costs for Development of Candidate Performance Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Payne, David A.

    This paper contains cost unit tables and instructions for their use in estimating the total cost of evaluating a given instructional objective or group of objectives. Included is a list of analytical procedures to be followed in the development of any device to evaluate student performance, (e.g., a unit exam in child development or an attitude…

  20. Evaluating Quality Management in University Departments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becket, Nina; Brookes, Maureen

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the abundance of research on quality management there is no universal consensus on how best to measure quality in higher education. This paper undertakes a critical evaluation of the different methods used to assess the quality of provision in higher education departments in the UK. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on relevant…

  1. [A method of iris image quality evaluation].

    PubMed

    Murat, Hamit; Mao, Dawei; Tong, Qinye

    2006-04-01

    Iris image quality evaluation plays a very important part in iris computer recognition. An iris image quality evaluation method was introduced into this study to distinguish good image from bad image caused by pupil distortion, blurred boundary, two circles appearing not concentric, and severe occlusion by eyelids and eyelashes. The tests based on this method gave good results.

  2. Should Title 24 Ventilation Requirements Be Amended to include an Indoor Air Quality Procedure?

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Mendell, Mark J.; Chan, Wanyu R.

    2013-05-13

    Minimum outdoor air ventilation rates (VRs) for buildings are specified in standards, including California?s Title 24 standards. The ASHRAE ventilation standard includes two options for mechanically-ventilated buildings ? a prescriptive ventilation rate procedure (VRP) that specifies minimum VRs that vary among occupancy classes, and a performance-based indoor air quality procedure (IAQP) that may result in lower VRs than the VRP, with associated energy savings, if IAQ meeting specified criteria can be demonstrated. The California Energy Commission has been considering the addition of an IAQP to the Title 24 standards. This paper, based on a review of prior data and new analyses of the IAQP, evaluates four future options for Title 24: no IAQP; adding an alternate VRP, adding an equivalent indoor air quality procedure (EIAQP), and adding an improved ASHRAE-like IAQP. Criteria were established for selecting among options, and feedback was obtained in a workshop of stakeholders. Based on this review, the addition of an alternate VRP is recommended. This procedure would allow lower minimum VRs if a specified set of actions were taken to maintain acceptable IAQ. An alternate VRP could also be a valuable supplement to ASHRAE?s ventilation standard.

  3. Experience gained from the application of basic quality assurance procedures in a Greek university engineering department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatelos, A. M.

    2010-06-01

    During the last decade, significant funding has become available to Greek public universities to support the convergence to the common European space of higher education. In a number of departments, this funding was wisely invested in the development of a quality culture, covering not only the educational process, but also the services offered by the department's administration and technical support staff. This paper presents the design and implementation of a quality-oriented studies' reform plan in the Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Thessaly in the period 2002-2008. Based on the successful experience from its application, a significant part of the personnel and students have become acquainted with basic quality assurance procedures and performance evaluation. Experience and lessons learnt from this effort are reported and discussed in this paper.

  4. Recommended procedures for performance testing of radiobioassay laboratories: Volume 1, Quality assurance. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect

    Fenrick, H.W.; MacLellan, J.A.

    1988-11-01

    Draft American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standard N13.30 (Performance Criteria for Radiobioassay) was developed in response to a concern expressed by the US Department of Energy and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to help ensure that bioassay laboratories provide accurate and consistent results. The draft standard specifies the criteria for defining the procedures necessary to establish a bioassay performance-testing laboratory and program. The testing laboratory will conduct tests to evaluate the performance of service laboratories. Pacific Northwest Laboratory helped define responsibilities and develop procedures as part of an effort to evaluate the draft ANSI N13.30 performance criteria for quality assurance at bioassay laboratories. This report recommends elements of quality assurance and quality control responsibilities for the bioassay performance-testing laboratory program, including the qualification and performance of personnel and the calibration, certification, and performance of equipment. The data base and recommended records system for documenting radiobioassay performance at the service laboratories are also presented. 15 refs.

  5. Dose audit and evaluation of work practices during barium procedures using digital radiography techniques.

    PubMed

    Livingstone, Roshan S; Augustine, Philomina; Aparna, I; Raj, D Victor

    2004-10-01

    Effective dose and organ doses during barium procedures performed using digital radiography machines were estimated and the related work practices were evaluated. Measured values of dose area product (DAP) were used for the calculation of effective doses. One hundred and thirty eight patients undergoing barium procedures were included in the study. The use of additional 0.2 mm copper filter during barium procedures effectively reduced patient doses. The effective dose during barium swallow procedure varied from 0.03 mSv to 3.5 mSv; during barium meal it varied from 0.18 mSv to 2.62 mSv; and during barium enema it varied from 0.56 mSv to 4.24 mSv. Dose auditing was done on the basis of patient doses, imaging techniques and image quality. Selection of optimized exposure factors imparted lower dose to patients during barium procedures.

  6. APPLICATION OF SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE CONCEPTS AND PROCEDURES TO ENVIORNMENTAL RESEARCH INVOLVING SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    As EPA’s environmental research expands into new areas that involve the development of software, quality assurance concepts and procedures that were originally developed for environmental data collection may not be appropriate. Fortunately, software quality assurance is a ...

  7. Animal Methods for Evaluating Forage Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Numerous methods are available that employ animals in the assessment of forage quality. Some of these procedures provide information needed to address very specific goals (e.g., monitoring protein adequacy), some serve as useful contributors to the efforts to accurately predict nutritive value, wher...

  8. Accident Sequence Evaluation Program: Human reliability analysis procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Swain, A.D.

    1987-02-01

    This document presents a shortened version of the procedure, models, and data for human reliability analysis (HRA) which are presented in the Handbook of Human Reliability Analysis With emphasis on Nuclear Power Plant Applications (NUREG/CR-1278, August 1983). This shortened version was prepared and tried out as part of the Accident Sequence Evaluation Program (ASEP) funded by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and managed by Sandia National Laboratories. The intent of this new HRA procedure, called the ''ASEP HRA Procedure,'' is to enable systems analysts, with minimal support from experts in human reliability analysis, to make estimates of human error probabilities and other human performance characteristics which are sufficiently accurate for many probabilistic risk assessments. The ASEP HRA Procedure consists of a Pre-Accident Screening HRA, a Pre-Accident Nominal HRA, a Post-Accident Screening HRA, and a Post-Accident Nominal HRA. The procedure in this document includes changes made after tryout and evaluation of the procedure in four nuclear power plants by four different systems analysts and related personnel, including human reliability specialists. The changes consist of some additional explanatory material (including examples), and more detailed definitions of some of the terms. 42 refs.

  9. Factor selection for service quality evaluation: a hospital case study.

    PubMed

    Ameryoun, Ahmad; Najafi, Seyedvahid; Nejati-Zarnaqi, Bayram; Khalilifar, Seyed Omid; Ajam, Mahdi; Ansarimoghadam, Ahmad

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop a systematic approach to predict service quality dimension's influence on service quality using a novel analysis based on data envelopment and SERVQUAL. Design/methodology/approach To assess hospital service quality in Tehran, expectation and perception of those who received the services were evaluated using SERVQUAL. The hospital service quality dimensions were found by exploratory factor analysis (EFA). To compare customer expectation and perception, perceived service quality index (PSQI) was measured using a new method based on common weights. A novel sensitivity approach was used to test the service quality factor's impact on the PSQI. Findings A new service quality dimension named "trust in services" was found using EFA, which is not an original SERVQUAL factor. The approach was applied to assess the hospital's service quality. Since the PSQI value was 0.76 it showed that improvements are needed to meet customer expectations. The results showed the factor order that affect PSQI. "Trust in services" has the strongest influence on PSQI followed by "tangibles," "assurance," "empathy," and "responsiveness," respectively. Practical implications This work gives managers insight into service quality by following a systematic method; i.e., measuring perceived service quality from the customer viewpoint and service factors' impact on customer perception. Originality/value The procedure helps managers to select the required service quality dimensions which need improvement and predict their effects on customer perception.

  10. An Evaluation of NO Procedures on Children with Brain Dysfunction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krippner, Stanley

    1973-01-01

    Evaluated were the effects of therapeutic procedures (crawling, creeping, response to sensory stimulation, and patterning) carried out by neurological organization rehabilitationists on the language and social competence of nine 2-to 8-year-old neurologically handicapped children and on the children's families. (MC)

  11. Evaluation of classification procedures for estimating wheat acreage in Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flores, L. M.; Register, D. T.

    1976-01-01

    This report presents the results of experiments which were performed to evaluate procedures for estimating wheat acreage in intensive test sites (ITS's) in Kansas. An analyst/interpreter (AI) selected and labeled fields from Landsat-1 satellite imagery. Statistics were generated for each selected ITS, and the imagery was classified using a maximum likelihood classifier. Various components of the classification process were tested.

  12. Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    This publication provides guidelines and evaluation procedures for undergraduate professional education in chemistry. Contents include: (1) "Scope and Organization of the Chemistry Program"; (2) "Financial Support"; (3) "Curriculum Requirements"; (4) "Commentary on Curriculum Requirements"; (5) "Faculty, Staff, and Facilities Requirements"; (6)…

  13. Evaluation of a Procedure for Increasing Sex-Fair Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Lucia Albino; Waldroop, James

    1978-01-01

    Students were assigned to treatment or control sections of a university course in individual counseling to evaluate the effectiveness of procedures to increase sex-fair counseling. Effectiveness was evidenced by the experimental group's more liberal attitudes toward women's roles, greater sensitivity to sex bias, and more positive clinical…

  14. 23 CFR 669.21 - Procedure for evaluating state compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Procedure for evaluating state compliance. 669.21 Section 669.21 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND... FHWA. The State may develop a software system to maintain copies or images of this proof-of-payment....

  15. 23 CFR 669.21 - Procedure for evaluating state compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Procedure for evaluating state compliance. 669.21 Section 669.21 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND... FHWA. The State may develop a software system to maintain copies or images of this proof-of-payment....

  16. 23 CFR 669.21 - Procedure for evaluating state compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Procedure for evaluating state compliance. 669.21 Section 669.21 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND... FHWA. The State may develop a software system to maintain copies or images of this proof-of-payment....

  17. Quality control procedures for dose-response curve generation using nanoliter dispense technologies.

    PubMed

    Quintero, Catherine; Rosenstein, Craig; Hughes, Bethany; Middleton, Richard; Kariv, Ilona

    2007-09-01

    With the advancement of high-throughput biomolecular screening techniques to the lead optimization stage, there is a critical need to quality control (QC) dose-response curves generated by robotic liquid handlers to ensure accurate affinity determinations. One challenge in evaluating the performance of liquid handlers is identifying and validating a robust method for testing dispense volumes across different instruments. Although traditional automated liquid handlers are still considered the standard platform in many laboratories, nanoliter dispensers are becoming more common and pose new challenges for routine quality control procedures. For example, standard gravimetric measurements are unreliable for testing the accuracy of nanoliter liquid dispenses. However, nanoliter dispensing technology allows for the conservation of compound, reduces compound carryover from well to well through discrete dispenses, and eliminates the need for intermediate compound dilution steps to achieve a low final DMSO assay concentration. Moreover, an intermediate dilution step in aqueous solution might result in compound precipitation at high concentrations. This study compared representative automation procedures done on a variety of liquid dispensers, including manual, traditional, and nanodispense volumes. The data confirmed the importance of establishing robust QC procedures for dose-response generation in addition to accuracy and precision determinations for each instrument, and they validated the use of nanoliter pipettors for dose-response testing. The results of this study also support the requirement for thorough mixing during serial compound dilutions prepared for high-throughput lead optimization strategies using traditional liquid handlers.

  18. Tailoring groundwater quality monitoring to vulnerability: a GIS procedure for network design.

    PubMed

    Preziosi, E; Petrangeli, A B; Giuliano, G

    2013-05-01

    Monitoring networks aiming to assess the state of groundwater quality and detect or predict changes could increase in efficiency when fitted to vulnerability and pollution risk assessment. The main purpose of this paper is to describe a methodology aiming at integrating aquifers vulnerability and actual levels of groundwater pollution in the monitoring network design. In this study carried out in a pilot area in central Italy, several factors such as hydrogeological setting, groundwater vulnerability, and natural and anthropogenic contamination levels were analyzed and used in designing a network tailored to the monitoring objectives, namely, surveying the evolution of groundwater quality relating to natural conditions as well as to polluting processes active in the area. Due to the absence of an aquifer vulnerability map for the whole area, a proxi evaluation of it was performed through a geographic information system (GIS) methodology, leading to the so called "susceptibility to groundwater quality degradation". The latter was used as a basis for the network density assessment, while water points were ranked by several factors including discharge, actual contamination levels, maintenance conditions, and accessibility for periodical sampling in order to select the most appropriate to the network. Two different GIS procedures were implemented which combine vulnerability conditions and water points suitability, producing two slightly different networks of 50 monitoring points selected out of the 121 candidate wells and springs. The results are compared with a "manual" selection of the points. The applied GIS procedures resulted capable to select the requested number of water points from the initial set, evaluating the most confident ones and an appropriate density. Moreover, it is worth underlining that the second procedure (point distance analysis [PDA]) is technically faster and simpler to be performed than the first one (GRID + PDA).

  19. Process perspective on image quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leisti, Tuomas; Halonen, Raisa; Kokkonen, Anna; Weckman, Hanna; Mettänen, Marja; Lensu, Lasse; Ritala, Risto; Oittinen, Pirkko; Nyman, Göte

    2008-01-01

    The psychological complexity of multivariate image quality evaluation makes it difficult to develop general image quality metrics. Quality evaluation includes several mental processes and ignoring these processes and the use of a few test images can lead to biased results. By using a qualitative/quantitative (Interpretation Based Quality, IBQ) methodology, we examined the process of pair-wise comparison in a setting, where the quality of the images printed by laser printer on different paper grades was evaluated. Test image consisted of a picture of a table covered with several objects. Three other images were also used, photographs of a woman, cityscape and countryside. In addition to the pair-wise comparisons, observers (N=10) were interviewed about the subjective quality attributes they used in making their quality decisions. An examination of the individual pair-wise comparisons revealed serious inconsistencies in observers' evaluations on the test image content, but not on other contexts. The qualitative analysis showed that this inconsistency was due to the observers' focus of attention. The lack of easily recognizable context in the test image may have contributed to this inconsistency. To obtain reliable knowledge of the effect of image context or attention on subjective image quality, a qualitative methodology is needed.

  20. An evaluation of periodontal assessment procedures among Indiana dental hygienists.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Using a descriptive correlational design, this study surveyed periodontal assessment procedures currently performed by Indiana dental hygienists in general dentistry practices to reveal if deficiencies in assessment exist. Members (n = 354) of the Indiana Dental Hygienists' Association (IDHA) were invited to participate in the survey. A 22 multiple choice question survey, using Likert scales for responses, was open to participants for three weeks. Descriptive and non-parametric inferential statistics analyzed questions related to demographics and assessment procedures practiced. In addition, an evaluation of the awareness of periodontal assessment procedures recommended by the American Academy of Periodontology (AAP) was examined. Of the 354 Indiana dental hygienists surveyed, a 31.9% response rate was achieved. Participants were asked to identify the recommended AAP periodontal assessment procedures they perform. The majority of respondents indicated either frequently or always performing the listed assessment procedures. Additionally, significant relationships were found between demographic factors and participants' awareness and performance of recommended AAP assessment procedures. While information gathered from this study is valuable to the body of literature regarding periodontal disease assessment, continued research with larger survey studies should be conducted to obtain a more accurate national representation of what is being practiced by dental hygienists.

  1. Development of quality standards of medicinal mistletoe - Helicanthes elastica (Desr.) Danser employing Pharmacopoeial procedures.

    PubMed

    Sunil Kumar, K N; Ravishankar, B; Yashovarma, B; Rajakrishnan, R; Thomas, J

    2016-11-01

    Helicanthes elastica (Desr.) Danser (Loranthaceae), commonly known as Indian mango mistletoe, is a parasitic shrub found widely growing on mango trees in southern India. Development of monographic quality standards is need of the hour for Pharmacopoeial/extra-Pharmacopoeial and folk medicinal plants. Systematic pharmacognostical evaluation of leaves of H. elastica has been carried out employing Pharmacopoeial procedures of testing herbal drugs. Macro-microscopic features of H. elastica leaf were recorded. Ethanolic extract was tested positive for alkaloids, steroids, carbohydrates, tannins, saponins and phenols. HPTLC fingerprint profile was developed for the identification of extracts using reference standard β-sitosterol glucoside. Results of the present investigation would serve as a source of pharmacognostical information and a document to control the quality of H. elastica (Desr.) Danser.

  2. Procedures for Testing and Evaluating Spacecraft-Type Heat Pipes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    Thermocouple Locations on Heat Pipes . 18 The thermocouple beads were attached to the stainless steel heat pipes by spot welding . In the case of the aluminum...RD-Ri46 671 PROCEDURES FOR TESTING AND EVRLUATING SPRCECRAFT-TYPE i/i HERT PIPES (U) DAYTON UNIV OH L K TOWER ET AL. APR 84 RFWRL-TR-84-2829 F33615-8i...RESOLUTIONd TEST CHART " - 1 y AFWALTR-84-2029 Qa PROCEDURES FOR TESTING AND EVALUATING SPACECRAFT-TYPE HEAT PIPES Leonard K. Tower Warner B. Kaufman Tower and

  3. A Procedure for Inter-Comparing the Skill of Regional-Scale Air Quality Model Simulations of Daily Maximum 8-Hour Ozone Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational model evaluation procedure is described to quantitatively assess the relative skill among several regionalscale air quality models simulating various percentiles of the cumulative frequency distribution of observed daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations. Bootstrap ...

  4. Programme Evaluation: Maintaining Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loots, A.

    2008-01-01

    The evaluation of educational or social programmes is paramount for establishing success or impact in higher education. Evaluation questions about programme goals (e.g. better performance of first-year students) or about the quality of programme strategies (design and implementation) and effectiveness of delivery (coordinator inputs and…

  5. Evaluation by policy makers of a procedure to describe perceived landscape openness.

    PubMed

    Weitkamp, Gerd; Van den Berg, Agnes E; Bregt, Arnold K; Van Lammeren, Ron J A

    2012-03-01

    In the last decade policy makers have increasingly recognized the need to include people's perceptions in methods for describing landscape quality. At the same time, a third wave of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) has become available that make it technically possible to model landscape quality in a realistic manner. However, as there is often a mismatch between science and policy, it remains unclear to what extent perception-based models developed by scientists can be useful to policy makers. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness to policy making of a GIS-based procedure for describing perceived landscape openness. To this end, a workshop was organized which was attended by eight Dutch policy makers who acted as representatives of their province (region). The Group Decision Room (GDR) technique was used to elicit the policy makers' evaluations of the procedure in an anonymous and reliable manner. The procedure was presented to the policy makers using cases from their own province, which they assessed using a mixture of qualitative and quantitative methods. The results show that policy makers rated the procedure as being highly relevant to policy making, scientifically credible, usable by policy makers and feasible to implement in the policy making process. They especially appreciated the flexibility and transparency of the procedure. The policy makers concluded that the procedure would be of most value for monitoring landscape changes and for analysing impacts on landscape openness in land use scenario studies. However, they requested guidelines for proper implementation of the various options in the procedure. In general, the current study shows that explicit and transparent evaluation of the usefulness of GIS-based tools can aid integration at the science-policy interface and help to ensure that both scientists and policy makers are informed of interrelated options and requirements.

  6. Application of improved extension evaluation method to water quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Heung; Hu, Bao Qing

    2014-02-01

    The extension evaluation method (EEM) has been developed and applied to evaluate water quality. There are, however, negative values in the correlative degree (water quality grades from EEM) after the calculation. This is not natural as the correlative degree is essentially an index based on grades (rankings) of water quality by different methods, which are positive. To overcome this negativity issue, the interval clustering approach (ICA) was introduced, which is based on the grey clustering approach (GCA) and interval-valued fuzzy sets. However, the computing process and formulas of ICA are rather complex. This paper provides a novel method, i.e., improved extension evaluation method, so as to avoid negative values in the correlative degree. To demonstrate our proposed approach, the improved EEM is applied to evaluate the water quality of three different cross-sections of the Fen River, the second major branch river of the Yellow River in China and the Han Jiang River, one of the major branch rivers of the Yangtse River in China. The results of the improved evaluation method are basically the same as the official water quality. The proposed method possesses also the same merit as the EEM and ICA method, which can be applied to assess water quality when the levels of attributes are defined in terms of intervals in the water quality criteria. Existing methods are mostly applicable to data in the form of single numeric values.

  7. On evaluating clustering procedures for use in classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pore, M. D.; Moritz, T. E.; Register, D. T.; Yao, S. S.; Eppler, W. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The problem of evaluating clustering algorithms and their respective computer programs for use in a preprocessing step for classification is addressed. In clustering for classification the probability of correct classification is suggested as the ultimate measure of accuracy on training data. A means of implementing this criterion and a measure of cluster purity are discussed. Examples are given. A procedure for cluster labeling that is based on cluster purity and sample size is presented.

  8. A Formal Approach for Designing and Evaluating Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Degani, Asaf; Heymann, Michael; Shafto, Michael; Remington, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Operator interaction with modern control systems is a topic of great concern in high-risk industries such as nuclear power and commercial aviation. The issues associated with such systems focus on the ability of the operators (e.g., pilots) to achieve mission goals safely while containing failures. Operators must be able to interact safely and reliably with highly automatic and complex systems across the full spectrum of possible operating conditions, including normal, abnormal, and emergency situations. In environments such as commercial aviation, operator interaction with the machine is specified through a set of standard operating procedures (SOP). A procedure represents a collective agreement on the 'best' way to perform a given task. The intent of this paper is to suggest a formal methodology, for designing and evaluating procedures, that is both reliable and systematic. Our approach involves two major elements: a model of the machine and a list of the operator's task specifications (goals). We use formal modeling paradigms for describing the system and super-imposing on it the operator's tasks. Such paradigms, based on recent frameworks such as Statecharts and Hierarchical Hybrid Machines appear to be adequate methods for analyzing operator interaction with modern control systems. To illustrate this methodology, we model and analyze the sequence of actions for an emergency procedure. The procedure, Irregular Engine Start, for a medium-range aircraft, specifies the sequence of immediate actions that must be performed by the crew to avoid an uncontrolled rise in engine temperature during start-up. A model of engine behavior during a hot start is constructed. It also describes the various actions that can be taken by the crew and the resulting outcomes. The model is then opened up as a tree of all possible action sequences. This action tree allows us to trace the correct sequences necessary to achieve the desired end-goal (secure and shut down of the engine). In

  9. Radionuclide studies in postoperative evaluation of the Fontan procedure

    SciTech Connect

    Brendel, A.J.; Wynchank, S.; Choussat, A.; Barat, J.L.; Deville, C.; Ducassou, D.; Fontan, F.

    1984-10-01

    Radionuclide studies were performed on 12 patients who had had a Fontan operation for cyanotic congenital heart disease, six of whom had undergone a prior palliative Glenn procedure. The patients without prior Glenn anastomoses were studied by radionuclide first-pass angiocardiography, using a right antecubital vein injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate. The patients with Glenn anastomoses required two injections, one by femoral vein to study the Fontan procedure, using bolus injection of /sup 99m/Tc pertechnetate or microspheres, and the second by right anetcubital vein to study the Glenn anastomosis and right lung, using a bolus of microspheres. Noninvasive radionuclide methods seem to be dependable in the postoperative evaluation of patients after the Fontan procedure. First-pass angiocardiography is most helpful in evaluating the dynamics and distribution of blood flow, especially the right atrial output, and gated blood-pool scintigraphy offers a better evaluation of right atrial and left ventricular contraction, so both supply complementary information.

  10. Interchangeability Evaluation of Multisource Ibuprofen Drug Products Using Biowaiver Procedure

    PubMed Central

    Shohin, I. E.; Kulinich, J. I.; Vasilenko, G. F.; Ramenskaya, G. V.

    2011-01-01

    The WHO biowaiver procedure for BCS Class II weak acids was evaluated by running two multisource IR ibuprofen drug products (Ibuprofen, 200 mg tablets, Tatchempharmpreparaty, Russia and Ibuprofen, 200 mg tablets, Biosintez, Russia) with current Marketing Authorizations (i.e. in vivo bioequivalent) through that procedure. Risks associated with excipients interaction and therapeutic index were considered to be not critical. In vitro dissolution kinetic studies were carried out according WHO Guidance (WHO Technical Report Series, No. 937, Annexes 7 and 8) using USP Apparatus II (paddle method) at 75 rpm. Dissolution profiles of test and reference ibuprofen tablets were considered equivalent in pH 4.5 using factors f1 (13) and f2 (72) and not equivalent in pH 6.8 (factor f1 was 26 and f2 was 24). Drug release of ibuprofen at pH 1.2 was negligible due to its weak acid properties. Therefore, two in vivo bioequivalent tablets were declared bioinequivalent by this procedure, indicating that procedure seems to be over-discriminatory. PMID:22707831

  11. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Ladd Marsh, 2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife

    2001-10-01

    Since the mid-1980s, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has been participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's (BPA's) efforts to mitigate for the negative impacts to fish and wildlife resulting from the development and operation of the 7 Columbia Basin Federal Hydropower System. BPA's mitigation obligations were formally recognized and mandated by the Northwest Power Act of 1980 and are guided by the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC's) Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA funds fish and wildlife projects throughout the Basin to meet the habitat and population restorative goals and objectives outlined in the NWPPC's Fish and Wildlife Program and to fulfill its mitigation responsibilities under the Power Act. Impacts to wildlife resulting from hydrofacility construction/inundation were estimated using Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) in the mid and late 1980s and are documented in BPA' s Wildlife Loss Assessments (Rasmussen and Wright 1990,a,b,c,d) and in the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Lower Snake River Wildlife Habitat Compensation Evaluation (ACOE 1991). The loss assessments provided estimates of lost habitat quality and quantity for the target species selected to represent the habitat cover types impacted by hydropower construction/inundation. The NWPPC incorporated these losses into their Fish and Wildlife Program, recognizing them as the unannualized losses attributable to the construction/inundation of the federal hydropower system (NWPPC 1995 and 2000, Table 1 1-4). The HEP methodology is used by wildlife managers within the Columbia Basin to determine habitat values, expressed as Habitat Units, gained through BPA-funded mitigation project work. ODFW and the other Oregon wildlife managers (i.e., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Confederated Tribes of the Warms Springs Reservation of Oregon, Burns Paiute Tribe, and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation [CTUIR]) have been working together since 1991

  12. Evaluation of Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Johanna Oxstrand; Katya Le Blanc; Seth Hays

    2012-09-01

    relevant for the task and situation at hand, which has potential consequences of taking up valuable time when operators must be responding to the situation, and potentially leading operators down an incorrect response path. Other challenges related to PBPs are the management of multiple procedures, place-keeping, finding the correct procedure for the task at hand, and relying on other sources of additional information to ensure a functional and accurate understanding of the current plant status (Converse, 1995; Fink, Killian, Hanes, & Naser, 2009; Le Blanc & Oxstrand, 2012). The main focus of this report is to describe the research activities conducted to address the remaining two objectives; Develop a prototype CBP system based on requirements identified and Evaluate the CBP prototype. The emphasis will be on the evaluation of an initial CBP prototype in at a Nuclear Power Plant.

  13. Evaluating and Optimizing Fish Health and Welfare During Experimental Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Westall, Lynda; Karp, Natasha A.; Hazlehurst, Diane; Kovacs, Ceri; Keeble, Rosemary; Thompson, Peter; Collins, Richard; Bussell, James

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Many facilities house fish in separate static containers post-procedure, for example, while awaiting genotyping results. This ensures fish can be easily identified, but it does not allow for provision of continuous filtered water or diet. At the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, concern over the housing conditions led to the development of an individual housing system (GeneS) enabling feeding and water filtration. Trials to compare the water quality measures between the various systems found that fish housed in static containers experienced rapid deterioration in water quality. By day 1, measures of ammonia were outside the Institute's prescribed values and continued to rise until it was 25-fold higher than recommended levels. Nitrite levels were also outside recommended levels for all fish by day 9 and were twofold higher by the end of the trial. The water quality measures for tanks held on the recirculating system were stable even though food was provided. These results indicate that for housing zebrafish, running water or appropriately timed water changes are a critical component to ensure that the ethical obligations are met. PMID:26914790

  14. Hnt'k'wipn 2005 Habitat Evaluation Procedure Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Gerald I.

    2007-02-01

    Administration funded the acquisition of the mitigation properties covered in this baseline HU assessment in accordance with the NPCC's Fish and Wildlife Program and is due the appropriate HU crediting for both protecting and enhancing that area. The mitigation property is composed of three separate property acquisitions completed in the southern portion of the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation (Figure 1). These acreages are contiguous (Figure 2) and were targeted because of their potential instream, wetland and riparian habitats. The 909 acre Hanson Property was purchased fee title in December of 2004 and includes the northern and southern most parcels. The 159.7 acre Allotment 331 was purchased in February of 2005 and lies along Hangman Creek and includes the majority of the forested land. Allotments 1021, 333A and 333B, which were acquired in September of 2005, lie along Hangman Creek upstream of Allotment 331 and are 160 acres, 80 acres and 75 acres respectively. The Allotments remain in Trust but are now held by the Department of Interior for the Coeur d'Alene Tribe rather than for individual Tribal members. Approximately 174.8 acres (acreage determined by Coeur d'Alene Tribal GIS) of the Hanson Property lies south and west of U.S. Highway 95. These 174.8 acres encompass uplands along with a farmstead that includes a dwelling, several shops, storage sheds and a loft barn. The Coeur d'Alene Tribe decided at the time of purchase not to retain those uplands in the mitigation program since uplands and residential areas are not suitable to the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. This baseline HU assessment encompasses only the contiguous acreages that lie north and east of U.S. Highway 95. This report is a summary of the 2005 baseline Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) conducted on the 1,195.2 acres (as determined from the Coeur d'Alene Tribe's GIS database) of hnt'k'wipn surrounding the confluence of Sheep Creek and Hangman Creeks on the Coeur d'Alene Indian Reservation

  15. Flat panel display test and evaluation: procedures, standards, and facilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Timothy W.; Daniels, Reginald; Hopper, Darrel G.

    1997-07-01

    This paper addresses flat panel display test and evaluation via a discussion of procedures, standards and facilities. Procedures need to be carefully developed and documented to ensure that test accomplished in separate laboratories produce comparable results. The tests themselves must not be a source of inconsistency in test results when such comparisons are made in the course of procurements or new technology prototype evaluations. Standards are necessary to expedite the transition of the new display technologies into applications and to lower the costs of custom parts applied across disparate applications. The flat panel display industry is in the course of ascertaining and formulating such standards as they are of value to designers, manufacturers, marketers and users of civil and military products and equipment. Additionally, in order to inform the DoD and industry, the test and evaluation facilities of the Air Force Research Laboratory Displays Branch are described. These facilities are available to support procurements involving flat panel displays and to examine new technology prototypes. Finally, other government display testing facilities within the Navy and the Army are described.

  16. Precalibration evaluation procedures for mid-infrared milk analyzers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Barbano, D M; Schweisthal, M; Fleming, J R

    2006-07-01

    The purpose of this paper is to present a detailed account of the precalibration procedures developed and implemented by the USDA Federal Milk Market Administrators (FMMA) for evaluating mid-infrared (MIR) milk analyzers. Mid-infrared analyzers specifically designed for milk testing provide a rapid and cost-effective means for determining milk composition for payment and dairy herd improvement programs. These instruments determine the fat, protein, and lactose content of milk, and enable the calculation of total solids, solids-not-fat, and other solids. All MIR analyzers are secondary testing instruments that require calibration by chemical reference methods. Precalibration is the process of assuring that the instrument is in good working order (mechanically and electrically) and that the readings before calibration are stable and optimized. The main components of precalibration are evaluation of flow system integrity, homogenization efficiency, water repeatability, zero shift, linearity, primary slope, milk repeatability, purging efficiency, and establishment of intercorrection factors. These are described in detail and apply to both filter-based and Fourier transform infrared instruments operating using classical primary and reference wavelengths. Under the USDA FMMA Precalibration Evaluation Program, the precalibration procedures were applied longitudinally over time using a wide variety of instruments and instrument models. Instruments in this program were maintained to pass the criteria for all precalibration procedures. All instruments used similar primary wavelengths to measure fat, protein, and lactose but there were differences in reference wavelength selection. Intercorrection factors were consistent over time within all instruments and similar among groups of instruments using similar primary and reference wavelengths. However, the magnitude and sign of the intercorrection factors were significantly affected by the choice of reference wavelengths.

  17. Evaluation and Interventional Management of Pain After Vertebral Augmentation Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Granville, Michelle; Jacobson, Robert E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A small subset of patients who underwent successful vertebral compression fracture (VCF) augmentation procedures may develop subsequent pain requiring spinal injections. In a retrospective analysis, we determined whether the pain was related to the original fracture site or to another area within the lumbar or thoracic spine. The pain occurred either at the same/adjacent level and/or non-adjacent level as the VCF. Interventional treatments primarily targeted the facet joints, specifically in the form of facet joint blocks and/or radiofrequency ablation to the medial branches. The pattern of facet injections relative to the original fracture level was studied. Additionally, the elapsed time between the vertebral augmentation and the subsequent interventional blocks was also evaluated. Methods A total of 56 patients sustained VCFs. 12 of these patients underwent interventional procedures after vertebral augmentation procedures. The level(s) of same/adjacent level and non-adjacent level pain were determined via physical examination and/or imaging studies. These levels were subsequently treated with interventional procedures primarily focused on the facet joints. The time period of the injections varied from two weeks status post-vertebral augmentation to as late as 304 weeks (5.8 years) status post-vertebral augmentation. Results We performed 25 vertebral augmentation procedures on these 12 patients. 15 lumbar, eight lower thoracic, and two mid-thoracic VCFs were augmented. 9/14 cases of blocks included those performed at non-adjacent levels, whereas 5/14 cases of blocks were performed only at the same and/or adjacent levels as the VCF. For the events in which thoracic VCFs were augmented, 6/7 (or 86%) had developed non-adjacent level pain in areas of the lumbar spine.  The time from vertebral augmentation procedure to subsequent pain procedure ranged from two weeks to five plus years. The average time elapsed was 83 weeks. Only one case

  18. Analytical procedures for environmental quality control. Volume 2. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L.K.; Wang, M.H.S.

    1989-01-15

    This report covers sixteen important documents. Some examples are: The determination of the maximum total trihalomethane potential; Nationwide approval of alternative test procedure for analysis of trihalomethanes; Volatile organic compounds in eater by purge and trap capillary column gas chromatography with photoionization and electrolytic conductivity detectors in series; Analysis of organohalide pesticides and arclors in drinking water by microextraction and gas chromatography; Testing for lead in school drinking water; Simplified methods for food and feed testing; Determination of nitroaromatic compounds and isophorone in industrial and municipal wastewaters; Sampling for giardia and/or cryptosporidium; determination of TCDD in industrial and municipal wastewaters; Determination of volatile organics in industrial and municipal wastewaters; Determination of polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in industrial and municipal wastewaters.

  19. Effectiveness of HVAC duct cleaning procedures in improving indoor air quality.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, I; Tansel, B; Mitrani, J D

    2001-12-01

    Indoor air quality has become one of the most serious environmental concerns as an average person spends about 22 hr indoors on a daily basis. The study reported in this article, was conducted to determine the effectiveness of three commercial HVAC (Heating Ventilation Air Conditioning) duct cleaning processes in reducing the level of airborne particulate matter and viable bioaerosols. The three HVAC sanitation processes were: (1) Contact method (use of conventional vacuum cleaning of interior duct surfaces); (2) Air sweep method (use of compressed air to dislodging dirt and debris); (3) Rotary brush method (insertion of a rotary brush into the ductwork to agitate and dislodge the debris). Effectiveness of these sanitation processes was evaluated in terms of airborne particulate and viable bioaerosol concentrations in residential homes. Eight identical homes were selected in the same neighborhood. Two homes were cleaned using each procedure and two were used as controls. It was found that both particle count readings and bioaerosol concentrations were higher when cleaning was being performed than before or after cleaning, which suggests that dirt, debris and other pollutants may become airborne as a result of disturbances caused by the cleaning processes. Particle count readings at 0.3 micron size were found to have increased due to cigarette smoking. Particle counts at 1.0 micron size were reduced due to HVAC duct cleaning. Post-level bioaerosol concentrations, taken two days after cleaning, were found to be lower than the pre-level concentrations suggesting that the cleaning procedures were effective to some extent. Homes cleaned with the Air Sweep procedure showed the highest degree of reduction in bioaerosol concentration among the three procedures investigated.

  20. A procedure to evaluate environmental rehabilitation in limestone quarries.

    PubMed

    Neri, Ana Claudia; Sánchez, Luis Enrique

    2010-11-01

    A procedure to evaluate mine rehabilitation practices during the operational phase was developed and validated. It is based on a comparison of actually observed or documented practices with internationally recommended best practices (BP). A set of 150 BP statements was derived from international guides in order to establish the benchmark. The statements are arranged in six rehabilitation programs under three categories: (1) planning (2) operational and (3) management, corresponding to the adoption of the plan-do-check-act management systems model to mine rehabilitation. The procedure consists of (i) performing technical inspections guided by a series of field forms containing BP statements; (ii) classifying evidences in five categories; and (iii) calculating conformity indexes and levels. For testing and calibration purposes, the procedure was applied to nine limestone quarries and conformity indexes were calculated for the rehabilitation programs in each quarry. Most quarries featured poor planning practices, operational practices reached high conformity levels in 50% of the cases and management practices scored moderate conformity. Despite all quarries being ISO 14001 certified, their management systems pay low attention to issues pertaining to land rehabilitation and biodiversity. The best results were achieved by a quarry whose expansion was recently submitted to the environmental impact assessment process, suggesting that public scrutiny may play a positive role in enhancing rehabilitation practices. Conformity indexes and levels can be used to chart the evolution of rehabilitation practices at regular intervals, to establish corporate goals and for communication with stakeholders.

  1. Subjective Evaluation Of A Perceptual Quality Metric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Charles F.

    1981-12-01

    A major problem which has plagued image processing has been the lack of an effective image quality measure. It is well known that common measures which are mathematical and analytically tractable do not correlate with human subjective evaluation. This paper presents the results of a subjective evaluation on twelve versions of a black and white image (the SPIE GIRL) and the rank ordering obtained with three computational measures. It was found that a measure based on a model of the human visual system compared to the subjective evaluation with a correlation of .92.

  2. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors: Station operation, record computation, and data reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Boulger, Robert W.; Oblinger, Carolyn J.; Smith, Brett A.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common monitoring-system configuration for water-quality data collection is the four-parameter monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data. Such systems also can be configured to measure other properties, such as turbidity or fluorescence. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with chemical analyses of samples to estimate chemical loads. The sensors that are used to measure water-quality field parameters require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. This report provides guidelines for site- and monitor-selection considerations; sensor inspection and calibration methods; field procedures; data evaluation, correction, and computation; and record-review and data-reporting processes, which supersede the guidelines presented previously in U.S. Geological Survey Water-Resources Investigations Report WRIR 00-4252. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.

  3. Evaluation of the virucidal performance of domestic laundry procedures.

    PubMed

    Heinzel, Michael; Kyas, Andrea; Weide, Mirko; Breves, Roland; Bockmühl, Dirk P

    2010-09-01

    Laundering is one of the most important means to ensure a sufficient hygiene standard in the household environment. To evaluate the performance of this process, it is desirable to have methods that mimic the real-life situation as closely as possible. Although methods for the evaluation of the antibacterial and antifungal efficacy of domestic laundry procedures are available, the effect of laundering on viruses is still rather unclear. As the influence of laundry process parameters such as mechanical actions, temperature dynamics or liquor ratio cannot be simulated in vitro by suspension assays, a new in situ test method allowing virus simulation tests in washing machines has been developed. Using this in situ method we could show that conventional household washing detergents have a full virucidal efficiency at 40 degrees C also against non-enveloped surrogate viruses.

  4. [Comparison of accreditation procedures, ISO 9000 certification procedures and total quality management. Personal experiences and application of quality assurance in a department of radiology and medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Duvauferrier, R; Rolland, Y; Philippe, C; Milon, J; de Korvin, B; Rambeau, M; Morcet, N; Ramée, A

    1999-04-01

    Management of quality assurance protocols in a radiology department can be done by using several tools or models. Some are specific like accreditation manuals issued by some organizations, others like the ISO 9000 certification and the Total Quality management are more general and already well known by manufacturers. In order to implement a process of quality improvement, we have reviewed three models of quality assurance: evaluation in total quality based on the European model "EFQM", accreditation based on booklets from French cancer centers and Canadian radiology centers and, finally, accreditation based on the ISO 9002 certification model. Based on results of our comparative study, these three tools of quality management are not contradictory and may be complementary. However, they can be compared in terms of constraints they impose, of their historical background, of the criteria evaluated as well as the role of different teams. In conclusion, we suggest that directors of radiology department interested in implementing a quality assurance program first evaluate their department using the Canadian accreditation model issued in 1993 which is useful to become familiar with this new concept of quality. In a second step, a self assessment using the EFQM has to be done in collaboration with all members of the administration board in order to integrate all parameters and to share this protocol with all decision makers. The last step is to consolidate the organization of the quality assurance protocols by means of the ISO 9002 certification.

  5. 21 CFR 106.1 - Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation. 106.1 Section 106.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL...

  6. 21 CFR 106.1 - Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation. 106.1 Section 106.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL...

  7. 21 CFR 106.1 - Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation. 106.1 Section 106.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL...

  8. CTEPP STANDARD OPERATING PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING INTERNAL FIELD AUDITS AND QUALITY CONTROL (SOP-2.25)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This SOP describes the method for conducting internal field audits and quality control procedures. Internal field audits will be conducted to ensure the collection of high quality data. Internal field audits will be conducted by Field Auditors (the Field QA Officer and the Field...

  9. 21 CFR 106.1 - Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Status and applicability of the quality control procedures regulation. 106.1 Section 106.1 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA QUALITY CONTROL...

  10. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Implementation Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Implementation Procedures F Appendix F to Part 132 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS WATER QUALITY GUIDANCE FOR THE GREAT LAKES SYSTEM Pt. 132, App. F Appendix F to... water quality, preclude attainment of WQS; or f. Controls more stringent than those required by...

