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Sample records for quality infant-toddler care

  1. Partnerships for Quality Infant-Toddler Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2003-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the Zero to Three: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that some communities are managing to establish and sustain good-quality infant-toddler care and to make it…

  2. The Effectiveness of Coursework and Onsite Coaching at Improving the Quality of Care in Infant-Toddler Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Amanda J.; Green, Sheridan; Koehn, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: This study evaluated the effectiveness of 2 professional development interventions aimed at improving the quality of care provided by caregivers in ordinary infant-toddler child care settings, both center- and home-based. In all, 183 participants in a community college course on infant-toddler theory and practice, an in-service…

  3. Improving the Quality Of Infant?Toddler Care Through Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Philippa H.; Milbourne, Suzanne A.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of a professional development program on the quality of care provided for infants and toddlers was assessed with a sample of 160 caregivers in 96 infant?toddler rooms in 48 childcare programs. Caregivers participated in a 3-month training course with a standardized curriculum of five 3-hour group classes and an out-of-class project. A…

  4. Issues in the Provision of Quality Infant/Toddler Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice S.

    Consideration is given to several issues that challenge parents and professionals when faced with the need for group care for infants. Discussion concerns characteristics wanted in those providing care for infants; the need for continuity in care and stability of the caregiver staff; the need for staff to infant ratios that contribute to…

  5. Concepts for Care: 20 Essays on Infant/Toddler Development and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lally, J. Ronald, Ed.; Mangione, Peter L., Ed.; Greenwald, Deborah, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    Leading experts in infant/toddler development have contributed succinct essays drawn from research, theory, clinical case studies, and carefully documented practice. Each essay represents current thinking in the field of infant/toddler development and care. Individually and as a collection, the essays provide a springboard for reflection,…

  6. La investigacion sobre la calidad de los programas para ninos de hasta dos anos de edad (Research on Quality in Infant-Toddler Programs). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Concern about the quality of infant-toddler care programs has grown recently in response to two factors. The first is the need of employed parents for such care, and the second is research emphasizing the importance of brain development in the early years. This Spanish-language Digest introduces some of the many issues related to the quality of…

  7. Teacher-Child Interactions in Infant/Toddler Child Care and Socioemotional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mortensen, Jennifer A.; Barnett, Melissa A.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The teacher-child relationships that develop in infant/toddler child care provide a critical caregiving context for young children's socioemotional development. However, gaps remain in researchers' understanding of the individual-level processes that facilitate socioemotional development, specifically in center-based…

  8. Making Connections: What Do Preschool Teachers Know about Infant/Toddler Care and Education?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    2011-01-01

    What do preschool teachers know about infant/toddler care and education? The answer to the question in the title is "Lots!" "if" they are fans of Lilian Katz. The author would not have said that before she sat down to read the new book Lilian wrote with her son Stephen. It's called "Intellectual Emergencies." It starts out with 12 of Lilian's…

  9. Infant-Toddler Group Day Care: A Review of Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmer, Sally

    Research conducted in the United States and Canada on the effects of group care outside of family settings for 20 or more hours per week on a regular basis shows few differences between day care and home reared children on four major variables: attachment, social interactions, cognitive development, and physical health. Of nine studies of…

  10. Nap Schedules and Sleep Practices in Infant-Toddler Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siren-Tiusanen, Helena; Robinson, Helja Antola

    2001-01-01

    Analyzed sleep-wake schedules and nap times in multiage infant-toddler groups through three case studies in Finnish day care centers. Found complex interactions among family daily patterns, day care patterns, and young children's sleep disturbances. Identified major differences in day care practices regarding sleep quality related to timing,…

  11. Infant--Toddler Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Funderburg, Ruth Seth; Forney, Paula

    The Georgia Parent Infant Network for Educational Services (PINES) is a home intervention program currently serving over 300 hearing impaired, visually impaired, and multihandicapped sensory impaired (MHSI) preschoolers. The infant-toddler evaluation component is described, with sections on screening and diagnosis, parent education concerning…

  12. Delaware FIRST: Implementing Handicapped Infant/Toddler Curriculum through Families and Family Day Care Providers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deiner, Penny L.; Whitehead, Linda C.

    The Delaware FIRST Program is designed to meet the needs of handicapped infants and toddlers through trained family day care providers. The program is based on a developmental family systems approach. It strives to provide families with ongoing support by offering mainstreamed family day care or respite care, by developing and/or facilitating an…

  13. The Influence of Culture in Infant-Toddler Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Test, Joan

    2015-01-01

    It is not only in families that young children are influenced to become members of their culture. Around the world and within individual countries, culture influences how care is provided to infants and toddlers in child care settings. In turn, infants and toddlers begin to learn how to act and think as members of their culture. From ways that…

  14. Setting Up for Infant/Toddler Care: Guidelines for Centers and Family Child Care Homes. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Godwin, Annabelle; Schrag, Lorraine

    With increasing numbers of infants in need of child care, the demand for infant care programs has grown. This handbook was designed to meet the need for technical assistance regarding program components and workable practices geared specifically to infant and toddler care. Part 1 of the handbook, "Considerations in Infant and Toddler…

  15. Child Care and Early Education Arrangements of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers: 2001. Statistical Analysis Report. NCES 2006-039

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulligan, Gail M.; Brimhall, DeeAnn; West, Jerry

    2005-01-01

    This report is the latest in a series of NCES reports on young children's nonparental care and education arrangements. It presents the most recent data available for children under the age of 6, taken from the 2001 administration of the ECPP. Interviews were conducted with parents or guardians of 6,741 children under age 6 who were not yet…

  16. Quality Child Care for Infants and Toddlers: Case Studies of Three Community Strategies. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsell, Diane; Nogales, Renee; Cohen, Julie

    To address the increasing child care needs of low-income families in the wake of welfare reform, federal and state governments have responded with increased funding for child care and for initiatives to improve quality. Some of these initiatives have been designed specifically to address the unique challenges of infant-toddler care. This report…

  17. Low Quality of Basic Caregiving Environments in Child Care: Actual Reality or Artifact of Scoring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah J.; Guss, Shannon

    2016-01-01

    Quality Rating Improvement Systems (QRIS) frequently include the Infant-Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R) as part of rating and improving child care quality. However, studies utilizing the ITERS-R consistently report low quality, especially for basic caregiving items. This research examined whether the low scores reflected the…

  18. Building Babies' Brains: A Training for Infant/Toddler Caregivers. Trainer's Guide [with Transparencies].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nalley, Donna, Ed.; Hamilton, Tracy, Ed.; Casbon, Christy, Ed.

    Emphasizing brain research, this guide is designed to help trainers teach caregivers to provide responsive care to infants/toddlers and to understand why responsive care is important. The training is targeted for anyone in a caregiving role, especially child care providers and home care providers. The guide is organized in three sections. Section…

  19. Infants, Toddlers, and Terror: Supporting Parents, Helping Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Responding to family needs in the wake of September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, this issue focuses on infants, toddlers, and terror.…

  20. Child Care Quality in the Netherlands over the Years: A Closer Look

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helmerhorst, Katrien O. W.; Riksen-Walraven, J. Marianne A.; Gevers Deynoot-Schaub, Mirjam J. J. M.; Tavecchio, Louis W. C.; Fukkink, Ruben G.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: We assessed the quality of child care in a nationally representative sample of 200 Dutch child care centers using the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised and/or Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised and compared it with a previous assessment in 2005. The Caregiver Interaction Profile (CIP) scales were used…

  1. Infant/Toddler Child Development Program. Forrest City Alternative School, Forrest City, Arkansas. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrest City Public Schools, AR.

    In 1988, the Forrest City Alternative School (Arkansas) began a program to provide care for the preschool children of teen mothers who wanted to obtain their high school diplomas. The children ranged in age from 8 weeks to 3 years in the infant/toddler group and 3-6 years in the child care group. These children were provided with care, preschool…

  2. Quality Infant/Toddler Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Caregiver-infant interactions in the first years of a child's life provide models and shape patterns of responding that can have consequences throughout the life-span. Research and practice have produced knowledge about the sensitivity of outcomes to characteristics of the infant nurturing situation. Infant caregivers should accept babies' need…

  3. Quality of Care and Education Provided by Greek Day-Care Centres: An Approach from Researcher's and Early Childhood Educators' Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rentzou, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    The present study is aimed at examining the level of quality and care provided by Greek preschool programmes, from the researcher's and early childhood educators' perspectives and verify whether they evaluate with the same way. Research results indicate that according to the researcher's assessment both preschool and infant/toddler classrooms…

  4. Rocking and Rolling: Supporting Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families. New Year's Resolutions for Infant/Toddler Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Britt, Donna R.; Gillespie, Linda Groves

    2008-01-01

    Britt and Gillespie make suggestions for teachers' professional New Year's resolutions, including challenging oneself. They include a collection of resources and urge teachers to join NAEYC's Infant/Toddler Professionals Interest Forum. (Contains 27 resources.)

  5. A Mixed Methods Investigation of Maternal Perspectives on Transition Experiences in Early Care and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, Rebecca Anne; Speirs, Katherine Elizabeth; Encinger, Amy Johnson; McElwain, Nancy L.

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: Strong relationships among children, families, and early care and education (ECE) providers are key to quality infant-toddler care. These relationships are shaped during the initial transition period to group care. We used a mixed methods approach to (a) assess maternal perspectives on the transition to group care, (b) explore…

  6. Leavetakings and Reunions of Infants, Toddlers, Preschoolers and Their Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; And Others

    The leavetakings and reunions of infants, toddlers, preschoolers, and their parents were observed as 56 children were dropped off and picked up at nursery school. During the pilot phase of the study, shorthand running records were made of the behaviors of each child and his or her parent for all of their leavetaking and reunion episodes. From 100…

  7. [Training Practitioners to Work with Infants, Toddlers and Their Families].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on the training of practitioners to work with infants, toddlers, and their families with emphasis on the activities of the TASK (Training Approaches for Skills and Knowledge) Project of the National Center for Clinical Infant Programs. The TASK project addresses the concerns of four "stakeholder" groups:…

  8. My Vision for Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodd, Christopher J.; Castle, Michael N.

    2006-01-01

    Two members of the U.S. Congress share their visions for infants, toddlers, and families. Senator Christopher Dodd (D-CT), Ranking Member of the Subcommittee on Education and Early Childhood Development, Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions, advocates shifting priorities and resources toward young children and families and…

  9. The Development of Play in Infants, Toddlers, and Young Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casby, Michael W.

    2003-01-01

    The first of two articles on play reviews the development of play in typically developing infants, toddlers, and young children, including Piaget's observations on the development of play; developmental play research following Piaget (research by Lunzer, Sinclair, Lezine, Lowe, Rosenblatt, Uzgiris and Hunt, Fenson and others, Watson and Fischer,…

  10. Infant Toddler Services through Community Collaboration: Oklahoma's Early Childhood Initiatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Carla B.; Horm, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Comprehensive, integrated services for infants, toddlers, and families are essential for optimal child development, and collaboration across systems is increasingly important to maximize limited resources. The authors describe three successful initiatives in Oklahoma that use a collaborative systems approach to providing direct services to young…

  11. Effects of Infant Day Care Experience on Behavior and Development: Research and Implications for Social Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ricciuti, Henry N.

    This paper reviews major research dealing with the effects of infant/toddler day care on the behavior and development of infants, with special emphasis on useful research implications for those concerned with providing high quality group care for infants outside the home. A brief examination of major analytic issues dealing with the problem of…

  12. Teacher-Child Interactions during Mealtimes: Observations of Toddlers in High Subsidy Child Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Rena A.; Fouts, Hillary N.; Bargreen, Kaitlin N.; Perkins, Kelley

    2016-01-01

    In the U.S., experiences of infants and toddlers in group care are often overshadowed by the policy and research focus on preschool education just prior to formal school entry. When infant-toddler care is studied, it is often described relative to the global quality of classroom environments. Little research has focused on the day-to-day…

  13. Routines and Rituals in the Lives of Infants, Toddlers, and Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Noting that during the earliest years of life, much of children's learning about themselves and the world around them occurs in…

  14. Infant-Toddler Teachers Can Successfully Employ Authentic Assessment: The "Learning through Relating" System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreno, Amanda J.; Klute, Mary M.

    2011-01-01

    This study documents the reliability and validity of a new infant-toddler authentic assessment, the Learning Through Relating Child Assets Record (LTR-CAR), and its feasibility of use by infant-toddler caregivers in an Early Head Start program. In a sample of 136 children, results indicated a strong internal structure of the LTR-CAR as evidenced…

  15. Routines. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    Intended for use in conjunction with videos illustrating key concepts and caregiving techniques, this guide focuses on how the daily routines of caring for infants and toddlers can become opportunities for promoting the child's learning and development and for deepening the relationship between child and caregiver. Special attention is given to…

  16. Diversity and Infant/Toddler Caregiving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet; Bhavnagri, Navaz Peshotan

    2000-01-01

    Discusses the importance of cultural sensitivity and specific cultural knowledge when providing care for infants and toddlers. Makes suggestions for responding to cultural differences. Describes dialogue and reflective-thinking strategies for identifying and responding to cultural differences. Asserts that caregivers need diversity training to see…

  17. Rethinking Attachment: Fostering Positive Relationships between Infants, Toddlers and Their Primary Caregivers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ebbeck, Marjory; Yim, Hoi Yin Bonnie

    2009-01-01

    This article provides a synthesis of current theory and research in relation to attachment between infants/toddlers and their caregivers. Worldwide statistics show that there are a significant number of women working in the global labour market. In Australia, recent research also found that over 300,000 children aged 0-5 years are currently…

  18. Rocking & Rolling: Supporting Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families. One Language, Two Languages, Three Languages . . . More?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prieto, H. Victoria

    2009-01-01

    The belief that a child has to abandon his home language to learn English implies that the young brain has limited learning capacity. Early childhood teachers need to help families understand that children can learn two languages at the same time. What matters is that the infant/toddler is in an effective language-learning environment, whether it…

  19. Social Situation of Development: Parents Perspectives on Infants-Toddlers' Concept Formation in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sikder, Shukla

    2015-01-01

    The social situation of development (SSD) specific to each age determines regularly the whole picture of the child's life. Therefore, we need to learn about the whole context surrounding children relevant to their development. The focus of the study is to understand parent's views on infant-toddler's science concept formation in the family…

  20. Nutrient intakes of US infants, toddlers, and preschoolers meet or exceed dietary reference intakes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of the study reported here was to assess the usual nutrient intakes of 3,273 US infants, toddlers, and preschoolers, aged 0 to 47 months, who were surveyed in the Feeding Infants and Toddlers Study (FITS) 2008; and to compare data on the usual nutrient intakes for the two waves of FITS...

  1. Comparison of ICD-10 and DC: 0-3R Diagnoses in Infants, Toddlers and Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Equit, Monika; Paulus, Frank; Fuhrmann, Pia; Niemczyk, Justine; von Gontard, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze and compare diagnoses of patients from a special outpatient department for infants, toddlers and preschoolers. Specifically, overlap, age and gender differences according to the two classification systems DC: 0-3R and ICD-10 were examined. 299 consecutive children aged 0-5;11 years received both ICD-10 and…

  2. Progress of Infants/Toddlers with Severe Disabilities: Perceived and Measured Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salisbury, Christine L.; Copeland, Christina G.

    2013-01-01

    An exploratory case study was undertaken to examine child and caregiver outcomes in a diverse sample of 21 infants/toddlers with severe disabilities who received services from an urban, Part C program where caregiver-focused intervention was emphasized. Purposive sampling and mixed methods were used to collect data on child developmental change,…

  3. What's Missing in Most of Our Early Childhood Degrees? Focusing More Deeply on Relationships and Learning with Infants, Toddlers, and Their Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Marilyn

    2016-01-01

    Infant-toddler teachers have the least education, the lowest pay, and the highest turnover rate of all adults in the field of early childhood education. In this article, the unique needs of infants, toddlers, and their families are explored at the 2-year associate (AA) and the 4-year bachelor (BA) levels of early childhood higher education degree…

  4. Suggested Equipment and Supplies for Infant - Toddler Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazyck, Aurelia

    A list of equipment and supplies useful in the daytime care of infants and toddlers is presented. This equipment is in use at an all-day care center for 15 infants and 10-12 toddlers. The following types of items are listed: furnishings, linens, toys for motor activities, manipulative toys, crib toys, outdoor play equipment, books, phonograph…

  5. Scaffolding, Analysis and Materials: Contributing Factors in an Unexpected Finding of Advanced Infant/Toddler Pretend Play?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrissey, Anne-Marie

    2014-01-01

    As part of a longitudinal study, infant/toddler pretend play development and maternal play modelling were investigated in dyadic context. A total of 21 children were videotaped in monthly play sessions with their mothers, from age 8 to 17 months. Child and mother pretend play frequencies and levels were measured using Brown's Pretend Play…

  6. SKI-HI Home Intervention for Families with Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Barbara; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The SKI-HI program, which provides home-based family support services for infants, toddlers, and preschool children who are deaf or hard of hearing, has been implemented by approximately 250 agencies and annually serves about 4,000 families. Information is provided on the program's rationale, development, family-centered home-based services,…

  7. The Infant-Toddler Component and Child Impact. Evaluation of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Affholter, Dennis; And Others

    Fifth in a series of the Child and Family Resource Program (CFRP) evaluation reports, this volume focuses on the infant/toddler component of CFRP and its impact on children approximately a year and a half after they enter the program. A brief summary of the CFRP evaluation design and preliminary findings presented in previous evaluation reports is…

  8. Infants & Toddlers "What's Going On? How to Hold Squriming Babies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2005-01-01

    Using Simple strategies, caregivers can learn to effectively communicate with infants through touch. This article offers suggestions and techniques for calming squirming babies of all types and ages who seem to be unable to find a comfortable position while being held. She begins by suggesting that care givers of very small babies be patient and…

  9. [Working with Infants, Toddlers, and Families in Rural Areas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on providing services to infants with special needs in rural areas. In "Old Threads, New Patterns: Reaching Out to Rural Families," Deborah Harris-Usner discusses bringing infant mental health care and parent-infant psychotherapy to rural New Mexico. In "The People of Kids Place: Creating and Maintaining…

  10. Infant/Toddler Caregiving: A Guide to Routines. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Mena, Janet

    Intended for use in conjunction with videos illustrating key concepts and caregiving techniques, this guide focuses on how the daily routines of caring for infants and toddlers can become opportunities for promoting the child's learning and development and for deepening the relationship between child and caregiver. Special attention is given to…

  11. The validity and reliability of the Arabic Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile.

    PubMed

    Abu-Dahab, Sana M N; Malkawi, Somaya Hussain; Nadar, Mohammad Shaban; Al Momani, Fidaa; Holm, Margo B

    2014-08-01

    In this study, we report the translation process, validity, and reliability of the Arabic Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile (IT_SP). A multistep approach was implemented to ensure the accuracy and equivalency of the Arabic and original English IT_SP. Factor analysis indicated that item loadings for over 50% of the items on the Arabic version were identical to the English version; all but three items had logical loadings. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) between scores on the Arabic and English versions reported by parents who were bilingual were >.90 supporting bilingual validity. Alpha coefficients for each section varied from .40 to .74, which was within the range of the English version (.17 to .86), and were thus similar. ICCs between scores for repeated assessments varied from .81 to .99 supporting test-retest reliability. The results support the validity and reliability of the Arabic IT_SP.

  12. Comprehensive Training of Personnel and Technical Assistance in Establishment of Home Intervention Program for Families of Infants, Toddlers, and Preschool Aged Children with Hearing Impairment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barringer, Don; Johnson, Dorothy

    This final report describes activities and accomplishments of an outreach project of Project SKI-HI, a family-centered, home intervention model designed to provide training to early intervention professionals serving infants, toddlers, and preschoolers with hearing impairments. In the project, an early intervention professional or a parent advisor…

  13. ZERO TO THREE Critical Competencies for Infant-Toddler Educators™ ... in Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ZERO TO THREE, 2016

    2016-01-01

    Early experiences matter. The quality of the early care and education provided to young children not only impacts their experiences now, but directly contributes to their future success in school and in life. High-quality early learning experiences require effective educators but attainment and application of these critical knowledge and skills is…

  14. Secure Relationships: Nurturing Infant/Toddler Attachment in Early Care Settings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    Noting that research and clinical findings confirm the connection to later emotional well-being of a secure attachment between each infant or young child and a warm, stable adult, this book addresses aspects of attachment important for caregivers of infants and toddlers. The book focuses on those aspects of attachment caregivers need to understand…

  15. Using the FAN Approach to Deepen Trauma-Informed Care for Infants, Toddlers, and Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heffron, Mary Claire; Gilkerson, Linda; Cosgrove, Kimberly; Heller, Sherryl Scott; Imberger, Jaci; Leviton, Audrey; Mueller, Mary; Norris-Shortle, Carole; Phillips, Caroline; Spielman, Eda; Wasserman, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Erikson Institute Fussy Baby Network® (FBN) leaders from around the country have been considering the importance of building trauma-informed service programs. In this article, they discuss ways that the Facilitating Attuned Interaction (FAN) approach and the core processes used by the FAN can be helpful both when trauma is an unexpected presence…

  16. Diarrhea & Child Care: Controlling Diarrhea in Out-of-Home Child Care. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Robin B.; Pickering, Larry K.

    This report, the fourth in the National Center for Early Development and Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlights" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during a "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses controlling diarrhea in out-of-home child care. The report…

  17. Who's Vulnerable in Infant Child Care Centers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kendall, Earline D.; Moukaddem, Virginia E.

    1992-01-01

    Maintains that infants and toddlers, parents, and child caregivers are vulnerable to a variety of infectious diseases from infant-toddler child care centers. These diseases include infectious diarrhea; rubella; cytomeglovirus; hepatitis A, and haemophilus influenza type B. Suggests ways to prevent the spread of such diseases. (BB)

  18. Home Centered Care: Designing a Family Day Care Program. A Guide for Caregivers and Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Ronda

    Consistent in its approach to child development and caregiving concepts, this guide for parents and child caregivers explores aspects of family day care in five sections. Section I discusses the design of physically safe environments for children. Section II describes the developing likes and needs of infants, toddlers, preschool children, and…

  19. Child Care Health Connections, 1999: A Health and Safety Newsletter for California Child Care Professionals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walery, Nancy, Ed.; Evinger, Sara, Ed.; Dailey, Lyn, Ed.; Sherman, Marsha, Ed.; Zamani, Rahman, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This document is comprised of the six 1999 issues of a bimonthly newsletter providing information on young children's health and safety for California's child care professionals. Regular features include a column on infant/toddler concerns, a question-answer column regarding medical and health issues, a nutrition column, and resources for child…

  20. Respiratory Infections: Respiratory Infections Challenge Child Care Centers. NCEDL Spotlights, No. 5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Albert M.; Henderson, Frederick W.

    This report, the fifth in the National Center for Early Development & Learning's (NCEDL) "Spotlight" series, is based on excerpts from a paper presented during the "Research into Practice in Infant/Toddler Care" synthesis conference in fall 1997. The report addresses preventing respiratory infections in child care centers.…

  1. Parents' and Teachers' Perceptions of Quality in Portuguese Childcare Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barros, Sílvia; Leal, Teresa B.

    2015-01-01

    The main goal of this study was to examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of quality in early childhood education for toddlers in Portugal. A total of 110 parents and 110 teachers participated in the study, rating the importance of specific quality criteria and assessing childcare classrooms, based on the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating…

  2. R.E.A.D.Y.: Read, Educate and Develop Youth. Reading Plan for Michigan: Parent Information for Infants, Toddlers, and Preschoolers. Learning Begins at Birth. [Kit with Videotape and Audiotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan Association for the Education of Young Children, East Lansing.

    Noting the important role that parents can play in preparing their child to learn to read, the Read, Educate and Develop Youth (READY) Reading Plan for Michigan provides kits to parents of infants, toddlers, and preschoolers. The kits contain suggestions for age-appropriate activities parents can do with their children to help them learn. In…

  3. A Pilot Longitudinal Follow-Up Study of the Brief Infant Toddler Social-Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) in Northern Finland: Examining Toddlers' Social-Emotional, Behavioural and Communicative Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haapsamo, Helena; Kuusikko-Gauffin, Sanna; Carter, Alice S.; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel; Ebeling, Hanna; Joskitt, Leena; Larinen, Katja; Soini, Hannu; Pihlaja, Paivi; Moilanen, Irma

    2012-01-01

    Developmental needs should be assessed in early infancy and followed longitudinally to improve identification, prevention and intervention efforts.The objective was to examine the relationship between competencies and areas of need in toddlers' development, and to describe the properties and utility of the Brief Infant Toddler Social-Emotional…

  4. Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care

    MedlinePlus

    Ensuring Quality Nursing Home Care Before you choose a nursing home Expert information from Healthcare Professionals Who Specialize in the Care ... Nearly 1.6 million older Americans live in nursing homes in the United States. The move to ...

  5. Raising the Educational Requirements for Teachers in Infant Toddler Classrooms: Implications for Institutions of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Deborah J.

    2010-01-01

    Repeated calls have recently arisen for increasing the educational level of early childhood teachers in all early care and education settings including classrooms for infants and toddlers. Since the majority of teachers in early child settings do not have a college degree, higher educational expectations could place a strain on early childhood…

  6. Service quality in health care.

    PubMed

    Kenagy, J W; Berwick, D M; Shore, M F

    1999-02-17

    Although US health care is described as "the world's largest service industry," the quality of service--that is, the characteristics that shape the experience of care beyond technical competence--is rarely discussed in the medical literature. This article illustrates service quality principles by analyzing a routine encounter in health care from a service quality point of view. This illustration and a review of related literature from both inside and outside health care has led to the following 2 premises: First, if high-quality service had a greater presence in our practices and institutions, it would improve clinical outcomes and patient and physician satisfaction while reducing cost, and it would create competitive advantage for those who are expert in its application. Second, many other industries in the service sector have taken service quality to a high level, their techniques are readily transferable to health care, and physicians caring for patients can learn from them.

  7. Care Coordination Practices among Illinois Pediatricians and Early Intervention Service Coordinators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baxter, Marissa

    2015-01-01

    Over the course of the past three decades, largely due to advances in technology, there has been growth in the fields of early intervention (EI) and pediatrics for infants/toddlers with special health care needs (SHCN). This growth has also brought about a change in the relationship between pediatricians and EI service coordinators, creating an…

  8. Sharing Books with Babies: Promoting Early Literacy in Early Care and Education. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boston Medical Center, MA. Doc4Kids Project.

    Suggesting that very young children spend every waking minute getting ready for kindergarten, this videotape for caregivers and early childhood teachers shows how to support early literacy skill development by sharing stories, relationships, and books with infants, toddlers, and preschoolers in care and education settings. The 25-minute videotape…

  9. Classroom Quality in Infant and Toddler Classrooms: Impact of Age and Programme Type

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Elizabeth K.; Pierro, Rebekah C.; Li, Jiayao; Porterfield, Mary Lee; Rucker, Lia

    2016-01-01

    This study examined differences in classroom quality, assessed by the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised (ITERS-R), in 287 infant and 479 toddler classrooms. Classroom quality was compared across classroom age group (infant compared to toddler classrooms) as well as across programme type (for-profit compared to not-for-profit…

  10. Nurses' Perceptions of Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Catherine; Powlesland, Jean; Phillips, Cynthia; Raszewski, Rebecca; Johnson, Alexia; Banks-Enorense, Kelly; Agoo, Victor C; Nacorda-Beltran, Rosalind; Halloway, Shannon; Martin, Kathleen; Smith, Lenore D; Walczak, Debra; Warda, Jane; Washington, Barbara J; Welsh, Julie

    Limited research has been conducted on how nurses define or perceive "quality nursing care." We conducted focus groups to identify nurses' perceptions of quality care at a Midwestern academic medical center. Transcripts of the focus group sessions were analyzed using thematic analysis techniques, and 11 themes emerged: Leadership, Staffing, Resources, Timeliness, Effective Communication/Collaboration, Professionalism, Relationship-Based Care, Environment/Culture, Simplicity, Outcomes, and Patient Experience.

  11. The Professional Preparation of Early Care and Education Providers: Addressing the Mismatch between Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goble, Carla B.; Moran, James D.; Horm, Diane M.

    2009-01-01

    Research continues to highlight the relationship between high quality preschool experiences for young children and the educational preparedness of their teachers. As a result, there is an increasing call for enhanced educational preparation for early childhood teachers working in the wide spectrum of programs serving infants, toddlers, and…

  12. Infants & Toddlers: "Baby Moves"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2007-01-01

    By three to four months of age, most babies placed on their tummies on a safe, warm surface push down with their arms and raise their chests, so that they can turn their heads to look about at the world around them. By five months, babies stretch both feet and hands upward in order to swipe at interesting mobiles placed overhead. At seven to nine…

  13. Perspectives on Home Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Kane, Robert L.; Illston, Laurel H.; Eustis, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Home care quality assurance (QA) must consider features inherent in home care, including: multiple goals, limited provider control, and unique family roles. Successive panels of stakeholders were asked to rate the importance of selected home care outcomes. Most highly rated outcomes were freedom from exploitation, satisfaction with care, physical safety, affordability, and physical functioning. Panelists preferred outcome indicators to process and structure, and all groups emphasized “enabling” criteria. Themes highlighted included: interpersonal components of care; normalizing life for clientele; balancing quality of life with safety; developing flexible, negotiated care plans; mechanisms for accountability and case management. These themes were formulated differently according to the stakeholders' role. Providers preferred intermediate outcomes, akin to process. PMID:10140158

  14. Quality of Care: Local Variations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gariboldi, Antonio; Livraghi, Paola

    Conducted in 1991, this study surveyed the quality of day care centers in the province of Pavia, Italy, in order to provide a description of the centers and to trace educational patterns in the infant, young toddler, and toddler sections of the centers. The 32 day care centers located in the province employ a staff of 342 and provide 1,700 places…

  15. The Need for the Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood: Background Research and Evaluation Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for the Study of Social Policy, 2009

    2009-01-01

    In FY 2009, the Children's Bureau funded the Center for the Study of Social Policy, in partnership with ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families, and the National Alliance of Children's Trust and Prevention Funds, to create a National Quality Improvement Center on Early Childhood (QIC-EC) focused on child maltreatment…

  16. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  17. Integrating Infant Mental Health into Primary Health Care and Early Childhood Education Settings in Israel: The "Mediational Intervention for Sensitizing Caregivers" Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shohet, Cilly; Jaegermann, Nurit

    2012-01-01

    The Mediational Intervention for Sensitizing Caregivers (MISC) model is a comprehensive developmental approach to help adults understand their role in child development by enhancing the quality of adult-child interactions. This article describes how the Irving B. Harris Program for Infants, Toddlers and Their Families at Bar-Ilan University…

  18. Quality in rheumatoid arthritis care.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Sehrash; Lesuis, Nienke; van Tuyl, Lilian H D; van Riel, Piet; Landewé, Robert

    2015-01-01

    While most rheumatology practices are characterized by strong commitment to quality of care and continuous improvement to limit disability and optimize quality of life for patients and their families, the actual step toward improvement is often difficult. This is because there are still barriers to be addressed and facilitators to be captured before a satisfying and cost-effective practice management is installed. Therefore, this review aims to assist practicing rheumatologists with quality improvement of their daily practice, focusing on care for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. First we define quality of care as "the degree to which health services for individuals and populations increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge". Often quality is determined by the interplay between structure, processes, and outcomes of care, which is also reflected in the corresponding indicators to measure quality of care. Next, a brief overview is given of the current treatment strategies used in RA, focusing on the tight control strategy, since this strategy forms the basis of international treatment guidelines. Adherence to tight control strategies leads, also in daily practice, to better outcomes in patients with regard to disease control, functional status, and work productivity. Despite evidence in favor of tight control strategies, adherence in daily practice is often challenging. Therefore, the next part of the review focuses on possible barriers and facilitators of adherence, and potential interventions to improve quality of care. Many different barriers and facilitators are known and targeting these can be effective in changing care, but these effects are rather small to moderate. With regard to RA, few studies have tried to improve care, such as a study aiming to increase the number of disease activity measures done by a combination of education and feedback. Two out of the three studies showed markedly

  19. Psychometric Evaluation of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) in a Predominately Hispanic, Low-Income Sample

    PubMed Central

    Hungerford, Gabriela M.; Garcia, Dainelys

    2015-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Brief Infant-Toddler Social and Emotional Assessment (BITSEA) with 12- to 15-month-old infants from predominately Hispanic, low-income families. Mothers of 144 infants were screened at a pediatric clinic as part of a larger study examining a brief home-based intervention for infants at-risk for behavior problems. Reliability was good for the BITSEA problem scale in all analyses and acceptable for the BITSEA competence scale in most analyses. Discriminative validity was supported by scores on the BITSEA competence scale significantly predicting delayed status on all ASQ-3 subscales. BITSEA problem scale scores significantly predicted scores on the total problems scale of the Child Behavior Checklist, supporting predictive validity. Analyses revealed a main effect of group on BITSEA problem scale scores, providing preliminary support for sensitivity to change for the BITSEA problem scale. Results support the BITSEA as an effective screening tool for use with young infants, Hispanic and Spanish-speaking populations, and low-income families. PMID:26379368

  20. Financial Health of Child Care Facilities Affects Quality of Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brower, Mary R.; Sull, Theresa M.

    2003-01-01

    Contends that child care facility owners, boards of directors, staff, and parents need to focus on financial management, as poor financial health compromises the quality of care for children. Specifically addresses the issues of: (1) concern for providing high quality child care; (2) the connection between quality and money; and (3) strengthening…

  1. Quality of Care and Disparities in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Howell, Elizabeth A; Zeitlin, Jennifer

    2017-03-01

    Growing attention is being paid to obstetric quality of care as patients are pressing the health care system to measure and improve quality. There is also an increasing recognition of persistent racial and ethnic disparities prevalent in obstetric outcomes. Yet few studies have linked obstetric quality of care with racial and ethnic disparities. This article reviews definitions of quality of care, health disparities, and health equity as they relate to obstetric care and outcomes; describes current efforts and challenges in obstetric quality measurement; and proposes 3 steps in an effort to develop, track, and improve quality and reduce disparities in obstetrics.

  2. Impact of extrinsic factors on fine motor performance of children attending day care

    PubMed Central

    Corsi, Carolina; dos Santos, Mariana Martins; de Andrade Perez Marques, Luísa; Rocha, Nelci Adriana Cicuto Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To assess the impact of extrinsic factors on fine motor performance of children aged 2-years old. Methods: 73 children attending public and 21 private day care centers were assessed. Day care environment was evaluated using the Infant/Toddler Environment Rating Scale-Revised Edition (ITERS-R), fine motor performance was assessed through the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development-III (BSITD-III), socioeconomic data, maternal education and time of start at the day care were collected through interviews. Spearman's correlation coefficient was calculated to assess the association between the studied variables. Results: The time at the day care was positively correlated with the children's performance in some fine motor tasks of the BSITD-III, showing that the activities developed in day care centers were important for the refinement of specific motor skills, while the overall fine motor performance by the scale was associated with maternal education and the ITERS-R scale sub-item “language and understanding”. Conclusions: Extrinsic factors such as higher maternal education and quality of day care centers are associated with fine motor performance in children attending day care. PMID:27094472

  3. USING THE PARENT-INFANT RELATIONSHIP GLOBAL ASSESSMENT SCALE TO IDENTIFY CAREGIVER-INFANT/TODDLER DYADS WITH ABUSIVE RELATIONSHIP PATTERNS IN SIX EUROPEAN COUNTRIES.

    PubMed

    Hatzinikolaou, Kornilia; Karveli, Vassiliki; Skoubourdi, Aggeliki; Zarokosta, Foteini; Antonucci, Gianluca; Visci, Giovanni; Calheiros, Maria Manuela; MagalhÃes, Eunice; Essau, Cecilia; Allan, Sharon; Pithia, Jayshree; Walji, Fahreen; Ezpeleta, Lourdes; Perez-Robles, Ruth; Fanti, Kostas A; Katsimicha, Evita; Hadjicharambous, Maria-Zoe; Nikolaidis, George; Reddy, Vasudevi

    2016-07-01

    The study examined whether the Diagnostic Classification of Mental Health and Developmental Disorders of Infancy and Early Childhood, Revised Edition (DC: 0-3R; ZERO TO THREE, 2005) Parent-Infant Relationship Global Assessment Scale (PIR-GAS) is applicable to six European countries and contributes to the identification of caregiver-infant/toddler dyads with abusive relationship patterns. The sample consisted of 115 dyads with children's ages ranging from 1 to 47 months. Sixty-four dyads were recruited from community settings without known violence problems, and 51 dyads were recruited from clinical settings and already had been identified with violence problems or as being at risk for violence problems. To classify the dyads on the PIR-GAS categories, caregiver-child interactions were video-recorded and coded with observational scales appropriate for child age. To test whether the PIR-GAS allows for reliable identification of dyads with abusive relationship patterns, PIR-GAS ratings were compared with scores on the the International Society for the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect's (ISPCAN) Child Abuse Screening Tool-Parental Version (ICAST-P; D.K. Runyan et al., ), a questionnaire measuring abusive parental disciplinary practices. It was found that PIR-GAS ratings differentiated between the general and the clinical sample, and the dyads with abusive patterns of relationship were identified by both the PIR-GAS and the ICAST-P. Interrater reliability for the PIR-GAS ranged from moderate to excellent. The value of a broader use of tools such as the DC: 0-3R to promote early identification of families at risk for infant and toddler abuse and neglect is discussed.

  4. Nurse Reported Quality of Care: A Measure of Hospital Quality

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski

    2013-01-01

    As the primary providers of round-the-clock bedside care, nurses are well positioned to report on hospital quality of care. Researchers have not examined how nurses’ reports of quality correspond with standard process or outcomes measures of quality. We assess the validity of evaluating hospital quality by aggregating hospital nurses’ responses to a single item that asks them to report on quality of care. We found that a 10% increment in the proportion of nurses reporting excellent quality of care was associated with lower odds of mortality and failure to rescue; greater patient satisfaction; and higher composite process of care scores for acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, and surgical patients. Nurse reported quality of care is a useful indicator of hospital performance. PMID:22911102

  5. Helping You Choose Quality Ambulatory Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quality Check ® at www. qualitycheck. org to find Joint Commission accredited ambulatory care centers. • Can you get a ... Helping Your Choose series is published by The Joint Commission, the largest health care accrediting body in the ...

  6. Quality of Care in the Cirrhotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Michael L; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common, complex, chronic condition requiring care by multiple specialists in different locations. Emerging data demonstrates limitations in the quality of care these patients receive—in large part due to the problems with care coordination rather than failures of individual providers. This article will discuss approaches for measuring quality, and provide a step-by-step guide for developing quality improvement programs for this patient population. PMID:27101005

  7. Can They Hope To Feel Safe Again? The Impact of Community Violence on Infants, Toddlers, Their Parents and Practitioners. A Report from the Final Plenary Session, Biennial National Training Institute, ZERO to THREE/National Center for Clinical Infant Programs (7th, Washington, D.C., December 8, 1991).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center for Clinical Infant Programs, Arlington, VA.

    The theme of the conference session reported in this booklet was the impact of community violence on infants, toddlers, their parents, and practitioners in education. The booklet contains the edited transcript of the session, which included presentations by three speakers. Clementine Barfield described the impact of urban violence on her family…

  8. Focus on Infants & Toddlers (Ages 0-3): A Quarterly Newsletter for the Education Community, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Virginia M., Ed.; Cantor, Patricia, Ed.

    2001-01-01

    These four quarterly newsletter issues address various topics of interest to child caregivers. Each issue includes articles on a specific theme, along with regular news or a column by an AECI Executive Board vice president. The Fall 2000 issue focuses on the special features and unique concerns of employer-sponsored child care, with one article…

  9. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  10. A service chief model for general pediatric inpatient care and residency training.

    PubMed

    Goldmann, D A; Andrews, S M; Pasternack, S; Nathan, D G; Lovejoy, F H

    1992-04-01

    Pediatric training programs are faced with rapid, fundamental changes in hospital practice and an increasingly rigorous regulatory and fiscal environment. Traditional models for providing care and teaching students and house officers may not be sufficiently responsive to these challenges. In 1986, the Department of Medicine at Children's Hospital, Boston, reorganized the general inpatient program and implemented a "service chief" system adapted from British hospital "firms." Three age-based inpatient services (Thomas Morgan Rotch infant/toddler service, Kenneth Daniel Blackfan school-age service, and Charles Alderson Janeway adolescent/young adult service) were created, each headed by an experienced clinician and teacher (service chief). The service chiefs developed age-appropriate curricula, recruited a balanced faculty of generalists and specialists to serve as attending physicians and provide teaching in their areas of expertise, and established strong collaborative relationships with nurse managers on their respective wards. Implementation of the service chief system has been associated with development of faculty esprit de corps, standardized tracking of faculty performance, enhanced supervision and counseling of housestaff, and improved continuity of patient care. Relationships with referring physicians have improved dramatically, as measured by formal satisfaction surveys. Accountability and documentation have been emphasized, and departmental billings have increased sharply. Ongoing quality indicators have been developed, and collaborative patient care, teaching, and quality-improvement projects have been initiated with the nursing staff. Naming the services for distinguished past physicians-in-chief has provided a focus for fund-raising.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Health care quality and safety issues.

    PubMed

    Cornett, Becky Sutherland

    2006-05-01

    Our health-care system is burdened with high costs, health-care disparities, overtreatment, undertreatment, high error rates, and fraud and abuse. At the same time, the United States has achieved spectacular medical advances using the latest technology. As a result, health-care quality measurement, publicly reported patient safety and quality indicators, and evaluation of patients' experience of care are watchwords of a new era of accountability for health-care professionals and organizations. The health-care industry is subject to increasing regulation, private sector challenges, and public demand to make significant improvements in all three components of the quality triad: structure, process, and outcome. This article examines regulatory initiatives and industry trends pertaining to patient safety and quality measurement and concludes with specific suggestions for the professions of speech-language pathology and audiology.

  12. [Quality assurance concepts in intensive care medicine].

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, A; Braun, J P; Riessen, R; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Bingold, T M

    2015-11-01

    Intensive care medicine (ICM) is characterized by a high degree of complexity and requires intense communication and collaboration on interdisciplinary and multiprofessional levels. In order to achieve good quality of care in this environment and to prevent errors, a proactive quality and error management as well as a structured quality assurance system are essential. Since the early 1990s, German intensive care societies have developed concepts for quality management and assurance in ICM. In 2006, intensive care networks were founded in different states to support the implementation of evidence-based knowledge into clinical routine and to improve medical outcome, efficacy, and efficiency in ICM. Current instruments and concepts of quality assurance in German ICM include core intensive care data from the data registry DIVI REVERSI, quality indicators, peer review in intensive care, IQM peer review, and various certification processes. The first version of German ICM quality indicators was published in 2010 by an interdisciplinary and interprofessional expert commission. Key figures, indicators, and national benchmarks are intended to describe the quality of structures, processes, and outcomes in intensive care. Many of the quality assurance tools have proved to be useful in clinical practice, but nationwide implementation still can be improved.

  13. Safety and quality in critical patient care.

    PubMed

    González-Méndez, María Isabel; López-Rodríguez, Luís

    The care quality has gradually been placed in the center of the health system, reaching the patient safety a greater role as one of the key dimensions of quality in recent years. The monitoring, measurement and improvement of safety and quality of care in the Intensive Care Unit represent a great challenge for the critical care community. Health interventions carry a risk of adverse events or events that can cause injury, disability and even death in patients. In Intensive Care Unit, the severity of the critical patient, communication barriers, a high number of activities per patient per day, the practice of diagnostic procedures and invasive treatments, and the quantity and complexity of the information received, among others, put at risk these units as areas for the occurrence of adverse events. This article presents some of the strategies and interventions proposed and tested internationally to optimize the care of critical patients and improve the safety culture in the Intensive Care Unit.

