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Sample records for quality patient care

  1. CMS emphasizes quality patient care.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    The Inpatient Prospective Payment System proposed rule for fiscal 2015 continues the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' move toward basing reimbursement on quality of care, not quantity. The rule also asks for public input on the two-midnight rule and a policy to address short-stay patients. CMS is implementing the Hospital-Acquired Condition Reduction Program, which penalizes hospitals that perform poorly. The agency proposes to add two safety measures to value-based purchasing in the future. PMID:24946382

  2. Quality of Care in the Cirrhotic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Volk, Michael L; Kanwal, Fasiha

    2016-01-01

    Cirrhosis is a common, complex, chronic condition requiring care by multiple specialists in different locations. Emerging data demonstrates limitations in the quality of care these patients receive—in large part due to the problems with care coordination rather than failures of individual providers. This article will discuss approaches for measuring quality, and provide a step-by-step guide for developing quality improvement programs for this patient population. PMID:27101005

  3. Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_160885.html Early Palliative Care Improves Patients' Quality of Life Also increases chances of having end-of-life ... incurable cancer helps patients cope and improves their quality of life, a new study shows. It also leads to ...

  4. Patient satisfaction surveys and quality of care: an information paper.

    PubMed

    Farley, Heather; Enguidanos, Enrique R; Coletti, Christian M; Honigman, Leah; Mazzeo, Anthony; Pinson, Thomas B; Reed, Kevin; Wiler, Jennifer L

    2014-10-01

    With passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, payment incentives were created to improve the "value" of health care delivery. Because physicians and physician practices aim to deliver care that is both clinically effective and patient centered, it is important to understand the association between the patient experience and quality health outcomes. Surveys have become a tool with which to quantify the consumer experience. In addition, results of these surveys are playing an increasingly important role in determining hospital payment. Given that the patient experience is being used as a surrogate marker for quality and value of health care delivery, we will review the patient experience-related pay-for-performance programs and effect on emergency medicine, discuss the literature describing the association between quality and the patient-reported experience, and discuss future opportunities for emergency medicine. PMID:24656761

  5. Patients' perceptions of care are associated with quality of hospital care: a survey of 4605 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Stein, Spencer M; Day, Michael; Karia, Raj; Hutzler, Lorraine; Bosco, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Favorable patient experience and low complication rates have been proposed as essential components of patient-centered medical care. Patients' perception of care is a key performance metric and is used to determine payments to hospitals. It is unclear if there is a correlation between technical quality of care and patient satisfaction. The study authors correlated patient perceptions of care measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores with accepted quality of care indicators. The Hospital Compare database (4605 hospitals) was used to examine complication rates and patient-reported experience for hospitals across the nation in 2011. The majority of the correlations demonstrated an inverse relationship between patient experience and complication rates. This negative correlation suggests that reducing these complications can lead to a better hospital experience. Overall, these results suggest that patient experience is generally correlated with the quality of care provided.

  6. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Insomnia

    PubMed Central

    Edinger, Jack D.; Buysse, Daniel J.; Deriy, Ludmila; Germain, Anne; Lewin, Daniel S.; Ong, Jason C.; Morgenthaler, Timothy I.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned five Workgroups to develop quality measures to optimize management and care for patients with common sleep disorders including insomnia. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, this document describes measurement methods for two desirable outcomes of therapy, improving sleep quality or satisfaction, and improving daytime function, and for four processes important to achieving these goals. To achieve the outcome of improving sleep quality or satisfaction, pre- and post-treatment assessment of sleep quality or satisfaction and providing an evidence-based treatment are recommended. To realize the outcome of improving daytime functioning, pre- and post-treatment assessment of daytime functioning, provision of an evidence-based treatment, and assessment of treatment-related side effects are recommended. All insomnia measures described in this report were developed by the Insomnia Quality Measures Workgroup and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with insomnia. Citation: Edinger JD, Buysse DJ, Deriy L, Germain A, Lewin DS, Ong JC, Morgenthaler TI. Quality measures for the care of patients with insomnia. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):311–334. PMID:25700881

  7. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, Lois E.; Hershner, Shelley; Loeding, Lauren D.; Maski, Kiran P.; Rifkin, Daniel I.; Selim, Bernardo; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Workgroup to develop quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. Following a comprehensive literature search, 306 publications were found addressing quality care or measures. Strength of association was graded between proposed process measures and desired outcomes. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, we identified three outcomes (including one outcome measure) and seven process measures. The first desired outcome was to reduce excessive daytime sleepiness by employing two process measures: quantifying sleepiness and initiating treatment. The second outcome was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis by employing the two process measures: completing both a comprehensive sleep history and an objective sleep assessment. The third outcome was to reduce adverse events through three steps: ensuring treatment follow-up, documenting medical comorbidities, and documenting safety measures counseling. All narcolepsy measures described in this report were developed by the Narcolepsy Quality Measures Work-group and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with narcolepsy. Citation: Krahn LE, Hershner S, Loeding LD, Maski KP, Rifkin DI, Selim B, Watson NF. Quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):335–355. PMID:25700880

  8. Meeting patients' needs: quality care in a changing environment.

    PubMed

    Rogut, L; Hudson, A

    1995-11-01

    Recent surveys of patients in New York and Cleveland, among other cities, indicate that there is substantial room for improvement in meeting patients' needs and preferences, particularly in the areas of emotional support, coordination of care, discharge preparation, and the involvement of family and friends. Hospitals are using a variety of techniques to improve patient care and organizational efficiency in this challenging environment. One prominent approach, reengineering, offers a means by which hospitals can integrate highly specialized departmental structures and functions by focusing on interdisciplinary teamwork and organizing the delivery of care around patients. Key elements of successful hospital reengineering efforts have included: - the involvement and commitment of senior management and other key stakeholders, particularly physicians, nurses, and union representatives; - investment in staff training and retraining, and the redesign of staff evaluation and compensation systems; - timely, unit-specific measures of patient satisfaction and the clinical quality of care; - consistent and frequent internal communication between staff and leadership; and - treatment that emphasizes communication among caregivers, patients, and their family members. Several basic issues need to be addressed if hospitals are to offer technically sophisticated medical care that is also responsive to their patients' personal needs, including: - variations among patients regarding the amount of information they want and need, and the amount of involvement they want in their care; - the means by which patients will get information about their medical care, and who will provide any additional support that may be needed by non-English-speaking or socioeconomically disadvantaged patients; and - the specific changes in medical practice and hospital processes that will promote the involvement of patients in their care. PMID:10164376

  9. Diabetes care quality is highly correlated with patient panel characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Steffani; O’Malley, Jean P.; Gold, Rachel; Heintzman, John; Likumahuwa, Sonja; DeVoe, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Health care reimbursement is increasingly based on quality. Little is known about how clinic-level patient characteristics affect quality performance, particularly in community health centers (CHCs). Methods Using electronic health record data for 4,019 diabetic patients from 23 CHC primary care clinics in the OCHIN practice-based research network, we calculated correlations between a clinic’s patient panel characteristics and delivery rates of diabetes preventive services in 2007. Using regression models, we estimated the proportion of clinic variability in clinics’ preventive services rates associated with the variability in the clinics’ patient panel characteristics. We also explored whether clinics’ performance rates were affected by how patient panel denominators were defined. Results Clinic rates of glycosylated hemoglobin testing, influenza immunizations, and lipid screening were positively associated with the percentage of patients with continuous health insurance coverage, and negatively associated with the percentage uninsured. Microalbumin screening rates were positively associated with the percentage of racial minorities in a clinic’s panel. Associations remained consistent with different panel denominators. Conclusions Clinic variability in delivery rates of preventive services correlates with differences in clinics’ patient panel characteristics, particularly the percentage of patients with continuous insurance coverage. Quality scores that do not account for these differences could create disincentives to diabetes care for vulnerable patients. PMID:24204063

  10. Do patients "like" good care? measuring hospital quality via Facebook.

    PubMed

    Timian, Alex; Rupcic, Sonia; Kachnowski, Stan; Luisi, Paloma

    2013-01-01

    With the growth of Facebook, public health researchers are exploring the platform's uses in health care. However, little research has examined the relationship between Facebook and traditional hospital quality measures. The authors conducted an exploratory quantitative analysis of hospitals' Facebook pages to assess whether Facebook "Likes" were associated with hospital quality and patient satisfaction. The 30-day mortality rates and patient recommendation rates were used to quantify hospital quality and patient satisfaction; these variables were correlated with Facebook data for 40 hospitals near New York, NY. The results showed that Facebook "Likes" have a strong negative association with 30-day mortality rates and are positively associated with patient recommendation. These exploratory findings suggest that the number of Facebook "Likes" for a hospital may serve as an indicator of hospital quality and patient satisfaction. These findings have implications for researchers and hospitals looking for a quick and widely available measure of these traditional indicators.

  11. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries.