  11. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  12. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  13. 42 CFR 412.434 - Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. 412.434 Section 412.434 Public Health... Services of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities § 412.434 Reconsideration and appeals procedures of Inpatient Psychiatric Facilities Quality Reporting (IPFQR) Program decisions. (a) An inpatient psychiatric facility...

  14. An analysis of tolerance levels in IMRT quality assurance procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Basran, Parminder S.; Woo, Milton K.

    2008-06-15

    Increased use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has resulted in increased efforts in patient quality assurance (QA). Software and detector systems intended to streamline the IMRT quality assurance process often report metrics, such as percent discrepancies between measured and computed doses, which can be compared to benchmark or threshold values. The purpose of this work is to examine the relationships between two different types of IMRT QA processes in order to define, or refine, appropriate tolerances values. For 115 IMRT plans delivered in a 3 month period, we examine the discrepancies between (a) the treatment planning system (TPS) and results from a commercial independent monitor unit (MU) calculation program; (b) TPS and results from a commercial diode-array measurement system; and (c) the independent MU calculation and the diode-array measurements. Statistical tests were performed to assess significance in the IMRT QA results for different disease site and machine models. There is no evidence that the average total dose discrepancy in the monitor unit calculation depends on the disease site. Second, the discrepancies in the two IMRT QA methods are independent: there is no evidence that a better --or worse--monitor unit validation result is related to a better--or worse--diode-array measurement result. Third, there is marginal benefit in repeating the independent MU calculation with a more suitable dose point, if the initial IMRT QA failed a certain tolerance. Based on these findings, the authors conclude at some acceptable tolerances based on disease site and IMRT QA method. Specifically, monitor unit validations are expected to have a total dose discrepancy of 3% overall, and 5% per beam, independent of disease site. Diode array measurements are expected to have a total absolute dose discrepancy of 3% overall, and 3% per beam, independent of disease site. The percent of pixels exceeding a 3% and 3 mm threshold in a gamma analysis should be

  15. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for the Display of Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Mihriban; Hoffman, Ronald B.; Litaker, Harry, Jr.; Solem, Jody; Holden, Kritina; Twyford, Evan; Conlee, Carl

    2007-01-01

    Over the past year, NASA's focus has turned to crewed long duration and exploration missions. On these journeys, crewmembers will be required to execute thousands of procedures to maintain life support systems, check out space suits, conduct science experiments, and perform medical exams. To support the many complex tasks crewmembers undertake in microgravity, NASA is interested in providing crewmembers a hands-free work environment to promote more efficient operations. The overarching objective is to allow crewmembers to use both of their hands for tasks related to their mission, versus holding a paper manual or interacting with a display. The use of advanced, hands-free tools will undoubtedly make the crewmembers task easier, but they can also add to overall task complexity if not properly designed. A leading candidate technology for supporting a hands-free environment is the Head-Mounted Display (HMD). A more recent technology (e-book reader) that could be easily temp-stowed near the work area is also a potential hands-free solution. Previous work at NASA involved the evaluation of several commercially available HMDs for visual quality, comfort, and fit, as well as suitability for use in microgravity. Based on results from this work, three HMDs were selected for further evaluation (along with an e-book reader), using International Space Station (ISS)-like maintenance procedures. Two evaluations were conducted in the Space Station Mockup and Trainer Facility (SSMTF) located at the NASA Johnson Space Center (building 9). The SSMTF is a full scale, medium fidelity replica of the pressurized portions of the ISS. It supports crew training such as ingress and egress, habitability, and emergency procedures. In each of the two evaluations, the participants performed two maintenance procedures. One maintenance procedure involved inspecting air filters in a life support system and replacing them with a clean filter if one were found to be contaminated. The second

  16. Quality control procedures for flow cytometric applications in the hematology laboratory.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, J L

    1996-12-01

    Clinical diagnosis is one of the areas in which flow cytometry (FCM) has gained wide popularity and FCM now plays a crucial role in several aspects of medical hematology. It has progressively replaced many traditional laboratory tests due to its greater accuracy, sensitivity and rapidity. Unfortunately, among the very large number of its potential applications, only a minority of flow cytometric protocols have been standardized. Numerous factors are responsible for variation in analytical conditions and may affect results obtained by FCM. All these variables can be schematically divided into three major groups: factors related to the biological samples, immunological and accessory reagent factors and factors associated with the use of instruments. The quality control program must monitor and evaluate all aspects of the procedure. This includes the following main aspects: 1) performance of the flow cytometer, 2) specimen collection, transportation and maintenance of its integrity, 3) reagents, particularly monoclonal antibodies and 4) sample measurements, data acquisition and their interpretation. Procedures described here are designed to assess all the settings which affect the reliability, reproducibility and sensitivity of the cytometer in order to ensure identical conditions on a daily basis.

  17. Kosher slaughter paradigms: Evaluation of slaughterhouse inspection procedures.

    PubMed

    Bozzo, Giancarlo; Di Pinto, Angela; Bonerba, Elisabetta; Ceci, Edmondo; Mottola, Anna; Roma, Rocco; Capozza, Paolo; Samoilis, Giorgio; Tantillo, Giuseppina; Celano, Gaetano Vitale

    2017-06-01

    Slaughter by Jewish religious rite is the killing of an animal by cutting the trachea and oesophagus and major blood vessels using a very sharp blade. This operation is subject to strict rules laid down by religious authorities that characterize its sacredness. The aim of the study was to evaluate the specific criteria inherent in the Jewish religious rite, by analysing reject rates during the different phases. In this study, 52.4% of the carcasses failed to quality as Kosher, with 22.9% being rejected due to pulmonary lesions and only 3% for miscuts. The study also revealed legal vacuums in the field of labelling rules.

  18. Quality control procedures for dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Victoria Y; Fahimian, Benjamin P; Xing, Lei; Hristov, Dimitre H

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the authors introduce and demonstrate quality control procedures for evaluating the geometric and dosimetric fidelity of dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving treatment couch motion synchronous with gantry and multileaf collimator (MLC). Tests were designed to evaluate positional accuracy, velocity constancy and accuracy for dynamic couch motion under a realistic weight load. A test evaluating the geometric accuracy of the system in delivering treatments over complex dynamic trajectories was also devised. Custom XML scripts that control the Varian TrueBeam™ STx (Serial #3) axes in Developer Mode were written to implement the delivery sequences for the tests. Delivered dose patterns were captured with radiographic film or the electronic portal imaging device. The couch translational accuracy in dynamic treatment mode was 0.01 cm. Rotational accuracy was within 0.3°, with 0.04 cm displacement of the rotational axis. Dose intensity profiles capturing the velocity constancy and accuracy for translations and rotation exhibited standard deviation and maximum deviations below 3%. For complex delivery involving MLC and couch motions, the overall translational accuracy for reproducing programmed patterns was within 0.06 cm. The authors conclude that in Developer Mode, TrueBeam™ is capable of delivering dynamic treatment delivery techniques involving couch motion with good geometric and dosimetric fidelity.

  19. Current good manufacturing practices, quality control procedures, quality factors, notification requirements, and records and reports, for infant formula. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-06-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA or we) is issuing a final rule that adopts, with some modifications, the interim final rule (IFR) entitled "Current Good Manufacturing Practices, Quality Control Procedures, Quality Factors, Notification Requirements, and Records and Reports, for Infant Formula'' (February 10, 2014). This final rule affirms the IFR's changes to FDA's regulations and provides additional modifications and clarifications. The final rule also responds to certain comments submitted in response to the request for comments in the IFR.

  20. Evaluating the effectiveness of air quality interventions.

    PubMed

    van Erp, Annemoon M M; O'Keefe, Robert; Cohen, Aaron J; Warren, Jane

    2008-01-01

    Evaluating the extent to which air quality regulations improve public health--sometimes referred to as accountability--is part of an emerging effort to assess the effectiveness of environmental regulatory policies. Air quality has improved substantially in the United States and Western Europe in recent decades, with far less visible pollution and decreasing concentrations of several major pollutants. In large part, these gains were achieved through increasingly stringent air quality regulations. The costs associated with compliance and, importantly, the need to ensure that the regulations are achieving the intended public health benefits underscore the importance of accountability research. To date, accountability research has emphasized measuring the effects of actions already taken to improve air quality. Such research may also contribute to estimating the burden of disease that might be avoided in the future if certain actions are taken. The Health Effects Institute (HEI) currently funds eight ongoing studies on accountability, which cover near-term interventions to improve air quality including (1) a ban on the sale of coal, (2) replacing old wood stoves with cleaner ones, (3) decreasing sulfur content in fuel, (4) measures to reduce traffic, and (5) longer term, wide-ranging actions or events (such as complex changes associated with the reunification of Germany). HEI is also funding the development of methods and research to assess regulations that are implemented incrementally over extended periods of time, such as Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, which reduces sulfur dioxide emissions from power plants in the eastern United States.

  1. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Graves Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Graves property (140 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also documented the general ecological condition of the property. The Graves property was significantly damaged from past/present livestock grazing practices. Baseline HEP surveys generated 284.28 habitat units (HUs) or 2.03 HUs per acre. Of these, 275.50 HUs were associated with the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type while 8.78 HUs were tied to the riparian shrub cover type.

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures Report; Carl Property - Yakama Nation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul; Muse, Anthony

    2008-02-01

    A baseline habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis was conducted on the Carl property (160 acres) in June 2007 to determine the number of habitat units to credit Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for providing funds to acquire the property as partial mitigation for habitat losses associated with construction of McNary Dam. HEP surveys also helped assess the general ecological condition of the property. The Carl property appeared damaged from livestock grazing and exhibited a high percentage of invasive forbs. Exotic grasses, while present, did not comprise a large percentage of the available cover in most areas. Cover types were primarily grassland/shrubsteppe with a limited emergent vegetation component. Baseline HEP surveys generated 356.11 HUs or 2.2 HUs per acre. Habitat units were associated with the following HEP models: California quail (47.69 HUs), western meadowlark (114.78 HUs), mallard (131.93 HUs), Canada goose (60.34 HUs), and mink (1.38 HUs).

  3. Quality Considerations for the Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wigren, Jan; Täng, Kristina

    2007-12-01

    Revealing the true structural and mechanical properties is of utmost importance for the optimized use of thermal sprayed coatings. Only the true properties can be expected to correlate to the spray parameters. During the recent decade, the gas turbine industry has experienced a focus on the laboratory procedures being the weakest link in a frozen and robust process. This article will show several results indicating that the laboratory procedures are more essential to the evaluation results than the spray parameters themselves. With new and robust laboratory techniques, the true properties of thermal spray coatings are revealed, causing a major problem with respect to the quality standards developed 30-40 years ago. In many cases, these old specifications need updates, which is a difficult task from a cost, time, and quality perspective for OEM’s. Coatings that have been successfully used for almost half a century no longer conform to the specification they were optimized to, because of these new appropriate laboratory techniques and procedures. What is actually meant when stating the following? (1) The coating has 5% porosity; (2) No cracks are allowed; (3) Tensile bond is 50 Mpa; (4) Hardness is 1000 HV; and (5) Coating thickness is 100 μm. This article also initiates a discussion on the measurement inaccuracies, for testing of thermally sprayed coatings, with respect to the commonly used general international standards (such as QS9000, ISO17025, AS9003, and ISO10012), as well as with respect to recommendations from the Six Sigma methodology.

  4. Application and testing of a procedure to evaluate transferability of habitat suitability criteria

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Jeff A.; Bovee, Ken D.

    1993-01-01

    A procedure designed to test the transferability of habitat suitability criteria was evaluated in the Cache la Poudre River, Colorado. Habitat suitability criteria were developed for active adult and juvenile rainbow trout in the South Platte River, Colorado. These criteria were tested by comparing microhabitat use predicted from the criteria with observed microhabitat use by adult rainbow trout in the Cache la Poudre River. A one-sided X2 test, using counts of occupied and unoccupied cells in each suitability classification, was used to test for non-random selection for optimum habitat use over usable habitat and for suitable over unsuitable habitat. Criteria for adult rainbow trout were judged to be transferable to the Cache la Poudre River, but juvenile criteria (applied to adults) were not transferable. Random subsampling of occupied and unoccupied cells was conducted to determine the effect of sample size on the reliability of the test procedure. The incidence of type I and type II errors increased rapidly as the sample size was reduced below 55 occupied and 200 unoccupied cells. Recommended modifications to the procedure included the adoption of a systematic or randomized sampling design and direct measurement of microhabitat variables. With these modifications, the procedure is economical, simple and reliable. Use of the procedure as a quality assurance device in routine applications of the instream flow incremental methodology was encouraged.

  5. Evaluation of Administrators [and] Practices for Evaluating Administrators, Guidelines and Procedures for Evaluation of Regular (Tenured) Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napa Coll., CA.

    Procedures for evaluating college administrators are provided. The first evaluation relates to the administrator's skill in bringing about optimum development, progress, and attainment of students. Standard forms for the evaluation of the college president, associate dean of instruction, and assistant dean of student activities are then discussed,…

  6. Computed tomography quality indexes: evaluation experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strocchi, Sabina; Vite, Cristina; Novario, Raffaele; Cacciatori, Marco; Frigerio, Giovanna; Conte, Leopoldo

    2009-02-01

    Aim of this work was to identify proper figures of merit (FoM's) to quantitatively and objectively assess the whole acquisition process of a CT image and to evaluate which are more significant. Catphan® phantom images where acquired with a 64 slices computed tomography system, with head and abdomen protocols. Automatic exposure modulation system was on, with different settings. We defined three FoM's (Q, Q1 and Q2) including image quality parameters and acquisition modalities; two of them (Q and Q1) include also a radiation dose quantity, the third (Q2) does not. Then we drew from these the comparable FoM's (CNR, Q1 *, Q2), that do not have dose in their definitions, in order to investigate how they depend on perceived image quality. The FoM's were evaluated for each series. At the same time, expert observers evaluated the number of low contrast inserts seen in the phantom' images. The considered CNR, Q1*, Q2 FoM's are linearly related to the perceived image quality for both the acquisition protocols (head: r2=0.91;0.94;0.91; abdomen: r2=0.93;0.93;0.85). Q and Q1 values analysis shows that these FoM's can distinguish between different acquisition modalities (head or abdomen) with statistically significant difference (p<0.05). The studied FoM's can be usefully used to quantitatively and objectively assess the whole CT image acquisition process. Those FoM's including also radiation dose (Q, Q1) can be used to objectively quantify the equilibrium between image quality and radiation dose for a certain acquisition modality.

  7. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  8. The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This presentation provides an overview of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). It contains a synopsis of the three phases of AQMEII, including objectives, logistics, and timelines. It also provides a number of examples of analyses conducted through AQMEII with a particular focus on past and future analyses of deposition. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, process models, and decision support tools for use both within and outside of EPA.

  9. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for the collection, evaluation, and use of the types of quality evaluation data specified in PGI 246.470-2....

  10. Evaluating Water Quality in a Suburban Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, S. M.; Garza, N.

    2008-12-01

    A water quality analysis and modeling study is currently being conducted on the Martinez Creek, a small catchment within Cibolo watershed, a sub-basin of the San Antonio River, Texas. Several other major creeks, such as Salatrillo, Escondido, and Woman Hollering merge with Martinez Creek. Land use and land cover analysis shows that the major portion of the watershed is dominated by residential development with average impervious cover percentage of approximately 40% along with a some of agricultural areas and brushlands. This catchment is characterized by the presence of three small wastewater treatment plants. Previous site visits and sampling of water quality indicate the presence of algae and fecal coliform bacteria at levels well above state standards at several locations in the catchment throughout the year. Due to the presence of livestock, residential development and wastewater treatment plants, a comprehensive understanding of water quality is important to evaluate the sources and find means to control pollution. As part of the study, a spatial and temporal water quality analyses of conventional parameters as well as emerging contaminants, such as veterinary pharmaceuticals and microbial pathogens is being conducted to identify critical locations and sources. Additionally, the Hydrologic Simulation Program FORTRAN (HSPF) will be used to identify best management practices that can be incorporated given the projected growth and development and feasibility.

  11. Evaluation of results of US corn and soybeans exploratory experiment: Classification procedures verification test. [Missouri, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carnes, J. G.; Baird, J. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The classification procedure utilized in making crop proportion estimates for corn and soybeans using remotely sensed data was evaluated. The procedure was derived during the transition year of the Large Area Crop Inventory Experiment. Analysis of variance techniques were applied to classifications performed by 3 groups of analysts who processed 25 segments selected from 4 agrophysical units (APU's). Group and APU effects were assessed to determine factors which affected the quality of the classifications. The classification results were studied to determine the effectiveness of the procedure in producing corn and soybeans proportion estimates.

  12. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality Assurance 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for...

  13. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality Assurance 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for...

  14. 48 CFR 246.470-2 - Quality evaluation data.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quality evaluation data... SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT QUALITY ASSURANCE Government Contract Quality Assurance 246.470-2 Quality evaluation data. The contract administration office shall establish a system for...

  15. CMAQ Involvement in Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Description of Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). Different chemical transport models are applied by different groups over North America and Europe and evaluated against observations.

  16. A procedure for the evaluation of measurement uncertainty based on moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willink, R.

    2005-10-01

    A practical, transparent and accurate procedure is proposed for the evaluation of measurement uncertainty. The procedure is based on established statistical theory, allows the treatment of correlated input quantities estimated from a finite number of observations and permits the assignment of asymmetric distributions to input quantities. The procedure is applicable wherever the basic method of clause 8 of the Guide to the Expression of Uncertainty in Measurement (the Guide) is applicable. As in the method of the Guide, distributions are associated with input quantities for use with a linearized formulation of the measurement function. These distributions are combined using a property of their statistical cumulants, which are simple functions of their moments. The distribution ultimately obtained for the measurand is a member of the Pearson family, which has the set of scaled t-distributions as a subset. So the procedure allows greater flexibility than the method of the Guide in the representation of the distribution associated with the measurand. The procedure has the qualities of internal consistency and transferability as outlined in clause 0.4 of the Guide and is consistent with principles of the 'propagation of distributions' that underlie a proposed supplement to the Guide. In many cases it will permit the quotation of uncertainty intervals that are narrower than those of the Guide yet with the same justifiable probability of containing the measurand, so providing a more informative statement to the user of the interval. The procedure is presented for the probabilities of 0.95 and 0.99 but can be extended to accommodate other probabilities.

  17. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  18. Quality of protection evaluation of security mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ksiezopolski, Bogdan; Zurek, Tomasz; Mokkas, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that during the design of teleinformatic system the tradeoff between the systems performance and the system protection should be made. The traditional approach assumes that the best way is to apply the strongest possible security measures. Unfortunately, the overestimation of security measures can lead to the unreasonable increase of system load. This is especially important in multimedia systems where the performance has critical character. In many cases determination of the required level of protection and adjustment of some security measures to these requirements increase system efficiency. Such an approach is achieved by means of the quality of protection models where the security measures are evaluated according to their influence on the system security. In the paper, we propose a model for QoP evaluation of security mechanisms. Owing to this model, one can quantify the influence of particular security mechanisms on ensuring security attributes. The methodology of our model preparation is described and based on it the case study analysis is presented. We support our method by the tool where the models can be defined and QoP evaluation can be performed. Finally, we have modelled TLS cryptographic protocol and presented the QoP security mechanisms evaluation for the selected versions of this protocol.

  19. Quality of Protection Evaluation of Security Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Ksiezopolski, Bogdan; Zurek, Tomasz; Mokkas, Michail

    2014-01-01

    Recent research indicates that during the design of teleinformatic system the tradeoff between the systems performance and the system protection should be made. The traditional approach assumes that the best way is to apply the strongest possible security measures. Unfortunately, the overestimation of security measures can lead to the unreasonable increase of system load. This is especially important in multimedia systems where the performance has critical character. In many cases determination of the required level of protection and adjustment of some security measures to these requirements increase system efficiency. Such an approach is achieved by means of the quality of protection models where the security measures are evaluated according to their influence on the system security. In the paper, we propose a model for QoP evaluation of security mechanisms. Owing to this model, one can quantify the influence of particular security mechanisms on ensuring security attributes. The methodology of our model preparation is described and based on it the case study analysis is presented. We support our method by the tool where the models can be defined and QoP evaluation can be performed. Finally, we have modelled TLS cryptographic protocol and presented the QoP security mechanisms evaluation for the selected versions of this protocol. PMID:25136683

  20. Embedding Quality in E-Learning Implementation through Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deepwell, Frances

    2007-01-01

    In relation to quality, evaluation is often used synonymously with quality assurance and monitoring processes (Ehlers et al, 2004). However, evaluation has other purposes, such as for development and knowledge (Chelimsky & Shadish, 1997). In this paper, I present a view of evaluation as an instrument of quality enhancement rather than quality…

  1. User-Centered Evaluation of the Quality of Blogs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chuenchom, Sutthinan

    2011-01-01

    Blogs serve multiple purposes, resulting in several types of blogs that vary greatly in terms of quality and content. It is important to evaluate the quality of blogs, which requires appropriate evaluation criteria. Unfortunately, there are minimal studies on framework and the specific criteria and indicators for evaluating the quality of blogs.…

  2. EPA's Quality Policy and Procedure CIO Policy Transmittal 09-001

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The purpose of this memo is to (1) issue the final versions of the Quality Policy and Procedure documents (with a Q&A document for your reference as well) and (2) call for members of a new advisory group to guide Policy implementation activities.

  3. Enhancing E-Learning Quality through the Application of the AKUE Procedure Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bremer, C.

    2012-01-01

    The paper describes the procedure model AKUE, which aims at the improvement and assurance of quality and cost efficiency in the context of the introduction of e-learning and the development of digital learning material. AKUE divides the whole planning and implementation process into four different phases: analysis, conception, implementation, and…

  4. Effect of milling temperature and post-milling cooling procedures on rice milling quality appraisals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to study the effects of different milling conditions and post-milling handling procedures on appraised milling quality of rough rice. Samples of medium grain rough rice (M202) with moisture content (MC) of 11.5±0.2% were used for this study. To create different mil...

  5. Influence of rice sample preparation and milling procedures on milling quality appraisals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this research was to investigate the effect of sample preparation and milling procedure on milling quality appraisals of rough rice. Samples of freshly harvested medium-grain rice (M202) with different initial moisture contents (MCs) ranging from 20.2% to 25.1% (w.b.) were used for...

  6. Statistics, Measures, and Quality Standards for Assessing Digital Reference Library Services: Guidelines and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClure, Charles R.; Lankes, R. David; Gross, Melissa; Choltco-Devlin, Beverly

    This manual is a first effort to begin to identify, describe, and develop procedures for assessing various aspects of digital reference service. Its overall purpose is to improve the quality of digital reference services and assist librarians to design and implement better digital reference services. More specifically, its aim is to: assist…

  7. 40 CFR Appendix B to Part 75 - Quality Assurance and Quality Control Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unit does not have to be in operation. Conduct the leak checks no less than 30 days apart, to the... of the 168 unit (or stack) operating hour grace period, the required linearity test or leak check has... Procedures B Appendix B to Part 75 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  8. Evaluation of vertical profiles to design continuous descent approach procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradeep, Priyank

    The current research focuses on predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of Continuous Descent Approach (CDA), which is among the key concepts of the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen). The idle-thrust CDA is a fuel economical, noise and emission abatement procedure, but requires increased separation to accommodate for variability and uncertainties in vertical and speed profiles of arriving aircraft. Although a considerable amount of researches have been devoted to the estimation of potential benefits of the CDA, only few have attempted to explain the predictability, variability and operational feasibility aspect of CDA. The analytical equations derived using flight dynamics and Base of Aircraft and Data (BADA) Total Energy Model (TEM) in this research gives insight into dependency of vertical profile of CDA on various factors like wind speed and gradient, weight, aircraft type and configuration, thrust settings, atmospheric factors (deviation from ISA (DISA), pressure and density of the air) and descent speed profile. Application of the derived equations to idle-thrust CDA gives an insight into sensitivity of its vertical profile to multiple factors. This suggests fixed geometric flight path angle (FPA) CDA has higher degree of predictability and lesser variability at the cost of non-idle and low thrust engine settings. However, with optimized design this impact can be overall minimized. The CDA simulations were performed using Future ATM Concept Evaluation Tool (FACET) based on radar-track and aircraft type data (BADA) of the real air-traffic to some of the busiest airports in the USA (ATL, SFO and New York Metroplex (JFK, EWR and LGA)). The statistical analysis of the vertical profiles of CDA shows 1) mean geometric FPAs derived from various simulated vertical profiles are consistently shallower than 3° glideslope angle and 2) high level of variability in vertical profiles of idle-thrust CDA even in absence of

  9. NORMAL QUALITY OF LIFE AFTER THE COX MAZE PROCEDURE FOR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION.

    PubMed

    Melby, Spencer J; Zierer, Andreas; Lubahn, Jordon G; Bailey, Marci S; Cox, James L; Schuessler, Richard B; Damiano, Ralph J

    2008-05-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVE: Atrial fibrillation(AF) has been shown in numerous studies to significantly decrease patient quality of life. The Cox-Maze procedure has excellent long-term efficacy in curing AF. However, it is unknown whether this procedure improves long-term quality of life in these patients. The purpose of this study was to examine late quality of life in patients that underwent a lone Cox-Maze procedure. METHODS: Between 1987 and 2003, 163 patients underwent a Cox-Maze procedure for lone AF at our institution. Of these, 68 patients agreed and completed the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 Health Survey. Scores from the age-matched general US population were normalized to a mean of 50 and standard deviation of 10 to facilitate comparison. Collected data were compared to the norm-based score for each domain using a one-sample t-test. Four patients were removed from analysis because of AF recurrence. RESULTS: There were 52 males(81%). Mean age was 52.6±9.5 years. Preoperatively, 37 patients(58%) had paroxysmal and 25 patients(39%) had persistent or permanent AF. The mean duration of AF before surgery was 9.8±8.2 years. There was no statistical difference in norm-based scores between the Cox-Maze procedure group and the age-matched general US population in any of the eight health domains at a mean follow-up of 8.7±3.7 years. CONCLUSION: Our results suggest that the Cox-Maze procedure cures atrial fibrillation in the majority of patients, and that those patients that are cured obtain a normal quality of life as compared to the general population at late follow-up.

  10. Revisiting the Procedures for the Vector Data Quality Assurance in Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdoğan, M.; Torun, A.; Boyacı, D.

    2012-07-01

    of spatial data quality concepts into developments and application requires existence of conceptual, logical and most importantly physical existence of data model, rules and knowledge of realization in a form of geo-spatial data. The applicable metrics and thresholds are determined on this concrete base. This study discusses application of geo-spatial data quality issues and QA (quality assurance) and QC procedures in the topographic data production. Firstly we introduce MGCP (Multinational Geospatial Co-production Program) data profile of NATO (North Atlantic Treaty Organization) DFDD (DGIWG Feature Data Dictionary), the requirements of data owner, the view of data producers for both data capturing and QC and finally QA to fulfil user needs. Then, our practical and new approach which divides the quality into three phases is introduced. Finally, implementation of our approach to accomplish metrics, measures and thresholds of quality definitions is discussed. In this paper, especially geometry and semantics quality and quality control procedures that can be performed by the producers are discussed. Some applicable best-practices that we experienced on techniques of quality control, defining regulations that define the objectives and data production procedures are given in the final remarks. These quality control procedures should include the visual checks over the source data, captured vector data and printouts, some automatic checks that can be performed by software and some semi-automatic checks by the interaction with quality control personnel. Finally, these quality control procedures should ensure the geometric, semantic, attribution and metadata quality of vector data.

  11. [Analytical quality of assays and comparison of procedures for the sweat test].

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Khoa, Thao; Borgard, Jean-Pierre; Marchand, Martine; Sitruk-Khalfon, Dominique; Feuillet, Marie-Noëlle; Feldmann, Delphine; Vassault, Anne; Rota, Michèle

    2012-01-01

    Sweat test measuring the chloride ion (Cl(-)) concentration in sweat is a tool for the cystic fibrosis (CF) diagnosis. We evaluated analytical criteria of different available methods and compared them into five hospitals and throught a national quality control program. Sweat tests were performed by stimulation using pilocarpine iontophoresis, sweat collection and measurement of sweat Cl(-) (mmol/L) by titration (colorimetric or coulometric end-point) or by in situ direct potentiometry using a chloride-selective electrode. Indirect determination by sweat conductivity measurement was expressed in mmol/L sodium chloride (NaCl) equivalents (Eq). Linearity range was demonstrated for all measurement procedures in the range 10 to 120 mmol/L. Intra-laboratory coefficients of variation (CVs) were <5% for values between 10 and 100 mmol/L. Inter-laboratory CVs were <3% only for conductivity measurement whatever the range. The comparison of results obtained for a same sweat sample, simultaneously by coulometric and conductivity measurements, demonstrated a first degree linear distribution between 30 to 60 mmol/L Cl(-) allowing us to establish an analytical correspondence table for this range. Thus, calculated values for 30, 40 and 60 mmol/L Cl(-) were respectively 57, 66 and 84 mmol/L NaCl Eq. In conclusion, comparison of methods highlighted that the less the sweat test is automatically controlled, the more the operator influence on results quality is important. Our study supports that sweat test result <50 mmol/L NaCl Eq is unlikely with CF diagnosis in absence of clinical arguments.

  12. Ecotoxicological evaluation of soil quality criteria

    SciTech Connect

    van Straalen, N.M.; Denneman, C.A. )

    1989-12-01

    To implement the Soil Protection Act of 1986, the Dutch Ministry of Housing, Physical Planning, and Environment has recently proposed a list of soil quality reference values. These values are, as yet, insufficiently based on ecotoxicological evidence. In this paper, a three-step procedure of risk assessment for soil contaminants is proposed. Arguing from experimental results concerning no observed effect concentrations for a set of selected soil organisms, the method aims at protecting a certain fraction of soil life, taking factors such as soil organic matter and clay content into account. When applied to cadmium, a concentration protecting 95% of soil invertebrates is estimated as 0.16 micrograms/g for a standard soil. The value of 0.8 micrograms/g, as proposed by the Dutch authorities, may, given the present variation and uncertainty of toxicity data, protect about 85% of the soil invertebrate fauna. It is concluded that even low levels of cadmium in soil may endanger the functioning of some sensitive soil animal species.21 references.

  13. A Comparative Evaluation of Three Relaxation Training Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jeffrey E.

    Comparison was made between the effectiveness of three relaxation training procedures: (1) Behavioral Relaxation Training, which consisted of training in relaxing specific parts of the body and controlling breathing; (2) Meditation (based on Benson's procedure for eliciting the relaxation response); and (3) Seashore Sounds "Attention Focusing,"…

  14. Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development – The importance of quality control procedures

    PubMed Central

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D.; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J.; Mateos-Pérez, J. M.; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C.; Karama, Sherif

    2015-01-01

    Several reports have described cortical thickness (CTh) developmental trajectories, with conflicting results. Some studies have reported inverted-U shape curves with peaks of CTh in late childhood to adolescence, while others suggested predominant monotonic decline after age 6. In this study, we reviewed CTh developmental trajectories in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development, and in a second step evaluated the impact of post-processing quality control (QC) procedures on identified trajectories. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual subjects with repeated scanning (1–3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3 years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models. The majority of brain regions showed linear monotonic decline of CTh. There were few areas of cubic trajectories, mostly in bilateral temporo-parietal areas and the right prefrontal cortex, in which CTh peaks were at, or prior to, age 8. When controlling for total brain volume, CTh trajectories were even more uniformly linear. The only sex difference was faster thinning of occipital areas in boys compared to girls. The best-fit model for whole brain mean thickness was a monotonic decline of 0.027 mm per year. QC procedures had a significant impact on identified trajectories, with a clear shift toward more complex trajectories when including all scans without QC (n=954). Trajectories were almost exclusively linear when using only scans that passed the most stringent QC (n=598). The impact of QC probably relates to decreasing the inclusion of scans with CTh underestimation secondary to movement artifacts, which are more common in younger subjects. In summary, our results suggest that CTh follows a simple linear decline in most cortical areas by age 5, and all areas by age 8. This study further supports the crucial importance of implementing post-processing QC in CTh studies of development, aging

  15. Trajectories of cortical thickness maturation in normal brain development--The importance of quality control procedures.

    PubMed

    Ducharme, Simon; Albaugh, Matthew D; Nguyen, Tuong-Vi; Hudziak, James J; Mateos-Pérez, J M; Labbe, Aurelie; Evans, Alan C; Karama, Sherif

    2016-01-15

    Several reports have described cortical thickness (CTh) developmental trajectories, with conflicting results. Some studies have reported inverted-U shape curves with peaks of CTh in late childhood to adolescence, while others suggested predominant monotonic decline after age 6. In this study, we reviewed CTh developmental trajectories in the NIH MRI Study of Normal Brain Development, and in a second step, evaluated the impact of post-processing quality control (QC) procedures on identified trajectories. The quality-controlled sample included 384 individual subjects with repeated scanning (1-3 per subject, total scans n=753) from 4.9 to 22.3years of age. The best-fit model (cubic, quadratic, or first-order linear) was identified at each vertex using mixed-effects models. The majority of brain regions showed linear monotonic decline of CTh. There were few areas of cubic trajectories, mostly in bilateral temporo-parietal areas and the right prefrontal cortex, in which CTh peaks were at, or prior to, age 8. When controlling for total brain volume, CTh trajectories were even more uniformly linear. The only sex difference was faster thinning of occipital areas in boys compared to girls. The best-fit model for whole brain mean thickness was a monotonic decline of 0.027mm per year. QC procedures had a significant impact on identified trajectories, with a clear shift toward more complex trajectories (i.e., quadratic or cubic) when including all scans without QC (n=954). Trajectories were almost exclusively linear when using only scans that passed the most stringent QC (n=598). The impact of QC probably relates to decreasing the inclusion of scans with CTh underestimation secondary to movement artifacts, which are more common in younger subjects. In summary, our results suggest that CTh follows a simple linear decline in most cortical areas by age 5, and all areas by age 8. This study further supports the crucial importance of implementing post-processing QC in CTh studies

  16. The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng; Kondev, F. G.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-03-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, AME2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the AME are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous AME2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to AME users. The second AME2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the AME2016 and the NUBASE2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). AMDC: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/ Contents The AME2016 atomic mass evaluation (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment proceduresAcrobat PDF (1.2 MB) Table I. Input data compared with adjusted valuesAcrobat PDF (1.3 MB)

  17. Evaluation of performance measurement instruments on their use for food quality systems.

    PubMed

    van der Spiegel, M; Luning, P A; Ziggers, G W; Jongen, W M F

    2004-01-01

    Due to regular challenges of food safety, consumers put high demands on the performance of food quality systems. To deal with these requirements, food manufacturers need effective quality management. Performance of food quality systems can be partly realized by quality assurance systems, such as HACCP (hazard analysis and critical control point), ISO (international organization for standardization), and BRC (british retail consortium). However, it is still unknown to what extent these systems factually contribute to the realization of quality in the wider sense. Therefore, an instrument is needed that measures the effectiveness of quality systems. This article describes the evaluation of instruments on their suitability for the development of a diagnostic instrument that measures the effectiveness of food quality systems. For this evaluation, perspectives of quality, typical characteristics of agrifood production, quantification, and performance measurement of quality management were studied. Instruments that measure the performance of both quality management and production quality were identified and evaluated on the basis of the defined criteria. The criteria for the performance of production quality were 6 quality dimensions, i.e., product quality, availability, costs,flexibility, reliability, and service. The criteria for performance of quality management were analyses of the relationships between quality management, context of the organization, and production quality, a normative procedure, validation, applicability, classification, and a process approach. Finally, for the final instrument, the evaluation resulted in an integrated approach i.e., a technomanagerial approach, and 3 suitable instruments i.e., Wageningen Management Approach, Extended Quality Triangle, and the quality concept of Noori and Radford.

  18. Thirdhand tobacco smoke: procedures to evaluate cytotoxicity in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Figueiró, Luciana Rizzieri; Dantas, Denise Conceição Mesquita; Linden, Rafael; Ziulkoski, Ana Luiza

    2016-06-01

    The risks associated to tobacco smoking are not ceased with smoke extinction. Many toxic compounds remain in the environment after the cigarette is extinguished and accumulated in the air or on surfaces. However, little is known about the risks of this exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate procedures to collect thirdhand smoke (THS) and prepare the samples to perform three in vitro toxicity tests. Cellulose papers and cotton wipes were used to impregnate with nicotine solution and smoke cigarette in a chamber or in smoker's home. Samples were immersed in methanol or Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium (DMEM) to expose Hep-2 cells. MTT, neutral red uptake (NRU) and trypan blue assays were performed. The concentration of nicotine in DMEM extract of THS in paper and cotton was similar to those in methanol extract (p > 0.05). Alterations in the mitochondrial and lysosomal functions were found in both paper and cotton samples; however, the cytotoxic effect was not always observed. There was a decrease of 21-31% in MTT assay and 38-56% in NRU assay (p < 0.003). There was a dose-response relationship between the amount of cigarettes and lysosomal viability; the correlation was higher for cotton samples (r = -0.843, p < 0.001). As a dose-response relationship was found only in NRU assay, this test may be a more suitable choice rather than the MTT assay. Paper and wipe sampling can be reliable markers of tobacco smoke contamination. Moreover, these materials, if properly prepared, can be used as substrate providers to perform cellular assays.

  19. Calibration procedure for a laser triangulation scanner with uncertainty evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genta, Gianfranco; Minetola, Paolo; Barbato, Giulio

    2016-11-01

    Most of low cost 3D scanning devices that are nowadays available on the market are sold without a user calibration procedure to correct measurement errors related to changes in environmental conditions. In addition, there is no specific international standard defining a procedure to check the performance of a 3D scanner along time. This paper aims at detailing a thorough methodology to calibrate a 3D scanner and assess its measurement uncertainty. The proposed procedure is based on the use of a reference ball plate and applied to a triangulation laser scanner. Experimental results show that the metrological performance of the instrument can be greatly improved by the application of the calibration procedure that corrects systematic errors and reduces the device's measurement uncertainty.

  20. The Ame2016 atomic mass evaluation * (I). Evaluation of input data; and adjustment procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, W. J.; Audi, G.; Wang, Meng; Kondev, F. G.; Naimi, S.; Xu, Xing

    2017-01-01

    This paper is the first of two articles (Part I and Part II) that presents the results of the new atomic mass evaluation, Ame2016. It includes complete information on the experimental input data (also including unused and rejected ones), as well as details on the evaluation procedures used to derive the tables of recommended values given in the second part. This article describes the evaluation philosophy and procedures that were implemented in the selection of specific nuclear reaction, decay and mass-spectrometric results. These input values were entered in the least-squares adjustment for determining the best values for the atomic masses and their uncertainties. Details of the calculation and particularities of the Ame are then described. All accepted and rejected data, including outweighted ones, are presented in a tabular format and compared with the adjusted values obtained using the least-squares fit analysis. Differences with the previous Ame2012 evaluation are discussed and specific information is presented for several cases that may be of interest to Ame users. The second Ame2016 article gives a table with the recommended values of atomic masses, as well as tables and graphs of derived quantities, along with the list of references used in both the Ame2016 and the Nubase2016 evaluations (the first paper in this issue). Amdc: http://amdc.impcas.ac.cn/

  1. Evaluation of Hardware and Procedures for Astronaut Assembly and Repair of Large Precision Reflectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lake, Mark S.; Heard, Walter L., Jr.; Watson, Judith J.; Collins, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    A detailed procedure is presented that enables astronauts in extravehicular activity (EVA) to efficiently assemble and repair large (i.e., greater than 10m-diameter) segmented reflectors, supported by a truss, for space-based optical or radio-frequency science instruments. The procedure, estimated timelines, and reflector hardware performance are verified in simulated 0-g (neutral buoyancy) assembly tests of a 14m-diameter, offset-focus, reflector test article. The test article includes a near-flight-quality, 315-member, doubly curved support truss and 7 mockup reflector panels (roughly 2m in diameter) representing a portion of the 37 total panels needed to fully populate the reflector. Data from the tests indicate that a flight version of the design (including all reflector panels) could be assembled in less than 5 hours - less than the 6 hours normally permitted for a single EVA. This assembly rate essentially matches pre-test predictions that were based on a vast amount of historical data on EVA assembly of structures produced by NASA Langley Research Center. Furthermore, procedures and a tool for the removal and replacement of a damaged reflector panel were evaluated, and it was shown that EVA repair of this type of reflector is feasible with the use of appropriate EVA crew aids.

  2. Evaluation of Revised Computer-Based Procedure System Prototype

    SciTech Connect

    Katya Le Blanc; Johanna Oxstrand; Cheradan Fikstad

    2013-01-01

    The nuclear power industry is very procedure driven, i.e. almost all activities that take place at a nuclear power plant are conducted by following procedures. The paper-based procedures (PBPs) currently used by the industry do a good job at keeping the industry safe. However, these procedures are most often paired with methods and tools put in place to anticipate, prevent, and catch errors related to hands-on work. These tools are commonly called human performance tools. The drawback with the current implementation of these tools is that the task of performing one procedure becomes time and labor intensive. For example, concurrent and independent verification of procedure steps are required at times, which essentially means that at least two people have to be actively involved in the task. Even though the current use of PBPs and human performance tools are keeping the industry safe, there is room for improvement. The industry could potentially increase their efficiency and safety by replacing their existing PBPs with CBPs. If implemented correctly, the CBP system could reduce the time and focus spent on using the human performance tools. Some of the tools can be completely incorporated in the CBP system in a manner that the performer does not think about the fact that these tools are being used. Examples of these tools are procedure use and adherence, placekeeping, and peer checks. Other tools can be partly integrated in a fashion that reduce the time and labor they require, such as concurrent and independent verification. The incorporation of advanced technology, such as CBP systems, may help to manage the effects of aging systems, structures, and components. The introduction of advanced technology may also make the existing LWR fleet more attractive to the future workforce, which will be of importance when the future workforce will chose between existing fleet and the newly built nuclear power plants.