  14. Quality of care: giving consumers a say.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    In this era of market-driven health care, there's a lot of talk about quality, but low-income consumers and their advocates have not always been part of that discussion. In recent years, many have focused more attention on expanding coverage and promoting enrollment. Now that's shifting, and those who've long advocated consumer involvement as a way to improve health care for all are focusing more on the quality issue. They're discovering that what health plans mean by quality often overlooks just those quality-of-care areas that most concern consumers. This issue of States of Health looks at quality, and shows how an initiative funded by the Nathan B. Cummings Foundation could contribute to a health care system in which a fuller, more consumer-oriented definition of quality actually counts.

  15. Quality and performance improvement in respiratory care.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Thomas P

    2004-06-01

    An essential responsibility of the modern respiratory care manager is to establish and monitor a particular level of quality and service being provided by a department. Focusing on quality and performance improvement fosters an environment that empowers and encourages all employees to be innovative and resolve roadblocks that limit organizational performance. This article discusses the issues regarding quality and performance improvement that arise in the daily operations of a respiratory care department.

  16. Leadership and the quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Firth-Cozens, J; Mowbray, D

    2001-01-01

    The importance of good leadership is becoming increasingly apparent within health care. This paper reviews evidence which shows that it has effects, not only on financial management, but on the quality of care provided. Some theories of leadership are discussed, primarily in terms of how different types of leaders might affect quality in different ways, including the effects that they might have on the stress or wellbeing of their staff which, in turn, is related to the quality of care produced. Finally, the conflicts shown in terms of leadership within the context of health care are discussed, leading to the conclusion that development programmes must be specially tailored to address the complexities of this arena. Key Words: leadership; quality of care; stress; personality PMID:11700372

  17. Total quality management in health care.

    PubMed

    McDonald, S C

    1994-01-01

    Total quality management (TQM), continuous quality improvement (CQI) and quality control are terms that are becoming very familiar to workers in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to discuss these terms and the concepts they describe. The origins of TQM and the keen interest in its application to the health care environment today are addressed. In other environments, TQM has shown significant increases in productivity while increasing effectiveness. Its application to the health care environment is the provision of the best possible care through continuously improving service to meet or exceed the needs and expectations of the customer. The customer in the health care environment could be the patient, staff, physician and community serviced by the hospital. Characteristics of the new organizational structure are reviewed. Established techniques and processes are commonly used to identify process-improvement opportunities to assist the manager in continuously evaluating quality trends.

  18. Guaranteeing Quality in Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Gwen G.

    This paper presents a discussion of state and federal licensing and regulation of child care services. A hierarchy of the kinds of regulation is defined: (1) basic preventive/protective requirements (related to zoning, fire and safety, sanitation, and basic day care licensing); (2) administrative standards for publicly operated programs (equal to…

  19. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  20. A Conceptual Framework for Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research on defining and measuring health care quality, little attention has been given to different stakeholders’ perspectives of high-quality health care services. The main purpose of this study was to explore the attributes of quality healthcare in the Iranian context. Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key healthcare stakeholders including clients, providers, managers, policy makers, payers, suppliers and accreditation panel members to identify the healthcare service quality attributes and dimensions. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Over 100 attributes of quality healthcare service were elicited and grouped into five categories. The dimensions were: efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, empathy, and environment. Consequently, a comprehensive model of service quality was developed for health care context. The findings of the current study led to a conceptual framework of healthcare quality. This model leads to a better understanding of the different aspects of quality in health care and provides a better basis for defining, measuring and controlling quality of health care services. PMID:23922534

  1. A conceptual framework for quality of care.

    PubMed

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research on defining and measuring health care quality, little attention has been given to different stakeholders' perspectives of high-quality health care services. The main purpose of this study was to explore the attributes of quality healthcare in the Iranian context. Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key healthcare stakeholders including clients, providers, managers, policy makers, payers, suppliers and accreditation panel members to identify the healthcare service quality attributes and dimensions. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Over 100 attributes of quality healthcare service were elicited and grouped into five categories. The dimensions were: efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, empathy, and environment. Consequently, a comprehensive model of service quality was developed for health care context. The findings of the current study led to a conceptual framework of healthcare quality. This model leads to a better understanding of the different aspects of quality in health care and provides a better basis for defining, measuring and controlling quality of health care services.

  2. Quality of care in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Christian T.; Treadwell, Marsha J.; Keller, San; Levine, Roger; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Werner, Ellen M.; Smith, Wally R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Documented deficiencies in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) care include poor access to knowledgeable providers and inadequate treatment in emergency departments (EDs). The aim of this study was to create patient-reported outcome measures of the quality of ambulatory and ED care for adults with SCD. We developed and pilot tested SCD quality of care questions consistent with Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys. We applied psychometric methods to develop scores and evaluate reliability and validity. The participants of this study were adults with SCD (n = 556)—63% aged 18 to 34 years; 64% female; 64% SCD-SS—at 7 US sites. The measure used was Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement information system Quality of Care survey. Most participants (90%) reported at least 1 severe pain episode (pain intensity 7.8 ± 2.3, 0–10 scale) in the past year. Most (81%) chose to manage pain at home rather than the ED, citing negative ED experiences (83%). Using factor analysis, we identified Access, Provider Interaction, and ED Care composites with reliable scores (Cronbach α 0.70–0.83) and construct validity (r = 0.32–0.83 correlations with global care ratings). Compared to general adult Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores, adults with SCD had worse care, adjusted for age, education, and general health. Results were consistent with other research reflecting deficiencies in ED care for adults with SCD. The Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement Quality of Care measure is a useful self-report measure for documenting and tracking disparities in quality of SCD care. PMID:27583862

  3. A possible role of the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile in screening for autism: a proof-of-concept study in the specific sample of prematurely born children with birth weights <1,500 g

    PubMed Central

    Beranova, Stepanka; Stoklasa, Jan; Dudova, Iva; Markova, Daniela; Kasparova, Martina; Zemankova, Jana; Urbanek, Tomas; Talasek, Tomas; Luukka, Pasi; Hrdlicka, Michal

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to explore the potential of the Infant/Toddler Sensory Profile (ITSP) as a screening tool for autism spectrum disorders (ASD) in prematurely born children. Methods Parents of 157 children with birth weights <1,500 g (aged 2 years, corrected for prematurity; 88 boys, 69 girls) completed a screening battery that included the ITSP, Modified Checklist for Autism in Toddlers (M-CHAT), and the Communication and Symbolic Behavior Scales Developmental Profile Infant-Toddler Checklist (CSBS-DP-ITC). Children with known disabilities were excluded. All the children who were screened positive on any of the screening tools subsequently underwent clinical examination including the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule. Results We used classification trees to answer the question whether ITSP (or some of its subscales) could be combined with the M-CHAT and/or the CSBS-DP-ITC or its subscales into an effective ASD screening tool. Using the CSBS-DP-ITC, overall score, and the Sensation Seeking subscale of the ITSP, we obtained a screening tool that was able to identify all of the ASD children in our sample (confirmed by cross-validation). The proposed screening tool is scored as follows: 1) if the overall CSBS-DP-ITC value is <45.5, then the screening is positive; 2) if the overall CSBS-DP-ITC value is ≥45.5 and the z-score of the Sensation Seeking subscale of ITSP is ≥1.54, then the screening is positive; 3) otherwise, the screening is negative. Conclusion The use of CSBS-DP-ITC in combination with the Sensation Seeking subscale of the ITSP improved the accuracy of autism screening in preterm children. PMID:28182143

  4. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  5. Nursing home care quality: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Grøndahl, Vigdis Abrahamsen; Fagerli, Liv Berit

    2017-02-13

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to explore potential differences in how nursing home residents rate care quality and to explore cluster characteristics. Design/methodology/approach A cross-sectional design was used, with one questionnaire including questions from quality from patients' perspective and Big Five personality traits, together with questions related to socio-demographic aspects and health condition. Residents ( n=103) from four Norwegian nursing homes participated (74.1 per cent response rate). Hierarchical cluster analysis identified clusters with respect to care quality perceptions. χ(2) tests and one-way between-groups ANOVA were performed to characterise the clusters ( p<0.05). Findings Two clusters were identified; Cluster 1 residents (28.2 per cent) had the best care quality perceptions and Cluster 2 (67.0 per cent) had the worst perceptions. The clusters were statistically significant and characterised by personal-related conditions: gender, psychological well-being, preferences, admission, satisfaction with staying in the nursing home, emotional stability and agreeableness, and by external objective care conditions: healthcare personnel and registered nurses. Research limitations/implications Residents assessed as having no cognitive impairments were included, thus excluding the largest group. By choosing questionnaire design and structured interviews, the number able to participate may increase. Practical implications Findings may provide healthcare personnel and managers with increased knowledge on which to develop strategies to improve specific care quality perceptions. Originality/value Cluster analysis can be an effective tool for differentiating between nursing homes residents' care quality perceptions.

  6. Quality of health care for the disadvantaged.

    PubMed

    Brook, R H; Williams, K N

    1975-01-01

    Literature review points out that: (a) differentials in health status between the disadvantaged and the nondisadvantaged persist, often to a large degree; (b) differentials in the overall amount of care received are less striking now than heretofore, but standardization by level of need demonstrates measurable discrepancies in health services provided to the disadvantaged compared with the nondisadvantaged; (c) the quality of health care for the disadvantaged is not strikingly poorer than care for the nondisadvantaged, but, in view of demonstrable shortcomings in the quality of health care in general, this is not viewed as a positive statement; and (d) attempts to improve quality of care for the disadvantaged have not had the hoped-for impact. Four new avenues are suggested for possible further research; increased patient responsibility, increased consumer knowledge, financial accountability, and quality assurance activities. Because of the likelihood of only marginal changes in health status, rigorous evaluation of any experimental program is emphasized. During the last decade, many attempts have been made by private and governmental bodies to improve the health of the American people. In general, these efforts have focused on improving the health of members of disadvantaged groups and have included such diverse activities as building OEO health centers, developing maternal and infant care programs, and financing care for the elderly. During the last few years, a different movement, concerned with assuring high quality care for all people, has produced efforts such as quality assurance activities in health maintenance organizations, the Professional Standards Review Organization program, and the medical care evaluation program of the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Hospitals. Consideration of these two issues, i.e., improving the health of disadvantaged groups and improving the quality of care for all people, has led to two policy-relevant questions: "Can

  7. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs.

  8. Empathy and quality of care.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reynolds, William J

    2002-01-01

    Empathy is a complex multi-dimensional concept that has moral cognitive emotive and behavioural components Clinical empathy involves an ability to: (a) understand the patient's situation, perspective, and feelings (and their attached meanings); (b) to communicate that understanding and check its accuracy; and (c) to act on that understanding with the patient in a helpful (therapeutic) way. Research on the effect of empathy on health outcomes in primary care is lacking, but studies in mental health and in nursing suggest it plays a key role. Empathy can be improved and successfully taught at medical school especially if it is embedded in the students actual experiences with patients. A variety of assessment and feedback techniques have also been used in general medicine psychiatry and nursing. Further work is required to determine if clinical empathy needs to be, and can be, improved in the primary care setting. PMID:12389763

  9. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research.

  10. Assessing Diabetes Care Disparities with Ambulatory Care Quality Measures

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jennifer M; Johnson, Pamela Jo; Wholey, Douglas R; Frederick, Mary L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To identify and describe racial/ethnic disparities in overall diabetes management. Data Source/Study Setting Electronic health record data from calendar year 2010 were obtained from all primary care clinics at one large health system in Minnesota (n = 22,633). Study Design We used multivariate logistic regression to estimate the odds of achieving the following diabetes management goals: A1C <8 percent, LDL cholesterol <100 mg/dl, blood pressure <140/90 mmHg, tobacco-free, and daily aspirin. Principal Findings Blacks and American Indians have higher odds of not achieving all goals compared to whites. Disparities in specific goals were also found. Conclusions Although this health system has above-average diabetes care quality, significant disparities by race/ethnicity were identified. This underscores the importance of stratifying quality measures to improve care and outcomes for all. PMID:25523494

  11. Professional standards: linking care, competence, and quality.

    PubMed

    Dozier, A M

    1998-04-01

    Professional standards are key to the success of nurses as health care evolves, new roles are created, and new practice settings established. They are the infrastructure beneath the development of institutional standards of care, competency-based education programs, and quality assurance programs. Using them to link these key components provides for consistency across practice settings and among practicing nurses within integrated delivery systems. They also serve as the foundation for consensus building for partnerships and interdisciplinary initiatives.

  12. [The quality of chronic care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Birgit; Nolte, Ellen; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years changes in the legal framework of the German health care system have promoted the development of new health service models to improve chronic care. Recent innovations include the nation-wide introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs), integrated care contracts, community nurse programmes, the introduction of General Practitioner (GP)-centred care contracts, and new opportunities to offer interdisciplinary outpatient care in polyclinics. The aim of this article is to describe the recent developments regarding both the implementation of new health care models by statutory health insurance companies and their evaluation. As part of a European project on the development and validation of disease management evaluation methods (DISMEVAL), we carried out a selective literature search to identify relevant models and evaluation studies. However, on the basis of the currently available evaluation and study results it is difficult to judge whether these developments have actually led to an improvement in the quality of chronic care in Germany. Only for DMPs, evaluation is legally mandatory; its methods are inappropriate, though, for studying the effectiveness of DMPs. Further study results on the effectiveness of DMPs mostly focus on the DMP Diabetes mellitus type II and show consistent improvements regarding process parameters such as regular routine examinations, adherence to treatment guidelines, and quality of life. More research will be needed to determine whether DMPs can also help reduce the incidence of secondary disease and mortality in the long term.

  13. Living with diabetes: quality of care and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Pera, Pilar Isla

    2011-01-01

    Background: The aim of this research was to characterize the experience of living with diabetes mellitus (DM) and identify patients’ opinions of the quality of care received and the results of interventions. Methods: A descriptive, exploratory evaluation study using qualitative methodology was performed. Participants consisted of 40 adult patients diagnosed with DM and followed up in a public hospital in Barcelona, Spain. A semistructured interview and a focus group were used and a thematic content analysis was performed. Results: Patients described DM as a disease that is difficult to control and that provokes lifestyle changes requiring effort and sacrifice. Insulin treatment increased the perception of disease severity. The most frequent and dreaded complication was hypoglycemia. The main problems perceived by patients affecting the quality of care were related to a disease-centered medical approach, lack of information, limited participation in decision-making, and the administrative and bureaucratic problems of the health care system. Conclusion: The bureaucratic circuits of the health care system impair patients’ quality of life and perceived quality of care. Health professionals should foster patient participation in decision-making. However, this requires not only training and appropriate attitudes, but also adequate staffing and materials. PMID:21423590

  14. Caring and Learning Environments: Quality in Regulated Family Child Care across Canada. You Bet I Care!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Gillian; Lero, Donna S.; Goelman, Hillel; Tougas, Jocelyne; LaGrange, Annette

    Canadian experts in diverse fields as well as people concerned about social justice and cohesion have identified quality child care as a crucial component in addressing a variety of broad societal goals. This study explored the relationships between quality in Canadian family child care homes and: provider characteristics and attitudes about…

  15. Total quality management issues in managed care.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, C P; Kaluzny, A D

    1997-01-01

    The implementation of total quality management (TQM) in health care has gone on in parallel with the growth of managed care. What is the interaction between the two? Key issues are the ascendance of cost control over quality in many areas, erosion of employee commitment and loyalty, and a short-run orientation. Associated with this is an emphasis on organizational learning rather than learning by autonomous professionals. Both TQM and managed care acknowledge the dynamic nature of clinical processes and the ability and responsibility of both institutions and clinicians to improve their processes. Both are consistent with efforts to identify and implement best practices. However, these similarities should not mask fundamental differences. Continuous improvement must shift its focus from avoiding unnecessary variation to facilitating rapid organizational learning and institutionalizing mass customization into the delivery of health services.

  16. Washington's Infant Toddler Early Intervention Program Study: Enrollment of Washington Children with Disabilities and Special Health Care Needs in Washington State Public Programs on December 1, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyons, Dorothy; Keenan, Trisha; Cawthon, Laurie; Felming, Jan; Dickey, Rita; Loerch, Sandy; Shureen, Anne

    This report presents information on infants and toddlers (ages birth to three) with delaying or disabling conditions, who were enrolled in Washington State public services on December 1, 1997, under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Part H. Major findings included: (1) there was a total enrollment of 5,007 infants and toddlers (2.1…

  17. Washington's Infant Toddler Early Intervention Program Study: Enrollment of Washington Children with Disabilities and Special Health Care Needs in Washington State Public Programs on December 1, 1995.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keenan, Trisha; And Others

    This document presents tables, graphs, and narrative text providing information on the number and characteristics of infants and toddlers, under the age of 3, with disabilities and special health problems who were enrolled in Washington State's infant and toddler early intervention program in 1995. Major findings of the report include the…

  18. Child Care Quality: An Overview for Parents. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Many parents want to know how important the quality of care is to children's social, emotional, and academic development. This digest synthesizes some major recent research on child care quality. First, the digest explains what features contribute to quality of care. The digest also explains the differences between studies of how quality is…

  19. The PRO nurse: advocate for quality care.

    PubMed

    Carroll, M; Maichele, J

    1993-01-01

    Since the inception of the Social Security Amendments of 1983, nurses have assumed expanded roles in ensuring the monitoring of the quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. This unique area of nursing practice offers new challenges and employment opportunities for the nurse as a patient advocate. Nurses who are interested in this role may contact state PRO directors or watch for specific recruitment advertisements in nursing magazines.

  20. Health care quality improvement publication trends.

    PubMed

    Sun, Gordon H; MacEachern, Mark P; Perla, Rocco J; Gaines, Jean M; Davis, Matthew M; Shrank, William H

    2014-01-01

    To analyze the extent of academic interest in quality improvement (QI) initiatives in medical practice, annual publication trends for the most well-known QI methodologies being used in health care settings were analyzed. A total of 10 key medical- and business-oriented library databases were examined: PubMed, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, ISI Web of Science, Scopus, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, ABI/INFORM, and Business Source Complete. A total of 13 057 articles were identified that discuss at least 1 of 10 well-known QI concepts used in health care contexts, 8645 (66.2%) of which were classified as original research. "Total quality management" was the only methodology to demonstrate a significant decline in publication over time. "Continuous quality improvement" was the most common topic of study across all publication years, whereas articles discussing Lean methodology demonstrated the largest growth in publication volume over the past 2 decades. Health care QI publication volume increased substantially beginning in 1991.

  1. Blending Key Ingredients to Assure Quality in Home Health Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, Deloris G.

    1986-01-01

    Careful staff selection, training, and review are among the methods the author recommends to home care agencies striving to provide top-notch services. Discusses measuring the quality of care employees are providing, accreditation, and the benefits of accreditation. (CT)

  2. Quality care as ethical care: a poststructural analysis of palliative and supportive district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Walshe, Catherine; Luker, Karen A

    2016-03-01

    Quality of care is a prominent discourse in modern health-care and has previously been conceptualised in terms of ethics. In addition, the role of knowledge has been suggested as being particularly influential with regard to the nurse-patient-carer relationship. However, to date, no analyses have examined how knowledge (as an ethical concept) impinges on quality of care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care and thirteen of their lay carers. Poststructural discourse analysis techniques were utilised to take an ethical perspective on the current way in which quality of care is assessed and produced in health-care. It is argued that if quality of care is to be achieved, patients and carers need to be able to redistribute and redevelop the knowledge of their services in a collaborative way that goes beyond the current ways of working. Theoretical works and extant research are then used to produce tentative suggestions about how this may be achieved.

  3. Assuring quality health care outcomes: lessons learned from car dealers?

    PubMed Central

    Dimsdale, Joel E

    2017-01-01

    Health care systems want quality but struggle to find the right tools because, typically, they track quality in only one or two ways. Because of the complexity of health care, high quality will emerge only when health care systems employ multiple approaches, including, importantly, patient-reported outcome perspectives. Sustained changes are unlikely to emerge in the absence of such multipronged interventions. PMID:28123314

  4. Ensuring Quality in Online Palliative Care Resources

    PubMed Central

    Tieman, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Evidence and information is an integral part of the processes enabling clinical and service delivery within health. It is used by health professionals in clinical practice and in developing their professional knowledge, by policy makers in decision making, and is sought by health consumers to help them manage their health needs and assess their options. Increasingly, this evidence and information is being disseminated and sought through online channels. The internet is fundamentally changing how health information is being distributed and accessed. Clinicians, patients, community members, and decision makers have an unprecedented capacity to find online information about palliative care and end-of-life care. However, it is clear that not all individuals have the skills to be able to find and assess the quality of the resources they need. There are also many issues in creating online resources that are current, relevant and authoritative for use by health professionals and by health consumers. This paper explores the processes and structures used in creating a major national palliative care knowledge resource, the CareSearch website, to meet the needs of health professionals and of patients and their families and carers. PMID:27983592

  5. Child Care Quality in Different State Policy Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Elizabeth; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2007-01-01

    Using data from the Child Care Supplement to the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study, we test associations between the quality of child care and state child care policies. These data, which include observations of child care and interviews with care providers and mothers for 777 children across 14 states, allow for comparisons across a…

  6. Improving service quality in primary care.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Denise M; Nordrum, Jon T; Edwards, Frederick D; Caselli, Richard J; Berry, Leonard L

    2015-01-01

    A framework for improving health care service quality was implemented at a 12-provider family medicine practice in 2010. A national patient satisfaction research vendor conducted weekly telephone surveys of 840 patients served by that practice: 280 patients served in 2009, and 560 served during 2010 and 2011. After the framework was implemented, the proportion of "excellent" ratings of provider service (the highest rating on a 5-point scale) increased by 5% to 9%, most notably thoroughness (P = .04), listening (P = .04), and explaining (P = .04). Other improvements included prompt test result notification and telephone staff courtesy (each by 10%, P = .02), as well as teamwork (by 8%, P = .04). Overall quality increased by 10% (P = .01), moving the practice from the 68th to the 91st percentile of medical practices in the research vendor's database. Improvements in patient satisfaction suggest that this framework may be useful in value-based payment models.

  7. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality.

  8. Theory and practice for measuring health care quality

    PubMed Central

    Berwick, Donald M.; Knapp, Marian Gilbert

    1987-01-01

    As competition, cost control, and new modes of delivery emerge in health care, there is a need to reexamine both the traditional definitions of health care quality and the methods by which it is measured. Industries other than health care have much to teach regarding the methods for obtaining, analyzing, and displaying data; techniques for problem identification, problem solving, and reassessment; and ideas about organizational factors that produce a high quality product or service. The Quality-of-Care Measurement Department at the Harvard Community Health Plan has built a program that draws from a distinguished health care quality assurance tradition and incorporates techniques that have been successful in other industries. PMID:10312319

  9. [Quality management is associated with high quality services in health care].

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Tenna Hassert; Riis, Allan; Mainz, Jan; Jensen, Anne-Louise Degn

    2013-12-09

    In these years, quality management has been the focus in order to meet high quality services for the patients in Danish health care. This article provides information on quality management and quality improvement and it evaluates its effectiveness in achieving better organizational structures, processes and results in Danish health-care organizations. Our findings generally support that quality management is associated with high quality services in health care.

  10. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each...

  11. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each...

  12. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each...

  13. 38 CFR 51.120 - Quality of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quality of care. 51.120 Section 51.120 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) PER DIEM FOR NURSING HOME CARE OF VETERANS IN STATE HOMES Standards § 51.120 Quality of care. Each...

  14. Differential Susceptibility to Parenting and Quality Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pluess, Michael; Belsky, Jay

    2010-01-01

    Research on differential susceptibility to rearing suggests that infants with difficult temperaments are disproportionately affected by parenting and child care quality, but a major U.S. child care study raises questions as to whether quality of care influences social adjustment. One thousand three hundred sixty-four American children from…

  15. Action Agenda: Quality Care for African American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Black Child Development Inst., Inc., Washington, DC.

    This action agenda focuses on quality child care for the Seattle (Washington) King County area. Poverty rates are high in King County, and quality child care is vital to breaking the cycle of poverty that traps many African-American families. A needs assessment in King County identified many areas for the improvement of child-care services. These…

  16. [Quality management in intensive care medicine. Indispensable for daily routine].

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Braun, J-P

    2012-05-01

    In areas requiring maximum safety like intensive care units or operating room departments, modern quality management and risk management are essential. Treatment of critically ill patients is associated with high risk and, therefore, demands risk management and quality management. External quality assessment in intensive care medicine has been developed based on a core data set and quality indicators. A peer review procedure has been established. In addition, regional networks of intensive care physicians result in improved local networking. In intensive care medicine, this innovative modular system of quality management and risk management is pursued more consequently than in any other specialty.

  17. Measuring the Multifaceted Nature of Infant and Toddler Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangione, Peter L.; Kriener-Althen, Kerry; Marcella, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Research Findings: The quality of group care infants and toddlers experience relates to their concurrent and later development. Recent quality improvement initiatives point to the need for ecologically valid measures that assess the multifaceted nature of child care quality. In this article, we present the psychometric properties of an infant and…

  18. Quality specifications and standard-setting for stoma care patients.

    PubMed

    Primer, M A

    1995-12-01

    Quality specifications can be used as an information resource by purchasers of health care. The nature of service provision and nursing care can be positively influenced by the formalisation of standards and quality specifications. Auditing is essential in the ongoing evaluation of a quality system.

  19. Child Care in the American South: Poverty, Costs, and Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Vikki K.

    2012-01-01

    High-quality child care has been shown to improve the academic success and life adjustments of children living in poverty. During the past decade, many American states have adopted voluntary Quality Rating and Improvement (QRI) systems in an attempt to increase the level of quality in child care. Using data compiled by the National Association of…

  20. Evaluating the Quality of the Child Care in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hujala, Eeva; Fonsen, Elina; Elo, Janniina

    2012-01-01

    In this study we examine parents' and teachers' perceptions of the early childhood education and care (ECEC) quality in Finland. The study is based on the paradigm of inclusionary quality and the assessment is based on the quality evaluation model. The parents and teachers assess the quality to be good. The strength of the quality was the effect…

  1. Quality assurance in health care: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Bilawka, E; Craig, B J

    2003-08-01

    Quality of health care delivery is a growing concern globally given current budget restraints and increasing demands on health care providers. The variety of quality assurance and quality management activities equals the numerous ways health care practitioners of all genres provide health care. Dental hygienists around the world must be knowledgeable about quality assurance and management in health care as it is a significant factor in the evolution of the dental hygiene profession and the quality of oral health care provided by dental hygienists. The objective of this research was to conduct a literature review on quality assurance and quality management. A MEDLINE search from 1966 to 2002 was conducted. The search resulted in approximately 145 articles. Additional references from works generated by the search were also obtained. The literature revealed information on the background and history of quality assurance and quality management. Much of the literature was devoted to discussions of the validity, reliability and effectiveness of most prominent quality management activities being utilised in health care today. The investigation revealed numerous issues and barriers surrounding quality management. This article concludes with suggestions for future directions of quality assurance and quality management.

  2. Postacute rehabilitation quality of care: toward a shared conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-05-01

    There is substantial interest in mechanisms for measuring, reporting, and improving the quality of health care, including postacute care (PAC) and rehabilitation. Unfortunately, current activities generally are either too narrow or too poorly specified to reflect PAC rehabilitation quality of care. In part, this is caused by a lack of a shared conceptual understanding of what construes quality of care in PAC rehabilitation. This article presents the PAC-rehab quality framework: an evidence-based conceptual framework articulating elements specifically pertaining to PAC rehabilitation quality of care. The widely recognized Donabedian structure, process, and outcomes (SPO) model furnished the underlying structure for the PAC-rehab quality framework, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framed the functional outcomes. A comprehensive literature review provided the evidence base to specify elements within the SPO model and ICF-derived framework. A set of macrolevel-outcomes (functional performance, quality of life of patient and caregivers, consumers' experience, place of discharge, health care utilization) were defined for PAC rehabilitation and then related to their (1) immediate and intermediate outcomes, (2) underpinning care processes, (3) supportive team functioning and improvement processes, and (4) underlying care structures. The role of environmental factors and centrality of patients in the framework are explicated as well. Finally, we discuss why outcomes may best measure and reflect the quality of PAC rehabilitation. The PAC-rehab quality framework provides a conceptually sound, evidence-based framework appropriate for quality of care activities across the PAC rehabilitation continuum.

  3. Tennessee Star-Quality Child Care Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Tennessee's Star-Quality Child Care Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  4. Louisiana Quality Start Child Care Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Louisiana's Quality Start Child Care Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs;…

  5. Quality care means valuing care assistants, porters, and cleaners too.

    PubMed

    Toynbee, P

    2003-12-01

    All too often, the focus of the very clever strategy papers produced in the upper reaches of the health department is on the next grand plan. Some of these reforms have been catastrophic for the quality of service that patients experience at ward level. Of these, the contracting out culture introduced in the 1980s and the 1990s has been the worst. Researching my book, Hard work-life in low pay Britain, I took six jobs at around the minimum wage, including work as a hospital porter, as a hospital cleaner, and as a care assistant. These are jobs at the sharp end, up close and very personal to the patients, strongly influencing their experiences of the services they were using. Yet they are low paid, undervalued jobs that fall below the radar of the policy makers. In hospitals they need to be brought back in-house and integrated into a team ethos. Paying these people more would cost more, but it would also harvest great rewards by using their untapped commitment.

  6. The role of academic medicine in improving health care quality.

    PubMed

    Brindis, Ralph G; Spertus, John

    2006-09-01

    Academic medicine, often entrenched in biomedical and clinical research, has largely ignored the development and application of quality metrics to ensure the delivery of high-quality health care. Nevertheless, academic medicine has substantial opportunities to lead the charge in building a quality infrastructure with the goal of delivering high-quality and cost-efficient health care to all Americans. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) have worked jointly to measure and improve the quality of cardiovascular care. This effort has led to the development of clinical practice guidelines, performance measures, data standards, national registries, and appropriateness criteria for cardiovascular care. Academic medicine should actively embrace and promote the type of quality metrics and criteria developed by ACC and AHA and apply this model across the entire academic medicine community. Academic medicine, with its many resources, could lead the way in the expanding field of quality science by supporting fundamental research in quality improvement, supporting academicians to improve quality at their own institutions, developing educational models for quality assessment and improvement, creating and implementing data registries, and serving as a conduit for developing the emerging science of quality assessment. In this and many other ways, academic medicine must offer the health care community leadership for improving our nation's health care quality with the same fervor presently exhibited for the advancement of basic science, the development of specialized and experimental therapy, and as centers for tertiary and quaternary patient care.

  7. Assessing quality of care for African Americans with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peters, Rosalind M; Benkert, Ramona; Dinardo, Ellen; Templin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    African Americans bear a disproportionate burden of hypertension. A causal-modeling design, using Donabedian's Quality Framework, tested hypothesized relationships among structure, process, and outcome variables to assess quality of care provided to this population. Structural assessment revealed that administrative and staff organization affected patients' trust in their provider and satisfaction with their care. Interpersonal process factors of racism, cultural mistrust, and trust in providers had a significant effect on satisfaction, and perceived racism had a negative effect on blood pressure (BP). Poorer quality in technical processes of care was associated with higher BP. Findings support the utility of Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care in a disease-specific population.

  8. Child Care and Mothers' Mental Health: Is High-Quality Care Associated with Fewer Depressive Symptoms?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Rachel A.; Usdansky, Margaret L.; Wang, Xue; Gluzman, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Finding high-quality child care may pose financial and logistical challenges and create ongoing emotional strains for some mothers. We use the Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development to ask (a) are child-care settings that mothers select on the basis of their own perceptions of quality rated more highly by independent observers (and more…

  9. Assessing the quality of primary care in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Leslie, Hannah H; Bitton, Asaf; Jerome, J Gregory; Thermidor, Roody; Joseph, Jean Paul; Kruk, Margaret E

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To develop a composite measure of primary care quality and apply it to Haiti’s primary care system. Methods Using the Primary Health Care Performance Initiative’s framework, we defined four domains of primary care service delivery: (i) accessible care; (ii) effective service delivery; (iii) management and organization; and (iv) primary care functions. We gave each primary care facility in Haiti a quality score for each domain and overall, with poor, fair and good quality indicated by scores of 0.00–0.49, 0.50–0.74 and 0.75–1.00, respectively. We quantified access and effective access to primary care as the proportions of the population within 5 km of any primary care facility and a good facility, respectively. Findings Of the 786 primary care facilities in Haiti in 2013, only 332 (43%) facilities were classified as good for accessible care. Fewer facilities were classified as good in the domains of effective service delivery (30; 4%), management and organization (91; 12%) and primary care functions (43; 5%). Although about 91% of the population lived within 5 km of a primary care facility, only an estimated 23% of the entire population – including just 5% of the rural population – had access to primary care of good quality. Conclusion Despite an extensive network of health facilities, a minority of Haitians had access to a primary care facility of good quality. Such facilities were especially scarce in rural areas. Similar systematic analyses of the quality of primary care could inform national efforts to strengthen health systems. PMID:28250531

  10. The meaning of quality of care in home care settings: older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Grigorovich, Alisa

    2016-03-01

    Research suggests that the experience of being a lesbian or bisexual woman influences women's interactions with health care providers, and their perception of the quality of care. Limited research to date, however, has examined how ageing and sexuality mediates women's experiences of quality, when accessing health care in the community. To fill a gap in the literature, this study investigated older lesbian and bisexual women's perspectives on the meaning of quality of care in the context of receiving home care services. This was a qualitative single case study. Sixteen participants, aged 55-72 from Ontario, Canada, participated in semi-structured interviews between 2011 and 2012. The interviews were recorded and transcribed. The interview data were analysed using iterative thematic analysis and guided by a feminist ethic of care perspective. Participants described quality of care in ways that were in line with a feminist ethic of care; that is, they wanted care providers to be responsive and attentive to their needs, to involve them in the caring process and to demonstrate respect and caring. Participants also indicated that providers' comfort with, and knowledge of, sexual diversity was important for enabling quality of care. These findings deepen our understanding of how to support quality of care for this population through changes to provider education and training, and health policy.

  11. Enhancing the Quality of Child Care: Lessons from Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chambliss, Catherine

    Drawing on current research, this paper advocates the optimization and enhancement of quality in group day care. Child development researchers offer many suggestions for improving the quality of child care. Recent research has indicated the importance peers play in children's development. Researchers have also indicated the importance of…

  12. Effects of Quality Improvement System for Child Care Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ma, Xin; Shen, Jianping; Kavanaugh, Amy; Lu, Xuejin; Brandi, Karen; Goodman, Jeff; Till, Lance; Watson, Grace

    2011-01-01

    Using multiple years of data collected from about 100 child care centers in Palm Beach County, Florida, the authors studied whether the Quality Improvement System (QIS) made a significant impact on quality of child care centers. Based on a pre- and postresearch design spanning a period of 13 months, QIS appeared to be effective in improving…

  13. Helping You Choose Quality Hospice Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... can also be provided in a hospital or nursing home. Hospice care is a Medicare benefit. The following ... patient’s care? • If the patient lives in a nursing home, how do hospice staff and the nursing home ...

  14. Nursing Effort and Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arling, Greg; Kane, Robert L.; Mueller, Christine; Bershadsky, Julie; Degenholtz, Howard B.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the relationship between nursing home staffing level, care received by individual residents, and resident quality-related care processes and functional outcomes. Design and Methods: Nurses recorded resident care time for 5,314 residents on 156 units in 105 facilities in four states (Colorado,…

  15. Money, Accreditation, and Child Care Center Quality. Working Paper Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, William T., Jr.; Lucas, Jessica K.

    In recent years, several states have offered financial incentives to encourage child care centers and homes to become accredited by a reputable national organization to improve child care quality. This report examines whether it is good policy to offer higher reimbursement rates to accredited child care facilities and assesses the relative merits…

  16. The Case for Quality Health Care for the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Ethel D.

    1978-01-01

    This article shows that, while there has been a modification of health care facilities and new approaches to medical care, little change has been effected in the interrelationship between the poor and the delivery of quality medical care. (Author/GC)

  17. Effects of multidisciplinary integrated care on quality of care in residential care facilities for elderly people: a cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    Boorsma, Marijke; Frijters, Dinnus H.M.; Knol, Dirk L.; Ribbe, Miel E.; Nijpels, Giel; van Hout, Hein P.J.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sophisticated approaches are needed to improve the quality of care for elderly people living in residential care facilities. We determined the effects of multidisciplinary integrated care on the quality of care and quality of life for elderly people in residential care facilities. Methods: We performed a cluster randomized controlled trial involving 10 residential care facilities in the Netherlands that included 340 participating residents with physical or cognitive disabilities. Five of the facilities applied multidisciplinary integrated care, and five provided usual care. The intervention, inspired by the disease management model, consisted of a geriatric assessment of functional health every three months. The assessment included use of the Long-term Care Facility version of the Resident Assessment Instrument by trained nurse-assistants to guide the design of an individualized care plan; discussion of outcomes and care priorities with the family physician, the resident and his or her family; and monthly multidisciplinary meetings with the nurse-assistant, family physician, psychologist and geriatrician to discuss residents with complex needs. The primary outcome was the sum score of 32 risk-adjusted quality-of-care indicators. Results: Compared with the facilities that provided usual care, the intervention facilities had a significantly higher sum score of the 32 quality-of-care indicators (mean difference − 6.7, p = 0.009; a medium effect size of 0.72). They also had significantly higher scores for 11 of the 32 indicators of good care in the areas of communication, delirium, behaviour, continence, pain and use of antipsychotic agents. Interpretation: Multidisciplinary integrated care resulted in improved quality of care for elderly people in residential care facilities compared with usual care. Trial registration: www.controlled-trials.com trial register no. ISRCTN11076857. PMID:21708967

  18. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    PubMed

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche.

  19. Association between education and quality of diabetes care in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Flatz, Aline; Casillas, Alejandra; Stringhini, Silvia; Zuercher, Emilie; Burnand, Bernard; Peytremann-Bridevaux, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Low socioeconomic status is associated with higher prevalence of diabetes, worse outcomes, and worse quality of care. We explored the relationship between education, as a measure of socioeconomic status, and quality of care in the Swiss context. Patients and methods Data were drawn from a population-based survey of 519 adults with diabetes during fall 2011 and summer 2012 in a canton of Switzerland. We assessed patients and diabetes characteristics. Eleven indicators of quality of care were considered (six of process and five of outcomes of care). After bivariate analyses, regression analyses adjusted for age, sex, and diabetic complications were performed to assess the relationship between education and quality of care. Results Of 11 quality-of-care indicators, three were significantly associated with education: funduscopy (patients with tertiary versus primary education were more likely to get the exam: odds ratio, 1.8; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.004–3.3) and two indicators of health-related quality of life (patients with tertiary versus primary education reported better health-related quality of life: Audit of Diabetes-Dependent Quality of Life: β=0.6 [95% CI, 0.2–0.97]; SF-12 mean physical component summary score: β=3.6 [95% CI, 0.9–6.4]). Conclusion Our results suggest the presence of educational inequalities in quality of diabetes care. These findings may help health professionals focus on individuals with increased needs to decrease health inequalities. PMID:25759596

  20. Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    whether the quality of care received by minority men with locally advanced prostate cancer differs from the care received by white men controlling for...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0540 TITLE: Racial Disparities in the Quality of Prostate Cancer Care PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nina Bickell CONTRACTING...to comply with a collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE

  1. [THE ORGANIZATION OF CONTROLLING QUALITY OF ORTHODONTIC CARE OF POPULATION].

    PubMed

    Chaban, A V; Schepin, V O; Korablev, V N

    2015-01-01

    The article presents originally developed model of quality of orthodontic care of population on the level of subject of the Russian Federation. The model includes the following elements: demand of population in orthodontic care, mission of orthodontic service, regulations of orthodontic service, table of facilities, staff list, standards of evaluation of effectiveness and audit of effectiveness of orthodontic care of population, and standards of quality control. The developed standards of quality control exemplified by typical stomatological polyclinic, demonstrated reserves of further development of quality and accessibility of orthodontic service to population in functioning of medical organization.

  2. Systems and processes that ensure high quality care.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Sally; Westmore, Kathryn

    2012-10-01

    This is the second in a series of articles examining the components of good corporate governance. It considers how the structures and processes for quality governance can affect an organisation's ability to be assured about the quality of care. Complex information systems and procedures can lead to poor quality care, but sound structures and processes alone are insufficient to ensure good governance, and behavioural factors play a significant part in making sure that staff are enabled to provide good quality care. The next article in this series looks at how the information reporting of an organisation can affect its governance.

  3. Issues in Measuring and Improving Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Maria A.

    1995-01-01

    This issue of the Health Care Financing Review focuses on issues and advances in measuring and improving the quality of care, particularly for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries. Discussions of quality-related topics are especially timely, given the growing and widespread interest in improving quality in the organization, financing, and delivery of health care services. This article has several purposes. The first is to provide a brief description of some of the causes underlying the growth of the health care quality movement; the second is to provide a contextual framework for discussion of some of the overarching themes that emerge in this issue. These themes include examining conceptual issues, developing quality measures for specific sites and populations, and creating or adapting data sets for quality-measurement purposes. PMID:10151882

  4. 'Busyness' and the preclusion of quality palliative district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Luker, Karen; Walshe, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Ethical care is beginning to be recognised as care that accounts for the views of those at the receiving end of care. However, in the context of palliative and supportive district nursing care, the patients' and their carers' views are seldom heard. This qualitative research study explores these views. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care, and 13 of their carers. Participants were recruited via community nurses and hospices between September 2010 and October 2011. Post-structural discourse analysis is used to examine how discourses operate on a moral level. One discourse, 'busyness', is argued to preclude a moral form of nursing care. The discourse of friendship is presented to contrast this. Discussion explores Gallagher's 'slow ethics' and challenges the currently accepted ways of measuring to improve quality of care concluding that quality cannot be measured.

  5. Poor Quality for Poor Women? Inequities in the Quality of Antenatal and Delivery Care in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Jigyasa; Leslie, Hannah H.; Kundu, Francis; Kruk, Margaret E.

    2017-01-01

    Background Quality of healthcare is an important determinant of future progress in global health. However, the distributional aspects of quality of care have received inadequate attention. We assessed whether high quality maternal care is equitably distributed by (1) mapping the quality of maternal care in facilities located in poorer versus wealthier areas of Kenya; and (2) comparing the quality of maternal care available to Kenyans in and not in poverty. Methods We assessed three measures of maternal care quality: facility infrastructure and clinical quality of antenatal care and delivery care, using indicators from the 2010 Kenya Service Provision Assessment (SPA), a standardized facility survey with direct observation of maternal care provision. We calculated poverty of the area served by antenatal or delivery care facilities using the Multidimensional Poverty Index. We used regression analyses and non-parametric tests to assess differences in maternal care quality in facilities located in more and less impoverished areas. We estimated effective coverage with a minimum standard of care for the full population and those in poverty. Results A total of 564 facilities offering at least one maternal care service were included in this analysis. Quality of maternal care was low, particularly clinical quality of antenatal and delivery care, which averaged 0.52 and 0.58 out of 1 respectively, compared to 0.68 for structural inputs to care. Maternal healthcare quality varied by poverty level: at the facility level, all quality metrics were lowest for the most impoverished areas and increased significantly with greater wealth. Population access to a minimum standard (≥0.75 of 1.00) of quality maternal care was both low and inequitable: only 17% of all women and 8% of impoverished women had access to minimally adequate delivery care. Conclusion The quality of maternal care is low in Kenya, and care available to the impoverished is significantly worse than that for the

  6. Quality in Family Child Care Networks: An Evaluation of All Our Kin Provider Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Toni; Reiman, Kayla; Nelson, Christina; Sager, Jessica; Wagner, Janna

    2016-01-01

    This article presents findings from a quasi-experimental evaluation of quality with a sample of 28 family child care providers in the All Our Kin Family Child Care Network, a staffed family child care network which offers a range of services including relationship-based intensive consultation, and 20 family child care providers who had no…

  7. The Quality of Care for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease.

    PubMed

    Yadlapati, Rena; Dakhoul, Lara; Pandolfino, John E; Keswani, Rajesh N

    2017-03-01

    Improving the quality of healthcare delivery is a cornerstone of modern medical care shared between all stakeholders. However, effectively improving quality requires both an understanding of the tenets of healthcare quality and how they relate to an individual disease process. This is especially important for common diseases, such as gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), where wide variations in practice exist. The high prevalence of GERD coupled with wide variation in clinical approach results in significant economic burden and poor quality of care. Thus, GERD serves as a useful framework to highlight the opportunities and current challenges of delivering high-quality care. In this article, we identify quality metrics in GERD and the areas in need of research to improve the quality of the management of GERD. Additionally, we suggest strategies for improvement as it relates to the proper diagnostic testing utilization and the decision-making process.