  12. Patient involvement in education for enhanced quality of care.

    PubMed

    Le Var, R M H

    2002-12-01

    Government policies in the UK are promoting health care practitioners working in partnership with patients and clients as an important constituent of quality in health care delivery. However, for practitioners to work in this way requires experience of such partnerships in the educational preparation. The involvement of patients and clients (i.e. service users) and their carers in the curriculum has been encouraged and supported in England since the early 1990s. From 1998, the comprehensive involvement in all phases of programme provision has been a requirement, ensuring that service users have a real 'voice' in influencing the direction of programmes. Examples of good practice are provided, demonstrating a range of approaches in the different stages of the educational process. Issues to be considered for successful implementation are included. Benefits to education and patient/client care are identified on the basis of literature and recent experience. They are strongly associated with enhanced quality of care. The article argues for a need to continue to broaden implementation for the major benefits of influencing the attitudes and approaches of students, and empowering users, with the end result of enhancing the quality of care. A strategic approach is needed to make user involvement an effective and workable reality. The need for systematic evaluation of the outcomes and for publications is highlighted. The principle of service user involvement in educational preparation is deemed to be equally relevant in other countries. PMID:12492943

  13. Health System Quality Improvement: Impact of Prompt Nutrition Care on Patient Outcomes and Health Care Costs.

    PubMed

    Meehan, Anita; Loose, Claire; Bell, Jvawnna; Partridge, Jamie; Nelson, Jeffrey; Goates, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Among hospitalized patients, malnutrition is prevalent yet often overlooked and undertreated. We implemented a quality improvement program that positioned early nutritional care into the nursing workflow. Nurses screened for malnutrition risk at patient admission and then immediately ordered oral nutritional supplements for those at risk. Supplements were given as regular medications, guided and monitored by medication administration records. Post-quality improvement program, pressure ulcer incidence, length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and costs of care were reduced.

  14. Case management in an acute-care hospital: collaborating for quality, cost-effective patient care.

    PubMed

    Grootveld, Kim; Wen, Victoria; Bather, Michelle; Park, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Case management has recently been advanced as a valuable component in achieving quality patient care that is also cost-effective. At St. Michael's Hospital, in Toronto, Ontario, case managers from a variety of professional backgrounds are central to a new care initiative--Rapid Assessment and Planning to Inform Disposition (RAPID)--in the General Internal Medicine (GIM) Unit that is designed to improve patient care and reconcile high emergency department volumes through "smart bed spacing." Involved in both planning and RAPID, GIM's case managers are the link between patient care and utilization management. These stewards of finite resources strive to make the best use of dollars spent while maintaining a commitment to quality care. Collaborating closely with physicians and others across the hospital, GIM's case managers have been instrumental in bringing about significant improvements in care coordination, utilization management and process redesign. PMID:24844723

  15. Quality of care: compared perceptions of patient and prosthodontist.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, B B; Razzoog, M E; Robinson, E

    1984-11-01

    The results suggest that, with the exception of retention, differences between patients' and prosthodontists' perceptions of treatment with complete dentures display greater variability with regard to function than to either esthetics or comfort. Although the literature has suggested that satisfying the esthetic concerns of the patient is likely to be a major hurdle in denture treatment success, this study suggests that occlusion, retention, and vertical dimension may be of more importance to effective communication. Misconceptions and unreal expectations should be dealt with early in the treatment program to avoid patient dissatisfaction. During the 1972 International Prosthodontic Workshop held in Ann Arbor, Michigan, the statement was made that patients were generally an unreliable guide as to the adequacy of their dentures, especially after wearing them for a period of time, and that further research to document the patient's reliability seemed unnecessary. This study has demonstrated that patients are quite reliable judges of many criteria related to dentures, provided channels for two-way communication are opened. With the ever greater economic stresses that force dentists to consider patients' concerns, perhaps it is increasingly the dentist's responsibility to better educate patients to evaluate all aspects of the quality of care they receive and encourage extensive two-way communication early in the treatment process. The adjusted quality assessment criteria used in the present study may be a useful instrument to use with patients prior to the initial interview in an effort to establish a better dentist-patient relationship.

  16. Quality specifications and standard-setting for stoma care patients.

    PubMed

    Primer, M A

    1995-12-01

    Quality specifications can be used as an information resource by purchasers of health care. The nature of service provision and nursing care can be positively influenced by the formalisation of standards and quality specifications. Auditing is essential in the ongoing evaluation of a quality system. PMID:8552696

  17. Quality Nursing Care for Hospitalized Patients with Advanced Illness: Concept Development

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Shigeko; Baggs, Judith G.; Knafl, Kathleen A.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of nursing care as perceived by hospitalized patients with advanced illness has not been examined. A concept of quality nursing care for this population was developed by integrating the literature on constructs defining quality nursing care with empirical findings from interviews of 16 patients with advanced illness. Quality nursing care was characterized as competence and personal caring supported by professionalism and delivered with an appropriate demeanor. Although the attributes of competence, caring, professionalism, and demeanor were identified as common components of quality care across various patient populations, the caring domain increased in importance when patients with advanced illness perceived themselves as vulnerable. Assessment of quality nursing care for patients with advanced illness needs to include measures of patient perceptions of vulnerability. PMID:20572095

  18. Barriers to Quality Care for Dying Patients in Rural Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Vorst, Rebecca F.; Crane, Lori A.; Barton, Phoebe Lindsey; Kutner, Jean S.; Kallail, K. James; Westfall, John M.

    2006-01-01

    Context: Barriers to providing optimal palliative care in rural communities are not well understood. Purpose: To identify health care personnel's perceptions of the care provided to dying patients in rural Kansas and Colorado and to identify barriers to providing optimal care. Methods: An anonymous self-administered survey was sent to health care…

  19. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed. PMID:10140872

  20. The patient as the pivot point for quality in health care delivery.

    PubMed

    Lengnick-Hall, C A

    1995-01-01

    Health care enterprises make comprehensive and durable changes in people. This human-centered purpose defines the fundamental nature of quality in health care settings. Traditional perspectives of quality and familiar views of customer satisfaction are inadequate to manage the complex relationships between the health care delivery firm and its patients. Patients play four roles in health care systems that must be reflected when defining and measuring quality in these settings: patient as supplier, patient as product, patient as participant, and patient as recipient. This article presents a conceptual model of quality that incorporates these diverse patient roles. The strategic and managerial implications of the model are also discussed.

  1. [Quality of care in intensive care units. Retrospective study on long-term patients].

    PubMed

    García, M P; López, P; Eseverri, C; Zazpe, C; Asiain, M C

    1998-01-01

    Nursing care must be evaluated in order to determine its effectiveness and identify deficiencies, which makes it possible to introduce corrective measures to optimize quality. The quality of care given to patients in our unit was evaluated with a retrospective analysis of 915 records in the Nursing Care Plan corresponding to 59 patients with a mean ICU stay of 15.5 days. Six areas of care and indicators of deficient practice were identified: orotracheal intubation: accidental disconnection, displacement, obstruction, and pressure sores on lips; arterial catheterization: accidental disconnection and obstruction; central venous catheterization: accidental disconnection and contamination; urinary catheterization: accidental disconnection and urinary bacteriology; nasogastric intubation: accidental disconnection, obstruction, and nasal pressure sores; conservation of skin integrity: presence of pressure sores, and prevention of falls from the bed or chair. The reference standards were taken from the published literature. The results show that airway care was adequate, although the frequency of pressure sores on the lip produced by orotracheal tubes was high. The indicators for following up the care of vascular and urinary catheters showed results similar to established standards. There was a high rate of nasogastric tube obstruction due to the administration of medication. Finally, the frequency of pressure sores was well below established standards and there were no accidental falls. It is concluded that the detection of areas in which care is deficient requires an analysis of relevant nursing activities so that corrective measures can be taken. This study is a useful baseline for future quality control.

  2. Analysis of early accountable care organizations defines patient, structural, cost, and quality-of-care characteristics.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Arnold M; Jha, Ashish K; Orav, E John; Liebman, Daniel L; Audet, Anne-Marie J; Zezza, Mark A; Guterman, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have attracted interest from many policy makers and clinical leaders because of their potential to improve the quality of care and reduce costs. Federal ACO programs for Medicare beneficiaries are now up and running, but little information is available about the baseline characteristics of early entrants. In this descriptive study we present data on the structural and market characteristics of these early ACOs and compare ACOs' patient populations, costs, and quality with those of their non-ACO counterparts at baseline. We found that ACO patients were more likely than non-ACO patients to be older than age eighty and had higher incomes. ACO patients were less likely than non-ACO patients to be black, covered by Medicaid, or disabled. The cost of care for ACO patients was slightly lower than that for non-ACO patients. Slightly fewer than half of the ACOs had a participating hospital. Hospitals that were in ACOs were more likely than non-ACO hospitals to be large, teaching, and not-for-profit, although there was little difference in their performance on quality metrics. Our findings can be useful in interpreting the early results from the federal ACO programs and in establishing a baseline to assess the programs' development.