  3. Medicare's Hospital Compare quality reports appear to have slowed price increases for two major procedures.

    PubMed

    Dor, Avi; Encinosa, William E; Carey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research has found that Hospital Compare, Medicare's public reporting initiative, has had little impact on patient outcomes. However, little is known about the initiative's impact on hospital prices, which may be significant because private insurers are generally well positioned to respond to quality information when negotiating prices with hospitals. We estimated difference-in-differences models of the effects of Hospital Compare quality reporting on transaction prices for two major cardiac procedures, coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). States that had mandated their own public reporting systems before the implementation of Hospital Compare formed the control group. We found that prices for these procedures continued to increase overall after the initiation of Hospital Compare quality scores, but the rate of increase was significantly lower in states with no quality reporting metrics of their own before Hospital Compare, when compared to the control states (annual rates of increase of 4.4 percent versus 8.7 percent for PCI, and 3.9 percent versus 10.6 percent for CABG, adjusted for overall inflation). This finding implies that Hospital Compare provided leverage to purchasers in moderating price increases, while adding competitive pressures on hospitals. Providing accurate quality information on both hospitals and health plans could benefit consumers.

  4. Minimally processed vegetable salads: microbial quality evaluation.

    PubMed

    Fröder, Hans; Martins, Cecília Geraldes; De Souza, Katia Leani Oliveira; Landgraf, Mariza; Franco, Bernadette D G M; Destro, Maria Teresa

    2007-05-01

    The increasing demand for fresh fruits and vegetables and for convenience foods is causing an expansion of the market share for minimally processed vegetables. Among the more common pathogenic microorganisms that can be transmitted to humans by these products are Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Salmonella. The aim of this study was to evaluate the microbial quality of a selection of minimally processed vegetables. A total of 181 samples of minimally processed leafy salads were collected from retailers in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil. Counts of total coliforms, fecal coliforms, Enterobacteriaceae, psychrotrophic microorganisms, and Salmonella were conducted for 133 samples. L. monocytogenes was assessed in 181 samples using the BAX System and by plating the enrichment broth onto Palcam and Oxford agars. Suspected Listeria colonies were submitted to classical biochemical tests. Populations of psychrotrophic microorganisms >10(6) CFU/g were found in 51% of the 133 samples, and Enterobacteriaceae populations between 10(5) and 106 CFU/g were found in 42% of the samples. Fecal coliform concentrations higher than 10(2) CFU/g (Brazilian standard) were found in 97 (73%) of the samples, and Salmonella was detected in 4 (3%) of the samples. Two of the Salmonella-positive samples had <10(2) CFU/g concentrations of fecal coliforms. L. monocytogenes was detected in only 1 (0.6%) of the 181 samples examined. This positive sample was simultaneously detected by both methods. The other Listeria species identified by plating were L. welshimeri (one sample of curly lettuce) and L. innocua (2 samples of watercress). The results indicate that minimally processed vegetables had poor microbiological quality, and these products could be a vehicle for pathogens such as Salmonella and L. monocytogenes.

  5. Indicators for the evaluation of diet quality.

    PubMed

    Gil, Ángel; Martinez de Victoria, Emilio; Olza, Josune

    2015-02-26

    The role of diet quality and physical activity in reducing the progression of chronic disease is becoming increasingly important. Dietary Quality Indices or Indicators (DQIs) are algorithms aiming to evaluate the overall diet and categorize individuals according to the extent to which their eating behaviour is "healthy". Predefined indexes assess dietary patterns based on current nutrition knowledge and they have been developed primarily for nutritional epidemiology to assess dietary risk factors for non-communicable diseases. There are many different types of DQIs. There are three major categories of DQIs: a) nutrient-based indicators; b) food/food group based indicators; and c) combination indexes, the vast majority of DQIs, which often include a measure of diet variety within and across food groups, a measure of adequacy i.e. nutrients (compared to requirements) or food groups (quantities or servings), a measure of nutrients/foods to consume in moderation, and an overall balance of macronutrients. The Healthy Eating Index (HEI), the Diet Quality Index (DQI), the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) and the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS) are the four 'original' diet quality scores that have been referred to and validated most extensively. Several indexes have been adapted and modified from those originals. In particular, many variations on the MDS have been proposed, included different alternate MDS and Mediterranean Diet Adherence Screener (MEDAS). Primary data source of DQI's are individual dietary data collection tools, namely 24 h quantitative intake recalls, dietary records and food frequency questionnaires. Nutrients found in many scores are total fat, saturated fatty acids or the ratio of monounsaturated fatty acids to saturated fatty acids or the latter SFA to polyunsaturated fatty acids. Cholesterol, protein content and quality, complex carbohydrates, mono- and disaccharides, dietary fibre and sodium are also found in various scores. All DQIs, except those that

  6. A new quality control procedure for detecting defects in proton range modifiers for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kreydick, Brad

    Proton beam radiotherapy is an increasingly common and accepted form of cancer treatment, which utilizes the novel energy-deposition characteristics of heavy, charged particles to destroy tumor cells. At the CDH Proton Therapy Center in Warrenville, IL, the main beam-delivery technique employs patient-specific beam modifiers to conform the beam to the target area, both perpendicular to the direction of beam travel and along the beam's axis. These devices are manufactured on-site using specifications generated by treatment planning software, and are subjected to several measurement and identification procedures to verify their integrity before use. A periodic manufacturing defect, not detected by this quality assurance procedure, was discovered by the author, and during the investigation to determine the root cause of the issue and whether the radiologic properties of the defects were relevant in clinical practice, a new quality assurance program was developed.

  7. Hay Contest Evaluation and Organization for Teaching and Promoting Hay Quality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, A. M.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Reviews the development and implementation of an evaluation method for exhibitions of commercially produced hay that combines forage analysis with a procedure for visual appraisal of hay. This model is utilized to improve awareness and foster improvement and appreciation for forage quality among hay producers at county and state shows. (16…

  8. Evaluation of the psychometric properties of the Hungarian quality of life in depression scale.

    PubMed

    Viola, Reka; Lovas, Kornelia; Szabo, Zoltan; Czenner, Zsuzsanna; Meads, David M; Soos, Gyongyver; McKenna, Stephen P

    2008-01-01

    The paper describes the adaptation and psychometric evaluation of the Hungarian version of the quality of life in depression scale. The adaptation procedure involved: bilingual translation; field-testing for face and content validity; and assessment of instrument's reliability and construct validity. The new language version was shown to be well-accepted by respondents and to have excellent psychometric properties.

  9. Radiographic comparative evaluation of the Sauve-Kapandji procedure and the Darrach procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akimasa; Futami, Toshirou; Tadano, Isao; Fujita, Mamoru; Watanabe, Tetsuya; Moriguchi, Takao

    2005-01-01

    For surgical treatment of rheumatoid wrists, we have routinely selected the Sauve-Kapandji (S-K) procedure or the Darrach procedure based on predetermined indications. In this study, we conducted a retrospective radiographic comparative evaluation of the changes in the carpus after the two procedures. The S-K group and the Darrach group each consisted of 13 wrists of 10 patients (all women). The indications for the Darrach procedure were the presence of radiolunate fusion, radial shelf formation, and old age. The carpal height ratio (CHR) and the ulnocarpal distance ratio (UCDR) were determined on wrist radiograms obtained before operation and at the final follow-up. The mean follow-up period was 4 years. Fisher's test was used to analyze the differences between the two groups. Both groups showed a decrease in mean CHR and an increase in mean UCDR at the final follow-up compared to the values before the operation, and there were no statistically significant differences. Furthermore, in the Darrach group, no significant differences in changes of the carpus were observed between patients with or without a radial shelf. We concluded that the present results do not support the superiority of the S-K method over the Darrach procedure for rheumatoid wrist reconstruction based on a radiographic evaluation.

  10. Identification and Evaluation Procedures for Gifted and Talented Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubenzer, Ron

    1979-01-01

    A discussion of identification procedures and instruments used for the six talent areas of giftedness is provided. The six areas covered include general intellectual ability, specific academic aptitude, creative and productive thinking, leadership abilities, visual and performing arts, and psychomotor skills. (PHR)

  11. Formalizing Evaluation Procedures for Marketing Faculty Research Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDermott, Dennis R.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Results of a national survey of marketing department heads (n=142) indicate that few marketing departments have formalized the development and communication of research performance standards to faculty. Guidelines and methods to accomplish those procedures most efficiently were proposed. (Author/JOW)

  12. THE ATMOSPHERIC MODEL EVALUATION TOOL (AMET); AIR QUALITY MODULE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation reviews the development of the Atmospheric Model Evaluation Tool (AMET) air quality module. The AMET tool is being developed to aid in the model evaluation. This presentation focuses on the air quality evaluation portion of AMET. Presented are examples of the...

  13. Alternative Procedures for Integrating Multidimensional Evaluations of Schools: An Experimental Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaeger, Richard M.; Usher, Claire H.

    This paper reports on a study of the foundation and application of two procedures used to specify appropriate weights to be applied to components in determining the overall quality of a school. These procedures are multiattribute utility technology (MAUT) and policy capturing, and the paper presents the results of applying them, using key…

  14. Standard procedures and quality-control practices for the U.S. Geological Survey National Field Quality Assurance Program from 1982 through 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stanley, D.L.

    1995-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey operates the National Field Quality Assurance Program to provide quality- assurance reference samples to field personnel who make water-quality field measurements. The program monitors the accuracy and precision of pH, specific conductance, and alkalinity field measurements. This report documents the operational procedures and quality-control techniques used in operating the quality-assurance program.

  15. Cost of Quality Evaluation Methodologies Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-07-28

    Manufacturing 4-3-1 4-4 Finance 4-4-1 4- 5 Quality Assurance 4- 5 -1 4-6 Subcontractor Management 4-6-1 4-7 Logistics 4-7-1 4-8 Contracts 4-8-1 5 ...Cost of Quality .... ........ 1-8 1-4 Cost of Quality Category Relationship ....... .1-9 1- 5 Company vs. Function Cost of Quality ......... 1-10 1-6...3-29 3-4 Total Cost of Quality .... ............. .. 3-31 5 -1 Integration of WBS and Organization Structure . 5 -1 LIST O7 TABLES TABLEPAGE 1-1

  16. 43 CFR 10005.20 - Project evaluation procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inclusion in the plan will be subjected to a systematic evaluation using the decision factors delineated in... discrepancies re-evaluated. Commission findings will be recorded and will be available for review. (f)...

  17. Environmental impact assessment in flanders, belgium: An evaluation of the administrative procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devuyst, Dimitri; Nierynck, Eddy; Hens, Luc; Ceuterick, Dirk; de Baere, Veerle; Wouters, Guido

    1993-05-01

    Two years of experience with EIA in Flanders (northern Belgium) was evaluated in order to gain perspective on the effectiveness of the administrative procedure. The four essential characteristics of the EIA procedure that were evaluated are: completeness, open and public character, objectivity, and verifiability. Representatives of all parties involved in the EIA procedure were interviewed. The result of the evaluation is a list of major problems with EIA. Recommendations for a more efficient procedure are suggested at a time when a proposal for a new, comprehensive, and permanent EIA decree is being discussed. The evaluation of the administrative procedure for EIA in Flanders shows that several vital characteristics of the EIA procedure are lacking. This reduces the obligatory and open nature of the process, resulting in insufficient guarantees that the environment receives the altention it deserves during the decision-making process.

  18. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Calispell Creek Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Calispell Creek property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in February 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Calispell Creek Project provides a total of 138.17 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 5.16 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Grassland provides 132.02 HUs for mallard and Canada goose. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 0.99 HUs for yellow warbler and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Calispell Creek Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  19. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : West Beaver Lake, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 103.08 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 7.17 HUs for mallard and muskrat. Conifer forest habitat provides 95.91 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  20. Perioperative outcomes for pediatric neurosurgical procedures: analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Benjamin J; Vissoci, Joao Ricardo N; Egger, Joseph R; Smith, Emily R; Grant, Gerald A; Haglund, Michael M; Rice, Henry E

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Existing studies have shown a high overall rate of adverse events (AEs) following pediatric neurosurgical procedures. However, little is known regarding the morbidity of specific procedures or the association with risk factors to help guide quality improvement (QI) initiatives. The goal of this study was to describe the 30-day mortality and AE rates for pediatric neurosurgical procedures by using the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatrics (NSQIP-Peds) database platform. METHODS Data on 9996 pediatric neurosurgical patients were acquired from the 2012-2014 NSQIP-Peds participant user file. Neurosurgical cases were analyzed by the NSQIP-Peds targeted procedure categories, including craniotomy/craniectomy, defect repair, laminectomy, shunts, and implants. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality, with secondary outcomes including individual AEs, composite morbidity (all AEs excluding mortality and unplanned reoperation), surgical-site infection, and unplanned reoperation. Univariate analysis was performed between individual AEs and patient characteristics using Fischer's exact test. Associations between individual AEs and continuous variables (duration from admission to operation, work relative value unit, and operation time) were examined using the Student t-test. Patient characteristics and continuous variables associated with any AE by univariate analysis were used to develop category-specific multivariable models through backward stepwise logistic regression. RESULTS The authors analyzed 3383 craniotomy/craniectomy, 242 defect repair, 1811 laminectomy, and 4560 shunt and implant cases and found a composite overall morbidity of 30.2%, 38.8%, 10.2%, and 10.7%, respectively. Unplanned reoperation rates were highest for defect repair (29.8%). The mortality rate ranged from 0.1% to 1.2%. Preoperative ventilator dependence was a significant predictor of any AE for all procedure groups, whereas

  1. Referenceless image quality evaluation for whole slide imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Noriaki; Bautista, Pinky A.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Ohyama, Nagaaki; Yagi, Yukako

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The image quality in whole slide imaging (WSI) is one of the most important issues for the practical use of WSI scanners. In this paper, we proposed an image quality evaluation method for scanned slide images in which no reference image is required. Methods: While most of the conventional methods for no-reference evaluation only deal with one image degradation at a time, the proposed method is capable of assessing both blur and noise by using an evaluation index which is calculated using the sharpness and noise information of the images in a given training data set by linear regression analysis. The linear regression coefficients can be determined in two ways depending on the purpose of the evaluation. For objective quality evaluation, the coefficients are determined using a reference image with mean square error as the objective value in the analysis. On the other hand, for subjective quality evaluation, the subjective scores given by human observers are used as the objective values in the analysis. The predictive linear regression models for the objective and subjective image quality evaluations, which were constructed using training images, were then used on test data wherein the calculated objective values are construed as the evaluation indices. Results: The results of our experiments confirmed the effectiveness of the proposed image quality evaluation method in both objective and subjective image quality measurements. Finally, we demonstrated the application of the proposed evaluation method to the WSI image quality assessment and automatic rescanning in the WSI scanner. PMID:22530177

  2. [Effect of data management quality on clinical research evidence evaluation].

    PubMed

    Gao, Hong-yang; Li, Qing-na; Zhao, Yang; Li, Bo; Rui, Gao

    2015-02-01

    Current clinical evaluation of literature quality has various ways. Most of them lay special emphasis on the evaluation of the design quality, but the evaluation of the implementation process quality is not perfect. Especially data management is not fully emphasized during the enforcement of clinical trials. Data from clinical research were bases for evaluating clinical findings. Although strict specifications and requirements for data management might be strictly written clearly in research protocols, they were not embodied in current clinical research evidence evaluation system. Data management is an important part of implementing the whole clinical trial process, which is a comprehensive reflection of data collecting, logging, sorting, and managing. Its objective is to obtain high quality research data for statistical analysis, thereby coming to a true and reliable conclusion. In order to overall evaluating clinical design and implement, we suggest that present quality evaluation indicators of clinical trails should be completed, and add data management quality evaluation during the whole implement process. Data management plans, standards and requirements for data checking, and management regulations for disobeying data and exception data should be added in quality evaluation indicators for clinical research evidence. The effect of data management quality on clinical research evidence evaluation should be emphasized.

  3. Academic research groups: evaluation of their quality and quality of their evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berche, Bertrand; Holovatch, Yuri; Kenna, Ralph; Mryglod, Olesya

    2016-02-01

    In recent years, evaluation of the quality of academic research has become an increasingly important and influential business. It determines, often to a large extent, the amount of research funding flowing into universities and similar institutes from governmental agencies and it impacts upon academic careers. Policy makers are becoming increasingly reliant upon, and influenced by, the outcomes of such evaluations. In response, university managers are increasingly attracted to simple metrics as guides to the dynamics of the positions of their various institutions in league tables. However, these league tables are invariably drawn up by inexpert bodies such as newspapers and magazines, using arbitrary measures and criteria. Terms such as “critical mass” and “h-index” are bandied about without understanding of what they actually mean. Rather than accepting the rise and fall of universities, departments and individuals on a turbulent sea of arbitrary measures, we suggest it is incumbent upon the scientific community itself to clarify their nature. Here we report on recent attempts to do that by properly defining critical mass and showing how group size influences research quality. We also examine currently predominant metrics and show that these fail as reliable indicators of group research quality.

  4. SeaWiFS Technical Report Series. Volume 38; SeaWiFS Calibration and Validation Quality Control Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Stanford B. (Editor); Firestone, Elaine R. (Editor); McClain, Charles R.; Darzi, Michael; Barnes, Robert A.; Eplee, Robert E.; Firestone, James K.; Patt, Frederick S.; Robinson, Wayne D.; Schieber, Brian D.; Woodward, Robert H.; Yeh, Eueng-nan

    1996-01-01

    This document provides five brief reports that address several quality control procedures under the auspices of the Calibration and Validation Element (CVE) within the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) Project. Chapter 1 describes analyses of the 32 sensor engineering telemetry streams. Anomalies in any of the values may impact sensor performance in direct or indirect ways. The analyses are primarily examinations of parameter time series combined with statistical methods such as auto- and cross-correlation functions. Chapter 2 describes how the various onboard (solar and lunar) and vicarious (in situ) calibration data will be analyzed to quantify sensor degradation, if present. The analyses also include methods for detecting the influence of charged particles on sensor performance such as might be expected in the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA). Chapter 3 discusses the quality control of the ancillary environmental data that are routinely received from other agencies or projects which are used in the atmospheric correction algorithm (total ozone, surface wind velocity, and surface pressure; surface relative humidity is also obtained, but is not used in the initial operational algorithm). Chapter 4 explains the procedures for screening level-, level-2, and level-3 products. These quality control operations incorporate both automated and interactive procedures which check for file format errors (all levels), navigation offsets (level-1), mask and flag performance (level-2), and product anomalies (all levels). Finally, Chapter 5 discusses the match-up data set development for comparing SeaWiFS level-2 derived products with in situ observations, as well as the subsequent outlier analyses that will be used for evaluating error sources.

  5. Quality evaluation of processed clay soil samples

    PubMed Central

    Steiner-Asiedu, Matilda; Harrison, Obed Akwaa; Vuvor, Frederick; Tano-Debrah, Kwaku

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study assessed the microbial quality of clay samples sold on two of the major Ghanaian markets. Methods The study was a cross-sectional assessing the evaluation of processed clay and effects it has on the nutrition of the consumers in the political capital town of Ghana. The items for the examination was processed clay soil samples. Results Staphylococcus spp and fecal coliforms including Klebsiella, Escherichia, and Shigella and Enterobacterspp were isolated from the clay samples. Samples from the Kaneshie market in Accra recorded the highest total viable counts 6.5 Log cfu/g and Staphylococcal count 5.8 Log cfu/g. For fecal coliforms, Madina market samples had the highest count 6.5 Log cfu/g and also recorded the highest levels of yeast and mould. For Koforidua, total viable count was highest in the samples from the Zongo market 6.3 Log cfu/g. Central market samples had the highest count of fecal coliforms 4.6 Log cfu/g and yeasts and moulds 6.5 Log cfu/g. “Small” market recorded the highest staphylococcal count 6.2 Log cfu/g. The water activity of the clay samples were low, and ranged between 0.65±0.01 and 0.66±0.00 for samples collected from Koforidua and Accra respectively. Conclusion The clay samples were found to contain Klebsiella spp. Escherichia, Enterobacter, Shigella spp. staphylococcus spp., yeast and mould. These have health implications when consumed. PMID:27642456

  6. Evaluation Manual for CIP Courses: Objectives and Implementation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siri, Carmen

    This manual has been designed to guide courses on potato production sponsored by the International Potato Center (CIP) in Lima (Peru). It describes the CIP Course Evaluation System that is presently used and provides guidelines on how to use feedback more effectively for improving training. CIP evaluations are largely formative. The CIP focuses on…

  7. A combined GIS-HEC procedure for flood hazard evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    McLin, S.G.

    1993-09-01

    A technique is described for incorporating a drainage recognition capability into a graphical information system (GIS) database. This capability is then utilized to export digital topographic profiles of stream-channel cross-sectional geometries to the Hydrologic Engineering Center`s Water Surface Profile (HEC-2) model. This model is typically used in conjunction with the Flood Hydrograph (HEC-1) package to define floodplain boundaries in complex watersheds. Once these floodplain boundaries are imported back into the GIS framework, they can be uniquely referenced to the New Mexico state plane coordinate system. A combined GIS-HEC application in ungaged watersheds at Los Alamos National Laboratory is demonstrated. This floodplain mapping procedure uses topographic data from the Laboratory`s MOSS database. Targeted stream channel segments are initially specified in the MOSS system, and topographic profiles along stream-channel cross-sections am extracted automatically. This procedure is initiated at a convenient downstream location within each watershed, and proceeds upstream to a selected termination point. HEC-2 utilizes these MOSS channel data and HEC-1 generated storm hydrographs to uniquely define the floodplain. The computed water surface elevations at each channel section am then read back into the MOSS system. In this particular application, 13 separate elongated watersheds traverse Laboratory lands, with individual channels ranging up to 11 miles in length. The 50, 100, and 500-year floods, and the Probable Maximum Flood (PMF) are quantified in HEC-1. Individual floodplains are then defined for each channel segment in HEC-2 at 250 foot intervals, and detailed 1:4800 scale maps am generated. Over 100 channel miles were mapped using this combined GIS-HEC procedure.

  8. [Analysis on evaluation tool for literature quality in clinical study].

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhai, Wei; Tan, Ya-qin; Huang, Juan

    2014-09-01

    The tools used for the literature quality evaluation are introduced. The common evaluation tools that are publicly and extensively used for the evaluation of clinical trial literature quality in the world are analyzed, including Jadad scale, Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement and Grades of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) system and the others. Additionally, the present development, updates and applications of these tools are involved in analysis.

  9. Application of wavelets to the evaluation of phantom images for mammography quality control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez, M.; Pina, D. R.; Miranda, J. R. A.; Duarte, S. B.

    2012-11-01

    The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology for the computed analysis of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic phantom images, to be used in a quality control (QC) program of mammographic services. Discrete wavelet transform processing was applied to enhance the quality of images from the ACR mammographic phantom and to allow a lower dose for automatic evaluations of equipment performance in a QC program. Regions of interest (ROIs) containing phantom test objects (e.g., masses, fibers and specks) were focalized for appropriate wavelet processing, which highlighted the characteristics of structures present in each ROI. To minimize false-positive detection, each ROI in the image was submitted to pattern recognition tests, which identified structural details of the focalized test objects. Geometric and morphologic parameters of the processed test object images were used to quantify the final level of image quality. The final purpose of this work was to establish the main computational procedures for algorithms of quality evaluation of ACR phantom images. These procedures were implemented, and satisfactory agreement was obtained when the algorithm scores for image quality were compared with the results of assessments by three experienced radiologists. An exploratory study of a potential dose reduction was performed based on the radiologist scores and on the algorithm evaluation of images treated by wavelet processing. The results were comparable with both methods, although the algorithm had a tendency to provide a lower dose reduction than the evaluation by observers. Nevertheless, the objective and more precise criteria used by the algorithm to score image quality gave the computational result a higher degree of confidence. The developed algorithm demonstrates the potential use of the wavelet image processing approach for objectively evaluating the mammographic image quality level in routine QC tests. The implemented computational procedures

  10. Application of wavelets to the evaluation of phantom images for mammography quality control.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M; Pina, D R; Miranda, J R A; Duarte, S B

    2012-11-07

    The main goal of this work was to develop a methodology for the computed analysis of American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic phantom images, to be used in a quality control (QC) program of mammographic services. Discrete wavelet transform processing was applied to enhance the quality of images from the ACR mammographic phantom and to allow a lower dose for automatic evaluations of equipment performance in a QC program. Regions of interest (ROIs) containing phantom test objects (e.g., masses, fibers and specks) were focalized for appropriate wavelet processing, which highlighted the characteristics of structures present in each ROI. To minimize false-positive detection, each ROI in the image was submitted to pattern recognition tests, which identified structural details of the focalized test objects. Geometric and morphologic parameters of the processed test object images were used to quantify the final level of image quality. The final purpose of this work was to establish the main computational procedures for algorithms of quality evaluation of ACR phantom images. These procedures were implemented, and satisfactory agreement was obtained when the algorithm scores for image quality were compared with the results of assessments by three experienced radiologists. An exploratory study of a potential dose reduction was performed based on the radiologist scores and on the algorithm evaluation of images treated by wavelet processing. The results were comparable with both methods, although the algorithm had a tendency to provide a lower dose reduction than the evaluation by observers. Nevertheless, the objective and more precise criteria used by the algorithm to score image quality gave the computational result a higher degree of confidence. The developed algorithm demonstrates the potential use of the wavelet image processing approach for objectively evaluating the mammographic image quality level in routine QC tests. The implemented computational procedures

  11. A procedure for testing the quality of LANDSAT atmospheric correction algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dias, L. A. V. (Principal Investigator); Vijaykumar, N. L.; Neto, G. C.

    1982-01-01

    There are two basic methods for testing the quality of an algorithm to minimize atmospheric effects on LANDSAT imagery: (1) test the results a posteriori, using ground truth or control points; (2) use a method based on image data plus estimation of additional ground and/or atmospheric parameters. A procedure based on the second method is described. In order to select the parameters, initially the image contrast is examined for a series of parameter combinations. The contrast improves for better corrections. In addition the correlation coefficient between two subimages, taken at different times, of the same scene is used for parameter's selection. The regions to be correlated should not have changed considerably in time. A few examples using this proposed procedure are presented.

  12. Quality and Evaluation in a Comprehensive Health Organization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Malcolm; Brazil, Kevin

    1995-01-01

    An innovative approach to delivering health care is being developed in several Ontario (Canada) communities. This report describes the initial framework for quality and evaluation for a comprehensive health organization (CHO). As CHOs become operational, there is great opportunity to develop a comprehensive approach to quality and evaluation. (SLD)

  13. Using Student Evaluations to Improve Individual and Department Teaching Qualities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedges, Mary R.; Webber, Don J.

    2014-01-01

    Student evaluations can be seen as an opportunity for students to vent their views on the quality of teaching that they receive, and sometimes instructors trivialise the importance of this opportunity for dialogue with students and colleagues and reflection on teaching practice. This paper takes student evaluations of teaching quality seriously…

  14. Hardware Testing and System Evaluation: Procedures to Evaluate Commodity Hardware for Production Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, J

    2004-02-27

    Without stable hardware any program will fail. The frustration and expense of supporting bad hardware can drain an organization, delay progress, and frustrate everyone involved. At Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), we have created a testing method that helps our group, SLAC Computer Services (SCS), weed out potentially bad hardware and purchase the best hardware at the best possible cost. Commodity hardware changes often, so new evaluations happen periodically each time we purchase systems and minor re-evaluations happen for revised systems for our clusters, about twice a year. This general framework helps SCS perform correct, efficient evaluations. This article outlines SCS's computer testing methods and our system acceptance criteria. We expanded the basic ideas to other evaluations such as storage, and we think the methods outlined in this article has helped us choose hardware that is much more stable and supportable than our previous purchases. We have found that commodity hardware ranges in quality, so systematic method and tools for hardware evaluation were necessary. This article is based on one instance of a hardware purchase, but the guidelines apply to the general problem of purchasing commodity computer systems for production computational work.

  15. Evaluation of video quality by CWSSIM method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-Ta; Hsu, Shau-Wei; Pong, Bao-Jen; Mang, Ou-Yang

    2010-08-01

    Several estimative factors of image quality have been developed for approaching the human perception objectively1-3. We propose to take systematically distorted videos into the estimative factors and analyze the relationship between them. Several types of noise and noise weight were took into COSME standard video and verified the image quality estimative factors which were MSE (Mean Square Error), SSIM (Structural SIMilarity), CWSSIM (Complex Wavelet SSIM), PQR (Picture Quality Ratings) and DVQ (Digital Video Quality). The noise includes white noise, blur and luminance...etc. In the results, CWSSIM index has higher sensitivity at image structure and it could estimate the distorted videos which have the same noise type at the different levels. PQR is similar to CWSSIM, but the ratings of distribution were banded together; SSIM index divides the noise types into two groups and DVQ has linear relationship with MSE in the logarithmic scale.

  16. EVALUATING AND USING AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grid-based models are being used to assess the magnitude of the pollution problem and to design emission control strategies to achieve compliance with the relevant air quality standards in the United States.

  17. Quality of Instruction Improved by Evaluation and Consultation of Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rindermann, Heiner; Kohler, Jurgen; Meisenberg, Gerhard

    2007-01-01

    One aim of student evaluation of instruction is the improvement of teaching quality, but there is little evidence that student assessment of instruction alone improves teaching. This study tried to improve the effects of evaluation by combining evaluation with individual counselling in an institutional development approach. Evaluation was…

  18. Water-quality sampling by the U.S. Geological Survey-Standard protocols and procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilde, Franceska D.

    2010-01-01

    Thumbnail of and link to report PDF (1.0 MB) The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) develops the sampling procedures and collects the data necessary for the accurate assessment and wise management of our Nation's surface-water and groundwater resources. Federal and State agencies, water-resource regulators and managers, and many organizations and interested parties in the public and private sectors depend on the reliability, timeliness, and integrity of the data we collect and the scientific soundness and impartiality of our data assessments and analysis. The standard data-collection methods uniformly used by USGS water-quality personnel are peer reviewed, kept up-to-date, and published in the National Field Manual for the Collection of Water-Quality Data (http://pubs.water.usgs.gov/twri9A/).

  19. Quality assurance for radioactive wastes disposed of in the Morsleben Site -- Planning, procedures and experiences

    SciTech Connect

    Martens, B.R.; Giller, H.; Brennecke, P.

    1995-12-31

    In Germany between 1978 and 1991, a repository for the disposal of radioactive waste was only accessible for waste producers in the former German Democratic Republic, GDR, namely, the former Morsleben salt mine. Since 1978 short-lived low and intermediate level radioactive wastes have been disposed of in this mine. The emplacement operations were stopped after the reunification of Germany by court order early in 1991. After reversal of this order in June 1992 extensive safety assessments were performed resulting in the formulation of new waste acceptance requirements and quality assurance procedures to be followed in order to demonstrate the fulfillment of these requirements. The emplacement operations were resumed in January 1994, and the repository is now accessible for all German waste producers. In the following quality assurance measures performed for radioactive waste packages prior to disposal are explained and experiences gained in the course of the performance of these measures discussed.

  20. Undergraduate Professional Education in Chemistry: Guidelines and Evaluation Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Chemical Society, Washington, DC.

    Provided are guidelines for evaluating undergraduate professional education in chemistry. The guidelines summarize an approved program as including: 400 hours of classroom work; 500 hours of laboratory work; a core curriculum covering principles of analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry; 1 year of advanced work in chemistry or…

  1. Evaluation of Surface Infiltration Testing Procedures in Permeable Pavement Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ASTM method (ASTM C1701) for measuring infiltration rate of in-place pervious concrete provides limited guidance on how to select testing locations, so research is needed to evaluate how testing sites should be selected and how results should be interpreted to assess surface ...

  2. Procedure 5 - Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  3. Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Promulgated quality assurance Procedure 5 Quality Assurance Requirements For Vapor Phase Mercury Continuous Emissions Monitoring Systems And Sorbent Trap Monitoring Systems Used For Compliance Determination At Stationary Sources

  4. Evaluation of Procedures for Backcalculation of Airfield Pavement Moduli

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    values include the aircraft classification number ( ACN ), the pavement classification number (PCN), the ACN /PCN ratio, and the computed allowable load...representation of the allowable load for a specified number of repetitions over the life of a pavement, and the ACN is a representation of the load applied by...an aircraft using the pavement. For evaluation purposes the ACN /PCN ratio is computed and shown in the tables. An aircraft operating at an ACN

  5. Finger vein image quality evaluation using support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lu; Yang, Gongping; Yin, Yilong; Xiao, Rongyang

    2013-02-01

    In an automatic finger-vein recognition system, finger-vein image quality is significant for segmentation, enhancement, and matching processes. In this paper, we propose a finger-vein image quality evaluation method using support vector machines (SVMs). We extract three features including the gradient, image contrast, and information capacity from the input image. An SVM model is built on the training images with annotated quality labels (i.e., high/low) and then applied to unseen images for quality evaluation. To resolve the class-imbalance problem in the training data, we perform oversampling for the minority class with random-synthetic minority oversampling technique. Cross-validation is also employed to verify the reliability and stability of the learned model. Our experimental results show the effectiveness of our method in evaluating the quality of finger-vein images, and by discarding low-quality images detected by our method, the overall finger-vein recognition performance is considerably improved.

  6. Federal Clearance of Educational Evaluation Instruments Procedural Problems and Proposed Remedies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Launor

    1977-01-01

    Presents a case study of how the review and clearance procedures are operating for evaluation instruments used in collecting information in connection with studies for the U.S. Office of Education. The review procedures are defective: They consume too much time. They are very costly. The results are unproductive. (Author/JM)

  7. The Evaluation of Treatment Procedures Aimed at the Reduction of Interpersonal Anxiety in the Dating Dyad.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curran, James P.; Gilbert, Francis S.

    Three outcome studies were conducted in order to evaluate various treatment procedures for subjects experiencing dating anxiety. The treatment procedures of specific focus was a skills training package using modeling, behavioral rehearsal, feedback, and in vivo practice as major components. The data from two studies indicates the skills training…

  8. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  9. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and... imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption by charitable institutions or distribution...

  10. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  11. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  12. 7 CFR 980.501 - Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and....501 Safeguard procedures for potatoes, onions, and tomatoes exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity requirements. (a) Each person who imports: (1) Potatoes, onions or tomatoes for consumption...

  13. Body Disfigurement and the Quality of Life of Adolescents with Pectus Excavatum: Effects of the Nuss Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jillian; MacMath, Sheryl; English, Margot; Martin, Joan; Hayashi, Al; Sigalet, David L.

    2006-01-01

    This article takes a comprehensive look at the effects of pectus excavatum, a congenital deformity with psychosocial and physical ramifications, and the Nuss procedure on the quality of life of adolescents. The Nuss procedure is a minimally invasive corrective surgery. Twenty-five participants from Calgary, Alberta were interviewed (10 adolescents…

  14. 7 CFR 999.500 - Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and maturity...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates... § 999.500 Safeguard procedures for walnuts and certain dates exempt from grade, size, quality, and... or Native Americans on reservations; or (2) Walnuts which are: green walnuts (so immature that...

  15. Improving the quality of procedure-specific operation reports in orthopaedic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Barritt, Andrew W; Clark, Laura; Cohen, Adam MM; Hosangadi-Jayedev, Naveen; Gibb, Paul A

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The objectives of this study were to: (i) assess whether handwritten operation reports for hip hemi-arthroplasties adhere to The Royal College of Surgeons of England (RCSE) guidelines on surgical documentation; (ii) improve adherence to these guidelines with procedure-specific computerised operation reports; and (iii) improve the quality of documentation in surgery. PATIENTS AND METHODS Thirty-three parameters based on RCSE guidelines were used to score hip hemi-arthroplasty operation reports. The first audit cycle was performed retrospectively to assess 50 handwritten operation reports, and the second cycle prospectively to assess 30 new computerised procedure-specific operation reports produced for hip hemi-arthroplasties. Eighty patients undergoing hip hemi-arthroplasty in a department of orthopaedic surgery within a UK hospital between September 2007 and August 2008 formed the study cohort. RESULTS The main outcome measure was the average scores attained by handwritten versus computerised operation reports. Handwritten reports scored an average of 58.7%, rising significantly (P < 0.01) to 92.8% following the introduction of detailed, computerised proformas for the operation note. Adherence to each RCSE parameter was improved. CONCLUSIONS Computerised proformas reduce variability between different operation reports for the same procedure and increase their content in line with RCSE recommendations. The proformas also constitute a more robust means of operative documentation. PMID:19995491

  16. An Evaluation Procedure for a New Program To Prepare Administrator Change Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Larry W.; Tanner, C. Kenneth

    1970-01-01

    This article describes a new program directed toward preparing principals to function as change agents in elementary and secondary schools in Appalachia. Program evaluation procedures that include cost effectiveness analysis based on Bayesian statistics are described in detail. (JH)

  17. Continuous quality control of the blood sampling procedure using a structured observation scheme

    PubMed Central

    Seemann, Tine Lindberg; Nybo, Mads

    2016-01-01

    Introduction An observational study was conducted using a structured observation scheme to assess compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline, to identify necessary focus items, and to investigate whether adherence to the phlebotomy guideline improved. Materials and methods The questionnaire from the EFLM Working Group for the Preanalytical Phase was adapted to local procedures. A pilot study of three months duration was conducted. Based on this, corrective actions were implemented and a follow-up study was conducted. All phlebotomists at the Department of Clinical Biochemistry and Pharmacology were observed. Three blood collections by each phlebotomist were observed at each session conducted at the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards, respectively. Error frequencies were calculated for the phlebotomy ward and the hospital wards and for the two study phases. Results A total of 126 blood drawings by 39 phlebotomists were observed in the pilot study, while 84 blood drawings by 34 phlebotomists were observed in the follow-up study. In the pilot study, the three major error items were hand hygiene (42% error), mixing of samples (22%), and order of draw (21%). Minor significant differences were found between the two settings. After focus on the major aspects, the follow-up study showed significant improvement for all three items at both settings (P < 0.01, P < 0.01, and P = 0.01, respectively). Conclusion Continuous quality control of the phlebotomy procedure revealed a number of items not conducted in compliance with the local phlebotomy guideline. It supported significant improvements in the adherence to the recommended phlebotomy procedures and facilitated documentation of the phlebotomy quality. PMID:27812302

  18. SU-E-J-162: Quality Assurance Procedures for MR Guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Bone Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L; Chen, X; Wang, B; Gupta, R; Ma, C

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work is to develop and verify our quality assurance (QA) procedures to ensure the safety and efficacy of MR-guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS) treatment of bone metastases. Methods: A practical QA program was developed. Monthly and daily QA (DQA) procedures were performed. The major QA items included the checks of the machine hardware, software and patient safety features. Briefly, these checks/tests include: 1) the cooling system reservoir and treatment table; 2) power to the treatment table; 3) the MR coil; 4) the transducer position with MRI; 5) image display on the treatment work station; 6) the effective focal spot in 3 directions using MR thermometry; and 7) all the safety devices including a sonication lamp, and the emergency stop-sonication switches. In order to avoid patient skin burn, it is important to remove gas bubbles in the interfaces between the treatment table and the gel pad, and the gel pad and patients skin during the patient setup. Our QA procedures have been verified and evaluated through patient treatments. Seven patients with scapula, humeral head, sacrum, ilium, pubic ramus and acetabular bone metastases were treated using MRgFUS. Results: Our study showed that all seven patients tolerated the MRgFUS treatment well. No skin toxicity or other complications were observed. The pain score (0–10) using the visual analog scale (VAS) was significantly reduced from 8.0 ± 1.1 before treatment to 4.7 ± 3.0, 3.0 ± 1.5, 3.2 ± 2.8 and 3.4 ± 1.5 at one day, one month, two months and three months after the MRgFUS treatment, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrated that with the appropriate QA procedures, MRgFUS is a safe, effective and noninvasive treatment modality for palliation of bone metastases.

  19. Program Evaluation: The Key to Quality Programming.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lawrence J.

    Part of a volume which explores current issues in service delivery to infants and toddlers (ages birth to 3) with handicapping conditions, this chapter presents program evaluation as a comprehensive process comprising three phases: input, process, and output. Three program evaluation models are summarized: Tyler's objective model, Scriven's…

  20. Aggregative Learning Method and Its Application for Communication Quality Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmetov, Dauren F.; Kotaki, Minoru

    2007-12-01

    In this paper, so-called Aggregative Learning Method (ALM) is proposed to improve and simplify the learning and classification abilities of different data processing systems. It provides a universal basis for design and analysis of mathematical models of wide class. A procedure was elaborated for time series model reconstruction and analysis for linear and nonlinear cases. Data approximation accuracy (during learning phase) and data classification quality (during recall phase) are estimated from introduced statistic parameters. The validity and efficiency of the proposed approach have been demonstrated through its application for monitoring of wireless communication quality, namely, for Fixed Wireless Access (FWA) system. Low memory and computation resources were shown to be needed for the procedure realization, especially for data classification (recall) stage. Characterized with high computational efficiency and simple decision making procedure, the derived approaches can be useful for simple and reliable real-time surveillance and control system design.

  1. Quality of life after different surgical procedures for the treatment of spinal metastases: results of a single-center prospective case series.

    PubMed

    de Ruiter, Godard C W; Nogarede, Claudine O; Wolfs, Jasper F C; Arts, Mark P

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The performance of surgery for spinal metastases is rapidly increasing. Different surgical procedures, ranging from stabilization alone to stabilization combined with corpectomy, are thereby performed for various indications. Little is known about the impact of these different procedures on patient quality of life (QOL), but this factor is crucial when discussing the various therapeutic options with patients and their families. Thus, the authors of this study investigated the effect of various surgical procedures for spinal metastases on patient QOL. METHODS The authors prospectively followed a cohort of 113 patients with spinal metastases who were referred to their clinic for surgical evaluation between July 2012 and July 2014. Quality of life was assessed using the EQ-5D at intake and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after treatment. RESULTS Nineteen patients were treated conservatively, 41 underwent decompressive surgery with or without stabilization, 47 underwent a piecemeal corpectomy procedure with stabilization and expandable cage reconstruction, and 6 had a stabilization procedure without decompression. Among all surgical patients, the mean EQ-5D score was significantly increased from 0.44 pretreatment to 0.59 at 3 months after treatment (p < 0.001). Mean EQ-5D scores at 1 year after surgery further increased to 0.84 following decompression with stabilization, 0.74 after corpectomy with stabilization, and 0.94 after stabilization without decompression. Frankel scores also improved after surgery. There were no significant differences in improvements in EQ-5D scores and Frankel grades among the different surgical procedures. In addition, mortality and complication rates were similar. CONCLUSIONS Quality of life can improve significantly after various extensive and less extensive surgical procedures in patients with spinal metastases. The relatively invasive corpectomy procedure, as compared with alternative less invasive techniques, does not negatively

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Tacoma Creek South Project, Technical Report 2003-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Tacoma Creek South property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in June 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Tacoma Creek South Project provides a total of 190.79 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetlands provide 20.51 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Grassland provides 1.65 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 11.76 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 139.92 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forest also provides 19.15 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Tacoma Creek South Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Upper Trimble Project, Technical Report 2004-2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 13, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Upper Trimble property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in March 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Upper Trimble Project provides a total of 250.67 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Wet meadow provides 136.92 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Mixed forest habitat provides 111.88 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 1.87 HUs for yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Upper Trimble Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  4. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1997. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project provides a total of 313.91 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 16.08 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Shoreline and island habitat provide 7.36 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Wet meadow provides 117.62 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 9.78 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 140.47 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest provides 22.60 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; North Eaton Lake, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-11-01

    On July 6, 2005, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the North Eaton Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in November 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The North Eaton Lake Project provides a total of 235.05 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 9.38 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Emergent wetland habitat provides 11.36 HUs for Canada goose, mallard and muskrat. Forested wetland provides 10.97 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard and white-tailed deer. Conifer forest habitat provides 203.34 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the North Eaton Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Priest River Project, Technical Report 2005.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 140.73 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 60.05 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow habitat provides 7.39 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub vegetation provides 71.13 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Open water habitat provides 2.16 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. The objective of using HEP at the Priest River Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  7. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; West Beaver Lake Project, Technical Report 2005

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-05-01

    On September 7, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the West Beaver Lake property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in September 2004. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, muskrat, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The West Beaver Lake Project provides a total of 82.69 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Emergent wetland habitat provides 8.80 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. Conifer forest habitat provides 70.33 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Open water provides 3.30 HUs for mallard, muskrat, and Canada goose. The objective of using HEP at the West Beaver Lake Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while providing additional crediting to BPA for enhanced habitat values.