  8. Nursing Home Care Quality: Insights from a Bayesian Network Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodson, Justin; Jang, Wooseung; Rantz, Marilyn

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is twofold. The first purpose is to utilize a new methodology (Bayesian networks) for aggregating various quality indicators to measure the overall quality of care in nursing homes. The second is to provide new insight into the relationships that exist among various measures of quality and how such measures…

  9. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Slovak Republic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) is a topic of increased policy interest in the Slovak Republic where improving quality in the ECEC sector is a subject of growing importance. The OECD has identified five effective policy levers to encourage quality in the sector: 1) quality goals and regulations; 2) curriculum and guidelines; 3)…

  10. Nursing care time and quality indicators for adult intensive care: correlation analysis.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Paulo Carlos; Fugulin, Fernanda Maria Togeiro

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this quantitative, correlational and descriptive study was to analyze the time the nursing staff spends to assist patients in Adult Intensive Care Units, as well as to verify its correlation with quality care indicators. The average length of time spent on care and the quality care indicators were identified by consulting management instruments the nursing head of the Unit employs. The average hours of nursing care delivered to patients remained stable, but lower than official Brazilian agencies' indications. The correlation between time of nursing care and the incidence of accidental extubation indicator indicated that it decreases with increasing nursing care delivered by nurses. The results of this investigation showed the influence of nursing care time, provided by nurses, in the outcome of care delivery.

  11. Price and quality transparency: how effective for health care reform?

    PubMed

    Nyman, John A; Li, Chia-Hsuan W

    2009-07-01

    Many in Minnesota and the United States are promoting price and quality transparency as a means for reforming health care. The assumption is that with such information, consumers and providers would be motivated to change their behavior and this would lead to lower costs and higher-quality care.This article attempts to determine the extent to which publicizing information about the cost and quality of medical care does, in fact, improve quality and lower costs, and thus should be included in any reform strategy. The authors reviewed a number of studies and concluded that there is a general lack of empirical evidence on the effect of price transparency on health care costs and that the evidence on the effectiveness of quality transparency is mixed.

  12. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement

    PubMed Central

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A.; Sledge, George W.; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Eberlein, Timothy J.; Feeley, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report’s recommendations—including two recommendations related to quality measurement—remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation’s inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America. PMID:24839592

  13. Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: The Critical Role of Quality Measurement.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Ganz, Patricia A; Sledge, George W; Levit, Laura; Hayman, James A; Eberlein, Timothy J; Feeley, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    In 1999, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) published Ensuring Quality Cancer Care, an influential report that described an ideal cancer care system and issued ten recommendations to address pervasive gaps in the understanding and delivery of quality cancer care. Despite generating much fervor, the report's recommendations-including two recommendations related to quality measurement-remain largely unfulfilled. Amidst continuing concerns regarding increasing costs and questionable quality of care, the IOM charged a new committee with revisiting the 1999 report and with reassessing national cancer care, with a focus on the aging US population. The committee identified high-quality patient-clinician relationships and interactions as central drivers of quality and attributed existing quality gaps, in part, to the nation's inability to measure and improve cancer care delivery in a systematic way. In 2013, the committee published its findings in Delivering High-Quality Cancer Care: Charting a New Course for a System in Crisis, which included two recommendations that emphasize coordinated, patient-centered quality measurement and information technology enhancements: Develop a national quality reporting program for cancer care as part of a learning health care system; and,Develop an ethically sound learning health care information technology system for cancer that enables real-time analysis of data from cancer patients in a variety of care settings. These recommendations underscore the need for independent national oversight, public-private collaboration, and substantial funding to create robust, patient-centered quality measurement and learning enterprises to improve the quality, accessibility, and affordability of cancer care in America.

  14. Violence towards health care staff and possible effects on the quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Arnetz, J E; Arnetz, B B

    2001-02-01

    Much of the research on violence in the health care sector has focused on the immediate and long-term effects of patient violence on staff victims. There is a lack of studies, however, examining whether individual reactions to violent episodes, such as anger and increased fear in one's work, have any measurable effect on staff behaviour toward their patients, and ultimately on the quality of patient care. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether an association exists between staff experiences with violence and patient-rated quality of patient care. A theoretical model was presented, suggesting that violence or threats experienced by health care staff have a negative effect on the quality of health care services offered, as measured by patients. In addition, it was theorised that there would be an association between staff work environment and staff reports of violence. Six questionnaire studies, three concerning hospital staff's views of their work environment and three dealing with patients' perceptions of the quality of care, provided the data for evaluating the model. Work environment and quality of care studies were carried out simultaneously at a single hospital in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. Regression analysis was used to see which combination of work environment and quality of care variables would best predict a positive overall grade for quality of care from the patient perspective. Violence entered consistently as an important predictor into each of the three best regression equations for 1994, 1995, and 1997, respectively. The results of this analysis suggest that the violence experienced by health care staff is associated with lower patient ratings of the quality of care. The study indicates that violence is not merely an occupational health issue, but may have significant implications for the quality of care provided.

  15. Leadership, staffing and quality of care in nursing homes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Leadership and staffing are recognised as important factors for quality of care. This study examines the effects of ward leaders' task- and relationship-oriented leadership styles, staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and ratio of unlicensed staff on three independent measures of quality of care. Methods A cross-sectional survey of forty nursing home wards throughout Norway was used to collect the data. Five sources of data were utilised: self-report questionnaires to 444 employees, interviews with and questionnaires to 13 nursing home directors and 40 ward managers, telephone interviews with 378 relatives and 900 hours of field observations. Separate multi-level analyses were conducted for quality of care assessed by relatives, staff and field observations respectively. Results Task-oriented leadership style had a significant positive relationship with two of the three quality of care indexes. In contrast, relationship-oriented leadership style was not significantly related to any of the indexes. The lack of significant effect for relationship-oriented leadership style was due to a strong correlation between the two leadership styles (r = 0.78). Staffing levels and ratio of registered nurses were not significantly related to any of the quality of care indexes. The ratio of unlicensed staff, however, showed a significant negative relationship to quality as assessed by relatives and field observations, but not to quality as assessed by staff. Conclusions Leaders in nursing homes should focus on active leadership and particularly task-oriented behaviour like structure, coordination, clarifying of staff roles and monitoring of operations to increase quality of care. Furthermore, nursing homes should minimize use of unlicensed staff and address factors related to high ratios of unlicensed staff, like low staff stability. The study indicates, however, that the relationship between staffing levels, ratio of registered nurses and quality of care is

  16. Capitation of Medicare: Quality Care or Third-Class Care for the Poor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wintringham, Karen

    Experience gathered to date confirms that capitation of Medicare does not necessarily decrease quality of health care and may in fact encourage an improvement in health care quality. Incentives inherent in capitated reimbursement are threefold. First, practitioners, by not receiving more payment for more service, are discouraged from providing…

  17. Certain Organizational Characteristics Affect ACO Preventive Care Quality Performance.

    PubMed

    Ticse, Caroline

    2016-06-01

    Key findings. (1) ACOs at provider workforce extremes--few primary care providers or many specialists--performed worse on measures of preventive care quality relative to those with more PCPs and fewer specialists. (2) Upfront investment in ACO formation is associated with higher performance in preventive care quality. (3) ACOs with a higher proportion of minority beneficiaries performed worse on disease prevention measures than did ACOs with a lower proportion of minority beneficiaries. (4) ACOs facing barriers to quality performance may benefit from organizational characteristics such as electronic health record capabilities and hospital inclusion in the ACO.

  18. Can disease management reduce health care costs by improving quality?

    PubMed

    Fireman, Bruce; Bartlett, Joan; Selby, Joe

    2004-01-01

    Disease management (DM) promises to achieve cost savings by improving the quality of care for chronic diseases. During the past decade the Permanente Medical Group in Northern California has implemented extensive DM programs. Examining quality indicators, utilization, and costs for 1996-2002 for adults with four conditions, we find evidence of substantial quality improvement but not cost savings. The causal pathway--from improved care to reduced morbidity to cost savings--has not produced sufficient savings to offset the rising costs of improved care. We conclude that the rationale for DM programs, like the rationale for any medical treatments, should rest on their effectiveness and value.

  19. The Quality of Care under a Managed-Care Program for Dual Eligibles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Homyak, Patricia; Bershadsky, Boris; Lum, Terry; Flood, Shannon; Zhang, Hui

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare the quality of care provided under the Minnesota Senior Health Options (MSHO), a special program designed to serve dually eligible older persons, to care provided to controls who received fee-for-service Medicare and Medicaid managed care. Design and Methods: Two control groups were used; one was…

  20. Child-Care Subsidies: Do They Impact the Quality of Care Children Experience?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Anna D.; Ryan, Rebecca M.; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    The federal child-care subsidy program represents one of the government's largest investments in early care and education, but little is known about whether it increases low-income children's access to higher quality child care. This study used newly available nationally representative data on 4-year-old children (N = 750) to investigate whether…

  1. Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association 2000-2001 Annual Report: Supporting Quality Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association, MN.

    This annual report of the Greater Minneapolis Day Care Association (GMDCA) details the accomplishments of the organization for 2000-2001. The report begins with a letter from the executive director focusing on the need to change our thinking about the care and education of young children, then describes components of quality child care and how the…

  2. Stakeholders' roles and responsibilities regarding quality of care.

    PubMed

    Huotari, Päivi; Havrdová, Zuzana

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to describe how different stakeholders (society, managers, employees and clients) can together ensure the quality of care. Design/methodology/approach Qualitative data were collected from four focus group interviews conducted in three countries. All interviewees were pursuing a master's degree in social and/or health care management and had begun working in their field after completing their bachelor's degree. The data were analysed using inductive content analysis. Findings The society and managers are responsible for the care system as a whole and must apply system-oriented, rather than sector-oriented, thinking. Employees are responsible for ensuring the continuity of client services in their work, and managers and employees share the responsibility of achieving the organisational goals and quality standards. The clients are responsible for acting as responsible service users and providing the required information to obtain care. Communication was strongly emphasised in the data, and it necessitates cross-professional and organisational boundaries, professional and political boundaries, as well as boundaries between the professional and the client. Research limitations/implications Since the interviewees were all pursuing a master's degree in social and/or health care management, when reflecting on their work experience, they may have also been reflecting what they had learned in university. Practical implications This study emphasises the importance of collaboration and communication between stakeholders in ensuring the quality of care. Unpredictable economies, the ageing population and the ongoing integration and reorganisation of health and social care services in Europe highlight systematic and strategic approach in quality of care. Originality/value This paper claims that communication between different care stakeholders gives a more systematic and coherent framework for the quality of care. Quality of care is a

  3. Many quality measurements, but few quality measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Schachter, Howard M; Mamaladze, Vasil; Lewin, Gabriela; Graham, Ian D; Brouwers, Melissa; Sampson, Margaret; Morrison, Andra; Zhang, Li; O'Blenis, Peter; Garritty, Chantelle

    2006-01-01

    Background Breast cancer in women is increasingly frequent, and care is complex, onerous and expensive, all of which lend urgency to improvements in care. Quality measurement is essential to monitor effectiveness and to guide improvements in healthcare. Methods Ten databases, including Medline, were searched electronically to identify measures assessing the quality of breast cancer care in women (diagnosis, treatment, followup, documentation of care). Eligible studies measured adherence to standards of breast cancer care in women diagnosed with, or in treatment for, any histological type of adenocarcinoma of the breast. Reference lists of studies, review articles, web sites, and files of experts were searched manually. Evidence appraisal entailed dual independent assessments of data (e.g., indicators used in quality measurement). The extent of each quality indicator's scientific validation as a measure was assessed. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) was asked to contribute quality measures under development. Results Sixty relevant reports identified 58 studies with 143 indicators assessing adherence to quality breast cancer care. A paucity of validated indicators (n = 12), most of which assessed quality of life, only permitted a qualitative data synthesis. Most quality indicators evaluated processes of care. Conclusion While some studies revealed patterns of under-use of care, all adherence data require confirmation using validated quality measures. ASCO's current development of a set of quality measures relating to breast cancer care may hold the key to conducting definitive studies. PMID:17176480

  4. Nonprice Competition and Quality of Care in Managed Care: The New York SCHIP Market

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hangsheng; Phelps, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine the effect of nonprice competition among managed care plans on the quality of care in the New York SCHIP market. Data Sources U.S. Census 2000; 2002 New York State Managed Care Plan Performance Report; and 2001 New York State Managed Care Annual Enrollment Report. Study Design Each market is defined as a county, and competition is measured as the number of plans in a market. Quality of care is measured in percentages using three Consumer Assessment of Health Plans Survey and three Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set scores. Two-stage least squares is applied to address the endogeneity between competition and the quality of care, using population as an instrument. Principle Findings We find a negative association between competition and quality of care. An additional managed care plan is significantly associated with a decrease of 0.40–2.31 percentage points in four out of six quality measures. After adjusting for production cost, a positive correlation is observed between price and quality measures across different pricing regions. Conclusions It seems likely that pricing policy is a constraint on quality production, although it may not be interpreted as a causal relationship and further study is needed. PMID:18454776

  5. The importance and challenge of paying for quality nursing care.

    PubMed

    Unruh, Lynn Y; Hassmiller, Susan B; Reinhard, Susan C

    2008-05-01

    Historically, the economic value that nursing brings to the patient care process has not been recognized or quantified. Improving the quality of nursing care through work environment changes or increases in staffing is viewed by many as an added cost, but the benefits in terms of money saved through improved nursing satisfaction and patient outcomes are not considered. This article introduces nine articles that were originally presented at the Economics of Nursing Invitational Conference: Paying for Quality Nursing Care held at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation in Princeton, New Jersey, June 13 and 14, 2007. Recommendations are to conduct research on the impact of policy and payment changes on the nursing workforce and quality of care and to correct the misalignment of socioeconomic and business case incentives for quality by payment systems and other changes.

  6. Achieving quality and fiscal outcomes in patient care: the clinical mentor care delivery model.

    PubMed

    Burritt, Joan E; Wallace, Patricia; Steckel, Cynthia; Hunter, Anita

    2007-12-01

    Contemporary patient care requires sophisticated clinical judgment and reasoning in all nurses. However, the level of development regarding these abilities varies within a staff. Traditional care models lack the structure and process to close the expertise gap creating potential patient safety risks. In an innovative model, senior, experienced nurses were relieved of direct patient care assignments to oversee nursing care delivery. Evaluation of the model showed significant impact on quality and fiscal outcomes.

  7. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Quality of Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Kevin; Sanders, Mechelle R

    2016-01-01

    The annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports document widespread and persistent racial and ethnic disparities. These disparities result from complex interactions between patient factors related to social disadvantage, clinicians, and organizational and health care system factors. Separate and unequal systems of health care between states, between health care systems, and between clinicians constrain the resources that are available to meet the needs of disadvantaged groups, contribute to unequal outcomes, and reinforce implicit bias. Recent data suggest slow progress in many areas but have documented a few notable successes in eliminating these disparities. To eliminate these disparities, continued progress will require a collective national will to ensure health care equity through expanded health insurance coverage, support for primary care, and public accountability based on progress toward defined, time-limited objectives using evidence-based, sufficiently resourced, multilevel quality improvement strategies that engage patients, clinicians, health care organizations, and communities.

  8. Evaluating medication-related quality of care in residential aged care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Jodie B; Vitry, Agnes; Caughey, Gillian E

    2015-01-01

    Given the growing aged care population, the complexity of their medication-related needs and increased risk of adverse drug events, there is a necessity to systematically monitor and manage medication-related quality of care. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and synthesise medication-related quality of care indicators with respect to application to residential aged care. MEDLINE (Ovid), Psychinfo, CINAHL, Embase and Google® were searched from 2001 to 2013 for studies that were in English, focused on older people aged 65+ years and discussed the development, application or validation of original medication-related quality of care indicators. The quality of selected articles was appraised using the Critical Appraisal Skills Program and psychometric qualities extracted and synthesised using content analysis. Indicators were mapped to six medication-related quality of care attributes and a minimum indicator set derived. Thirty three articles describing 25 indicator sets met the inclusion criteria. Thirteen (52%) contained prescribing quality indicators only. Eight (32%) were developed specifically for aged care. Twenty three (92%) were validated and seven (28%) assessed for reliability. The most common attribute addressed was medication appropriateness (n = 24). There were no indicators for evaluating medication use in those with limited life expectancy, which resulted in only five of the six attributes being addressed. The developed minimum indicator set contains 28 indicators representing 22 of 25 identified indicator sets. Whilst a wide variety of validated indicator sets exist, none addressed all aspects of medication-related quality of care pertinent to residential aged care. The minimum indicator set is intended as a foundation for comprehensively evaluating medication-related quality of care in this setting. Future work should focus on bridging identified gaps.

  9. [Assessing user satisfaction, an objective for quality of care].

    PubMed

    Séné-Bourgeois, Martine; Mathieu-Chakroun, Isabelle; Margat, Aurore

    The assessment of user satisfaction constitutes a key indicator of the quality of care. It can be envisaged either as part of an internal strategy which favours the improvement of practices, an external strategy whose focus is more commercial and/or an exploratory strategy to develop care models. User satisfaction is expressed in particular through complaint letters and discharge questionnaires. These regulated schemes enable quality to be approached on an individual and collective level.

  10. Internal marketing: creating quality employee experiences in health care organizations.

    PubMed

    Masri, Maysoun Dimachkie; Oetjen, Dawn; Rotarius, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    To cope with the recent challenges within the health care industry, health care managers need to engage in the internal marketing of their various services. Internal marketing has been used as an effective management tool to increase employees' motivation, satisfaction, and productivity (J Mark Commun. 2010;16(5):325-344). Health care managers should understand that an intense focus on internal marketing factors will lead to a quality experience for employees that will ultimately have a positive effect on the patient experiences.

  11. Quality of Hospice Care: Comparison between Rural and Urban Residents

    PubMed Central

    Baernholdt, Marianne; Campbell, Cathy L.; Hinton, Ivora D.; Yan, Guofen; Lewis, Erica

    2015-01-01

    Discrepancies between needed and received hospice care exist especially in rural areas. Hospice care quality ratings for 743 rural and urban patients and families were compared. Rural participants reported higher overall satisfaction and with pain/symptom management. Regardless of geographic location, satisfaction was higher when patients were informed and emotionally supported. Patients and family ratings did not differ. Findings support prior reports using retrospective rather than our study’s point-of care surveys. PMID:25546093

  12. Infant and Toddler Child Care Quality Measures: Bibliography

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Research Connections collection contains records for more than 1,300 instruments that have been used to conduct studies in the child care and early education field. This bibliography provides records for instruments in the collection that can be used to observe child care quality in center-based settings serving infants and toddlers. In…

  13. Creating a culture for health care quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Velma; Perryman, Martha M

    2007-01-01

    Approximately 67% of hospital quality indicators require some type of laboratory testing to monitor compliance. Unfortunately, in many hospitals, laboratory data information systems remain an untapped resource in eliminating medical errors and improving patient safety. Using case scenarios, this article demonstrates potential consequences for patient safety and quality of care when information sharing between medical technologists and nurses is not a part of a hospital's culture. The outcome for this patient could have been avoided if a more inclusive health care quality and safety culture existed. Creating a culture for health care quality and safety requires consensus building by clinical and administrative leaders. Consensus building occurs by managing relationships among and between a team of independent, autonomous physicians, nurses, allied health professionals, and health care administrators. These relationships are built on mutual respect and effective communication. Creating a quality culture is a challenging but necessary prerequisite for eliminating medical errors and ensuring patient safety. Physician leaders promoting and advancing cultural change in clinical care from one of exclusive decision making authority to a culture that is based on shared decision making are a necessary first step. Shared decision making requires mutual respect, trust, confidentiality, responsiveness, empathy, effective listening, and communication among all clinical team members. Physician and administrative leaders with a focus on patient safety and a willingness to change will ensure a culture of health care quality and safety.

  14. Can we measure the quality of breast surgical care?

    PubMed

    Kaufman, Cary S; Landercasper, Jeffrey

    2011-10-01

    Many studies have demonstrated gaps in healthcare quality for all medical and surgical specialties including breast surgical care. How to optimally measure and improve quality has generated debate at the local, state, and national level. Attempts to judge medical performance by private companies using non-risk-adjusted administrative databases may not be accurate and may unfairly penalize surgical care. An overview of concepts to measure and improve quality of breast cancer care is presented with specific examples relevant to breast surgeons. Breast surgeons and their professional organizations need to take ownership of quality measure programs because others will surely do so if we do not. Participation in one or more of these programs is beneficial because peer performance comparison allows identification of potential areas for individual or institutional improvement and demonstrates the commitment of breast surgeons to quality improvement. This commitment may gain even greater importance if trends continue toward performance-based physician payment, patient steerage, licensure, and board certification.

  15. Disparities in Health Care Quality among Asian Children with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Son, Esther; Parish, Susan L; Igdalsky, Leah

    2017-03-02

    There is a dearth of information on the quality of health care for Asian American children and particularly Asian children with special health care needs (CSHCN). The goal of this article was to determine whether there were disparities in quality of health care for Asian CSHCN, whose experiences have not been studied. Data were derived from the 2009-2010 National Survey of Children with Special Health Care Needs (ns = 355 non-Hispanic Asian children and 4,343 non-Hispanic white CSHCN). Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the relationship between racial identity (that is, non-Hispanic white and non-Hispanic Asian) and quality of health care. Racial disparities in quality of health care were substantial between Asian and white CSHCN in 2009-2010. Asian parents were significantly less likely than white parents to report that their health care provider provided the specific information they needed, helped them feel like a partner in their child's care, and was sensitive to the family's values and customs. The development and testing of specific, targeted policy and practice interventions to reduce disparities in health care quality for these children are urgently needed.

  16. Coaching to Quality: Increasing Quality in Early Care and Education Programmes through Community-University Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, Jaesook Lee; Harte, Helene Arbouet

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes efforts to increase the quality in early care and education through targeted coaching. A collaborative including several community agencies and a university developed a framework of support for early care and education providers, using coaching as its foundational basis, called Coaching to Quality (CTQ). This paper provides a…

  17. Does Satisfaction Reflect the Technical Quality of Mental Health Care?

    PubMed Central

    Edlund, Mark J; Young, Alexander S; Kung, Fuan Yue; Sherbourne, Cathy D; Wells, Kenneth B

    2003-01-01

    Objective To analyze the relationship between satisfaction and technical quality of care for common mental disorders. Data Source A nationally representative telephone survey of 9,585 individuals conducted in 1997–1998. Study Design Using multinomial logistic regression techniques we investigated the association between a five-level measure of satisfaction with the mental health care available for personal or emotional problems and two quality indicators. The first measure, appropriate technical quality, was defined as use of either appropriate counseling or psychotropic medications during the prior year for a probable depressive or anxiety disorder. The second, active treatment, indicated whether the respondent had received treatment for a psychiatric disorder in the past year. Covariates included measures of physical and mental health and sociodemographic indicators. Principal Findings Appropriate technical quality of care was significantly associated with higher levels of satisfaction. The strength of the association was moderate. Conclusions Satisfaction is associated with technical quality of care. However, profiling quality of care with satisfaction will likely require large samples and case-mix adjustment, which may be more difficult for plans or provider groups to implement than measuring technical indicators. More importantly, satisfaction is not the same as technical quality, and our results suggest that at this time they cannot be made to approach each other closely enough to eliminate either. PMID:12785565

  18. [Health care quality assurance in the Netherlands].

    PubMed

    Reerink, E

    1990-01-01

    In this paper the main structural features of the dutch health system are described, together with a historical survey of its development in recent years. The basic elements of quality assurance in the country are also discussed.

  19. Providing quality palliative care in end-stage Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Yeaman, Paul A; Ford, James L; Kim, Kye Y

    2013-08-01

    Providing quality palliative care is a daunting task profoundly impacted by diminished patient capacity at the end of life. Alzheimer disease (AD) is a disorder that erases our memories and is projected to increase dramatically for decades to come. By the time the patients with AD reach the end stage of the disease, the ability of patients to provide pertinent subjective complaints of pain and discomfort would have vanished. Historical perspectives of palliative care, exploration of the AD process, ethical issues, and crucial clinical considerations are provided to improve the understanding of disease progression and quality of care for patients with end-stage AD.

  20. Quality of Care: Expanding the Social Work Dialogue

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Megivern, Deborah M.; McMillen, J. Curtis; Proctor, Enola K.; Striley, Catherine L. W.; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Munson, Michelle R.

    2007-01-01

    For social work practitioners to engage fully in efforts designed to improve the quality of social services, they need to understand what is meant by quality of care, grapple with its complexity, and know how to identify and leverage the key factors most likely to influence it. This article introduces a conceptual model that articulates numerous…

  1. Quality Matters in Early Childhood Education and Care: Norway 2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taguma, Miho; Litjens, Ineke; Makowiecki, Kelly

    2013-01-01

    Early childhood education and care (ECEC) can bring a wide range of benefits--for children, parents and society at large. However, these benefits are conditional on "quality". Expanding access to services without attention to quality will not deliver good outcomes for children or long-term productivity benefits for society. This series…

  2. Service quality perceptions in primary health care centres in Greece

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Vicky; Zygiaris, Sotiris

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Context  The paper refers to the increased competition between health care providers and the need for patient‐centred services in Greece. Using service quality methodology, this paper investigates service quality perceptions of patients in Greek public primary health centres. Objective  To test the internal consistency and applicability of SERVQUAL in primary health care centres in Greece. Strategy  SERVQUAL was used to examine whether patients have different expectations from health care providers and whether different groups of patients may consider some dimensions of care more important than others. Results  The analysis showed that there were gaps in all dimensions measured by SERVQUAL. The largest gap was detected in empathy. Further analysis showed that there were also differences depending on gender, age and education levels. A separate analysis of expectations and perceptions revealed that this gap was because of differences in patients’ perceptions rather than expectations. Discussion and conclusions  This paper raises a number of issues that concern the applicability of SERVQUAL in health care services and could enhance current discussions about SERVQUAL improvement. Quality of health care needs to be redefined by encompassing multiple dimensions. Beyond a simple expectations–perceptions gap, people may hold different understandings of health care that, in turn, influence their perception of the quality of services. PMID:22296402

  3. Quality of antenatal and childbirth care in northern Ghana.

    PubMed

    Duysburgh, E; Williams, A; Williams, J; Loukanova, S; Temmerman, M

    2014-09-01

    The QUALMAT research project aims to improve maternal and newborn health by improving the quality of antenatal and childbirth care provided in primary healthcare facilities. Within the frame of this project, a comprehensive quality assessment took place in selected health centres in northern Ghana. The results of this assessment showed that overall quality of routine antenatal and childbirth care was satisfactory, although some critical gaps were identified. Counselling and health education practices need to be improved; laboratory investigations are often not performed; examination and monitoring of mother and newborn during childbirth are inadequate; partographs are often not used and poorly completed; and equipment to provide assisted vaginal deliveries was absent.

  4. Home health care quality conferences: promoting change through dialogue.

    PubMed

    Rudin, Danylle

    2006-01-01

    The following brief is based on the results of two conferences on home care quality hosted by the Center for Home Care Policy and Research of the Visiting Nurse Service of New York. For more information about the conference outcomes and proceedings please see: Feldman, P.H.,Peterson, L.E., Reische, L., Bruno, L., & Clark, A. (2004). Charting the course for home healthcare quality: Action steps for achieving sustainable improvement. Conference proceedings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 22(12): 841-850; and Feldman, P.H., Clark, A., & Bruno, L. (2006). Advancing the agenda for home healthcare quality: Conference proceedings and findings. Home Healthcare Nurse, 24(5): 282-290.

  5. Companion animals in palliative care: a hidden quality option?

    PubMed

    Tanneberger, S; Köhler, U

    2013-01-01

    In the light of the unprecedented demographic changes in many countries it is important to review and adapt existing strategies for giving old and incurable patients the adequate health care. Based on available data the importance of companion animals needs to be considered as part of individual care planning. Despite intensive research in other areas of health care, there is limited data concerning the use of companion animals in palliative care. The field demands much more recognition. For many people companion animals can be a chance for better quality of life.

  6. Infants & Toddlers: Understanding Confusing Expressions of Emotion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honig, Alice Sterling

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author responds to a teacher's question on a baby's behavior who keeps banging on his high chair and laughs uncontrollably. The author states that young children pay close attention to adult's emotional responses. Their lives depend on knowing the best ways to get positive or at least neutral responses from grown-ups in charge…

  7. [WINHO quality indicators for outpatient oncology care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hermes-Moll, Kerstin; Klein, Gudrun; Buschmann-Maiworm, Regina E; Baumann, Walter; Otremba, Burkhard; Lebahn, Herbert; Steinmetz, H Tilmann; Geraedts, Max; Kleeberg, Ulrich R; Schmitz, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the WINHO indicators project is to describe and enhance the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany with indicators. This paper deals with the development of a set of evidence- and consensus-based meaningful indicators to assess the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany. These indicators are intended to be applied in assessments of quality of patient care in oncology practices, in quality reports and in peer-to-peer benchmarking. A set of 272 already existing indicators was identified through internet and literature searches. After redundancy reduction and addition of newly developed indicators for areas of ambulatory oncology care that were not yet covered, a preliminary set of 67 indicators was established. The further development of the indicator set was based on a modified version of the two-step RAND/UCLA expert evaluation method, which has been internationally established for developing quality indicator sets. The indicators were modified after the first round of ratings. After completing and assessing the second round of ratings, a set of 46 homogeneously positively rated quality indicators is now available for outpatient oncology care in Germany.

  8. The Association of Level of Care With NICU Quality

    PubMed Central

    Gould, Jeffrey B.; Bennett, Mihoko; Goldstein, Benjamin A.; Draper, David; Phibbs, Ciaran S.; Lee, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Regionalized care delivery purportedly optimizes care to vulnerable very low birth weight (VLBW; <1500 g) infants. However, a comprehensive assessment of quality of care delivery across different levels of NICUs has not been done. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of 21 051 VLBW infants in 134 California NICUs. NICUs designated their level of care according to 2012 American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. We assessed quality of care delivery via the Baby-MONITOR, a composite indicator, which combines 9 risk-adjusted measures of quality. Baby-MONITOR scores are measured as observed minus expected performance, expressed in standard units with a mean of 0 and an SD of 1. RESULTS: Wide variation in Baby-MONITOR scores exists across California (mean [SD] 0.18 (1.14), range –2.26 to 3.39). However, level of care was not associated with overall quality scores. Subcomponent analysis revealed trends for higher performance of Level IV NICUs on several process measures, including antenatal steroids and any human milk feeding at discharge, but lower scores for several outcomes including any health care associated infection, pneumothorax, and growth velocity. No other health system or organizational factors including hospital ownership, neonatologist coverage, urban or rural location, and hospital teaching status, were significantly associated with Baby-MONITOR scores. CONCLUSIONS: The comprehensive assessment of the effect of level of care on quality reveals differential opportunities for improvement and allows monitoring of efforts to ensure that fragile VLBW infants receive care in appropriate facilities. PMID:26908663

  9. Can patients reliably identify safe, high quality care?

    PubMed Central

    Tevis, Sarah E.; Schmocker, Ryan K.; Kennedy, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey is a publicly reported tool that measures patient satisfaction. As both patients and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) reimbursement rely on survey results as a metric of quality of care, we reviewed the current literature to determine if patient satisfaction correlates with quality, safety, or patient outcomes. We found varying associations between safety culture, process of care measure compliance, and patient outcomes with patient satisfaction on the HCAHPS survey. Some studies found inverse relationships between quality and safety metrics and patient satisfaction. The measure that most reliably correlated with high patient satisfaction was low readmission rate. Future studies using patient specific data are needed to better identify which factors most influence patient satisfaction and to determine if patient satisfaction is a marker of safer and better quality care. Furthermore, the HCAHPS survey should continue to undergo evaluations to assure it generates predictable results. PMID:26413179

  10. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, Lois E.; Hershner, Shelley; Loeding, Lauren D.; Maski, Kiran P.; Rifkin, Daniel I.; Selim, Bernardo; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Workgroup to develop quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. Following a comprehensive literature search, 306 publications were found addressing quality care or measures. Strength of association was graded between proposed process measures and desired outcomes. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, we identified three outcomes (including one outcome measure) and seven process measures. The first desired outcome was to reduce excessive daytime sleepiness by employing two process measures: quantifying sleepiness and initiating treatment. The second outcome was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis by employing the two process measures: completing both a comprehensive sleep history and an objective sleep assessment. The third outcome was to reduce adverse events through three steps: ensuring treatment follow-up, documenting medical comorbidities, and documenting safety measures counseling. All narcolepsy measures described in this report were developed by the Narcolepsy Quality Measures Work-group and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with narcolepsy. Citation: Krahn LE, Hershner S, Loeding LD, Maski KP, Rifkin DI, Selim B, Watson NF. Quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):335–355. PMID:25700880

  11. Afghanistan's national strategy for improving quality in health care

    PubMed Central

    Rahimzai, Mirwais; Amiri, Mirwais; Burhani, Nadera Hayat; Leatherman, Sheila; Hiltebeitel, Simon; Rahmanzai, Ahmed Javed

    2013-01-01

    Quality problem or issue When the Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan began reconstructing the health system in 2003, it faced serious challenges. Decades of war had severely damaged the health infrastructure and the country's ability to deliver health services. Initial assessment A national health resources assessment in 2002 revealed huge structural and resource disparities fundamental to improving health care. For example, only 9% of the population was able to access basic health services, and about 40% of health facilities had no female health providers, severely constraining access of women to health care. Multiple donor programs and the MoPH had some success in improving quality, but questions about sustainability, as well as fragmentation and poor coordination, existed. Plan of action In 2009, MoPH resolved to align and accelerate quality improvement efforts as well as build structural and skill capacity. Implementation The MoPH established a new quality unit within the ministry and undertook a year-long consultative process that drew on international evidence and inputs from all levels of the health system to developed a National Strategy for Improving Quality in Health Care consisting of a strategy implementation framework and a five-year operational plan. Lessons Learned Even in resource-restrained countries, under the most adverse circumstances, quality of health care can be improved at the front-lines and a consensual and coherent national quality strategy developed and implemented. PMID:23485422

  12. Private ownership of primary care providers associated with patient perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolin; Yin, Jia; Wong, Samuel Y.S.; Griffiths, Sian M.; Zou, Guanyang; Shi, Leiyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Ownership of primary care providers varies in different cities in China. Shanghai represented the full public ownership model of primary providers; Shenzhen had public-owned but private-operated providers; and Hong Kong represented the full private ownership. The study aims to assess the association of primary care ownership and patient perceived quality of care in 3 Chinese megacities. We conducted multistage stratified random surveys in 2013 in the 3 cities. Quality scores of primary care were measured using the validated primary care assessment tools. Multivariate linear regression models were used to compare quality scores after controlling potential confounders of patient demographic, socioeconomic, and healthcare utilization factors. Overall, 797 primary care users in Shanghai, 802 in Shenzhen, and 1325 in Hong Kong participated in the study. The mean total quality scores were reported the highest in Shanghai (28.39), followed by Shenzhen (25.82) and then Hong Kong (25.21) (P < 0.001). Shanghai participants reported the highest scores for 1st contact accessibility, coordination of information, comprehensiveness of service availability, and culture competence, while Hong Kong participants reported the lowest for these domains (P < 0.001). Hong Kong participants from rich households reported higher total scores than those from poor households (P < 0.05); however, this was not found in Shanghai and Shenzhen. The study suggests that private primary care ownership may be associated with lower quality and less equitable care distribution. In China, it suggests that it may be beneficial to promote public-owned and nonprofit providers. Promoting privatization in primary care may be at the cost of quality and equity of primary care. PMID:28072718

  13. Health, Quality of Care and Quality of Life: A Case of Frail Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsieh, Chang-Ming

    2009-01-01

    This study explores the relationship between health, quality of care of geriatric case management and quality of life for the purpose of furthering the understanding of the relationship between quality of life and geriatric case management. Using survey data from a group of frail older adults, this study assesses the relative merit of two…

  14. Illinois Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Illinois' Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  15. Palm Beach Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Palm Beach's Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  16. Maine Quality for ME: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Maine's Quality for ME prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  17. Indiana Paths to Quality: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Indiana's Paths to Quality prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  18. Missouri Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Missouri's Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  19. Ohio Step Up to Quality: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Ohio's Step Up to Quality prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family…

  20. Virginia Star Quality Initiative: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Virginia's Star Quality Initiative prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators…

  1. New Hampshire Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of New Hampshire's Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  2. Miami-Dade Quality Counts: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Miami-Dade's Quality Counts prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for…

  3. Mississippi Quality Step System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS)Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Mississippi's Quality Step System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Application…

  4. Nurse care manager contribution to quality of care in a dual-eligible special needs plan.

    PubMed

    Roth, Carol P; Ganz, David A; Nickles, Lorraine; Martin, David; Beckman, Robin; Wenger, Neil S

    2012-07-01

    We evaluated the quality of care provided to older patients with complex needs in a dual-eligible, community-based Medicare Special Needs Plan that used a nurse care manager model. Care provided by physicians was substantially supplemented by nurse care managers, as measured by Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders quality indicators. We describe selected nurse care manager activities for six geriatric conditions (falls, dementia, depression, nutrition, urinary incontinence, and end-of-life care) during provision of patient care coordination and management for patients in the highest decile of clinical complexity. We identify areas of high nurse performance (i.e., falls screening, functional assessment, behavioral interventions for dementia problems, advance care planning) and areas of potential missed opportunities (i.e., follow up for new memory problems, targeted dementia counseling, nutrition, and behavioral approaches to urinary incontinence). Increasing the collaborative interaction between nurses providing care in this model and physicians has the potential to enhance nurses' contributions to primary care for vulnerable older adults.

  5. The Impact of Personalized Preventive Care on Health Care Quality, Utilization, and Expenditures

    PubMed Central

    Musich, Shirley; Wang, Shaohung; Hawkins, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to evaluate the impact on health care utilization and expenditure trends over time of a personalized preventive medicine program delivering individualized care focused on lifestyle behavior modification, disease prevention, and compliance with quality-related metrics. MD-Value in Prevention (MDVIP) is a network of affiliated primary care physicians who utilize a model of health care delivery based on an augmented physician-patient relationship and focused on personalized preventive health care. Multivariate modeling was used to control for demographics, socioeconomics, supply of health care services, and health status among 10,186 MDVIP members and randomly selected, matched nonmembers. Health care utilization and expenditure trends were tracked from the pre period prior to member enrollment for a period of up to 3 years post enrollment. MDVIP members experienced reduced utilization of emergency room and urgent care services compared to nonmembers. Program savings ranges indicated that, over time, increasing percentages of members achieved cost savings compared to nonmembers. Older age groups were more likely to realize savings in the early years with preventive activities indicating condition management, and younger age groups were most likely to achieve savings by the third year after enrollment. These results indicate that a primary care model based on an enhanced physician-patient relationship and focused on quality and personalized preventive care within a time frame of 3 years can achieve positive health care expenditure outcomes and improved health management. PMID:26871762

  6. Agents of Change in Foster Care for Infants and Toddlers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    "Zero to Three" is a single-focus bulletin of the National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families providing insight from multiple disciplines on the development of infants, toddlers, and their families. Conceived by the Zero to Three Child Welfare Task Force, this issue focuses on agents of change for infants and toddlers in foster…

  7. Does a quality management system improve quality in primary care practices in Switzerland? A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Goetz, Katja; Hess, Sigrid; Jossen, Marianne; Huber, Felix; Rosemann, Thomas; Brodowski, Marc; Künzi, Beat; Szecsenyi, Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To examine the effectiveness of the quality management programme—European Practice Assessment—in primary care in Switzerland. Design Longitudinal study with three points of measurement. Setting Primary care practices in Switzerland. Participants In total, 45 of 91 primary care practices completed European Practice Assessment three times. Outcomes The interval between each assessment was around 36 months. A variance analyses for repeated measurements were performed for all 129 quality indicators from the domains: ‘infrastructure’, ‘information’, ‘finance’, and ‘quality and safety’ to examine changes over time. Results Significant improvements were found in three of four domains: ‘quality and safety’ (F=22.81, p<0.01), ‘information’ (F=27.901, p<0.01) and ‘finance’ (F=4.073, p<0.02). The 129 quality indicators showed a significant improvement within the three points of measurement (F=33.864, p<0.01). Conclusions The European Practice Assessment for primary care practices thus provides a functioning quality management programme, focusing on the sustainable improvement of structural and organisational aspects to promote high quality of primary care. The implementation of a quality management system which also includes a continuous improvement process would give added value to provide good care. PMID:25900466

  8. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care

    PubMed Central

    van Dam, P.A.; Verkinderen, L.; Hauspy, J.; Vermeulen, P.; Dirix, L.; Huizing, M.; Altintas, S.; Papadimitriou, K.; Peeters, M.; Tjalma, W.

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on “QIs and breast cancer” and “benchmarking and breast cancer care”, and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  9. Quality end-of-Life cancer care: An overdue imperative.

    PubMed

    Faguet, Guy B

    2016-12-01

    This review assesses the current status of end-of-life care based on large-scale, multiyear nationwide surveys of treatment modality, setting, and cost of care during terminal patients' last months of life. It shows that end-of-life care goals often remain suboptimal. Contributing factors include prioritized life preservation, uneven commitment to palliative care, few palliative care specialists, and perverse financial incentives that encourage costly interventions. Although not determinant per se, these factors coupled to doubts about what constitutes end-of-life can lead to overextended disease treatment and a late implementation of palliative care. In order to bridge the existing gap between care received and care expected and achieve quality end-of-life and promote death with dignity, we propose both to view the person rather than the disease as the unit of care and a pragmatic definition of end-of-life. Such a strategy should facilitate selecting an optimal time to transition from disease-targeted treatment to palliative care.

  10. How can primary care cross the quality chasm?

    PubMed

    Solberg, Leif I; Elward, Kurtis S; Phillips, William R; Gill, James M; Swanson, Graham; Main, Deborah S; Yawn, Barbara P; Mold, James W; Phillips, Robert L

    2009-01-01

    The chasm between knowledge and practice decried by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) is the result of other chasms that have not been addressed. They include the chasm between what we know and what we need to know to improve care; the chasm between those who provide primary care and those who do not fund, study, support, or publish practical primary care studies; and the chasm between research and quality improvement (QI). These chasms are a result of problematic concepts, attitudes, traditions, time frames, and financing approaches among the various participants. If we are to facilitate the production and use of the knowledge needed for primary care to cross IOM's chasm, major changes are needed. These changes include the following: (1) admission by all primary care professions that we have quality problems that require our unified attention and action; (2) conversion of the paradigm from "translate research into practice" to "optimizing health and health care through research and QI"; (3) development and facilitation of more partnerships among clinicians, researchers, and care delivery leaders for engaged scholarship in both research and QI; (4) modification of the agendas and methods of funders and researchers so they emphasize the problems of patients and patient care and support practical time frames and research designs; and (5) facilitation by funders and journals of the dissemination and implementation of lessons from QI and practical research.