  3. Quality measures for the care of patients with lateral epicondylalgia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Lateral epicondylalgia (LE) defines a condition of varying degrees of pain near the lateral epicondyle. Studies on the management of LE indicated unexplained variations in the use of pharmacologic, non-pharmacological and surgical treatments. The main aim of this paper was to develop and evaluate clinical quality measures (QMs) or quality indicators, which may be used to assess the quality of the processes of examination, education and treatment of patients with LE. Methods Different QMs were developed by a multidisciplinary group of experts in Quality Management of Health Services during a period of one year. The process was based following a 3-step model: i) review and proportion of existing evidence-based recommendations; ii) review and development of quality measures; iii) pilot testing of feasibility and reliability of the indicators leading to a final consensus by the whole panel. Results Overall, a set of 12 potential indicators related to medical and physical therapy assessment and treatment were developed to measure the performance of LE care. Different systematic reviews and randomized control trials supported each of the indicators judged to be valid during the expert panel process. Application of the new indicator set was found to be feasible; only the measurement of two quality measures had light barriers. Reliability was mostly excellent (Kappa > 0.8). Conclusions A set of good practice indicators has been built and pilot tested as feasible and reliable. The chosen 3-step standardized evidence-based process ensures maximum clarity, acceptance and sustainability of the developed indicators. PMID:24172311

  4. Understanding quality patient care and the role of the practicing nurse.

    PubMed

    Owens, Laura D; Koch, Robert W

    2015-03-01

    Nurses play a vital role in improving the safety and quality of patient care. The authors provide the front-line nurse providers with an overview of critical concepts related to quality management of patient care. A historical approach provides the reader with an overview of the trajectory or the quality in health care movement. Furthermore, the article provides the nurse with a basic understanding of national and international organizations that focus on quality patient care. A brief introduction of measures of quality care is presented as well as implications for nursing practice.

  5. Patient Satisfaction with Hospital Inpatient Care: Effects of Trust, Medical Insurance and Perceived Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qunhong; Liu, Chaojie; Jiao, Mingli; Hao, Yanhua; Han, Yuzhen; Gao, Lijun; Hao, Jiejing; Wang, Lan; Xu, Weilan; Ren, Jiaojiao

    2016-01-01

    Objective Deteriorations in the patient-provider relationship in China have attracted increasing attention in the international community. This study aims to explore the role of trust in patient satisfaction with hospital inpatient care, and how patient-provider trust is shaped from the perspectives of both patients and providers. Methods We adopted a mixed methods approach comprising a multivariate logistic regression model using secondary data (1200 people with inpatient experiences over the past year) from the fifth National Health Service Survey (NHSS, 2013) in Heilongjiang Province to determine the associations between patient satisfaction and trust, financial burden and perceived quality of care, followed by in-depth interviews with 62 conveniently selected key informants (27 from health and 35 from non-health sectors). A thematic analysis established a conceptual framework to explain deteriorating patient-provider relationships. Findings About 24% of respondents reported being dissatisfied with hospital inpatient care. The logistic regression model indicated that patient satisfaction was positively associated with higher level of trust (OR = 14.995), lower levels of hospital medical expenditure (OR = 5.736–1.829 as compared with the highest quintile of hospital expenditure), good staff attitude (OR = 3.155) as well as good ward environment (OR = 2.361). But patient satisfaction was negatively associated with medical insurance for urban residents and other insurance status (OR = 0.215–0.357 as compared with medical insurance for urban employees). The qualitative analysis showed that patient trust—the most significant predictor of patient satisfaction—is shaped by perceived high quality of service delivery, empathic and caring interpersonal interactions, and a better designed medical insurance that provides stronger financial protection and enables more equitable access to health care. Conclusion At the core of high levels of patient dissatisfaction

  6. Family physicians improve patient health care quality and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Bowman, Marjorie A; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2013-01-01

    This issue exemplifies family physicians' ability to provide great care and to continuously improve. For example, beyond other specialty care, the care provided by family physicians is associated with improved melanoma diagnosis and outcomes and improved preventive services for those with a history of breast cancer. Electronic health records are providing new avenues to both assess outcomes and influence care. However, to truly reward quality care, simplistic and readily measurable items such as laboratory results or assessment of the provision of preventive services must be adjusted for risk. Health insurance influences classic preventive care services more than personal health behaviors. The care provided at federally qualified health centers throughout the nation is highly appreciated by the people they serve and is not plagued by the types of disparities in other settings.

  7. Loss of relational continuity of care in schizophrenia: associations with patient satisfaction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Sanatinia, Rahil; Cowan, Violet; Barnicot, Kirsten; Zalewska, Krysia; Shiers, David; Cooper, Stephen J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Users of mental health service are concerned about changes in clinicians providing their care, but little is known about their impact. Aims To examine associations between changes in staff, and patient satisfaction and quality of care. Method A national cross-sectional survey of 3379 people aged 18 or over treated in secondary care for schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Results Nearly 41.9% reported at least one change in their key worker during the previous 12 months and 10.5% reported multiple changes. Those reporting multiple changes were less satisfied with their treatment and less likely to report having a care plan, knowing how to obtain help when in a crisis or to have had recommended physical health assessments. Conclusions Frequent changes in staff providing care for people with psychosis are associated with poorer quality of care. Greater efforts need to be made to protect relational continuity of care for such patients. Declaration of interest M.J.C. was co-chair of the expert advisory group on the NICE quality standard on Service User Experience in Adult Mental Health. S.J.C. has previously been a member of the Health and Social Care Board Northern Ireland Formulary Committee. D.S. received a speaker’s fee from Janssen Cilag in 2011. He is a topic expert on NICE guideline for psychosis and schizophrenia in children and young people and a board member of National Collaborating Centre for Mental Health. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2016. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) license. PMID:27713834

  8. Associations between perceived chronic care quality, perceived patient centeredness, and illness representations among persons with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Joseph; Iyer, Neeraj N; Collins, William B

    2014-01-01

    Patient beliefs about their illness can motivate behaviors consistent with good disease management. Perceived high-quality chronic care would be expected to increase likelihood of having such beliefs. Associations between perceived quality of chronic care and illness representations, and associations between patient centeredness and illness representations were assessed among persons with diabetes. A mail survey of diabetic patients visiting a multispecialty physician network serving urban and suburban populations in a large midwestern city was conducted. The Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care-5A questionnaire was used to assess perceived chronic care quality and patient centeredness. The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire was used to assess illness representations. Of 500 mailed surveys, 89 completed surveys were returned. The sample consisted mostly of retirees (61%), Whites (81%), and women (60%). Higher perceived chronic care quality was associated with better disease understanding of diabetes (0.24, p = .05). Patients reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) indicated better disease understanding (-0.26, p = .04) and those reporting higher patient centeredness (or lower patient-centeredness scores) perceived less impact of illness (0.29, p = .02). Chronic care quality as defined in the Chronic Care Model and consistency of chronic care with patient expectations (patient centeredness) was associated with illness representations favorable for good self-care management.

  9. Patient safety measures in burn care: do National reporting systems accurately reflect quality of burn care?

    PubMed

    Mandell, Samuel P; Robinson, Ellen F; Cooper, Claudette L; Klein, Matthew B; Gibran, Nicole S

    2010-01-01

    Recently, much attention has been placed on quality of care metrics and patient safety. Groups such as the University Health-System Consortium (UHC) collect and review patient safety data, monitor healthcare facilities, and often report data using mortality and complication rates as outcomes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the UHC database to determine if it differentiates quality of care across burn centers. We reviewed UHC clinical database (CDB) fields and available data from 2006 to 2008 for the burn product line. Based on the September 2008 American Burn Association (ABA) list of verified burn centers, we categorized centers as American Burn Association-verified burn centers, self-identified burn centers, and other centers that are not burn units but admit some burn patients. We compared total burn admissions, risk pool, complication rates, and mortality rates. Overall mortality was compared between the UHC and National Burn Repository. The UHC CDB provides fields for number of admissions, % intensive care unit admission, risk pool, length of stay, complication profiles, and mortality index. The overall numbers of burn patients in the database for the study period included 17,740 patients admitted to verified burn centers (mean 631 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), 10,834 for self-identified burn centers (mean 437 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years), and 1,487 for other centers (mean 11.5 admissions/burn center/yr or per 2 years). Reported complication rates for verified burn centers (21.6%), self-identified burn centers (21.3%), and others (20%) were similar. Mortality rates were highest for self-identified burn centers (3.06%), less for verified centers (2.88%), and lowest for other centers (0.74%). However, these outcomes data may be misleading, because the risk pool criteria do not include burn-specific risk factors, and the inability to adjust for injury severity prevents rigorous comparison across centers. Databases such as the