  8. Evaluation of three electrodeposition procedures for uranium, plutonium and americium.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jung-Suk; Warwick, Phillip E; Croudace, Ian W; Lee, Sang-Han

    2014-05-01

    While both mass spectrometry and alpha-particle spectrometry have been widely used for measuring alpha activities, the former is preferred since many laboratories are not equipped with ICP-MS and MC-ICP-MS systems. In this study, three electrodeposition techniques using ammonium chloride, ammonium oxalate and ammonium sulphate as electrolyte solutions were applied and evaluated for the preparation of uranium, plutonium and americium sources for alpha-particle spectrometry. Changes in pH and temperature throughout the electrodeposition process were measured every 15 min, together with percentage deposition every 30 min. The percentage deposition in each method was checked at 300, 400 and 500 mA, and the optimised time and current were determined.

  9. [Hemispheric functional specialization and anxiety. Focus on an evaluation procedure].

    PubMed

    Perier, N; Boulenger, J P; Eustache, F; Bisserbe, J C; Lebreuilly, J; Zarifian, E

    1992-01-01

    Observations of brain-lesioned patients and experimental psychology studies have shown that the influence of the specific functioning of the two hemispheres of the brain on the regulation of emotional behaviour appears to be unequal and suggests a functional specialization of the right hemisphere for the expression and comprehension of the affective components of behaviour. However, the extension of this hypothesis to include all emotional experiences remains controversial. The observed superiority of the left hemisphere in the perception of positive emotions and the predominance of the right hemisphere in the treatment of negative emotions would appear to favour a joint and complementary participation of both cerebral hemispheres in emotional experiences. In the case of affective disorders, and particularly in anxiety symptoms, the hypothesis of a dysfunctioning of the right hemisphere is similarly questioned: while all metabolic studies corroborate this hypothesis, experimental psychological studies suggest the existence of a preferential involvement of one or the other hemisphere in relation to individual differences such as the "trait" anxiety score. Moreover, the few studies which have been undertaken with healthy volunteers raise the problem of their extrapolation to pathological situations. In view of the potential interest in the neuropsychological evaluations of subjects with different forms of pathological anxiety, we have developed an experimented with two tests aimed at evaluating the differential activity of the two hemispheres of the brain. These two tests, constructed on a "mirror-image" model from the specifications of a functional hemispheric specialization, are supposed to involve cognitive strategies pinpointing preferentially one hemisphere or the other.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Statistical procedures for evaluating daily and monthly hydrologic model predictions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Coffey, M.E.; Workman, S.R.; Taraba, J.L.; Fogle, A.W.

    2004-01-01

    The overall study objective was to evaluate the applicability of different qualitative and quantitative methods for comparing daily and monthly SWAT computer model hydrologic streamflow predictions to observed data, and to recommend statistical methods for use in future model evaluations. Statistical methods were tested using daily streamflows and monthly equivalent runoff depths. The statistical techniques included linear regression, Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency, nonparametric tests, t-test, objective functions, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation. None of the methods specifically applied to the non-normal distribution and dependence between data points for the daily predicted and observed data. Of the tested methods, median objective functions, sign test, autocorrelation, and cross-correlation were most applicable for the daily data. The robust coefficient of determination (CD*) and robust modeling efficiency (EF*) objective functions were the preferred methods for daily model results due to the ease of comparing these values with a fixed ideal reference value of one. Predicted and observed monthly totals were more normally distributed, and there was less dependence between individual monthly totals than was observed for the corresponding predicted and observed daily values. More statistical methods were available for comparing SWAT model-predicted and observed monthly totals. The 1995 monthly SWAT model predictions and observed data had a regression Rr2 of 0.70, a Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency of 0.41, and the t-test failed to reject the equal data means hypothesis. The Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient and the R r2 coefficient were the preferred methods for monthly results due to the ability to compare these coefficients to a set ideal value of one.

  11. Does quality of female sexual function improve after a transobturator tape procedure?

    PubMed

    Kamalak, Z; Köşüş, A; Hızlı, F; Köşüş, N; Hızlı, D; Kafalı, H

    2014-08-01

    The aim of this study was to use a questionnaire to evaluate any changes in sexual satisfaction of women who underwent a transobturator tape (TOT) procedure for stress urinary incontinence. A total of 30 women agreed to participate in the study and were invited to fill out the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI) questionnaire prior to surgery and 3 months after surgery. As a result, after the TOT operation, there was a statistically significant improvement in libido (desire), arousal, lubrication, orgasm and satisfaction. The TOT procedure seems to have a positive effect on female sexual function by reducing the urinary leakage during sexual activity and by decreasing the pain during or after sexual activity.

  12. Test Procedures for Characterizing, Evaluating, and Managing Separator Materials used in Secondary Alkaline Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guasp, Edwin; Manzo, Michelle A.

    1997-01-01

    Secondary alkaline batteries, such as nickel-cadmium and silver-zinc, are commonly used for aerospace applications. The uniform evaluation and comparison of separator properties for these systems is dependent upon the measurement techniques. This manual presents a series of standard test procedures that can be used to evaluate, compare, and select separator materials for use in alkaline batteries. Detailed test procedures evaluating the following characteristics are included in this manual: physical measurements of thickness and area weight, dimensional stability measurements, electrolyte retention, resistivity, permeability as measured via bubble pressure, surface evaluation via SEM, chemical stability, and tensile strength.

  13. Evaluation of computer-aided procedure for detecting surface water. [using ERTS-1 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results from an evaluation of a computer-aided procedure for processing ERTS-1 data to detect and locate surface water are presented. The procedure was evaluated using data from a study area in the vicinity of the Lake Somerville area in Washington County, Texas. The procedure consisted of (1) selecting water training fields, (2) aggregating the training samples together and clustering them into unimodal clusters, (3) computing the mean vector and covariance matrix for each cluster, (4) classifying all of the study area into classes corresponding to the clusters using the maximum likelihood classifier, and (5) thresholding out the nonwater pixels.

  14. Multivariate Bias Correction Procedures for Improving Water Quality Predictions using Mechanistic Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libera, D.; Arumugam, S.

    2015-12-01

    Water quality observations are usually not available on a continuous basis because of the expensive cost and labor requirements so calibrating and validating a mechanistic model is often difficult. Further, any model predictions inherently have bias (i.e., under/over estimation) and require techniques that preserve the long-term mean monthly attributes. This study suggests and compares two multivariate bias-correction techniques to improve the performance of the SWAT model in predicting daily streamflow, TN Loads across the southeast based on split-sample validation. The first approach is a dimension reduction technique, canonical correlation analysis that regresses the observed multivariate attributes with the SWAT model simulated values. The second approach is from signal processing, importance weighting, that applies a weight based off the ratio of the observed and model densities to the model data to shift the mean, variance, and cross-correlation towards the observed values. These procedures were applied to 3 watersheds chosen from the Water Quality Network in the Southeast Region; specifically watersheds with sufficiently large drainage areas and number of observed data points. The performance of these two approaches are also compared with independent estimates from the USGS LOADEST model. Uncertainties in the bias-corrected estimates due to limited water quality observations are also discussed.

  15. Johnston Island air quality monitoring systems user's guide: System description and standard operating procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Martins, S.

    1991-02-01

    This document is an overview of Monitor Labs air-quality monitoring systems installed at the Johnston Island JCAD Facility during 1990 by personnel from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). All Johnston Island personnel involved with air-quality monitoring should become familiar with this document. It supplements other training and documentation. This report is written from a user's standpoint and assumes that the reader has some familiarity with air-quality systems. It represents a consolidation of information from many different sources, including training classes video tapes, Monitor Labs manuals, personal experiences with the systems, and verbal communications with Monitor Labs employees. This document includes background information on the project and descriptions of the systems and all components; it makes suggestions for daily, weekly, and quarterly standard operating procedures; it details the installation and tests performed by LLNL/Monitor Labs personnel in bringing the systems on-line; it gives the current status of the systems; and it provides suggestions for future modifications and/or additions. 7 figs.

  16. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400

    SciTech Connect

    Fritz, Brad G.; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P.

    2006-07-26

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's NUREG-1400 addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present two detailed examples of the implementation of qualitative air flow studies at different scales using guidelines established by NUREG-1400. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within the transfer area of the 105 KE Basin, located on the Hanford Site, Richland, Washington. The purpose of the study was to determine appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment in support of sludge water pumping activities. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an air flow study, the stagnant layer would not have been identified, and could have resulted in locating samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test.

  17. Evaluation of airflow patterns following procedures established by NUREG-1400.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Brad G; Khan, Fenton; Mendoza, Donaldo P

    2006-08-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's guide, NUREG-1400, addresses many aspects of air sampling in the work place. Here, we present detailed examples of the methodology used to conduct two qualitative airflow studies at different sites. In one test, smoke was used to evaluate the airflow patterns within a high-bay building for the purpose of determining appropriate locations for air monitoring equipment. The study revealed a stagnant layer of the air within the transfer area that made predicting movement of contamination within the transfer area difficult. Without conducting an airflow study, the stagnant layer may not have been identified and could have resulted in placement of samplers at inappropriate locations. In a second test, smoke was used to verify the effectiveness of an air space barrier curtain. The results showed that the curtain adequately separated the two air spaces. The methodology employed in each test provided sound, easy to interpret information that satisfied the requirements of each test. The methods described in this article can be applied at most facilities where determination of airflow patterns or the verification of suspected airflow patterns is required.

  18. A Model Procedure Integrating Total Quality Management into the Source Selection Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-01

    spawning attempts to incorporate quality considerations into DoD source selection evaluation methods? 2. How did CICA impact DoD use of Best Value source...operations at every organizational level, in every area of responsibility, and in every product or service produced. TQM combines fundamental management... committed to continuous process/product/service improvement. 2. An understanding of the needs of the customer, and keeping those needs foremost in the

  19. Water quality assessment of the Li Canal using a functional fuzzy synthetic evaluation model.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Ling, Liu

    2014-07-01

    Through introducing functional data analysis (FDA) theory into the conventional fuzzy synthetic evaluation (FSE) method, the functional fuzzy synthetic evaluation (FFSE) model is established. FFSE keeps the property of the conventional FSE that the fuzziness in the water quality condition can be suitably measured. Furthermore, compared with FSE, FFSE has the following advantages: (1) FFSE requires fewer conditions for observation, for example, pollutants can be monitored at different times, and missing data is accepted; (2) the dynamic variation of the water quality condition can be represented more comprehensively and intuitively. The procedure of FFSE is discussed and the water quality of the Li Canal in 2012 is evaluated as an illustration. The synthetic classification of the Li Canal is "II" in January, February and July, and "I" in other months, which can satisfy the requirement of the Chinese South-to-North Water Diversion Project.

  20. Guidelines and standard procedures for continuous water-quality monitors : site selection, field operation, calibration, record computation, and reporting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wagner, Richard J.; Mattraw, H.C.; Ritz, G.F.; Smith, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey uses continuous water-quality monitors to assess variations in the quality of the Nation's surface water. A common system configuration for data collection is the four-parameter water-quality monitoring system, which collects temperature, specific conductance, dissolved oxygen, and pH data, although systems can be configured to measure other properties such as turbidity or chlorophyll. The sensors that are used to measure these water properties require careful field observation, cleaning, and calibration procedures, as well as thorough procedures for the computation and publication of final records. Data from sensors can be used in conjunction with collected samples and chemical analyses to estimate chemical loads. This report provides guidelines for site-selection considerations, sensor test methods, field procedures, error correction, data computation, and review and publication processes. These procedures have evolved over the past three decades, and the process continues to evolve with newer technologies.

  1. Hyperspectral and multispectral imaging for evaluating food safety and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Spectral imaging technologies have been developed rapidly during the past decade. This paper presents hyperspectral and multispectral imaging technologies in the area of food safety and quality evaluation, with an introduction, demonstration, and summarization of the spectral imaging techniques avai...

  2. The Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation provides an overview of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). It contains a synopsis of the three phases of AQMEII, including objectives, logistics, and timelines. It also provides a number of examples of analyses conducted through ...

  3. Incorporating principal component analysis into air quality model evaluation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of standard air quality model evaluation techniques is becoming compromised as the simulation periods continue to lengthen in response to ever increasing computing capacity. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a statistical approach called Princi...

  4. Parameter Trending, Geolocation Quality Control and the Procedures to Support Preparation of Next Versions of the TRMM Reprocessing Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2004-01-01

    TRMM has been an imminently successful mission from an engineering standpoint but even more from a science standpoint. An important part of this science success has been the careful quality control of the TRMM standard products. This paper will present the quality monitoring efforts that the TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) conducts on a routine basis. The paper will detail parameter trending, geolocation quality control and the procedures to support the preparation of next versions of the algorithm used for reprocessing.

  5. Conceptualising and Evaluating Teacher Quality: Substantive and Methodological Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ingvarson, Lawrence; Rowe, Ken

    2008-01-01

    Whereas findings from recent research highlight the importance of teacher quality in improving students' academic performances and experiences of schooling, substantive and methodological issues surrounding the conceptualisation and evaluation of "teacher quality" are not well understood. Such deficiencies are particularly evident in claims for…

  6. Developing High-Quality Teachers: Teacher Evaluation for Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Looney, Janet

    2011-01-01

    As countries aim to ensure high achievement for all students, improving and sustaining the quality of the teacher workforce is a vital policy priority. Several studies have found that well-designed teacher evaluation systems, aligned with professional learning and development, can contribute to improvements in the quality of teaching and raise…

  7. Methodology for Evaluating Quality and Reusability of Learning Objects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurilovas, Eugenijus; Bireniene, Virginija; Serikoviene, Silvija

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to present the scientific model and several methods for the expert evaluation of quality of learning objects (LOs) paying especial attention to LOs reusability level. The activities of eQNet Quality Network for a European Learning Resource Exchange (LRE) aimed to improve reusability of LOs of European Schoolnet's LRE…

  8. Regulation and quality evaluation system for HIV diagnostics in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sihong; Huang, Weijin; Zhang, Li; An, Juanjuan; Li, Xiuhua; Song, Aijing; Nie, Jianhui; Zhang, Chuntao; Wang, Youchun

    2016-03-01

    A sophisticated regulatory framework has been constructed for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) diagnostics in China, which have developed over the past 30 years. China National Institutes for Food and Drug Control acts as the legal institution in this regulatory framework, launching important activities to ensure the quality of HIV diagnostics. These include the analysis of the main problems faced in developing domestic HIV diagnostics, by investigating the quality of HIV diagnostics and their development; exploring the key factors affecting the quality of HIV diagnostics, to determine the criteria for screening national reference samples; the development of new technologies and methods for preparing reference samples; and the establishment of nine types of national reference panels and nine national standards to evaluate the quality of HIV diagnostics. Based on these researches, a quality evaluation system was established, including nine types of national reference panels, nine national standards for HIV diagnostics, and five sample banks (HIV-positive sample bank, HIV-negative sample bank, common international genotype sample bank, seroconversion series sample bank, HIV virus bank) to evaluate the quality of HIV diagnostics in China. The regulatory framework and the quality evaluation system are pivotal in ensuring the quality of the HIV diagnostics licensed in China.

  9. Does the EUA Institutional Evaluation Programme Contribute to Quality Improvement?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavares, Diana Amado; Rosa, Maria Joao; Amaral, Alberto

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to reflect on the relevance of the Institutional Evaluation Programme (IEP) of the European University Association (EUA) to universities' quality improvement. It aims to analyse IEP follow-up reports to determine whether the programme contributes to the development of a quality improvement culture.…

  10. The Pan European Phenological Database PEP725: Data Content and Data Quality Control Procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurkovic, Anita; Hübner, Thomas; Koch, Elisabeth; Lipa, Wolfgang; Scheifinger, Helfried; Ungersböck, Markus; Zach-Hermann, Susanne

    2014-05-01

    Phenology - the study of the timing of recurring biological events in the animal and plant world - has become an important approach for climate change impact studies in recent years. It is therefore a "conditio sine qua non" to collect, archive, digitize, control and update phenological datasets. Thus and with regard to cross-border cooperation and activities it was necessary to establish, operate and promote a pan European phenological database (PEP725). Such a database - designed and tested under cost action 725 in 2004 and further developed and maintained in the framework of the EUMETNET program PEP725 - collects data from different European governmental and nongovernmental institutions and thus offers a unique compilation of plant phenological observations. The data follows the same classification scheme - the so called BBCH coding system - that makes datasets comparable. Europe had a long tradition in the observation of phenological events: the history of collecting phenological data and their usage in climatology began in 1751. The first datasets in PEP725 date back to 1868. However, there are only a few observations available until 1950. From 1951 onwards, the phenological networks all over Europe developed rapidly: Currently, PEP725 provides about 9 million records from 23 European countries (covering approximately 50% of Europe). To supply the data in a good and uniform quality it is essential and worthwhile to establish and develop data quality control procedures. Consequently, one of the main tasks within PEP725 is the conception of a multi-stage-quality control. Currently the tests are stepwise composed: completeness -, plausibility -, time consistency -, climatological - and statistical checks. In a nutshell: The poster exemplifies the status quo of the data content of the PEP725 database and incipient stages of used and planned quality controls, respectively. For more details, we would also like to promote and refer to the PEP725 website (http

  11. Proceedings of a Seminar on Water Quality Evaluation. 22-24 January 1980, Tampa, Florida.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    other potentially toxic pollutants. The testing procedures do not cover such water quality problems as nutrient loading or coliform contamination . If...to accomplish these goals we categorized discharges by the type of operation and the level of contamination in the dredged material and at the...which the discharge is placed into the proper category. In addition, during this evaluation, the contaminants of concern that may be present in the

  12. A Novel Quality Measure and Correction Procedure for the Annotation of Microbial Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Overmars, Lex; Siezen, Roland J.; Francke, Christof

    2015-01-01

    The identification of translation initiation sites (TISs) constitutes an important aspect of sequence-based genome analysis. An erroneous TIS annotation can impair the identification of regulatory elements and N-terminal signal peptides, and also may flaw the determination of descent, for any particular gene. We have formulated a reference-free method to score the TIS annotation quality. The method is based on a comparison of the observed and expected distribution of all TISs in a particular genome given prior gene-calling. We have assessed the TIS annotations for all available NCBI RefSeq microbial genomes and found that approximately 87% is of appropriate quality, whereas 13% needs substantial improvement. We have analyzed a number of factors that could affect TIS annotation quality such as GC-content, taxonomy, the fraction of genes with a Shine-Dalgarno sequence and the year of publication. The analysis showed that only the first factor has a clear effect. We have then formulated a straightforward Principle Component Analysis-based TIS identification strategy to self-organize and score potential TISs. The strategy is independent of reference data and a priori calculations. A representative set of 277 genomes was subjected to the analysis and we found a clear increase in TIS annotation quality for the genomes with a low quality score. The PCA-based annotation was also compared with annotation with the current tool of reference, Prodigal. The comparison for the model genome of Escherichia coli K12 showed that both methods supplement each other and that prediction agreement can be used as an indicator of a correct TIS annotation. Importantly, the data suggest that the addition of a PCA-based strategy to a Prodigal prediction can be used to ‘flag’ TIS annotations for re-evaluation and in addition can be used to evaluate a given annotation in case a Prodigal annotation is lacking. PMID:26204119

  13. Infrared image quality evaluation method without reference image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Song; Ren, Tingting; Wang, Chengsheng; Lei, Bo; Zhang, Zhijie

    2013-09-01

    Since infrared image quality depends on many factors such as optical performance and electrical noise of thermal imager, image quality evaluation becomes an important issue which can conduce to both image processing afterward and capability improving of thermal imager. There are two ways of infrared image quality evaluation, with or without reference image. For real-time thermal image, the method without reference image is preferred because it is difficult to get a standard image. Although there are various kinds of methods for evaluation, there is no general metric for image quality evaluation. This paper introduces a novel method to evaluate infrared image without reference image from five aspects: noise, clarity, information volume and levels, information in frequency domain and the capability of automatic target recognition. Generally, the basic image quality is obtained from the first four aspects, and the quality of target is acquired from the last aspect. The proposed method is tested on several infrared images captured by different thermal imagers. Calculate the indicators and compare with human vision results. The evaluation shows that this method successfully describes the characteristics of infrared image and the result is consistent with human vision system.

  14. The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) Study: Cohort Description and Data Quality Procedures

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Richard N.; Alsop, David C.; Fong, Tamara G.; Metzger, Eran; Cooper, Zara

    2015-01-01

    Background/Objectives Delirium is the most common complication of major elective surgery in older patients. The Successful Aging after Elective Surgery (SAGES) study was designed to examine novel risk factors and long-term outcomes associated with delirium. This report describes the cohort, quality assurance procedures, and results. Design Long-term prospective cohort study. Setting Three academic medical centers. Participants A total of 566 patients age 70 and older without recognized dementia scheduled for elective major surgery. Measurements Participants were assessed preoperatively, daily during hospitalization, and at variable monthly intervals for up to 36 months post-discharge. Delirium was assessed in hospital by trained study staff. Study outcomes included cognitive and physical function. Novel risk factors for delirium were assessed including genetic and plasma biomarkers, neuroimaging markers, and cognitive reserve markers. Interrater reliability (kappa and weighted kappa) was assessed for key variables in 119 of the patient interviews. Results Participants were an average of 77 years old and 58% were female. The majority of patients (81%) were undergoing orthopedic surgery and 24% developed delirium post-operatively. Over 95% of eligible patients were followed for 18 months. There was >99% capture of key study outcomes (cognitive and functional status) at every study interview and interrater reliability was high (weighted kappas for delirium = 0.92 and for overall cognitive and functional outcomes = 0.94 -1.0). Completion rates for plasma biomarkers (4 timepoints) were 95%-99% and for neuroimaging (one year follow-up) was 86%. Conclusion The SAGES study will contribute to the understanding of novel risk factors, pathophysiology and long-term outcomes of delirium. This manuscript describes the cohort and data quality procedures, and will serve as a reference source for future studies based on SAGES. PMID:26662213

  15. Using Third Party Data to Update a Reference Dataset in a Quality Evaluation Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, E. M. A.; Ariza-López, F. J.; Ureña-Cámara, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays it is easy to find many data sources for various regions around the globe. In this 'data overload' scenario there are few, if any, information available about the quality of these data sources. In order to easily provide these data quality information we presented the architecture of a web service for the automation of quality control of spatial datasets running over a Web Processing Service (WPS). For quality procedures that require an external reference dataset, like positional accuracy or completeness, the architecture permits using a reference dataset. However, this reference dataset is not ageless, since it suffers the natural time degradation inherent to geospatial features. In order to mitigate this problem we propose the Time Degradation & Updating Module which intends to apply assessed data as a tool to maintain the reference database updated. The main idea is to utilize datasets sent to the quality evaluation service as a source of 'candidate data elements' for the updating of the reference database. After the evaluation, if some elements of a candidate dataset reach a determined quality level, they can be used as input data to improve the current reference database. In this work we present the first design of the Time Degradation & Updating Module. We believe that the outcomes can be applied in the search of a full-automatic on-line quality evaluation platform.

  16. Field test of a bioassay procedure for assessing habitat quality on fish spawning grounds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manny, Bruce A.; Jude, David J.; Eshenroder, Randy L.

    1989-01-01

    A bioassay procedure to assess habitat quality was tested on Port Austin reef in southern Lake Huron, a spawning area of lake trout Salvelinus namaycush. In 1986, Plexiglas incubators filled with fertilized lake trout eggs were buried by scuba divers in rock rubble at two sites. The incubators then were attached to chains between large trap-net anchors on the bottom and left over winter. At one site, egg hatch rate was significantly higher in incubators that remained buried in substrate (24%) than in incubators that were dislodged out onto the substrate (13%). At the other, more exposed site, no significant difference was found in percent hatch between eggs that incubated in (10%) and on (8%) the substrate. Percent hatch at both sites was significantly lower than that (40%) of eggs from the same source that were incubated in controlled laboratory conditions. In autumn, concentrations of dissolved ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and nitrate near bottom and in the substrate posed no threat to lake trout embryos and were not correlated with hatch rate; concentrations differed significantly between the two sites. During winter, 15 cm of sediment settled from the water onto the reef but did not accumulate or smother the eggs. The bioassay procedure is easy to implement, is recommended for use in the Great Lakes, and could be adapted easily for use elsewhere.

  17. Calibration procedures for imaging spectrometers: improving data quality from satellite missions to UAV campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brachmann, Johannes F. S.; Baumgartner, Andreas; Lenhard, Karim

    2016-10-01

    The Calibration Home Base (CHB) at the Remote Sensing Technology Institute of the German Aerospace Center (DLR-IMF) is an optical laboratory designed for the calibration of imaging spectrometers for the VNIR/SWIR wavelength range. Radiometric, spectral and geometric characterization is realized in the CHB in a precise and highly automated fashion. This allows performing a wide range of time consuming measurements in an efficient way. The implementation of ISO 9001 standards ensures a traceable quality of results. DLR-IMF will support the calibration and characterization campaign of the future German spaceborne hyperspectral imager EnMAP. In the context of this activity, a procedure for the correction of imaging artifacts, such as due to stray light, is currently being developed by DLR-IMF. Goal is the correction of in-band stray light as well as ghost images down to a level of a few digital numbers in the whole wavelength range 420-2450 nm. DLR-IMF owns a Norsk Elektro Optikks HySpex airborne imaging spectrometer system that has been thoroughly characterized. This system will be used to test stray light calibration procedures for EnMAP. Hyperspectral snapshot sensors offer the possibility to simultaneously acquire hyperspectral data in two dimensions. Recently, these rather new spectrometers have arisen much interest in the remote sensing community. Different designs are currently used for local area observation such as by use of small unmanned aerial vehicles (sUAV). In this context the CHB's measurement capabilities are currently extended such that a standard measurement procedure for these new sensors will be implemented.

  18. Evaluating the Effects of a Video Prompt in a System of Least Prompts Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Katie A.; Ayres, Kevin M.; Mechling, Linda C.; Alexander, Jennifer L.; Mataras, Theologia K.; Shepley, Sally B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a system of least prompts procedure with a video prompt serving as the model in teaching office tasks to three high school students with moderate intellectual disability. A multiple probe across behaviors design replicated across participants was used to evaluate the intervention. The…

  19. Cross-national research on contractor evaluation procedures in public works procurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Seiya; Sato, Naoyoshi; Matsumoto, Naoya

    Contractor evaluation methods in Japan's public works procurement, beginning with construction business licensure, going through biennial preliminary firm rating, up to project-by-project prequalification and comprehensive point rating, were developed during the period when public works were mostly procured through designated competitive bidding. It is essential to focus attention on contractor evaluation methods for introducing different types of procurement procedures which enhance the use of technological capabilities held by private businesses. An overall review of contractor evaluation procedures should be conducted in view of the present situation, where the open competitive bidding has become mainly used in combination with comprehensive evaluation, as well as to allow for further diversification of procurement methods. In Western countries, improvements have been made for the past several years in contractor evaluation procedures with more emphasis on "Value for Money." Advanced efforts made by these countries will be useful as a reference for overhauling Japan's contractor evaluation system. This study conducts a comparative review of contractor evaluation procedures for public procurement in Western countries such as the United States, the United Kingdom and France by identifying similarities and differences between those of Japan and the above mentioned countries. This reveals that a contractor's technical or professional ability is looked at separately from its economic and financial standing in those countries studied, and there is no case like Japan in which those two factors are integrated into one for evaluation.

  20. Pilot evaluation of sailplane handling qualities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bennett, A. G., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The evaluation sailplanes were found generally deficient in the area of cockpit layout. The pilots indicated general dissatisfaction with high pitch sensitivity especially when coupled with inertially induced stick forces. While all sailplanes were judged satisfactory for centering thermals and in the ease of speed control in circling flight, pilot opinions diverged on the maneuvering response, pull-out characteristics from a dive, and on phugoid damping. Lateral-directional control problems were noted mainly during takeoff and landing for most sailplanes with the landing wheel ahead of center of gravity. Pilot opinion of in-flight lateral-directional stability and control was generally satisfactory. Five of the evaluation sailplanes exhibited a very narrow airspeed band in which perceptible stall warning buffet occurred. However, this characteristic was considered not objectionable when stall recovery was easy. The pilots objected to the characteristics of a wide airspeed band of stall warning followed by a stall with yawing and rolling tendency and substantial loss of altitude during the stall. Glide path control for the evaluation sailplanes was found to be generally objectionable.

  1. Ground-Water Data-Collection Protocols and Procedures for the National Water-Quality Assessment Program: Collection and Documentation of Water-Quality Samples and Related Data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koterba, Michael T.; Wilde, Franceska D.; Lapham, Wayne W.

    1995-01-01

    Protocols for ground-water sampling are described in a report written in 1989 as part of the pilot program for the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQA) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). These protocols have been reviewed and revised to address the needs of the full-scale implementation of the NAWQA Program that began in 1991. This report, which is a collaborative effort between the NAWQA Program and the USGS Office of Water Quality, is the result of that review and revision. This report describes protocols and recommended procedures for the collection of water-quality samples and related data from wells for the NAWQA Program. Protocols and recommended procedures discussed include (1) equipment setup and other preparations for data collection; (2) well purging and field measurements; (3) collecting and processing ground-water-quality samples; (4) equipment decontamination; (5) quality-control sampling; and (6) sample handling and shipping.

  2. Evaluation of screening procedures for bioconcentratable organic chemicals in effluents and sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burkhard, L.P.; Sheedy, B.R.

    1995-04-01

    Screening procedures have been developed by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to isolate and tentatively identify nonpolar organic chemicals in effluent and sediment samples with high potential to form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. The objective of this study was to determine if the sample components tentatively identified by the effluent- and sediment-screening procedures actually form chemical residues in aquatic organisms. This evaluation consisted of analyzing effluent and sediment samples from a field site with discharges from two coke-manufacturing facilities using the screening procedures. Effluent, sediment, crayfish (Decapoda), and sunfish (Lepomis sp.) samples from the field site were also prepared using conventional sample preparation procedures and analyzed for the tentatively identified chemicals (TIDs) reported by the screening procedures. Results of the screening procedures were then compared to the results of the analyses on the samples prepared using the conventional sample preparation procedures. For the effluent-screening procedure, 182 of 183 TIDs in Coke Plant 1 effluent and all of the 7 TIDs in Coke Plant 2 effluent were found in the crayfish, sunfish, and/or sediment samples downstream of the discharges. For the sediment-screening procedure, 92 of 93 TIDs and all of 47 TIDs in sediment samples from two sampling stations downstream of the discharges were found in the crayfish and/or sunfish samples.

  3. Red River Wildlife Management Area HEP Report, Habitat Evaluation Procedures, Technical Report 2004.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2004-11-01

    A habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis conducted on the 314-acre Red River Wildlife Management Area (RRWMA) managed by the Idaho Department of Fish and Game resulted in 401.38 habitat units (HUs). Habitat variables from six habitat suitability index (HSI) models, comprised of mink (Mustela vison), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), common snipe (Capella gallinago), black-capped chickadee (Parus altricapillus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), were measured by Regional HEP Team (RHT) members in August 2004. Cover types included wet meadow, riverine, riparian shrub, conifer forest, conifer forest wetland, and urban. HSI model outputs indicate that the shrub component is lacking in riparian shrub and conifer forest cover types and that snag density should be increased in conifer stands. The quality of wet meadow habitat, comprised primarily of introduced grass species and sedges, could be improved through development of ephemeral open water ponds and increasing the amount of persistent wetland herbaceous vegetation e.g. cattails (Typha spp.) and bulrushes (Scirpus spp.).

  4. Quality assurance and training procedures for computer-aided detection and diagnosis systems in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Huo, Zhimin; Summers, Ronald M; Paquerault, Sophie; Lo, Joseph; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey; Armato, Samuel G; Freedman, Matthew T; Lin, Jesse; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Fryd, David; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAD) is increasingly used for decision support by clinicians for detection and interpretation of diseases. However, there are no quality assurance (QA) requirements for CAD in clinical use at present. QA of CAD is important so that end users can be made aware of changes in CAD performance both due to intentional or unintentional causes. In addition, end-user training is critical to prevent improper use of CAD, which could potentially result in lower overall clinical performance. Research on QA of CAD and user training are limited to date. The purpose of this paper is to bring attention to these issues, inform the readers of the opinions of the members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) CAD subcommittee, and thus stimulate further discussion in the CAD community on these topics. The recommendations in this paper are intended to be work items for AAPM task groups that will be formed to address QA and user training issues on CAD in the future. The work items may serve as a framework for the discussion and eventual design of detailed QA and training procedures for physicists and users of CAD. Some of the recommendations are considered by the subcommittee to be reasonably easy and practical and can be implemented immediately by the end users; others are considered to be "best practice" approaches, which may require significant effort, additional tools, and proper training to implement. The eventual standardization of the requirements of QA procedures for CAD will have to be determined through consensus from members of the CAD community, and user training may require support of professional societies. It is expected that high-quality CAD and proper use of CAD could allow these systems to achieve their true potential, thus benefiting both the patients and the clinicians, and may bring about more widespread clinical use of CAD for many other diseases and applications. It is hoped that the awareness of the need

  5. Data envelopment analysis in service quality evaluation: an empirical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Seyedvahid; Saati, Saber; Tavana, Madjid

    2015-10-01

    Service quality is often conceptualized as the comparison between service expectations and the actual performance perceptions. It enhances customer satisfaction, decreases customer defection, and promotes customer loyalty. Substantial literature has examined the concept of service quality, its dimensions, and measurement methods. We introduce the perceived service quality index (PSQI) as a single measure for evaluating the multiple-item service quality construct based on the SERVQUAL model. A slack-based measure (SBM) of efficiency with constant inputs is used to calculate the PSQI. In addition, a non-linear programming model based on the SBM is proposed to delineate an improvement guideline and improve service quality. An empirical study is conducted to assess the applicability of the method proposed in this study. A large number of studies have used DEA as a benchmarking tool to measure service quality. These models do not propose a coherent performance evaluation construct and consequently fail to deliver improvement guidelines for improving service quality. The DEA models proposed in this study are designed to evaluate and improve service quality within a comprehensive framework and without any dependency on external data.

  6. Quality framework proposal for Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects.

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, Naomi G.; Arfman, John F.; Limary, Siviengxay

    2008-09-01

    This report proposes the first stage of a Quality Framework approach that can be used to evaluate and document Component Material Evaluation (CME) projects. The first stage of the Quality Framework defines two tools that will be used to evaluate a CME project. The first tool is used to decompose a CME project into its essential elements. These elements can then be evaluated for inherent quality by looking at the subelements that impact their level of quality maturity or rigor. Quality Readiness Levels (QRLs) are used to valuate project elements for inherent quality. The Framework provides guidance for the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders for CME project prerequisites that help to ensure the proper level of confidence in the deliverable given its intended use. The Framework also Provides a roadmap that defined when and how the Framework tools should be applied. Use of these tools allow the Principal Investigator (PI) and stakeholders to understand what elements the project will use to execute the project, the inherent quality of the elements, which of those are critical to the project and why, and the risks associated to the project's elements.

  7. Iodine absorption cells quality evaluation methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Holá, Miroslava; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Du-Burck, Frédéric; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2016-12-01

    The absorption cells represent an unique tool for the laser frequency stabilization. They serve as irreplaceable optical frequency references in realization of high-stable laser standards and laser sources for different brands of optical measurements, including the most precise frequency and dimensional measurement systems. One of the most often used absorption media covering visible and near IR spectral range is molecular iodine. It offers rich atlas of very strong and narrow spectral transitions which allow realization of laser systems with ultimate frequency stabilities in or below 10-14 order level. One of the most often disccussed disadvantage of the iodine cells is iodine's corrosivity and sensitivity to presence of foreign substances. The impurities react with absorption media and cause spectral shifts of absorption spectra, spectral broadening of the transitions and decrease achievable signal-to-noise ratio of the detected spectra. All of these unwanted effects directly influence frequency stability of the realized laser standard and due to this fact, the quality of iodine cells must be precisely controlled. We present a comparison of traditionally used method of laser induced fluorescence (LIF) with novel technique based on hyperfine transitions linewidths measurement. The results summarize advantages and drawbacks of these techniques and give a recommendation for their practical usage.

  8. Evaluating the Role of Content in Subjective Video Quality Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Vrgovic, Petar

    2014-01-01

    Video quality as perceived by human observers is the ground truth when Video Quality Assessment (VQA) is in question. It is dependent on many variables, one of them being the content of the video that is being evaluated. Despite the evidence that content has an impact on the quality score the sequence receives from human evaluators, currently available VQA databases mostly comprise of sequences which fail to take this into account. In this paper, we aim to identify and analyze differences between human cognitive, affective, and conative responses to a set of videos commonly used for VQA and a set of videos specifically chosen to include video content which might affect the judgment of evaluators when perceived video quality is in question. Our findings indicate that considerable differences exist between the two sets on selected factors, which leads us to conclude that videos starring a different type of content than the currently employed ones might be more appropriate for VQA. PMID:24523643

  9. Acoustic evaluation of cementing quality using obliquely incident ultrasonic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Wen-Xing; Qiao, Wen-Xiao; Che, Xiao-Hua; Xie, Hui

    2014-09-01

    Ultrasonic cement bond logging is a widely used method for evaluating cementing quality. Conventional ultrasonic cement bond logging uses vertical incidence and cannot accurately evaluate lightweight cement bonding. Oblique incidence is a new technology for evaluating cement quality with improved accuracy for lightweight cements. In this study, we simulated models of acoustic impedance of cement and cementing quality using ultrasonic oblique incidence, and we obtained the relation between cementing quality, acoustic impedance of cement, and the acoustic attenuation coefficient of the A0-mode and S0-mode Lamb waves. Then, we simulated models of different cement thickness and we obtained the relation between cement thickness and the time difference of the arrival between the A0 and A0' modes.

  10. Computer–Based Procedures for Nuclear Power Plant Field Workers: Preliminary Results from Two Evaluation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Katya L Le Blanc; Johanna H Oxstrand

    2013-10-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory and participants from the U.S. nuclear industry are collaborating on a research effort aimed to augment the existing guidance on computer-based procedure (CBP) design with specific guidance on how to design CBP user interfaces such that they support procedure execution in ways that exceed the capabilities of paper-based procedures (PBPs) without introducing new errors. Researchers are employing an iterative process where the human factors issues and interface design principles related to CBP usage are systematically addressed and evaluated in realistic settings. This paper describes the process of developing a CBP prototype and the two studies conducted to evaluate the prototype. The results indicate that CBPs may improve performance by reducing errors, but may increase the time it takes to complete procedural tasks.

  11. Meat quality evaluation by hyperspectral imaging technique: an overview.

    PubMed

    Elmasry, Gamal; Barbin, Douglas F; Sun, Da-Wen; Allen, Paul

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, a number of methods have been developed to objectively measure meat quality attributes. Hyperspectral imaging technique as one of these methods has been regarded as a smart and promising analytical tool for analyses conducted in research and industries. Recently there has been a renewed interest in using hyperspectral imaging in quality evaluation of different food products. The main inducement for developing the hyperspectral imaging system is to integrate both spectroscopy and imaging techniques in one system to make direct identification of different components and their spatial distribution in the tested product. By combining spatial and spectral details together, hyperspectral imaging has proved to be a promising technology for objective meat quality evaluation. The literature presented in this paper clearly reveals that hyperspectral imaging approaches have a huge potential for gaining rapid information about the chemical structure and related physical properties of all types of meat. In addition to its ability for effectively quantifying and characterizing quality attributes of some important visual features of meat such as color, quality grade, marbling, maturity, and texture, it is able to measure multiple chemical constituents simultaneously without monotonous sample preparation. Although this technology has not yet been sufficiently exploited in meat process and quality assessment, its potential is promising. Developing a quality evaluation system based on hyperspectral imaging technology to assess the meat quality parameters and to ensure its authentication would bring economical benefits to the meat industry by increasing consumer confidence in the quality of the meat products. This paper provides a detailed overview of the recently developed approaches and latest research efforts exerted in hyperspectral imaging technology developed for evaluating the quality of different meat products and the possibility of its widespread

  12. A subjective study to evaluate video quality assessment algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadrinathan, Kalpana; Soundararajan, Rajiv; Bovik, Alan C.; Cormack, Lawrence K.