  11. Improving the quality of care for children in health systems.

    PubMed Central

    Homer, C J; Kleinman, L C; Goldman, D A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize the state of the art in quality improvement, review its application to care for children, and define the information that will be needed so that care for children can be further improved. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Health services for children exhibit numerous deficiencies in quality of care. The deficiencies cross all major domains of pediatric care--preventive services, acute care, and chronic care--and provide the opportunity for creative application of improvement strategies with a potential to benefit the health and well-being of children. Approaches to quality improvement have changed over the past two decades from those emphasizing the inspection of structural aspects of care and the imposition of sanctions to more dynamic strategies that emphasize measurement and comparison to motivate change; the use of evidence to specify aims for improvement; and the adoption of a variety of management strategies adapted from business and the social sciences to achieve these aims. These modern approaches to quality improvement have rarely been subjected to rigorous testing of their effectiveness. Moreover, their application in pediatrics has been less widespread than in adult healthcare. For children, several aspects about health services, such as the relative rarity of chronic illness, the important effects of social factors on health, and the limited cost, make some of these approaches even more challenging and may require new approaches or meaningful modifications. RECOMMENDATIONS: Research to understand better the general process of improvement will benefit improvement efforts for children. Research that builds the base of knowledge about best practices for children--effectiveness research--will also result in an enhanced capacity for improvement of those systems that care for children's health. Quality of care for children would be enhanced by targeted research examining ways both to foster improvement across segments of society, and to make

  12. Spatial competition for quality in the market for hospital care.

    PubMed

    Montefiori, Marcello

    2005-06-01

    This study analyses the market for secondary health care services when patient choice depends on the quality/distance mix that achieves utility maximization. First, the hospital's equilibrium in a Hotelling spatial competition model under simultaneous quality choices is analyzed to define hospitals' strategic behavior. A first equilibrium outcome is provided, the understanding of which is extremely useful for the policy maker wishing to improve social welfare. Second, patients are assumed to be unable, because of asymmetry of information, to observe the true quality provided. Their decisions reflect the perceived quality, which is affected by bias. Using the mean-variance method, the equilibrium previously found is investigated in a stochastic framework.

  13. The health of female child care providers: implications for quality of care.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Dee; Gaines, Sherry; Wold, Judith Lupo; Williams, Armenia; Leary, Janie

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the health behaviors and perceived health status of child care providers. Health behaviors and health status were also examined in relation to caring for children and the providers' perceptions of quality child care. A researcher-developed questionnaire, adapted from Williams, Mason, and Wold (2001), was mailed to a random sample of 1,000 child care providers employed in 49 child care centers in Georgia. Results indicated that, overall, the sample was a healthy population with 86.8% rating their health as good to excellent. Seventy-three percent (73%) received a physical exam annually, and 70% reported having health insurance. Despite these ratings, participants reported that they were overweight, were emotionally strained, and did not engage in physical exercise at least 3 times per week. Although most performed breast self-exams, the majority did not fully understand breast health practices. Furthermore, the majority of the child care providers (78.7%) believed that their health does not impact the care that they provide to children. Last, their definitions of quality of care for children suggested a minimal standard of care or less. These findings provide information that can be useful in designing occupational health programs within community child care settings and in promoting healthy behaviors in women.

  14. Gauging food and nutritional care quality in hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Food and nutritional care quality must be assessed and scored, so as to improve health institution efficacy. This study aimed to detect and compare actions related to food and nutritional care quality in public and private hospitals. Methods Investigation of the Hospital Food and Nutrition Service (HFNS) of 37 hospitals by means of structured interviews assessing two quality control corpora, namely nutritional care quality (NCQ) and hospital food service quality (FSQ). HFNS was also evaluated with respect to human resources per hospital bed and per produced meal. Results Comparison between public and private institutions revealed that there was a statistically significant difference between the number of hospital beds per HFNS staff member (p = 0.02) and per dietitian (p < 0.01). The mean compliance with NCQ criteria in public and private institutions was 51.8% and 41.6%, respectively. The percentage of public and private health institutions in conformity with FSQ criteria was 42.4% and 49.1%, respectively. Most of the actions comprising each corpus, NCQ and FSQ, varied considerably between the two types of institution. NCQ was positively influenced by hospital type (general) and presence of a clinical dietitian. FSQ was affected by institution size: large and medium-sized hospitals were significantly better than small ones. Conclusions Food and nutritional care in hospital is still incipient, and actions concerning both nutritional care and food service take place on an irregular basis. It is clear that the design of food and nutritional care in hospital indicators is mandatory, and that guidelines for the development of actions as well as qualification and assessment of nutritional care are urgent. PMID:22954229

  15. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  16. Job Crafting, Employee Well-being, and Quality of Care.

    PubMed

    Yepes-Baldó, Montserrat; Romeo, Marina; Westerberg, Kristina; Nordin, Maria

    2016-11-24

    The main objective is to study the effects of job crafting activities of elder care and nursing home employees on their perceived well-being and quality of care in two European countries, Spain and Sweden. The Job Crafting, the General Health, and the Quality of Care questionnaires were administered to 530 employees. Correlations and hierarchical regression analyses were performed. Results confirm the effects of job crafting on quality of care (r = .291, p < .01; β = .261, p < .01; ΔR(2) = .065, p < .01) and employees' well-being (r = .201, p < .01; β = .171, p < .01; ΔR(2) = .028, p < .01). A positive linear relationship was found between job crafting and well-being in Spain and Sweden and with quality of care in Spain. On the contrary, in Sweden, the relationship between job crafting and well-being was not linear. Job crafting contributes significantly to employees' and residents' well-being. Management should promote job crafting to co-create meaningful and productive work. Cultural effects are proposed to explain the differences found.

  17. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance.

  18. A Portable Computer System for Auditing Quality of Ambulatory Care

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, J. Michael; Dunn, Earl V.; Borgiel, Alexander E.

    1987-01-01

    Prior efforts to effectively and efficiently audit quality of ambulatory care based on comprehensive process criteria have been limited largely by the complexity and cost of data abstraction and management. Over the years, several demonstration projects have generated large sets of process criteria and mapping systems for evaluating quality of care, but these paper-based approaches have been impractical to implement on a routine basis. Recognizing that portable microcomputers could solve many of the technical problems in abstracting data from medical records, we built upon previously described criteria and developed a microcomputer-based abstracting system that facilitates reliable and cost-effective data abstraction.

  19. Total quality management and the Army health care system.

    PubMed

    Jeffer, E K

    1991-10-01

    Total quality management (TQM) is the newest in a long line of magic formulas which have been touted as saviors for American industry and medicine. The author discusses the basic concepts of TQM and notes that much of it resembles philosophical beliefs long held by the medical community. TQM does offer many opportunities to refine old concepts and further those goals of quality care to which health care providers have always aspired. If, however, it becomes simply another codified bureaucracy, then a great deal of time and money will be invested for very little gain.

  20. Improving intensive care unit quality using collaborative networks.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sam R; Scales, Damon C

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative networks of intensive care units can help promote a quality-improvement agenda across an entire system or region. Proposed advantages include targeting a greater number of patients, sharing of resources, and common measurement systems for audit and feedback or benchmarking. This review focuses on elements that are essential for the success and sustainability of these collaborative networks, using as examples networks in Michigan and Ontario. More research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which collaborative networks lead to improved care delivery and to demonstrate their cost-effectiveness in comparison with other approaches to system-level quality improvement.

  1. [Nosocomial infections and quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Navarro, S; Rangel-Frausto, M S

    1999-01-01

    The main objective of a hospital-acquired infections control program is to decrease the risk of acquisition and the morbidity and costs associated. The organization of a team with technical and humanistic leadership is essential. Every infection control program must also develop strategies that allow: a) identification of the problems, b) to establish the importance of each one, c) to determine their causes, d) to develop solutions and e) the evaluation of the recommended solutions. The development of technical and humanistic abilities by the leader and the members of the team, and the use of the tools mentioned above have produced the only validate and highly effective program of quality improvement in the hospital.

  2. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  3. Advanced units: quality measures in urgency and emergency care

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Cordioli, Eduardo; Pedrotti, Carlos Henrique Sartorato; Iervolino, Mauro; Bastos, Antonio da Silva; de Almeida, Luis Roberto Natel; Neves, Henrique Sutton de Sousa; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, through care indicators, the quality of services rendered to patients considered urgency and emergency cases at an advanced emergency care unit. Methods We analyzed data from managerial reports of 64,891 medical visits performed in the Emergency Care Unit of the Ibirapuera Unit at Care during the period from June 1st, 2012 through May 31st, 2013. The proposed indicators for the assessment of care were rate of death in the emergency care unit; average length of stay of patients in the unit; rate of unplanned return visits; admission rate for patients screened as level 1 according to the Emergency Severity Index; rate of non-finalized medical consultations; rate of complaints; and door-to-electrocardiogram time. Results The rate of death in the emergency care unit was zero. Five of the 22 patients classified as Emergency Severity Index 1 (22.7%) arrived presenting cardiac arrest. All were treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reestablishment of vital functions. The average length of stay of patients in the unit was 3 hours, 33 minutes, and 7 seconds. The rate of unscheduled return visits at the emergency care unit of the Ibirapuera unit was 13.64%. Rate of complaints was 2.8/1,000 patients seen during the period Conclusion The model of urgency and emergency care in advanced units provides an efficient and efficaious service to patients. Both critically ill patients and those considered less complex can receive proper treatment for their needs. PMID:25628203

  4. The Care Quality Commission's end-of-year report.

    PubMed

    Tingle, John

    Annual reports of organizations are very useful, they portray the activities that have been carried out and also lay out plans for the future. Trends, challenges and opportunities for the organization and the sector are also identified. Annual reports are in many respects very similar to the end of year reports that we all received at school but perhaps not as blunt. The Care Quality Commission (CQC) annual report (the report) has just been published and it provides an illuminating picture of NHS care in England with many challenges, successes and failures clearly revealed. Key sections of the report that relate to NHS health care will be discussed in this article.

  5. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective.

    PubMed

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, I R; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, C M; Purcarea, V L

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer's perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician's perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician's perspective.

  6. The management of health care service quality. A physician perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bobocea, L; Gheorghe, IR; Spiridon, St; Gheorghe, CM; Purcarea, VL

    2016-01-01

    Applying marketing in health care services is presently an essential element for every manager or policy maker. In order to be successful, a health care organization has to identify an accurate measurement scale for defining service quality due to competitive pressure and cost values. The most widely employed scale in the services sector is SERVQUAL scale. In spite of being successfully adopted in fields such as brokerage and banking, experts concluded that the SERVQUAL scale should be modified depending on the specific context. Moreover, the SERVQUAL scale focused on the consumer’s perspective regarding service quality. While service quality was measured with the help of SERVQUAL scale, other experts identified a structure-process-outcome design, which, they thought, would be more suitable for health care services. This approach highlights a different perspective on investigating the service quality, namely, the physician’s perspective. Further, we believe that the Seven Prong Model for Improving Service Quality has been adopted in order to effectively measure the health care service in a Romanian context from a physician’s perspective. PMID:27453745

  7. Quality improvement of paediatric care in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Schulpen, Tom W J; Lombarts, Kiki M J

    2007-01-01

    The development of the quality improvement programme of the Paediatric Association of the Netherlands is described within the setting of the national programme of the Dutch government. The programme is based on four pillars: site visits by peers (visitatie), continuous medical and professional education, development of clinical (evidence based) guidelines and patient safety with complication registration. The site visits by peers play a central role in assessing the quality improvement activities in hospital based paediatric care. The self assessment approach and the confidential character of the visits are well received by the surveyed specialists. Recent inclusion of quality criteria in the legally required 5 yearly medical specialist recertification process has boosted the care for quality, which could serve as example for other countries. PMID:17588977

  8. Palliative care and quality of life in neuro-oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mummudi, Naveen

    2014-01-01

    Health-related quality of life has become an important end point in modern day clinical practice in patients with primary or secondary brain tumors. Patients have unique symptoms and problems from diagnosis till death, which require interventions that are multidisciplinary in nature. Here, we review and summarize the various key issues in palliative care, quality of life and end of life in patients with brain tumors, with the focus on primary gliomas. PMID:25165570

  9. Compendium of Quality Rating Systems and Evaluations: The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tout, Kathryn; Starr, Rebecca; Soli, Margaret; Moodie, Shannon; Kirby, Gretchen; Boller, Kimberly

    2010-01-01

    Quality Rating Systems (QRS) are currently operating, under development, or being piloted in over 25 states or local areas. As the QRS model becomes integrated into the landscape of child care and education service delivery, policy, and the decisions parents make about child care across the United States, there is an increasing need for…

  10. Physician incentives to improve quality and the delivery of high quality ambulatory medical care

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, Tara F.; Federman, Alex D.; Ross, Joseph S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence of physician incentives for quality and to test the hypothesis that quality of ambulatory medical care is better by physicians with these incentives. Study Design Cross-sectional study using data from the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey Method We examined the association between physician compensation based on quality, physician compensation based on satisfaction, and public reporting of practice measures and twelve measures of high quality ambulatory care. Results Overall, 20.8% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on quality, 17.7% of visits were to physicians whose compensation was partially based on patient satisfaction, and 10.0% of visits were to physicians who publicly reported performance measures. Quality of ambulatory care varied: weight reduction counseling occurred in 12.0% of preventative care visits by obese patients whereas urinalysis was not performed in 93.0% of preventative care visits. In multivariable analyses, there were no statistically significant associations between compensation for quality and delivery of any of the 12 measures, nor between compensation for satisfaction and 11 of the 12 measures; the exception was BMI screening in preventative visits (47.8% vs. 56.2%, adjusted p=0.004). There was also no statistically significant association between public reporting and delivery of 11 of 12 measures; the exception was weight reduction counseling for overweight patients (10.0% vs. 25.5%, adjusted p=0.01). Conclusions We found no consistent association between incentives for quality and 12 measures of high quality ambulatory care. PMID:22554038

  11. Quality Health Care for Children and the Affordable Care Act: A Voltage Drop Checklist

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Paul H.; Halfon, Neal

    2014-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act (ACA) introduces enormous policy changes to the health care system with several anticipated benefits and a growing number of unanticipated challenges for child and adolescent health. Because the ACA gives each state and their payers substantial autonomy and discretion on implementation, understanding potential effects will require state-by-state monitoring of policies and their impact on children. The “voltage drop” framework is a useful interpretive guide for assessing the impact of insurance market change on the quality of care received. Using this framework we suggest a state-level checklist to examine ACA statewide implementation, assess its impact on health care delivery, and frame policy correctives to improve child health system performance. Although children’s health care is a small part of US health care spending, child health provides the foundation for adult health and must be protected in ACA implementation. PMID:25225140

  12. Compassion: the missing link in quality of care.

    PubMed

    van der Cingel, Margreet

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the impact of selected findings from a PhD-study that focuses on compassion as a guiding principle for contemporary nursing education and practice. The study, of which the literature review and empirical findings have already been published, looked at compassion as perceived within the relationship of nurses and older persons with a chronic disease. The patient group was chosen because daily life for them is characterized by long-term dependency on care. The literature review resulted in a theoretical framework of compassion that also explores other closely related concepts such as suffering and empathy. The empirical part of the study, in which 61 in-depth interviews and 6 group interviews with patients and nurses took place, showed that compassion is a mirroring process in response to grief. Compassion consists of seven dimensions such as attentiveness and presence, in which saliency, so as to anticipate patients' needs, is of major importance. Compassion is perceived by participants as an indispensable aspect of care, which helps to reveal relevant information in order to establish appropriate outcomes of care. This article focuses on the aspects of the PhD-study in which an analysis of compassion in the context of both modern as well as the history of nursing took place. Currently evidence based practice is regarded as the standard for good quality care. Nevertheless there is an on-going debate about what constitutes good quality care. Within this debate two opposing views are apparent. One view defines good care as care supported by the best scientific evidence. The other view states that good care takes place within the nurse-patient relationship in which the nurse performs professional care based on intuitive knowing. It is suggested that compassion is the (missing) link between these views.

  13. Recognizing Differences in Hospital Quality Performance for Pediatric Inpatient Care

    PubMed Central

    Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Toomey, Sara L.; Chien, Alyna T.; Jang, Jisun; Bryant, Maria C.; Klein, David J.; Kaplan, William J.; Schuster, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hospital quality-of-care measures are publicly reported to inform consumer choice and stimulate quality improvement. The number of hospitals and states with enough pediatric hospital discharges to detect worse-than-average inpatient care remains unknown. METHODS: This study was a retrospective analysis of hospital discharges for children aged 0 to 17 years from 3974 hospitals in 44 states in the 2009 Kids’ Inpatient Database. For 11 measures of all-condition or condition-specific quality, we assessed the number of hospitals and states that met a “power standard” of 80% power for a 5% level significance test to detect when care is 20% worse than average over a 3-year period. For this assessment, we approximated volume as 3 times actual 2009 admission volumes. RESULTS: For all-condition quality, 1380 hospitals (87% of all pediatric discharges) and all states met the power standard for the family experience-of-care measure; 1958 hospitals (95% of discharges) and all states met the standard for adverse drug events. For condition-specific quality measures of asthma, birth, and mental health, 203 to 482 hospitals (52%–90% of condition-specific discharges) met the power standard and 40 to 44 states met the standard. One hospital and 16 states met the standard for sickle cell disease. No hospital and ≤27 states met the standard for the remaining measures studied (appendectomy, cerebrospinal fluid shunt surgery, gastroenteritis, heart surgery, and seizure). CONCLUSIONS: Most children are admitted to hospitals in which all-condition measures of quality have adequate power to show modest differences in performance from average, but most condition-specific measures do not. Policies regarding incentives for pediatric inpatient quality should take these findings into account. PMID:26169435

  14. Enhancing Child Care Quality by Director Training and Collegial Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Gillian; Ferguson, Tammy McCormick; Ressler, Glory; Lomotey, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Although considerable evidence confirms that a director with good leadership and administrative skills is vital for developing and sustaining a high quality child care program, many directors assume the role with little management experience or training. This paper reports on a training program in Canada that combined a formal curriculum to…

  15. Adolescent Substance Abuse Treatment: Organizational Change and Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rieckmann, Traci; Fussell, Holly; Doyle, Kevin; Ford, Jay; Riley, Katherine J.; Henderson, Stuart

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse treatment agencies serving youth face unique barriers to providing quality care. Interviews with 17 adolescent programs found that family engagement, community involvement, and gender and diversity issues affected treatment delivery. Programs report organizational change efforts with implications for future process improvement…

  16. Once Attained, Can Quality Child Care Be Maintained?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roach, Mary A.; Kim, YaeBin; Riley, David A.

    2006-01-01

    Research Findings: This study was designed to assess whether investments in child care quality were maintained 3 years after public funding for these centers was significantly reduced. An earlier evaluation documented significant improvements in classroom environments, teachers' sensitivity, and teachers' child-centered beliefs following a…

  17. TQ What?: Applying Total Quality Management to Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewes, Dorothy

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the concept of Total Quality Management (TQM), developed by W. Edward Deming and Joseph Juran in 1940s, and its applications for child care centers. Discusses how TQM focuses on customer satisfaction, measuring performance, benchmarking, employee empowerment, and continuous training. Includes a list of suggested readings on TQM. (MDM)

  18. Improving the quality of health care: what's taking so long?

    PubMed

    Chassin, Mark R

    2013-10-01

    Nearly fourteen years ago the Institute of Medicine's report, To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, triggered a national movement to improve patient safety. Despite the substantial and concentrated efforts that followed, quality and safety problems in health care continue to routinely result in harm to patients. Desired progress will not be achieved unless substantial changes are made to the way in which quality improvement is conducted. Alongside important efforts to eliminate preventable complications of care, there must also be an effort to seriously address the widespread overuse of health services. That overuse, which places patients at risk of harm and wastes resources at the same time, has been almost entirely left out of recent quality improvement endeavors. Newer and much more effective strategies and tools are needed to address the complex quality challenges confronting health care. Tools such as Lean, Six Sigma, and change management are proving highly effective in tackling problems as difficult as hand-off communication failures and patient falls. Finally, the organizational culture of most American hospitals and other health care organizations must change. To create a culture of safety, leaders must eliminate intimidating behaviors that suppress the reporting of errors and unsafe conditions. Leaders must also hold everyone accountable for adherence to safe practices.

  19. A Descriptive Study of Three Typical "Quality" Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drezek, Wendy

    This paper describes a study designed to collect quantified observational data on the behavior of children and teachers throughout the day at three typical quality day care centers. From 50 to 55 hours of observation were completed on five randomly-chosen 3-year-olds in each setting. While the number of subjects and centers was limited, the…

  20. The economics of health care quality and medical errors.

    PubMed

    Andel, Charles; Davidow, Stephen L; Hollander, Mark; Moreno, David A

    2012-01-01

    Hospitals have been looking for ways to improve quality and operational efficiency and cut costs for nearly three decades, using a variety of quality improvement strategies. However, based on recent reports, approximately 200,000 Americans die from preventable medical errors including facility-acquired conditions and millions may experience errors. In 2008, medical errors cost the United States $19.5 billion. About 87 percent or $17 billion were directly associated with additional medical cost, including: ancillary services, prescription drug services, and inpatient and outpatient care, according to a study sponsored by the Society for Actuaries and conducted by Milliman in 2010. Additional costs of $1.4 billion were attributed to increased mortality rates with $1.1 billion or 10 million days of lost productivity from missed work based on short-term disability claims. The authors estimate that the economic impact is much higher, perhaps nearly $1 trillion annually when quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) are applied to those that die. Using the Institute of Medicine's (IOM) estimate of 98,000 deaths due to preventable medical errors annually in its 1998 report, To Err Is Human, and an average of ten lost years of life at $75,000 to $100,000 per year, there is a loss of $73.5 billion to $98 billion in QALYs for those deaths--conservatively. These numbers are much greater than those we cite from studies that explore the direct costs of medical errors. And if the estimate of a recent Health Affairs article is correct-preventable death being ten times the IOM estimate-the cost is $735 billion to $980 billion. Quality care is less expensive care. It is better, more efficient, and by definition, less wasteful. It is the right care, at the right time, every time. It should mean that far fewer patients are harmed or injured. Obviously, quality care is not being delivered consistently throughout U.S. hospitals. Whatever the measure, poor quality is costing payers and

  1. Promoting High-Quality Family Child Care: A Policy Perspective for Quality 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy

    Although family child care has the potential to offer young children individual attention and customized, educational programs to help them thrive, the quality of these programs is dependent upon a workforce that is at the bottom of the occupational status and pay hierarchy. This report examines ways to promote high quality in family child care…

  2. Quality of Dementia Care in the Community: Identifying Key Quality Assurance Components

    PubMed Central

    Heckman, George A.; Boscart, Veronique M.; Franco, Bryan B.; Hillier, Loretta; Crutchlow, Lauren; Lee, Linda; Molnar, Frank; Seitz, Dallas; Stolee, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Primary care-based memory clinics (PCMCs) have been established in several jurisdictions to improve the care for persons with Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias. We sought to identify key quality indicators (QIs), quality improvement mechanisms, and potential barriers and facilitators to the establishment of a quality assurance framework for PCMCs. Methods We employed a Delphi approach to obtain consensus from PCMC clinicians and specialist physicians on QIs and quality improvement mechanisms. Thirty-eight candidate QIs and 19 potential quality improvement mechanisms were presented to participants in two rounds of electronic Delphi surveys. Written comments were collected and descriptively analyzed. Results The response rate for the first and second rounds were 21.3% (n = 179) and 12.8% (n = 88), respectively. The majority of respondents were physicians. Fourteen QIs remained after the consensus process. Ten quality improvement mechanisms were selected with those characterized by specialist integration, such as case discussions and mentorships, being ranked highly. Written comments revealed three major themes related to potential barriers and facilitators to quality assurance: 1) perceived importance, 2) collaboration and role clarity, and 3) implementation process. Conclusion We successfully utilized a consultative process among primary and specialty providers to identify core QIs and quality improvement mechanisms for PCMCs. Identified quality improvement mechanisms highlight desire for multi-modal education. System integration and closer integration between PCMCs and specialists were emphasized as essential for the provision of high-quality dementia care in community settings. PMID:28050221

  3. Parental Perceptions of Child Care Quality in Centre-Based and Home-Based Settings: Associations with External Quality Ratings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehrer, Joanne S.; Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined how parental perceptions of child care quality were related to external quality ratings and considered how parental perceptions of quality varied according to child care context (home-based or centre-based settings). Parents of 179 4-year-old children who attended child care centres (n = 141) and home-based settings…

  4. Exploring the potential for secondary uses of Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) data for improving the quality of dementia care.

    PubMed

    Khalid, Shehla; Surr, Claire; Neagu, Daniel; Small, Neil

    2017-01-01

    The reuse of existing datasets to identify mechanisms for improving healthcare quality has been widely encouraged. There has been limited application within dementia care. Dementia Care Mapping is an observational tool in widespread use, predominantly to assess and improve quality of care in single organisations. Dementia Care Mapping data have the potential to be used for secondary purposes to improve quality of care. However, its suitability for such use requires careful evaluation. This study conducted in-depth interviews with 29 Dementia Care Mapping users to identify issues, concerns and challenges regarding the secondary use of Dementia Care Mapping data. Data were analysed using modified Grounded Theory. Major themes identified included the need to collect complimentary contextual data in addition to Dementia Care Mapping data, to reassure users regarding ethical issues associated with storage and reuse of care related data and the need to assess and specify data quality for any data that might be available for secondary analysis.

  5. Improving Quality of Emergency Care Through Integration of Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Martha; Wrenn, Glenda; Ede, Victor; Wilson, Nana; Custer, William; Risby, Emile; Claeys, Michael; Shelp, Frank E; Atallah, Hany; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to better integrate emergency medical and psychiatric care at a large urban public hospital, identify impact on quality improvement metrics, and reduce healthcare cost. A psychiatric fast track service was implemented as a quality improvement initiative. Data on disposition from the emergency department from January 2011 to May 2012 for patients impacted by the pilot were analyzed. 4329 patients from January 2011 to August 2011 (pre-intervention) were compared with 4867 patients from September 2011 to May 2012 (intervention). There was a trend of decline on overall quality metrics of time to triage and time from disposition to discharge. The trend analysis of the psychiatric length of stay and use of restraints showed significant reductions. Integrated emergency care models are evidence-based approach to ensuring that patients with mental health needs receive proper and efficient treatment. Results suggest that this may also improve overall emergency department's throughput.

  6. Peer reviewing critical care: a pragmatic approach to quality management

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Jan-Peter; Bause, Hanswerner; Bloos, Frank; Geldner, Götz; Kastrup, Marc; Kuhlen, Ralf; Markewitz, Andreas; Martin, Jörg; Mende, Hendrik; Quintel, Michael; Steinmeier-Bauer, Klaus; Waydhas, Christian; Spies, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    Critical care medicine frequently involves decisions and measures that may result in significant consequences for patients. In particular, mistakes may directly or indirectly derive from daily routine processes. In addition, consequences may result from the broader pharmaceutical and technological treatment options, which frequently involve multidimensional aspects. The increasing complexity of pharmaceutical and technological properties must be monitored and taken into account. Besides the presence of various disciplines involved, the provision of 24-hour care requires multiple handovers of significant information each day. Immediate expert action that is well coordinated is just as important as a professional handling of medicine's limitations. Intensivists are increasingly facing professional quality management within the ICU (Intensive Care Unit). This article depicts a practical and effective approach to this complex topic and describes external evaluation of critical care according to peer reviewing processes, which have been successfully implemented in Germany and are likely to gain in significance. PMID:21063473

  7. Quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services: user satisfaction

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Cássio de Almeida; dos Santos, Bruna Tatiane Prates; Andrade, Dina Luciana Batista; Barbosa, Francielle Alves; da Costa, Fernanda Marques; Carneiro, Jair Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the quality of emergency rooms and urgent care services according to the satisfaction of their users. Methods A cross-sectional descriptive study with a quantitative approach. The sample comprised 136 users and was drawn at random. Data collection took place between October and November 2012 using a structured questionnaire. Results Participants were mostly male (64.7%) aged less than 30 years (55.8%), and the predominant level of education was high school (54.4%). Among the items evaluated, those that were statistically associated with levels of satisfaction with care were waiting time, confidence in the service, model of care, and the reason for seeking care related to acute complaints, cleanliness, and comfortable environment. Conclusion Accessibility, hospitality, and infrastructure were considered more relevant factors for patient satisfaction than the cure itself. PMID:26313440

  8. Quality of care for 2 common pediatric conditions treated by convenient care providers.

    PubMed

    Jacoby, Richard; Crawford, Albert G; Chaudhari, Paresh; Goldfarb, Neil I

    2011-01-01

    Rates of adherence to 2 quality measures, modeled after Heathcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set (HEDIS) measures, were evaluated in a pediatric population in a convenient care (retail medicine) clinic setting. The measures were appropriate testing for children with pharyngitis and appropriate treatment for children with upper-respiratory infection (URI). The convenient care clinic (CCC) achieved a ranking above the HEDIS 90th percentile for the pharyngitis measure and approximately midway between the 50th and 90th percentiles for the URI measure for the 2007 reporting period. This represents the third major study reporting quality of care for pharyngitis in a CCC setting and the first study for URIs. Other aspects of quality--namely access, follow-up, and equity--are also reported on for the population in question.

  9. Improving quality of care during labour and childbirth and in the immediate postnatal period.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Dame Tina

    2016-10-01

    Quality of care during labour and childbirth and in the immediate postnatal period is important in ensuring healthy maternal and newborn survival. A narrative review of existing quality frameworks in the context of evidence-based interventions for essential care demonstrates the complexities of quality of care and the domains required to provide high quality of care. The role of the care provider is pivotal to optimum care; however, providers need appropriate training and supervision, which should include assessment of core competencies. Organisational factors such as staffing levels and resources may support or hinder the delivery of optimum care and should be observed during any monitoring. The woman's perspective is central to all quality of care strategies; her opinion should be sought where possible. The importance of assessing and monitoring quality of care during such a critical period should be appreciated. A number of quality frameworks offer organisations with a foundation on which they can deliver high quality care.

  10. Complicated deliveries, critical care and quality in emergency obstetric care in Northern Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Ø E; Ndeki, S; Norheim, O F

    2004-10-01

    Our objective was to determine the availability and quality of obstetric care to improve resource allocation in northern Tanzania. We surveyed all facilities providing delivery services (n=129) in six districts in northern Tanzania using the UN Guidelines for monitoring emergency obstetric care (EmOC). The three last questions in this audit outline are examined: Are the right women (those with obstetric complications) using emergency obstetric care facilities (Met Need)? Are sufficient quantities of critical services being provided (cesarean section rate (CSR))? Is the quality of the services adequate (case fatality rate (CFR))? Complications are calculated using Plan 3 of the UN Guidelines to assess the value of routine data for EmOC indicator monitoring. Nearly 60% of the expected complicated deliveries in the study population were conducted at EmOC qualified health facilities. 81.2% of the expected complicated deliveries are conducted in any facility (including facilities not qualifying as EmOC facilities). There is an inadequate level of critical services provided (CSR 4.6). Voluntary agencies provide most of these services in rural settings. All indicators show large variations with the setting (urban/rural location, level and ownership of facilities). Finally, there is large variation in the CFR with only one facility meeting the minimum accepted level. Utilization and quality of critical obstetric services at lower levels and in rural districts must be improved. The potential for improving the resource allocation within lower levels of the health care system is discussed. Given the small number of qualified facilities yet relatively high Met Need, we argue that it is neither the mothers' ignorance nor their lack of ability to get to a facility that is the main barrier to receiving quality care when needed, but rather the lack of quality care at the facility. Little can be concluded using the CFR to describe the quality of services provided.

  11. Perceived nursing service quality in a tertiary care hospital, Maldives.

    PubMed

    Nashrath, Mariyam; Akkadechanunt, Thitinut; Chontawan, Ratanawadee

    2011-12-01

    The present study explored nurses' and patients' expectations of nursing service quality, their perception of performance of nursing service quality performed by nurses, and compared nursing service quality, as perceived by nurses and patients. The sample consisted of 162 nurses and 383 patients from 11 inpatient wards/units in a tertiary care hospital in the Maldives. Data were collected using the Service Quality scale, and analyzed using descriptive statistics and the Mann-Whitney U-test. The results indicated that the highest expected dimension and perceived dimension for nursing service quality was Reliability. The Responsiveness dimension was the least expected dimension and the lowest performing dimension for nursing service quality as perceived by nurses and patients. There was a statistically significant difference between nursing service quality perceived by nurses and patients. The study results could be used by nurse administrators to develop strategies for improving nursing service quality so that nursing service delivery process can be formulated in such a way as to reduce differences of perception between nurses and patients regarding nursing service quality.

  12. [Quality of care in diabetic patients receiving pharmacologic treatment].

    PubMed

    Lombraña, María A; Capetta, María E; Ugarte, Alejandro; Correa, Viviana; Giganti, Jorge; Saubidet, Cristian Lopez; Stryjewski, Martin E

    2007-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease with an increasing prevalence. Appropriate treatment of the disease and prevention of chronic complications reduce morbidity and mortality in a cost-effective manner. These actions should be measured through the use of validated indicators for quality of care. The goal of this study was to assess the quality of care in diabetic patients under pharmacologic treatment in a private university hospital. A retrospective study was conducted in adult patients who bought insulin or oral hypoglycemic agents during a 3 month period; demographic and clinical data were obtained for 12 consecutive months following the buying period. The study included 305 adult patients; most were males (60%), with type 2 diabetes (95%), and using oral hipoglycemic agents (86%). Control of blood pressure was registered in 80%, foot exam in 5%, eye exam in 27%, HbA1C blood level in 85%, complete lipid profile in 82%, microalbuminuria in 27% and creatinine clearance in 22% of patients, respectively. Mean values were HbA1C 7.1(+/- 1.6)%, and < or = 7% in 66%, LDL 113 (+/- 33.6) mg/dl and <100 mg/dl in 30%, BP 136-79 mm Hg and < 130-80 mm Hg in 46% of patients, respectively. This study emphasizes the need for quality of care assessment through validated indicators and points out the aspects that should be improved within a health care system.

  13. Competition and quality in home health care markets.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kyoungrae; Polsky, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    Market-based solutions are often proposed to improve health care quality; yet evidence on the role of competition in quality in non-hospital settings is sparse. We examine the relationship between competition and quality in home health care. This market is different from other markets in that service delivery takes place in patients' homes, which implies low costs of market entry and exit for agencies. We use 6 years of panel data for Medicare beneficiaries during the early 2000s. We identify the competition effect from within-market variation in competition over time. We analyze three quality measures: functional improvements, the number of home health visits, and discharges without hospitalization. We find that the relationship between competition and home health quality is nonlinear and its pattern differs by quality measure. Competition has positive effects on functional improvements and the number of visits in most ranges, but in the most competitive markets, functional outcomes and the number of visits slightly drop. Competition has a negative effect on discharges without hospitalization that is strongest in the most competitive markets. This finding is different from prior research on hospital markets and suggests that market-specific environments should be considered in developing polices to promote competition.

  14. Process Dimensions of Child Care Quality and Academic Achievement: An Instrumental Variables Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Anamarie; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg; Burchinal, Peg; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2012-01-01

    Child care quality is usually measured along two dimensions--structural and process. In this paper the authors focus on process quality--the quality of child care center instructional practices and teacher interactions with students. They use an instrumental variables technique to estimate the effect of child care center process quality on…

  15. A Count for Quality: Child Care Center Directors on Rating and Improvement Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulman, Karen; Matthews, Hannah; Blank, Helen; Ewen, Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Quality Rating and Improvement Systems (QRIS)--a strategy to improve families' access to high-quality child care--assess the quality of child care programs, offer incentives and assistance to programs to improve their ratings, and give information to parents about the quality of child care. These systems are operating in a growing number of…

  16. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency.

  17. Why Good Quality Care Needs Philosophy More Than Compassion

    PubMed Central

    Leget, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    Although Marianna Fotaki’s Editorial is helpful and challenging by looking at both the professional and institutional requirements for reinstalling compassion in order to aim for good quality healthcare, the causes that hinder this development remain unexamined. In this commentary, 3 causes are discussed; the boundary between the moral and the political; Neoliberalism; and the underdevelopment of reflection on the nature of care. A plea is made for more philosophical reflection on the nature of care and its implications in healthcare education. PMID:26673178

  18. Dentist-patient relationship and quality care 2. Trust.

    PubMed

    Yamalik, Nermin

    2005-06-01

    The public in general and individual patients in particular have a high level of trust in the dental profession. As trust is an important moral value and a demand in health care, a better understanding of the multidimensional nature of trust and its impact on the efficiency and quality of care is of utmost importance. The core values and principles of dentistry serve to maintain the professional status and the associated trust in the profession and thus are of particular concern to the individual dentist and to organised dentistry.

  19. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  20. Southern Regional Action Plan To Improve the Quality of Early Care and Education. Southern Regional Task Force on Child Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southern Inst. on Children and Families, Columbia, SC.

    This booklet presents the action plan developed by the Southern Regional Task Force on Child Care for improving the quality of early care and education (ECE) in southern states. Also included in the booklet are tables that represent data collected from 16 participating states and the District of Columbia on state child care quality standards and…

  1. Evaluation of Delaware Stars for Early Success: Year 1 Report. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Heather L.; Karoly, Lynn A.; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Tamargo, Jennifer; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2014-01-01

    Delaware was in the first group of states to receive a federal grant in 2012 to improve early care and education services and increase the number of infants, toddlers, and preschool-age children in high-quality programs. One component of the state's grant is a rigorous validation process for Delaware Stars for Early Success, a voluntary quality…

  2. Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Sanatinia, Rahil; Cowan, Violet; Barnicot, Kirsten; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Cooper, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Users of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact. Aims To examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Method A national cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Nearly 41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended physical health assessments. Conclusions Frequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients. Declaration of interest M.J.C. was co-chair of the expert advisory group on the NICE quality standard on Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health. S.J.C. has previously been a member of the Health and Social Care Board Northern Ireland Formulary Committee. D.S. received a speaker’s fee from Janssen Cilag in 2011. He is a topic expert on NICE guideline for psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people and a board member of National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27713834

  3. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  4. Implementing a quality improvement programme in palliative care in care homes: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An increasing number of older people reach the end of life in care homes. The aim of this study is to explore the perceived benefits of, and barriers to, implementation of the Gold Standards Framework for Care Homes (GSFCH), a quality improvement programme in palliative care. Methods Nine care homes involved in the GSFCH took part. We conducted semi-structured interviews with nine care home managers, eight nurses, nine care assistants, eleven residents and seven of their family members. We used the Framework approach to qualitative analysis. The analysis was deductive based on the key tasks of the GSFCH, the 7Cs: communication, coordination, control of symptoms, continuity, continued learning, carer support, and care of the dying. This enabled us to consider benefits of, and barriers to, individual components of the programme, as well as of the programme as a whole. Results Perceived benefits of the GSFCH included: improved symptom control and team communication; finding helpful external support and expertise; increasing staff confidence; fostering residents' choice; and boosting the reputation of the home. Perceived barriers included: increased paperwork; lack of knowledge and understanding of end of life care; costs; and gaining the cooperation of GPs. Many of the tools and tasks in the GSFCH focus on improving communication. Participants described effective communication within the homes, and with external providers such as general practitioners and specialists in palliative care. However, many had experienced problems with general practitioners. Although staff described the benefits of supportive care registers, coding predicted stage of illness and advance care planning, which included improved communication, some felt the need for more experience of using these, and there were concerns about discussing death. Conclusions Most of the barriers described by participants are relevant to other interventions to improve end of life care in care homes

  5. [The objective assessment of the quality of oral health care and development of quality indicators].

    PubMed

    Pinke, Ildikó; Paulik, Edit; Kivovics, Péter; Segatto, Emil; Nagy, Katalin

    2011-12-01

    Public health care administration and decision-makers need appropriate tools and information to assess and monitor oral health needs and improve the performance of the oral health system. The aim of the article is to introduce the available methods of measurement of the quality of service, to give a brief summary considering the role of quality indicators in domestic and international sources and the European indicator project (EGOHID) and to introduce ICDAS (International Caries Detection and Assessment System), the method used for clinical examinations. The clinical indicators - that are produced from data gained from the questionnaires and screenings--provide an opportunity to improve and develop quality. Quality indicators are objective measure of the process or outcome of patient care. The 40 indicators were created by the experts of EGOHID program which are described in four categories. Part A is indicators for monitoring the oral health of children and adolescents, Part B is in general population, Part C is indicators for monitoring the oral health systems, Part D concerns indicators for monitoring the oral health quality of life. The purpose of developing public health care and--within it--dental care is the effective use of resources and besides it, reaching the popular level of health gain for which it is a necessary tool when forming and continuously developing the quality approach of providers.

  6. [Hypermedia in medical education: quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Kusec, Sanja; Jaksić, Zelimir; Vuletić, Gorka; Kovacić, Luka; Pavleković, Gordana

    2002-09-01

    The recent technological developments have found its place in medical education as well. Hypermedia has become very popular through the widespread use of the Internet. In its research project, the Department of Educational Technology of the Andrija Stampar School of Public Health studied and applied the educational methods in continuing training of health professionals using hypermedia and taking into account the specificities of medical and health practices. Potentials of hypermedia in medical education are presented within the topic on quality of health care. The result of this project is an interactive educational disk designed for physicians and other health professionals in primary health care faced with the issue of quality. This paper gives an overview of the experience gained during the work on the project and describes the created educational disk with all its specificities observed in the development of the educational hypermedia materials.

  7. Staffing Subsidies and the Quality of Care in Nursing Homes

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Andrew D.; Lee, Yong Suk

    2015-01-01

    Concerns about the quality of state-financed nursing home care has led to the wide-scale adoption by states of pass-through subsidies, in which Medicaid reimbursement rates are directly tied to staffing expenditure. We examine the effects of Medicaid pass-through on nursing home staffing and quality of care by adapting a two-step FGLS method that addresses clustering and state-level temporal autocorrelation. We find that pass-through subsidies increases staffing by about 1% on average and 2.7% in nursing homes with a low share of Medicaid patients. Furthermore, pass-through subsidies reduce the incidences of pressure ulcer worsening by about 0.9%. PMID:25814437

  8. Solving the Puzzle of Child Care: Quality Enhancement Project Centers. Final Report. Child Day Care Planning Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellison, Carole; Ash, Geraldine

    This report describes the Quality Enhancement Project (QEP), one of four major components of the Child Day Care Planning Project (CDCPP) of Cuyahoga County, Ohio. The major goal of the QEP was to develop a model for improving the quality of funded centers. The quality of care at 65 funded centers in Cleveland and 11 surrounding suburbs was…

  9. Parent Experiences with State Child Care Subsidy Systems and Their Perceptions of Choice and Quality in Care Selected

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raikes, Helen; Torquati, Julia; Wang, Cixin; Shjegstad, Brinn

    2012-01-01

    Research Findings: This study investigated parents' experiences using Child Care and Development Fund and other state-dispersed child care subsidies, reasons for choosing their current child care program, and perceptions of the quality of child care received from their current program. A telephone survey of 659 parents receiving child care…

  10. Racial/ethnic perspectives on the quality of hospice care.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Cathy L; Baernholdt, Marianne; Yan, Guofen; Hinton, Ivora D; Lewis, Erica

    2013-06-01

    Diversity in the US population is increasing, and evaluating the quality of culturally sensitive hospice care is important. A survey design was used to collect data from 743 patients enrolled in hospice or their family members or caregivers. Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with any of the hospice interventions or outcomes. Patients were less likely to be satisfied with the overall hospice care (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.065-0.796, P = .021) compared to other type of respondents.  Satisfaction with emotional support was substantially associated with the increased likelihood of satisfaction with pain management (OR = 3.82, 95% CI = 1.66-8.83, P = .002), satisfaction with other symptom management (OR = 6.17, 95% CI = 2.80-13.64, P < .001), and of overall satisfaction with hospice care (OR = 20.22, 95% CI = 8.64-47.35, P < .001).