  10. Examining the Role of Patient Experience Surveys in Measuring Health Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Marc N.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Hays, Ron D.; Lehrman, William G.; Rybowski, Lise; Edgman-Levitan, Susan; Cleary, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Patient care experience surveys evaluate the degree to which care is patient-centered. This article reviews the literature on the association between patient experiences and other measures of health care quality. Research indicates that better patient care experiences are associated with higher levels of adherence to recommended prevention and treatment processes, better clinical outcomes, better patient safety within hospitals, and less health care utilization. Patient experience measures that are collected using psychometrically sound instruments, employing recommended sample sizes and adjustment procedures, and implemented according to standard protocols are intrinsically meaningful and are appropriate complements for clinical process and outcome measures in public reporting and pay-for-performance programs. PMID:25027409

  11. Engaging Patients to Meet Their Fundamental Needs: Key to Safe and Quality Care.

    PubMed

    Jeffs, Lianne; Saragosa, Marianne; Merkley, Jane; Maione, Maria

    2016-01-01

    This paper highlights the relationship between the Fundamentals of Care Framework, patient safety and quality improvement by describing a more holistic view of patient engagement across the healthcare system. By creating reliable and resilient healthcare organizations that enhance nurses' capacity to engage in relational care and vigilance, healthcare agencies can effectively achieve safety and quality aims. Integral to this is the nurse-patient relationship, whereby nurses know patient preferences for care and recognize when patients are deteriorating to prevent harm within the context of care environments. PMID:27309642

  12. Standardizing the care of detox patients to achieve quality outcomes.

    PubMed

    Becker, Kathy; Semrow, Sue

    2006-03-01

    Providing appropriate treatment for detoxification patients is both challenging and difficult because alcohol abuse and dependence are largely underestimated in the acute hospital setting. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome is treated not only by addictionologists on chemical dependency units, but also by primary care physicians in acute inpatient settings. The need for consistent inpatient treatment through the use of identified protocols can help provide safe and effective care. The need for consistent, inpatient medical-surgical detoxification treatment in our organization became apparent with the staff's identification of patient care concerns. Using an organizational approach, a multidisciplinary team was created to standardize the care of detoxification patients, beginning with patient admission and ending with discharge and referral for outpatient management. Standardization would ensure consistent assessment and intervention, and improve communication among the clinical team members. A protocol was developed for both the emergency department and the inpatient units. The goals of the team were to decrease the adverse events related to detoxification, such as seizures and aggression, and provide a consistent method of treatment for staff to follow.

  13. Using the Vascular Quality Initiative to improve quality of care and patient outcomes for vascular surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Bensley, Rodney P; Beck, Adam W

    2015-06-01

    The Society for Vascular Surgery Vascular Quality Initiative (VQI) is a collaborative network of vascular specialists from various specialties that seeks to improve the quality and safety of vascular care by sharing data among physicians, medical centers, and regions. Working under a Patient Safety Organization designation by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, the VQI provides a protected environment where data can be pooled and evaluated for trends that might provide opportunities to improve the care we provide our patients. Since its inception in 2011, this national organization has grown rapidly and now involves >300 medical centers that are separated into 18 active regional groups who meet twice yearly to discuss quality improvement. The structure of the VQI provides a powerful platform for data collection and analysis, and has allowed the development of a large body of literature that demonstrates the importance and benefits of participation. Here we provide a brief overview of the VQI to date.

  14. In their own words: Patients and families define high-quality palliative care in the intensive care unit*

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Judith E.; Puntillo, Kathleen A.; Pronovost, Peter J.; Walker, Amy S.; McAdam, Jennifer L.; Ilaoa, Debra; Penrod, Joan

    2011-01-01

    Objective Although the majority of hospital deaths occur in the intensive care unit and virtually all critically ill patients and their families have palliative needs, we know little about how patients and families, the most important “stakeholders,” define high-quality intensive care unit palliative care. We conducted this study to obtain their views on important domains of this care. Design Qualitative study using focus groups facilitated by a single physician. Setting A 20-bed general intensive care unit in a 382-bed community hospital in Oklahoma; 24-bed medical–surgical intensive care unit in a 377-bed tertiary, university hospital in urban California; and eight-bed medical intensive care unit in a 311-bed Veterans’ Affairs hospital in a northeastern city. Patients Randomly-selected patients with intensive care unit length of stay ≥5 days in 2007 to 2008 who survived the intensive care unit, families of survivors, and families of patients who died in the intensive care unit. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results Focus group facilitator used open-ended questions and scripted probes from a written guide. Three investigators independently coded meeting transcripts, achieving consensus on themes. From 48 subjects (15 patients, 33 family members) in nine focus groups across three sites, a shared definition of high-quality intensive care unit palliative care emerged: timely, clear, and compassionate communication by clinicians; clinical decision-making focused on patients’ preferences, goals, and values; patient care maintaining comfort, dignity, and personhood; and family care with open access and proximity to patients, interdisciplinary support in the intensive care unit, and bereavement care for families of patients who died. Participants also endorsed specific processes to operationalize the care they considered important. Conclusions Efforts to improve intensive care unit palliative care quality should focus on domains and processes that

  15. Relationship Between Patients' Perceptions of Care Quality and Health Care Errors in 11 Countries: A Secondary Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Slack, Marion; Malone, Daniel C.; MacKinnon, Neil J.; Warholak, Terri L.

    2016-01-01

    Patients may be the most reliable reporters of some aspects of the health care process; their perspectives should be considered when pursuing changes to improve patient safety. The authors evaluated the association between patients' perceived health care quality and self-reported medical, medication, and laboratory errors in a multinational sample. The analysis was conducted using the 2010 Commonwealth Fund International Health Policy Survey, a multinational consumer survey conducted in 11 countries. Quality of care was measured by a multifaceted construct developed using Rasch techniques. After adjusting for potentially important confounding variables, an increase in respondents' perceptions of care coordination decreased the odds of self-reporting medical errors, medication errors, and laboratory errors (P < .001). As health care stakeholders continue to search for initiatives that improve care experiences and outcomes, this study's results emphasize the importance of guaranteeing integrated care. PMID:26783863

  16. Quality of life and quality of care data from a 7-year pilot project for home ventilator patients.

    PubMed

    Baldwin-Myers, A S; Oppenheimer, E A

    1996-01-01

    A research demonstration pilot project for hospitalized adult and pediatric long-term ventilator-dependent patients was conducted by Kaiser Permanente Southern California Region from 1985 until 1992. The purpose of the pilot project was to investigate if home care was a realistic alternative to continued hospital care. Many aspects of home care as compared to hospital care were studied. The results of the quality of life and quality of care study in addition to cost data are presented in this paper. Standardized questionnaire tools were used to obtain patient data from the perspective of the patient, as well as others providing direct patient care. Respondents were asked to measure perceptions of quality of life and quality of care at home versus at the hospital in regard to health status, life satisfaction, emotional well-being, caregiver ability, and professional care and services. Quality of care was found to be similar to hospital care. Quality of life was judged to be better at home. PMID:10154369

  17. Determinants of Quality of Life in Primary Care Patients with Diabetes: Implications for Social Workers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ayalon, Liat; Gross, Revital; Tabenkin, Hava; Porath, Avi; Heymann, Anthony; Porter, Boaz

    2008-01-01

    Using a cross-sectional design of 400 primary care patients with diabetes, the authors evaluated demographics, health status, subjective health and mental health, health behaviors, health beliefs, knowledge of diabetes treatment, satisfaction with medical care, and quality of medical care as potential predictors of QoL and QoL in the hypothetical…

  18. Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and families… | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Palliative Care Palliative Care: Increasing the quality of life for patients and ... Past Issues / Spring 2014 Table of Contents Palliative Care: Conversations Matter™ for Sick Children "Palliative Care: Conversations ...

  19. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important. PMID:11727291

  20. Patients' perceptions of service quality dimensions: an empirical examination of health care in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Clemes, M D; Ozanne, L K; Laurensen, W L

    2001-01-01

    The 1984 liberalization of the New Zealand economy has resulted in a health care sector that has become very competitive (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). The private sector is now able to supply health care services and, as a result, a greater value is being placed on patient satisfaction (Zwier and Clarke, 1999). However, despite the increasing focus on customer satisfaction, research into health care patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality is scarce. This can be problematic, as quality of care is an essential issue in the strategic marketing of health care services (Turner and Pol, 1995). This study takes a step towards addressing this deficiency by identifying patients' perceptions of the dimensions of service quality in health care. The findings of this study are based on the empirical analysis of a sample of 389 respondents interviewed by telephone. The findings indicate that the service quality dimensions identified in this health care specific study differ in number and dimensional structure from the widely adopted service quality dimensions first identified by Parasuraman, Berry and Zeithaml (1988): reliability, responsiveness, assurance, empathy and tangibles. The service quality dimensions identified in this study were: reliability, tangibles, assurance, empathy, food, access, outcome, admission, discharge and responsiveness. In addition, health care patients perceive the service quality dimensions relating to the core product in health care delivery (for example, outcome and reliability) as more important than the service quality dimensions relating to the peripheral product in health care delivery (for example, food, access and tangibles). Finally, the results of this study suggest that patients with different geographic, demographic, and behavioristic characteristics have different needs and wants during health care delivery and therefore perceive different service quality dimensions as important.