    2010-02-01

    Automatic methods to evaluate the perceptual quality of a digital video sequence have widespread applications wherever the end-user is a human. Several objective video quality assessment (VQA) algorithms exist, whose performance is typically evaluated using the results of a subjective study performed by the video quality experts group (VQEG) in 2000. There is a great need for a free, publicly available subjective study of video quality that embodies state-of-the-art in video processing technology and that is effective in challenging and benchmarking objective VQA algorithms. In this paper, we present a study and a resulting database, known as the LIVE Video Quality Database, where 150 distorted video sequences obtained from 10 different source video content were subjectively evaluated by 38 human observers. Our study includes videos that have been compressed by MPEG-2 and H.264, as well as videos obtained by simulated transmission of H.264 compressed streams through error prone IP and wireless networks. The subjective evaluation was performed using a single stimulus paradigm with hidden reference removal, where the observers were asked to provide their opinion of video quality on a continuous scale. We also present the performance of several freely available objective, full reference (FR) VQA algorithms on the LIVE Video Quality Database. The recent MOtion-based Video Integrity Evaluation (MOVIE) index emerges as the leading objective VQA algorithm in our study, while the performance of the Video Quality Metric (VQM) and the Multi-Scale Structural SIMilarity (MS-SSIM) index is noteworthy. The LIVE Video Quality Database is freely available for download1 and we hope that our study provides researchers with a valuable tool to benchmark and improve the performance of objective VQA algorithms.

  13. Service Quality Assessment Scale (SQAS): An Instrument for Evaluating Service Quality of Health-Fitness Clubs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lam, Eddie T. C.; Zhang, James J.; Jensen, Barbara E.

    2005-01-01

    This study was designed to develop the Service Quality Assessment Scale to evaluate the service quality of health-fitness clubs. Through a review of literature, field observations, interviews, modified application of the Delphi technique, and a pilot study, a preliminary scale with 46 items was formulated. The preliminary scale was administered to…

  14. Comparing catchment sediment fingerprinting procedures using an auto-evaluation approach with virtual sample mixtures.

    PubMed

    Palazón, Leticia; Latorre, Borja; Gaspar, Leticia; Blake, William H; Smith, Hugh G; Navas, Ana

    2015-11-01

    Information on sediment sources in river catchments is required for effective sediment control strategies, to understand sediment, nutrient and pollutant transport, and for developing soil erosion management plans. Sediment fingerprinting procedures are employed to quantify sediment source contributions and have become a widely used tool. As fingerprinting procedures are naturally variable and locally dependant, there are different applications of the procedure. Here, the auto-evaluation of different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures is proposed to support the selection of the fingerprinting procedure with the best capacity for source discrimination and apportionment. Surface samples from four land uses from a Central Spanish Pyrenean catchment were used i) as sources to generate the virtual sample mixtures and ii) to characterise the sources for the fingerprinting procedures. The auto-evaluation approach involved comparing fingerprinting procedures based on four optimum composite fingerprints selected by three statistical tests, three source characterisations (mean, median and corrected mean) and two types of objective functions for the mixing model. A total of 24 fingerprinting procedures were assessed by this new approach which were solved by Monte Carlo simulations and compared using the root mean squared error (RMSE) between known and assessed source ascriptions for the virtual sample mixtures. It was found that the source ascriptions with the highest accuracy were achieved using the corrected mean source characterisations for the composite fingerprints selected by the Kruskal Wallis H-test and principal components analysis. Based on the RMSE results, high goodness of fit (GOF) values were not always indicative of accurate source apportionment results, and care should be taken when using GOF to assess mixing model performance. The proposed approach to test different fingerprinting procedures using virtual sample mixtures provides an

  15. Four-dimensional evaluation of regional air quality models

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present highlights of the results obtained in the third phase of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII3). Activities in AQMEII3 were focused on evaluating the performance of global, hemispheric and regional modeling systems over Europe and North Ame...

  16. Taking Teacher Quality Seriously: A Collaborative Approach to Teacher Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Stan

    2012-01-01

    If narrow, test-based evaluation of teachers is unfair, unreliable, and has negative effects on kids, classrooms, and curricula, what's a better approach? By demonizing teachers and unions, and sharply polarizing the education debate, the corporate reform movement has actually undermined serious efforts to improve teacher quality and evaluation.…

  17. A Coherent System of Teacher Evaluation for Quality Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Tammie; Aguilar, Elena; Berg, Ellen; Cismowski, Liane; Cody, Anthony; Cohen, David B.; Dean, Sandra; Formigli, Lynn; Fung, Jane; Lee, Cliff; Marshall, Kathie; Skorko, Nancy; White, Silver

    2015-01-01

    This article addresses the questions, "How should we evaluate the quality of teaching?" and "What kind of evaluation system will move all California teachers on a path of improvement throughout their careers?" The article, adapted from a report written by a group of accomplished California teachers, recommends seven core…

  18. Evaluating newly acquired authority of nurse practitioners and physician assistants for reserved medical procedures in the Netherlands: a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    De Bruijn-Geraets, Daisy P; Van Eijk-Hustings, Yvonne JL; Vrijhoef, Hubertus JM

    2014-01-01

    Aim The study protocol is designed to evaluate the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Background Recent (temporarily) enacted legislation in Dutch health care authorizes nurse practitioners and physician assistants to indicate and perform specified medical procedures, i.e. catheterization, cardioversion, defibrillation, endoscopy, injection, puncture, prescribing and simple surgical procedures, independently. Formerly, these procedures were exclusively reserved to physicians, dentists and midwives. Design A triangulation mixed method design is used to collect quantitative (surveys) and qualitative (interviews) data. Methods Outcomes are selected from evidence-based frameworks and models for assessing the impact of advanced nursing on quality of health care. Data are collected in various manners. Surveys are structured around the domains: (i) quality of care; (ii) costs; (iii) healthcare resource use; and (iv) patient centredness. Focus group and expert interviews aim to ascertain facilitators and barriers to the implementation process. Data are collected before the amendment of the law, 1 and 2·5 years thereafter. Groups of patients, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, supervising physicians and policy makers all participate in this national study. The study is supported by a grant from the Dutch Ministry of Health, Welfare and Sport in March 2011. Research Ethics Committee approval was obtained in July 2011. Conclusion This study will provide information about the effects of granting independent authorization for medical procedures to nurse practitioners and physician assistants on processes and outcomes of health care. Study findings aim to support policy makers and other stakeholders in making related decisions. The study design enables a cross-national comparative analysis. PMID:24684631

  19. Clinical Profile and Quality of Life of Adult Patients After the Fontan Procedure.

    PubMed

    Bordin, Giulia; Padalino, Massimo Antonio; Perentaler, Sonja; Castaldi, Biagio; Maschietto, Nicola; Michieli, Pierantonio; Crepaz, Roberto; Frigo, Anna Chiara; Vida, Vladimiro Lorenzo; Milanesi, Ornella

    2015-08-01

    Increasingly, more patients with univentricular heart reach adulthood. Therefore, long-term psychological features are an important concern. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and psychological profile of post-Fontan adult patients and to identify the most significant determinants of quality of life. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, we reviewed the surgical and medical history of post-Fontan adult patients. Patients underwent a 24-h electrocardiogram, echocardiography and exercise testing. Self-report questionnaires were used to assess the Work Ability Index, quality of life (Satisfaction with Life Scale), perceived health status (SF-36 questionnaire), coping strategies (Brief Cope questionnaire) and presence of mood disorders (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale). Thirty-nine patients aged between 18 and 48 years (mean 27.5 years) were enrolled. The mean follow-up was 21.5 years. Most patients were unmarried (82.9 %), had a high school diploma (62.9 %) and were employed (62.9 %). Twenty-nine patients (82.3 %) had at least one long-term complication. The median single ventricle ejection fraction was 57 %, and the median maximal oxygen consumption was 26.8 ml/min/kg. This population tended to be anxious and to use adaptive coping strategies. Quality of life was perceived as excellent or good in 57.2 % of cases and was not related to either cardiac function or exercise capacity. Both quality of life and SF-36 domains were related to the Work Ability Index. This cohort of post-Fontan adult patients enjoyed a good quality of life irrespective of disease severity.

  20. [Preparation and quality evaluation of Iohexol liposomes].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Rongli; Zhu, Xiali; Hung, Guihua; Zhang, Na; Zhang, Bingjie

    2007-08-01

    The liposomes were prepared by reverse-phase evaporation technique. The morphology of the liposomes, the entrapment efficiency and the particle size distribution were evaluated. The CT signals of Iohexol liposomes in rabbits were compared with those of Iohexol injection in rabbits. The entrapment efficiency of Iohexol liposomes was 82.35% +/- 1.82%. The liposmes were spherical or ellipsoidal shape in shape. The mean diameter of the Iohexol liposomes was 207 7 nm. The polydispersity index was 0.355. The Zeta potential was--1.83 mV. The drug was highly entrapped into the liposomes with good reproduction and stability. The in vitro release of Iohexol liposomes was significantly slower than that of Iohexol,and was 98.57% at 24 h. Iohexol liposomes may reduce the dosage, prolong the effective time of the developing agent, and could reduce the side effects of Iohexol on the blood vessels and cerebral nerves.

  1. Quality evaluation of tandem mass spectral libraries.

    PubMed

    Oberacher, Herbert; Weinmann, Wolfgang; Dresen, Sebastian

    2011-06-01

    Tandem mass spectral libraries are gaining more and more importance for the identification of unknowns in different fields of research, including metabolomics, forensics, toxicology, and environmental analysis. Particularly, the recent invention of reliable, robust, and transferable libraries has increased the general acceptance of these tools. Herein, we report on results obtained from thorough evaluation of the match reliabilities of two tandem mass spectral libraries: the MSforID library established by the Oberacher group in Innsbruck and the Weinmann library established by the Weinmann group in Freiburg. Three different experiments were performed: (1) Spectra of the libraries were searched against their corresponding library after excluding either this single compound-specific spectrum or all compound-specific spectra prior to searching; (2) the libraries were searched against each other using either library as reference set or sample set; (3) spectra acquired on different mass spectrometric instruments were matched to both libraries. Almost 13,000 tandem mass spectra were included in this study. The MSforID search algorithm was used for spectral matching. Statistical evaluation of the library search results revealed that principally both libraries enable the sensitive and specific identification of compounds. Due to higher mass accuracy of the QqTOF compared with the QTrap instrument, matches to the MSforID library were more reliable when comparing spectra with both libraries. Furthermore, only the MSforID library was shown to be efficiently transferable to different kinds of tandem mass spectrometers, including "tandem-in-time" instruments; this is due to the coverage of a large range of different collision energy settings-including the very low range-which is an outstanding characteristics of the MSforID library.

  2. Evaluation of the sustainability of contrasted pig farming systems: the procedure, the evaluated systems and the evaluation tools.

    PubMed

    Bonneau, M; de Greef, K; Brinkman, D; Cinar, M U; Dourmad, J Y; Edge, H L; Fàbrega, E; Gonzàlez, J; Houwers, H W J; Hviid, M; Ilari-Antoine, E; Klauke, T N; Phatsara, C; Rydhmer, L; van der Oever, B; Zimmer, C; Edwards, S A

    2014-12-01

    Although a few studies consider the sustainability of animal farming systems along the three classical main pillars (economy, environment and society), most studies on pig farming systems address only one of these pillars. The present paper is the introduction to a series of companion papers presenting the results of a study undertaken within the EU-supported project Q-PorkChains, aiming at building a comprehensive tool for the evaluation of pig farming systems, which is robust to accommodate the large variability of systems existing in Europe. The tool is mostly based on questions to farmers and comprises a total of 37 dimensions distributed along eight themes: Animal Welfare, Animal Health, Breeding Programmes, Environmental Sustainability, Meat Safety, Market Conformity, Economy and Working Conditions. The paper describes the procedure that was used for building the tool, using it on 15 contrasted pig farming systems and analysing the results. The evaluated systems are briefly described and a short overview of the dimensions is provided. Detailed descriptions of the theme-wise tools and results, as well as the results of an integrated evaluation, are available in the companion papers.

  3. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report Wanaket Wildlife Area, Techical Report 2005-2006.

    SciTech Connect

    Ashley, Paul

    2006-02-01

    The Regional HEP Team (RHT) and Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) Wildlife Program staff conducted a follow-up habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) analysis on the Wanaket Wildlife Management Area in June 2005. The 2005 HEP investigation generated 3,084.48 habitat units (HUs) for a net increase of 752.18 HUs above 1990/1995 baseline survey results. The HU to acre ratio also increased from 0.84:1.0 to 1.16:1.0. The largest increase in habitat units occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type (California quail and western meadowlark models), which increased from 1,544 HUs to 2,777 HUs (+43%), while agriculture cover type HUs were eliminated because agricultural lands (managed pasture) were converted to shrubsteppe/grassland. In addition to the agriculture cover type, major changes in habitat structure occurred in the shrubsteppe/grassland cover type due to the 2001 wildfire which removed the shrub component from well over 95% of its former range. The number of acres of all other cover types remained relatively stable; however, habitat quality improved in the riparian herb and riparian shrub cover types. The number and type of HEP species models used during the 2005 HEP analysis were identical to those used in the 1990/1995 baseline HEP surveys. The number of species models employed to evaluate the shrubsteppe/grassland, sand/gravel/mud/cobble, and riparian herb cover types, however, were fewer than reported in the McNary Dam Loss Assessment (Rassmussen and Wright 1989) for the same cover types.

  4. [Evaluation of quality control of baciloscopy in tuberculosis diagnosis in Cuba].

    PubMed

    Martínez Romero, María Rosarys; Sardiña Aragón, Misleidis; García, Grechen; Almaguer Díaz, Marisol; Llanes Cordero, Maria J; Montoro Cardoso, Ernesto

    2006-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the diag-nosis of tuberculosis in Provincial Hygiene and Epidemiological Centers of the country including special municipality Isle of Youth. The quality control was performed on 4 382 sputum smears from January to December 2004 following the Manual of procedures of the National Tuberculosis Control program. Good quality in Ziehl Neelsen extension and staining was seen in 4003 smears (91.35%). The overall agreement coefficient between the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory and the rest of the provincial laboratories was 99.79%. Sensitivity and specificity figures were over 99%. These results showed the quality of sputum smears microscopy diagnosis at provincial laboratories and the need of carrying out permanent supervision, monitoring and re-training of staff in acid-fast bacilli test in order to lay down the foundations for the introduction of blind rechecking methods and panel of sputum smears, aimed at improving the tuberculosis diagnosis quality in Cuba.

  5. Evaluation of the EIA system performance in Greece, using quality indicators

    SciTech Connect

    Androulidakis, Ioannis . E-mail: iandroul@civil.auth.gr; Karakassis, Ioannis

    2006-04-15

    Greece was among the last countries in the European Union to adopt the EU Directives on Environmental Impact Assessment, upgrading the previously existing legislative framework. The aim of the present paper was to appraise the quality of a randomly selected sample of EISs using non-obligatory but quality-related indicators and to evaluate the overall quality of these studies produced in Greece during the last decade (1993-2003). It was found that the majority of these EISs performed rather poorly in respect of most indicators used and there was little evidence of improvement with time. It is concluded that the authorities in charge still have little experience in coping with the increasing bulk of project submissions and are primarily interested in conformity with formal requirements rather than in reliable predictions and in overall quality of the EIA procedure.

  6. Evaluating supplier quality performance using fuzzy analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nazihah; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Rajoo, Shanmugam Sundram Kalimuthu

    2014-12-01

    Evaluating supplier quality performance is vital in ensuring continuous supply chain improvement, reducing the operational costs and risks towards meeting customer's expectation. This paper aims to illustrate an application of Fuzzy Analytical Hierarchy Process to prioritize the evaluation criteria in a context of automotive manufacturing in Malaysia. Five main criteria were identified which were quality, cost, delivery, customer serviceand technology support. These criteria had been arranged into hierarchical structure and evaluated by an expert. The relative importance of each criteria was determined by using linguistic variables which were represented as triangular fuzzy numbers. The Center of Gravity defuzzification method was used to convert the fuzzy evaluations into their corresponding crisps values. Such fuzzy evaluation can be used as a systematic tool to overcome the uncertainty evaluation of suppliers' performance which usually associated with human being subjective judgments.

  7. Test and evaluation procedures for Sandia's Teraflops Operating System (TOS) on Janus.

    SciTech Connect

    Barnette, Daniel Wayne

    2005-10-01

    This report describes the test and evaluation methods by which the Teraflops Operating System, or TOS, that resides on Sandia's massively-parallel computer Janus is verified for production release. Also discussed are methods used to build TOS before testing and evaluating, miscellaneous utility scripts, a sample test plan, and a proposed post-test method for quickly examining the large number of test results. The purpose of the report is threefold: (1) to provide a guide to T&E procedures, (2) to aid and guide others who will run T&E procedures on the new ASCI Red Storm machine, and (3) to document some of the history of evaluation and testing of TOS. This report is not intended to serve as an exhaustive manual for testers to conduct T&E procedures.

  8. Report on objective ride quality evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wambold, J. C.; Park, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The correlation of absorbed power as an objective ride measure to the subjective evaluation for the bus data was investigated. For some individual bus rides the correlations were poor, but when a sufficient number of rides was used to give reasonable sample base, an excellent correlation was obtained. The following logarithmical function was derived: S = 1.7245 1n (39.6849 AP), where S = one subjective rating of the ride; and AP = the absorbed power in watts. A six-degree-of-freedom method developed for aircraft data was completed. Preliminary correlation of absorbed power with ISO standards further enhances the bus ride and absorbed power correlation numbers since the AP's obtained are of the same order of magnitude for both correlations. While it would then appear that one could just use ISO standards, there is no way to add the effect of three degrees of freedom. The absorbed power provides a method of adding the effects due to the three major directions plus the pitch and roll.

  9. Evaluating supplier quality performance using analytical hierarchy process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalimuthu Rajoo, Shanmugam Sundram; Kasim, Maznah Mat; Ahmad, Nazihah

    2013-09-01

    This paper elaborates the importance of evaluating supplier quality performance to an organization. Supplier quality performance evaluation reflects the actual performance of the supplier exhibited at customer's end. It is critical in enabling the organization to determine the area of improvement and thereafter works with supplier to close the gaps. Success of the customer partly depends on supplier's quality performance. Key criteria as quality, cost, delivery, technology support and customer service are categorized as main factors in contributing to supplier's quality performance. 18 suppliers' who were manufacturing automotive application parts evaluated in year 2010 using weight point system. There were few suppliers with common rating which led to common ranking observed by few suppliers'. Analytical Hierarchy Process (AHP), a user friendly decision making tool for complex and multi criteria problems was used to evaluate the supplier's quality performance challenging the weight point system that was used for 18 suppliers'. The consistency ratio was checked for criteria and sub-criteria. Final results of AHP obtained with no overlap ratings, therefore yielded a better decision making methodology as compared to weight point rating system.

  10. Post-Mission Quality Assurance Procedure for Survey-Grade Mobile Mapping Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerstinga, A. P.; Friess, P.

    2016-06-01

    Mobile Mapping Systems (MMS) consist of terrestrial-based moving platforms that integrate a set of imaging sensors (typically digital cameras and laser scanners) and a Position and Orientation System (POS), designed to collect data of the surrounding environment. MMS can be classified as "mapping-grade" or "survey-grade" depending on the system's attainable accuracy. Mapping-grade MMS produce geospatial data suitable for GIS applications (e.g., asset management) while survey-grade systems should satisfy high-accuracy applications such as engineering/design projects. The delivered accuracy of an MMS is dependent on several factors such as the accuracy of the system measurements and calibration parameters. It is critical, especially for survey-grade systems, to implement a robust Quality Assurance (QA) procedure to ensure the achievement of the expected accuracy. In this paper, a new post-mission QA procedure is presented. The presented method consists of a fully-automated self-calibration process that allows for the estimation of corrections to the system calibration parameters (e.g., boresight angles and lever-arm offsets relating the lidar sensor(s) to the IMU body frame) as well as corrections to the system measurements (e.g., post-processed trajectory position and orientation, scan angles and ranges). As for the system measurements, the major challenge for MMS is related to the trajectory determination in the presence of multipath signals and GNSS outages caused by buildings, underpasses and high vegetation. In the proposed self-calibration method, trajectory position errors are properly modelled while utilizing an efficient/meaningful trajectory segmentation technique. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated using a dataset collected under unfavorable GNSS conditions.

  11. An automated procedure for material parameter evaluation for viscoplastic constitutive models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbrie, P. K.; James, G. H.; Hill, P. S.; Allen, D. H.; Haisler, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    An automated procedure is presented for evaluating the material parameters in Walker's exponential viscoplastic constitutive model for metals at elevated temperature. Both physical and numerical approximations are utilized to compute the constants for Inconel 718 at 1100 F. When intermediate results are carefully scrutinized and engineering judgement applied, parameters may be computed which yield stress output histories that are in agreement with experimental results. A qualitative assessment of the theta-plot method for predicting the limiting value of stress is also presented. The procedure may also be used as a basis to develop evaluation schemes for other viscoplastic constitutive theories of this type.

  12. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report, Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife I Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    In 2002, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 1992. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, and yellow warbler. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project provides a total of 936.76 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Open water habitat provides 71.92 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Shoreline and island habitat provide 12.77 HUs fore Canada goose and mallard. Cattail hemi-marsh provides 308.42 HUs for Canada goose, mallard, and muskrat. Wet meadow provides 208.95 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scrub-shrub wetlands provide 14.43 HUs for yellow warbler, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Deciduous forested wetlands provide 148.62 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, mallard, and white-tailed deer. Grassland meadow provides 3.38 HUs for Canada goose. Conifer forest provides 160.44 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. The objective of using HEP at the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project and other protected properties is to document the quality and quantity of available habitat for selected wildlife species. In this way, HEP provides information on the relative value of the same area at future points in time so that the effect of management activities on wildlife habitat can be quantified. When combined with other tools, the baseline HEP will be used to determine the most effective on-site management, restoration, and enhancement actions to increase habitat suitability for targeted species. The same process will be replicated every five years to quantitatively evaluate the effectiveness of management strategies in improving and maintaining habitat conditions while

  13. Procedures for adjusting regional regression models of urban-runoff quality using local data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoos, A.B.; Sisolak, J.K.

    1993-01-01

    Statistical operations termed model-adjustment procedures (MAP?s) can be used to incorporate local data into existing regression models to improve the prediction of urban-runoff quality. Each MAP is a form of regression analysis in which the local data base is used as a calibration data set. Regression coefficients are determined from the local data base, and the resulting `adjusted? regression models can then be used to predict storm-runoff quality at unmonitored sites. The response variable in the regression analyses is the observed load or mean concentration of a constituent in storm runoff for a single storm. The set of explanatory variables used in the regression analyses is different for each MAP, but always includes the predicted value of load or mean concentration from a regional regression model. The four MAP?s examined in this study were: single-factor regression against the regional model prediction, P, (termed MAP-lF-P), regression against P,, (termed MAP-R-P), regression against P, and additional local variables (termed MAP-R-P+nV), and a weighted combination of P, and a local-regression prediction (termed MAP-W). The procedures were tested by means of split-sample analysis, using data from three cities included in the Nationwide Urban Runoff Program: Denver, Colorado; Bellevue, Washington; and Knoxville, Tennessee. The MAP that provided the greatest predictive accuracy for the verification data set differed among the three test data bases and among model types (MAP-W for Denver and Knoxville, MAP-lF-P and MAP-R-P for Bellevue load models, and MAP-R-P+nV for Bellevue concentration models) and, in many cases, was not clearly indicated by the values of standard error of estimate for the calibration data set. A scheme to guide MAP selection, based on exploratory data analysis of the calibration data set, is presented and tested. The MAP?s were tested for sensitivity to the size of a calibration data set. As expected, predictive accuracy of all MAP?s for

  14. Quality evaluation in medical visualization: some issues and a taxonomy of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Beatriz S.; Dillenseger, Jean-Louis

    2005-04-01

    Among the several medical imaging stages (acquisition, reconstruction, etc.), visualization is the latest stage on which decision is generally taken. Scientific visualization tools allow to process complex data into a graphical visible and understandable form, the goal being to provide new insight. If the evaluation of procedures is a crucial issue and a main concern in medicine, paradoxically visualization techniques, predominantly in tri-dimensional imaging, have not been the subject of many evaluation studies. This is perhaps due to the fact that the visualization process integrates the Human Visual and Cognitive Systems, which makes evaluation especially difficult. However, as in medical imaging, the question of quality evaluation of a specific visualization remains a main challenge. While a few studies concerning specific cases have already been published, there is still a great need for definition and systemization of evaluation methodologies. The goal of our study is to propose such a framework, which makes it possible to take into account all the parameters taking part in the evaluation of a visualization technique. Concerning the problem of quality evaluation in data visualization in general, and in medical data visualization in particular, three different concepts appear to be fundamental: the type and level of components used to convey to the user the information contained in the data, the type and level at which evaluation can be performed, and the methodologies used to perform such evaluation. We propose a taxonomy involving types of methods that can be used to perform evaluation at different levels.

  15. Quantitative evaluation of CBM reservoir fracturing quality using logging data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Xiaoyan

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents a method for the quantitative evaluation of fracturing quality of coalbed methane (CBM) reservoirs using logging data, which will help optimize the reservoir fracturing layer. First, to make full use of logging and laboratory analysis data of coal cores, a method to determine the brittleness index of CBM reservoirs is deduced using coal industrial components. Second, this paper briefly introduces methodology to compute the horizontal principal stress difference coefficient of coal seams and the minimum horizontal principal stress difference of coal seams and roof and floor. Third, an evaluation model for the coal structure index is established using logging data, which fully considers the fracturing quality of CBM reservoirs affected by the coal structure. Fourth, the development degree of the coal reservoir is evaluated. The evaluation standard for fracturing quality of CBM reservoirs based on these five evaluation parameters is used for quantitative evaluation. The results show that the combination of methods proposed in this paper are effective. The results are consistent with the fracturing dynamic drainage. The coal seam with large brittleness index, large stress difference between the coal seam and roof and floor, small stress difference coefficient and high coal structure index has a strong fracturing quality.

  16. Water quality evaluation of Al-Gharraf river by two water quality indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ewaid, Salam Hussein

    2016-12-01

    Water quality of Al-Gharraf river, the largest branch of Tigris River south of Iraq, was evaluated by the National Sanitation Foundation Water Quality Index (NFS WQI) and the Heavy Metal Pollution Index (HPI) depending on 13 physical, chemical, and biological parameters of water quality measured monthly at ten stations on the river during 2015. The NSF-WQI range obtained for the sampling sites was 61-70 indicating a medium water quality. The HPI value was 98.6 slightly below the critical value for drinking water of 100, and the water quality in the upstream stations is better than downstream due to decrease in water and the accumulation of contaminants along the river. This study explains the significance of applying the water quality indices that show the aggregate impact of ecological factors in charge of water pollution of surface water and which permits translation of the monitoring data to assist the decision makers.

  17. Reliability of antagonistic arch impression in dental prostheses: clinical evaluation of different preimpression preparation procedures.

    PubMed

    Scotti, R; Lugli, M; D'Elia, A

    1995-08-01

    This study compared the influence of different methods of preimpression preparation on the quality of occlusal reproduction in irreversible hydrocolloid impressions. A total of 30 impressions of the lower dental arch of a patient were made with five different preimpression preparation procedures. Stone casts were made and analyzed. Critical comparison showed that the preimpression preparation influenced the quality of the occlusal surface of the cast. Fingerpainting the occlusal surface with fluid hydrocolloid before positioning the loaded impression tray, associated with use of a saliva ejector, reduced the incidence of macroscopic defects on the occlusal surface of the impressions.

  18. An evaluation of a time-saving anaesthetic machine checkout procedure.

    PubMed

    Berge, J A; Gramstad, L; Grimnes, S

    1994-11-01

    Although it is generally acknowledged that a pre-use checkout of the anaesthetic machine significantly improves patient safety, an evaluation of such procedures is uncommon. Previous studies have shown that anaesthetic personnel using different check routines are unable to detect the majority of pre-set technical malfunctions. We have shown that it is possible to develop an effective and time-saving check procedure by integrating seven simple steps into one continuous flow procedure, where the settings and results of one step are used in the following step to optimize step interaction. The method is a 'core' procedure adapted to machines sold after 1980 according to the current ISO standard (presently undergoing revision). A user inquiry demonstrated that this pre-use check has been easily adopted in departments of anaesthesia. Moreover, the inquiry showed that most departments would not accept a checkout procedure which required more than 5-6 min. A study on nurse anaesthetists performing this procedure in the operating suite showed an average checking time of approximately 3 min. A performance test was undertaken by activating four different malfunctions in an anaesthetic machine training simulator. Twelve of 17 nurse anaesthetists rapidly identified all faults, whereas five nurses missed one or two faults. Our study suggests that our check procedure (the seven point check) provides a time-saving method for effective pre-use control of the anaesthetic machine.

  19. Metrics for the Evaluation the Utility of Air Quality Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumo, T. M.; Stockwell, W. R.

    2013-12-01

    Global warming is expected to lead to higher levels of air pollution and therefore the forecasting of both long-term and daily air quality is an important component for the assessment of the costs of climate change and its impact on human health. Some of the risks associated with poor air quality days (where the Air Pollution Index is greater than 100), include hospital visits and mortality. Accurate air quality forecasting has the potential to allow sensitive groups to take appropriate precautions. This research builds metrics for evaluating the utility of air quality forecasting in terms of its potential impacts. Our analysis of air quality models focuses on the Washington, DC/Baltimore, MD region over the summertime ozone seasons between 2010 and 2012. The metrics that are relevant to our analysis include: (1) The number of times that a high ozone or particulate matter (PM) episode is correctly forecasted, (2) the number of times that high ozone or PM episode is forecasted when it does not occur and (3) the number of times when the air quality forecast predicts a cleaner air episode when the air was observed to have high ozone or PM. Our evaluation of the performance of air quality forecasts include those forecasts of ozone and particulate matter and data available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)'s AIRNOW. We also examined observational ozone and particulate matter data available from Clean Air Partners. Overall the forecast models perform well for our region and time interval.

  20. Integrating Program Theory and Systems-Based Procedures in Program Evaluation: A Dynamic Approach to Evaluate Educational Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grammatikopoulos, Vasilis

    2012-01-01

    The current study attempts to integrate parts of program theory and systems-based procedures in educational program evaluation. The educational program that was implemented, called the "Early Steps" project, proposed that physical education can contribute to various educational goals apart from the usual motor skills improvement. Basic…

  1. On Quality Control Procedures Being Adopted for TRMM LBA and KWAJEX Soundings Data Sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, B.; Halverson, Jeffrey B.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    During NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) field campaigns Large Scale Biosphere Atmosphere (LBA) held in Amazonia (Brazil) in the period January- February, 1999, and the Kwajalein Experiment (KWAJEX) held in the Republic of Marshall Islands in the period between August-September, 1999, extensive radiosonde observations (raob) were collected using VIZ and Vaisala sondes which have different response characteristics. In all, 320 raob for LBA and 972 fixed raob for KWAJEX have been obtained and are being processed. Most atmospheric sensible heat source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) budget studies are based on sounding data, and the accuracy of the raob is important especially in regions of deep moist convection. A data quality control (QC) project has been initiated at GSFC by the principal investigator (JBH), and this paper addresses some of the quantitative findings for the level I and II QC procedures. Based on these quantitative assessment of sensor (or system) biases associated with each type of sonde, the initial data repair work will be started. Evidence of moisture biases between the two different sondes (VIZ and Vaisala) has been shown earlier by Halverson et al. (2000). Vaisala humidity sensors are found to have a low-level dry bias in the boundary layer, whereas above 600 mb the VIZ sensor tends to register a dryer atmosphere. All raob data were subjected to a limit check based on an algorithm already well tested for the raob data obtained during the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA-COARE).

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

    1999-01-01

    Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

  3. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-07

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  4. A semi-automated tool for treatment plan-quality evaluation and clinical trial quality assurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiazhou; Chen, Wenzhou; Studenski, Matthew; Cui, Yunfeng; Lee, Andrew J.; Xiao, Ying

    2013-07-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a plan-quality evaluation program for clinical routine and multi-institutional clinical trials so that the overall evaluation efficiency is improved. In multi-institutional clinical trials evaluating the plan quality is a time-consuming and labor-intensive process. In this note, we present a semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program which combines MIMVista, Java/MATLAB, and extensible markup language (XML). More specifically, MIMVista is used for data visualization; Java and its powerful function library are implemented for calculating dosimetry parameters; and to improve the clarity of the index definitions, XML is applied. The accuracy and the efficiency of the program were evaluated by comparing the results of the program with the manually recorded results in two RTOG trials. A slight difference of about 0.2% in volume or 0.6 Gy in dose between the semi-automated program and manual recording was observed. According to the criteria of indices, there are minimal differences between the two methods. The evaluation time is reduced from 10-20 min to 2 min by applying the semi-automated plan-quality evaluation program.

  5. An Evaluation of the Cloze Procedure as a Test for Plagiarism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standing, Lionel; Gorassini, Donald

    1986-01-01

    Reports the results of two experiments which evaluated the effectiveness of the cloze test as a method for detecting plagiarism. In both studies, the cloze performance of students was significantly better in nonplagiarizing than plagiarizing situations. Concludes that when used with caution, the cloze procedure appears to be potentially helpful in…

  6. Evaluation of a Deductive Procedure to Teach Grammatical Inflections to Children with Language Impairment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Finestack, Lizbeth H.; Fey, Marc E.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the learning effects of a deductive language-teaching procedure when teaching a novel gender agreement verb inflection to children with language impairment. Method: Thirty-two 6-8-year-old children with language impairment were randomly assigned to either a deductive (N = 16) or an inductive (N = 16) treatment group. In the…

  7. A Functional-Analytic Model of Analogy Using the Relational Evaluation Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Ian; Barnes-Holmes, Dermot; Roche, Bryan

    2004-01-01

    Analogical reasoning is conceptualized by Relational Frame Theory as responding in accordance with an equivalence relation between equivalence or other types of derived stimulus relations. The purpose of this study was to provide an empirical demonstration of analogy using the Relational Evaluation Procedure (REP), a recently developed technique…

  8. Evaluation of the Cloze Procedure as a Teaching Device for Improving Reading Comprehension.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellington, Billie Jean

    This study evaluated the effect of the cloze procedure in the development of comprehension, vocabulary, and speed of reading by comparing the scores on the Cooperative English Tests; Reading Comprehension of a group receiving cloze reading comprehension exercises, a group receiving conventional reading comprehension exercises, and a group…

  9. A National Survey of Faculty Development Evaluation Outcome Measures and Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Murrell, Vicki S.

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national study of 39 higher education institutions that collected information about their evaluation procedures and outcome measures for faculty development for online teaching conducted during 2011-2012. The survey results found that over 90% of institutions used measures of the faculty person's…

  10. EVALUATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES FOR NEAR-COASTAL AREAS OF THE GULF OF MEXICO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lewis, Michael A. In press. Evaluation of Environmental Hazard Assessment Procedures for Near-Coastal Areas of the Gulf of Mexico (Abstract). To be presented at the Annual Meeting of the the Australasian Society of Ecotoxicology, July 2004, Gold Coast, Australia. 1 p. (ERL,GB R98...

  11. Program Evaluation Project Report, 1969-1973. Chapter One: Basic Goal Attainment Scaling Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kiresuk, Thomas J.; Garwick, Geoffrey

    The P.E.P. Report 1969-1973 focuses on the various findings and activities of the Program Evaluation Project. This chapter of the report discusses the basic goal attainment scaling procedures. Goal attainment scaling is a methodology for developing personalized, multivariable, scaled descriptions which can be used for either therapy…

  12. [A quality evaluation tableau for health institutions: an educational tool].

    PubMed

    Moll, Marie Christine; Decavel, Frédérique; Merlet, Christine

    2009-09-01

    For a few years, health institutions have had to comply with the certification and the need to establish the new governance. Thanks to the accreditation version 2 (obtained in 2005), the elaboration of the hospital project (adopted in October, 2006) and the organization in poles since 2006, the quality oriented management became a priority axis at the University Hospital of Angers. The strategic adaptation to quality requirements leads to develop the hospital management, more especially at the level of the clinical, medico technical and administrative poles. The elements of the hospital project including the part about the quality, risk and evaluation aim at being adapted by every pole according to the level of its project. This adaptation which is imposed to each pole manager requires a practical and educational accompaniment allowing at the same time to realize a diagnosis of the progress of the quality approach, a measure of the impact of the global impregnation within the institution and a comparison between pole. A eight axis dashboard with criteria and a user guide were developed from certification ISO 9001, the EFQM manual and the certification manual version 2 of the Healthcare High Authorities. The criteria are transcribed in an EXCEL grid ready to use. Succeeding in estimating your own quality system means that you demonstrate the maturity of the quality approach. The results of this evaluation confirmed those of the certification. The dashboard is a management structuring tool at the service of the multidisciplinary team. Two considerations emerge from these results: First of all, for the hospital top management, the axes to be improved emerge as a priority to determine and target the next annual action plans. The results also allow to support the auto evaluation for the certification version 2010 planned in January of the same year. It is a pragmatic tool which allows auto evaluation and comparison to estimate the pole performances. It is a strategic

  13. An NCME Instructional Module on Quality Control Procedures in the Scoring, Equating, and Reporting of Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allalouf, Avi

    2007-01-01

    There is significant potential for error in long production processes that consist of sequential stages, each of which is heavily dependent on the previous stage, such as the SER (Scoring, Equating, and Reporting) process. Quality control procedures are required in order to monitor this process and to reduce the number of mistakes to a minimum. In…

  14. Impact Evaluation from Quality Assurance Agencies' Perspectives: Methodological Approaches, Experiences and Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kajaste, Matti; Prades, Anna; Scheuthle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Starting from the main objective of external quality assurance (EQA) procedures to assure and improve the quality of higher education institutions and its provisions, the paper examines expected impacts of EQA procedures on institutions from the perspectives of three European quality assurance agencies. First, the paper examines the expected…

  15. Application of a 3D volumetric display for radiation therapy treatment planning I: quality assurance procedures.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xing; Kirk, Michael Collins; Napoli, Josh; Stutsman, Sandy; Zusag, Tom; Khelashvili, Gocha; Chu, James

    2009-07-17

    To design and implement a set of quality assurance tests for an innovative 3D volumetric display for radiation treatment planning applications. A genuine 3D display (Perspecta Spatial 3D, Actuality-Systems Inc., Bedford, MA) has been integrated with the Pinnacle TPS (Philips Medical Systems, Madison WI), for treatment planning. The Perspecta 3D display renders a 25 cm diameter volume that is viewable from any side, floating within a translucent dome. In addition to displaying all 3D data exported from Pinnacle, the system provides a 3D mouse to define beam angles and apertures and to measure distance. The focus of this work is the design and implementation of a quality assurance program for 3D displays and specific 3D planning issues as guided by AAPM Task Group Report 53. A series of acceptance and quality assurance tests have been designed to evaluate the accuracy of CT images, contours, beams, and dose distributions as displayed on Perspecta. Three-dimensional matrices, rulers and phantoms with known spatial dimensions were used to check Perspecta's absolute spatial accuracy. In addition, a system of tests was designed to confirm Perspecta's ability to import and display Pinnacle data consistently. CT scans of phantoms were used to confirm beam field size, divergence, and gantry and couch angular accuracy as displayed on Perspecta. Beam angles were verified through Cartesian coordinate system measurements and by CT scans of phantoms rotated at known angles. Beams designed on Perspecta were exported to Pinnacle and checked for accuracy. Dose at sampled points were checked for consistency with Pinnacle and agreed within 1% or 1 mm. All data exported from Pinnacle to Perspecta was displayed consistently. The 3D spatial display of images, contours, and dose distributions were consistent with Pinnacle display. When measured by the 3D ruler, the distances between any two points calculated using Perspecta agreed with Pinnacle within the measurement error.

  16. Information Quality Evaluation of C2 Systems at Architecture Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    significantly impacts the information quality of C2 system and improve the architecture designs. The rest of paper is organized as follow: Section 2 ...Simulation simulate the described architecture under specific scenarios Evaluation evaluate the IQ of the C2 system based on simulation results Analysis ...their 12 interactions SV- 2 5 systems and their 4 communications 4 systems and their 3 communications SV-4 27 functions 24 functions SV-5 39

  17. Quality assurance procedures for environmental control and monitoring in plant growth facilities. Report of the North Central Regional 101 Committee on Growth Chamber Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, T. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1986-01-01

    This report includes procedures for ensuring the quality of the environment provided for plant growth in controlled environment facilities. Biologists and engineers may use these procedures for ensuring quality control during experiments or for ensuring quality control in the design of plant growth facilities. Environmental monitoring prior to and during experiments is included in these procedures. Specific recommendations cover control, acquisition, and calibration for sensor types for the separate parameters of radiation (light), temperature, humidity, carbon dioxide, and air movement.

  18. Medical Operations Console Procedure Evaluation: BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Troop; Pettys, Marianne; Hurst, Victor, IV; Smaka, Todd; Paul, Bonnie; Rosenquist, Kevin; Gast, Karin; Gillis, David; McCulley, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    International Space Station (ISS) Mission Operations are managed by multiple flight control disciplines located at the lead Mission Control Center (MCC) at NASA-Johnson Space Center (JSC). ISS Medical Operations are supported by the complementary roles of Flight Surgeons (Surgeon) and Biomedical Engineer (BME) flight controllers. The Surgeon, a board certified physician, oversees all medical concerns of the crew and the BME provides operational and engineering support for Medical Operations Crew Health Care System. ISS Medical Operations is currently addressing the coordinated response to a crew call down for an emergent medical event, in particular when the BME is the only Medical Operations representative in MCC. In this case, the console procedure BME Response to Crew Call Down for an Emergency will be used. The procedure instructs the BME to contact a Surgeon as soon as possible, coordinate with other flight disciplines to establish a Private Medical Conference (PMC) for the crew and Surgeon, gather information from the crew if time permits, and provide Surgeon with pertinent console resources. It is paramount that this procedure is clearly written and easily navigated to assist the BME to respond consistently and efficiently. A total of five BME flight controllers participated in the study. Each BME participant sat in a simulated MCC environment at a console configured with resources specific to the BME MCC console and was presented with two scripted emergency call downs from an ISS crew member. Each participant used the procedure while interacting with analog MCC disciplines to respond to the crew call down. Audio and video recordings of the simulations were analyzed and each BME participant's actions were compared to the procedure. Structured debriefs were conducted at the conclusion of both simulations. The procedure was evaluated for its ability to elicit consistent responses from each BME participant. Trials were examined for deviations in procedure task

  19. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... effective and efficient manner, are complying with Federal evaluation and reporting requirements,...

  20. A simplified LBB evaluation procedure for austenitic and ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Gamble, R.M.; Wichman, K.R.