  11. Racial/Ethnic Perspectives on the Quality of Hospice Care

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Cathy L.; Baernholdt, Marianne; Yan, Guofen; Hinton, Ivora D.; Lewis, Erica

    2013-01-01

    Diversity in the US population is increasing, and evaluating the quality of culturally sensitive hospice care is important. A survey design was used to collect data from 743 patients enrolled in hospice or their family members or caregivers. Race/ethnicity was not significantly associated with any of the hospice interventions or outcomes. Patients were less likely to be satisfied with the overall hospice care (OR = 0.23, 95% CI = 0.065-0.796, P = .021) compared to other type of respondents. Satisfaction with emotional support was substantially associated with the increased likelihood of satisfaction with pain management (OR = 3.82, 95% CI = 1.66-8.83, P = .002), satisfaction with other symptom management (OR = 6.17, 95% CI = 2.80-13.64, P < .001), and of overall satisfaction with hospice care (OR = 20.22, 95% CI = 8.64-47.35, P < .001). PMID:22952128

  12. Quality and equity in early childhood care in Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izu, Regina Moromizato

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines educational policy documents and programs on early childhood development and education in Peru. The author provides an evaluation of early childhood learning programs and their outcomes in different education centers in Peru. Health, nutrition, development, and participation are identified as key areas of concern. The study concludes with a reference to the importance of monitoring quality and equity in early childhood care.

  13. Effects of an Integrated Care System on quality of care and satisfaction for children with special health care needs.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice; Madden, Vanessa; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2012-04-01

    To assess the effects of an Integrated Care System (ICS) on parent-reported quality of care and satisfaction for Children with Special Health Care Needs (CSHCN). In 2006 Florida reformed its Medicaid program in Broward and Duval counties. Children's Medical Services Network (CMSN) chose to participate in the reform and developed an ICS for CSHCN. The ICS ushered in several changes such as more prior approval requirements and closing of the provider network. Telephone surveys were conducted with CMSN parents whose children reside in the reform counties and parents whose children reside outside of the reform counties in 2006 and 2007 (n = 1,727). Results from multivariate quasi-experimental models show that one component of parent-report quality of care, customer service, increased. Following implementation of the ICS, customer service increased by 0.22 points. After implementation of the ICS, parent-reported quality and satisfaction were generally unaffected. Although significant increases were not seen in the majority of the quality and satisfaction domains, it is nonetheless encouraging that parents did not report negative experiences with the ICS. It is important to present these interim findings so that progress can be monitored and decision-makers can begin to consider if the program should be expanded statewide.

  14. National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (NSQIP) and the Quality of Surgical Care in Pediatric Orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Brighton, Brian K

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, the safety, quality, and value of surgical care have become increasingly important to surgeons and hospitals. Quality improvement in surgical care requires the ability to collect, measure, and act upon reliable and clinically relevant data. One example of a large-scale quality effort is the American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program-Pediatric (ACS NSQIP-Pediatric), the only nationwide, risk-adjusted, outcomes-based program evaluating pediatric surgical care.

  15. Changes in Quality of Health Care Delivery after Vertical Integration

    PubMed Central

    Carlin, Caroline S; Dowd, Bryan; Feldman, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To fill an empirical gap in the literature by examining changes in quality of care measures occurring when multispecialty clinic systems were acquired by hospital-owned, vertically integrated health care delivery systems in the Twin Cities area. Data Sources/Study Setting Administrative data for health plan enrollees attributed to treatment and control clinic systems, merged with U.S. Census data. Study Design We compared changes in quality measures for health plan enrollees in the acquired clinics to enrollees in nine control groups using a differences-in-differences model. Our dataset spans 2 years prior to and 4 years after the acquisitions. We estimated probit models with errors clustered within enrollees. Data Collection/Extraction Methods Data were assembled by the health plan’s informatics team. Principal Findings Vertical integration is associated with increased rates of colorectal and cervical cancer screening and more appropriate emergency department use. The probability of ambulatory care–sensitive admissions increased when the acquisition caused disruption in admitting patterns. Conclusions Moving a clinic system into a vertically integrated delivery system resulted in limited increases in quality of care indicators. Caution is warranted when the acquisition causes disruption in referral patterns. PMID:25529312

  16. Mobile computing and the quality of home care nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Paré, Guy; Sicotte, Claude; Moreault, Marie-Pierre; Poba-Nzaou, Placide; Nahas, Georgette; Templier, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the introduction of mobile computing on the quality of home care nursing practice in Québec. The software, which structured and organized the nursing activities in patients' homes, was installed sequentially in nine community health centres. The completeness of the nursing notes was compared in 77 paper records (pre-implementation) and 73 electronic records (post-implementation). Overall, the introduction of the software was associated with an improvement in the completeness of the nursing notes. All 137 nurse users were asked to complete a structured questionnaire. A total of 101 completed questionnaires were returned (74% response rate). Overall, the nurses reported a very high level of satisfaction with the quality of clinical information collected. A total of 57 semi-structured interviews were conducted and most nurses believed that the new software represented a user-friendly tool with a clear and understandable structure. A postal questionnaire was sent to approximately 1240 patients. A total of 223 patients returned the questionnaire (approximately 18% response rate). Overall, patients felt that the use of mobile computing during home visits allowed nurses to manage their health condition better and, hence, provide superior care services. The use of mobile computing had positive and significant effects on the quality of care provided by home nurses.

  17. Quality of tuberculosis care in high burden countries: the urgent need to address gaps in the care cascade.

    PubMed

    Cazabon, Danielle; Alsdurf, Hannah; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Daftary, Amrita; Pai, Madhukar

    2017-03-01

    Despite the high coverage of directly observed treatment short-course (DOTS), tuberculosis (TB) continues to affect 10.4 million people each year, and kills 1.8 million. High TB mortality, the large number of missing TB cases, the emergence of severe forms of drug resistance, and the slow decline in TB incidence indicate that merely expanding the coverage of TB services is insufficient to end the epidemic. In the era of the End TB Strategy, we need to think beyond coverage and start focusing on the quality of TB care that is routinely offered to patients in high burden countries, in both public and private sectors. In this review, current evidence on the quality of TB care in high burden countries, major gaps in the quality of care, and some novel efforts to measure and improve the quality of care are described. Based on systematic reviews on the quality of TB care or surrogates of quality (e.g., TB diagnostic delays), analyses of TB care cascades, and newer studies that directly measure quality of care, it is shown that the quality of care in both the public and private sector falls short of international standards and urgently needs improvement. National TB programs will therefore need to systematically measure and improve quality of TB care and invest in quality improvement programs.

  18. Quality of tuberculosis care in high burden countries: the urgent need to address gaps in the care cascade

    PubMed Central

    Cazabon, Danielle; Alsdurf, Hannah; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Nathavitharana, Ruvandhi; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Daftary, Amrita; Pai, Madhukar

    2016-01-01

    Despite the high coverage of DOTS, tuberculosis (TB) continues to affect 10.4 million people each year, and kills 1.8 million. High TB mortality, the large number of missing TB cases, the emergence of severe forms of drug-resistance, and the slow decline in TB incidence indicate that merely expanding the coverage of TB services is insufficient to end the epidemic. In the era of the End TB Strategy, we need to think beyond coverage and start focusing on the quality of TB care that is routinely offered to patients in high burden countries, in both public and private sectors. In this review, we describe current evidence on the quality of TB care in high burden countries, major gaps in the quality of care, and some novel efforts to measure and improve the quality of care. Based on systematic reviews on the quality of TB care or surrogates of quality (e.g. TB diagnostic delays), analyses of TB care cascades, and newer studies that directly measure quality of care, we show that the quality of care in both the public and private sectors falls short of international standards and urgently needs improvement. National TB programs will therefore need to systematically measure and improve quality of TB care, and invest in quality improvement programs. PMID:27794468

  19. QUALITY-OF-CARE INDICATORS FOR PELVIC ORGAN PROLAPSE: DEVELOPMENT OF AN INFRASTRUCTURE FOR QUALITY ASSESSMENT

    PubMed Central

    Anger, Jennifer T.; Scott, Victoria C.S.; Kiyosaki, Krista; Khan, Aqsa A.; Sevilla, Claudia; Connor, Sarah E.; Roth, Carol P.; Litwin, Mark S.; Wenger, Neil S.; Shekelle, Paul G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction A paucity of data exists addressing the quality of care provided to women with pelvic organ prolapse (POP). We sought to develop a means to measure this quality through the development of quality-of-care indicators (QIs). Methods QIs were modeled after those previously described in the Assessing the Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project. The indicators were then presented to a panel of nine experts. Using the RAND Appropriateness Method, we analyzed each indicator’s preliminary rankings. A forum was then held in which each indicator was thoroughly discussed by the panelists as a group, after which panelists individually re-rated the indicators. QIs with median scores of at least seven were considered valid. Results QIs were developed that addressed screening, diagnosis, work-up, and both nonsurgical and surgical management. Areas of controversy included whether screening should be performed to identify prolapse, whether pessary users should undergo a vaginal exam by a health professional every six months versus annually, and whether a colpocleisis should be offered to older women planning to undergo surgery for POP. Fourteen of 21 potential indicators were rated as valid for pelvic organ prolapse (median score ≥ 7). Conclusion We developed and rated fourteen potential quality indicators for the care of women with POP. Once these QIs are tested for feasibility they can be used on a larger scale to measure and compare the care provided to women with prolapse in different clinical settings. PMID:23644812

  20. Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p <0. 001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  1. An instrumental variables approach to post-acute care nursing home quality: is there a dime's worth of evidence that continuing care retirement communities provide higher quality?

    PubMed

    Bowblis, John R; McHone, Heather S

    2013-09-01

    For the affluent elderly, continuing care retirement communities (CCRCs) have become a popular option for long term care and other health care needs related to aging. While CCRCs have experienced significant growth over the last few decades, very little is known about the quality of care CCRCs provide. This paper is the first to rigorously study CCRCs on a national scale and the only study that focuses on nursing home quality. Using a national sample from 2005, we determine if the quality of post-acute care provided by CCRC nursing homes is superior to traditional nursing homes. To mimic randomization of patients, instrumental variables analysis is used with relative distance as an exclusion restriction to handle the endogeneity of the type of facility where care is provided. After adjusting for endogeniety, we find that CCRC nursing homes provide post-acute care quality that is similar or lower to traditional nursing homes, depending on the quality measure.

  2. Client satisfaction and quality of health care in rural Bangladesh.

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza Aldana, J.; Piechulek, H.; al-Sabir, A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess user expectations and degree of client satisfaction and quality of health care provided in rural Bangladesh. METHODS: A total of 1913 persons chosen by systematic random sampling were successfully interviewed immediately after having received care in government health facilities. FINDINGS: The most powerful predictor for client satisfaction with the government services was provider behaviour, especially respect and politeness. For patients this aspect was much more important than the technical competence of the provider. Furthermore, a reduction in waiting time (on average to 30 min) was more important to clients than a prolongation of the quite short (from a medical standpoint) consultation time (on average 2 min, 22 sec), with 75% of clients being satisfied. Waiting time, which was about double at outreach services than that at fixed services, was the only element with which users of outreach services were dissatisfied. CONCLUSIONS: This study underscores that client satisfaction is determined by the cultural background of the people. It shows the dilemma that, though optimally care should be capable of meeting both medical and psychosocial needs, in reality care that meets all medical needs may fail to meet the client's emotional or social needs. Conversely, care that meets psychosocial needs may leave the clients medically at risk. It seems important that developing countries promoting client-oriented health services should carry out more in-depth research on the determinants of client satisfaction in the respective culture. PMID:11436472

  3. National infection prevention and control programmes: Endorsing quality of care.

    PubMed

    Stempliuk, Valeska; Ramon-Pardo, Pilar; Holder, Reynaldo

    2014-01-01

    Core components Health care-associated infections (HAIs) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In addition to pain and suffering, HAIs increase the cost of health care and generates indirect costs from loss of productivity for patients and society as a whole. Since 2005, the Pan American Health Organization has provided support to countries for the assessment of their capacities in infection prevention and control (IPC). More than 130 hospitals in 18 countries were found to have poor IPC programmes. However, in the midst of many competing health priorities, IPC programmes are not high on the agenda of ministries of health, and the sustainability of national programmes is not viewed as a key point in making health care systems more consistent and trustworthy. Comprehensive IPC programmes will enable countries to reduce the mobility, mortality and cost of HAIs and improve quality of care. This paper addresses the relevance of national infection prevention and control (NIPC) programmes in promoting, supporting and reinforcing IPC interventions at the level of hospitals. A strong commitment from national health authorities in support of national IPC programmes is crucial to obtaining a steady decrease of HAIs, lowering health costs due to HAIs and ensuring safer care.

  4. Quality-of-care indicators for infantile spasms.

    PubMed

    Wang, C Jason; Jonas, Rinat; Fu, Chong Min; Ng, Chun Y; Douglass, Laurie

    2013-01-01

    We developed a comprehensive set of quality-of-care indicators for the management of children with infantile spasms in the United States, encompassing evaluation, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention and management of side effects and comorbidities. The indicators were developed using the RAND/UCLA Modified Delphi Method. After a focused review of the literature and guidelines by the study team, an expert panel (nominated by leaders of Child Neurology Society, American Epilepsy Society, and National Institute for Neurologic Disorders) rated the draft indicators anonymously, met face-to-face to discuss each indicator, and rerated the revised indicators on validity, feasibility, and importance. The panel recommended 21 indicators, of which 8 were identified as most likely to have a large positive impact on improving quality of life and/or health outcomes for children with infantile spasms. The proposed indicators can be used to assess and document variations and gaps in quality-of-care and inform future research and quality improvement interventions.

  5. Quality of surgical care and readmission in elderly glioblastoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Nuño, Miriam; Ly, Diana; Mukherjee, Debraj; Ortega, Alicia; Black, Keith L.; Patil, Chirag G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmissions post medical or surgical discharge have been analyzed extensively. Studies have shown that complex interactions of multiple factors are responsible for these hospitalizations. Methods A retrospective analysis was conducted using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) Medicare database of newly diagnosed elderly glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients who underwent surgical resection between 1991 and 2007. Hospitals were classified into high- or low-readmission rate cohorts using a risk-adjusted methodology. Bivariate comparisons of outcomes were conducted. Multivariate analysis evaluated differences in quality of care according to hospital readmission rates. Results A total of 1,273 patients underwent surgery in 338 hospitals; 523 patients were treated in 228 high-readmission hospitals and 750 in 110 low-readmission hospitals. Patient characteristics for high-versus low-readmission hospitals were compared. In a confounder-adjusted model, patients treated in high- versus low-readmission hospitals had similar outcomes. The hazard of mortality for patients treated at high- compared to low-readmission hospitals was 1.06 (95% CI, 0.095%–1.19%). While overall complications were comparable between high- and low-readmission hospitals (16.3% vs 14.3%; P = .33), more postoperative pulmonary embolism/deep vein thrombosis complications were documented in patients treated at high-readmission hospitals (7.5% vs 4.1%; P = .01). Adverse events and levels of resection achieved during surgery were comparable at high- and low-readmission hospitals. Conclusions For patients undergoing GBM resection, quality of care provided by hospitals with the highest adjusted readmission rates was similar to the care delivered by hospitals with the lowest rates. These findings provide evidence against the preconceived notion that 30-day readmissions can be used as a metric for quality of surgical and postsurgical care. PMID:26034614

  6. Quality improvement education to improve performance on ulcerative colitis quality measures and care processes aligned with National Quality Strategy priorities.

    PubMed

    Greene, Laurence; Moreo, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have reported suboptimal approaches to patient care. In the United States, the findings have motivated leading gastroenterology organizations to call for initiatives that support clinicians in aligning their practices with quality measures for IBD and priorities of the National Quality Strategy (NQS). We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) education program on ulcerative colitis in which patient charts were audited for 30 gastroenterologists before (n = 300 charts) and after (n = 290 charts) they participated in QI-focused educational activities. Charts were audited for nine measures, selected for their alignment with four NQS priorities: making care safer, ensuring patient engagement, promoting communication, and promoting effective treatment practices. Four of the measures, including guideline-directed vaccinations and assessments of disease type and activity, were part of the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). The other five measures involved counseling patients on various topics in ulcerative colitis management, documentation of side effects, assessment of adherence status, and simplification of dosing. The gastroenterologists also completed baseline and post-education surveys designed to assess qualitative outcomes. One of the educational interventions was a private audit feedback session conducted for each gastroenterologist. The sessions were designed to support participants in identifying measures reflecting suboptimal care quality and developing action plans for improvement. In continuous improvement cycles, follow-up interventions included QI tools and educational monographs. Across the nine chart variables, post-education improvements ranged from 0% to 48%, with a mean improvement of 15.9%. Survey findings revealed improvements in self-reported understanding of quality measures and intentions to apply them to practice, and lower rates of perceived significant barriers to high-quality

  7. An international environmental scan of quality indicators for cardiovascular care.

    PubMed

    Abrahamyan, Lusine; Boom, Nicole; Donovan, Linda R; Tu, Jack V

    2012-01-01

    Quality indicators (QIs) are increasingly being used to measure and improve the quality of cardiac care. We conducted an international environmental scan to identify and critically appraise published QI development initiatives addressing cardiovascular disease (CVD). A review of the peer-reviewed and grey English-language literature was conducted to identify published CVD QI development initiatives. The quality of identified studies was assessed using a modified version of the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE) II QI tool-an instrument originally developed for the assessment of the quality of clinical practice guidelines. An initial literature search identified 2314 potentially relevant abstracts of peer-reviewed articles. After a review of the abstracts, 120 full text articles were retrieved and reviewed. Of these, 20 articles and 1 peer-reviewed monograph were selected for critical appraisal (n = 21). Most of the initiatives were conducted in North America (76%) and were published after 2005 (62%). The majority (5 of 6) of the AGREE II QI domain scores were skewed toward higher values, including the median score for the 'overall quality' rating (83.3%). Of the CVD categories addressed within the 21 initiatives, heart failure was the most common (n = 10 QI indicator sets), followed by acute coronary syndromes (n = 8). Considerable variation was observed in the methods utilized and the degree of scientific rigour applied in the published international CVD QI development initiatives. Adoption of standardized methods could help improve the quality of QI development initiatives.

  8. Agents of Nursing Home Quality of Care: Ombudsmen and Staff Ratios Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry, Ralph L.

    1991-01-01

    Compared effects of ombudsman programs on quality of nursing home care on random sample of 134 Medicare/Medicaid-certified long-term care facilities in Missouri. Found that presence of ombudsman program was most important factor associated with quality for intermediate-care facilities, and was significantly associated with quality for skilled…

  9. Quality nursing care for hospitalized patients with advanced illness: concept development.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G; Knafl, Kathleen A

    2010-08-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability.

  10. Making a Quality Child Care Choice: Finding and Keeping Quality Child Care Can Be Challenging. Where Do You Start? = Choisir des services de garde de qualite: Trouver et garder des services de garde de qualite peut etre difficile. Du commencer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Child Care Federation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    This booklet offers Canadian parents guidance on finding high-quality child care. The booklet begins by defining quality child care, indicating that child care should support a child's emotional, social, intellectual well-being and that child caregivers are the key to quality child care. The characteristics of quality child care settings are also…

  11. [Supportive care, cognition and quality of life in brain metastases].

    PubMed

    Le Rhun, É; Taillibert, S; Blonski, M; Jouniaux Delbez, N; Delgadillo, D; Taillia, H; Auquier, P; Belin, C; Bonnetain, F; Varin, D; Tallet, A; Taillandier, L

    2015-02-01

    Brain metastases impact on the survival of the patients, but on their quality of life as well. The objective of the management of these patients is then double. Currently, due to medical advances, survivals tend to improve, especially for some tumor subtypes. During the course of the disease, different neurological signs and symptoms can be observed according to the location, the number and the volume of the metastase(s). Patients and caregivers are especially worried about the loss of autonomy and cognitive impairments. A permanent dialogue, during the course of the disease, is mandatory, in order to adapt the management to the objectives determined by the patients and the medical team. These objectives may vary according to the objective response rates of the disease to anticancer therapies, according to the impact of the disease and its management in daily living. Anticancer therapies and supportive care must be appreciated according to their impact on the survival, on the preservation of the functional independence and the quality of life of the patient, on their abilities to preserve the neurological status and delay the apparition of new neurological signs and symptoms, and their adverse events. Supportive care, cognition and quality of life should be regularly evaluated and adapted according to the objectives of the management of brain metastases patients. Different approaches are described in this paper.

  12. The Quality Assurance Project: introducing quality improvement to primary health care in less developed countries.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, D D; Heiby, J R; Hatzell, T A

    1991-01-01

    Persistently excessive morbidity and mortality rates in less developed countries (LDCs) served by primary health care systems suggest that the quality of services is inadequate. The PRICOR project, sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development, has designed and implemented methods for quality assessment and problem solving in LDC health systems. After developing comprehensive lists of essential activities and tasks, similar to practice parameters, for seven child survival interventions, PRICOR supported comprehensive quality assessment studies in twelve LDC countries. The studies, yielding over 6000 observations of health worker-client encounters, indicated highly prevalent, serious program deficiencies in areas including diagnosis, treatment, patient education and supervision. To facilitate corrective action, PRICOR assisted managers in conducting operations research to resolve priority problems revealed by the assessments. The recently initiated Quality Assurance Project is building on PRICOR techniques in designing and implementing sustainable continuous quality improvement programs for LDC health systems.

  13. Caregivers in older peoples' care: perception of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health.

    PubMed

    From, Ingrid; Nordström, Gun; Wilde-Larsson, Bodil; Johansson, Inger

    2013-09-01

    The aim was to describe and compare nursing assistants', enrolled nurses' and registered nurses' perceptions of quality of care, working conditions, competence and personal health in older peoples' care. Altogether 70 nursing assistants, 163 enrolled nurses and 198 registered nurses completed a questionnaire comprising Quality from the Patient's Perspective modified for caregivers, Creative Climate Questionnaire, Stress of Conscience Questionnaire, items on education and competence and Health Index. The caregivers reported higher perceived reality of quality of care in medical-technical competence and physical-technical conditions than in identity-oriented approach and socio-cultural atmosphere. In subjective importance, the highest rating was assessed in one of the physical-technical items. The organisational climate was for three of the dimensions rather close/reached the value for a creative climate, for seven dimensions close to a stagnant climate. In perceived stress of conscience, there were low values. Nursing assistants had lower values than enrolled nurses and registered nurses. The caregivers reported highest values regarding previous education making them feel safe at work and lowest value on the item about education increasing the ability for a scientific attitude. Registered nurses could use knowledge in practice and to a higher degree than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses reported a need to gain knowledge, but the latter more often received education during working hours. The health index among caregivers was high, but registered nurses scored lower on emotional well-being than nursing assistants/enrolled nurses. The caregivers' different perceptions of quality of care and work climate need further attention. Although stress of conscience was low, it is important to acknowledge what affected the caregivers work in a negative way. Attention should be paid to the greater need for competence development among registered nurses during working hours.

  14. Team structure, team climate and the quality of care in primary care: an observational study

    PubMed Central

    Bower, P; Campbell, S; Bojke, C; Sibbald, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether practice structure (for example, list size, number of staff) predicts team processes and whether practice structure and team process in turn predict team outcomes Design: Observational study using postal questionnaires and medical note audit. Team process was assessed through a measure of "climate" which examines shared perceptions of organisational policies, practices, and procedures. Setting: Primary care. Subjects: Members of the primary health care team from 42 practices. Main outcome measures: Objective measures of quality of chronic disease management, patients' evaluations of practices, teams' self-reported ratings of effectiveness, and innovation. Results: Team climate was better in singlehanded practices than in partnerships. Practices with longer booking intervals provided superior chronic disease management. Higher team climate scores were associated with superior clinical care in diabetes, more positive patient evaluations of practice and self-reported innovation and effectiveness. Conclusions: Although the conclusions are preliminary because of the limited sample size, the study suggests that there are important relationships between team structure, process, and outcome that may be of relevance to quality improvement initiatives in primary care. Possible causal mechanisms that might underlie these associations remain to be determined. PMID:12897360

  15. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses.

    PubMed

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research.

  16. Indicators for Evaluating the Performance and Quality of Care of Ambulatory Care Nurses

    PubMed Central

    Rapin, Joachim; D'Amour, Danielle; Dubois, Carl-Ardy

    2015-01-01

    The quality and safety of nursing care vary from one service to another. We have only very limited information on the quality and safety of nursing care in outpatient settings, an expanding area of practice. Our aim in this study was to make available, from the scientific literature, indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate the performance of nursing care in outpatient settings and to integrate those indicators into the theoretical framework of Dubois et al. (2013). We conducted a scoping review in three databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EMBASE) and the bibliographies of selected articles. From a total of 116 articles, we selected 22. The results of our study not only enable that framework to be extended to ambulatory nursing care but also enhance it with the addition of five new indicators. Our work offers nurses and managers in ambulatory nursing units indicators potentially sensitive to nursing that can be used to evaluate performance. For researchers, it presents the current state of knowledge on this construct and a framework with theoretical foundations for future research in ambulatory settings. This work opens an unexplored field for further research. PMID:26380108

  17. Quality of Care Attributions to Employed Versus Stay-at-Home Mothers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shpancer, Noam; Melick, Katherine M.; Sayre, Pamela S.; Spivey, Aria T.

    2006-01-01

    The present study was designed to find whether evaluations of maternal competence are linked to mothers' employment status and the quality of maternal care. Participants rated videotaped vignettes, depicting either high-quality or low-quality mother-infant interactions, on various dimensions of care quality. The videotaped mothers were described…

  18. Quality improvement in depression care in the Netherlands: the Depression Breakthrough Collaborative. A quality improvement report

    PubMed Central

    Franx, Gerdien; Meeuwissen, Jolanda A.C; Sinnema, Henny; Spijker, Jan; Huyser, Jochanan; Wensing, Michel; de Lange, Jacomine

    2009-01-01

    Background Improving the healthcare for patients with depression is a priority health policy across the world. Roughly, two major problems can be identified in daily practice: (1) the content of care is often not completely consistent with recommendations in guidelines and (2) the organization of care is not always integrated and delivered by multidisciplinary teams. Aim To describe the content and preliminary results of a quality improvement project in primary care, aiming at improving the uptake of clinical depression guidelines in daily practice as well as the collaboration between different mental health professionals. Method A Depression Breakthrough Collaborative was initiated from December 2006 until March 2008. The activities included the development and implementation of a stepped care depression model, a care pathway with two levels of treatment intensity: a first step treatment level for patients with non-severe depression (brief or mild depressive symptoms) and a second step level for patients with severe depression. Twelve months data were measured by the teams in terms of one outcome and several process indicators. Qualitative data were gathered by the national project team with a semi-structured questionnaire amongst the local team coordinators. Results Thirteen multidisciplinary teams participated in the project. In total 101 health professionals were involved, and 536 patients were diagnosed. Overall 356 patients (66%) were considered non-severely depressed and 180 (34%) patients showed severe symptoms. The mean percentage of non-severe patients treated according to the stepped care model was 78%, and 57% for the severely depressed patient group. The proportion of non-severely depressed patients receiving a first step treatment according to the stepped care model, improved during the project, this was not the case for the severely depressed patients. The teams were able to monitor depression symptoms to a reasonable extent during a period of 6

  19. Analysis of early accountable care organizations defines patient, structural, cost, and quality-of-care characteristics.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Arnold M; Jha, Ashish K; Orav, E John; Liebman, Daniel L; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Zezza, Mark A; Guterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have attracted interest from many policy makers and clinical leaders because of their potential to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. Federal ACO programs for Medicare beneficiaries are now up and running, but little information is available about the baseline characteristics of early entrants. In this descriptive study we present data on the structural and market characteristics of these early ACOs and compare ACOs' patient populations, costs, and quality with those of their non-ACO counterparts at baseline. We found that ACO patients were more likely than non-ACO patients to be older than age eighty and had higher incomes. ACO patients were less likely than non-ACO patients to be black, covered by Medicaid, or disabled. The cost of care for ACO patients was slightly lower than that for non-ACO patients. Slightly fewer than half of the ACOs had a participating hospital. Hospitals that were in ACOs were more likely than non-ACO hospitals to be large, teaching, and not-for-profit, although there was little difference in their performance on quality metrics. Our findings can be useful in interpreting the early results from the federal ACO programs and in establishing a baseline to assess the programs' development.

  20. Evaluation of quality in social care: aplus program.

    PubMed

    Dutrénit, Jean-Marc

    2005-10-01

    France is not advanced regarding evaluation in social work, despite a law established in January 2002 making evaluation a legal obligation every 5 years. This article presents a software program to help social services evaluate on both individual and group levels. Automatic dashboard results of the program with special emphasis on the main qualities social work would usually present reciprocity and social competence, client ability development, and social care treatment components. The last point is an automatic selection of most efficient treatment components of ability development.

  1. Quality in Child Day Care Centres: How to Promote It? A Study of Six Day-Care Centres.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Elly; Miltenburg, Ruth

    1994-01-01

    Explored how research can be useful for improving day-care quality. Studied relationship of pedagogic content and parent policy to day-care center aims, finding a strong relationship between special goals and quality standards. Suggested that improvement requires context-bound theories and a stronger theoretical framework for working with groups…

  2. Effect of an Innovative Medicare Managed Care Program on the Quality of Care for Nursing Home Residents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kane, Robert L.; Flood, Shannon; Bershadsky, Boris; Keckhafer, Gail

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: We sought to assess the quality of care provided by an innovative Medicare+Choice HMO targeted specifically at nursing home residents and employing nurse practitioners to provide additional primary care over and above that provided by physicians. The underlying premise of the Evercare approach is that the additional primary care will…

  3. A Profile Approach to Child Care Quality, Quantity, and Type of Setting: Parent Selection of Infant Child Care Arrangements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosinsky, Laura Stout; Kim, Se-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Building on prior variable-oriented research which demonstrates the independence of the associations of child care quality, quantity, and type of setting with family factors and child outcomes, the current study identifies four profiles of child care dimensions from the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development. Profiles accounted for…

  4. Critical care nurses' perceptions of obstacles, supports, and knowledge needed in providing quality end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Crump, Saundra K; Schaffer, Marjorie A; Schulte, Evie

    2010-01-01

    In response to critical care nurses' perceptions of increasing stress and conflict in difficult end-of-life (EOL) situations, the researchers conducted a study to identify perceived obstacles, supports, and knowledge needed to provide quality EOL care. The conclusions were as follows: (1) families and patients need clear, direct, and consistent information to make EOL decisions; (2) physician-related issues affect nurses' ability to provide quality EOL care; (3) critical care nurses need more knowledge, skill, and a sense of cultural competency to provide quality care; and (4) having properly completed advance directives can reduce confusion about the goals of care. Recommendations for improving EOL care were made as a result of the study.

  5. Introducing quality management into primary health care services in Uganda.

    PubMed Central

    Omaswa, F.; Burnham, G.; Baingana, G.; Mwebesa, H.; Morrow, R.

    1997-01-01

    In 1994, a national quality assurance programme was established in Uganda to strengthen district-level management of primary health care services. Within 18 months both objective and subjective improvements in the quality of services had been observed. In the examples documented here, there was a major reduction in maternal mortality among pregnant women referred to Jinja District Hospital, a reduction in waiting times and increased patient satisfaction at Masaka District Hospital, and a marked reduction in reported cases of measles in Arua District. Beyond these quantitative improvements, increased morale of district health team members, improved satisfaction among patients, and greater involvement of local government in the decisions of district health committees have been observed. At the central level, the increased coordination of activities has led to new guidelines for financial management and the procurement of supplies. District quality management workshops followed up by regular support visits from the Ministry of Health headquarters have led to a greater understanding by central staff of the issues faced at the district level. The quality assurance programme has also fostered improved coordination among national disease-control programmes. Difficulties encountered at the central level have included delays in carrying out district support visits and the failure to provide appropriate support. At the district level, some health teams tackled problems over which they had little control or which were overly complex; others lacked the management capacity for problem solving. PMID:9185368

  6. Quality measures for the care of patients with lateral epicondylalgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylalgia (LE) defines a condition of varying degrees of pain near the lateral epicondyle. Studies on the management of LE indicated unexplained variations in the use of pharmacologic, non-pharmacological and surgical treatments. The main aim of this paper was to develop and evaluate clinical quality measures (QMs) or quality indicators, which may be used to assess the quality of the processes of examination, education and treatment of patients with LE. Methods Different QMs were developed by a multidisciplinary group of experts in Quality Management of Health Services during a period of one year. The process was based following a 3-step model: i) review and proportion of existing evidence-based recommendations; ii) review and development of quality measures; iii) pilot testing of feasibility and reliability of the indicators leading to a final consensus by the whole panel. Results Overall, a set of 12 potential indicators related to medical and physical therapy assessment and treatment were developed to measure the performance of LE care. Different systematic reviews and randomized control trials supported each of the indicators judged to be valid during the expert panel process. Application of the new indicator set was found to be feasible; only the measurement of two quality measures had light barriers. Reliability was mostly excellent (Kappa > 0.8). Conclusions A set of good practice indicators has been built and pilot tested as feasible and reliable. The chosen 3-step standardized evidence-based process ensures maximum clarity, acceptance and sustainability of the developed indicators. PMID:24172311

  7. Quality of care and health-related quality of life of climacteric stage women cared for in family medicine clinics in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Objectives 1) To design and validate indicators to measure the quality of the process of care that climacteric stage women receive in family medicine clinics (FMC). 2) To assess the quality of care that climacteric stage women receive in FMC. 3) To determine the association between quality of care and health-related quality of life (HR-QoL) among climacteric stage women. Methods The study had two phases: I. Design and validation of indicators to measure the quality of care process by using the RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method. II. Evaluation of the quality of care and its association with HR-QoL through a cross-sectional study conducted in two FMC located in Mexico City that included 410 climacteric stage women. The quality of care was measured by estimating the percentage of recommended care received (PRCR) by climacteric stage women in three process components: health promotion, screening, and treatment. The HR-QoL was measured using the Cervantes scale (0-155). The association between quality of care and HR-QoL was estimated through multiple linear regression analysis. Results The lowest mean of PRCR was for the health promotion component (24.1%) and the highest for the treatment component (86.6%). The mean of HR-QoL was 50.1 points. The regression analysis showed that in the treatment component, for every 10 additional points of the PRCR, the global HR-QoL improved 2.8 points on the Cervantes scale (coefficient -0.28, P < 0.0001). Conclusion The indicators to measure quality of care for climacteric stage women are applicable and feasible in family medicine settings. There is a positive association between the quality of the treatment component and HR-QoL; this would encourage interventions to improve quality of care for climacteric stage women. PMID:20144238

  8. Health Care Spending and Quality in Year 1 of the Alternative Quality Contract

    PubMed Central

    Song, Zirui; Safran, Dana Gelb; Landon, Bruce E.; He, Yulei; Ellis, Randall P.; Mechanic, Robert E.; Day, Matthew P.; Chernew, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    Background In 2009, Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts (BCBS) implemented a global payment system called the Alternative Quality Contract (AQC). Provider groups in the AQC system assume accountability for spending, similar to accountable care organizations that bear financial risk. Moreover, groups are eligible to receive bonuses for quality. Methods Seven provider organizations began 5-year contracts as part of the AQC system in 2009. We analyzed 2006–2009 claims for 380,142 enrollees whose primary care physicians (PCPs) were in the AQC system (intervention group) and for 1,351,446 enrollees whose PCPs were not in the system (control group). We used a propensity-weighted difference-in-differences approach, adjusting for age, sex, health status, and secular trends to isolate the treatment effect of the AQC in comparisons of spending and quality between the intervention group and the control group. Results Average spending increased for enrollees in both the intervention and control groups in 2009, but the increase was smaller for enrollees in the intervention group — $15.51 (1.9%) less per quarter (P = 0.007). Savings derived largely from shifts in outpatient care toward facilities with lower fees; from lower expenditures for procedures, imaging, and testing; and from a reduction in spending for enrollees with the highest expected spending. The AQC system was associated with an improvement in performance on measures of the quality of the management of chronic conditions in adults (P<0.001) and of pediatric care (P = 0.001), but not of adult preventive care. All AQC groups met 2009 budget targets and earned surpluses. Total BCBS payments to AQC groups, including bonuses for quality, are likely to have exceeded the estimated savings in year 1. Conclusions The AQC system was associated with a modest slowing of spending growth and improved quality of care in 2009. Savings were achieved through changes in referral patterns rather than through changes in

  9. The quality of care and influence of double health care coverage in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Rajmil, L.; Borrell, C.; Starfield, B.; Fernandez, E.; Serra, V.; Schiaffino, A.; Segura, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To analyse inequalities by social class in children's access to and utilisation of health services in Catalonia (Spain), private health insurance coverage, and certain aspects of the quality of care received.
DESIGN—Cross sectional study using data from the 1994 Catalan Health Interview Survey.
SETTING—Child population of Catalonia.
PARTICIPANTS—A representative sample of non-institutionalised children younger than 15 years (n = 2433).
MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES—Health services utilisation, perceived health, type of health insurance (only National Health System (NHS) or both NHS and private health insurance), and social class.
RESULTS—No inequalities by social class were found for the utilisation of health care services provided by the NHS among children in most need. Double health care coverage does not influence the social pattern of visits. Nevertheless, social inequalities still remain in the use of those health services provided only partially by the NHS (dentist) and when characteristics of the last consultation are taken into account. That is, subjects who paid for a private service waited an average of 14.8 minutes less than those whose visit was paid for by the NHS only.
CONCLUSION—Equitable access and use of medical care services in relation to need, regardless of the type of insurance and social class of their children and families, has been achieved in this region of Spain; differences by social class remain for those services incompletely covered by national health insurance and aspects of the quality of care provided.

 PMID:10952636

  10. Quality in Family Child Care Settings: The Relationship between Provider Educational Experiences and Global Quality Scores in a Statewide Quality Rating and Improvement System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallam, Rena A.; Bargreen, Kaitlin N.; Ridgley, Robyn

    2013-01-01

    This study is a secondary analysis of a statewide sample of licensed family child care providers in the Tennessee Child Care Evaluation and Report Card Program ("N"?=?1,145) that describes the general quality of family child care programs in the state and examines the relationships between provider education and global quality. Study…

  11. Virtual Patient Technology: Engaging Primary Care in Quality Improvement Innovations

    PubMed Central

    May, Christine N; Sadasivam, Rajani S; Houston, Thomas K

    2017-01-01

    Background Engaging health care staff in new quality improvement programs is challenging. Objective We developed 2 virtual patient (VP) avatars in the context of a clinic-level quality improvement program. We sought to determine differences in preferences for VPs and the perceived influence of interacting with the VP on clinical staff engagement with the quality improvement program. Methods Using a participatory design approach, we developed an older male smoker VP and a younger female smoker VP. The older male smoker was described as a patient with cardiovascular disease and was ethnically ambiguous. The female patient was younger and was worried about the impact of smoking on her pregnancy. Clinical staff were allowed to choose the VP they preferred, and the more they engaged with the VP, the more likely the VP was to quit smoking and become healthier. We deployed the VP within the context of a quality improvement program designed to encourage clinical staff to refer their patients who smoke to a patient-centered Web-assisted tobacco intervention. To evaluate the VPs, we used quantitative analyses using multivariate models of provider and practice characteristics and VP characteristic preference and analyses of a brief survey of positive deviants (clinical staff in practices with high rates of encouraging patients to use the quit smoking innovation). Results A total of 146 clinical staff from 76 primary care practices interacted with the VPs. Clinic staff included medical providers (35/146, 24.0%), nurse professionals (19/146, 13.0%), primary care technicians (5/146, 3.4%), managerial staff (67/146, 45.9%), and receptionists (20/146, 13.7%). Medical staff were mostly male, and other roles were mostly female. Medical providers (OR 0.031; CI 0.003-0.281; P=.002) and younger staff (OR 0.411; CI 0.177-0.952; P=.038) were less likely to choose the younger, female VP when controlling for all other characteristics. VP preference did not influence online patient

  12. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part I: Five Pioneers in Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay

    2015-08-01

    Five pioneers had a huge impact on the quality movement in health care in the United States. Ernest Codman contributed in many ways, including his focus on outcome analysis. Avidis Donabedian is known for his focus on the 3 domains of structure, process, and outcome in health care. Walter Shewhart is known especially for the control chart and early work on what W. Edwards Deming made into the PDSA cycle. Deming is also known for other contributions, including his 14 points of management, correcting system problems rather than blaming the workers, and his System of Profound Knowledge. Juran is known for the Pareto principle and his emphasis on customer satisfaction and addressing the human, not just statistical side, of quality improvement.

  13. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  14. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  15. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  16. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  17. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  18. 45 CFR 98.51 - Activities to improve the quality of child care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.51 Activities to improve the quality of child care. (a) No less than four percent of the aggregate funds expended by the Lead... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Activities to improve the quality of child...

  19. Money Matters for Early Education: The Relationships among Child Care Quality, Teacher Characteristics, and Subsidy Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    St.Clair-Christman, JeanMarie; Buell, Martha; Gamel-McCormick, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Child care is the first out-of-home learning opportunity for many children. For low-income children, a high-quality child care placement can provide many of the experiences and skills that help build a foundation for later school success. Among the many measures of child care quality, some closely linked to later success in school are those…

  20. 77 FR 70786 - Request for Information Regarding Health Care Quality for Exchanges

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-27

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Request for Information Regarding Health Care... Improvement in Health Care (National Quality Strategy) to create national aims and priorities that would guide local, state, and national efforts to improve the quality of health care in the United States....

  1. Perceptions of Local Health Care Quality in 7 Rural Communities with Telemedicine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nesbitt, Thomas S.; Marcin, James P.; Daschbach, Martha M.; Cole, Stacey L.

    2005-01-01

    Rural health services are difficult to maintain because of low patient volumes, limited numbers of providers, and unfavorable economies of scale. Rural patients may perceive poor quality in local health care, directly impacting the sustainability of local health care services. This study examines perceptions of local health care quality in 7…

  2. Enhancing Early Child Care Quality and Learning for Toddlers at Risk: The Responsive Early Childhood Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landry, Susan H.; Zucker, Tricia A.; Taylor, Heather B.; Swank, Paul R.; Williams, Jeffrey M.; Assel, Michael; Crawford, April; Huang, Weihua; Clancy-Menchetti, Jeanine; Lonigan, Christopher J.; Phillips, Beth M.; Eisenberg, Nancy; Spinrad, Tracy L.; de Viliers, Jill; de Viliers, Peter; Barnes, Marcia; Starkey, Prentice; Klein, Alice

    2014-01-01

    Despite reports of positive effects of high-quality child care, few experimental studies have examined the process of improving low-quality center-based care for toddler-age children. In this article, we report intervention effects on child care teachers' behaviors and children's social, social-emotional classroom activities (RECC).…

  3. Improving the Quality of Nursing Home Care and Medical-Record Accuracy with Direct Observational Technologies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schnelle, John F.; Osterweil, Dan; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2005-01-01

    Nursing home medical-record documentation of daily-care occurrence may be inaccurate, and information is not documented about important quality-of-life domains. The inadequacy of medical record data creates a barrier to improving care quality, because it supports an illusion of care consistent with regulations, which reduces the motivation and…

  4. Music therapy in pediatric palliative care: family-centered care to enhance quality of life.

    PubMed

    Lindenfelser, Kathryn J; Hense, Cherry; McFerran, Katrina

    2012-05-01

    Research into the value of music therapy in pediatric palliative care (PPC) has identified quality of life as one area of improvement for families caring for a child in the terminal stages of a life-threatening illness. This small-scale investigation collected data in a multisite, international study including Minnesota, USA, and Melbourne, Australia. An exploratory mixed method design used the qualitative data collected through interviews with parents to interpret results from the PedsQL Family Impact Module of overall parental quality of life. Parents described music therapy as resulting in physical improvements of their child by providing comfort and stimulation. They also valued the positive experiences shared by the family in music therapy sessions that were strength oriented and family centered. This highlighted the physical and communication scales within the PedsQL Family Impact Module, where minimal improvements were achieved in contrast to some strong results suggesting diminished quality of life in cognitive and daily activity domains. Despite the significant challenges faced by parents during this difficult time, parents described many positive experiences in music therapy, and the overall score for half of the parents in the study did not diminish. The value of music therapy as a service that addresses the family-centered agenda of PPC is endorsed by this study.