  1. Chronic care model strategies in the United States and Germany deliver patient-centered, high-quality diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Stock, Stephanie; Pitcavage, James M; Simic, Dusan; Altin, Sibel; Graf, Christian; Feng, Wen; Graf, Thomas R

    2014-09-01

    Improving the quality of care for chronic diseases is an important issue for most health care systems in industrialized nations. One widely adopted approach is the Chronic Care Model (CCM), which was first developed in the late 1990s. In this article we present the results from two large surveys in the United States and Germany that report patients' experiences in different models of patient-centered diabetes care, compared to the experiences of patients who received routine diabetes care in the same systems. The study populations were enrolled in either Geisinger Health System in Pennsylvania or Barmer, a German sickness fund that provides medical insurance nationwide. Our findings suggest that patients with type 2 diabetes who were enrolled in the care models that exhibited key features of the CCM were more likely to receive care that was patient-centered, high quality, and collaborative, compared to patients who received routine care. This study demonstrates that quality improvement can be realized through the application of the Chronic Care Model, regardless of the setting or distinct characteristics of the program.

  2. Quality of life issues in patients with diabetes and lower extremity ulcers: patients and care givers.

    PubMed

    Brod, M

    1998-05-01

    The impact of lower extremity ulcers on the quality of life (QoL) of patients with diabetes and their care givers was assessed in a series of focus groups. Fourteen patients with diabetes and lower extremity ulcers and 11 care givers participated in the focus groups. Semi-structured discussions identified the issues relating to four broad QoL domains and subdomains: social (daily, leisure, family and social life), psychological (emotional health and positive consequences), physical (physical health and treatment impact) and economic (employment and finances). The patients and care givers experienced a negative impact on all domains of QoL because of the limitations in mobility caused by the ulcer which required an adaptation to a different lifestyle. A reduction in social activities, increased family tensions, lost time from work and a negative impact on general health were experienced by both groups. It is necessary to separate the impact of the ulcer from the general condition of diabetes on both patients' and care givers' QoL. The results from this disease-specific focus will allow for an improved clinical understanding with targeted interventions and contribute to the development of a disease-specific instrument to understand and measure QoL better in these individuals.

  3. Effects of Primary Care Team Social Networks on Quality of Care and Costs for Patients With Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mundt, Marlon P.; Gilchrist, Valerie J.; Fleming, Michael F.; Zakletskaia, Larissa I.; Tuan, Wen-Jan; Beasley, John W.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States. Primary care teams can be best suited to improve quality of care and lower costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. This study evaluates the associations between primary care team communication, interaction, and coordination (ie, social networks); quality of care; and costs for patients with cardiovascular disease. METHODS Using a sociometric survey, 155 health professionals from 31 teams at 6 primary care clinics identified with whom they interact daily about patient care. Social network analysis calculated variables of density and centralization representing team interaction structures. Three-level hierarchical modeling evaluated the link between team network density, centralization, and number of patients with a diagnosis of cardiovascular disease for controlled blood pressure and cholesterol, counts of urgent care visits, emergency department visits, hospital days, and medical care costs in the previous 12 months. RESULTS Teams with dense interactions among all team members were associated with fewer hospital days (rate ratio [RR] = 0.62; 95% CI, 0.50–0.77) and lower medical care costs (−$556; 95% CI, −$781 to −$331) for patients with cardiovascular disease. Conversely, teams with interactions revolving around a few central individuals were associated with increased hospital days (RR = 1.45; 95% CI, 1.09–1.94) and greater costs ($506; 95% CI, $202–$810). Team-shared vision about goals and expectations mediated the relationship between social network structures and patient quality of care outcomes. CONCLUSIONS Primary care teams that are more interconnected and less centralized and that have a shared team vision are better positioned to deliver high-quality cardiovascular disease care at a lower cost. PMID:25755035

  4. Patient-centeredness and quality management in Dutch diabetes care organizations after a 1-year intervention

    PubMed Central

    Campmans-Kuijpers, Marjo JE; Lemmens, Lidwien C; Baan, Caroline A; Rutten, Guy EHM

    2016-01-01

    Background More focus on patient-centeredness in care for patients with type 2 diabetes requests increasing attention to diabetes quality management processes on patient-centeredness by managers in primary care groups and outpatient clinics. Although patient-centered care is ultimately determined by the quality of interactions between patients and clinicians at the practice level, it should be facilitated at organizational level too. This nationwide study aimed to assess the state of diabetes quality management on patient-centeredness at organizational level and its possibilities to improve after a tailored intervention. Methods This before–after study compares the quality management on patient-centeredness within Dutch diabetes care groups and outpatient clinics before and after a 1-year stepwise intervention. At baseline, managers of 51 diabetes primary care groups and 28 outpatient diabetes clinics completed a questionnaire about the organization’s quality management program. Patient-centeredness (0%–100%) was operationalized in six subdomains: facilitating self-management support, individualized care plan support, patients’ access to medical files, patient education policy, safeguarding patients’ interests, and formal patient involvement. The intervention consisted of feedback and benchmark and if requested a telephone call and/or a consultancy visit. After 1 year, the managers completed the questionnaire again. The 1-year changes were examined by dependent (non) parametric tests. Results Care groups improved significantly on patient-centeredness (from 47.1% to 53.3%; P=0.002), and on its subdomains “access to medical files” (from 42.0% to 49.4%), and “safeguarding patients’ interests” (from 58.1% to 66.2%). Outpatient clinics, which scored higher at baseline (66.7%) than care groups, did not improve on patient-centeredness (65.6%: P=0.54) or its subdomains. “Formal patient involvement” remained low in both care groups (23.2%) and

  5. Patient Centeredness and Engagement in Quality-of-Care Oncology Research.

    PubMed

    Clauser, Steven B; Gayer, Christopher; Murphy, Elizabeth; Majhail, Navneet S; Baker, K Scott

    2015-05-01

    More than a decade after the Institute of Medicine (IOM) first studied the quality of cancer care, obstacles to achieving high-quality care remain, and studies suggest that cancer care is often not as patient centered, accessible, coordinated, or evidence based as it could be. Patients, their families, and clinicians face a wide range of complex and often confusing choices regarding their health and health care concerns and require trustworthy information to decide which options are best for them. The Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) strives to fund clinical comparative effectiveness research, guided by patients, caregivers, and the broader health care community, that will provide high-integrity, evidence-based information to help people make informed health care decisions. This mission is well aligned with the IOM's recent conceptual framework and corresponding recommendations that recognize that addressing the needs of patients with cancer and their families is the most important component of a high-quality cancer care delivery system. PCORI seeks the opportunity to partner with diverse interdisciplinary research teams who demonstrate a strong commitment to the inclusion and engagement of patients and stakeholders as they work to develop high-quality cancer care delivery systems. We see rich opportunities for such partnership in the cancer care community, given the wealth of well-established patient advocacy groups and organizations and cutting-edge research institutions, all of which are working toward the common goal of improving the quality of cancer care for patients and their families. This article and the project it describes provide an example of an avenue for advancing this goal. PMID:25852140

  6. [Telemedicine: Improving the quality of care for critical patients from the pre-hospital phase to the intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Murias, G; Sales, B; García-Esquirol, O; Blanch, L

    2010-01-01

    The Health System is in crisis and critical care (from transport systems to the ICU) cannot escape from that. Lack of integration between ambulances and reference Hospitals, a deep shortage of critical care specialists and assigned economical resources that increase less than critical care demand are the cornerstones of the problem. Moreover, the analysis of the situation anticipated that the problem will be worse in the future. "Closed" ICUs in which critical care specialists direct patient care outperform "open" ones in which primary admitting physicians direct patient care in consultation with critical care specialists. However, the current paradigm in which a critical care specialist is close to the patient is in the edge of the trouble so, only a new paradigm could help to increase the number of patients under intensivist care. Current information technology and networking capabilities should be fully exploited to improve both the extent and quality of intensivist coverage. Far to be a replacement of the existing model Telemedicine might be a complimentary tool. In fact, to centralize medical data into servers has many additional advantages that could even improve the way in which critical care physicians take care of their patients under the traditional system. PMID:19811855

  7. [Applying back massage protocol to promote an intensive care unit patient's quality of sleep].