    1997-04-01

    The NRC previously has approved application of LBB analysis as a means to demonstrate that the probability of pipe rupture was extremely low so that dynamic loads associated with postulated pipe break could be excluded from the design basis (1). The purpose of this work was to: (1) define simplified procedures that can be used by the NRC to compute allowable lengths for circumferential throughwall cracks and assess margin against pipe fracture, and (2) verify the accuracy of the simplified procedures by comparison with available experimental data for piping having circumferential throughwall flaws. The development of the procedures was performed using techniques similar to those employed to develop ASME Code flaw evaluation procedures. The procedures described in this report are applicable to pipe and pipe fittings with: (1) wrought austenitic steel (Ni-Cr-Fe alloy) having a specified minimum yield strength less than 45 ksi, and gas metal-arc, submerged arc and shielded metal-arc austentic welds, and (2) seamless or welded wrought carbon steel having a minimum yield strength not greater than 40 ksi, and associated weld materials. The procedures can be used for cast austenitic steel when adequate information is available to place the cast material toughness into one of the categories identified later in this report for austenitic wrought and weld materials.

  1. Application and Evaluation of an Expert Judgment Elicitation Procedure for Correlations

    PubMed Central

    Zondervan-Zwijnenburg, Mariëlle; van de Schoot-Hubeek, Wenneke; Lek, Kimberley; Hoijtink, Herbert; van de Schoot, Rens

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to apply and evaluate a procedure to elicit expert judgments about correlations, and to update this information with empirical data. The result is a face-to-face group elicitation procedure with as its central element a trial roulette question that elicits experts' judgments expressed as distributions. During the elicitation procedure, a concordance probability question was used to provide feedback to the experts on their judgments. We evaluated the elicitation procedure in terms of validity and reliability by means of an application with a small sample of experts. Validity means that the elicited distributions accurately represent the experts' judgments. Reliability concerns the consistency of the elicited judgments over time. Four behavioral scientists provided their judgments with respect to the correlation between cognitive potential and academic performance for two separate populations enrolled at a specific school in the Netherlands that provides special education to youth with severe behavioral problems: youth with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), and youth with diagnoses other than ASD. Measures of face-validity, feasibility, convergent validity, coherence, and intra-rater reliability showed promising results. Furthermore, the current study illustrates the use of the elicitation procedure and elicited distributions in a social science application. The elicited distributions were used as a prior for the correlation, and updated with data for both populations collected at the school of interest. The current study shows that the newly developed elicitation procedure combining the trial roulette method with the elicitation of correlations is a promising tool, and that the results of the procedure are useful as prior information in a Bayesian analysis. PMID:28197115

  2. Study of the selection of indicator parameters in marine water quality evaluation and the evaluation methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Pan, Delu; Wang, Difeng; Fu, Dongyang

    2014-10-01

    In order to obtain the indicator types which must be introduced in marine water quality evaluation as well as the suitable evaluation methodology, GB3097-1997 National Marine Water Quality Standards is, in the first place, analyzed to establish a hypothetical sample which is consisting of 2000 stances, each stance containing the information of 21 indicators. And then a stepwise discriminant method is utilized to filter the 21 indicators in accordance with their water quality classification discriminant abilities. And finally, 6 indicators with significant discriminant ability, biochemical oxygen demand(BOD5), oil type(Oil), total phosphorus(P), cadmium(Cd), cyanide(HH) and chemical oxygen demand(COD), are selected and the water quality evaluation chart of the corresponding six indicators is also established. Theoretically, the water quality indicator types and the suitable evaluation methodology, which must be introduced when the water quality evaluation is done in all the waters under the jurisdiction of China, are discussed in this paper, providing theoretical basis for the subsequent marine water quality evaluation based on field observation.

  3. Techniques to evaluate the quality of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Diaz, Marlen

    2014-11-01

    There is not a perfect agree in the definition of medical image quality from the physician and physicist point of view. The present conference analyzes the standard techniques used to grade image quality. In the first place, an analysis about how viewing conditions related to environment, monitor used or physician experience determines the subjective evaluation is done. After that, the physics point of view is analyzed including the advantage and disadvantage of the main published methods like: Quality Control Tests, Mathematical metrics, Modulation Transfer Function, Noise Power Spectrum, System Response Curve and Mathematical observers. Each method is exemplified with the results of updated papers. We concluded that the most successful methods up to the present have been those which include simulations of the Human Visual System. They have good correlation between the results of the objective metrics and the subjective evaluation made by the observers.

  4. EPA Research Evaluating CAFO Impacts on Ground Water Quality

    EPA Science Inventory

    An overview of several projects will be presented on a research program currently underway at ORD’s Ground Water and Ecosystems Restoration Division (GWERD) to evaluate CAFO impacts on ground water quality. The overall research objectives are to characterize the potential for gro...

  5. Sensory and quality evaluation of selected citrus hybrids

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasingly consumers are becoming more sophisticated in their demand for diversity of products, greater health potential and good eating quality. The evaluation of a population of mandarin citrus (Citrus reticulata) and mandarin hybrids, was initiated in 2006-2007 with the goal of establishing bas...

  6. Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces: OECD/CELE Pilot Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Ahlefeld, Hannah

    2009-01-01

    CELE's International Pilot Project on Evaluating Quality in Educational Spaces aims to assist education authorities, schools and others to maximise the use of and investment in learning environments. This article provides an update on the pilot project, which is currently being implemented in Brazil, Mexico, New Zealand, Portugal and the United…

  7. A General Framework for the Evaluation of Clinical Trial Quality

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Vance W.; Alperson, Sunny Y.

    2009-01-01

    Flawed evaluation of clinical trial quality allows flawed trials to thrive (get funded, obtain IRB approval, get published, serve as the basis of regulatory approval, and set policy). A reasonable evaluation of clinical trial quality must recognize that any one of a large number of potential biases could by itself completely invalidate the trial results. In addition, clever new ways to distort trial results toward a favored outcome may be devised at any time. Finally, the vested financial and other interests of those conducting the experiments and publishing the reports must cast suspicion on any inadequately reported aspect of clinical trial quality. Putting these ideas together, we see that an adequate evaluation of clinical quality would need to enumerate all known biases, update this list periodically, score the trial with regard to each potential bias on a scale of 0% to 100%, offer partial credit for only that which can be substantiated, and then multiply (not add) the component scores to obtain an overall score between 0% and 100%. We will demonstrate that current evaluations fall well short of these ideals. PMID:19463104

  8. Ensuring Data Quality in Extension Research and Evaluation Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radhakrishna, Rama; Tobin, Daniel; Brennan, Mark; Thomson, Joan

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a checklist as a guide for Extension professionals to use in research and evaluation studies they carry out. A total of 40 statements grouped under eight data quality components--relevance, objectivity, validity, reliability, integrity, generalizability, completeness, and utility--are identified to ensure that research…

  9. Student Evaluations of Teaching: Improving Teaching Quality in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammonds, Frank; Mariano, Gina J.; Ammons, Gracie; Chambers, Sheridan

    2017-01-01

    Student evaluations of teaching (SET) are widely used in both North America and the UK as a means of documenting and improving teaching quality. This article discusses current research on SET administration and interpretation in both regions. Sections of the article are dedicated to various problems associated with SETs and how these may be…

  10. Evaluating and Enhancing Outcomes Assessment Quality in Higher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kenneth; Goodwin, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Accreditation is a mark of distinction indicating that an institution has met high standards set by the profession, and an increasingly important feature of the accreditation process in higher education is "outcomes assessment." This article presents two rubrics for evaluating the quality of an institution's outcomes assessment system. One rubric…

  11. Evaluating Service Quality in Universities: A Service Department Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Gareth; Smith, Alison; Clarke, Alison

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to report on an in-depth exploration of service quality in an Information Technology service department in a Higher Education Institute (HEI) and to evaluate the instrument used. Design/methodology/approach: The study surveys customers using the SERVQUAL instrument, which is one of the most widely used and…

  12. Evaluating Quality in Associate Degree Culinary Arts Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertzman, Jean; Ackerman, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine which categories and indicators of quality are best suited to evaluating associate degree culinary arts programs (ADCAP). Design/methodology/approach: The researchers surveyed a national sample of culinary educators and industry chefs in the USA. The instrument asked the participants to rate the…

  13. [Building a quality evaluation system for the nursing triage process].

    PubMed

    Gadda, Giorgio; Destrebecq, Anne; Bollini, Giovanna; Terzoni, Stefano

    2009-01-01

    In literature there are no studies regarding the quality evaluation of the whole triage process; however, since it is necessary to evaluate what really happens everyday in the Emergency Rooms, as well as verifying the daily level of throughput, there is a strong need for an appropriate tool. Measuring the quality of triage means improving the caring process. This article presents a new measurement grid, aimed at realizing a Quality Evaluation of Nursing Care. Currently, the most widespread systems used for the QENC are the Australian Triage Scale, the Canadian triage and Acuity Scale and the Italian Group of Triage Scale. The global/biphasic triage system was used in our study because it seems the most accurate, according to literature. There are several indicators that evaluate many aspects of the triage process; every single indicator has a score. The sum of the scores defines the quality level of the nursing triage process. Our paper discusses the application of this score in a major Milan hospital, based upon a preliminary study.

  14. Airborne Ultrasonics for Nondestructive Evaluation of Leather Quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Our recent research has shown that besides Acoustic Emission (AE), Airborne Ultrasonics (AU) can also be applied for the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of leather quality. Implementation of these methods in the manufacturing process could save a considerable amount of money, decrease the use of ch...

  15. Evaluation of quality of life related to nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Wanden-Berghe, Carmina; Sanz-Valero, Javier; Escribà-Agüir, Vicenta; Castelló-Botia, Isabel; Guardiola-Wanden-Berghe, Rocio

    2009-04-01

    The way in which the quality of life related to health (HRQoL) is affected by the nutritional status of the patient is a subject of constant interest and permanent debate. The purpose of the present paper is to review those studies that relate HRQoL to nutritional status and examine the tools (questionnaires) that they use to investigate this relationship. A critical review of published studies was carried out via an investigation of the following databases: MEDLINE (via PubMed); EMBASE; The Cochrane Library; Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL); Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) Web of Science; Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature (LILACS); Spanish Health Sciences Bibliographic Index (IBECS). The search was carried out from the earliest date possible until July 2007.The medical subject heading terms used were 'quality of life', 'nutritional status' and 'questionnaires'. The articles had to contain at least one questionnaire that evaluated quality of life. Twenty-eight documents fulfilling the inclusion criteria were accepted, although none of them used a specific questionnaire to evaluate HRQoL related to nutritional status. However, some of them used a combination of generic questionnaires with the intention of evaluating the same. Only three studies selectively addressed the relationship between nutritional status and quality of life, this evaluation being performed not by means of specific questionnaires but by statistical analysis of data obtained via validated questionnaires.

  16. Evaluation of regional climate simulations for air quality modelling purposes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menut, Laurent; Tripathi, Om P.; Colette, Augustin; Vautard, Robert; Flaounas, Emmanouil; Bessagnet, Bertrand

    2013-05-01

    In order to evaluate the future potential benefits of emission regulation on regional air quality, while taking into account the effects of climate change, off-line air quality projection simulations are driven using weather forcing taken from regional climate models. These regional models are themselves driven by simulations carried out using global climate models (GCM) and economical scenarios. Uncertainties and biases in climate models introduce an additional "climate modeling" source of uncertainty that is to be added to all other types of uncertainties in air quality modeling for policy evaluation. In this article we evaluate the changes in air quality-related weather variables induced by replacing reanalyses-forced by GCM-forced regional climate simulations. As an example we use GCM simulations carried out in the framework of the ERA-interim programme and of the CMIP5 project using the Institut Pierre-Simon Laplace climate model (IPSLcm), driving regional simulations performed in the framework of the EURO-CORDEX programme. In summer, we found compensating deficiencies acting on photochemistry: an overestimation by GCM-driven weather due to a positive bias in short-wave radiation, a negative bias in wind speed, too many stagnant episodes, and a negative temperature bias. In winter, air quality is mostly driven by dispersion, and we could not identify significant differences in either wind or planetary boundary layer height statistics between GCM-driven and reanalyses-driven regional simulations. However, precipitation appears largely overestimated in GCM-driven simulations, which could significantly affect the simulation of aerosol concentrations. The identification of these biases will help interpreting results of future air quality simulations using these data. Despite these, we conclude that the identified differences should not lead to major difficulties in using GCM-driven regional climate simulations for air quality projections.

  17. Exploring in integrated quality evaluation of Chinese herbal medicines: the integrated quality index (IQI) for aconite.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding-kun; Wang, Jia-bo; Yang, Ming; Peng, Cheng; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2015-07-01

    Good medicinal herbs, good drugs. Good evaluation method and indices are the prerequisite of good medicinal herbs. However, there exist numerous indices for quality evaluation and control in Chinese medicinal materials. However, most of these indices are non-interrelated each other, as well as having little relationship with efficiency and safety. The results of different evaluatior methods may not be consistent, even contradictory. Considering the complex material properties of Chinese medicinal materials, single method and index is difficult to objectively and comprehensively reflect the quality. Therefore, it is essential to explore the integrated evaluation methods. In this paper, oriented by the integrated evaluation strategies for traditional Chinese medicine quality, a new method called integrated quality index (IQI) by the integration of empirical evaluation, chemical evaluation, and biological evaluation was proposed. In addition, a study case of hypertoxic herb Aconitum carmichaelii Debx. was provided to explain this method in detail. The results suggested that in the view of specifications, the average weight of Jiangyou aconite was the greatest, followed by Weishan aconite, Butuo aconite, Hanzhong aconite, and Anxian aconite; from the point of chemical components, Jiangyou aconite had the characteristic with strong efficacy and weak toxicity, next was Hanzhong aconite, Butuo aconite, Weishan aconite, and Anxian aconite; taking toxicity price as the index, Hanzhong aconite and Jiangyou aconite have the lower toxicity, while Butuo aconite, Weishan aconite, and Anxian aconite have the relatively higher one. After the normalization and integration of evaluation results, we calculated the IQI value of Jiangyou aconite, Hanzhong aconite, Butuo aconite, Weishan aconite, and Anxian aconite were 0.842 +/- 0.091, 0.597 +/- 0.047, 0.442 +/- 0.033, 0.454 +/- 0.038, 0.170 +/- 0.021, respectively. The quality of Jiangyou aconite is significantly better than the

  18. Quality control of superficial hyperthermia by treatment evaluation.

    PubMed

    de Bruijne, Maarten; Van der Zee, Jacoba; Ameziane, Ali; Van Rhoon, Gerard C

    2011-01-01

    Steering of multi-element heating arrays for superficial hyperthermia (SHT) can be a challenge in the clinic. This is because the technician has to deal with a multiple-input multiple-output system, varying tissue dynamics, and often sparse tissue temperature data. In addition, patient feedback needs to be taken into account. Effective management of the steering task determines the quality of heating. Systematic evaluation is an effective tool to control the quality of treatments. The purpose of this manuscript is to report on a treatment evaluation flow developed for SHT at the Erasmus MC. This flow is used to secure the quality of steering as well as to stimulate general quality awareness in the hyperthermia team. All treatments are evaluated in a multidisciplinary discussion. Tools and methods were developed to enable effective and efficient evaluations. The treatment evaluation sheet is a compact and intuitive representation of power and temperature data. Trend lines and a temperature-depth plot allow a quick analysis of the steering parameters and the heating profile within the target volume. In addition, the principal statistics of applicator power, water bolus and tissue temperature values are given. Power steering data includes the number of switch-off events, interruption time and the number of steering actions. A list of basic checks and reference values for clinical data support further the treatment evaluation. These tools and the systematic treatment evaluations they facilitate, ultimately lead to consistent performance and fine tuning of the set-up and steering strategy for each individual patient.

  19. Commissioning and quality assurance procedures for the HDR Valencia skin applicators

    PubMed Central

    Granero, Domingo; Candela-Juan, Cristian; Ballester, Facundo; Ouhib, Zoubir; Vijande, Javier; Richart, Jose

    2016-01-01

    The Valencia applicators (Nucletron, an Elekta company, Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) are cup-shaped tungsten applicators with a flattening filter used to collimate the radiation produced by a high-dose-rate (HDR) 192Ir source, and provide a homogeneous absorbed dose at a given depth. This beam quality provides a good option for the treatment of skin lesions at shallow depth (3-4 mm). The user must perform commissioning and periodic testing of these applicators to guarantee the proper and safe delivery of the intended absorbed dose, as recommended in the standards in radiation oncology. In this study, based on AAPM and GEC-ESTRO guidelines for brachytherapy units and our experience, a set of tests for the commissioning and periodic testing of the Valencia applicators is proposed. These include general considerations, verification of the manufacturer documentation and physical integrity, evaluation of the source-to-indexer distance and reproducibility, setting the library plan in the treatment planning system, evaluation of flatness and symmetry, absolute output and percentage depth dose verification, independent calculation of the treatment time, and visual inspection of the applicator before each treatment. For each test, the proposed methodology, equipment, frequency, expected results, and tolerance levels (when applicable) are provided. PMID:27895687

  20. Computational procedures for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of vibration frequencies and Eigenmodes of framed structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fetterman, Timothy L.; Noor, Ahmed K.

    1987-01-01

    Computational procedures are presented for evaluating the sensitivity derivatives of the vibration frequencies and eigenmodes of framed structures. Both a displacement and a mixed formulation are used. The two key elements of the computational procedure are: (a) Use of dynamic reduction techniques to substantially reduce the number of degrees of freedom; and (b) Application of iterative techniques to improve the accuracy of the derivatives of the eigenmodes. The two reduction techniques considered are the static condensation and a generalized dynamic reduction technique. Error norms are introduced to assess the accuracy of the eigenvalue and eigenvector derivatives obtained by the reduction techniques. The effectiveness of the methods presented is demonstrated by three numerical examples.

  1. A Comparative Evaluation of Two Extraction Procedures: The TCLP and the EP

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-10-01

    TECHNICAL REPORT EL-92-33 A COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF TWO EXTRACTION PROCEDURES: THE TCLP AND THE EP AD-A259 346 by R. Mark Bricka , Teresa T. Holmes...Extraction Procedures: Interagency Agreement The TCLP and the EP No. DA930146-01-05 6. AUTHOR(S) R. Mark Bricka , Teresa T. Holmes, M. John Cullinane 7...Mr. David Friedman of the EPA Office of Solid Waste. The report was prepared by Mr. R. Mark Bricka , Ms. Teresa T. Holmes, and Dr. M. John Cullinane of

  2. Standard Evaluation Procedures (SEPs) and Data Entry Spreadsheet Templates (DESTs) for Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) Tier 1 Assays

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page provides information and access to Standard Evaluation Procedures (SEPs) and Data Entry Spreadsheet Templates (DESTs) developed by EPA's Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (OCSPP).

  3. Clinically evaluated procedure for the reconstruction of vocal fold vibrations from endoscopic digital high-speed videos.

    PubMed

    Lohscheller, Jörg; Toy, Hikmet; Rosanowski, Frank; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Döllinger, Michael

    2007-08-01

    Investigation of voice disorders requires the examination of vocal fold vibrations. State of the art is the recording of endoscopic high-speed movies which capture vocal fold vibrations in real-time. It enables investigating the interrelation between disturbances of vocal fold vibrations and voice disorders. However, the lack of clinical studies and of a standardized procedure to reconstruct vocal fold vibrations from high-speed videos constrain the clinical acceptance of the high-speed technique. An image processing approach is presented that extracts the vibrating vocal fold edges from digital high-speed movies. The initial segmentation is principally based on a seeded region-growing algorithm. Even in movies with low image quality the algorithm segments successfully the glottal area by an introduced two-dimensional threshold matrix. Following segmentation, the vocal fold edges are reconstructed from the computed time-varying glottal area. The performance of the procedure was objectively evaluated within a study comprising 372 high-speed recordings. The accuracy of vocal fold reconstruction exceeds manual segmentation results obtained by clinical experts. The algorithm reaches an information flow-rate of up to 98 images per second. The robustness and high accuracy of the procedure makes it suitable for the application in clinical routine. It enables an objective and highly accurate description of vocal fold vibrations which is essential to realize extensive clinical studies which focus on the classification of voice disorders.

  4. Evaluation of quality in social care: aplus program.

    PubMed

    Dutrénit, Jean-Marc

    2005-10-01

    France is not advanced regarding evaluation in social work, despite a law established in January 2002 making evaluation a legal obligation every 5 years. This article presents a software program to help social services evaluate on both individual and group levels. Automatic dashboard results of the program with special emphasis on the main qualities social work would usually present reciprocity and social competence, client ability development, and social care treatment components. The last point is an automatic selection of most efficient treatment components of ability development.

  5. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-05-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 436-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  6. Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) Report for the Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project, Technical Report 2002.

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Darren

    2003-06-01

    The Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP), developed in 1980 by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS 1980a, USFWS 1980b), uses a habitat/species based approach to assessing project impacts, and is a convenient tool to document the predicted effects of proposed management actions. The Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) endorsed the use of HEP in its Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program to evaluate wildlife benefits and impacts associated with the development and operation of the federal Columbia River Basin hydroelectric system (NPPC 1994). The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group (AFIWG) used HEP in 1987 to evaluate wildlife habitat losses attributed to the Albeni Falls hydroelectric facility (Martin et al. 1988). In 1992, the AFIWG (Idaho Department of Fish and Game; Kalispel, Coeur d'Alene, and Kootenai Tribes) began implementing activities to mitigate these losses. Implementation activities include protecting, restoring and enhancing wildlife habitat. HEPs are used extensively within the NPPC's Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Wildlife managers use HEP to determine habitat lost from the construction of the federal hydroelectric projects and habitat gained through NPPC mitigation program. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) models for each of the seven target species are used to determine habitat quality and quantity losses for representative habitat cover types for this project. Target species include Bald Eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, muskrat, white-tailed deer and yellow warbler. In 2002, a HEP team determined the habitat condition of the 164-acre Pend Oreille Wetlands Wildlife II Project (Figure 1). The HEP team consisted of the following members and agencies: Roy Finley, Kalispel Natural Resource Department (KNRD); Neil Lockwood, KNRD; Brian Merson, KNRD; Sonny Finley, KNRD; Darren Holmes, KNRD; Anna, Washington Dept. of Fish and Game (WDFW); and Scott, WDFW. Baseline Habitat Units (HU) will be credited to

  7. Tools used for evaluation of Brazilian children's quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Souza, João Gabriel S.; Pamponet, Marcela Antunes; Souza, Tamirys Caroline S.; Pereira, Alessandra Ribeiro; Souza, Andrey George S.; Martins, Andréa Maria E. de B. L.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the available tools to evaluate children's quality of life validated for Brazilian language and culture. DATA SOURCES: Search of scientific articles in Medline, Lilacs and SciELO databases using the combination of descriptors "quality of life", "child" and "questionnaires" in Portuguese and English. DATA SYNTHESIS: Among the tools designed to assess children's quality of life validated for the Brazilian language and culture, the Auto questionnaire Qualité de Vie Enfant Imagé (AUQEI), the Child Health Questionnaire - Parent Form 50 (CHQ-PF50), the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL(tm)) version 4.0 and the Kidscreen-52 are highlighted. Some tools do not include all range of ages and some lack domains that are currently considered relevant in the context of childhood, such as bullying. Moreover, due to the cultural diversity of Brazil, it may be necessary to adapt some instruments or to validate other tools. CONCLUSIONS: There are validated instruments to evaluate children's quality of life in Brazil. However, the validation or the adaptation of other international tools have to be considered in order to overcome current deficiencies. PMID:25119761

  8. Evaluation of Hands-Free Devices for Space Habitat Maintenance Procedures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, R. B.; Twyford, E.; Conlee, C. S.; Litaker, H. L.; Solemn, J. A.; Holden

    2007-01-01

    Currently, International Space Station (ISS) crews use a laptop computer to display procedures for performing onboard maintenance tasks. This approach has been determined to be suboptimal. A heuristic evaluation and two studies have been completed to test commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) "near-eye" heads up displays (HUDs) for support of these types of maintenance tasks. In both studies, subjects worked through electronic procedures to perform simple maintenance tasks. As a result of the Phase I study, three HUDs were down-selected to one. In the Phase II study, the HUD was compared against two other electronic display devices - a laptop computer and an e-book reader. Results suggested that adjustability and stability of the HUD display were the most significant acceptability factors to consider for near-eye displays. The Phase II study uncovered a number of advantages and disadvantages of the HUD relative to the laptop and e-book reader for interacting with electronic procedures.

  9. Evaluating Library Buildings: Principles and Procedures for Post-Occupancy Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kusack, James M.

    This manual provides the steps in planning a post-occupancy evaluation of library facilities to determine how effective the designed environment is for users. Evaluating a building provides a feedback loop to the planning process and can help fine tune the building or help others. The first actions of the planners are to clarify the purpose; gain…

  10. Scientific evaluation and pricing of medical devices and associated procedures in France.

    PubMed

    Gilard, Martine; Debroucker, Frederique; Dubray, Claude; Allioux, Yves; Aper, Eliane; Barat-Leonhardt, Valérie; Brami, Michèle; Carbonneil, Cédric; Chartier-Kastler, Emmanuel; Coqueblin, Claire; Fare, Sandrine; Giri, Isabelle; Goehrs, Jean-Marie; Levesque, Karine; Maugendre, Philippe; Parquin, François; Sales, Jean-Patrick; Szwarcensztein, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Medical devices are many and various, ranging from tongue spatulas to implantable or invasive devices and imaging machines; their lifetimes are short, between 18 months and 5 years, due to incessant incremental innovation; and they are operator-dependent: in general, the clinical user performs a fitting procedure (hip implant or pacemaker), a therapeutic procedure using a non-implantable invasive device (arrhythmic site ablation probe, angioplasty balloon, extension spondyloplasty system, etc.) or follow-up of an active implanted device (long-term follow-up of an implanted cardiac defibrillator or of a deep brain stimulator in Parkinson's patients). A round-table held during the XXVIII(th) Giens Workshops meeting focused on the methodology of scientific evaluation of medical devices and the associated procedures with a view to their pricing and financing by the French National Health Insurance system. The working hypothesis was that the available data-set was sufficient for and compatible with scientific evaluation with clinical benefit. Post-registration studies, although contributing to the continuity of assessment, were not dealt with. Moreover, the focus was restricted to devices used in health establishments, where the association between devices and technical medical procedures is optimally representative. An update of the multiple regulatory protocols governing medical devices and procedures is provided. Issues more specifically related to procedures as such, to non-implantable devices and to innovative devices are then dealt with, and the proposals and discussion points raised at the round-table for each of these three areas are presented.

  11. Are image quality metrics adequate to evaluate the quality of geometric objects?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogowitz, Bernice E.; Rushmeier, Holly E.

    2001-06-01

    Geometric objects are often represented by many millions of triangles or polygons, which limits the ease with which they can be transmitted and displayed electronically. This has lead to the development of many algorithms for simplifying geometric models, and to the recognition that metrics are required to evaluate their success. The goal is to create computer graphic renderings of the object that do not appear to be degraded to a human observer. The perceptual evaluation of simplified objects is a new topic. One approach has been to sue image-based metrics to predict the perceived degradation of simplified 3D models. Since that 2D images of 3D objects can have significantly different perceived quality, depending on the direction of the illumination, 2D measures of image quality may not adequately capture the perceived quality of 3D objects. To address this question, we conducted experiments in which we explicitly compared the perceived quality of animated 3D objects and their corresponding 2D still image projections. Our results suggest that 2D judgements do not provide a good predictor of 3D image quality, and identify a need to develop 'object quality metrics.'

  12. Report of the FELASA Working Group on evaluation of quality systems for animal units.

    PubMed

    Howard, B; van Herck, H; Guillen, J; Bacon, B; Joffe, R; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M

    2004-04-01

    This report compares and considers the merits of existing, internationally available quality management systems suitable for implementation in experimental animal facilities. These are: the Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines, ISO 9000:2000 (International Organization for Standardization) and AAALAC International (Association for Assessment and Accreditation of Laboratory Animal Care International). Good laboratory practice (GLP) is a legal requirement for institutions undertaking non-clinical health and environmental studies for the purpose of registering or licensing for use and which have to be 'GLP-compliant'. GLP guidelines are often only relevant for and obtainable by those institutions. ISO is primarily an external business standard, which provides a management tool to master and optimize a business activity; it aims to implement and enhance 'customer satisfaction'. AAALAC is primarily a peer-reviewed system of accreditation which evaluates the organization and procedures in programmes of animal care and use to ensure the appropriate use of animals, safeguard animal well-being (ensuring state-of-the-art housing, management, procedural techniques, etc.) as well as the management of health and safety of staff. Management needs to determine, on the basis of a facility's specific goals, whether benefits would arise from the introduction of a quality system and, if so, which system is most appropriate. The successful introduction of a quality system confers peer-recognition against an independent standard, thereby providing assurance of standards of animal care and use, improving the quality of animal studies, and contributing to the three Rs-reduction, refinement and replacement.

  13. The European Conformity Assessment Procedures and the Quality Assurance Instruments for Personal Protective Equipment in the Internal Market.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Joachim

    1995-01-01

    Conformity assessment procedures prescribed by European legislation are presented and their concrete implementation is illustrated by the example of personal protective equipment (PPE). The different categories of PPE defined by Council Directive 89/686/EEC are explained with reference to the applicable conformity assessment elements. Quality assurance of production is presented as the central element of the conformity assessment procedure for complex PPE. Special emphasis is put on the necessity of having a regular exchange of views and information among notified bodies in Europe. Ways in which third countries can eventually carry out conformity assessment on the basis of a contract with the European Community Commission are explained.

  14. [Postoperative evaluation of different surgical procedures in genuine stress urinary incontinence: a retrospective study].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Colorado, S; Pérez-Soriano, P; Alvarez-Mercado, R L; Herbert, A; Kunhardt-Rasch, J

    1996-06-01

    An evaluation of the surgical treatment for stress and mixed urinary incontinence and pelvic relaxation. One-year follow-up, was done. A retrospective study with 144 files from the surgeries performed between February 1993 and June 1994, at the Clínica de Urología Ginecológica del Instituto Nacional de Perinatología. We excluded 37 files because of incomplete information. The age, parity, hormonal stage, preoperative diagnosis by urodynamic studies, surgical treatments and one-year follow-up were analyzed. The mean age was 45.5 years. Pereyra procedure was performed in 53, Burch procedure in 47, anterior colporrhaphy in 5, and sling procedure in 2 patients. The incidence of complications was similar between the different groups. Resumption of spontaneous postsurgical voiding was delayed in the Pereyra group. The Burch urethropexy and Pereyra procedures were equally effective, with no statistical differences observed. Burch vaginal suspension was not more effective for the correction of urinary stress incontinence than Pereyra procedure.

  15. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area, Technical Report 2000-2003.

    SciTech Connect

    Kozusko, Shana

    2003-12-01

    The Nez Perce Tribe (NPT) currently manages a 15,325 acre parcel of land known as the Precious Lands Wildlife Management Area that was purchased as mitigation for losses incurred by construction of the four lower Snake River dams. The Management Area is located in northern Wallowa County, Oregon and southern Asotin County, Washington (Figure 1). It is divided into three management parcels--the Buford parcel is located on Buford Creek and straddles the WA-OR state line, and the Tamarack and Basin parcels are contiguous to each other and located between the Joseph Creek and Cottonwood Creek drainages in Wallowa County, OR. The project was developed under the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-501), with funding from the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA). The acreage protected under this contract will be credited to BPA as habitat permanently dedicated to wildlife and wildlife mitigation. A modeling strategy known as Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and adopted by BPA as a habitat equivalency accounting system. Nine wildlife species models were used to evaluate distinct cover type features and provide a measure of habitat quality. Models measure a wide range of life requisite variables for each species and monitor overall trends in vegetation community health and diversity. One product of HEP is an evaluation of habitat quality expressed in Habitat Units (HUs). This HU accounting system is used to determine the amount of credit BPA receives for mitigation lands. After construction of the four lower Snake River dams, a HEP loss assessment was conducted to determine how many Habitat Units were inundated behind the dams. Twelve target species were used in that evaluation: Canada goose, mallard, river otter, downy woodpecker, song sparrow, yellow warbler, marsh wren, western meadowlark, chukar, ring-necked pheasant, California quail, and mule deer. The U.S. Army Corp of

  16. Quality in Family Child Care Networks: An Evaluation of All Our Kin Provider Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Reiman, Kayla; Nelson, Christina; Sager, Jessica; Wagner, Janna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of quality with a sample of 28 family child care providers in the All Our Kin Family Child Care Network, a staffed family child care network which offers a range of services including relationship-based intensive consultation, and 20 family child care providers who had no…

  17. Criteria for the Evaluation of Quality Improvement Programs and the Use of Quality Improvement Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    This document provides a set of criteria to be used by psychologists in evaluating quality improvement programs (QIPs) that have been promulgated by health care organizations, government agencies, professional associations, or other entities. These criteria also address the privacy and confidentiality issues evoked by the intended use of patient…

  18. 77 FR 235 - Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Colorado; Procedural Rules...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-04

    ... Quality Control Commission (Commission) on January 16, 1998 and submitted to EPA as a State Implementation..., unless the context indicates otherwise. (v) The word Commission means the Colorado Air Quality Control... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 52 Approval and Promulgation of Air Quality Implementation Plans; Colorado;...

  19. Spatio-temporal evaluation of Yamchi Dam basin water quality using Canadian water quality index.

    PubMed

    Farzadkia, Mahdi; Djahed, Babak; Shahsavani, Esmaeel; Poureshg, Yousef

    2015-04-01

    In recent years, the growth of population and increase of the industries around the tributaries of Yamchi Dam basin have led to deterioration of dam water quality. This study aimed to evaluate the quality of the Yamchi Dam basin water, which is used for drinking and irrigation consumptions using Canadian Water Quality Index (CWQI) model, and to determine the main water pollution sources of this basin. Initially, nine sampling stations were selected in the sensitive locations of the mentioned basin's tributaries, and 12 physico-chemical parameters and 2 biological parameters were measured. The CWQI for drinking consumptions was under 40 at all the stations indicating a poor water quality for drinking consumptions. On the other hand, the CWQI was 62-100 for irrigation at different stations; thus, the water had an excellent to fair quality for irrigation consumptions. Almost in all the stations, the quality of irrigation and drinking water in cold season was better. Besides, for drinking use, total coliform and fecal coliform had the highest frequency of failure, and total coliform had the maximum deviation from the specified objective. For irrigation use, total suspended solids had the highest frequency of failure and deviation from the objective in most of the stations. The pisciculture center, aquaculture center, and the Nir City wastewater discharge were determined as the main pollution sources of the Yamchi Dam basin. Therefore, to improve the water quality in this important surface water resource, urban and industrial wastewater treatment prior to disposal and more stringent environmental legislations are recommended.

  20. Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) Quality Assurance Manual

    SciTech Connect

    C. L. Smith; R. Nims; K. J. Kvarfordt; C. Wharton

    2008-08-01

    The Systems Analysis Programs for Hands-on Integrated Reliability Evaluations (SAPHIRE) is a software application developed for performing a complete probabilistic risk assessment using a personal computer running the Microsoft Windows operating system. SAPHIRE is primarily funded by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The role of the INL in this project is that of software developer and tester. This development takes place using formal software development procedures and is subject to quality assurance (QA) processes. The purpose of this document is to describe how the SAPHIRE software QA is performed for Version 6 and 7, what constitutes its parts, and limitations of those processes.

  1. Impact of data quality and quantity and the calibration procedure on crop growth model calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seidel, Sabine J.; Werisch, Stefan

    2014-05-01

    Crop growth models are a commonly used tool for impact assessment of climate variability and climate change on crop yields and water use. Process-based crop models rely on algorithms that approximate the main physiological plant processes by a set of equations containing several calibration parameters as well as basic underlying assumptions. It is well recognized that model calibration is essential to improve the accuracy and reliability of model predictions. However, model calibration and validation is often hindered by a limited quantity and quality of available data. Recent studies suggest that crop model parameters can only be derived from field experiments in which plant growth and development processes have been measured. To be able to achieve a reliable prediction of crop growth under irrigation or drought stress, the correct characterization of the whole soil-plant-atmosphere system is essential. In this context is the accurate simulation of crop development, yield and the soil water dynamics plays an important role. In this study we aim to investigate the importance of a site and cultivar-specific model calibration based on experimental data using the SVAT model Daisy. We investigate to which extent different data sets and different parameter estimation procedures affect particularly yield estimates, irrigation water demand and the soil water dynamics. The comprehensive experimental data has been derived from an experiment conducted in Germany where five irrigation regimes were imposed on cabbage. Data collection included continuous measurements of soil tension and soil water content in two plots at three depths, weekly measurements of LAI, plant heights, leaf-N-content, stomatal conductivity, biomass partitioning, rooting depth as well as harvested yields and duration of growing period. Three crop growth calibration strategies were compared: (1) manual calibration based on yield and duration of growing period, (2) manual calibration based on yield

  2. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Grand Coulee Dam Mitigation, 1996-1999 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Kieffer, B.; Singer, Kelly; Abrahamson, Twa-le

    1999-07-01

    The purpose of this Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) study was to determine baseline habitat units and to estimate future habitat units for Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) mitigation projects on the Spokane Indian Reservation. The mitigation between BPA and the Spokane Tribe of Indians (STOI) is for wildlife habitat losses on account of the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the HEP survey data will assist in mitigation crediting and appropriate management of the mitigation lands.

  3. A Markov Chain Model for evaluating the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Edmunds, T.A.

    1994-01-01

    A Markov Chain Model has been developed to evaluate the effectiveness of randomized surveillance procedures. The model is applicable for surveillance systems that monitor a collection of assets by randomly selecting and inspecting the assets. The model provides an estimate of the detection probability as a function of the amount of time that an adversary would require to steal or sabotage the asset. An interactive computer code has been written to perform the necessary computations.

  4. Landing flying qualities evaluation criteria for augmented aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, R. C.; Smith, R.; Bailey, R.

    1980-01-01

    The criteria evaluated were: Calspan Neal-Smith; Onstott (Northrop Time Domain); McDonnell-Douglas Equivalent System Approach; R. H. Smith Criterion. Each criterion was applied to the same set of longitudinal approach and landing flying qualities data. A revised version of the Neal-Smith criterion which is applicable to the landing task was developed and tested against other landing flying qualities data. Results indicated that both the revised Neal-Smith criterion and the Equivalent System Approach are good discriminators of pitch landing flying qualities; Neal-Smith has particular merit as a design guide, while the Equivalent System Approach is well suited for development of appropriate military specification requirements applicable to highly augmented aircraft.

  5. The Triangle Model for evaluating the effect of health information technology on healthcare quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Ancker, Jessica S; Kern, Lisa M; Abramson, Erika; Kaushal, Rainu

    2012-01-01

    With the proliferation of relatively mature health information technology (IT) systems with large numbers of users, it becomes increasingly important to evaluate the effect of these systems on the quality and safety of healthcare. Previous research on the effectiveness of health IT has had mixed results, which may be in part attributable to the evaluation frameworks used. The authors propose a model for evaluation, the Triangle Model, developed for designing studies of quality and safety outcomes of health IT. This model identifies structure-level predictors, including characteristics of: (1) the technology itself; (2) the provider using the technology; (3) the organizational setting; and (4) the patient population. In addition, the model outlines process predictors, including (1) usage of the technology, (2) organizational support for and customization of the technology, and (3) organizational policies and procedures about quality and safety. The Triangle Model specifies the variables to be measured, but is flexible enough to accommodate both qualitative and quantitative approaches to capturing them. The authors illustrate this model, which integrates perspectives from both health services research and biomedical informatics, with examples from evaluations of electronic prescribing, but it is also applicable to a variety of types of health IT systems.

  6. [Long-term results of peripheral vascular injuries in patients' limbs following reconstructive surgical procedures and influence on the quality of life].

    PubMed

    Deja, Włodzimierz; Wieczorek, Dariusz; Deja, Agata; Lasek, Jerzy; Kawecka, Aleksandra; Marks, Wojciech

    2006-01-01

    Major vascular injuries in extremities are rare and constitute problems for surgeons and their sequelae strongly influence remote future of the patients. The aim of study is to evaluate surgical treatment of vascular injuries in extremities and some aspects of quality of life. Since 1983 until 2002 sixty four patients with vascular limbs injuries were treated in the department. Remote evaluation has been performed in 33 persons. Severity of limb injuries was measured by Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS). In 20 patients (60.6%) very good and good recent results were obtained, satisfactory in 24.2% and bad results in 15.2% persons. Evaluation of functional status has been made by means of locomotion test and Jebsen-Taylor's test, social approval questionnaire, depression Beck's scale, the scale of hypochondria and by an original questionnaire to evaluate the quality of life. As considerable interdependence has been found between the functional status and the following factors: injury severity expressed in MESS (p < 0.01), clinic reception procedure (p < 0.001), ischemia time (p < 0.01), coincidence of other injuries (fractures and dislocations, muscle, tendon and nerve lesions) (p < 0.01), limb amputation (p < 0.01). Hand function significantly influences the quality of life. Patients who were in shock after trauma in the remote assessment showed susceptibility to the lowered mood and depression (p < 0.05). Quality of life is strongly connected with the features of personality, correlating mainly with the mood and tendencies of concentration upon somatic symptoms. Function of the hand influences strongly the quality of life. Amputated patients may in spite of their crippling limitations are able to adapt to everyday life.

  7. Procedures to evaluate the efficiency of protective clothing worn by operators applying pesticide.

    PubMed

    Espanhol-Soares, Melina; Nociti, Leticia A S; Machado-Neto, Joaquim Gonçalves

    2013-10-01

    The evaluation of the efficiency of whole-body protective clothing against pesticides has already been carried out through field tests and procedures defined by international standards, but there is a need to determine the useful life of these garments to ensure worker safety. The aim of this article is to compare the procedures for evaluating efficiency of two whole-body protective garments, both new and previously used by applicators of herbicides, using a laboratory test with a mannequin and in the field with the operator. The evaluation of the efficiency of protective clothing used both quantitative and qualitative methodologies, leading to a proposal for classification according to efficiency, and determination of the useful life of protective clothing for use against pesticides, based on a quantitative assessment. The procedures used were in accordance with the standards of the modified American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F 1359:2007 and International Organization for Standardization 17491-4. The protocol used in the field was World Health Organization Vector Biology and Control (VBC)/82.1. Clothing tested was personal water repellent and pesticide protective. Two varieties of fabric were tested: Beige (100% cotton) and Camouflaged (31% polyester and 69% cotton). The efficiency in exposure control of the personal protective clothing was measured before use and after 5, 10, 20, and 30 uses and washes under field conditions. Personal protective clothing was worn by workers in the field during the application of the herbicide glyphosate on weed species in mature sugar cane plantations using a knapsack sprayer. The modified ASTM 1359:2007 procedure was chosen as the most appropriate due to its greater repeatability (lower coefficient of variation). This procedure provides quantitative evaluation needed to determine the efficiency and useful life of individual protective clothing, not just at specific points of failure, but according to dermal

  8. PREFACE SPECIAL ISSUE ON MODEL EVALUATION: EVALUATION OF URBAN AND REGIONAL EULERIAN AIR QUALITY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The "Preface to the Special Edition on Model Evaluation: Evaluation of Urban and Regional Eulerian Air Quality Models" is a brief introduction to the papers included in a special issue of Atmospheric Environment. The Preface provides a background for the papers, which have thei...