  5. "They Treat you a Different Way:" Public Insurance, Stigma, and the Challenge to Quality Health Care.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Hume, Anna C; Baker, Allison M; Bell, Hannah S; Montemayor, Isabel; Elwell, Kristan; Hunt, Linda M

    2017-03-01

    Under the Affordable Care Act, Medicaid Expansion programs are extending Medicaid eligibility and increasing access to care. However, stigma associated with public insurance coverage may importantly affect the nature and content of the health care beneficiaries receive. In this paper, we examine the health care stigma experiences described by a group of low-income public insurance beneficiaries. They perceive stigma as manifest in poor quality care and negative interpersonal interactions in the health care setting. Using an intersectional approach, we found that the stigma of public insurance was compounded with other sources of stigma including socioeconomic status, race, gender, and illness status. Experiences of stigma had important implications for how subjects evaluated the quality of care, their decisions impacting continuity of care, and their reported ability to access health care. We argue that stigma challenges the quality of care provided under public insurance and is thus a public health issue that should be addressed in Medicaid policy.

  6. Relationship Between Patients' Perceptions of Care Quality and Health Care Errors in 11 Countries: A Secondary Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Hincapie, Ana L; Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C; MacKinnon, Neil J; Warholak, Terri L

    2016-01-01

    Patients may be the most reliable reporters of some aspects of the health care process; their perspectives should be considered when pursuing changes to improve patient safety. The authors evaluated the association between patients' perceived health care quality and self-reported medical, medication, and laboratory errors in a multinational sample. The analysis was conducted using the 2010 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, a multinational consumer survey conducted in 11 countries. Quality of care was measured by a multifaceted construct developed using Rasch techniques. After adjusting for potentially important confounding variables, an increase in respondents' perceptions of care coordination decreased the odds of self-reporting medical errors, medication errors, and laboratory errors (P < .001). As health care stakeholders continue to search for initiatives that improve care experiences and outcomes, this study's results emphasize the importance of guaranteeing integrated care.

  7. Stability and Patterns of Classroom Quality in German Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuger, Susanne; Kluczniok, Katharina; Kaplan, David; Rossbach, Hans-Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Many education systems worldwide have dedicated a significant amount of resources to improve quality levels in early childhood education and care. Research can contribute to this goal by providing information about conditions of high-quality education and care and reasons for changes in the quality provided to children. This study therefore…

  8. Quality of Care for Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; Chan, Leighton; Andrilla, C. Holly A.; Huff, Edwin D.; Hart, L. Gary

    2010-01-01

    Background: In the mid-1990s, significant gaps existed in the quality of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) care between rural and urban hospitals. Since then, overall AMI care quality has improved. This study uses more recent data to determine whether rural-urban AMI quality gaps have persisted. Methods: Using inpatient records data for 34,776…

  9. The Nonprofit Advantage: Producing Quality in Thick and Thin Child Care Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cleveland, Gordon; Krashinsky, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Nonprofit child care centers are frequently observed to produce child care which is, on average, of higher quality than care provided in commercial child care centers. In part, this nonprofit advantage is due to different input choices made by nonprofit centers--lower child--staff ratios, better-educated staff and directors, higher rates of…

  10. National Statement on Quality Child Care (Enonce de principe national sur la qualite dans les services de garde).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canadian Child Care Federation, Ottawa (Ontario).

    The Canadian Child Day Care Federation's National Statement on Quality Child Care suggests separate principles of quality care for center-based and family-based child care. The principles of quality center-based care are divided into seven areas, each with a statement of general philosophy. The philosophical principles are then defined in more…

  11. Task shifting in the provision of home and social care in Ontario, Canada: implications for quality of care.

    PubMed

    Denton, Margaret; Brookman, Catherine; Zeytinoglu, Isik; Plenderleith, Jennifer; Barken, Rachel

    2015-09-01

    Growing healthcare costs have caused home-care providers to look for more efficient use of healthcare resources. Task shifting is suggested as a strategy to reduce the costs of delivering home-care services. Task shifting refers to the delegation or transfer of tasks from regulated healthcare professionals to home-care workers (HCWs). The purpose of this paper is to explore the impacts of task shifting on the quality of care provided to older adults from the perspectives of home healthcare workers. This qualitative study was completed in collaboration with a large home and community care organisation in Ontario, Canada, in 2010-2011. Using a purposive sampling strategy, semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with 46 home healthcare workers including HCWs, home-care worker supervisors, nurses and therapists. Study participants reported that the most common skills transferred or delegated to HCWs were transfers, simple wound care, exercises, catheterisation, colostomies, compression stockings, G-tube feeding and continence care. A thematic analysis of the data revealed mixed opinions on the impacts of task shifting on the quality of care. HCWs and their supervisors, more often than nurses and therapists, felt that task shifting improved the quality of care through the provision of more consistent care; the development of trust-based relationships with clients; and because task shifting reduced the number of care providers entering the client's home. Nurses followed by therapists, as well as some supervisors and HCWs, expressed concerns that task shifting might compromise the quality of care because HCWs lacked the knowledge, training and education necessary for more complex tasks, and that scheduling problems might leave clients with inconsistent care once tasks are delegated or transferred. Policy implications for regulating bodies, employers, unions and educators are discussed.

  12. Quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Fatima, P; Ishrat, S; Rahman, D; Banu, J; Deeba, F; Begum, N; Anwary, S A; Hossain, H B

    2015-01-01

    Infertility is an important health issue which has been neglected in the developing countries. First test-tube babies (triplet) in Bangladesh were born on 30th May, 2001. Although there is no tertiary level infertility center in the public sector, several private centers have come up with the facilities. The objective of the study was to find i) the quality and quantity of infertility care in Bangladesh and ii) the cause of infertility in the attending patients iii) the treatment seeking behaviors iv) and the reasons for not taking treatment among the attending patients. There are now 10 tertiary level Infertility centers in Bangladesh. The information was collected in a preformed datasheet about the facilities and the profile of the patients and the treatment seeking behavior of the attending patients. Out of the ten centers two centers refused to respond and did not disclose their data. Around 16700 new patients are enrolled in a year in the responsive clinics. Five percent (5%) of the patients underwent ART, 7% of the patients gave only one visit, 84% of the patients completed their evaluation, 76% of the patients took treatment. Causes of infertility in the patients taking treatment were male factor in 36.4%, bilateral tubal block in 20.2%, PCOS and anovulation in 31.7%, endometriosis in 19.6%, unexplained in 10.95, combined in 3.5%, ovarian failure in 1.4%, testicular failure in 0.33%, congenital anomaly in 0.3%. The main reason for not taking treatment was financial constrainment. The quality and quantity of infertility care is dependent on the available resources and on the use of the resources by the patients. In developing countries the resources are merging and confined to specified areas which cannot meet the demand of their population. The study gives us the idea of the need and the demand of the services in the country.

  13. Complementary effect of patient volume and quality of care on hospital cost efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Hoon; Park, Imsu; Jung, Ilyoung; Dey, Asoke

    2015-12-04

    This study explores the direct effect of an increase in patient volume in a hospital and the complementary effect of quality of care on the cost efficiency of U.S. hospitals in terms of patient volume. The simultaneous equation model with three-stage least squares is used to measure the direct effect of patient volume and the complementary effect of quality of care and volume. Cost efficiency is measured with a data envelopment analysis method. Patient volume has a U-shaped relationship with hospital cost efficiency and an inverted U-shaped relationship with quality of care. Quality of care functions as a moderator for the relationship between patient volume and efficiency. This paper addresses the economically important question of the relationship of volume with quality of care and hospital cost efficiency. The three-stage least square simultaneous equation model captures the simultaneous effects of patient volume on hospital quality of care and cost efficiency.

  14. Quality Of Health Care In India: Challenges, Priorities, And The Road Ahead.

    PubMed

    Mohanan, Manoj; Hay, Katherine; Mor, Nachiket

    2016-10-01

    India's health care sector provides a wide range of quality of care, from globally acclaimed hospitals to facilities that deliver care of unacceptably low quality. Efforts to improve the quality of care are particularly challenged by the lack of reliable data on quality and by technical difficulties in measuring quality. Ongoing efforts in the public and private sectors aim to improve the quality of data, develop better measures and understanding of the quality of care, and develop innovative solutions to long-standing challenges. We summarize priorities and the challenges faced by efforts to improve the quality of care. We also highlight lessons learned from recent efforts to measure and improve that quality, based on the articles on quality of care in India that are published in this issue of Health Affairs The rapidly changing profile of diseases in India and rising chronic disease burden make it urgent for state and central governments to collaborate with researchers and agencies that implement programs to improve health care to further the quality agenda.

  15. End-user perspectives on e-commerce and health care web site quality.

    PubMed

    Le Rouge, Cynthia; De Leo, Gianluca

    2008-11-06

    We explore and compare the importance of various quality dimensions for health care and e-commerce web sites. The results show that the importance of various quality attributes for all except four of ten quality dimensions studied differ between health care and e-commerce web sites. These results can help health care managers to improve and/or to guide the design of their web sites.

  16. Putting a new face on managed care. Consumers need convincing about quality issues.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Howard P; Chen, Robert J; Johnston-Zamora, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    Widespread consumer suspicion about the quality of managed care indicates that marketers still have work to do Research shows that women identify personal relationships with physicians, medical expertise, speed of access, and comprehensiveness of service as important signs of quality when selecting a managed care plan for their families. Based on existing research findings and new focus group data, this article provides guidelines for promoting an association of quality with managed care, particularly among women.

  17. Impact of provider coordination on nurse and physician perceptions of patient care quality.

    PubMed

    McIntosh, Nathalie; Burgess, James F; Meterko, Mark; Restuccia, Joseph D; Alt-White, Anna C; Kaboli, Peter; Charns, Martin

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the role of provider coordination on nurse manager and physician perceptions of care quality, while controlling for organizational factors. Findings indicated that nurse-nurse coordination was positively associated with nurse manager perceptions of care quality; neither physician-physician nor physician-nurse coordination was associated with physician perceptions. Organizational factors associated with positive perceptions of care quality included facility support of education for nurses and physicians, and the use of multidisciplinary rounding.

  18. Quality Improvement in Critical Care: Selection and Development of Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Claudio M.; Project, The Quality Improvement in Critical Care

    2016-01-01

    Background. Caring for critically ill patients is complex and resource intensive. An approach to monitor and compare the function of different intensive care units (ICUs) is needed to optimize outcomes for patients and the health system as a whole. Objective. To develop and implement quality indicators for comparing ICU characteristics and performance within and between ICUs and regions over time. Methods. Canadian jurisdictions with established ICU clinical databases were invited to participate in an iterative series of face-to-face meetings, teleconferences, and web conferences. Eighteen adult intensive care units across 14 hospitals and 5 provinces participated in the process. Results. Six domains of ICU function were identified: safe, timely, efficient, effective, patient/family satisfaction, and staff work life. Detailed operational definitions were developed for 22 quality indicators. The feasibility was demonstrated with the collection of 3.5 years of data. Statistical process control charts and graphs of composite measures were used for data display and comparisons. Medical and nursing leaders as well as administrators found the system to be an improvement over prior methods. Conclusions. Our process resulted in the selection and development of 22 indicators representing 6 domains of ICU function. We have demonstrated the feasibility of such a reporting system. This type of reporting system will demonstrate variation between units and jurisdictions to help identify and prioritize improvement efforts. PMID:27493476

  19. Thalassaemia in children: from quality of care to quality of life.

    PubMed

    Amid, Ali; Saliba, Antoine N; Taher, Ali T; Klaassen, Robert J

    2015-11-01

    Over the past few decades, there has been a remarkable improvement in the survival of patients with thalassaemia in developed countries. Availability of safe blood transfusions, effective and accessible iron chelating medications, the introduction of new and non-invasive methods of tissue iron assessment and other advances in multidisciplinary care of thalassaemia patients have all contributed to better outcomes. This, however, may not be true for patients who are born in countries where the resources are limited. Unfortunately, transfusion-transmitted infections are still major concerns in these countries where paradoxically thalassaemia is most common. Moreover, oral iron chelators and MRI for monitoring of iron status may not be widely accessible or affordable, which may result in poor compliance and suboptimal iron chelation. All of these limitations will lead to reduced survival and increased thalassaemia-related complications and subsequently will affect the patient's quality of life. In countries with limited resources, together with improvement of clinical care, strategies to control the disease burden, such as public education, screening programmes and appropriate counselling, should be put in place. Much can be done to improve the situation by developing partnerships between developed countries and those with limited resources. Future research should also particularly focus on patient's quality of life as an important outcome of care.

  20. Improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care – a feasibility study with caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Hermenau, Katharin; Kaltenbach, Elisa; Mkinga, Getrude; Hecker, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Institutionalized children in low-income countries often face maltreatment and inadequate caregiving. In addition to prior traumatization and other childhood adversities in the family of origin, abuse and neglect in institutional care are linked to various mental health problems. By providing a manualized training workshop for caregivers, we aimed at improving care quality and preventing maltreatment in institutional care. In Study 1, 29 participating caregivers rated feasibility and efficacy of the training immediately before, directly after, and 3 months following the training workshop. The results showed high demand, good feasibility, high motivation, and acceptance of caregivers. They reported improvements in caregiver–child relationships, as well as in the children’s behavior. Study 2 assessed exposure to maltreatment and the mental health of 28 orphans living in one institution in which all caregivers had been trained. The children were interviewed 20 months before, 1 month before, and 3 months after the training. Children reported a decrease in physical maltreatment and assessments showed a decrease in mental health problems. Our approach seems feasible under challenging circumstances and provides first hints for its efficacy. These promising findings call for further studies testing the efficacy and sustainability of this maltreatment prevention approach. PMID:26236248

  1. Quality assurance of radiotherapy in cancer treatment: toward improvement of patient safety and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Ishikura, Satoshi

    2008-11-01

    The process of radiotherapy (RT) is complex and involves understanding of the principles of medical physics, radiobiology, radiation safety, dosimetry, radiation treatment planning, simulation and interaction of radiation with other treatment modalities. Each step in the integrated process of RT needs quality control and quality assurance (QA) to prevent errors and to give high confidence that patients will receive the prescribed treatment correctly. Recent advances in RT, including intensity-modulated and image-guided RT, focus on the need for a systematic RTQA program that balances patient safety and quality with available resources. It is necessary to develop more formal error mitigation and process analysis methods, such as failure mode and effect analysis, to focus available QA resources optimally on process components. External audit programs are also effective. The International Atomic Energy Agency has operated both an on-site and off-site postal dosimetry audit to improve practice and to assure the dose from RT equipment. Several countries have adopted a similar approach for national clinical auditing. In addition, clinical trial QA has a significant role in enhancing the quality of care. The Advanced Technology Consortium has pioneered the development of an infrastructure and QA method for advanced technology clinical trials, including credentialing and individual case review. These activities have an impact not only on the treatment received by patients enrolled in clinical trials, but also on the quality of treatment administered to all patients treated in each institution, and have been adopted globally; by the USA, Europe and Japan also.

  2. Improving quality and reducing inequities: a challenge in achieving best care

    PubMed Central

    Nicewander, David A.; Qin, Huanying; Ballard, David J.

    2006-01-01

    The health care quality chasm is better described as a gulf for certain segments of the population, such as racial and ethnic minority groups, given the gap between actual care received and ideal or best care quality. The landmark Institute of Medicine report Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century challenges all health care organizations to pursue six major aims of health care improvement: safety, timeliness, effectiveness, efficiency, equity, and patient-centeredness. “Equity” aims to ensure that quality care is available to all and that the quality of care provided does not differ by race, ethnicity, or other personal characteristics unrelated to a patient's reason for seeking care. Baylor Health Care System is in the unique position of being able to examine the current state of equity in a typical health care delivery system and to lead the way in health equity research. Its organizational vision, “culture of quality,” and involved leadership bode well for achieving equitable best care. However, inequities in access, use, and outcomes of health care must be scrutinized; the moral, ethical, and economic issues they raise and the critical injustice they create must be remedied if this goal is to be achieved. Eliminating any observed inequities in health care must be synergistically integrated with quality improvement. Quality performance indicators currently collected and evaluated indicate that Baylor Health Care System often performs better than the national average. However, there are significant variations in care by age, gender, race/ethnicity, and socioeconomic status that indicate the many remaining challenges in achieving “best care” for all. PMID:16609733

  3. Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Palliative Care Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and ... Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Palliative Care: Conversations Matter™ for Sick Children "Palliative Care: Conversations ...

  4. Comparative analysis of quality assurance in health care delivery and higher medical education.

    PubMed

    Busari, Jamiu O

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in higher medical education involves the development, sustenance, improvement, and evaluation of the standard of training of medical professionals. In health care delivery, QA focuses on guaranteeing and maintaining a high standard of the service provided in different health care systems. When the service delivered by the care provider is in accordance with what the recipients of health care expect, then quality in health care is considered to be present. There are several factors in higher medical education and health care that are responsible for the emergence of QA. These include externally imposed obligations requiring demonstration of public accountability and responsibility from educational institutions, as well as the need for activity-specific information by policy makers as an aid for important decision-making within educational institutions. In health care delivery on the other hand, the emergence of QA is linked to the need for containing rising health care costs in the face of limited resources and to guaranteeing high quality patient care in a changing health care environment where the power relationship between doctors and patients is shifting towards patients. Although medical education can be regarded as a distinct entity in the health care industry, it still remains an inherent part of the health care delivery system. As a result, different strategies aimed at guaranteeing and assuring high standards of health care and education in many countries tend to overlap. This paper reflects on whether quality assurance in health care delivery and medical education should be seen as separate entities.

  5. Nursing home staffing and training recommendations for promoting older adults' quality of care and life: Part 1. Deficits in the quality of care due to understaffing and undertraining.

    PubMed

    Maas, Meridean L; Specht, Janet P; Buckwalter, Kathleen C; Gittler, Josephine; Bechen, Kate

    2008-04-01

    Caught between the inability or unwillingness of nursing home corporations and owners to redistribute revenue and the reluctance of federal and state agencies to increase payments to nursing homes, the nation's most vulnerable older adults are not receiving the care they deserve. Widespread recognition of substandard care and quality of life of older adults in nursing homes has existed for decades. In addition, there is substantial evidence that poor quality of care is related to inadequate numbers and training of nursing staff. Still, policy makers and nursing home owners have failed to take needed action. In the first article of this two-part series, major deficits in the care of older adult nursing home residents are reviewed, and research documenting the relationship between nursing home staffing and the quality of care and life of residents is summarized.

  6. Effects of Primary Care Team Social Networks on Quality of Care and Costs for Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.; Fleming, Michael F.; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. METHODS Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. RESULTS Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50–0.77) and lower medical care costs (−$556; 95% CI, −$781 to −$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09–1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202–$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. PMID:25755035

  7. Quebec's Child Care Services: What Are the Mechanisms Influencing Children's Behaviors across Quantity, Type, and Quality of Care Experienced?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemay, Lise; Bigras, Nathalie; Bouchard, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine how quantity, type, and quality of care interact in predicting externalizing and internalizing behaviors of 36-month-old children attending Quebec's educational child care from their first years of life. To do so, the authors examined two hypothesized models: (1) a mediation model where quantity, type,…

  8. Barriers to Quality Care for Dying Patients in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vorst, Rebecca F.; Crane, Lori A.; Barton, Phoebe Lindsey; Kutner, Jean S.; Kallail, K. James; Westfall, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Barriers to providing optimal palliative care in rural communities are not well understood. Purpose: To identify health care personnel's perceptions of the care provided to dying patients in rural Kansas and Colorado and to identify barriers to providing optimal care. Methods: An anonymous self-administered survey was sent to health care…

  9. Toward a 21st Century Quality-Measurement System for Managed-Care Organizations

    PubMed Central

    Armstead, Rodney C.; Elstein, Paul; Gorman, John

    1995-01-01

    As the Nation's largest managed-care purchaser, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) is working to develop a uniform data and performance-measurement system for all enrollees in managed-care plans. This effort will ultimately hold managed-care plans accountable for continuous improvement in the quality of care they provide and will provide information to consumers and purchasers to make responsible managed-care choices. The effort entails overhauling peer review organization (PRO) conduct of health maintenance organization (HMO) quality review, pilot testing a new HMO performance-measurement system, establishing criteria for Medicaid HMO quality-assurance (QA) programs, adapting employers' HMO performance reporting systems to the needs of Medicare and Medicaid, and participation in a new alliance between public and private sector managed-care purchasers to promote quality improvement and accountability for health plans. PMID:10151892

  10. Improving Service Quality in Long-term Care Hospitals: National Evaluation on Long-term Care Hospitals and Employees Perception of Quality Dimensions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jinkyung; Han, Woosok

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To investigate predictors for specific dimensions of service quality perceived by hospital employees in long-term care hospitals. Methods Data collected from a survey of 298 hospital employees in 18 long-term care hospitals were analysed. Multivariate ordinary least squares regression analysis with hospital fixed effects was used to determine the predictors of service quality using respondents’ and organizational characteristics. Results The most significant predictors of employee-perceived service quality were job satisfaction and degree of consent on national evaluation criteria. National evaluation results on long-term care hospitals and work environment also had positive effects on service quality. Conclusion The findings of the study show that organizational characteristics are significant determinants of service quality in long-term care hospitals. Assessment of the extent to which hospitals address factors related to employeeperceived quality of services could be the first step in quality improvement activities. Results have implications for efforts to improve service quality in longterm care hospitals and designing more comprehensive national evaluation criteria. PMID:24159497

  11. The impact of medical interpreter services on the quality of health care: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Flores, Glenn

    2005-06-01

    Twenty-one million Americans are limited in English proficiency (LEP), but little is known about the effect of medical interpreter services on health care quality. Asystematic literature review was conducted on the impact of interpreter services on quality of care. Five database searches yielded 2,640 citations and a final database of 36 articles, after applying exclusion criteria. Multiple studies document that quality of care is compromised when LEP patients need but do not get interpreters. LEP patients' quality of care is inferior, and more interpreter errors occur with untrained ad hoc interpreters. Inadequate interpreter services can have serious consequences for patients with mental disorders. Trained professional interpreters and bilingual health care providers positively affect LEP patients' satisfaction, quality of care, and outcomes. Evidence suggests that optimal communication, patient satisfaction, and outcomes and the fewest interpreter errors occur when LEP patients have access to trained professional interpreters or bilingual providers.

  12. Chronic care model strategies in the United States and Germany deliver patient-centered, high-quality diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Pitcavage, James M; Simic, Dusan; Altin, Sibel; Graf, Christian; Feng, Wen; Graf, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Improving the quality of care for chronic diseases is an important issue for most health care systems in industrialized nations. One widely adopted approach is the Chronic Care Model (CCM), which was first developed in the late 1990s. In this article we present the results from two large surveys in the United States and Germany that report patients' experiences in different models of patient-centered diabetes care, compared to the experiences of patients who received routine diabetes care in the same systems. The study populations were enrolled in either Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania or Barmer, a German sickness fund that provides medical insurance nationwide. Our findings suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in the care models that exhibited key features of the CCM were more likely to receive care that was patient-centered, high quality, and collaborative, compared to patients who received routine care. This study demonstrates that quality improvement can be realized through the application of the Chronic Care Model, regardless of the setting or distinct characteristics of the program.

  13. Measuring and monitoring quality in satellite echo services within critical care: an exploration of best practice

    PubMed Central

    Colebourn, Claire L

    2015-01-01

    The subspecialty of critical care echocardiography is a rapidly developing area of cardiac imaging. The United Kingdom Committee for Critical Care Echocardiography was set up in 2009 to examine the remit of echocardiography in critical care, and a successful collaboration between the British Society of Echocardiography (BSE) and the Intensive Care Society has resulted in the establishment of two new critical care accreditation processes: Focused Intensive Care Echocardiography and Advanced Critical Care Echocardiography. These accreditation processes are currently driving the development of satellite echo services within critical care departments throughout the UK. Individual practitioner – and more recently, departmental – accreditation have become well-established processes advocated by the BSE. Practitioner accreditation promotes accountability, and departmental accreditation standardises the environment in which practitioners operate. The accreditation of individual echocardiographers has been embraced by the critical care fraternity; we propose that departmental accreditation for critical care echo services be viewed in the same way. Identifying quality indicators for satellite echocardiography services within critical care areas is therefore the focus of the present quality exploration: our aim is to propose a set of parameters against which satellite critical care echo services can be benchmarked. In publishing our suggestions, we hope to stimulate debate in light of the rapid evolution of critical care echocardiography as a subspecialty practice. We suggest that our proposed parameters could be used to maintain satellite critical care service standards and to help identify departments capable of delivering high-quality services and training in critical care echocardiography. PMID:26693334

  14. Good-quality social care for people with Parkinson’s disease: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Fiona; Stocks, Amanda-Jayne; McDonnell, Ann; Ramaswamy, Bhanu; Wood, Brendan; Whitfield, Malcolm

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The study examines the meaning of good-quality social care for people with Parkinson's disease and their carers. It identifies, from their perspective, the impact of good-quality social care on health and well-being. Design Qualitative case study methodology, interview and framework analysis techniques were used. Setting: community locations in the north and midlands of England. Participants Data were collected from 43 participants including individual interviews with people with Parkinson's disease (n=4), formal and informal social care providers (n=13), 2 focus groups, 1 with people with Parkinson's disease and their carers (n=17), and 1 with professionals (n=8), plus a telephone interview with a former commissioner. Findings Good-quality social care, delivered in a timely fashion, was reported to have a positive impact on health. Furthermore, there is an indication that good-quality social care can prevent untoward events, such as infections, symptom deterioration and deterioration in mental health. The concept of the ‘Impact Gap’ developed from the findings, illustrates how the costs of care may be reduced by delivering good-quality social care. Control, choice and maintaining independence emerged as indicators of good-quality social care, irrespective of clinical condition. Participants identified characteristics indicative of good-quality social care specific to Parkinson's disease, including understanding Parkinson's disease, appropriate administration of medication, timing of care and reassessment. ‘Parkinson's aware’ social care was seen to generate psychological, physical and social benefits that were inter-related. Conclusions The findings indicate how maximising quality in social care delivery for people with Parkinson's disease can impact on health and well-being. Long-term or short-term benefits may result in prevented events and reductions in health and social care resource. Health professionals can be instrumental in early

  15. Quality of Mental Health Care for Nursing Home Residents: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Grabowski, David C.; Aschbrenner, Kelly A.; Rome, Vincent F.; Bartels, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    Because of the high proportion of nursing home residents with a mental illness other than dementia, the quality of mental health care in nursing homes is a major clinical and policy issue. The authors apply Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care based on the triad of structure, process, and outcome-based measures in reviewing the literature on the quality of mental health care in nursing homes. Quality measures used within the literature include mental health consultations and hospitalizations, inappropriate use of medications, and mental health survey deficiencies. Factors related to the resident's welfare (nurse staffing), provider norms (locality), and financial factors (payer mix) were associated with the quality of mental health care. Although future research is necessary, the extant literature suggests that persons with mental illness are frequently admitted to nursing homes and their care is often of poor quality and related to a series of resident and facility factors. PMID:20223943

  16. Implementing clinical governance in English primary care groups/trusts: reconciling quality improvement and quality assurance

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, S; Sheaff, R; Sibbald, B; Marshall, M; Pickard, S; Gask, L; Halliwell, S; Rogers, A; Roland, M

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the concept of clinical governance being advocated by primary care groups/trusts (PCG/Ts), approaches being used to implement clinical governance, and potential barriers to its successful implementation in primary care. Design: Qualitative case studies using semi-structured interviews and documentation review. Setting: Twelve purposively sampled PCG/Ts in England. Participants: Fifty senior staff including chief executives, clinical governance leads, mental health leads, and lay board members. Main outcome measures: Participants' perceptions of the role of clinical governance in PCG/Ts. Results: PCG/Ts recognise that the successful implementation of clinical governance in general practice will require cultural as well as organisational changes, and the support of practices. They are focusing their energies on supporting practices and getting them involved in quality improvement activities. These activities include, but move beyond, conventional approaches to quality assessment (audit, incentives) to incorporate approaches which emphasise corporate and shared learning. PCG/Ts are also engaged in setting up systems for monitoring quality and for dealing with poor performance. Barriers include structural barriers (weak contractual levers to influence general practices), resource barriers (perceived lack of staff or money), and cultural barriers (suspicion by practice staff or problems overcoming the perceived blame culture associated with quality assessment). Conclusion: PCG/Ts are focusing on setting up systems for implementing clinical governance which seek to emphasise developmental and supportive approaches which will engage health professionals. Progress is intentionally incremental but formidable challenges lie ahead, not least reconciling the dual role of supporting practices while monitoring (and dealing with poor) performance. PMID:12078380

  17. Factors Predicting Bereaved Caregiver Perception of Quality of Care in the Final Week of Life: Implications for Health Care Providers

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Philip C.; Garrido, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Cancer caregivers are key stakeholders in the final weeks of life and in bereavement. Research has highlighted end-of-life (EOL) factors important to caregivers, as well as factors contributing to caregiver mental health and bereavement outcomes. There has been limited data on factors predicting caregiver perceptions of quality of EOL care. Objective: This study's purpose was to identify modifiable predictors of caregivers' Caregiver Evaluation of Quality of End of Life Care (CEQUEL) scores, with the broader aim of informing clinical interventions to improve caregiver impressions of care and subsequent bereavement adjustment. Methods: Study data came from Coping with Cancer I (CwC1). CwC1 investigators interviewed advanced cancer patients and caregivers prior to the patient's death (Wave 1) and reinterviewed caregivers following the death (Wave 2) (N=275 dyads). The authors identified potential Wave 1 predictors of CEQUEL scores and performed a series of linear regression analyses to identify a parsimonious predictive model using corrected Akaike's Information Criterion (AICc) values. Results: In adjusted analyses, caregivers rated quality of care as poorer when patients died in a hospital (B=−1.40, SE=0.40, p=0.001) (B, unstandardized regression coefficient; SE, standard error) or had less than one week of inpatient hospice care (B=−1.98, SE=−0.70, p=0.006). Whole-person physician care and caregiver religiosity were associated with perceived higher quality of care in unadjusted, but not adjusted, analyses. Conclusions: Findings suggest that place of death and hospice length of stay best predict bereaved caregiver evaluations of quality of EOL care. These findings equip health care providers with modifiable targets to improve caregivers' experience of EOL care and subsequent bereavement. PMID:26186021

  18. Patient reported outcome measures of quality of end-of-life care: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kearns, Tara; Cornally, Nicola; Molloy, William

    2017-02-01

    End-of-life (EoL) care(1) is increasingly used as a generic term in preference to palliative care or terminal care, particularly with reference to individuals with chronic disease, who are resident in community and long-term care (LTC) settings. This review evaluates studies based on patient reported outcome measures (PROMS) of quality of EoL care across all health-care settings. From 1041 citations, 12 studies were extracted by searches conducted in EBSCO, Scopus, Web of Science, PubMed, Cochrane, Open Grey and Google Scholar databases. At present, the evidence base for EoL care is founded on cancer care. This review highlights the paucity of studies that evaluate quality of EoL care for patients with chronic disease outside the established cancer-acute care paradigm, particularly in LTC. This review highlights the absence of any PROMs for the estimated 60% of patients in LTC with cognitive impairment. Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) are critical to understanding how EoL care services and practices affect patients' health and EoL experience. PROMs describe the quality of care from the patient's perspective and add balance to existing clinical or proxy-derived knowledge on the quality of care and services provided.

  19. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS)

    PubMed Central

    Badawi, Dalia; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil; Mourad, Yara; Behbehani, Kazem

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from that developed by the National Diabetes Quality Improvement Alliance and the International Diabetes Federation. Five key care domains/measures were employed: (1) Blood glucose level measurement, (2) Cholesterol level measurement, (3) Blood pressure measurement, (4) Kidney function testing and (5) Smoking status check. The sample included the four major primary health care centers with the highest case load in Kuwait City, 4,241 patients in 2012 and 3,211 in 2010. Findings revealed the applicability and utility of employing performance indicators for diabetes care in Kuwait. Furthermore, findings revealed that many of the primary health care centers have achieved noteworthy improvement in diabetes care between 2010 and 2012, with the exception of smoking status check. The DQIS can help policymakers identify performance gaps and investigate key system roadblocks related to diabetes care in Kuwait. PMID:26176691

  20. Quality of Type II Diabetes Care in Primary Health Care Centers in Kuwait: Employment of a Diabetes Quality Indicator Set (DQIS).

    PubMed

    Badawi, Dalia; Saleh, Shadi; Natafgi, Nabil; Mourad, Yara; Behbehani, Kazem

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus is one of the major public health challenges, affecting more than 347 million adults worldwide. The impact of diabetes necessitates assessing the quality of care received by people with diabetes, especially in countries with a significant diabetes burden such as Kuwait. This paper aimed at piloting an approach for measuring Type II diabetes care performance through the use of a diabetes quality indicator set (DQIS) in primary health care. The DQIS for Kuwait was adapted from that developed by the National Diabetes Quality Improvement Alliance and the International Diabetes Federation. Five key care domains/measures were employed: (1) Blood glucose level measurement, (2) Cholesterol level measurement, (3) Blood pressure measurement, (4) Kidney function testing and (5) Smoking status check. The sample included the four major primary health care centers with the highest case load in Kuwait City, 4,241 patients in 2012 and 3,211 in 2010. Findings revealed the applicability and utility of employing performance indicators for diabetes care in Kuwait. Furthermore, findings revealed that many of the primary health care centers have achieved noteworthy improvement in diabetes care between 2010 and 2012, with the exception of smoking status check. The DQIS can help policymakers identify performance gaps and investigate key system roadblocks related to diabetes care in Kuwait.

  1. [ISO System 9000 or evaluation of the quality of medical care].

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Gas, Héctor Gerardo

    2008-01-01

    Evaluation of the quality of medical care began in Mexico in 1956. This was done by reviewing the clinical files of patients. In 1984, Donabedian introduced the Theory of Systems that evaluates structure, process and results, adopted as a base in the IMSS to develop the System of Integral Evaluation and Continuous Improvement of the Quality of the Medical Care, through the identification and solution of the problems that affect quality in medical care as well as the improvements of the inefficient processes or those with low quality. The Joint Commission on Accreditation of Health Care, European Foundation for Quality Management (ETQM) and International Society for Quality in Health Care (ISQua) use a similar methodology in its evaluations. The ISO System (International Organization for Standardization) was created in 1947 to assure and to certify the quality of the production processes and to guarantee the quality of the products that were fabricated. In health institutions the ISO system is useful to certify the structure and organization, and it indicates that they are under conditions to assure the quality of medical care, but it does not guarantee that this must happen. On the other hand, faults in structure and organization may result in poor quality of care. We conclude that both systems are complementary, rather than exclusionary.

  2. Annotated Bibliography: Understanding Ambulatory Care Practices in the Context of Patient Safety and Quality Improvement.

    PubMed

    Montano, Maria F; Mehdi, Harshal; Nash, David B

    2016-11-01

    The ambulatory care setting is an increasingly important component of the patient safety conversation. Inpatient safety is the primary focus of the vast majority of safety research and interventions, but the ambulatory setting is actually where most medical care is administered. Recent attention has shifted toward examining ambulatory care in order to implement better health care quality and safety practices. This annotated bibliography was created to analyze and augment the current literature on ambulatory care practices with regard to patient safety and quality improvement. By providing a thorough examination of current practices, potential improvement strategies in ambulatory care health care settings can be suggested. A better understanding of the myriad factors that influence delivery of patient care will catalyze future health care system development and implementation in the ambulatory setting.

  3. Investing in Our Children's Future: The Path to Quality Child Care through the Pennsylvania Child Care/Early Childhood Development Training System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iutcovich, Joyce; Fiene, Richard; Johnson, James; Koppel, Ross; Langan, Francine

    This study identified training needs for Pennsylvania child care providers and assessed the impact of training, classroom/caregiver dynamics, and staff characteristics on child care quality. Participating were 29 family child care providers, 30 group homes, and 60 child care centers, stratified by type of site and geographic region. Quality of…

  4. Improving the quality of health care through contracting: a study of health authority practice.

    PubMed Central

    Gray, J D; Donaldson, L J

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To investigate approaches of district health authorities to quality in contracting. DESIGN: Descriptive survey. SETTING: All district health authorities in one health region of England in a National Health Service accounting year. MATERIAL: 129 quality specifications used in contracting for services in six specialties (eight general quality specifications and 121 service specific quality specifications) MAIN MEASURES: Evaluation of the use of quality specifications; their scope and content in relation to established criteria of healthcare quality. RESULTS: Most district health authorities developed quality specifications which would be applicable to their local hospital. When purchasing care outside their boundaries they adopted the quality specifications developed by other health authorities. The service specific quality specifications were more limited in scope than the general quality specifications. The quality of clinical care was referred to in 75% of general and 43% of service specific quality specifications. Both types of specification considered quality issues in superficial and broad terms only. Established features of quality improvement were rarely included. Prerequisites to ensure provider accountability and satisfactory delivery of service specifications were not routinely included in contracts. CONCLUSION: Quality specifications within service contracts are commonly used by health authorities. This study shows that their use of this approach to quality improvement is inconsistent and unlikely to achieve desired quality goals. Continued reliance on the current approach is holding back a more fundamental debate on how to create effective management of quality improvement through the interaction between purchasers and providers of health care. PMID:10164143

  5. Short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery predict program sustainability.

    PubMed

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-01-01

    Empirical evidence on sustainability of programs that improve the quality of care delivery over time is lacking. Therefore, this study aims to identify the predictive role of short and long term improvements in quality of chronic care delivery on program sustainability. In this longitudinal study, professionals [2010 (T0): n=218, 55% response rate; 2011 (T1): n=300, 68% response rate; 2012 (T2): n=265, 63% response rate] from 22 Dutch disease-management programs completed surveys assessing quality of care and program sustainability. Our study findings indicated that quality of chronic care delivery improved significantly in the first 2 years after implementation of the disease-management programs. At T1, overall quality, self-management support, delivery system design, and integration of chronic care components, as well as health care delivery and clinical information systems and decision support, had improved. At T2, overall quality again improved significantly, as did community linkages, delivery system design, clinical information systems, decision support and integration of chronic care components, and self-management support. Multilevel regression analysis revealed that quality of chronic care delivery at T0 (p<0.001) and quality changes in the first (p<0.001) and second (p<0.01) years predicted program sustainability. In conclusion this study showed that disease-management programs based on the chronic care model improved the quality of chronic care delivery over time and that short and long term changes in the quality of chronic care delivery predicted the sustainability of the projects.

  6. Family Impacts among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: The Role of Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Zuckerman, Katharine E.; Lindly, Olivia J.; Bethell, Christina D.; Kuhlthau, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To compare health care quality and family employment and financial impacts among children with special health care needs (CSHCN) with autism spectrum disorder (CSHCN+ASD), CSHCN with functional limitations (CSHCN+FL), and CSHCN lacking these conditions (other CSHCN). To test whether high health care quality was associated with reduced family impacts among CSHCN+ASD. Methods Data from the 2009-2010 National Survey of CSHCN were used to compare 3025 CSHCN+ASD, 6505 CSHCN+FL, and 28 296 other CSHCN. Weighted multivariate logistic regression analyses examined six age-relevant, federally-defined health care quality indicators and five family financial and employment impact indicators. Two composite measures were additionally used: (1) receipt of care that met all age-relevant quality indicators; and (2) had ≥ two of the five adverse family impacts. Results Across all health care quality indicators CSHCN+ASD fared poorly, with only 7.4% meeting all age-relevant indicators. CSHCN+ASD had worse health care quality than other CSHCN, including CSHCN+FL. CSHCN+ASD also had high rates of adverse family impact, with over half experiencing two or more adverse impacts. Rates of adverse family impact were higher in CSHCN+ASD than other CSHCN, including CSHCN+FL. Among CSHCN+ASD, those whose health care that met federal quality standards were less likely to have multiple adverse family impacts than CSHCN+ASD whose health care did not meet federal quality standards. Conclusions CSHCN+ASD are more prone to experience poor health care quality and family impacts than other CSHCN, even CSHCN+FL. Receipt of care meeting federal quality standards may potentially lessen adverse family impacts for CSHCN+ASD. PMID:24976352

  7. [Evaluation of quality of care in a general surgery department].

    PubMed

    Visset, J; Paineau, J; Letessier, E; Hamelin, E; Hamy, A; Courant, O

    A permanent evaluation of a department's activity and the quality of health care it provides is needed to avoid inappropriate use resulting from a wide range of causes. The activity of a general surgery department treating and average of 1,500 patients per year and performing 1,200 operations was analyzed over the period 1986 to 1992. Post-operative hospital follow-up was noted for each patient and any complications were analyzed on discharge day by the surgeons, the anaesthesiologists and the nursing staff. A year-end sum up was conducted each year by homogeneous groups. Examples are presented: surgery for cancer of the oesophagus (122 cases), surgery for gastro-oesophageal reflux (120 cases), thyroid surgery (1,314 cases from 1988 to 1992). Complications, hospital stay and former pathologies were evaluated in order to determine the indications, prevent complications and evaluate more rapidly the advantages of modifications in techniques. The results were compared between surgeons. This daily evaluation allowed a better analysis than a retrospective study compared with data in the literature. Permanent personal reevaluation was one of the practical consequences of the study considered to be and enriching experience.

  8. Quality in anesthesia care: lessons from industry and a proposal for valid measurement and improvement.

    PubMed

    Jensen, N F; Tinker, J H

    1993-01-01

    Quality anesthetic care is a goal fundamental to our tradition and our training, but defining and measuring quality in anesthesia presents special challenges. Industrial models of quality, especially those so fundamental to the re-emergence of post-war Japan, deserve careful study and are discussed at some length, but they clearly have limitations in understanding quality in anesthesiology. We suggest that most current quality efforts are inherently flawed. Whether or not they rigorously attempt to define quality, they are hampered by lack of data concerning outcomes and alternatives, as well as lack of distinction between quality and efficacy. Quality efforts in American medicine and anesthesiology seem mired in a "criterion of potential benefit," which is still central to many of our prescriptions for individual medical care. Current quality improvement efforts do not seem well suited to correct these flaws. Anesthetic care, and that of American medicine in general, is fragmented, enormously costly, and sometimes inappropriate or poor. Anesthesiologists are suspicious of current quality efforts to improve this care. The system often seems more geared to eliminate bad apples than to improve patient care. Because anesthesia is a specialty that facilitates care but seldom "cures," we face greater challenges in studying and defining quality than do other specialties. Because of this, it is imperative that several principles govern future quality improvement efforts in anesthesiology. First, a reasonable balance must be attained between study of outcomes and processes of anesthesia care. Second, anesthesia-specific severity of illness indexing must be developed. Third, and perhaps most important, anesthetic processes and outcomes must be reported on a national level. Fundamental to future quality efforts in our specialty, we believe, is the establishment of a protected National Anesthesia Outcome Registry. This article reviews the industrial and medical history of

  9. Child Care Quality and Children's Cognitive and Socio-Emotional Development: An Australian Longitudinal Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gialamas, Angela; Mittinty, Murthy N.; Sawyer, Michael G.; Zubrick, Stephen R.; Lynch, John

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence that high-quality non-parental child care can contribute to children's learning, development and successful transition to school. Research examining the quality of child care and the effect on children's development is not well documented outside the USA. We used data from the Longitudinal Study of Australian Children to…

  10. Factors Associated with the Utilization and Quality of Prenatal Care in Western Rural Regions of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dongxu, Wang; Yuhui, Shi; Stewart, Donald; Chun, Chang; Chaoyang, Li

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The paper seeks to identify key features of prenatal care utilization and quality in western regions of China and to determine the factors affecting the quality of prenatal care. Design/methodology/approach: A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted. The instrument for the study was a 10-stem respondent-administered, structured…

  11. The Quest for Quality: How YoungStar Is Affecting Child Care in Milwaukee County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Betsy; Peterangelo, Joe; Henken, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The State of Wisconsin's YoungStar system was created by the Legislature and Governor in 2010 to "drive quality improvement in child care throughout the state." YoungStar uses a five-star system to rate child care providers based on several measures of quality, including staff education levels, learning environment, business methods, and…

  12. A Nursing Interaction Approach to Consumer Internet Training on Quality Health Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesley, Marsha L.; Oermann, Marilyn H.; Vander Wal, Jillon S.