    PubMed

    Fang, Chiu-Shu; Liu, Chin-Fang

    2006-12-01

    This case report concerns the nursing experience of applying back massage to a patient in an intensive care unit (ICU) from 10 May, 2005, in order to improve the patient's quality of sleep. In order to collect information about his quality of sleep of the patient, the author used observation, interview and a Richards-Campbell sleep questionnaire (RCSQ). It was observed that, before massage, the patient's sleep quality was poor, which wa why the protocol with back massage was proposed. The results after back massage was applied that heart beat, respiration. oxygen saturation and blood pressure were not significantly improved. This was probably related to the patient's worry about having his endotracheal tube removed. The patient's perception of sleep, indeed, was obviously improved, a result which may have been related to his/her perception of comfort and care from the nurse. Applying back massage to an ICU patient may therefore be regarded as helpful improving the patient's sleep quality. It is hoped that this case report may serve as a positive reference for health care providers so that it may help patients to recover fully through rest and sleep. Since this report concerned only one patient, however, to understand the real outcome of how back massage could improve the quality of sleep of ICU patients, research is planned on the use of back massage protocol on a large number os such patients. PMID:17160874

  8. Missing Elements Revisited: Information Engineering for Managing Quality of Care for Patients with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Matthew J; Connor, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Advances in information technology offer new avenues for assembling data about diet and care regimens of diabetes patients “in the field.” This creates a challenge for their doctors and the diabetes care community—how to organize and use new data to produce better long-term outcomes for diabetes patients. Methods iAbetics approaches the challenge as a quality management problem, drawing on total quality concepts, which in turn are grounded in application of the scientific method. We frame the diabetes patient's quality-of-care problem as an ongoing scientific investigation aimed at quantifying and predicting relationships between specific care-management actions and their outcomes for individual patients in their ordinary course of life. Results Framing diabetes quality-of-care management as a scientific investigation leads to a seven-step model termed “adaptive empirical iteration.” Adaptive empirical iteration is a deliberate process to perfect the patient's choices, decisions, and actions in routine situations that make up most day-to-day life and to systematically adapt across differences in individual patients and/or changes in their physiology, diet, or environment. The architecture incorporates care-protocol management and version control, structured formats for data collection using mobile smart phones, statistical analysis on secure Web sites, tools for comparing alternative protocols, choice architecture technology to improve patient decisions, and information sharing for doctor review. Conclusions Adaptive empirical iteration is a foundation for information architecture designed to systematically improve quality-of-care provided to diabetes patients who act as their own day-to-day care provider under supervision and with support from their doctor. The approach defines “must-have” capabilities for systems using new information technology to improve long-term outcomes for diabetes patients. PMID:20920451

  9. The Physician Quality Improvement Initiative: Engaging Physicians in Quality Improvement, Patient Safety, Accountability and their Provision of High-Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, Kirsten; Degendorfer, Niki; Clarke, Cathy; Panet, Hayley; Worthington, Jim; McLean, Richard F; Chan, Charlie K N

    2016-01-01

    University Health Network has been working to become a high-reliability organization, with a focus on safe, quality patient care. In response, the Medical Affairs Department has implemented several strategic initiatives to drive accountability, quality improvement and engagement with our physician population. One of these initiatives, the Physician Quality Improvement Initiative (PQII) is a physician-led project designed to provide active medical staff, in collaboration with their physician department chiefs, a comprehensive approach to focused and practical quality improvement in their practice. In this document, we outline the project, including its implementation strategy, logic model and outcomes, and provide discussion on how it fits into UHN's global strategy to provide safe, quality patient care. PMID:27009706

  10. Impact of weight bias and stigma on quality of care and outcomes for patients with obesity

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, SM; Burgess, DJ; Yeazel, MW; Hellerstedt, WL; Griffin, JM; van Ryn, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to critically review the empirical evidence from all relevant disciplines regarding obesity stigma in order to (i) determine the implications of obesity stigma for healthcare providers and their patients with obesity and (ii) identify strategies to improve care for patients with obesity. We conducted a search of Medline and PsychInfo for all peer-reviewed papers presenting original empirical data relevant to stigma, bias, discrimination, prejudice and medical care. We then performed a narrative review of the existing empirical evidence regarding the impact of obesity stigma and weight bias for healthcare quality and outcomes. Many healthcare providers hold strong negative attitudes and stereotypes about people with obesity. There is considerable evidence that such attitudes influence person-perceptions, judgment, interpersonal behaviour and decision-making. These attitudes may impact the care they provide. Experiences of or expectations for poor treatment may cause stress and avoidance of care, mistrust of doctors and poor adherence among patients with obesity. Stigma can reduce the quality of care for patients with obesity despite the best intentions of healthcare providers to provide high-quality care. There are several potential intervention strategies that may reduce the impact of obesity stigma on quality of care. PMID:25752756

  11. Social support, self-care, and quality of life in cancer patients receiving radiotherapy in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Hanucharurnkul, S.

    1988-01-01

    The purpose of the study was two-fold: (1) to examine the relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life in adult cancer patients receiving radiotherapy while the selected basic conditioning factors of age, marital and socio-economic status, living arrangement, stage and site of cancer were statistically controlled; and (2) to test a theoretical model which postulated that (a) quality of life was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors, social support and self-care, and (b) self-care was predicted jointly by the selected basic conditioning factors and social support. A convenience sample of 112 adult cervical and head/neck cancer patients receiving radiotherapy was obtained from radiotherapy outpatient clinic in three hospitals located in Bangkok, Thailand. Results of the study indicated positive relationships among self-care, social support, and quality of life. Socio-economic status, site of cancer, and self-care were significant predictors for reported quality of life. Social support appeared to be a significant predictor of quality of life indirectly through self-care. Socio-economic status and social support were also significant predictors of self-care, whereas, stage and site of cancer seemed to predict self-care indirectly through social support.

  12. Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Aurora, R. Nisha; Collop, Nancy A.; Jacobowitz, Ofer; Thomas, Sherene M.; Quan, Stuart F.; Aronsky, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a prevalent disorder associated with a multitude of adverse outcomes when left untreated. There is significant heterogeneity in the evaluation and management of OSA resulting in variation in cost and outcomes. Thus, the goal for developing these measures was to have a way to evaluate the outcomes and reliability of the processes involved with the standard care approaches used in the diagnosis and management of OSA. The OSA quality care measures presented here focus on both outcomes and processes. The AASM commissioned the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup to develop quality care measures aimed at optimizing care for adult patients with OSA. These quality care measures developed by the Adult OSA Quality Measures Workgroup are an extension of the original Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) approved Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS) measures group for OSA. The measures are based on the available scientific evidence, focus on public safety, and strive to improve quality of life and cardiovascular outcomes for individual OSA patients. The three outcomes that were selected were as follows: (1) improve disease detection and categorization; (2) improve quality of life; and (3) reduce cardiovascular risk. After selecting these relevant outcomes, a total of ten process measures were chosen that could be applied and assessed for the purpose of accomplishing these outcomes. In the future, the measures described in this document may be reported through the PQRS in addition to, or as a replacement for, the current OSA measures group. The overall objective for the development of these measures is that implementation of these quality measures will result in improved patient outcomes, reduce the public health burden of OSA, and provide a measurable standard for evaluating and managing OSA. Citation: Aurora RN, Collop NA, Jacobowitz O, Thomas SM, Quan SF, Aronsky AJ. Quality measures for the care of adult patients with

  13. Patient perceptions of electronic medical records use and ratings of care quality

    PubMed Central

    Finney Rutten, Lila J; Vieux, Sana N; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Arora, Neeraj K; Moser, Richard P; Beckjord, Ellen Burke; Hesse, Bradford W

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Despite considerable potential for improving health care quality, adoption of new technologies, such as electronic medical records (EMRs), requires prudence, to ensure that such tools are designed, implemented, and used meaningfully to facilitate patient-centered communication and care processes, and better health outcomes. The association between patients’ perceptions of health care provider use of EMRs and health care quality ratings was assessed. Method Data from two iterations of the Health Information National Trends Survey, fielded in 2011 and 2012, were pooled for these analyses. The data were collected via mailed questionnaire, using a nationally representative listing of home addresses as the sampling frame (n=7,390). All data were weighted to provide representative estimates of quality of care ratings and physician use of EMR, in the adult US population. Descriptive statistics, t-tests, and multivariable linear regression analyses were conducted. Results EMR use was reported significantly more frequently by females, younger age groups, non-Hispanic whites, and those with higher education, higher incomes, health insurance, and a usual source of health care. Respondents who reported physician use of EMRs had significantly higher ratings of care quality (Beta=4.83, standard error [SE]=1.7, P<0.01), controlling for sociodemographic characteristics, usual source of health care, and health insurance status. Conclusion Nationally representative data suggest that patients’ perceptions of EMR use are associated with their perceptions of the quality of the health care they receive. PMID:24711715

  14. Quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care and in outpatient treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mihanović, Mate; Restek-Petrović, Branka; Bogović, Anamarija; Ivezić, Ena; Bodor, Davor; Požgain, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Background The Sveti Ivan Psychiatric Hospital in Zagreb, Croatia, offers foster home care treatment that includes pharmacotherapy, group psychodynamic psychotherapy, family therapy, and work and occupational therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the health-related quality of life of patients with schizophrenia treated in foster home care with that of patients in standard outpatient treatment. Methods The sample consisted of 44 patients with schizophrenia who, upon discharge from the hospital, were included in foster home care treatment and a comparative group of 50 patients who returned to their families and continued receiving outpatient treatment. All patients completed the Short Form 36 Health Survey Questionnaire on the day they completed hospital treatment, 6 months later, and 1 year after they participated in the study. The research also included data on the number of hospitalizations for both groups of patients. Results Though directly upon discharge from the hospital, patients who entered foster home care treatment assessed their health-related quality of life as poorer than patients who returned to their families, their assessments significantly improved over time. After 6 months of treatment, these patients even achieved better results in several dimensions than did patients in the outpatient program, and they also had fewer hospitalizations. These effects remained the same at the follow-up 1 year after the inclusion in the study. Conclusion Notwithstanding the limitations of this study, it can be concluded that treatment in foster home care is associated with an improvement in the quality of life of patients with schizophrenia, but the same was not observed for the patients in standard outpatient treatment. We hope that these findings will contribute to an improved understanding of the influence of psychosocial factors on the functioning of patients and the development of more effective therapeutic methods aimed at improving the patients

  15. Developing a Patient Care Co-ordination Centre in Trafford, England: lessons from the International Foundation for Integrated Care (IFIC)/Advancing Quality Alliance integrated care fellowship experience.