  9. Investigating Architectural Quality Theories for School Evaluation: A Critical Review of Evaluation Instruments in Sweden

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygt, Erland

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a critical review of instruments used to evaluate compulsory schools in Sweden and is part of a doctoral programme project investigating the relationship between school architecture and learning. In Sweden, as in many countries, evaluation instruments are used both to improve school quality and as a means to provide…

  10. A ruggedness evaluation of procedures for damage threshold testing optical materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooker, Matthew W.; Thomas, Milfred E.; Wise, Stephanie A.; Tappan, Nina D.

    1995-01-01

    A ruggedness evaluation of approaches to damage threshold testing was performed to determine the influence of three procedural variables on damage threshold data. The differences between the number of test sites evaluated at an applied fluence level (1 site versus 10 sites), the number of laser pulses at each test site (1 pulse versus 200 pulses), and the beam diameter (0.35 mm versus 0.70 mm) were all found to significantly influence the damage threshold data over a 99-percent confidence interval.

  11. Bibliometric indicators for evaluating the quality of scientifc publications.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Medha A

    2014-03-01

    Evaluation of quality and quantity of publications can be done using a set of statistical and mathematical indices called bibliometric indicators. Two major categories of indicators are (1) quantitative indicators that measure the research productivity of a researcher and (2) performance indicators that evaluate the quality of publications. Bibliometric indicators are important for both the individual researcher and organizations. They are widely used to compare the performance of the individual researchers, journals and universities. Many of the appointments, promotions and allocation of research funds are based on these indicators. This review article describes some of the currently used bibliometric indicators such as journal impact factor, crown indicator, h-index and it's variants. It is suggested that for comparison of scientific impact and scientific output of researchers due consideration should be given to various factors affecting theses indicators.

  12. Evaluation of a clinical genetics service--a quality initiative.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Alison M; Chodirker, Bernard N; Bocangel, Patricia; Mhanni, Aizeddin A

    2014-10-01

    Paper-based surveys are an effective means of evaluating the quality of a clinical service. As part of ongoing quality improvement initiatives within our Genetics Program, new patients were invited to participate in a paper-based survey. Issues related to the quality of counseling based on educational/informational aspects (e.g. whether testing was explained fully, testing options, the meaning of normal/abnormal testing), competency, respect and nondirectiveness of counseling in addition to clinical environment/setting were evaluated. Data related to demographics, discipline seen within the program and whether the patient was seen by a physician or genetic counselor were also captured. Five hundred questionnaires were distributed. One hundred and forty-seven questionnaires were returned, with a response rate of 29.4 %. The majority of patients seen were prenatal (pregnant) patients and comprised a heterogeneous group including those seen for advanced maternal age and abnormal maternal serum screening. Overall, 98.6 % of respondents felt their appointment in genetics was a positive experience. Issues related to confidentiality, pros and cons of testing, meaning of an abnormal test result and time allotted for decision making were significantly different in some disciplines between genetic counselor and geneticist. However, when controlling for referral indication, these differences lost significance with the exception of issues relating to confidentiality and perceived time allotted to organize thoughts and questions. This survey provided valuable information to allow for improvement in the quality of the provision of service.

  13. Guidelines and standard procedures for studies of ground-water quality; selection and installation of wells, and supporting documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lapham, W.W.; Wilde, F.D.; Koterba, M.T.

    1997-01-01

    This is the first of a two-part report to document guidelines and standard procedures of the U.S. Geological Survey for the acquisition of data in ground-water-quality studies. This report provides guidelines and procedures for the selection and installation of wells for water-quality studies/*, and the required or recommended supporting documentation of these activities. Topics include (1) documentation needed for well files, field folders, and electronic files; (2) criteria and information needed for the selection of water-supply and observation wells, including site inventory and data collection during field reconnaissance; and (3) criteria and preparation for installation of monitoring wells, including the effects of equipment and materials on the chemistry of ground-water samples, a summary of drilling and coring methods, and information concerning well completion, development, and disposition.

  14. 34 CFR 75.224 - What are the procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the procedures for using a multiple tier... procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications? (a) The Secretary may use a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications. (b) The Secretary may refuse to review...

  15. 34 CFR 75.224 - What are the procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the procedures for using a multiple tier... procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications? (a) The Secretary may use a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications. (b) The Secretary may refuse to review...

  16. 34 CFR 75.224 - What are the procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the procedures for using a multiple tier... procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications? (a) The Secretary may use a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications. (b) The Secretary may refuse to review...

  17. 34 CFR 75.224 - What are the procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the procedures for using a multiple tier... procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications? (a) The Secretary may use a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications. (b) The Secretary may refuse to review...

  18. 34 CFR 75.224 - What are the procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the procedures for using a multiple tier... procedures for using a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications? (a) The Secretary may use a multiple tier review process to evaluate applications. (b) The Secretary may refuse to review...

  19. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been...

  20. 9 CFR 147.16 - Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Procedure for the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). 147.16 Section 147.16 Animals and Animal Products... the evaluation of mycoplasma reactors by in vivo bio-assay (enrichment). This procedure has been...

  1. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  2. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  3. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2013-10-01 2012-10-01 true Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  4. 45 CFR 303.109 - Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR PROGRAM OPERATIONS § 303.109 Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on... 45 Public Welfare 2 2014-10-01 2012-10-01 true Procedures for State monitoring, evaluation and reporting on programs funded by Grants to States for Access and Visitation Programs. 303.109 Section...

  5. Human factors evaluation of teletherapy: Human-system interfaces and procedures. Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Kaye, R.D.; Henriksen, K.; Jones, R.; Morisseau, D.S.; Serig, D.I.

    1995-07-01

    A series of human factors evaluations was undertaken to better understand the contributing factors to human error in the teletherapy environment. Teletherapy is a multidisciplinary methodology for treating cancerous tissue through selective exposure to an external beam of ionizing radiation. The principal sources of radiation are a radioactive isotope, typically cobalt60 (Co-60), or a linear accelerator device capable of producing very high energy x-ray and electron beams. A team of human factors specialists conducted site visits to radiation oncology departments at community hospitals, university centers, and free-standing clinics. In addition, a panel of radiation oncologists, medical physicists, and radiation technologists served as subject matter experts. A function and task analysis was initially performed to guide subsequent evaluations in the areas of user-system interfaces, procedures, training and qualifications, and organizational policies and practices. The present report focuses on an evaluation of the human-system interfaces in relation to the treatment machines and supporting equipment (e.g., simulators, treatment planning computers, control consoles, patient charts) found in the teletherapy environment. The report also evaluates operating, maintenance and emergency procedures and practices involved in teletherapy. The evaluations are based on the function and task analysis and established human engineering guidelines, where applicable.

  6. Evaluation of the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This work evaluates particle size-composition distributions simulated by the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model using Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) measurements at 18 sites across North America. Size-resolved measurements of particulate SO4+, with the model ranging from an underestimation to overestimation of both the peak diameter and peak particle concentration across the sites. Computing PM2.5 from the modeled size distribution parameters rather than by summing the masses in the Aitken and a

  7. Chemical shoreline cleaning agents: Evaluation of two laboratory procedures for estimating performance

    SciTech Connect

    Clayton, J.B.; Tsang, S.F.; Frank, V.; Marsden, P.; Chau, N.

    1993-07-01

    The report presents data from studies designed to evaluate characteristics of selected bench-scale test methods for estimating cleaning performance of chemical agents for removal of oil from substrate surfaces. Such agents have the potential to be used to remove oil that might strand on shorelines and cause adverse effects to impacted ecosystems. In order to mitigate the effect of stranded oil with chemical cleaning agents, however, an on-scene coordinator must have information and an understanding of performance characteristics for available cleaning agents. Performance of candidate cleaning agents can be estimated on the basis of laboratory testing procedures that are designed to evaluate performance of different agents. Data presented in the report are intended to assist the U.S. EPA in evaluation of candidate test methods for estimating performance of cleaning agents. Two test methods were selected for evaluating performance: Environment Canada's Inclined Trough test and a Swirling Coupon test developed in the program.

  8. Quantitative image quality evaluation for cardiac CT reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Hsin-Wu; Fan, Jiahua; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Balhorn, William; Okerlund, Darin R.

    2016-03-01

    Maintaining image quality in the presence of motion is always desirable and challenging in clinical Cardiac CT imaging. Different image-reconstruction algorithms are available on current commercial CT systems that attempt to achieve this goal. It is widely accepted that image-quality assessment should be task-based and involve specific tasks, observers, and associated figures of merits. In this work, we developed an observer model that performed the task of estimating the percentage of plaque in a vessel from CT images. We compared task performance of Cardiac CT image data reconstructed using a conventional FBP reconstruction algorithm and the SnapShot Freeze (SSF) algorithm, each at default and optimal reconstruction cardiac phases. The purpose of this work is to design an approach for quantitative image-quality evaluation of temporal resolution for Cardiac CT systems. To simulate heart motion, a moving coronary type phantom synchronized with an ECG signal was used. Three different percentage plaques embedded in a 3 mm vessel phantom were imaged multiple times under motion free, 60 bpm, and 80 bpm heart rates. Static (motion free) images of this phantom were taken as reference images for image template generation. Independent ROIs from the 60 bpm and 80 bpm images were generated by vessel tracking. The observer performed estimation tasks using these ROIs. Ensemble mean square error (EMSE) was used as the figure of merit. Results suggest that the quality of SSF images is superior to the quality of FBP images in higher heart-rate scans.

  9. Evaluation of Operational Procedures for Using a Time-Based Airborne Inter-arrival Spacing Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oseguera-Lohr, Rosa M.; Lohr, Gary W.; Abbott, Terence S.; Eischeid, Todd M.

    2002-01-01

    An airborne tool has been developed based on the concept of an aircraft maintaining a time-based spacing interval from the preceding aircraft. The Advanced Terminal Area Approach Spacing (ATAAS) tool uses Automatic Dependent Surveillance-Broadcast (ADS-B) aircraft state data to compute a speed command for the ATAAS-equipped aircraft to obtain a required time interval behind another aircraft. The tool and candidate operational procedures were tested in a high-fidelity, full mission simulator with active airline subject pilots flying an arrival scenario using three different modes for speed control. The objectives of this study were to validate the results of a prior Monte Carlo analysis of the ATAAS algorithm and to evaluate the concept from the standpoint of pilot acceptability and workload. Results showed that the aircraft was able to consistently achieve the target spacing interval within one second (the equivalent of approximately 220 ft at a final approach speed of 130 kt) when the ATAAS speed guidance was autothrottle-coupled, and a slightly greater (4-5 seconds), but consistent interval with the pilot-controlled speed modes. The subject pilots generally rated the workload level with the ATAAS procedure as similar to that with standard procedures, and also rated most aspects of the procedure high in terms of acceptability. Although pilots indicated that the head-down time was higher with ATAAS, the acceptability of head-down time was rated high. Oculometer data indicated slight changes in instrument scan patterns, but no significant change in the amount of time spent looking out the window between the ATAAS procedure versus standard procedures.

  10. A Comparative Evaluation for Biologic Width following Surgical Crown Lengthening Using Gingivectomy and Ostectomy Procedure.

    PubMed

    Ganji, Kiran Kumar; Patil, Veena Ashok; John, Jiji

    2012-01-01

    Surgical crown lengthening has been proposed as a means of facilitating restorative procedures and preventing injuries in teeth with structurally inadequate clinical crown or exposing tooth structure in the presence of deep, subgingival pathologies which may hamper the access for proper restorative measures. Histological studies utilizing animal models have shown that postoperative crestal resorption allowed reestablishment of the biologic width. However, very little has been done in humans. Aims. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the potential changes in the periodontal tissues, particularly the biologic width, following surgical crown lengthening by two surgical procedures before and after crown placement. Methods and Material. Twenty (20) patients who needed surgical crown lengthening to gain retention necessary for prosthetic treatment and/or to access caries, tooth fracture, or previous prosthetic margins entered the study. The following parameters were obtained from line angles of treated teeth (teeth requiring surgical crown lengthening) and adjacent sites: Plaque and Gingival Indices (PI) & (GI), Position of Gingival Margin from reference Stent (PGMRS), Probing depth (PD), and Biologic Width (BW). Statistical Analysis Used. Student "t" Test. Results. Initial baseline values of biologic width were 2.55 mm (Gingivectomy procedure B1 Group) and 1.95 mm (Ostectomy procedure B2 Group) and after surgical procedure the values were 1.15 mm and 1.25 mm. Conclusions. Within the limitations of the study the biologic width, at treated sites, was re-established to its original vertical dimension by 3 months. Ostectomy with apically positioned flap can be considered as a more effective procedure than Gingivectomy for Surgical Crown Lengthening.

  11. A matter of taste: evaluating the quality of qualitative research.

    PubMed

    Sandelowski, Margarete

    2015-06-01

    Driven by an impetus to standardize, numerous checklists have been devised to address quality in qualitative research, but these standards and the mindset driving them offer no language with which to speak about taste, or the aesthetic sensibilities that play such a key role in evaluating the goodness of any object. In this article, quality appraisal in qualitative research is considered in the context of taste, that is, in the discernment involved in judging the value of research and in the recognition of the key role reviewer preferences, sensibilities and membership in one or more taste communities play in these judgements. The evaluation of a study is accomplished by evaluating one or more reports from that study, and such reports may be conceived as art forms amenable to the same criteria for appraisal as poems or paintings. Taste implies judgements about the quality of objects and a person's ability to sift through and select from a store of knowledge that knowledge appropriate to judge its value. What binds a community of practitioners (here reviewers of qualitative studies) together is taste-making, or the constant refinements of judgements concerning what constitutes good and bad practice.

  12. Azimuthally acoustic logging tool to evaluate cementing quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Junqiang; Ju, Xiaodong; Qiao, Wenxiao; Men, Baiyong; Wang, Ruijia; Wu, Jinping

    2014-08-01

    An azimuthally sensitive acoustic bond tool (AABT) uses a phased arc array transmitter that can provide directionally focused radiation. The acoustic sonde consists of a phased arc array transmitter and two monopole receivers, the spaces from the transmitter being 0.91 m and 1.52 m, respectively. The transmitter includes eight transducer sub-units. By controlling the high-voltage firing signal phase for each transmitter, the radiation energy of the phased arc array transducer can be focused in a single direction. Compared with conventional monopole and dipole transmitters, the new transmitter provides cement quality evaluation with azimuthal sensitivity, which is not possible with conventional cement bond log/variable density log tools. Laboratory measurements indicate that the directivity curves for the phased arc array and those computed theoretically are consistent and show good agreement. We acquire measurements from a laboratory cistern and from the field to validate the reliability and applicability of the AABT. Results indicate that the AABT accurately evaluates the azimuthal cement quality of case-cement interfaces by imaging the amplitude of the first-arrival wave. This tool visualizes the size, position and orientation of channeling and holes. In the case of good case-cement bonding, the AABT also evaluates the azimuthal cementing quality of the cement formation interface by imaging the amplitude of formation waves.

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Hellsgate Project, 1999-2000 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Berger, Matthew

    2000-05-01

    A Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) study was conducted on lands acquired and/or managed (4,568 acres total) by the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate project) to mitigate some of the losses associated with the original construction and operation of Grand Coulee Dam and inundation of habitats behind the dams. Three separate properties, totaling 2,224 acres were purchased in 1998. One property composed of two separate parcels, mostly grassland lies southeast of the town of Nespelem in Okanogan County (770 acres) and was formerly called the Hinman property. The former Hinman property lies within an area the Tribes have set aside for the protection and preservation of the sharp-tailed grouse (Agency Butte unit). This special management area minus the Hinman acquisition contains 2,388 acres in a long-term lease with the Tribes. The second property lies just south of the Silver Creek turnoff (Ferry County) and is bisected by the Hellsgate Road (part of the Friedlander unit). This parcel contains 60 acres of riparian and conifer forest cover. The third property (now named the Sand Hills unit) acquired for mitigation (1,394 acres) lies within the Hellsgate Reserve in Ferry County. This new acquisition links two existing mitigation parcels (the old Sand Hills parcels and the Lundstrum Flat parcel, all former Kuehne purchases) together forming one large unit. HEP team members included individuals from the Colville Confederated Tribes Fish and Wildlife Department (CTCR), Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW), and Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The HEP team conducted a baseline habitat survey using the following HEP species models: mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), mink (Mustela vison), downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), bobcat (Lynx rufus), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), and sharp-tailed grouse (Tympanuchus phasianellus columbianus). HEP analysis and results are discussed within the body of the text. The cover types

  14. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Rainwater Wildlife Area, 1998-2001 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Childs, Allen

    2004-01-01

    The 8,768 acre Rainwater Wildlife Area was acquired in September 1998 by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) through an agreement with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to partially offset habitat losses associated with construction of the John Day and McNary hydroelectric facilities on the mainstem Columbia River. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) were used to determine the number of habitat units credited to BPA for acquired lands. Upland and riparian forest, upland and riparian shrub, and grassland rover types are evaluated in this study. Targeted wildlife species include downy woodpecker (Picoides pubescens), black-capped chickadee (Parus atricopillus), blue grouse (Dendragapus obscurus), great blue heron (Ardea herodias), yellow warbler (Dendroica petechia), mink (Mustela vison), and Western meadowlark (Sturnella neglects). Habitat surveys were conducted in 1998 and 1999 in accordance with published HEP protocols and included 65,300, 594m{sup 2} plots, and 112 one-tenth-acre plots. Between 153.3 and 7,187.46 acres were evaluated for each target wildlife mitigation species. Derived habitat suitability indices were multiplied by corresponding cover-type acreages to determine the number of habitat units for each species. The total baseline habitat units credited to BPA for the Rainwater Wildlife Area and its seven target species is 5,185.3 habitat units. Factors limiting habitat suitability are related to the direct, indirect, and cumulative effects of past livestock grazing, road construction, and timber harvest which have simplified the structure, composition, and diversity of native plant communities. Alternatives for protecting and improving habitat suitability include exclusion of livestock grazing, road de-commissioning/obliteration, reforestation and thinning, control of competing and unwanted vegetation (including noxious weeds), reestablishing displaced or reduced native

  15. Method for evaluation of predictive models of microwave ablation via post-procedural clinical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Jarrod A.; Brown, Daniel; Kingham, T. Peter; Jarnagin, William R.; Miga, Michael I.; Clements, Logan W.

    2015-03-01

    Development of a clinically accurate predictive model of microwave ablation (MWA) procedures would represent a significant advancement and facilitate an implementation of patient-specific treatment planning to achieve optimal probe placement and ablation outcomes. While studies have been performed to evaluate predictive models of MWA, the ability to quantify the performance of predictive models via clinical data has been limited to comparing geometric measurements of the predicted and actual ablation zones. The accuracy of placement, as determined by the degree of spatial overlap between ablation zones, has not been achieved. In order to overcome this limitation, a method of evaluation is proposed where the actual location of the MWA antenna is tracked and recorded during the procedure via a surgical navigation system. Predictive models of the MWA are then computed using the known position of the antenna within the preoperative image space. Two different predictive MWA models were used for the preliminary evaluation of the proposed method: (1) a geometric model based on the labeling associated with the ablation antenna and (2) a 3-D finite element method based computational model of MWA using COMSOL. Given the follow-up tomographic images that are acquired at approximately 30 days after the procedure, a 3-D surface model of the necrotic zone was generated to represent the true ablation zone. A quantification of the overlap between the predicted ablation zones and the true ablation zone was performed after a rigid registration was computed between the pre- and post-procedural tomograms. While both model show significant overlap with the true ablation zone, these preliminary results suggest a slightly higher degree of overlap with the geometric model.

  16. Evaluating investment in quality improvement capacity building: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Mery, Gustavo; Dobrow, Mark J; Baker, G Ross; Im, Jennifer; Brown, Adalsteinn

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Leading health systems have invested in substantial quality improvement (QI) capacity building, but little is known about the aggregate effect of these investments at the health system level. We conducted a systematic review to identify key steps and elements that should be considered for system-level evaluations of investment in QI capacity building. Methods We searched for evaluations of QI capacity building and evaluations of QI training programmes. We included the most relevant indexed databases in the field and a strategic search of the grey literature. The latter included direct electronic scanning of 85 relevant government and institutional websites internationally. Data were extracted regarding evaluation design and common assessment themes and components. Results 48 articles met the inclusion criteria. 46 articles described initiative-level non-economic evaluations of QI capacity building/training, while 2 studies included economic evaluations of QI capacity building/training, also at the initiative level. No system-level QI capacity building/training evaluations were found. We identified 17 evaluation components that fit within 5 overarching dimensions (characteristics of QI training; characteristics of QI activity; individual capacity; organisational capacity and impact) that should be considered in evaluations of QI capacity building. 8 key steps in return-on-investment (ROI) assessments in QI capacity building were identified: (1) planning—stakeholder perspective; (2) planning—temporal perspective; (3) identifying costs; (4) identifying benefits; (5) identifying intangible benefits that will not be included in the ROI estimation; (6) discerning attribution; (7) ROI calculations; (8) sensitivity analysis. Conclusions The literature on QI capacity building evaluation is limited in the number and scope of studies. Our findings, summarised in a Framework to Guide Evaluations of QI Capacity Building, can be used to start closing this knowledge

  17. Operational Procedures for Collecting Water-Quality Samples at Monitoring Sites on Maple Creek Near Nickerson and the Platte River at Louisville, Eastern Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Steven M.; Swanson, Robert B.

    1994-01-01

    Prototype stream-monitoring sites were operated during part of 1992 in the Central Nebraska Basins (CNBR) and three other study areas of the National Water-Quality Assessment (NAWQ) Program of the U.S. Geological Survey. Results from the prototype project provide information needed to operate a net- work of intensive fixed station stream-monitoring sites. This report evaluates operating procedures for two NAWQA prototype sites at Maple Creek near Nickerson and the Platte River at Louisville, eastern Nebraska. Each site was sampled intensively in the spring and late summer 1992, with less intensive sampling in midsummer. In addition, multiple samples were collected during two high- flow periods at the Maple Creek site--one early and the other late in the growing season. Water-samples analyses included determination of pesticides, nutrients, major ions, suspended sediment, and measurements of physical properties. Equipment and protocols for the water-quality sampling procedures were evaluated. Operation of the prototype stream- monitoring sites included development and comparison of onsite and laboratory sample-processing proce- dures. Onsite processing was labor intensive but allowed for immediate preservation of all sampled constituents. Laboratory processing required less field labor and decreased the risk of contamination, but allowed for no immediate preservation of the samples.

  18. Development of a toxicity identification evaluation procedure for characterizing metal toxicity in marine sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, R.M.; Cantwell, M.G.; Pelletier, M.C.; Ho, K.T.; Serbst, J.R.; Cook, H.F.; Kuhn, A.

    2000-04-01

    A multiagency effort is underway to develop whole sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) methods. Whole sediment TIE methods will be critical tools for characterizing toxicity at hazardous waste sites and in the conduct of environmental risk assessments. The research approach is based on the predominance of three classes of toxicants in sediments: ammonia, nonpolar organic chemicals, and metals. Here the authors describe a procedure for characterizing acute toxicity caused by metals in whole marine sediments. The procedure involves adding a chelating resin to sediments, resulting in the sequestration of bioavailable metal while not stressing testing organisms. Within the testing chambers, the presence of resin resulted in statistically significant reductions in the overlying and interstitial water concentrations of five metals (cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, and zinc) generally by factors of 40 and 200. Toxicity to both the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and mysid Americamysis bahia (formerly Mysidopsis bahia) of sediments spiked with the five metals was decreased by approximately a factor of four when resin was present. While very effective at reducing the concentrations and toxicity of metals, the resin has only minor ameliorative effects on the toxicity of ammonia and a representative nonpolar toxicant (Endosulfan). Resin and accumulated metal were easily isolated from the testing system following exposures allowing for the initiation of phase II TIE (identification) procedures. This procedure using the addition of a chelating resin provides an approach for determining the importance of metals to the toxicity of marine sediments. Work is continuing to validate the method with environmentally contaminated sediments.

  19. The development of marine Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) procedures using the unicellular alga Nitzschia closterium.

    PubMed

    Hogan, A C; Stauber, J L; Pablo, F; Adams, M S; Lim, R P

    2005-05-01

    Unicellular algae are highly sensitive to a wide range of toxicants and have been used extensively in ecotoxicological testing. This, along with their ability to grow in very small test volumes over short test durations, make them ideal test organisms for use in Toxicity Identification Evaluations (TIEs). Despite this, microalgae have not previously been used in marine TIE studies. In this study, the marine diatom Nitzschia closterium was shown to be a highly suitable test organism after modification of the standard test protocol to reduce test volumes to 6 mL and test duration to 48 h. The alga was tolerant to the chemicals used in phase I of the standard USEPA TIE protocol, and physical TIE manipulations had no effect on algal growth. The cation exchange procedure, however, inhibited algal growth, while the anion exchange procedure stimulated growth, making these two procedures unsuitable for use with this species. Of the buffers trialed for the graduated pH procedure, 0.01 M PIPES buffer was found to be suitable for buffering at pH 7 because it maintained the required pH over the duration of the test and did not affect the growth or sensitivity of the algae to one reference toxicant (copper). A trial TIE on a secondary-treated sewage effluent for discharge into coastal waters showed that the developed protocols could successfully be used to identify ammonia as the major toxicant in the effluent.

  20. Reducing the cost of evaluating the committor by a fitting procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenjin; Ma, Ao

    2015-11-01

    Correct identification of reaction coordinates in complex systems is essential for understanding the mechanisms of their reaction dynamics. Existing methods for identifying reaction coordinates typically require knowledge of the committor—the probability of a given configuration to reach the product basin. The high computational cost of evaluating committors has limited applications of methods for identifying reaction coordinates. We proposed a fitting procedure that can reduce the cost of evaluating committors by an order of magnitude or more. The method only requires evaluating the committors of a few configurations in a transition path by the standard and costly shooting procedure. The committors of the other configurations are then estimated with great accuracy by a sigmoid function derived from fitting the few numerically evaluated committors. The method has been systematically tested on a model system of a Brownian particle moving in a one-dimensional double-well potential, and a small biomolecular system—the isomerization of alanine dipeptide in vacuum and in explicit water.

  1. Evaluation of Environmental Quality Productive Ecosystem Guayas (Ecuador).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo, Wilson; Pardo, Francisco; Sanfeliu, Teófilo; Carrera, Gloria; Jordan, Manuel; Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2015-04-01

    Natural resources are deteriorating very rapidly in the Gulf of Guayaquil and the area of influence in the Guayas Basin due to human activity. Specific problems are generated by the mismanagement of the aquaculture industry affecting the traditional agricultural sectors: rice, banana, sugarcane, cocoa, coffee, and soya also studied, and by human and industrial settlements. The development of industrial activities such as aquaculture (shrimp building for shrimp farming in ponds) and agriculture, have increasingly contributed to the generation of waste, degrading and potentially toxic elements in high concentrations, which can have adverse effects on organisms in the ecosystems, in the health of the population and damage the ecological and environmental balance. The productive Guayas ecosystem, consists of three interrelated ecosystems, the Gulf of Guayaquil, the Guayas River estuary and the Guayas Basin buffer. The objective of this study was to evaluate the environmental quality of the productive Guayas ecosystem (Ecuador), through operational and specific objectives: 1) Draw up the transition coastal zone in the Gulf of Guayaquil, 2) Set temporal spatial variability of soil salinity in wetlands rice, Lower Guayas Basin, 3) evaluate the heavy metals in wetland rice in the Lower Basin of Guayas. The physical and chemical parameters of the soils have been studied. These are indicators of environmental quality. The multivariate statistical method showed the relations of similarities and dissimilarities between variables and parameter studies as stable. Moreover, the boundaries of coastal transition areas, temporal spatial variability of soil salinity and heavy metals in rice cultivation in the Lower Basin of Guayas were researched. The sequential studies included and discussed represent a broad framework of fundamental issues that has been valued as a basic component of the productive Guayas ecosystem. They are determinants of the environmental quality of the Guayas

  2. Landmine-detection rats: an evaluation of reinforcement procedures under simulated operational conditions.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Amanda; Lalonde, Kate; Edwards, Timothy; Cox, Christophe; Weetjens, Bart; Poling, Alan

    2014-05-01

    Because the location of landmines is initially unknown, it is impossible to arrange differential reinforcement for accurate detection of landmines by pouched rats working on actual minefields. Therefore, provision must be made for maintenance of accurate responses by an alternative reinforcement strategy. The present experiment evaluated a procedure in which a plastic bag containing 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT), the active ingredient in most landmines, was placed in contact with the ground in a disturbed area, then removed, to establish opportunities for reinforcement. Each of five rats continued to accurately detect landmines when extinction was arranged for landmine-detection responses and detections of TNT-contaminated locations were reinforced under a fixed-ratio 1 schedule. The results of this translational research study suggest that the TNT-contamination procedure is a viable option for arranging reinforcement opportunities for rats engaged in actual landmine-detection activities and the viability of this procedure is currently being evaluated on minefields in Angola and Mozambique.

  3. Guide for Improving NRS Data Quality: Procedures for Data Collection and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condelli, Larry; Castillo, Laura; Seburn, Mary; Deveaux, Jon

    This guide for improving the quality of National Reporting System for Adult Education (NRS) data through improved data collection and training is intended for local providers and state administrators. Chapter 1 explains the guide's purpose, contents, and use and defines the following components of data quality: objectivity; integrity;…

  4. Measuring quality of care in psychiatric emergencies: construction and evaluation of a Bayesian index.

    PubMed Central

    Gustafson, D H; Sainfort, F; Johnson, S W; Sateia, M

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study was conducted to determine whether an index for measuring quality of care for psychiatric emergencies is reliable and valid. DATA SOURCES/STUDY SETTING. The study used primary data collected over a 12-month period from two urban hospitals in the Northeast. One had 700 inpatient beds, an inpatient psychiatric unit, and community mental health personnel located in the emergency department. The other had 300 beds but none of the other hospital's features. STUDY DESIGN. The index was developed by a panel of experts in emergency psychiatry using a subjective Bayesian statistical methodology and was evaluated in terms of its ability to: (1) predict a second panel's judgments of quality; (2) predict a specific quality-related patient outcome, i.e., compliance with follow-up recommendations; (3) provide a reliable measurement procedure; and (4) detect variations in patterns of emergency department practices. DATA COLLECTION/EXTRACTION METHODS. Data were collected on 2,231 randomly selected emergency psychiatric patients (psychiatric diagnosis, alcohol abuse, nonverbal patients experiencing a psychiatric emergency, and patients with somatic complaints such as life crisis) treated in the emergency departments of the two hospitals. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. The index predicted physician judgments of quality, was reliable, exhibited sufficient variation in scores, and was strongly associated with patient compliance. CONCLUSIONS. The study demonstrated that a subjective Bayesian model can be used to develop a reliable and valid index for measuring quality of care, with potential for practical application in management of health services. PMID:8514497

  5. [Quality analysis and evaluation of surgery for herniated lumbar disk. I. Methodology].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-López, P; Iglesias-Casarrubios, P; Alday-Anzolal, R; de la Cruz-Bértolo, J; Díez-Lobato, R

    2001-10-01

    A method for the analysis of the quality of the lumbar disc surgery was developed. The method assesses the important quality parameters such as scientific and technical quality (STQ), functional grades, quality of life, patients satisfaction and economic costs. The STQ related to the measurement of the care according to the available medical and technological knowledge was determined according to the performance of explicit criteria and standards in the clinic documentation (PEP method: Performance Evaluation Procedure). To measure the functional grade, a modification of Spanfort's criteria was used. To assess the quality of life a modification of 12-item Short Form health survey was applied. This form includes aspects like pain, social interaction, family characteristics, employment and psychological status. A questionnaire was used to measure satisfaction. The form was previously designed taking into account the patients and professionals criteria. In every stage care given, information issued, management and hosting, the patients and professionals opinions was considered and weighted. To calculate the cost three different systems were proposed i.e., Analytic economic management system (ABC-ABM), Weight related costs of DRGs (Diagnostic Related Groups) and Costs computed from price listing for consulting and hospitalization established by INSALUD.

  6. Balancing stakeholder needs in the evaluation of healthcare quality improvement

    PubMed Central

    Leviton, Laura C; Melichar, Lori

    2016-01-01

    Quality improvement (QI) efforts affect a broader range of people than we often assume. These are the potential stakeholders for QI and its evaluation, and they have valuable perspectives to offer when they are consulted in planning, conducting and interpreting evaluations. QI practitioners are accustomed to consulting stakeholders to assess unintended consequences or assess patient experiences of care, but in many cases there are additional benefits to a broad inclusion of stakeholders. These benefits are better adherence to ethical standards, to assure that all legitimate interests take part, more useful and relevant evaluation information and better political buy-in to improve impact. Balancing various stakeholder needs for information requires skill for both politics and research management. These challenges have few pat answers, but several preferred practices, which are illustrated with practical examples. PMID:26893512

  7. Development and evaluation of a prototype in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaron, J. B., Jr.; Morris, G. G.

    1981-01-01

    An in-flight instrument flight rules (IFR) procedures trainer capable of providing simulated indications of instrument flight in a typical general aviation aircraft independent of ground based navigation aids was developed. The IFR navaid related instruments and circuits from an ATC 610J table top simulator were installed in a Cessna 172 aircraft and connected to its electrical power and pitot static systems. The benefits expected from this hybridization concept include increased safety by reducing the number of general aviation aircraft conducting IFR training flights in congested terminal areas, and reduced fuel use and instruction costs by lessening the need to fly to and from navaid equipped airports and by increased efficiency of the required in-flight training. Technical feasibility was demonstrated and the operational feasibility of the concept was evaluated. Results indicated that the in-flight simulator is an effective training device for teaching IFR procedural skills.

  8. An extraction/enzymatic procedure for serum cholesterol measurement: evaluation of performance characteristics.

    PubMed

    Franzini, C; Luraschi, P

    1990-12-01

    The performance characteristics of an extraction/enzymatic procedure for serum cholesterol measurement were evaluated. The procedure is substantially derived from the accepted reference method as standardized by the Centers for Disease Control, substituting the enzymatic reaction for the Liebermann-Burchard reaction. Imprecision (CV) was consistently less than 1.5%, and accuracy was comparable to that of the definitive isotope dilution mass spectrometry method and the accepted reference method. Direct comparison of the enzymatic with the Liebermann-Burchard reaction, using a set of 50 human sera, revealed about -0.05 mmol/l constant bias of the former versus the latter, this being possibly due to higher specificity of the enzymatic reaction. As compared with the accepted reference method, the method described is characterized by higher practicability, the reagent being easier to prepare and to handle, and generating a more stable, chemically defined end-product.

  9. The Usability of SEEQ in Quality Evaluation of Arabic Secondary Education in Malaysia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    al-Muslim, M.; Arifin, Zamri

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of Arabic education in Malaysia needs to be conducted on a continuous basis to achieve the objectives of Arabic education. Student Evaluation of Education Quality (SEEQ) was proposed as one of the evaluation instruments of the quality of Arabic education. This study aimed to evaluate the usability of SEEQ in the context…

  10. Evaluation of milk powder quality by protein oxidative modifications.

    PubMed

    Scheidegger, Dana; Radici, Paola M; Vergara-Roig, Víctor A; Bosio, Noelia S; Pesce, Silvia F; Pecora, Rolando P; Romano, José C P; Kivatinitz, Silvia C

    2013-06-01

    The objective of the present research was to evaluate commercially available milk powders according to their protein oxidative modifications and antioxidant capacity, and to evaluate if these characteristics are related to physical quality parameters such as dispersibility or stability during storage. Fifteen commercially processed spray-dried milk powders were evaluated: 6 whole milk powders (WMP), 4 skim milk powders (SMP), and 5 infant formula powders (IFP). Protein oxidative status was measured as protein carbonyl (PC) content, dityrosine content, and extent of protein polymerization. The level of PC was slightly lower in SMP than in WMP, whereas IFP had more than twice as much PC as WMP (2.8 ± 0.4, 2.1 ± 0.2, and 6.5 ± 1.3 nmol/mg of protein for WMP, SMP, and IFP, respectively). No differences were detected in dityrosine accumulation. Although all the possible pairs of parameters were tested for correlations, we found that 4 parameters were linked: PC, whey content, protein aggregate level, and dispersibility. After 9 mo of storage at -20°C or room temperature, all milk samples were analyzed to evaluate changes in protein oxidative status (PC, dityrosine, and protein integrity) and related parameters. Compared with the initial condition, PC increased in all tested samples after 9 mo of storage at -20°C or at room temperature. Stored milk powders had increased PC and decreased dispersibility compared with prestorage levels. Our results highlight the importance of protein oxidative status in milk powder and its relationship to other related quality parameters, such as protein integrity and dispersibility. Our findings suggest that the understanding of such relationships could help in developing quality differentiation for different types of milk powders in the product market.

  11. Mexico City Air Quality Research Initiative; Volume 5, Strategic evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    1994-03-01

    Members of the Task HI (Strategic Evaluation) team were responsible for the development of a methodology to evaluate policies designed to alleviate air pollution in Mexico City. This methodology utilizes information from various reports that examined ways to reduce pollutant emissions, results from models that calculate the improvement in air quality due to a reduction in pollutant emissions, and the opinions of experts as to the requirements and trade-offs that are involved in developing a program to address the air pollution problem in Mexico City. The methodology combines these data to produce comparisons between different approaches to improving Mexico City`s air quality. These comparisons take into account not only objective factors such as the air quality improvement or cost of the different approaches, but also subjective factors such as public acceptance or political attractiveness of the different approaches. The end result of the process is a ranking of the different approaches and, more importantly, the process provides insights into the implications of implementing a particular approach or policy.

  12. Evaluation of emissions and air quality in megacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurjar, B. R.; Butler, T. M.; Lawrence, M. G.; Lelieveld, J.

    Several concepts and indicators exist to measure and rank urban areas in terms of their socio-economic, infrastructural, and environment-related parameters. The World Bank regularly publishes the World Development Indicators (WDI), and the United Nations reports the City Development Index (CDI) and also ranks megacities on the basis of their population size. Here, we evaluate and rank megacities in terms of their trace gas and particle emissions and ambient air quality. Besides ranking the megacities according to their surface area and population density, we evaluate them based on carbon monoxide (CO) emissions per capita, per year, and per unit surface area. Further, we rank the megacities according to ambient atmospheric concentrations of criteria pollutants, notably total suspended particles (TSP), sulfur dioxide (SO 2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO 2). We propose a multi-pollutant index (MPI) considering the combined level of the three criteria pollutants (i.e., TSP, SO 2, and NO 2) in view of the World Health Organization (WHO) Guidelines for Air Quality. Of 18 megacities considered here 5 classify as having "fair" air quality, and 13 as "poor". The megacities with the highest MPI, Dhaka, Beijing, Cairo, and Karachi, most urgently need reduction of air pollution.

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Priest River, 2004-2005 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Entz, Ray

    2005-02-01

    On July 6, 2004, the Habitat Evaluation Procedure (HEP) was used to determine baseline habitat suitability on the Priest River property, an acquisition completed by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in 2001. Evaluation species and appropriate models include bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, Canada goose, mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer. Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) values were visually estimated and agreed upon by all HEP team members. The Priest River Project provides a total of 105.41 Habitat Units (HUs) for the species evaluated. Conifer forest habitat provides 26.95 HUs for bald eagle, black-capped chickadee, and white-tailed deer. Grassland habitat provides 23.78 HUs for Canada goose and mallard. Scmb-shrub vegetation provides 54.68 HUs for mallard, yellow warbler, and white-tailed deer.

  14. The effects of lairage time and handling procedure prior to slaughter on stress and meat quality parameters in pigs.

    PubMed

    Dokmanović, M; Velarde, A; Tomović, V; Glamočlija, N; Marković, R; Janjić, J; Baltić, M Ž

    2014-10-01

    Lairage time (short - 8min to 2.7h, n=28 vs. long - 14 to 21.5h, n=72) and pig handling (gentle - no use of stick or electric prod, pig not slipping, falling, nor emitting high-pitched vocalizations vs. rough - where any of these occurred) effects on pig stress and meat quality were measured. Blood lactate and cortisol, plus post-mortem pH (pH60min; pH24h), temperature (T60min), drip loss, sensory and instrumental color and meat quality for the longissimus dorsi, pars lumbalis derived meat were determined. Carcass rigor mortis and skin damages were measured. Lairage time significantly affected blood lactate, carcass rigor mortis, skin damages, drip loss, color and meat quality. Handling procedure influenced blood lactate, pH60min and T60min. Long lairage was more stressful, and was detrimental to carcass quality, but caused better meat quality compared to short lairage. Rough handling was related to higher lactate and lower meat quality.

  15. Evaluating Core Quality for a Mars Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiss, D. K.; Budney, C.; Shiraishi, L.; Klein, K.

    2012-01-01

    Sample return missions, including the proposed Mars Sample Return (MSR) mission, propose to collect core samples from scientifically valuable sites on Mars. These core samples would undergo extreme forces during the drilling process, and during the reentry process if the EEV (Earth Entry Vehicle) performed a hard landing on Earth. Because of the foreseen damage to the stratigraphy of the cores, it is important to evaluate each core for rock quality. However, because no core sample return mission has yet been conducted to another planetary body, it remains unclear as to how to assess the cores for rock quality. In this report, we describe the development of a metric designed to quantitatively assess the mechanical quality of any rock cores returned from Mars (or other planetary bodies). We report on the process by which we tested the metric on core samples of Mars analogue materials, and the effectiveness of the core assessment metric (CAM) in assessing rock core quality before and after the cores were subjected to shocking (g forces representative of an EEV landing).