    2004-01-01

    This study examined the effectiveness of using the Internet to teach consumers about quality health care, compared consumer definitions of quality health care prior to and following completion of the Internet experience, and compared ratings of learning, satisfaction and value of the Internet instruction between consumers who completed the…

  13. Quality Health Care for People with Developmental Disabilities: A Guide for Parents and Other Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfaffinger, Kathleen M.; Nelson, Richard P.

    Starting with the premise that all people have a right to quality health care, this guide emphasizes that assisting people with developmental disabilities to obtain health care and maintain healthy life styles will enhance the quality of their lives at home and in the community. The guide consists of four sections. A section on obtaining care…

  14. How Does Your Community Grow? Planting Seeds for Quality Day Care. A Citizen Action Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fried, Mindy; O'Reilly, Elaine

    This manual, which presents the principles and steps involved in the two-year Citizen Involvement for Day Care Quality Project in Massachusetts, serves as a guide for developing a citizen network to address the need for quality day care. The Project was housed by the Office for Children (OFC), the state agency which licenses and monitors all day…

  15. Vermont STep Ahead Recognition System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Vermont's STep Ahead Recognition System (STARS) prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for All Child Care Programs;…

  16. Evaluating outcomes of care and targeting quality improvement using Medicare health outcomes survey data.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Sonya E

    2012-01-01

    The Medicare Health Outcomes Survey (HOS) provides a rich source of outcomes data on the Medicare Advantage (MA) program for the US Department of Health and Human Services, managed care organizations participating in Medicare, quality improvement organizations, and health services researchers working to improve quality of care for Medicare enrollees. Since 1998, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has collected longitudinal functional status information to assess the performance of Medicare managed care organizations. This introduction reviews the goals of the HOS program, how the HOS supports health care reform, and outlines recent HOS studies exploring data applications for monitoring outcomes and implementing quality improvement activities.

  17. Brazil's National Program for Improving Primary Care Access and Quality (PMAQ)

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Matthew J.; Rocha, Marcia Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Despite some remarkable achievements, there are several challenges facing Brazil's Family Health Strategy (FHS), including expanding access to primary care and improving its quality. These concerns motivated the development of the National Program for Improving Primary Care Access and Quality (PMAQ). Although voluntary, the program now includes nearly 39 000 FHS teams in the country and has led to a near doubling of the federal investment in primary care in its first 2 rounds. In this article, we introduce the PMAQ and advance several recommendations to ensure that it continues to improve primary care access and quality in Brazil. PMID:28252498

  18. The role of clinical governance as a strategy for quality improvement in primary care.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Stephen M; Sweeney, Grace M

    2002-01-01

    This power considers the process of implementing clinical governance in primary care and its impact on quality improvement. It discuss how clinical governance is being implemented both at the level of Primary Care Organisations and general practices, and the challenges to implementing clinical governance. It also suggests a model for promoting the factors that will help clinical governance improve quality of care. The experience of implementing clinical governance is broadly positive to date. However, the government needs to match its commitment to a ten-year programme of change with realistic timetables to secure the cultural and organisational changes needed to improve quality of care. PMID:12389764

  19. Using a Medical Information System to Improve the Quality of Patient Care

    PubMed Central

    Sneider, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    A Medical Information System (MIS) impacts virtually every department in a hospital. Technicon's MATRIX MIS is designed to improve patient care while reducing the cost of delivering that care. This paper discusses several of the features designed to improve the quality of patient care at user hospitals.

  20. Handbook on Quality Child Care for Young Children: Settings Standards and Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baglin, Carol Ann, Ed.; Bender, Michael, Ed.

    Intended primarily for professionals teaching early childhood and infant intervention courses, this handbook presents an overview of child care as both a support to families and an economic necessity, meeting changing and dynamic needs. Child care settings and types of care are discussed, along with quality indicators, licensing, and provider…

  1. Child Care Quality and Children's Cortisol in Basque Country and the Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; Groeneveld, Marleen G.; Larrea, Inaki; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Barandiaran, Alexander; Linting, Marielle

    2010-01-01

    A cross-country comparison of children's cortisol levels at child care was performed in relation to their cortisol levels at home and the quality and quantity of child care they received. Participants were toddlers visiting child care centers in Spanish Basque Country (N = 60) and the Netherlands (N = 25) with substantial variation in structural…

  2. Do Variables Associated with Quality Child Care Programs Predict the Inclusion of Children with Disabilities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Essa, Eva L.; Bennett, Patrick R.; Burnham, Melissa M.; Martin, Sally S.; Bingham, Ann; Allred, Keith

    2008-01-01

    Little research has been carried out on the inclusion of children with special needs in child care. The purpose of this study was to determine what variables predict the inclusion of children with disabilities in centers and home care. Logistic regression was used to examine the association of several indicators of quality child care and…

  3. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  4. Intensive Care Unit Utilization and Interhospital Transfers As Potential Indicators of Rural Hospital Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wakefield, Douglas S.; Ward, Marcia; Miller, Thomas; Ohsfeldt, Robert; Jaana, Mirou; Lei, Yang; Tracy, Roger; Schneider, John

    2004-01-01

    Obtaining meaningful information from statistically valid and reliable measures of the quality of care for disease-specific care provided in small rural hospitals is limited by small numbers of cases and different definitive care capacities. An alternative approach may be to aggregate and analyze patient services that reflect more generalized care…

  5. Parents Pleased With Child Care Options and Quality. Research Brief, Volume 96, Number 4

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A recent survey of 430 parents in southeastern Wisconsin finds the majority are satisfied with the quality of their child care arrangements and their options for child care. Most say they would not change anything about their child care arrangement if they had the chance, and nearly two-thirds report a willingness to pay more for their current…

  6. Conditions of Caregiving, Provider Nurturance and Quality Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Ann M. Berghout; Lindauer, Shelley L. Knudsen; Rodriguez, Ariel; Norton, Maria L.; Nelson, Farol A. Groutage

    1997-01-01

    Examined relationships of child care provider education, presence of children from economically strained homes, and program structure to providers' self-perception, nurturance, and caregiving conditions in 36 licensed family day care homes. Found that when provider self-perceptions were high, but day care clients experienced economic strain, the…

  7. Using Quality Experts from Manufacturing to Transform Primary Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steiner, Rose M.; Walsworth, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Improving Performance in Practice (IPIP) is an initiative convened by the American Board of Medical Specialties. It investigates the efficacy of coaches in helping primary-care practices improve the care of patients with diabetes and asthma. Most IPIP states use coaches who have a health care background, and are trained in quality…

  8. Nurse Burnout and Quality of Care: Cross-National Investigation in Six Countries

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Sean P.; Finlayson, Mary; Aiken, Linda H.

    2010-01-01

    We explored the relationship between nurse burnout and ratings of quality of care in 53,846 nurses from six countries. In this secondary analysis, we used data from the International Hospital Outcomes Study; data were collected from1998 to 2005. The Maslach Burnout Inventory and a single-item reflecting nurse-rated quality of care were used inmultiple logistic regression modeling to investigate the association between nurse burnout and nurse-rated quality of care. Across countries, higher levels of burnout were associated with lower ratings of the quality of care independent of nurses’ ratings of practice environments. These findings suggest that reducing nurse burnout may be an effective strategy for improving nurse-rated quality of care in hospitals. PMID:20645421

  9. Research Highlights: Developing Quality of Care Indicators for the Vulnerable Elderly. The ACOVE Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    traditionally associated with old age. Furthermore, the goal of medical care for the elderly has progressed beyond survival to maximizing quality of life...status are often inappropriate for the elderly . RAND Health has collaborated with Pfizer, Inc. to create the first quality-of-care assessment system...for older persons. The goals of the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders (ACOVE) project were to define the population of vulnerable elderly , identify

  10. Resident attractiveness: an influential factor in the quality of care in nursing homes.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Sara L

    2005-08-01

    Studying the characteristics considered attractive in residents in long-term care can provide an innovative picture of how nursing staff may perceive and inadvertently respond to residents based on those characteristics. It may be difficult to believe that attractiveness can affect the quality of residents' care. However, being open to the discovery of all factors that may influence the quality of care is important to promote positive changes in resident outcomes in nursing homes.

  11. Selected reflections on quality of medical care evaluation in the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Brook, R H; Davies, A R; Kamberg, C J

    1980-01-01

    Quality assessment of medical care in the 1980s will face several challenges. Most important is the current move toward cost containment. Issues such as making cost-benefit tradeoffs and defining the focus of medical care will be difficult to resolve. With the help of patients and nonhealth professionals, decisions and tradeoffs can be made and a viable equilibrium between cost containment and quality of health care may be achieved.

  12. La calidad del cuidado infantil: Un resumen para padres (Child Care Quality: An Overview for Parents). ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patten, Peggy; Ricks, Omar Benton

    Many parents want to know how important the quality of care is to children's social, emotional, and academic development. This Digest synthesizes some major recent research on child care quality. First, the Digest explains what features contribute to quality of care. The Digest also explains the differences between studies of how quality is…

  13. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important.

  14. Midwifery and quality care: findings from a new evidence-informed framework for maternal and newborn care.

    PubMed

    Renfrew, Mary J; McFadden, Alison; Bastos, Maria Helena; Campbell, James; Channon, Andrew Amos; Cheung, Ngai Fen; Silva, Deborah Rachel Audebert Delage; Downe, Soo; Kennedy, Holly Powell; Malata, Address; McCormick, Felicia; Wick, Laura; Declercq, Eugene

    2014-09-20

    In this first paper in a series of four papers on midwifery, we aimed to examine, comprehensively and systematically, the contribution midwifery can make to the quality of care of women and infants globally, and the role of midwives and others in providing midwifery care. Drawing on international definitions and current practice, we mapped the scope of midwifery. We then developed a framework for quality maternal and newborn care using a mixed-methods approach including synthesis of findings from systematic reviews of women's views and experiences, effective practices, and maternal and newborn care providers. The framework differentiates between what care is provided and how and by whom it is provided, and describes the care and services that childbearing women and newborn infants need in all settings. We identified more than 50 short-term, medium-term, and long-term outcomes that could be improved by care within the scope of midwifery; reduced maternal and neonatal mortality and morbidity, reduced stillbirth and preterm birth, decreased number of unnecessary interventions, and improved psychosocial and public health outcomes. Midwifery was associated with more efficient use of resources and improved outcomes when provided by midwives who were educated, trained, licensed, and regulated. Our findings support a system-level shift from maternal and newborn care focused on identification and treatment of pathology for the minority to skilled care for all. This change includes preventive and supportive care that works to strengthen women's capabilities in the context of respectful relationships, is tailored to their needs, focuses on promotion of normal reproductive processes, and in which first-line management of complications and accessible emergency treatment are provided when needed. Midwifery is pivotal to this approach, which requires effective interdisciplinary teamwork and integration across facility and community settings. Future planning for maternal and

  15. Quality of cancer follow-up care: a focus on Latina breast cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Ashing, Kimlin; Napoles, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Receiving quality cancer follow-up care influences survivorship outcomes. Among Latinas, breast cancer is the number one cause of cancer death; yet Latinas do not receive adequate follow-up care. This study examined quality of cancer follow-up care among Latina breast cancer survivors (BCS) and whether it differs by participant language and healthcare system variables (provider specialty, and medical setting). Methods Two hundred thirty-two (95 English-speaking Latina and 137 Spanish-speaking) Latina BCS were recruited from the California Cancer Registry, hospital cancer registries, and community agencies. Results English-speaking Latina BCS were more likely to report receiving cancer follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.001). BCS without a regular place for cancer follow-up care were more likely to report not seeing a primary care provider (p<0.05) or cancer specialist (p<0.001) in the past 12 months. English-speaking Latina BCS (p<0.001), BCS who saw a cancer specialist in the past 12 months (p<0.001), and received follow-up care at a doctor’s office (p<0.05) reported higher quality of care. Speaking English, having seen a cancer specialist, and receiving follow-up care at a doctor’s office were independently associated with higher quality of care, explaining 44 % of the variance. Conclusions Our study findings suggest that examining the influence of ethnic and linguistic factors on quality of cancer follow-up care is necessary to address health disparities. Improved access to cancer follow-up care for Spanish-speaking Latina BCS is of particular concern. Implication of Cancer Survivors Identifying follow-up care needs of Latina BCS may contribute to providing high-quality care and improved survivorship outcomes. PMID:24563169

  16. Framing reflexivity in quality improvement devices in the care for older people.

    PubMed

    van Loon, Esther; Zuiderent-Jerak, Teun

    2012-06-01

    Health care organizations are constantly seeking ways to improve quality of care and one of the often-posed solutions to deliver 'good care' is reflexivity. Several authors stress that enhancing the organizations' and caregivers' reflexivity allows for more situated, and therefore better care. Within quality improvement initiatives, devices that guarantee quality are also seen as key to the delivery of good care. These devices do not solely aim at standardizing work practices, but are also of importance in facilitating reflexivity. In this article, we study how quality improvement devices position the relationship between situated reflection and standardization of work processes. By exploring the work of Michel Callon, Michael Lynch, and Lucy Suchman on reflexivity in work practices, we study the development and introduction of the Care Living Plan. This device aimed to transform care organizations of older people from their orientation towards the system of care into organizations that take a client-centred approach. Our analysis of the construction of specific forms of reflexivity in quality devices indicates that the question of reflexivity does not need to be opposed to standardization and needs to be addressed not only at the level of where reflexivity is organizationally situated and who gets to do the reflecting, but also on the content of reflexivity, such as what are the issues that care workers can and cannot reflect upon. In this paper we point out the theoretical importance of a more detailed empirical study of the framing of reflexivity in care practices.

  17. Patients' satisfaction with the quality of nursing care provided: the Saudi experience.

    PubMed

    Atallah, Mohammad A; Hamdan-Mansour, Ayman M; Al-Sayed, Mohammad M; Aboshaiqah, Ahmad E

    2013-12-01

    Patient's satisfaction has emerged as a central focus of health-care delivery during the last decades, and nursing care became one significant component of patient's satisfaction. The purpose of this study is to examine patients' satisfaction with quality of nursing care provided in Saudi Arabia. Cross-sectional descriptive correctional design was used to recruit 100 patients from one regional hospital in Saudi Arabia. Data collected using structured interview from patients related to six dimensions of nursing care. Patients had a high level of satisfaction with nursing care provided (86% agreement rate). Language (56% disagreement rate), discharge information (56% disagreement rate) and availability (20% disagreement rate) have been identified with the lowest rates of patients satisfaction. Nursing leaders and health-care administrators need to maintain quality nursing care and develop strategies for improving nursing care emphasizing language as barrier and strategies of information dissemination.

  18. Associations Between Family Ratings on Experience With Care and Clinical Quality-of-Care Measures for Nursing Home Residents.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Li, Qinghua; Tang, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Several states are currently collecting and publicly reporting nursing home resident and/or family member ratings of experience with care in an attempt to improve person-centered care in nursing homes. Using the 2008 Maryland nursing home family survey reports and other data, this study performed both facility- and resident-level analyses, and estimated the relationships between family ratings of care and several long-term care quality measures (pressure ulcers, overall and potentially avoidable hospitalizations, and mortality) after adjustment for resident characteristics. We found that better family evaluations of overall and specific aspects of care may be associated with reduced rates of risk-adjusted measures at the facility level (range of correlation coefficients: -.01 to -.31). Associations of overall experience ratings tended to persist after further adjustment for common nursing home characteristics such as nurse staffing levels. We conclude that family ratings of nursing home care complement other types of performance measures such as risk-adjusted outcomes.

  19. Measures of Quality of Care for People with HIV: A Scoping Review of Performance Indicators for Primary Care.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Sharon; Kendall, Claire; Hogel, Matthew; McLaren, Meaghan; Liddy, Clare

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare of people with HIV is transitioning from specialty care to the primary healthcare (PHC) system. However, many of the performance indicators used to measure the quality of HIV care pre-date this transition. The goal of this work was to examine how existing HIV care performance indicators measure the comprehensive and longitudinal care offered in a PHC setting. A scoping review consisting of peer-reviewed and grey literature searches was performed. Two reviewers evaluated study eligibility and indicators in documents meeting inclusion criteria were extracted into a database. Indicators were matched to a PHC performance measurement framework to determine their applicability for evaluating quality of care in the PHC setting. The literature search identified 221 publications, of which 47 met inclusion criteria. 1184 indicators were extracted and removal of duplicates left 558 unique indicators. A majority of the 558 indicators fell under the 'secondary prevention' (12%) and 'care of chronic conditions' (33%) domains when indicators were matched to the PHC performance framework. Despite the imbalance, nearly all performance domains in the PHC framework were populated by at least one indicator with significant concentrations in domains such as patient-provider relationship, patient satisfaction, population and community characteristics, and access to care. Existing performance frameworks for the care of people with HIV provide a comprehensive set of indicators that align well with a PHC performance framework. Nonetheless, some important elements of care, such as patient-reported outcomes, are poorly covered by existing indicators. Advancing our understanding of how the experience of care for people with HIV is impacted by changes in health services delivery, specifically more care within the PHC system, will require performance indicators to capture this aspect of HIV care.

  20. [SOROKA UNIVERSITY MEDICAL CENTER: THE ROAD TO LEADERSHIP IN QUALITY OF MEDICAL CARE, SERVICE AND RESEARCH].

    PubMed

    Davidson, Ehud; Sheiner, Eyal

    2016-02-01

    Soroka University Medical Center is a tertiary hospital, and the sole medical center in the Negev, the southern part of Israel. Soroka has invested in quality, service and research. The region has developed joint programs in order to advance the quality of medical care whilst optimizing the utilization of available resources. In this editorial we describe the path to leadership in quality of medical care, service and research.

  1. [Promoting competition and improving quality. Accepting the intergenerational contract by stabilizing health care reform].

    PubMed

    Wasem, J

    2002-08-01

    The challenge of demographic transition requires a health care reform which strengthens competition and quality in health care. With this, important contributions in stabilizing intergenerational relations, especially intergenerational solidarity in the public health care system, can be achieved. The reform proposal by an expert group, invited by the Friedrich-Ebert-Foundation to develop a concept of health care reform, takes these considerations into account.

  2. Delivery System Integration and Health Care Spending and Quality for Medicare Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    McWilliams, J. Michael; Chernew, Michael E.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hamed, Pasha; Landon, Bruce E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Medicare accountable care organization (ACO) programs rely on delivery system integration and provider risk sharing to lower spending while improving quality of care. Methods Using 2009 Medicare claims and linked American Medical Association Group Practice data, we assigned 4.29 million beneficiaries to provider groups based on primary care use. We categorized group size according to eligibility thresholds for the Shared Savings (≥5,000 assigned beneficiaries) and Pioneer (≥15,000) ACO programs and distinguished hospital-based from independent groups. We compared spending and quality of care between larger and smaller provider groups and examined how size-related differences varied by 2 factors considered central to ACO performance: group primary care orientation (measured by the primary care share of large groups’ specialty mix) and provider risk sharing (measured by county health maintenance organization penetration and its relationship to financial risk accepted by different group types for managed care patients). Spending and quality of care measures included total medical spending, spending by type of service, 5 process measures of quality, and 30-day readmissions, all adjusted for sociodemographic and clinical characteristics. Results Compared with smaller groups, larger hospital-based groups had higher total per-beneficiary spending in 2009 (mean difference: +$849), higher 30-day readmission rates (+1.3% percentage points), and similar performance on 4 of 5 process measures of quality. In contrast, larger independent physician groups performed better than smaller groups on all process measures and exhibited significantly lower per-beneficiary spending in counties where risk sharing by these groups was more common (−$426). Among all groups sufficiently large to participate in ACO programs, a strong primary care orientation was associated with lower spending, fewer readmissions, and better quality of diabetes care. Conclusions Spending

  3. Spirometry in primary care: An analysis of spirometry test quality in a regional primary care asthma program

    PubMed Central

    Licskai, Christopher J; Sands, Todd W; Paolatto, Lisa; Nicoletti, Ivan; Ferrone, Madonna

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary care office spirometry can improve access to testing and concordance between clinical practice and asthma guidelines. Compliance with test quality standards is essential to implementation. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the quality of spirometry performed onsite in a regional primary care asthma program (RAP) by health care professionals with limited training. METHODS: Asthma educators were trained to perform spirometry during two 2 h workshops and supervised during up to six patient encounters. Quality was analyzed using American Thoracic Society (ATS) 1994 and ATS/European Respiratory Society (ERS) 2003 (ATS/ERS) standards. These results were compared with two regional reference sites: a primary care group practice (Family Medical Centre [FMC], Windsor, Ontario) and a teaching hospital pulmonary function laboratory (London Health Sciences Centre [LHSC], London, Ontario). RESULTS: A total of 12,815 flow-volume loops (FVL) were evaluated: RAP – 1606 FVL in 472 patient sessions; reference sites – FMC 4013 FVL in 573 sessions; and LHSC – 7196 in 1151 sessions. RAP: There were three acceptable FVL in 392 of 472 (83%) sessions, two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 428 of 469 (91%) sessions, and 395 of 469 (84%) according to ATS/ERS criteria. All quality criteria – minimum of three acceptable and two reproducible FVL according to ATS criteria in 361 of 472 (77%) sessions and according to ATS/ERS criteria in 337 of 472 (71%) sessions. RAP met ATS criteria more often than the FMC (388 of 573 [68%]); however, less often than LHSC (1050 of 1151 [91%]; P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Health care providers with limited training and experience operating within a simple quality program achieved ATS/ERS quality spirometry in the majority of sessions in a primary care setting. The quality performance approached pulmonary function laboratory standards. PMID:22891184

  4. Quality of services and demand for health care in Nigeria: a multinomial probit estimation.

    PubMed

    Akin, J S; Guilkey, D K; Denton, E H

    1995-06-01

    This study attempts to empirically answer three important policy questions for a population sample from Ogun State, Nigeria: 1. Would price (fee) increases for health care lead to large reductions of care usage or to shifts across types of care used? 2. Would price increases lead to net increases in revenues for the health system? 3. Would the price increases have larger impacts (in the form of reductions in health care usage) on lower income members of the population? Household data are combined with data on prices and quality of care, collected directly from facilities, to estimate the demand for outpatient health care. Many of the statistical problems of demand estimation with micro level data are avoided by an innovation--the first use of the multinomial probit estimation method for health demand. A separate but related problem, that the price data used in such studies are usually endogenous (in fact usually are expenditures, which are to a great degree determined by the actual care choice) is avoided by the collection of a specific exogenous price variable directly from the health providers. Because the health care 'good'--outpatient health care--can vary to such a degree across providers, quality of care must be controlled in order that the coefficients on prices and other variables will not be biased. A strong circumstantial case can be made that past estimation efforts probably underestimated the impact of prices of care on provider choices, because those providers charging higher prices also tend to provide higher quality care and those charging lower prices to provide care of lower quality. Because of this fear of bias on the extremely important price coefficient, effective control of the quality of the care available at the alternative accessible care providers is almost certainly at this time the most important marginal innovation to demand estimation. Most past researchers simply have not had available to them exogenous quality of care information

  5. Attachment and non-maternal care: towards contextualizing the quantity versus quality debate.

    PubMed

    Aviezer, Ora; Sagi-Schwartz, Abraham

    2008-09-01

    In this commentary to Friedman's and Boyle's review we focus on the context of early child care as it is reflected in the debate on the effects of quality of care versus amount of care and attachment relations. It is argued that cross-national research should be considered along with the NICHD Study of Early Child Care and Youth Development (SECCYD) in order to promote better understanding of the interface of attachment, child care, and context. In addition, some methodological issues are discussed including the status of the Strange Situation assessment, definition of non-maternal care, and longitudinal correlates of attachment.

  6. Assessing the Validity of the Qualistar Early Learning Quality Rating and Improvement System as a Tool for Improving Child-Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellman, Gail L.; Perlman, Michal; Le, Vi-Nhuan; Setodji, Claude Messan

    2008-01-01

    As a result of the generally low quality of child care in the United States and the increased emphasis on accountability in education policy, quality rating systems (QRSs) are proliferating in the child-care arena. QRSs assess child-care providers on multiple dimensions of quality and integrate these assessments into an easily understood summary…

  7. End-stage renal disease: a proving ground for quality improvement in health care.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, W E; Gibney, R

    1997-05-01

    This article chronicles the health care quality improvement efforts that relate to patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD). The emphasis is on quality improvement as a management system as opposed to the quality improvements that resulted from strictly technical dialysis-related issues. The government has exercised considerable oversight on the ESRD program because of its growth and cost. History has shown that quality assurance (QA) has had little effect on improving quality or decreasing cost. The philosophy, methods, and tools of continuous quality improvement (CQI) have been shown to work in health care. CQI is a management system that offers hope for higher quality affordable health care. Computer technology is at last sophisticated enough to permit the collection of large amounts of clinical data at the point of care. This will permit CQI methods and tools to be applied generally at reasonable costs. Physicians in general and nephrologists in particular are beginning to understand the managed care environment. They are beginning to understand the paradigm shift that is required to effect the changes necessary for physicians to assume their leadership role in health care. This article reviews the quality efforts of the past and present. It discusses the strengths and weaknesses of efforts to improve quality and lastly presents a vision for the future.

  8. The impact of competition on quality and prices in the English care homes market.

    PubMed

    Forder, Julien; Allan, Stephen

    2014-03-01

    This study assesses the impact of competition on quality and price in the English care/nursing homes market. Considering the key institutional features, we use a theoretical model to assess the conditions under which further competition could increase or reduce quality. A dataset comprising the population of 10,000 care homes was used. We constructed distance/travel-time weighted competition measures. Instrumental variable estimations, used to account for the endogeneity of competition, showed quality and price were reduced by greater competition. Further analyses suggested that the negative quality effect worked through the effect on price - higher competition reduces revenue which pushes down quality.

  9. Quality of care in psychosis and bipolar disorder from the service user perspective.

    PubMed

    Skelly, Niamh; Schnittger, Rebecca I; Butterly, Lisa; Frorath, Charlotte; Morgan, Craig; McLoughlin, Declan M; Fearon, Paul

    2013-12-01

    According to the recovery model of mental health care, service development should incorporate the expert knowledge of service users. To date, there has been limited research into conceptualizations of mental health care quality among services users diagnosed with bipolar disorder or psychosis. To investigate service user perspectives on quality of care, we conducted six focus groups (N = 29) with inpatients and outpatients of an independent Irish mental health service. We undertook an inductive thematic analysis of the data. Participants identified proactive staff, meaningful and warm staff-patient interactions, and safety and sociability in the inpatient environment as components of good quality mental health care. Participants also discussed how the implementation of best practice guidelines does not necessarily improve quality of care from the service user perspective. This and similar qualitative research should be used to inform service development and the creation of evaluation instruments compatible with the recovery model.

  10. 2020 vision for a high-quality, high-value maternity care system.

    PubMed

    Carter, Martha Cook; Corry, Maureen; Delbanco, Suzanne; Foster, Tina Clark-Samazan; Friedland, Robert; Gabel, Robyn; Gipson, Teresa; Jolivet, R Rima; Main, Elliott; Sakala, Carol; Simkin, Penny; Simpson, Kathleen Rice

    2010-01-01

    A concrete and useful way to create an action plan for improving the quality of maternity care in the United States is to start with a view of the desired result, a common definition and a shared vision for a high-quality, high-value maternity care system. In this paper, we present a long-term vision for the future of maternity care in the United States. We present overarching values and principles and specific attributes of a high-performing maternity care system. We put forth the "2020 Vision for a High-Quality, High-Value Maternity Care System" to serve as a positive starting place for a fruitful collaborative process to develop specific action steps for broad-based maternity care system improvement.

  11. [Quality of life and supportive care in head and neck cancers].

    PubMed

    Babin, Emmanuel; Heutte, Natacha; Grandazzi, Guillaume; Prévost, Virginie; Robard, Laetitia

    2014-05-01

    The quality of life of patients treated for head and neck cancers and their carers is part of the current concerns of health care teams. Assessment tools were created and helped to highlight the severe physical effects (pain, mucositis…) and chronic (mutilation, post-radiation complications…) related to the disease or to different treatments but also to consider the psychosocial impact of this disease. Improving the quality of life through a thoughtful and comprehensive support that must be associated with somatic care, mental health care, rehabilitation and inclusion of social difficulties and suffering relatives. Supportive care shall ensure a good quality of life for patients treated and their families but also reduce the physical effects associated with the disease and treatment. They rely on coordination of care including the cancer networks established in the cancer plan to ensure comprehensive and continuous care for these patients.

  12. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  13. Users' perceptions of outpatient quality of care in Kilosa District Hospital in central Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Juma, D; Manongi, R

    2009-10-01

    Use of users' perception in measuring quality of care has been shown to be useful in screening problems and in planning for improvement of quality of health care delivery. Traditionally, quality of care has been measured using professional standards, neglecting users' opinions which may leave psychosocial needs unattended. The objective of this descriptive cross-sectional study was to assess users' perceptions of quality of care given at outpatient department (OPD) at Kilosa District Hospital in Central Tanzania. Hospital based exit interviews were conducted to adult patients or caregivers of children attending the hospital. Focus Group Discussions were conducted among community members in selected villages within the hospital catchment area. Information on perceptions on care provider-patient interaction, cost of service, availability of medicines, equipment and health personnel was sought from the participants. Overall OPD was perceived to have several shortcomings including verbal abuse of patients by care providers, lack of responsiveness to patients' needs, delays, inadequate examination, unreliable supply of medicines, lack of confidentiality and favouritism in health care provision. Cost of service was perceived to be reasonable provided medicines were available. In conclusion, provider-patient interactions, timely services, supply of medicines and favouritism were the major factors affecting quality of service at the hospital. Efforts should be made to address the shortcomings so as to improve quality of care and users perceptions.

  14. What is important in evaluating health care quality? An international comparison of user views

    PubMed Central

    Groenewegen, Peter P; Kerssens, Jan J; Sixma, Herman J; van der Eijk, Ingrid; Boerma, Wienke GW

    2005-01-01

    Background Quality of care from the perspective of users is increasingly used in evaluating health care performance. Going beyond satisfaction studies, quality of care from the users' perspective is conceptualised in two dimensions: the importance users attach to aspects of care and their actual experience with these aspects. It is well established that health care systems differ in performance. The question in this article is whether there are also differences in what people in different health care systems view as important aspects of health care quality. The aim is to describe and explain international differences in the importance that health care users attach to different aspects of health care. Methods Data were used from different studies that all used a version of the QUOTE-questionnaire that measures user views of health care quality in two dimensions: the importance that users attach to aspects of care and their actual experience. Data from 12 European countries and 5133 individuals were used. They were analysed using multi-level analysis. Results Although most of the variations in importance people attach to aspects of health care is located at the individual level, there are also differences between countries. The ranking of aspects shows similarities. 'My GP should always take me seriously' was in nearly all countries ranked first, while an item about waiting time in the GP's office was always ranked lowest. Conclusion Differences between countries in how health care users value different aspects of care are difficult to explain. Further theorising should take into account that importance and performance ratings are positively related, that people compare their experiences with those of others, and that general and instrumental values might be related through the institutions of the health care system. PMID:15723701

  15. Quality of Care in the Social Services: Research Agenda and Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillen, J. Curtis; Proctor, Enola K.; Megivern, Deborah; Striley, Catherine Woodstock; Cabassa, Leopoldo J.; Munson, Michelle R.; Dickey, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    In an era of heightened accountability, remarkably little is known empirically about the quality of social work services. This article applies insights from health services research to propose a research agenda on the quality of care in the social services. The agenda calls for studies that address the definition of quality service, variations in…

  16. Quality Early Childhood Education and Care--The Role of Attitudes and Dispositions in Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell-Barr, Verity

    2017-01-01

    The early childhood workforce is routinely demonstrated as being central to the quality of early childhood education and care (ECEC). Frequently, discussions of quality focus on structural features of training, such as level and duration. However, the literature demonstrates that quality extends beyond the structural and that early childhood…

  17. Quality and Impact of Centre-Based Early Childhood Education and Care. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janta, Barbara; van Belle, Janna; Stewart, Katherine

    2016-01-01

    There is a strong association between the quality of Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) provision and the outcomes for children, with high quality ECEC being associated with better child outcomes later in life. This brief reviewed the broad range of indicators that have been linked to quality, with a focus on understanding how these…

  18. Quality of Child Care Using the Environment Rating Scales: A Meta-Analysis of International Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vermeer, Harriet J.; van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Cárcamo, Rodrigo A.; Harrison, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    The current study provides a systematic examination of child care quality around the globe, using the Environment Rating Scales (ERS). Additional goals of this study are to examine associations between ERS process quality and structural features (group size, caregiver-child ratio) that underpin quality and between ERS and more proximal aspects of…

  19. Hospital commitment to community orientation and its association with quality of care and patient experience.

    PubMed

    Kang, Raymond; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana

    2013-01-01

    We examine the association between hospital community orientation and quality-of-care measures, which include process measures for patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia as well as measures of patient experience. The community orientation measure is obtained from the 2009 American Hospital Association's Annual Survey Database. Information on hospital quality of care and patient experience comes from 2009 Hospital Quality Alliance data and results from the 2009 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (Medicare.gov, 2009). To evaluate the relationship between community orientation and measures of quality and patient experience, we used multivariate linear regressions. Organizational and market control variables included bed size, ownership, teaching status, safety net status, number of nurses per patient day, multihospital system status, network status, extent of reliance on managed care, market competition, and location within an Aligning Forces for Quality community (these communities have multistakeholder alliances and focus on improving quality of care at the community level). After controlling for organizational factors, we found that hospitals with a stronger commitment to community orientation perform better on process measures for all three conditions, and they report higher patient experience of care scores for one measure, than do those demonstrating weaker commitment. Hospital commitment to community orientation is significantly related to the provision of high-quality care and to one measure of patient experience of care.

  20. Stroke care quality in China: Substantial improvement, and a huge challenge and opportunity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilong; Li, Zixiao; Zhao, Xingquan; Wang, David; Li, Hao; Xian, Ying; Liu, Liping; Wang, Yongjun

    2017-04-01

    Stroke is The first two authors contributed equally. the leading cause of death and adult disability in China. Although evidence-based clinical interventions have been identified to improve care and outcomes in stroke, significant gaps still exist between guideline recommendations and clinical practice in China. Regional and national stroke registries have been used to assess the benchmark of stroke care quality, provide feedback on compliance with evidence-based performance measures to health care providers, and continuously improve stroke care quality without increasing additional medical costs in the past several decades worldwide. In China, stroke care has become a national priority. A series of stroke care quality assessment and improvement actions was initiated by the Ministry of Health to increase the detection of high-risk populations with stroke, rate of adherence to evidence-based process performance measures of stroke care, and stroke care organization development, aiming to decrease the burden of stroke. China National Stroke Registries have been started in 2007, and they are conducted every 3 to 5 years. A carotid disease screen and intervention project for communities was initiated in 2009. The Chinese Stroke Association, founded in 2015, launched the Chinese Stroke Center Alliance to increase the stroke center design in the near future. In this article, we described these stroke care actions and progression, summarized the benchmark and improvement of stroke care quality, and outlined the future plans in China.

  1. Enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care in a rural primary care setting in Nigeria: perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers

    PubMed Central

    Odusola, Aina O.; Stronks, Karien; Hendriks, Marleen E.; Schultsz, Constance; Akande, Tanimola; Osibogun, Akin; van Weert, Henk; Haafkens, Joke A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypertension is a highly prevalent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) that can be modified through timely and long-term treatment in primary care. Objective We explored perspectives of primary care staff and health insurance managers on enablers and barriers for implementing high-quality hypertension care, in the context of a community-based health insurance programme in rural Nigeria. Design Qualitative study using semi-structured individual interviews with primary care staff (n = 11) and health insurance managers (n=4). Data were analysed using standard qualitative techniques. Results Both stakeholder groups perceived health insurance as an important facilitator for implementing high-quality hypertension care because it covered costs of care for patients and provided essential resources and incentives to clinics: guidelines, staff training, medications, and diagnostic equipment. Perceived inhibitors included the following: high staff workload; administrative challenges at facilities; discordance between healthcare provider and insurer on how health insurance and provider payment methods work; and insufficient fit between some guideline recommendations and tools for patient education and characteristics/needs of the local patient population. Perceived strategies to address inhibitors included the following: task-shifting; adequate provider payment benchmarking; good provider–insurer relationships; automated administration systems; and tailoring guidelines/patient education. Conclusions By providing insights into perspectives of primary care providers and health insurance managers, this study offers information on potential strategies for implementing high-quality hypertension care for insured patients in SSA. PMID:26880152

  2. Quality improvement initiatives in neonatal intensive care unit networks: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Shah, Vibhuti; Warre, Ruth; Lee, Shoo K

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal intensive care unit networks that encompass regions, states, and even entire countries offer the perfect platform for implementing continuous quality improvement initiatives to advance the health care provided to vulnerable neonates. Through cycles of identification and implementation of best available evidence, benchmarking, and feedback of outcomes, combined with mutual collaborative learning through a network of providers, the performance of health care systems and neonatal outcomes can be improved. We use examples of successful neonatal networks from across North America to explore continuous quality improvement in the neonatal intensive care unit, including the rationale for the formation of neonatal networks, the role of networks in continuous quality improvement, quality improvement methods and outcomes, and barriers to and facilitators of quality improvement.

  3. Quality and Day Care: What Do Children Have To Say?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoskins, Marie L.; Pence, Alan; Chambers, Elizabeth

    1999-01-01

    Examines day care memories at ages 11-12 and 17-18 of 4 female participants in the Victoria Day Care Research Project. Reports a continued strong interest in fathers and a shift over time in salience of different memories. Presents implications for early childhood educators. (DLH)

  4. Quality Child Care for All: A Guide to Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panitch, Melanie

    This manual is intended to facilitate the integration of children with mental handicaps into child care centers in Canada and elsewhere. The first chapter looks at the background of integration in early childhood child care programs in Canada and identifies concerns of parents. The second chapter explores the practice of labelling children with…

  5. Do active patients seek higher quality prenatal care?: A panel data analysis from Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jessica; Golub, Ginger; Kruk, Margaret E; McConnell, Margaret

    2016-11-01

    Despite poverty and limited access to health care, evidence is growing that patients in low-income countries are taking a more active role in their selection of health care providers. Urban areas such as Nairobi, Kenya offer a rich context for studying these "active" patients because of the large number of heterogeneous providers available. We use a unique panel dataset from 2015 in which 402 pregnant women from peri-urban (the "slums" of) Nairobi, Kenya were interviewed three times over the course of their pregnancy and delivery, allowing us to follow women's care decisions and their perceptions of the quality of care they received. We define active antenatal care (ANC) patients as those women who switch ANC providers and explore the prevalence, characteristics and care-seeking behavior of these patients. We analyze whether active ANC patients appear to be seeking out higher quality facilities and whether they are more satisfied with their care. Women in our sample visit over 150 different public and private ANC facilities. Active patients are more educated and more likely to have high risk pregnancies, but have otherwise similar characteristics to non-active patients. We find that active patients are increasingly likely to pay for private care (despite public care being free) and to receive a higher quality of care over the course of their pregnancy. We find that active patients appear more satisfied with their care over the course of pregnancy, as they are increasingly likely to choose to deliver at the facility providing their ANC.

  6. Peer pressure and public reporting within healthcare setting: improving accountability and health care quality in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Specchia, Maria Lucia; Veneziano, Maria Assunta; Cadeddu, Chiara; Ferriero, Anna Maria; Capizzi, Silvio; Ricciardi, Walter

    2012-01-01

    In the last few years, the need of public reporting of health outcomes has acquired a great importance. The public release of performance results could be a tool for improving health care quality and many attempts have been made in order to introduce public reporting programs within the health care context at different levels. It would be necessary to promote the introduction of a standardized set of outcome and performance measures in order to improve quality of health care services and to make health care providers aware of the importance of transparency and accountability.

  7. Chronic disease management: a review of current performance across quality of care domains and opportunities for improving osteoarthritis care.

    PubMed

    Brand, Caroline A; Ackerman, Ilana N; Bohensky, Megan A; Bennell, Kim L

    2013-02-01

    Osteoarthritis is the most prevalent chronic joint disease worldwide. The incidence and prevalence are increasing as the population ages and lifestyle risk factors such as obesity increase. There are several evidence-based clinical practice guidelines available to guide clinician decision making, but there is evidence that care provided is suboptimal across all domains of quality: effectiveness, safety, timeliness and appropriateness, patient-centered care, and efficiency. System, clinician, and patient barriers to optimizing care need to be addressed. Innovative models designed to meet patient needs and those that harness social networks must be developed, especially to support those with mild to moderate disease.

  8. The Effect of Horticultural Therapy on the Quality of Life of Palliative Care Patients.

    PubMed

    Lai, Claudia Kam-Yuk; Lau, Carmen Ka-Yan; Kan, Wai Yin; Lam, Wai Man; Fung, Connie Yuen Yee

    2017-01-27

    Palliative care patients experienced a variety of needs and perceived their quality of life as being only fair. This study adopted a single group repeated-measure design to investigate the effect of horticultural therapy on the quality of life of palliative care patients using the Quality of Life Concern in End of Life Questionnaire. Significant differences in the domains of "existential distress" and "health care concern" were observed immediately post-intervention and at four weeks post-intervention, respectively. No other significant differences were seen in the other domains or in the total mean score of the outcome measure.