    PubMed

    Gregory, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The NHS and Social Care in England are facing one of the biggest financial challenges for a generation. Commissioners and providers need to work on collaborative schemes to manage the increasing demand on health and social care within a period of financial constraint. Different forms of care co-ordination have been developed at different levels across the world. In the north-west of England, the Trafford health and social care economy have been working through a competitive dialogue process with industry to develop an innovative and dynamic solution to deliver seamless co-ordination for all patients and service users. The strategy is to develop a new Patient Care Co-ordination Centre, which will be responsible for the delivery of co-ordinated, quality care. The Patient Care Co-ordination Centre will work at clinical, service, functional and community levels across multiple providers covering risk stratification, preventative, elective and unscheduled care. I am the clinical lead for the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre and during my year as an Advancing Quality Alliance Integrated Care Fellow, I have had the opportunity to study examples of care coordination from UK and international sites. The learning from these visits has been assimilated into the design process of the Patient Care Co-ordination Centre.

  16. Nutritional support and quality of life in cancer patients undergoing palliative care.

    PubMed

    Prevost, V; Grach, M-C

    2012-09-01

    In palliative care, the nutrition provided has to be tailored to the patient's needs, enhancing patient comfort and quality of life (QoL). We conducted a literature search to review methods of measuring QoL, and modalities of nutritional intervention and their influence on QoL of cancer patients in palliative care. Original papers published in English were selected from PubMed database by using the search terms, palliative medicine, cancer, nutrition and quality of life. Specific tools that are particularly recommended to assess QoL in a palliative care setting are reviewed. The main goal in palliative care is to maintain oral nutrition by providing nutritional counselling. Enteral nutritional support showed inconsistent effects on survival and QoL. An evidence-base for parenteral nutrition is still lacking. Ethical considerations concerning provision of food and hydration in end-of-life care are discussed. Nutritional status should be assessed early and regularly during treatment using appropriate tools. In the particularly acute context of palliative care, optimal patient management requires adequate education and counselling to patients and families. Meaningful interactions between the patient, caregivers and medical team would also increase the chance of resolving nutrition-related issues and help to fulfil each patient's specific nutritional needs and thus improve the QoL.

  17. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement

    PubMed Central

    Kittinger, Benjamin J.; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C.

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  18. Surgical Precision in Clinical Documentation Connects Patient Safety, Quality of Care, and Reimbursement.

    PubMed

    Kittinger, Benjamin J; Matejicka, Anthony; Mahabir, Raman C

    2016-01-01

    Emphasis on quality of care has become a major focus for healthcare providers and institutions. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has multiple quality-of-care performance programs and initiatives aimed at providing transparency to the public, which provide the ability to directly compare services provided by hospitals and individual physicians. These quality-of-care programs highlight the transition to pay for performance, rewarding physicians and hospitals for high quality of care. To improve the use of pay for performance and analyze quality-of-care outcome measures, the Division of Plastic Surgery at Scott & White Memorial Hospital participated in an inpatient clinical documentation accuracy project (CDAP). Performance and improvement on metrics such as case mix index, severity of illness, risk of mortality, and geometric mean length of stay were assessed after implementation. After implementation of the CDAP, the division of plastic surgery showed increases in case mix index, calculated severity of illness, and calculated risk of mortality and a decrease in length of stay. For academic plastic surgeons, quality of care demands precise documentation of each patient. The CDAP provides one avenue to hone clinical documentation and performance on quality measures. PMID:26903784

  19. Quest for quality care and patient safety: the case of Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Lim, M

    2004-01-01

    

 Quality of care in Singapore has seen a paradigm shift from a traditional focus on structural approaches to a broader multidimensional concept which includes the monitoring of clinical indicators and medical errors. Strong political commitment and institutional capacities have been important factors for making the transition. What is still lacking, however, is a culture of rigorous programme evaluation, public involvement, and patient empowerment. Despite these imperfections, Singapore has made considerable strides and its experience may hold lessons for other small developing countries in the common quest for quality care and patient safety. PMID:14757804

  20. [Endorsement of risk management and patient safety by certification of conformity in health care quality assessment].

    PubMed

    Waßmuth, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Certification of conformity in health care should provide assurance of compliance with quality standards. This also includes risk management and patient safety. Based on a comprehensive definition of quality, beneficial effects on the management of risks and the enhancement of patient safety can be expected from certification of conformity. While these effects have strong face validity, they are currently not sufficiently supported by evidence from health care research. Whether this relates to a lack of evidence or a lack of investigation remains open. Advancing safety culture and "climate", as well as learning from adverse events rely in part on quality management and are at least in part reflected in the certification of healthcare quality. However, again, evidence of the effectiveness of such measures is limited. Moreover, additional factors related to personality, attitude and proactive action of healthcare professionals are crucial factors in advancing risk management and patient safety which are currently not adequately reflected in certification of conformity programs.

  1. Quality of care for patients with non-communicable diseases in the Dedza District, Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Rachel; Der Merwe, Lisa Van; Mash, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In Malawi, non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are thought to cause 28% of deaths in adults. The aim of this study was to establish the extent of primary care morbidity related to NCDs, as well as to audit the quality of care, in the primary care setting of Dedza District, central Malawi. Methods This study was a baseline audit using clinic registers and a questionnaire survey of senior health workers at 5 clinics, focusing on care for hypertension, diabetes, asthma and epilepsy Results A total of 82 581 consultations were recorded, of which 2489 (3.0%) were for the selected NCDs. Only 5 out of 32 structural criteria were met at all 5 clinics and 9 out of 29 process criteria were never performed at any clinic. The only process criteria performed at all five clinics was measurement of blood pressure. The staff's knowledge on NCDs was basic and the main barriers to providing quality care were lack of medication and essential equipment, inadequate knowledge and guidelines, fee-for-service at two clinics, geographic inaccessibility and lack of confidence in the primary health care system by patients. Conclusion Primary care morbidity from NCDs is currently low, although other studies suggest a significant burden of disease. This most likely represents a lack of utilisation, recognition, diagnosis and ability to manage patients with NCDs. Quality of care is poor due to a lack of essential resources, guidelines, and training. PMID:26245609

  2. Improving the quality of discharge care for the homeless: a patient-centered approach.

    PubMed

    Greysen, S Ryan; Allen, Rebecca; Rosenthal, Marjorie S; Lucas, Georgina I; Wang, Emily A

    2013-05-01

    Homeless patients are at risk for low-quality discharge care, yet there are limited patient-centered data to guide improvement. We explored relationships between assessment of housing status by hospital staff and quality of discharge care using quantitative and qualitative data from interviews and chart reviews with 98 homeless patients: 80% male, mean homelessness 2.8 years, mean age 44. Patient-reported performance of discharge care varied substantially across seven domains from 16-75% and chart review documented lower performance than patient report. Over half (56%) were not asked about their housing status and multivariable logistic regression showed assessment of housing status was independently associated with higher performance in five domains: discussions about cost of medications, physical activity levels, diet, transportation, and mental health follow-up. Qualitative data revealed patient concerns about stigmatization from disclosure of housing status. Our findings suggest that addressing housing status in acute care settings while avoiding stigmatization may improve discharge care for homeless patients.