  16. A model to evaluate quality and effectiveness of disease management.

    PubMed

    Lemmens, K M M; Nieboer, A P; van Schayck, C P; Asin, J D; Huijsman, R

    2008-12-01

    Disease management has emerged as a new strategy to enhance quality of care for patients suffering from chronic conditions, and to control healthcare costs. So far, however, the effects of this strategy remain unclear. Although current models define the concept of disease management, they do not provide a systematic development or an explanatory theory of how disease management affects the outcomes of care. The objective of this paper is to present a framework for valid evaluation of disease-management initiatives. The evaluation model is built on two pillars of disease management: patient-related and professional-directed interventions. The effectiveness of these interventions is thought to be affected by the organisational design of the healthcare system. Disease management requires a multifaceted approach; hence disease-management programme evaluations should focus on the effects of multiple interventions, namely patient-related, professional-directed and organisational interventions. The framework has been built upon the conceptualisation of these disease-management interventions. Analysis of the underlying mechanisms of these interventions revealed that learning and behavioural theories support the core assumptions of disease management. The evaluation model can be used to identify the components of disease-management programmes and the mechanisms behind them, making valid comparison feasible. In addition, this model links the programme interventions to indicators that can be used to evaluate the disease-management programme. Consistent use of this framework will enable comparisons among disease-management programmes and outcomes in evaluation research.

  17. Control of Risks Through the Use of Procedures: A Method for Evaluating the Change in Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praino, Gregory T.; Sharit, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    not. The model used for describing the Failure Likelihood considers how well a task was established by evaluating that task on five components. The components selected to define a well established task are: that it be defined, assigned to someone capable, that they be trained appropriately, that the actions be organized to enable proper completion and that some form of independent monitoring be performed. Validation of the method was based on the information provided by a group of experts in Space Shuttle ground processing when they were presented with 5 scenarios that identified a clause from a procedure. For each scenario, they recorded their perception of how important the associated rule was and how likely it was to fail. They then rated the components of Control Value and Failure Likelihood for all the scenarios. The order in which each reviewer ranked the scenarios Control Value and Failure Likelihood was compared to the order in which they ranked the scenarios for each of the associated components; inevitability and opportunity for Control Value and definition, assignment, training, organization and monitoring for Failure Likelihood. This order comparison showed how the components contributed to a relative relationship to the substitute risk element. With the relationship established for Space Shuttle ground processing, this method can be used to gauge if the introduction or removal of a particular rule will increase or decrease the .risk associated with the hazard it is intended to control.

  18. A quality improvement project to optimize patient outcomes following the maze procedure.

    PubMed

    Henry, Linda L; Ad, Niv; Martin, Lisa; Hunt, Sharon; Crippen, Pamela

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common of all clinically sustained heart arrhythmias with associated morbidities (shortness of breath, fatigue, and stroke). The maze cardiac surgical procedure is a new treatment option available for patients who have medical refractory AF. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a written postdischarge protocol was necessary to improve outcomes following the maze procedure. Only 3 (27%) patients with AF were actively treated by an arrhythmia protocol for restoration of sinus rhythm. Unnecessary pharmacologic management for AF was found in 44 patients with normal sinus rhythm. A postdischarge protocol was developed that improved outcomes.

  19. A quality assurance framework for the fully automated and objective evaluation of image quality in cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Steiding, Christian; Kolditz, Daniel; Kalender, Willi A.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: Thousands of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scanners for vascular, maxillofacial, neurological, and body imaging are in clinical use today, but there is no consensus on uniform acceptance and constancy testing for image quality (IQ) and dose yet. The authors developed a quality assurance (QA) framework for fully automated and time-efficient performance evaluation of these systems. In addition, the dependence of objective Fourier-based IQ metrics on direction and position in 3D volumes was investigated for CBCT. Methods: The authors designed a dedicated QA phantom 10 cm in length consisting of five compartments, each with a diameter of 10 cm, and an optional extension ring 16 cm in diameter. A homogeneous section of water-equivalent material allows measuring CT value accuracy, image noise and uniformity, and multidimensional global and local noise power spectra (NPS). For the quantitative determination of 3D high-contrast spatial resolution, the modulation transfer function (MTF) of centrally and peripherally positioned aluminum spheres was computed from edge profiles. Additional in-plane and axial resolution patterns were used to assess resolution qualitatively. The characterization of low-contrast detectability as well as CT value linearity and artifact behavior was tested by utilizing sections with soft-tissue-equivalent and metallic inserts. For an automated QA procedure, a phantom detection algorithm was implemented. All tests used in the dedicated QA program were initially verified in simulation studies and experimentally confirmed on a clinical dental CBCT system. Results: The automated IQ evaluation of volume data sets of the dental CBCT system was achieved with the proposed phantom requiring only one scan for the determination of all desired parameters. Typically, less than 5 min were needed for phantom set-up, scanning, and data analysis. Quantitative evaluation of system performance over time by comparison to previous examinations was also

  20. A Signal Detection Theory Approach to Evaluating Oculometer Data Quality

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latorella, Kara; Lynn, William, III; Barry, John S.; Kelly, Lon; Shih, Ming-Yun

    2013-01-01

    Currently, data quality is described in terms of spatial and temporal accuracy and precision [Holmqvist et al. in press]. While this approach provides precise errors in pixels, or visual angle, often experiments are more concerned with whether subjects'points of gaze can be said to be reliable with respect to experimentally-relevant areas of interest. This paper proposes a method to characterize oculometer data quality using Signal Detection Theory (SDT) [Marcum 1947]. SDT classification results in four cases: Hit (correct report of a signal), Miss (failure to report a ), False Alarm (a signal falsely reported), Correct Reject (absence of a signal correctly reported). A technique is proposed where subjects' are directed to look at points in and outside of an AOI, and the resulting Points of Gaze (POG) are classified as Hits (points known to be internal to an AOI are classified as such), Misses (AOI points are not indicated as such), False Alarms (points external to AOIs are indicated as in the AOI), or Correct Rejects (points external to the AOI are indicated as such). SDT metrics describe performance in terms of discriminability, sensitivity, and specificity. This paper presentation will provide the procedure for conducting this assessment and an example of data collected for AOIs in a simulated flightdeck environment.

  1. The interlaboratorial quality assurance program for blood lead determination. An evaluation of methods and results.

    PubMed

    Morisi, G; Patriarca, M; Taggi, F

    1989-01-01

    For over five years a national program, promoted by a working group of the Istituto Superiore di Sanità (Italian National Institute of Health), has been active in Italy for the quality control of the blood lead levels determination. The program is based on the adoption, by the laboratories, of the same known-titre materials, for the internal quality control, and on the participation in periodical collaborative exercises for the external quality evaluation. The promoting laboratory prepared the control samples, verified their homogeneity and stability and distributed them to the laboratories following a randomized procedure; then, it provided a preliminary elaboration of the results (precision, difference from the median, distribution) after each exercise, and carried out the global evaluation of the performances of each laboratory after at least one year of activity in the program using parametric (regression analysis) and non-parametric (evaluation of the results according to pre-determined acceptability criteria) statistical methods. After four years of activity, the results obtained show that the adopted scheme and the procedures used turned out to be adequate. The study of the regression parameters between the results of each laboratory and the medians of the results of all the laboratories has confirmed the validity of the graphic criterion adopted, also yielding specific information on the relative contribution of the different kinds of error (systematic, constant and/or proportional and casual) to the global error. Furthermore, the proportion of the laboratories with "good level" performances (i.e., acceptable results in at least 80% of the examined samples) has increased from approximately 30% in the first phase to approximately 50% in the fourth phase.

  2. Participant evaluation results for two indoor air quality studies

    SciTech Connect

    Hawthorne, A.R.; Dudney, C.S.; Cohen, M.A.; Spengler, J.D.

    1987-01-01

    After two surveys for indoor air pollutants (radon and other chemicals) the homeowners were surveyed for their reactions. The results of these participant evaluation surveys, assuming that the participants that responded to the survey were representative, indicate that homeowners will accept a significant level of monitoring activity as part of an indoor air quality field study. Those participants completing surveys overwhelmingly enjoyed being in the studies and would do it again. We believe that the emphasis placed on positive homeowner interactions and efforts made to inform participants throughout our studies were positive factors in this result. There was no substantial differences noted in the responses between the 70-house study, which included a homeowner compensation payment of $100, and the 300-house study, which did not include a compensation payment. These results provide encouragement to conduct future complex, multipollutant indoor air quality studies when they are scientifically sound and cost effective.

  3. Evaluating frequency and quality of pathogen-specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Anikeeva, Nadia; Grosso, Dolores; Flomenberg, Neal; Sykulev, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    It is generally accepted that enumeration and characterization of antigen-specific T cells provide essential information about potency of the immune response. Here, we report a new technique to determine the frequency and potency of antigen-specific CD8 T cells. The assay measures changes of intracellular Ca2+ in real time by fluorescent microscopy in individual CD8 T cells responding to cognate peptides. The T cells form continuous monolayer, enabling the cells to present the peptides to each other. This approach allows us to evaluate the kinetics of intracellular Ca2+ signalling that characterizes the quality of T cell response. We demonstrate the usefulness of the assay examining the frequency and quality of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8 T cells from healthy donor and patient after haploidentical stem cell transplantation. The new assay has a potential to provide essential information determining the status of the immune system, disease morbidity, potency of therapeutic intervention and vaccine efficacy. PMID:27786275

  4. Report: Procedural Review of EPA’s Greenhouse Gases Endangerment Finding Data Quality Processes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report #11-P-0702, September 26, 2011. EPA met statutory requirements for rulemaking and generally followed requirements and guidance related to ensuring the quality of the supporting technical information.

  5. Laboratory study of the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kuivila, Kathryn; Crepeau, Kathryn L.

    1999-01-01

    A laboratory study was used to evaluate the response of select insecticides to toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Fourteen insecticides, one degradation product, and one synergist were spiked into organic-grade water and carried through toxicity identification evaluation procedures. Concentrations of each compound were analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. During Phase I, the water sample was pumped through a C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with methanol. Dimethoate was not removed by the extraction, but remained in the rinsate. In contrast, permethrin was removed by the extraction, but was not recovered by the methanol elution, and 80 percent of the permethrin remained on the cartridge, teflon tubing, and glassware. Chlorpyrifos also was not recovered completely with the methanol elution (only 62 percent was recovered). The other insecticides were extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and recovered by elution with methanol (80 percent or greater). During Phase II, a new spiked water sample was extracted by C-8 solid-phase extraction cartridge and then eluted with varying concentrations of methanol and water into different fractions. Each methanol:water fraction was analyzed for the added compounds. Most of the insecticides eluted in two fractions, with concentrations of 10 percent or greater. The largest number of insecticides eluted in the 75 percent methanol:water fraction.

  6. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures. PMID:26078779

  7. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures.

  8. Quality Procedures in the European Higher Education Area and Beyond--Visions for the Future: Third ENQA Survey. ENQA Occasional Papers 18

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grifoll, Josep; Hopbach, Achim; Kekalainen, Helka; Lugano, Nathalie; Rozsnyai, Christina; Shopov, Todor

    2012-01-01

    Higher education reforms over the last decade, resulting in the establishment of the European Higher Education Area, with new social demands and expectations, have greatly impacted quality assurance in higher education. As a follow-up activity to two previous surveys on external quality procedures, the European Association for Quality Assurance in…

  9. Evaluation of Topographic Error and Quality with Stereophotoclinometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Eric; Weirich, John; Campbell, Tanner; Lambert, Diane; Drozd, Kristofer

    2016-10-01

    One of the primary means to evaluate the accuracy of a shape model is to measure the deviation between a truth model (if available) and the shape model. Typically, this is done by calculating the square root of the average error squared of all the points, i.e the root mean squared error (RMS).This technique provides valuable insight into the error distribution of a shape model, as well as providing an objective measurement of deviations. However, it does not fully explain the error and especially the quality of a digital terrain model. Systematic errors can obscure poorly performing regions and may over-report errors.We have begun an extensive analysis of using normalized cross-correlation to evaluate the quality of shape models compared to truth topography, as well as the agreement between images rendered from the model with the original images. This technique provides a tool to differentiate between local accuracy and global accuracy. It also provides an effective way to decompose the error vector into horizontal and vertical displacements. It is especially useful for stereophotoclinometry (SPC) because it allows a clear determination of the quality of the model at the resolution of the source images (i.e. if the source images have a 5cm pixel size, it shows how well the SPC solution is at 5cm). Additionally, it demonstrates how essential a good imaging plan is to the quality of the shape model.We are using these techniques in support of the OSIRIS-REx mission to the asteroid Bennu.

  10. Evaluation of the Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model is a state-of-the-science air quality model that simulates the emission, transport and fate of numerous air pollutants, including ozone and particulate matter. The Computational Exposure Division (CED) of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency develops the CMAQ model and periodically releases new versions of the model that include bug fixes and various other improvements to the modeling system. In the fall of 2015, CMAQ version 5.1 was released. This new version of CMAQ will contain important bug fixes to several issues that were identified in CMAQv5.0.2 and additionally include updates to other portions of the code. Several annual, and numerous episodic, CMAQv5.1 simulations were performed to assess the impact of these improvements on the model results. These results will be presented, along with a base evaluation of the performance of the CMAQv5.1 modeling system against available surface and upper-air measurements available during the time period simulated. The National Exposure Research Laboratory (NERL) Computational Exposure Division (CED) develops and evaluates data, decision-support tools, and models to be applied to media-specific or receptor-specific problem areas. CED uses modeling-based approaches to characterize exposures, evaluate fate and transport, and support environmental diagnostics/forensics with input from multiple data sources. It also develops media- and receptor-specific models, proces

  11. Evaluation of a continuous quality improvement program in anticoagulant therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Ariane; Lahaie, Alexandre; Odobasic, Bojan; Tremblay, Marie-Philip; Wazzan, Dana; Caron, Stéphanie; Leblanc, Caroline; Martineau, Josée; Lalonde, Lyne

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ACO Program (Programme ACO), a continuous quality improvement program (CQIP) in anticoagulation therapy, was offered in community pharmacies as a pilot project. Objective: To evaluate the participants’ appreciation for the various activities of the program. Methods: Participants had access to training activities, including an audit with feedback, online training activities (OTA), clinical tools and support from facilitators. Cognitive behavioural learning determinants were evaluated before and 5 months after the beginning of the program. Participants’ satisfaction and perception were documented via online questionnaires and a semistructured interview. Results: Of the 52 pharmacists in the ACO Program, 47 participated in this evaluation. Seventy-seven percent of the participants completed at least 1 OTA and 6% published on the forum. The feeling of personal effectiveness rose from 8.01 (7.67-8.35) to 8.62 (8.24-8.99). The audit and feedback, as well as the high-quality OTA and their lecturers, were the most appreciated elements. Discussion: There was a high OTA participation rate. The facilitators seemed to play a key role in the CQIP. The low level of participation in the forum reflects the known phenomenon of social loafing. Technical difficulties affecting the platform and data collection for the audit with feedback constituted limitations. Conclusion: The CQIP in anticoagulation therapy is appreciated by community pharmacists and is associated with an improved feeling of personal effectiveness. PMID:27829859

  12. Eco-environmental quality evaluation of Huaibei Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, M.; Zhu, Y.; Lü, H.; Li, Y.; Zhou, X.; Chen, Y.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, the destruction of the ecological environment in Huaibei Plain has limited the development of the economy. Doing research on eco-environment quality evaluation methods may be helpful to the recovery of the eco-environment in Huaibei Plain and the construction of ecological civilization. A new assessment system was introduced in this paper on the basis of a traditional eco-environmental evaluation method; the NPP index was used to replace biological abundance index and vegetation coverage index. This new method was used to evaluate the eco-environment quality of Huaibei Plain. Results indicate that: (a) the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain has been getting worse since 1990, but has improved since 2000; (b) the water-network density index is the key factor which affects the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain; (c) If human activities, pollution control, land degradation and urban area development are not taken into consideration, the eco-environment of Huaibei Plain in dry years will be serious.

  13. Teaching Surgical Procedures with Movies: Tips for High-quality Video Clips

    PubMed Central

    Jacquemart, Mathieu; Bouletreau, Pierre; Breton, Pierre; Mojallal, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Video must now be considered as a precious tool for learning surgery. However, the medium does present production challenges, and currently, quality movies are not always accessible. We developed a series of 7 surgical videos and made them available on a publicly accessible internet website. Our videos have been viewed by thousands of people worldwide. High-quality educational movies must respect strategic and technical points to be reliable. PMID:27757342

  14. An Assessment of the Quality of Sampling Procedures Reported in Clinical Nursing Research: A Pilot Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-01-01

    knowledge which provides the foundation or scientific base upon which nursing education and practice are built (American Nurses Association, 1984, 1985... nursing education "usually were quite adequate", but presented no evidence of having assessed the adequacy of the sample sizes through power...22- 28. Gothler, A. M. (1986). Quality nursing research: The key to quality nursing education . Nurse Educator, 11(2), 14-16. Harrell, J. S. (1986

  15. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Implementation Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... hydrologic modifications preclude the attainment of the WQS, and it is not feasible to restore the waterbody... consistent with sections B.9, C.1, C.3 through C.6, and E.1 through E.5 of this procedure. 1. Stream Design. These design flows must be used unless data exist to demonstrate that an alternative stream design...

  16. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Implementation Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... hydrologic modifications preclude the attainment of the WQS, and it is not feasible to restore the waterbody... consistent with sections B.9, C.1, C.3 through C.6, and E.1 through E.5 of this procedure. 1. Stream Design. These design flows must be used unless data exist to demonstrate that an alternative stream design...

  17. 40 CFR Appendix F to Part 132 - Great Lakes Water Quality Initiative Implementation Procedures

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... hydrologic modifications preclude the attainment of the WQS, and it is not feasible to restore the waterbody... consistent with sections B.9, C.1, C.3 through C.6, and E.1 through E.5 of this procedure. 1. Stream Design. These design flows must be used unless data exist to demonstrate that an alternative stream design...

  18. Quality Issues in Judging Portfolios: Implications for Organizing Teaching Portfolio Assessment Procedures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tigelaar, Dineke E. H.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Wolfhagen, Ineke H. A. P.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2005-01-01

    This article addresses the choice of the most appropriate procedure for the assessment of portfolios used in teacher and lecturer assessment. A characteristic of modern assessment modes, including portfolios, is that the information they provide is often qualitative and derived from different contexts. Unambiguous, objective rating of portfolios…

  19. The imprecise science of evaluating scholarly performance: utilizing broad quality categories for an assessment of business and management journals.

    PubMed

    Lange, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    In a growing number of countries, government-appointed assessment panels develop ranks on the basis of the quality of scholarly outputs to apportion budgets in recognition of evaluated performance and to justify public funds for future R&D activities. When business and management journals are being grouped in broad quality categories, a recent study has noted that this procedure was placing the same journals in essentially the same categories. Drawing on journal quality categorizations by several German- and English-speaking business departments and academic associations, the author performs nonparametric tests and correlations to analyze whether this claim can be substantiated. In particular, he examines the ability of broad quality categorizations to add value to governmental, administrative, and academic decision making by withstanding the criticism traditionally levied at research quality assessments.

  20. New Methods for Air Quality Model Evaluation with Satellite Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holloway, T.; Harkey, M.

    2015-12-01

    Despite major advances in the ability of satellites to detect gases and aerosols in the atmosphere, there remains significant, untapped potential to apply space-based data to air quality regulatory applications. Here, we showcase research findings geared toward increasing the relevance of satellite data to support operational air quality management, focused on model evaluation. Particular emphasis is given to nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and formaldehyde (HCHO) from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument aboard the NASA Aura satellite, and evaluation of simulations from the EPA Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This work is part of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team (AQAST), and is motivated by ongoing dialog with state and federal air quality management agencies. We present the response of satellite-derived NO2 to meteorological conditions, satellite-derived HCHO:NO2 ratios as an indicator of ozone production regime, and the ability of models to capture these sensitivities over the continental U.S. In the case of NO2-weather sensitivities, we find boundary layer height, wind speed, temperature, and relative humidity to be the most important variables in determining near-surface NO2 variability. CMAQ agreed with relationships observed in satellite data, as well as in ground-based data, over most regions. However, we find that the southwest U.S. is a problem area for CMAQ, where modeled NO2 responses to insolation, boundary layer height, and other variables are at odds with the observations. Our analyses utilize a software developed by our team, the Wisconsin Horizontal Interpolation Program for Satellites (WHIPS): a free, open-source program designed to make satellite-derived air quality data more usable. WHIPS interpolates level 2 satellite retrievals onto a user-defined fixed grid, in effect creating custom-gridded level 3 satellite product. Currently, WHIPS can process the following data products: OMI NO2 (NASA retrieval); OMI NO2 (KNMI retrieval); OMI

  1. Citrus fruits--varieties, chemistry, technology, and quality evaluation. Part II. Chemistry, technology, and quality evaluation. A. Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ranganna, S; Govindarajan, V S; Ramana, K V

    1983-01-01

    In Part 2 of this review on citrus fruits, the literature on chemistry, technology, and quality evaluation are critically considered. Sweet oranges, mandarin, grapefruit, lemon, and lime are generally used for processing. The literature on chemical components of citrus fruit which include sugars, polysaccharides, oraganic acids, nitrogenous constituents and lipids; carotenoids which contribute to color; vitamins and minerals, and flavonoids; limonoids, some of which impart bitterness to the juice; and the volatile components which contribute to aroma have been reviewed. Chilled and pasteurized juices, juice concentrates, and beverages are the important products manufactured commercially, and to a limited extent powdered citrus juices, canned segments, and marmalades. The literature on the manufacture of these products also as new types of juice and oil extractors; TASTE and other types of evaporators; tank farms to store juice and concentrate in bulk; aseptic filling in bulk containers and retail packs; alternate flexible and rigid containers other than glass and tin; and recovery of volatile flavoring constituents during juice processing are some of the important technological developments in the recent past and have been discussed. Bitterness in citrus juices and its control, composition of cloud, and its stability and changes during storage have been reviewed. Essential oils, pectin, frozen and dried juice sacs, dried pulp and molasses, flavonoids, seed oil, and meal are the important byproducts, the manufacture of which is given in essential details. Generally, consumers judge the product on the basis of its sensory attributes. The quality of finished product is dependent upon the raw materials used and control of processes. The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) standards for different products, physicochemical and microbiological parameters prescribed as indices of quality of fruit, juice, concentrate, and other products; composition of essential oils; and

  2. Quality Evaluation By Acousto-Ultrasonic Testing Of Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, Alex

    1989-01-01

    Promising nondestructive-testing method based on ultrasonic simulation of stress waves. Report reviews acousto-ultrasonic technology for nondestructive testing. Discusses principles, suggests advanced signal-analysis schemes for development, and presents potential applications. Acousto-ultrasonics applied principally to assess defects in laminated and filament-wound fiber-reinforced composite materials. Technique used to determine variations in such properties as tensile, shear, and flexural strengths and reductions in strength and toughness caused by defects. Also used to evaluate states of cure, porosities, orientation of fibers, volume fractions of fibers, bonding between fibers and matrices, and qualities of interlaminar bonds.

  3. Photothermal Techniques Used to Evaluate Quality in Dairy Products.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Romero, E.; Balderas-López, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal systems were used to quantify thermal and optical properties of commercial and natural dairy products. Thermal diffusivity and light absorption coefficient were analyzed. It was found that water content easily alters thermal properties in samples of milk. In addition, all samples showed strong light absorptions at 405 nm, 980 nm and 488 nm, evidencing presence of proteins, fat and vitamins (riboflavin), respectively. Therefore, it was shown that thermo-physical properties measured in this work could be used as complementary parameters for quality evaluation of dairy products.

  4. Space-Time Analysis of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII) Phase 1 Air Quality Simulations

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study presents an evaluation of summertime daily maximum ozone concentrations over North America (NA) and Europe (EU) using the database generated during Phase 1 of the Air Quality Model Evaluation International Initiative (AQMEII). The analysis focuses on identifying tempor...

  5. [Quality management in a clinical research facility: Evaluation of changes in quality in-house figures and the appraisal of in-house quality indicators].

    PubMed

    Aden, Bile; Allekotte, Silke; Mösges, Ralph

    2016-12-01

    For long-term maintenance and improvement of quality within a clinical research institute, the implementation and certification of a quality management system is suitable. Due to the implemented quality management system according to the still valid DIN EN ISO 9001:2008 desired quality objectives are achieved effectively. The evaluation of quality scores and the appraisal of in-house quality indicators make an important contribution in this regard. In order to achieve this and draw quality assurance conclusions, quality indicators as sensible and sensitive as possible are developed. For this, own key objectives, the retrospective evaluation of quality scores, a prospective follow-up and also discussions establish the basis. In the in-house clinical research institute the measures introduced by the quality management led to higher efficiency in work processes, improved staff skills, higher customer satisfaction and overall to more successful outcomes in relation to the self-defined key objectives.

  6. Integrating standard operating procedures and industry notebook standards to evaluate students in laboratory courses.

    PubMed

    Wallert, Mark A; Provost, Joseph J

    2014-01-01

    To enhance the preparedness of graduates from the Biochemistry and Biotechnology (BCBT) Major at Minnesota State University Moorhead for employment in the bioscience industry we have developed a new Industry certificate program. The BCBT Industry Certificate was developed to address specific skill sets that local, regional, and national industry experts identified as lacking in new B.S. and B.A. biochemistry graduates. The industry certificate addresses concerns related to working in a regulated industry such as Good Laboratory Practices, Good Manufacturing Practices, and working in a Quality System. In this article we specifically describe how we developed a validation course that uses Standard Operating Procedures to describe grading policy and laboratory notebook requirements in an effort to better prepare students to transition into industry careers.

  7. Quality assurance and quality control data validation procedures used for the Love Canal and Dallas lead soil monitoring programs.

    PubMed

    Brown, K W; Black, S C

    1983-06-01

    Public awareness of soils contamination has increased in recent years due in part to the notoriety associated with the indiscriminate release, packaging, transporting and disposal of hazardous materials. In 1980, and again in 1982, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) was responsible for designing, implementing and conducting environmental monitoring programs at Love Canal in Niagara Falls, New York, and in Dallas, Texas, that dealt with suspected contaminated soils. Both of these monitoring programs were conducted over a relatively short time with the collection and analysis of over 4000 soil samples. The methods employed by the Environmental Protection Agency for providing soil data that was scientifically valid and of defensible quality for each of these monitoring programs are presented. Also, methods for identifying data bias, its precision and its uncertainty are identified.

  8. Classification and quality evaluation of tobacco leaves based on image processing and fuzzy comprehensive evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Xinhong

    2011-01-01

    Most of classification, quality evaluation or grading of the flue-cured tobacco leaves are manually operated, which relies on the judgmental experience of experts, and inevitably limited by personal, physical and environmental factors. The classification and the quality evaluation are therefore subjective and experientially based. In this paper, an automatic classification method of tobacco leaves based on the digital image processing and the fuzzy sets theory is presented. A grading system based on image processing techniques was developed for automatically inspecting and grading flue-cured tobacco leaves. This system uses machine vision for the extraction and analysis of color, size, shape and surface texture. Fuzzy comprehensive evaluation provides a high level of confidence in decision making based on the fuzzy logic. The neural network is used to estimate and forecast the membership function of the features of tobacco leaves in the fuzzy sets. The experimental results of the two-level fuzzy comprehensive evaluation (FCE) show that the accuracy rate of classification is about 94% for the trained tobacco leaves, and the accuracy rate of the non-trained tobacco leaves is about 72%. We believe that the fuzzy comprehensive evaluation is a viable way for the automatic classification and quality evaluation of the tobacco leaves.

  9. A design procedure for the handling qualities optimization of the X-29A aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bosworth, John T.; Cox, Timothy H.

    1989-01-01

    A design technique for handling qualities improvement was developed for the X-29A aircraft. As with any new aircraft, the X-29A control law designers were presented with a relatively high degree of uncertainty in their mathematical models. The presence of uncertainties, and the high level of static instability of the X-29A caused the control law designers to stress stability and robustness over handling qualities. During flight test, the mathematical models of the vehicle were validated or corrected to match the vehicle dynamic behavior. The updated models were then used to fine tune the control system to provide fighter-like handling characteristics. A design methodology was developed which works within the existing control system architecture to provide improved handling qualities and acceptable stability with a minimum of cost in both implementation as well as software verification and validation.

  10. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction.

    PubMed

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S Stevens

    2015-06-01

    Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940's, and during the last 10-15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence.

  11. Use of Preclinical Drug vs. Food Choice Procedures to Evaluate Candidate Medications for Cocaine Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Banks, Matthew L; Hutsell, Blake A; Schwienteck, Kathryn L; Negus, S. Stevens

    2015-01-01

    Opinion Statement Drug addiction is a disease that manifests as an inappropriate allocation of behavior towards the procurement and use of the abused substance and away from other behaviors that produce more adaptive reinforcers (e.g. exercise, work, family and social relationships). The goal of treating drug addiction is not only to decrease drug-maintained behaviors, but also to promote a reallocation of behavior towards alternative, nondrug reinforcers. Experimental procedures that offer concurrent access to both a drug reinforcer and an alternative, nondrug reinforcer provide a research tool for assessment of medication effects on drug choice and behavioral allocation. Choice procedures are currently the standard in human laboratory research on medications development. Preclinical choice procedures have been utilized in biomedical research since the early 1940’s, and during the last 10–15 years, their use for evaluation of medications to treat drug addiction has increased. We propose here that parallel use of choice procedures in preclinical and clinical studies will facilitate translational research on development of medications to treat cocaine addiction. In support of this proposition, a review of the literature suggests strong concordance between preclinical effectiveness of candidate medications to modify cocaine choice in nonhuman primates and rodents and clinical effectiveness of these medications to modify either cocaine choice in human laboratory studies or metrics of cocaine abuse in patients with cocaine use disorder. The strongest evidence for medication effectiveness in preclinical choice studies has been obtained with maintenance on the monoamine releaser d-amphetamine, a candidate agonist medication for cocaine use analogous to use of methadone to treat heroin abuse or nicotine formulations to treat tobacco dependence. PMID:26009706

  12. Evaluation of a novel correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from broadband SIP measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Johan Alexander; Zimmermann, Egon; Esser, Odilia; Haegel, Franz-Hubert; Treichel, Andrea; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-12-01

    Broadband spectral induced polarization (SIP) measurements of the complex electrical resistivity can be affected by the contact impedance of the potential electrodes above 100 Hz. In this study, we present a correction procedure to remove electrode impedance effects from SIP measurements to improve the accuracy of broadband complex electrical resistivity measurements. The first step in this correction procedure is to estimate the electrode impedance using a measurement with reversed current and potential electrodes. In a second step, this estimated electrode impedance is used to correct SIP measurements based on a simplified electrical model of the SIP measurement system. We evaluated this new correction procedure using SIP measurements on water because of the well-defined dielectric properties. It was found that the difference between the corrected and expected phase of the complex electrical resistivity of water was below 0.1 mrad at 1 kHz for a wide range of electrode impedances. In addition, SIP measurements on a saturated unconsolidated sediment sample with two types of potential electrodes showed that the measured phase of the electrical resistivity was very similar (difference < 0.2 mrad) up to a frequency of 10 kHz after the effect of the different electrode impedances was removed. Finally, SIP measurements on variably saturated unconsolidated sand were made. Here, the plausibility of the phase of the electrical resistivity was improved for frequencies up to 1 kHz, but errors remained for higher frequencies due to the approximate nature of the electrode impedance estimates and some remaining unknown parasitic capacitances that led to current leakage. It was concluded that the proposed correction procedure for SIP measurements improved the accuracy of the phase measurements by an order of magnitude in the kHz frequency range. Further improvement of this accuracy requires a method to accurately estimate parasitic capacitances in situ.

  13. Optimizing experimental procedures for quantitative evaluation of crop plant performance in high throughput phenotyping systems

    PubMed Central

    Junker, Astrid; Muraya, Moses M.; Weigelt-Fischer, Kathleen; Arana-Ceballos, Fernando; Klukas, Christian; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Meyer, Rhonda C.; Riewe, David; Altmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Detailed and standardized protocols for plant cultivation in environmentally controlled conditions are an essential prerequisite to conduct reproducible experiments with precisely defined treatments. Setting up appropriate and well defined experimental procedures is thus crucial for the generation of solid evidence and indispensable for successful plant research. Non-invasive and high throughput (HT) phenotyping technologies offer the opportunity to monitor and quantify performance dynamics of several hundreds of plants at a time. Compared to small scale plant cultivations, HT systems have much higher demands, from a conceptual and a logistic point of view, on experimental design, as well as the actual plant cultivation conditions, and the image analysis and statistical methods for data evaluation. Furthermore, cultivation conditions need to be designed that elicit plant performance characteristics corresponding to those under natural conditions. This manuscript describes critical steps in the optimization of procedures for HT plant phenotyping systems. Starting with the model plant Arabidopsis, HT-compatible methods were tested, and optimized with regard to growth substrate, soil coverage, watering regime, experimental design (considering environmental inhomogeneities) in automated plant cultivation and imaging systems. As revealed by metabolite profiling, plant movement did not affect the plants' physiological status. Based on these results, procedures for maize HT cultivation and monitoring were established. Variation of maize vegetative growth in the HT phenotyping system did match well with that observed in the field. The presented results outline important issues to be considered in the design of HT phenotyping experiments for model and crop plants. It thereby provides guidelines for the setup of HT experimental procedures, which are required for the generation of reliable and reproducible data of phenotypic variation for a broad range of applications. PMID

  14. Incorporating principal component analysis into air quality model evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, Brian; Bash, Jesse; Foley, Kristen; Pleim, Jon

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of standard air quality model evaluation techniques is becoming compromised as the simulation periods continue to lengthen in response to ever increasing computing capacity. Accordingly, the purpose of this paper is to demonstrate a statistical approach called Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with the intent of motivating its use by the evaluation community. One of the main objectives of PCA is to identify, through data reduction, the recurring and independent modes of variations (or signals) within a very large dataset, thereby summarizing the essential information of that dataset so that meaningful and descriptive conclusions can be made. In this demonstration, PCA is applied to a simple evaluation metric - the model bias associated with EPA's Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) model when compared to weekly observations of sulfate (SO42-) and ammonium (NH4+) ambient air concentrations measured by the Clean Air Status and Trends Network (CASTNet). The advantages of using this technique are demonstrated as it identifies strong and systematic patterns of CMAQ model bias across a myriad of spatial and temporal scales that are neither constrained to geopolitical boundaries nor monthly/seasonal time periods (a limitation of many current studies). The technique also identifies locations (station-grid cell pairs) that are used as indicators for a more thorough diagnostic evaluation thereby hastening and facilitating understanding of the probable mechanisms responsible for the unique behavior among bias regimes. A sampling of results indicates that biases are still prevalent in both SO42- and NH4+ simulations that can be attributed to either: 1) cloud processes in the meteorological model utilized by CMAQ, which are found to overestimated convective clouds and precipitation, while underestimating larger-scale resolved clouds that are less likely to precipitate, and 2) biases associated with Midwest NH3 emissions which may be partially ameliorated

  15. A new fluorescent imaging procedure in vivo for evaluation of the retinal microcirculation in rats.

    PubMed

    Kimura, H; Kiryu, J; Nishiwaki, H; Ogura, Y

    1995-03-01

    We investigated a new method for in vivo evaluation of the retinal microcirculation in rats using a cell-permeant fluorescent dye, acridine orange (AO), which stains cell nuclei and cytoplasm, and a scanning laser ophthalmoscope (SLO). AO, which binds and interacts with DNA and RNA, and thus stains cell nuclei and cytoplasm, was administered intravenously to rats. Fluorescein angiography was performed after administration of the AO, and fundus images were recorded on S-VHS videotape by means of an SLO. Argon laser was used as an exciter of the dye. The retinal vessels were stained with the dye, rendering the retinal microvasculature clearly visible. Cell nuclei and vessel walls were observed as greater fluorescence and lesser fluorescence, respectively. Leukocytes were also observed as highly fluorescent dots moving through the vessels. The results suggest that SLO visualization of AO uptake by cells may be a useful procedure for the evaluation of retinal microcirculation in vivo in rats.

  16. Assessment of the assessment: evaluation of the model quality estimates in CASP10.

    PubMed

    Kryshtafovych, Andriy; Barbato, Alessandro; Fidelis, Krzysztof; Monastyrskyy, Bohdan; Schwede, Torsten; Tramontano, Anna

    2014-02-01

    The article presents an assessment of the ability of the thirty-seven model quality assessment (MQA) methods participating in CASP10 to provide an a priori estimation of the quality of structural models, and of the 67 tertiary structure prediction groups to provide confidence estimates for their predicted coordinates. The assessment of MQA predictors is based on the methods used in previous CASPs, such as correlation between the predicted and observed quality of the models (both at the global and local levels), accuracy of methods in distinguishing between good and bad models as well as good and bad regions within them, and ability to identify the best models in the decoy sets. Several numerical evaluations were used in our analysis for the first time, such as comparison of global and local quality predictors with reference (baseline) predictors and a ROC analysis of the predictors' ability to differentiate between the well and poorly modeled regions. For the evaluation of the reliability of self-assessment of the coordinate errors, we used the correlation between the predicted and observed deviations of the coordinates and a ROC analysis of correctly identified errors in the models. A modified two-stage procedure for testing MQA methods in CASP10 whereby a small number of models spanning the whole range of model accuracy was released first followed by the release of a larger number of models of more uniform quality, allowed a more thorough analysis of abilities and inabilities of different types of methods. Clustering methods were shown to have an advantage over the single- and quasi-single- model methods on the larger datasets. At the same time, the evaluation revealed that the size of the dataset has smaller influence on the global quality assessment scores (for both clustering and nonclustering methods), than its diversity. Narrowing the quality range of the assessed models caused significant decrease in accuracy of ranking for global quality predictors but

  17. [Procedures for optimizing the intralaboratory quality control in mass screening for hepatitis C virus antibodies].

    PubMed

    Potapova, A A; Bogush, P G; Redchenko, E B; Dronova, V M

    2008-03-01

    The paper presents data on the optimization of intralaboratory quality control of tests for hepatitis C virus antibodies by enzyme immunoassay in the mass screening scope of studies. It is concluded that the control material prepared without assistance is suitable only to assess the convergence of the results of a study. The problems in the monitoring of the reproducibility of study results and in the standardization of on-line quality control involving the construction and keeping of control charts are solved by using standardized commercial materials and a computer-based data processing system.

  18. Online subjective testing for consumer-photo quality evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Michele A.; McKnight, Patrick; Quartuccio, Jacob; Nicholas, David; Jaladi, Ramesh; Corriveau, Philip

    2016-07-01

    We take a look at crowdsourcing for subjective image quality evaluation using real image stimuli with nonsimulated distortions. Our aim is to scale the task of subjectively rating images while ensuring maximal data validity and accuracy. While previous work has begun to explore crowdsourcing for quality assessment, it has either used images that are not representative of popular consumer scenarios or used crowdsourcing to collect data without comparison to experiments in a controlled environment. Here, we address the challenges imposed by the highly variable online environment, using stimuli that are subtle and more complex than has traditionally been used in quality assessment experiments. In a series of experiments, we vary different design parameters and demonstrate how they impact the subjective responses obtained. Of the parameters examined are stimulus display mode, study length, stimulus habituation, and content homogeneity/heterogeneity. Our method was tested on a database that was rated in a laboratory test previously. Once our design parameters were chosen, we rated a database of consumer photographs and are making this data available to the research community.

  19. Water-quality data-collection activities in Colorado and Ohio; Phase III, evaluation of existing data for use in assessing regional water-quality conditions and trends

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Norris, J. Michael; Hren, Janet; Myers, Donna N.; Chaney, Thomas H.; Childress, Carolyn J. Oblinger

    1990-01-01

    During the past several years, a growing number of questions have been raised by members of Congress and others about the status of current waterquality conditions in the Nation, trends in water quality, and the major factors that affect water-quality conditions and trends. One area of particular interest and concern has been the suitability of existing water-quality data for addressing these types of questions at regional and national scales. In response to these questions and concerns, the U.S. Geological Survey began a pilot study in Colorado and Ohio to (1) determine the characteristics of current water-quality data-collection activities of Federal, State, regional, and local agencies and universities; and (2) determine how well the data from these activities, collected for various purposes and using different procedures, can be used to improve our ability to address the aforementioned questions.Colorado and Ohio were chosen for the pilot study because they represent regions with different types of water-quality issues and programs. The results of the study are specific to the two States and are not intended to be extrapolated to other States.The study was divided into three phases whose objectives were:Phase I Identify and inventory 1984 water-quality data-collection programs, including costs, in Colorado and Ohio, and identify those programs that meet a set of broad criteria for producing data that potentially are appropriate for water-quality assessments of regional and national scope. Phase II Evaluate the quality assurance of field and laboratory procedures used to produce the data from programs that met the broad criteria of Phase I. Phase III Compile the qualifying data from Phase II and evaluate the extent to which the resulting data base can be used to address selected water-quality questions for the two States.This report presents the results of Phase III, focusing on (1) the number of measurements made at each data-collection site for selected

  20. Evaluation of methods for the isolation of high quality RNA from bovine and cervine hide biopsies.

    PubMed

    Brannan, Jaime L; Holman, Patricia J; Olafson, Pia U; Pruett, John H; Riggs, Penny K

    2013-02-01

    Molecular investigations of the ruminant response to ectoparasites at the parasite-host interface are critically dependent upon the quality of RNA. The complexity of ruminant skin decreases the capacity to obtain high quality RNA from biopsy samples, which directly affects the reliability of data produced by gene expression experiments. Two methods for isolating total RNA from skin were compared and the use of 4M guanidinium isothiocyanate (GITC) during frozen storage of the specimens was evaluated. In addition, the best procedure for RNA isolation from bovine skin punch biopsies was also tested on white-tailed deer skin biopsies. Skin biopsy punches were collected and frozen prior to pulverization for RNA isolation. Total RNA quantity and integrity were determined by spectrophotometry and capillary electrophoresis technology, respectively. Significantly increased total RNA yield (P < 0.05) and higher integrity (P < 0.05) were obtained with a TRI Reagent® isolation method. Freezing and subsequent storage of bovine skin punch biopsies in 4 M GITC did not affect the amount or integrity of total RNA recovered by either RNA isolation method. However, quantity and integrity of total RNA extracted with the TRI Reagent method were again significantly higher than with the alternate technique, confirming it as the superior method. The TRI Reagent isolation method also yielded high quality total RNA from white-tailed deer skin punch biopsies, suggesting the usefulness of this method for obtaining RNA of a quality suitable for gene expression studies in other ruminant species.