  9. Comparative analysis of quality assurance in health care delivery and higher medical education

    PubMed Central

    Busari, Jamiu O

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance (QA) in higher medical education involves the development, sustenance, improvement, and evaluation of the standard of training of medical professionals. In health care delivery, QA focuses on guaranteeing and maintaining a high standard of the service provided in different health care systems. When the service delivered by the care provider is in accordance with what the recipients of health care expect, then quality in health care is considered to be present. There are several factors in higher medical education and health care that are responsible for the emergence of QA. These include externally imposed obligations requiring demonstration of public accountability and responsibility from educational institutions, as well as the need for activity-specific information by policy makers as an aid for important decision-making within educational institutions. In health care delivery on the other hand, the emergence of QA is linked to the need for containing rising health care costs in the face of limited resources and to guaranteeing high quality patient care in a changing health care environment where the power relationship between doctors and patients is shifting towards patients. Although medical education can be regarded as a distinct entity in the health care industry, it still remains an inherent part of the health care delivery system. As a result, different strategies aimed at guaranteeing and assuring high standards of health care and education in many countries tend to overlap. This paper reflects on whether quality assurance in health care delivery and medical education should be seen as separate entities. PMID:23762010

  10. Improving the quality of emergency medicine care by developing a quality requirement framework: a study from The Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In The Netherlands, mainly inexperienced physicians work in the ED on all shifts, including the evening and night shifts, when no direct supervision is available. In 2004 a report of the Dutch Health Care Inspectorate revealed that quality of care at Emergency Departments (EDs) was highly variable. Based on this report and international studies showing significant potential for quality improvement, stakeholders felt the need to improve the quality of EM care. Based on the literature, a baseline measurement and a panel of experts, The Netherlands recently developed a nationwide quality requirement framework (QRF) for EM. This article describes the content of and path to this QRF. Methods To conduct a baseline measurement, the panel needed to identify measurable entities related to EM care at EDs. This was done by formulating both qualitative and partly quantitative questions related to the following competence areas: triage system, training of personnel (physicians and nurses), facilities and supervision of physicians. 27 out of 104 Dutch EDs were sampled via a cross-sectional study design, using an online survey and standardized follow-up interview in which the answers of the survey were reviewed. Results In the QRF, EM care is divided into a basic level of EM care and six competence certification areas (CCAs): (acute) abdominal aortic aneurysm, acute coronary syndrome, acute psychiatric behavioral disorder, cerebral vascular accident, pediatric critical care and infants with low birth weight. For the basic level of EM care and for every CCA minimum prerequisites for medical devices and training of personnel are established. The factors selected for the QRF can be regarded as minimum quality standards for EM care. A major finding of this study was that in The Netherlands, none of the 27 sampled EDs demonstrated compliance with these factors. Conclusion Our study shows that Dutch EDs fall short of what the expert consensus panelists considered minimum

  11. Quality of Care for Childhood Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in a Managed Care Medicaid Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zima, Bonnie T.; Bussing, Regina; Tang, Lingqi; Zhang, Lily; Ettner, Susan; Belin, Thomas R.; Wells, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether clinical severity is greater among children receiving attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) care in primary care compared with those in specialty mental health clinics, and to examine how care processes and clinical outcomes vary by sector across three 6-month time intervals. Method: This was a longitudinal…

  12. The Impact of Child Care Subsidy Use on Child Care Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Rebecca M.; Johnson, Anna; Rigby, Elizabeth; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the federal government allotted $7 billion in child care subsidies to low-income families through the state-administered Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF), now the government's largest child care program (US DHHS, 2008). Although subsidies reduce costs for families and facilitate parental employment, it is unclear how they impact the…

  13. Using a summary measure for multiple quality indicators in primary care: the Summary QUality InDex (SQUID)

    PubMed Central

    Nietert, Paul J; Wessell, Andrea M; Jenkins, Ruth G; Feifer, Chris; Nemeth, Lynne S; Ornstein, Steven M

    2007-01-01

    Background Assessing the quality of primary care is becoming a priority in national healthcare agendas. Audit and feedback on healthcare quality performance indicators can help improve the quality of care provided. In some instances, fewer numbers of more comprehensive indicators may be preferable. This paper describes the use of the Summary Quality Index (SQUID) in tracking quality of care among patients and primary care practices that use an electronic medical record (EMR). All practices are part of the Practice Partner Research Network, representing over 100 ambulatory care practices throughout the United States. Methods The SQUID is comprised of 36 process and outcome measures, all of which are obtained from the EMR. This paper describes algorithms for the SQUID calculations, various statistical properties, and use of the SQUID within the context of a multi-practice quality improvement (QI) project. Results At any given time point, the patient-level SQUID reflects the proportion of recommended care received, while the practice-level SQUID reflects the average proportion of recommended care received by that practice's patients. Using quarterly reports, practice- and patient-level SQUIDs are provided routinely to practices within the network. The SQUID is responsive, exhibiting highly significant (p < 0.0001) increases during a major QI initiative, and its internal consistency is excellent (Cronbach's alpha = 0.93). Feedback from physicians has been extremely positive, providing a high degree of face validity. Conclusion The SQUID algorithm is feasible and straightforward, and provides a useful QI tool. Its statistical properties and clear interpretation make it appealing to providers, health plans, and researchers. PMID:17407560

  14. The American College of Surgeons: an enduring commitment to quality and patient care.

    PubMed

    Hoyt, David B; Schneidman, Diane S

    2015-03-01

    This paper describes the American College of Surgeons' 100-plus-year commitment to improving quality and patient care. It summarizes programs that the College established a century ago to improve patient care, including the Hospital Standardization Program, and new initiatives, such as the ACS National Surgical Quality Improvement Program. The College's longstanding experience with quality improvement programs is enabling the organization to play a critical and influential role in helping to ensure that health care reforms, including those in the Affordable Care Act, are implemented in a way that best serves that interests of the surgical patient. Through a combination of these data analysis systems and the application of a finely tuned set of values, the College has become a respected voice in quality and patient safety. The ultimate goal is to create an environment where high value and high reliability take precedence over high volume and where all health care professionals play an active leadership role in delivering optimal, coordinated care. This article further describes how the surgical culture can be reshaped to meet these evolving needs and demands. The American College of Surgeons (ACS) has a longstanding commitment to improving the quality of surgical care through outcome measurement, standards setting, accreditation, and educational activities. This legacy has enabled the ACS to play an influential role in recent developments related to implementation of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) and Medicare physician payment reform.

  15. Total Quality Management in Health Care - A Study on TQM Implementation and its Application to the Army Health Care System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-15

    Quality Management in a 300- Bed Community Hospital : The Quality Improvement Process Translated to Health Care." QMB, September 1992, pp. 293-300. Hume...get a irnzmogram. She called the Army Community Hospital for assistance. After several telephone calls, she was directed to the Radiology Department...assisted her in having her marmogram done under an external partnership agreement in the local civilian hospital . Within two weeks, Mrs. Smith was

  16. Improving the Quality of Long-Term Care with Better Information

    PubMed Central

    Mor, Vincent

    2005-01-01

    Publicly reporting information stimulates providers’ efforts to improve the quality of health care. The availability of mandated, uniform clinical data in all nursing homes and home health agencies has facilitated the public reporting of comparative quality data. This article reviews the conceptual and technical challenges of applying information about the quality of long-term care providers and the evidence for the impact of information-based quality improvement. Quality “tools” have been used despite questions about the validity of the measures and their use in selecting providers or offering them bonus payments. Although the industry now realizes the importance of quality, research still is needed on how consumers use this information to select providers and monitor their performance and whether these efforts actually improve the outcomes of care. PMID:16201996

  17. Predicting Desire for Institutional Placement among Racially Diverse Dementia Family Caregivers: The Role of Quality of Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Fei; Durkin, Daniel W.; Hilgeman, Michelle M.; Harris, Grant; Gaugler, Joseph E.; Wardian, Jana; Allen, Rebecca S.; Burgio, Louis D.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Literature on institutionalization of patients with dementia has not considered the role of caregivers' quality of care, which encompasses caregivers' exemplary care (EC) behaviors and caregivers' potentially harmful behaviors (PHBs) toward care recipients. This study sought to understand the role of quality of care in mediating between…

  18. Quality of care from the patients' perspective: from theoretical concept to a new measuring instrument

    PubMed Central

    Sixma, Herman J.; Kerssens, Jan J.; van Campen, Crétien; Peters, Loe

    2002-01-01

    Introduction Patient views on quality of care are of paramount importance with respect to the implementation of quality assurance (QA) and improvement (QI) programmes. However, the relevance of patient satisfaction studies is often questioned because of conceptual and methodological problems. Here, it is our belief that a different strategy is necessary. Objective To develop a conceptual framework for measuring quality of care seen through the patients' eyes, based on the existing literature on consumer satisfaction in health care and business research. Results Patient or consumer satisfaction is regarded as a multidimensional concept, based on a relationship between experiences and expectations. However, where most health care researchers tend to concentrate on the result, patient (dis)satisfaction, a more fruitful approach is to look at the basic components of the concept: expectations (or `needs') and experiences. A conceptual framework – based on the sequence performance, importance, impact – and quality judgements of different categories of patients derived from importance and performance scores of different health care aspects, is elaborated upon and illustrated with empirical evidence. Conclusions The new conceptual model, with quality of care indices derived from importance and performance scores, can serve as a framework for QA and QI programmes from the patients' perspective. For selecting quality of care aspects, a category‐specific approach is recommended including the use of focus group discussions. PMID:11281863

  19. Quality indicators for acute myocardial infarction: A position paper of the Acute Cardiovascular Care Association.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Francois; Gale, Chris P; Bonnefoy, Eric; Capuano, Frederic; Claeys, Marc J; Danchin, Nicolas; Fox, Keith Aa; Huber, Kurt; Iakobishvili, Zaza; Lettino, Maddalena; Quinn, Tom; Rubini Gimenez, Maria; Bøtker, Hans E; Swahn, Eva; Timmis, Adam; Tubaro, Marco; Vrints, Christiaan; Walker, David; Zahger, Doron; Zeymer, Uwe; Bueno, Hector

    2017-02-01

    Evaluation of quality of care is an integral part of modern healthcare, and has become an indispensable tool for health authorities, the public, the press and patients. However, measuring quality of care is difficult, because it is a multifactorial and multidimensional concept that cannot be estimated solely on the basis of patients' clinical outcomes. Thus, measuring the process of care through quality indicators (QIs) has become a widely used practice in this context. Other professional societies have published QIs for the evaluation of quality of care in the context of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), but no such indicators exist in Europe. In this context, the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) Acute Cardiovascular Care Association (ACCA) has reflected on the measurement of quality of care in the context of AMI (ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) and non-ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI)) and created a set of QIs, with a view to developing programmes to improve quality of care for the management of AMI across Europe. We present here the list of QIs defined by the ACCA, with explanations of the methodology used, scientific justification and reasons for the choice for each measure.

  20. Perceived quality of health care services among people with osteoarthritis – results from a nationwide survey

    PubMed Central

    Grønhaug, Gudmund; Hagfors, Jon; Borch, Ingebjørg; Østerås, Nina; Hagen, Kåre Birger

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the perceived quality of care received by people with osteoarthritis (OA) in Norway and explore factors associated with the quality of care. Methods A national survey in which members of the Norwegian Rheumatism Association with OA registered as their main diagnosis completed a questionnaire. The perceived quality of care was reported on a 17-item OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator questionnaire, covering both pharmacological and non-pharmacological aspects of OA care. In addition, the four-page questionnaire covered areas related to demographic characteristics, the location and impact of the OA, and utilization and satisfaction with health care services. The quality of care is calculated as pass rates, where the numerator represents the number of indicators passed and the denominator represents the number of eligible persons. Results In total, 1,247 participants (response rate 57%) completed the questionnaire. Mean age was 68 years (standard deviation 32) and 1,142 (92%) were women. Respondents reported OA in hand only (12.4%), hip only (7.3%), knee only (10.4%), in two locations (42%) or all three locations (27%). The overall OsteoArthritis Quality Indicator pass rate was 47% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46%–48%), and it was higher for pharmacological aspects (53% [51%–54%]) than for non-pharmacological aspects of care (44% [43%–46%]). The pass rate for the individual quality indicators ranged from 8% for “referral for weight reduction” to 81% for “receiving advice about exercises”. Satisfaction with care was strongly associated with perceived quality. The pass rate for those who were “very satisfied” was 33% (25%–40%) higher than those who were “very unsatisfied” with care. Conclusion While the OA patient seems to be rather satisfied with the perceived OA care, there is still room for improvement in the quality of care. Although the quality of care in the present study is somewhat higher than in other studies, less than

  1. A prospective observational study of quality of diabetes care in a shared care setting: trends and age differences (ZODIAC-19)

    PubMed Central

    van Hateren, Kornelis J J; Drion, Iefke; Kleefstra, Nanne; Groenier, Klaas H; Houweling, Sebastiaan T; van der Meer, Klaas; Bilo, Henk J G

    2012-01-01

    Objective The Zwolle Outpatient Diabetes project Integrating Available Care (ZODIAC) study was initiated in 1998 to investigate the effects of shared care for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in the Netherlands, and to reduce the number of diabetes-related complications. Benchmarking the performance of diabetes care was and is an important aspect of this study. We aimed to investigate trends in diabetes care, within the ZODIAC study for a wide variety of quality indicators during a long follow-up period (1998–2008), with special interest for different age groups. Design Prospective observational cohort study. Setting Primary care, Zwolle, The Netherlands. Participants Patients with T2DM. Methods A dataset of quality measures was collected annually during the patient's visit to the practice nurse or general practitioner. Linear time trends from 1998 to 2008 were estimated using linear mixed models in which we adjusted for age and gender. Age was included in the model as a categorical variable: for each follow-up year all participants were categorised into the categories <60, 60–75 and >75 years. Differences in trends between the age categories were investigated by adding an interaction term to the model. Results The number of patients who were reported to participate increased in the period 1998–2008 from 1622 to 27 438. All quality indicators improved in this study, except for body mass index. The prevalence albuminuria decreased in an 11-year-period from 42% to 21%. No relevant differences between the trends for the three age categories were observed. During all years of follow-up, mean blood pressure and body mass index were the lowest and highest, respectively, in the group of patients <60 years (data not shown). Conclusions Quality of diabetes care within the Dutch ZODIAC study, a shared care project, has considerably improved in the period 1998–2008. There were no relevant differences between trends across various age categories

  2. Blueprint for action: steps toward a high-quality, high-value maternity care system.

    PubMed

    Angood, Peter B; Armstrong, Elizabeth Mitchell; Ashton, Diane; Burstin, Helen; Corry, Maureen P; Delbanco, Suzanne F; Fildes, Barbara; Fox, Daniel M; Gluck, Paul A; Gullo, Sue Leavitt; Howes, Joanne; Jolivet, R Rima; Laube, Douglas W; Lynne, Donna; Main, Elliott; Markus, Anne Rossier; Mayberry, Linda; Mitchell, Lynn V; Ness, Debra L; Nuzum, Rachel; Quinlan, Jeffrey D; Sakala, Carol; Salganicoff, Alina

    2010-01-01

    Childbirth Connection hosted a 90th Anniversary national policy symposium, Transforming Maternity Care: A High Value Proposition, on April 3, 2009, in Washington, DC. Over 100 leaders from across the range of stakeholder perspectives were actively engaged in the symposium work to improve the quality and value of U.S. maternity care through broad system improvement. A multi-disciplinary symposium steering committee guided the strategy from its inception and contributed to every phase of the project. The "Blueprint for Action: Steps Toward a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", issued by the Transforming Maternity Care Symposium Steering Committee, answers the fundamental question, "Who needs to do what, to, for, and with whom to improve the quality of maternity care over the next five years?" Five stakeholder workgroups collaborated to propose actionable strategies in 11 critical focus areas for moving expeditiously toward the realization of the long term "2020 Vision for a High Quality, High Value Maternity Care System", also published in this issue. Following the symposium these workgroup reports and recommendations were synthesized into the current blueprint. For each critical focus area, the "Blueprint for Action" presents a brief problem statement, a set of system goals for improvement in that area, and major recommendations with proposed action steps to achieve them. This process created a clear sightline to action that if enacted could improve the structure, process, experiences of care, and outcomes of the maternity care system in ways that when anchored in the culture can indeed transform maternity care.

  3. Assessment of Parents’ Perception of Quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Keiza, Eunice Mmbone; Chege, Margaret Njambi; Omuga, Blasio Osogo

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Adequate knowledge of parents’ perception of quality of pediatric cancer care helps to identify the areas of care improvement which would contribute to disease outcome in regard to the quality of life and satisfaction with the care provided. The aim of the study was to assess the parents’ perception of the quality of Pediatric Oncology Inpatient Care at Kenyatta National Hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive quantitative and qualitative study was undertaken using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and a focused group discussion guide. Assessment of parents’ perception of quality of care was done in relation to the institution's structures and care delivery processes. These included the ward environment, resources for cancer treatment, care processes, service providers, and parents’ knowledge empowerment. Participants were systematically selected. Parents’ perception was defined as satisfaction or dissatisfaction with the care provided. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp.) and presented as frequencies and percentages. Chi-square was used to test the significant association between variables. Level of significance was set at a P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 107 respondents were interviewed and 57.9% were satisfied with the overall quality of care they received. The determinants of overall satisfaction in this study were found to be related to resources for cancer treatment (odds ratio [OR] =3.10; 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.39–6.90; P = 0.005), care delivery processes (OR = 2.87; 95% CI = 1.28–6.43; P = 0.009), and the ward environment (OR = 2.59; 95% CI = 1.17–5.74; P = 0.018). Conclusions: The parents were moderately satisfied with the oncology care services their children received. The gaps identified in service delivery included those related to the availability of the required resources for efficient care delivery and also educational as well as psychosocial needs of the parents

  4. Supporting employees' work-family needs improves health care quality: Longitudinal evidence from long-term care.

    PubMed

    Okechukwu, Cassandra A; Kelly, Erin L; Bacic, Janine; DePasquale, Nicole; Hurtado, David; Kossek, Ellen; Sembajwe, Grace

    2016-05-01

    We analyzed qualitative and quantitative data from U.S.-based employees in 30 long-term care facilities. Analysis of semi-structured interviews from 154 managers informed quantitative analyses. Quantitative data include 1214 employees' scoring of their supervisors and their organizations on family supportiveness (individual scores and aggregated to facility level), and three outcomes: (1), care quality indicators assessed at facility level (n = 30) and collected monthly for six months after employees' data collection; (2), employees' dichotomous survey response on having additional off-site jobs; and (3), proportion of employees with additional jobs at each facility. Thematic analyses revealed that managers operate within the constraints of an industry that simultaneously: (a) employs low-wage employees with multiple work-family challenges, and (b) has firmly institutionalized goals of prioritizing quality of care and minimizing labor costs. Managers universally described providing work-family support and prioritizing care quality as antithetical to each other. Concerns surfaced that family-supportiveness encouraged employees to work additional jobs off-site, compromising care quality. Multivariable linear regression analysis of facility-level data revealed that higher family-supportive supervision was associated with significant decreases in residents' incidence of all pressure ulcers (-2.62%) and other injuries (-9.79%). Higher family-supportive organizational climate was associated with significant decreases in all falls (-17.94%) and falls with injuries (-7.57%). Managers' concerns about additional jobs were not entirely unwarranted: multivariable logistic regression of employee-level data revealed that among employees with children, having family-supportive supervision was associated with significantly higher likelihood of additional off-site jobs (RR 1.46, 95%CI 1.08-1.99), but family-supportive organizational climate was associated with lower likelihood

  5. Quality of psoriasis care in Germany: results of the national health care study "PsoHealth3".

    PubMed

    Langenbruch, Anna; Radtke, Marc Alexander; Jacobi, Arnd; Purwins, Sandra; Haack, Kristina; Reich, Kristian; Stroemer, Klaus; Mrowietz, Ulrich; Augustin, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Two national surveys conducted in 2005 and 2007 indicated deficits in psoriasis care and induced the composition of the ''National Goals for Health Care in Psoriasis 2010-2015''. The aim of this work was to (1) evaluate the quality of care for patients with psoriasis in Germany, (2) compare this with prior psoriasis studies PsoHealth1 (2005) and PsoHealth2 (2007), and (3) review the implementation of national treatment goals. By means of a cross sectional study the following indicators of health care quality were collected: psoriasis severity (Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) and proportion of PASI >20), quality of life (Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were corporated: proportion of DLQI >10), previous systemic treatment, inpatient treatment, and days absent from work due to psoriasis. Between January 2013 and March 2014, 1265 patients from 82 dermatological centres were included (mean age of 52 years). 9.2 % had a PASI >20 (2007: 11.6 %; 2005: 17.8 %). 21.3 % reported strong quality of life restrictions (DLQI >10) (2007: 28.2 %; 2005: 34.0 %). 59.5 % had received a systemic treatment at least once within the last 5 years (2007: 47.3 %; 2005: 32.9 %). 20.1 % were treated inpatient within the last 5 years (2007: 20.1 %; 2005: 26.9 %). The current data indicate a better health care situation for psoriasis in Germany. The implementation of the S3-Guideline and the ''National Goals for Health Care in Psoriasis 2010-2015'' could have been contributing factors.

  6. Advance Care Planning: is quality end of life care really that simple?

    PubMed

    Johnson, Stephanie; Kerridge, Ian; Butow, Phyllis N; Tattersall, Martin H N

    2017-04-01

    The routine implementation of Advance Care Planning (ACP) is now a prominent feature of policy directed at improving end of life care in Australia. However, while complex ACP interventions may modestly reduce medical care at the end of life and enable more people to die at home or outside of acute hospital settings, existing legal, organisational, cultural and conceptual barriers limit the implementation and utility of ACP. We suggest that meaningful improvements in end of life care will not result from the institutionalisation of ACP but from more significant changes to the design and delivery of care.

  7. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures.

  8. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  9. "Serious and complex illness" in quality improvement and policy reform for end-of-life care.

    PubMed

    Lynn, J; Forlini, J H

    2001-05-01

    Americans are living longer - a mark of success in public health and medical care - but more will live the last few years with progressive illness and disability. The dominant conception of care delivery separates "aggressive" or life-extending care from "palliative" or death-accepting care, with an assumed "transition" between them. The physiology and the experience of this population are mismatched in this model. Here, we propose a more useful category for public policy and clinical quality improvement: persons who will die as a result of "serious and complex illness." Delivery system changes could ensure reliable, continuous, and competent care to this population.

  10. Quality of Primary Health Care for children and adolescents living with HIV 1

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Leticia; de Paula, Cristiane Cardoso; Magnago, Tania Solange Bosi de Souza; Padoin, Stela Maris de Mello; Harzheim, Erno; da Silva, Clarissa Bohrer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to evaluate the quality of health care for children and adolescents living with HIV, among the different types of Primary Health Care services of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul. Method: cross-sectional study, developed with 118 Primary Health Care professionals. The Primary Care Evaluation Instrument, Professional version, was used. For verification of the variables associated with the high score, Poisson Regression was used. Results: the professionals of the Family Health Strategy, when compared to those of the Primary Health Units, obtained a greater degree of orientation to primary care, both for the overall score and for the derived attributes score, as well as for the integrality and community orientation attributes. A specialization in Primary Health Care, other employment and a statutory work contract were associated with quality of care. Conclusion: the Family Health Strategy was shown to provide higher quality health care for children and adolescents living with HIV, however, the coverage is still low. The need was highlighted to expand this coverage and invest in vocational training directed toward Primary Care and making the professionals effective, through public selection procedure, as well as an improvement program that recognizes the care requirements, in these settings, of children and adolescents infected with HIV. PMID:27579927

  11. Type of health insurance and the quality of primary care experience.

    PubMed Central

    Shi, L

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the association between type of health insurance coverage and quality of primary care as measured by its distinguishing attributes--first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. METHODS: The household component of the 1996 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey was used for this study. The analysis primarily focused on subjects aged younger than 65 years who identified a usual source of care. Logistic regressions were used to examine the independent effects of insurance status on primary care attributes while individual sociodemographic characteristics were controlled for. RESULTS: The experience of primary care varies according to insurance status. The insured are able to obtain better primary care than the uninsured, and the privately insured are able to obtain better primary care than the publicly insured. Those insured through fee-for-service coverage experience better longitudinal care and less of a barrier to access than those insured through health maintenance organizations (HMOs). CONCLUSIONS: While expanding insurance coverage is important for establishing access to care, efforts are needed to enhance the quality of primary health care, particularly for the publicly insured. Policymakers should closely monitor the quality of primary care provided by HMOs. PMID:11111255

  12. Patient Safety in Critical Care Unit: Development of a Nursing Quality Indicator System.

    PubMed

    Lima, Camila S P; Barbosa, Sayonara F F

    2015-01-01

    This is a methodological study and technological production that aims to describe the development of a computerized system of nursing care quality indicators for the Intensive Care Unit. The study population consisted of a systems analyst and fifteen critical care nurses. For the development of the system we adopted some of the best practices of the Unified Process methodology using the Unified Modeling Language and the programming language Java Enterprise Edition 7. The system consists of an access menu with the following functions: Home (presents general information), New Record (records the indicator), Record (record search), Census (add information and indicators of the patient), Report (generates report of the indicators) and Annex (accesses the Braden Scale). This information system allows for measurement of the quality of nursing care and to evaluate patient safety in intensive care unit by monitoring quality indicators in nursing.

  13. The Importance of Curriculum in Achieving Quality Child Day Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Diane Trister

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the components of high quality child day care curricula, focusing on educational philosophy, program goals and objectives, the physical environment, the role of teachers and administrators, and partnerships with families. (MDM)

  14. The First National Report Card on Quality of Health Care in America

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    evaluate performance on 439 clinical indicators of quality for 30 acute and chronic conditions, such as diabetes mellitus , asthma, hypertension (high blood pressure) and heart disease, and for related preventive care.

  15. Relationship Quality in Non-Cognitively Impaired Mother-Daughter Care Dyads: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Diane N; Hansen, Lissi; Baggs, Judith G; Lyons, Karen S

    2015-11-01

    More than 60 million Americans provide care to a family member; roughly two thirds are women providing care to aging mothers. Despite the protective nature of relationship quality, little attention has been given to its role in mother-daughter care dyads, particularly in mothers without cognitive impairment. A systematic appraisal of peer-reviewed, English language research was conducted. Nineteen articles met criteria. When relationship quality is positive, mother-daughter dyads enjoy rewards and mutuality, even when conflict occurs. Daughters grow more emotionally committed to mothers' over the care trajectory, despite increasing demands. Daughters' commitment deepens as mothers physically decline, and mothers remain engaged, emotional partners. When relationship quality is ambivalent or negative, burden, conflict, and blame conspire, creating a destructive cycle. Avenues for continuing study, including utilizing the dyad as the unit of analysis, troubled dyads, longitudinal assessment, and end of life context, are needed before interventions to improve mother-daughter relationship quality may be successfully implemented.

  16. Assessing quality of nursing care as a confounding variable in an outcome study on neurodevelopmental treatment.

    PubMed

    Hafsteinsdóttir, Thóra B; Kruitwagen, Cas; Strijker, Karin; van der Weide, Lies; Grypdonck, Maria H F

    2007-01-01

    When planning a study measuring the effects of a neurodevelopmental treatment (NDT), we were confronted with the methodological problem that while measuring the effects of NDT, a rival hypothesis is that the decision to implement the NDT might be related to the quality of nursing care. Therefore, we measured the quality of nursing care as a possible confounding variable in relation to this outcome study. The quality of nursing care was measured on 12 wards participating in the experimental and control groups of the outcome study. Data were collected from 125 patients and 71 nurses and patients' records. The findings showed no significant differences in the quality of nursing care between the 2 groups of wards (P = .49). This method may be useful to other researchers conducting outcome research and who are confronted with a similar methodological problem.

  17. Exploring the Quality of Life of Younger Residents Living in Long-Term Care Facilities.

    PubMed

    Hay, Kara; Chaudhury, Habib

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the characteristics of "quality of life" of younger residents in long-term care facilities. This multimethod study employed in-depth interviews with younger residents, focus groups with staff members and interviews with management team members at two care facilities in British Columbia, Canada. Data analysis revealed three themes: (a) a new chapter in life, (b) experiencing quality of life, and (c) nature of social life. These themes highlight the characteristics of younger residents' quality of life and provide insights into the salient contributing factors. Findings of this study are useful in better understanding aspects of younger residents' quality of life and their psychosocial needs and consequently can guide decision making to provide an appropriate care environment for this population segment in long-term care settings.

  18. A Closer Look at Kith and Kin Care: Exploring Variability of Quality within Family, Friend and Neighbor Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shivers, Eva Marie

    2006-01-01

    This exploratory study focused on the interactional dimensions of kith and kin care, and involved childcare providers living in low-income urban communities in Los Angeles (80% African American; 20% Latina). The focus of the present study was to examine: 1) The range and variability of each index of quality--providers' professional development…

  19. Developments in total quality management in the United States: the Intermountain Health Care perspective.

    PubMed

    Richards, K F

    1994-06-01

    In summary our purpose has been to evaluate quality in the following terms. Best process of care--narrowing the variation of care decisions, working towards the best method. Best clinical outcome--decreased morbidity ond mortality. Best patient satisfaction--both for clinical outcome and the process of care. Best value--best value at the lowest cost. At Intermountain Health Care we believe that the best way to achieve the best quality improvement in a health care system is to involve all of the participants--patients, providers, and systems--in employing the principles of total quality management. Patient involvement--in prevention; participating in best care process through education and utilisation; in evaluating functional status before, during, and after intervention; in satisfaction; in clinical outcome and follow up with providers. Provider involvement--in planning, implementing, analysing, and educating; in defining guidelines; in reassessing and defining guidelines; in reassessing and continually modifying the care map, always striving for "best care." System involvement--in providing structure and mechanisms, support staff, and information systems and being willing to focus on quality as a part of its mission. An American philosopher, George Santayana, once said: "What we call the contagious force of an idea is really the force of the people who have embraced it." It will be up to all of us collectively to become the force behind moving quality management principles into the forefront of patient care methodology and ensuring that quality remains as the guiding principle of health care delivery in the future.

  20. Quality of Care for Patients With Traction in Shahid Beheshti Hospital in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Adib Hajbaghery, Mohsen; Moradi, Tayebeh

    2013-01-01

    Background With increasing incidence of traumatic fractures, the use of orthopedic intervention such as traction has increased. Inappropriate traction care may cause substantial morbidity and delay the patient rehabilitation. Objectives This study was conducted to evaluate the quality of care for patients with traction in the orthopedic unit of Kashan's Shahid Beheshti Hospital, Kashan, Iran. Patients and Methods This observational study was conducted on 100 patients with traumatic fractures of hip and femur bones who were admitted to Kashan Shahid-Beheshti Hospital during the first 6 months of 2012, and for whom skeletal or skin traction was performed. Data were collected using a checklist including questions about the personal characteristics and 23 items related to care for patients with tractions. These items were in three domains including caring while establishing traction, recording care and patient’s education. Descriptive statistics were calculated and data were analyzed using the independent sample t-test and Pearson correlation coefficient. Results The mean age of patients was 51.16 ± 23.28 years and 66% of them were male. In total, 47% of the patients were treated by skin traction and 53% by skeletal traction. The overall mean score of quality of care was 10.20 ± 2.64. Quality of establishing traction was good in 55% of patients, but the quality of care was poor in the domains of recording care (88%) and patient education (96%). Total mean of quality of care was significantly different between male and female patients (P < 0.02). Conclusions The quality of care of patients with traction was not optimal. Therefore it is necessary to improve measures in this area. PMID:24396800

  1. Quality of care in hospital emergency departments and family physicians' offices.

    PubMed Central

    Spasoff, R. A.; Lane, P.; Steele, R.

    1977-01-01

    Indicator conditions were used to evaluate the quality of 686 episodes of care provided in two emergency departments and in five family physicians' offices. Overall, the care was considered adequate in 53% of the emergency department cases and in 40% of the cases dealt with in family physicians' offices, the difference being significant (P less than 0.01). Referrals were very common in both settings, and when quality was assessed solely on the basis of the care actually given by the primary-care providers the difference between the two settings disappeared. Half the observed deficiencies in care related to failure to document the findings from history-taking and physical examination. From these and earlier findings we conclude that the emergency department can be an appropriate setting for the care of nontraumatic illness. PMID:880525

  2. Do We Care More about Our Cars than about Our Children? High-Quality Child Care: Luxury Option or Standard Equipment?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koshansky, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    Reviews research showing that there is a level of quality below which children's development is compromised. Uses analogies of options available to consumers when buying cars to designate features of quality child care. Argues that high-quality care should be available to all children. (AMC)

  3. AHRQ prevention quality indicators to assess the quality of primary care of local providers: a pilot study from Italy

    PubMed Central

    Flacco, Maria Elena; De Vito, Corrado; Arcà, Silvia; Carle, Flavia; Capasso, Lorenzo; Marzuillo, Carolina; Muraglia, Angelo; Samani, Fabio; Villari, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Background: Outside the USA, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) prevention quality indicators (PQIs) have been used to compare the quality of primary care services only at a national or regional level. However, in several national health systems, primary care is not directly managed by the regions but is in charge of smaller territorial entities. We evaluated whether PQIs might be used to compare the performance of local providers such as Italian local health authorities (LHAs) and health districts. Methods: We analysed the hospital discharge abstracts of 44 LHAs (and 11 health districts) of five Italian regions (including ≈18 million residents) in 2008–10. Age-standardized PQI rates were computed following AHRQ specifications. Potential predictors were investigated using multilevel modelling. Results: We analysed 11 470 722 hospitalizations. The overall rates of preventable hospitalizations (composite PQI 90) were 1012, 889 and 988 (×100 000 inhabitants) in 2008, 2009 and 2010, respectively. Composite PQIs were able to differentiate LHAs and health districts and showed small variation in the performance ranking over years. Conclusion: Although further research is required, our findings support the use of composite PQIs to evaluate the performance of relatively small primary health care providers (50 000–60 000 enrollees) in countries with universal health care coverage. Achieving high precision may be crucial for a structured quality assessment system to align hospitalization rate indicators with measures of other contexts of care (cost, clinical management, satisfaction/experience) that are typically computed at a local level. PMID:24367065

  4. Health Care User Perspectives on Constructing, Contextualizing, and Co-Producing “Quality of Care”

    PubMed Central

    Baim-Lance, Abigail; Tietz, Daniel; Schlefer, Madeleine; Agins, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Most of the research on health care user “quality of care” perspectives seeks discrete and measurable indicators to advance quality improvement (QI) goals. This lacks sufficiently grounded query about the meaning of “quality of care” for health users, and how context influences their ideas and experiences. We studied this between 2010 and 2011, repeatedly interviewing and shadowing 45 individuals in three of New York’s hospital-based outpatient HIV care settings during routine visits. We found participants using common terminology, but across the cohort meaning varied and employed personal narratives. Participants conveyed the impact of historic and current experiences of stigma and discrimination on limiting access to care, and showed its destabilizing effects on quality constructs. Participants also felt they contributed to their health care settings’ delivery of quality care. From our findings, we discuss the applicability and implications of “co-production” to conceptualize health care as jointly delivered by typical “givers” and “receivers” of care. PMID:25670664

  5. A quality improvement framework for equity in cardiovascular care: results of a national collaborative.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Bruce; Sears, Vickie; Bretsch, Jennifer K; Wilson, Marcia; Jones, Karen C; Mead, Holly; Hasnain-Wynia, Romana; Ayala, Rochelle Knowles; Bhalla, Rohit; Cornue, Christopher M; Emrich, Christina Marie; Patel, Paru; Setzer, Jean R; Suitonu, Jennifer; Velazquez, Eric J; Eagle, Kim Allan; Winniford, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    Disparities in the quality of cardiovascular care provided to minorities have been well documented, but less is known about the use of quality improvement methods to eliminate these disparities. Measurement is also often impeded by a lack of reliable patient demographic data. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of hospitals with large minority populations to measure and improve the care rendered to Black and Hispanic patients. The Expecting Success: Excellence in Cardiac Care project utilized the standardized collection of self-reported patient race, ethnicity, and language data to generate stratified performance measures for cardiac care coupled with evidence-based practice tools in a national competitively selected sample of 10 hospitals with high cardiac volumes and largely minority patient populations. Main outcomes included changes in nationally recognized measures of acute myocardial infarction and heart failure quality of care and 2 composite measures, stratified by patient demographic characteristics. Quality improved significantly at 7 of the 10 hospitals as gauged by composite measures (p < .05), and improvements exceeded those observed nationally for all hospitals. Three of 10 hospitals found racial or ethnic disparities which were eliminated in the course of the project. Clinicians and institutions were able to join the standardized collection of self-reported patient demographic data to evidence-based measures and quality improvement tools to improve the care of minorities and eliminate disparities in care. This framework may be replicable to ensure equity in other clinical areas.

  6. Comparing Quality of Public Primary Care between Hong Kong and Shanghai Using Validated Patient Assessment Tools

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaolin; Li, Haitao; Yang, Nan; Wong, Samuel Y. S.; Owolabi, Onikepe; Xu, Jianguang; Shi, Leiyu; Tang, Jinling; Li, Donald; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Primary care is the key element of health reform in China. The objective of this study was to compare patient assessed quality of public primary care between Hong Kong, a city with established primary care environment influenced by its colonial history, and Shanghai, a city leading primary care reform in Mainland China; and to measure the equity of care in the two cities. Methods Cross sectional stratified random sampling surveys were conducted in 2011. Data were collected from 1,994 respondents in Hong Kong and 811 respondents in Shanghai. A validated Chinese version of the primary care assessment tool was employed to assess perceived quality of primary care with respect to socioeconomic characteristics and health status. Results We analyzed 391 and 725 respondents in Hong Kong and Shanghai, respectively, who were regular public primary care users. Respondents in Hong Kong reported significant lower scores in first contact accessibility (1.59 vs. 2.15), continuity of care (2.33 vs. 3.10), coordination of information (2.84 vs. 3.64), comprehensiveness service availability (2.43 vs. 3.31), comprehensiveness service provided (2.11 vs. 2.40), and the total score (23.40 vs. 27.40), but higher scores in first contact utilization (3.15 vs. 2.54) and coordination of services (2.67 vs. 2.40) when compared with those in Shanghai. Respondents with higher income reported a significantly higher total primary care score in Hong Kong, but not in Shanghai. Conclusions Respondents in Shanghai reported better quality of public primary care than those in Hong Kong, while quality of public primary care tended to be more equitable in Shanghai. PMID:25826616

  7. Quality of Care in One Italian Nursing Home Measured by ACOVE Process Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Pileggi, Claudia; Manuti, Benedetto; Costantino, Rosa; Bianco, Aida; Nobile, Carmelo G. A.; Pavia, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To adapt the Assessing Care of Vulnerable Elders Quality Indicators (ACOVE QIs) for use in Italy, to assess the adherence to these indicators as reported in the medical records of residents in a nursing home (NH), to compare this adherence for general medical and geriatric conditions, and eventually, to identify the relationships between patients' characteristics and reported processes of care. Methods Two physicians collected the data by reviewing medical records of all NH residents in the previous 5 years, for a period of one year. Patients aged <65 years were excluded. A total of 245 patients were reviewed during the study period. The ACOVE QIs set, developed for NH processes of care, was used to assess the quality of care. Multivariate analysis was performed to identify and to assess the role of patients' characteristics on quality of processes of care by several domains of care in general medical and geriatric conditions. Results With the exception of diabetes management, quality of processes of care for general medical conditions approached adequate adherence. Care falls substantially short of acceptable levels for geriatric conditions (pressure ulcers, falls, dementia). On the contrary, the recommended interventions for urinary incontinence were commonly performed. Adherence to indicators varied for the different domains of care and was proven worse for the screening and prevention indicators both for geriatric and general medical conditions. Statistical analysis showed disparities in provision of appropriate processes of care associated with gender, age, co-morbidities, level of function and mobility, length of stay and modality of discharge by NHs. Conclusions Adherence to recommended processes of care delivered in NH is inadequate. Substantial work lies ahead for the improvement of care. Efforts should focus particularly on management of geriatric conditions and on preventive healthcare. PMID:24675745

  8. Guiding Principles for Providing High-Quality Education in Juvenile Justice Secure Care Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    Providing high-quality education in juvenile justice secure care settings presents unique challenges for the administrators, teachers, and staff who are responsible for the education, rehabilitation, and welfare of youths committed to their care. The United States departments of Education (ED) and Justice (DOJ) recognize that while these…

  9. Child Care Quality: Does It Matter and Does It Need To Be Improved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandell, Deborah Lowe; Wolfe, Barbara

    This report aims to provide an answer to the question of whether there is an economic justification for public intervention to improve the quality of nonparental child care, especially for lower income families. Evidence from large- and small-scale studies of the effects of child care on children's development is presented, and the economic…

  10. Parents' and Providers' Views of Important Aspects of Child Care Quality. Publication #2015-13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sosinsky, Laura; Halle, Tamara; Susman-Stillman, Amy; Cleveland, Jennifer; Li, Weilin

    2015-01-01

    The Maryland-Minnesota Child Care Research Partnership brought together two states committed to examining critical issues in early care and education and using research findings to inform policy with an interdisciplinary team of researchers experienced in conducting studies on (1) subsidy policy; (2) quality improvement strategies; and (3)…

  11. The Relationship of Day Care Quality to Children's Free Play Behavior and Social Problem Solving Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Susan D.; Reichhart-Erickson, Marina

    A total of 55 children attending 15 day care centers and nursery schools participated in an investigation of the relationship of day care quality to 4-year-old children's activities during free play and to their knowledge of social problem solving. The study also considered the extent to which social class mediated relationships between variables.…

  12. The Quality of Life of Palliative Care Staff: A Personal Construct Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared palliative care staff with staff from burn and neonatal units and with mature age general nursing trainees at end of training. Found that palliative care staff expressed better quality of life, in terms of significantly less anxiety and depression, as well as more good feelings than other staff groups. (Author/NB)

  13. Evaluating the Quality of the Learning Outcome in Healthcare Sector: The Expero4care Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cervai, Sara; Polo, Federica

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to present the Expero4care model. Considering the growing need for a training evaluation model that does not simply fix processes, the Expero4care model represents the first attempt of a "quality model" dedicated to the learning outcomes of healthcare trainings. Design/Methodology/Approach: Created as development…

  14. Within- and Between-Sector Quality Differences in Early Childhood Education and Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bassok, Daphna; Fitzpatrick, Maria; Greenberg, Erica; Loeb, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    This study leverages nationally representative data (N ˜ 6,000) to examine the magnitude of quality differences between (a) formal and informal early childhood education and care providers; (b) Head Start, prekindergarten, and other center-based care; and (c) programs serving toddlers and those serving preschoolers. It then documents differences…

  15. Timing of High-Quality Child Care and Cognitive, Language, and Preacademic Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Weilin; Farkas, George; Duncan, Greg J.; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2013-01-01

    The effects of high- versus low-quality child care during 2 developmental periods (infant-toddlerhood and preschool) were examined using data from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Study of Early Child Care. Propensity score matching was used to account for differences in families who used different combinations of child…

  16. Information-Seeking in Family Day Care: Access, Quality and Personal Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corr, L.; Davis, E.; Cook, K.; Mackinnon, A.; Sims, M.; Herrman, H.

    2014-01-01

    Family day-care (FDC) educators work autonomously to provide care and education for children of mixed ages, backgrounds and abilities. To meet the demands and opportunities of their work and regulatory requirements, educators need access to context-relevant and high quality information. No previous research has examined how and where these workers…

  17. Hospice in Assisted Living: Promoting Good Quality Care at End of Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartwright, Juliana C.; Miller, Lois; Volpin, Miriam

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to describe good quality care at the end of life (EOL) for hospice-enrolled residents in assisted living facilities (ALFs). Design and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design was used to obtain detailed descriptions of EOL care provided by ALF medication aides, caregivers, nurses, and hospice nurses in…

  18. Preschool Center Care Quality Effects on Academic Achievement: An Instrumental Variables Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auger, Anamarie; Farkas, George; Burchinal, Margaret R.; Duncan, Greg J.; Vandell, Deborah Lowe

    2014-01-01

    Much of child care research has focused on the effects of the quality of care in early childhood settings on children's school readiness skills. Although researchers increased the statistical rigor of their approaches over the past 15 years, researchers' ability to draw causal inferences has been limited because the studies are based on…

  19. Quality of Care for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Rural and Urban US Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baldwin, Laura-Mae; MacLehose, Richard F.; Hart, L. Gary; Beaver, Shelli K.; Every,Nathan; Chan,Leighton

    2004-01-01

    Context: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a common and important cause of admission to US rural hospitals, as transport of patients with AMI to urban settings can result in unacceptable delays in care. Purpose: To examine the quality of care for patients with AMI in rural hospitals with differing degrees of remoteness from urban centers.…

  20. Child-Care Provider Survey Reveals Cost Constrains Quality. Research Brief. Volume 96, Number 5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Policy Forum, 2008

    2008-01-01

    A survey of 414 child care providers in southeastern Wisconsin reveals that cost as well as low wages and lack of benefits for workers can constrain providers from pursuing improvements to child-care quality. Of survey respondents, approximately half of whom are home-based and half center-based, 13% have at least three of five structural factors…