  3. Quality of life and palliative care needs of elderly patients with advanced heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Helen YL; Yu, Doris SF; Leung, Doris YP; Chan, Aileen WK; Hui, Elsie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the quality of life and palliative care needs of elderly patients with advanced heart failure (HF). Methods This was a correlation descriptive study conducted at a 650-bed sub-acute hospital. Patients who were aged 65 or over, diagnosed with HF of New York Heart Association Class III or IV symptoms, and mentally sound were eligible to the study. The Edmonton Symptom Assessment Scale, the overall quality of life single item scale, and the McQill Quality of Life Questionnaire (MQoL), were used for measurement. Multiple regression analysis was performed to determine factors for predicting quality of life. Results A convenience sample of 112 patients was recruited. Their age was 81.5 ± 8.5 years. The three most distressing symptoms reported by the patients were tiredness (5.96 ± 2.78), drowsiness (5.47 ± 2.93), and shortness of breath (5.34 ± 2.96). Their mean overall quality of life single item scale score was 4.72 ± 2.06 out of 10. The mean MQoL physical subscale score was the lowest (4.20 ± 1.767), whereas their mean psychological subscale was the highest (7.14 ± 2.39). However, in a multivariate analysis model, quality of life was significantly associated with existential wellbeing, physical wellbeing, psychological wellbeing and educational level. Conclusions The findings highlight that spiritual concerns are significant palliative care needs among elderly patients with advanced HF, in addition to symptom management. This is in line with the argument that palliative care that places great emphasis on holistic care should be integrated to the care of this group of patients. PMID:27594869

  4. Improving patient care through student leadership in team quality improvement projects.

    PubMed

    Tschannen, Dana; Aebersold, Michelle; Kocan, Mary Jo; Lundy, Francene; Potempa, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    In partnership with a major medical center, senior-level nursing students completed a root cause analysis and implementation plan to address a unit-specific quality issue. To evaluate the project, unit leaders were asked their perceptions of the value of the projects and impact on patient care, as well as to provide exemplars depicting how the student root cause analysis work resulted in improved patient outcome and/or unit processes. Liaisons noted benefits of having an RCA team, with positive impact on patient outcomes and care processes.

  5. Quality of internal communication in health care and the professional-patient relationship.

    PubMed

    March Cerdá, Joan Carles; Prieto Rodríguez, María Angeles; Pérez Corral, Olivia; Lorenzo, Sergio Minué; Danet, Alina

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken for the purpose of describing internal communication and the professional-patient relationship and to establish a descriptive model of the interaction between these 2 variables. A nationwide survey was carried out in primary care and specialist care centers in Spain. A simple random sampling method was used with 1183 health care professionals. The data collection instrument was a Likert questionnaire that recorded information on the perceived quality of internal communication (0-100 scale), professional-patient relationships (0-100 scale), and sociodemographic variables. The results were analyzed using SPSS 15.0, performing mean comparisons and a suitable linear regression model.The total average of the quality of internal communication was 53.79 points, and that of the professional-patient relationships was 74.17 points. Sex made no statistically significant difference. Age shows that the older the participant, the better his/her opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. Nursing staff had the highest opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. The association between internal communication and professional-patient relationship was positive (R = 0.45).It was concluded that continuous exchange of information among health care professionals, together with learning and shared decision making or a positive emotional climate, is an element that will consolidate good professional-patient relationships and ensure patient satisfaction. PMID:20436336

  6. Measuring nursing essential contributions to quality patient care outcomes.

    PubMed

    Wolgast, Kelly A; Taylor, Katherine; Garcia, Dawn; Watkins, Miko

    2011-01-01

    Workload Management System for Nursing (WMSN) is a core Army Medical Department business system that has provided near real-time, comprehensive nursing workload and manpower data for decision making at all levels for over 25 years. The Army Manpower Requirements and Documentation Agency populates data from WMSN into the Manpower Staffing Standards System (Inpatient module within Automated Staffing Assessment Model). The current system, Workload Management System for Nursing Internet (WMSNi), is an interim solution that requires additional functionalities for modernization and integration at the enterprise level. The expanding missions and approved requirements for WMSNi support strategic initiatives on the Army Medical Command balanced scorecard and require continued sustainment for multiple personnel and manpower business processes for both inpatient and outpatient nursing care. This system is currently being leveraged by the TRICARE Management Activity as an interim multiservice solution, and is being used at 24 Army medical treatment facilities. The evidenced-based information provided to Army decision makers through the methods used in the WMSNi will be essential across the Army Medical Command throughout the system's life cycle. PMID:22124876

  7. Physicians' career satisfaction, quality of care and patients' trust: the role of community uninsurance.

    PubMed

    Pagán, José A; Balasubramanian, Lakshmi; Pauly, Mark V

    2007-10-01

    There is evidence that health care providers located in communities with relatively large uninsured populations face financial difficulties because of low service demand and high levels of uncompensated care. Data on 4,920 physicians from the 2000-2001 Community Tracking Study Physician Survey and from 25,637 adults from the 2003 Community Tracking Study Household Survey were used to analyze whether the relative size of the local uninsured population is associated with the level of career satisfaction and the quality of care provided by physicians and to assess whether patient trust is associated with the level of community uninsurance. The results indicate that the proportion of uninsured adults in a given community is negatively related to physicians' career satisfaction and the perceived quality of health care provided. Community uninsurance is also negatively related to patient trust in their doctor and positively related to whether insured patients believed that their doctor was influenced by rules from health insurance companies. Physicians in communities with relatively large uninsured populations may have lower career satisfaction and lower perceptions of the quality of care provided due to financial difficulties. Patients in these communities are also less likely to trust their physician.

  8. Patient satisfaction analysis on service quality of dental health care based on empathy and responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Dewi, Fellani Danasra; Sudjana, Grita; Oesman, Yevis Marty

    2011-01-01

    Background: Transformation of health care is underway from sellers’ market to consumers’ market, where the satisfaction of the patients’ need is a primary concern while defining the service quality. Hence, commitment to provide a high-quality service and achieving patients’ satisfaction becomes an important issue for dental health care provider. The aim of this research is to investigate the quality of dental health care service based on empathy and responsiveness aspects. Methods: A total of 90 questionnaires were completed by the dental patients who came to dental polyclinic located in Government Hospital, West Java, Indonesia. The questionnaire was concerned on two dimensions of service quality model, i.e. empathy and responsiveness. The obtained data were analyzed using inferential statistics (t test) and also descriptive statistics with importance–performance analysis. Results: All the attributes tested by t test showed that perception and expectation differed significantly, except for responsiveness, i.e. ability of dental assistants in assisting the dentist (t test 0.505patient satisfaction is the response given by administration staff related to long waiting time (t test 5.377), followed by dental assistant's knowledge about the patient's need during treatment (t test 4.822) and explanation that was given by dentist (t test 4.700). Conclusion: It can be inferred from IPA that priority should be given to dentist's communication and dental assistant's knowledge toward patient's needs to enhance the service quality. PMID:22135687

  9. Improving quality of care among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia: a nationwide initiative

    PubMed Central

    Mainz, Jan; Svendsen, Marie Louise; Nordentoft, Merete; Voldsgaard, Inge; Baandrup, Lone; Bartels, Paul; Johnsen, Søren Paaske

    2015-01-01

    Background The effectiveness of systematic quality improvement initiatives in psychiatric care remains unclear. Aims To examine whether quality of care has changed following implementation of a systematic monitoring programme of hospital performance measures. Method In a nationwide population-based cohort study, we identified 14 228 patients admitted to psychiatric departments between 2004 and 2011 from The Danish Schizophrenia Registry. The registry systematically monitors the adherence to guideline recommended processes of care. Results The overall proportion of all relevant recommended processes of care increased from 64 to 76% between 2004 and 2011. The adherence to individual processes of care increased over time, including assessment of psychopathology using a diagnostic interview (relative risk (RR): 2.01, 95% CI: 1.51–2.68), contact with relatives (RR: 1.44, 95% CI: 1.27–1.62), psychoeducation (RR: 1.33, 95% CI: 1.19–1.48), psychiatric aftercare (RR: 1.06, 95% CI: 1.01–1.11) and suicide risk assessment (RR: 1.31, 95% CI: 1.21–1.42). Conclusions Quality of care improved from 2004 to 2011 among patients hospitalised with schizophrenia in Denmark. Declaration of interest None. Copyright and usage © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2015. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Non-Commercial, No Derivatives (CC BY-NC-ND) licence.

  10. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. Objective To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. Design 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Key results Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Conclusions Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to

  11. Distinguishing service quality from patient satisfaction in developing health care marketing strategies.

    PubMed

    Taylor, S A

    1994-01-01

    The marketing function in health care is increasingly becoming strategic in nature. The quality of care provided and the level of patient satisfaction are emerging as the core of many marketing strategies in health services as a means to achieve a distinctive competency in ever-more competitive markets. Therefore, it is not surprising that few issues have generated more discussion in both practitioner and research circles. Nonetheless, according to the health services literature, service quality and patient satisfaction have confounded many, the outcome of which may be an inability of health care managers to effectively derive, implement, and control marketing strategies. This article identifies emerging literature that assists in overcoming these limitations. PMID:10134419

  12. Nursing postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care.

    PubMed

    Silva, R; Martins, M M; Jardim, H G

    2016-06-01

    The postoperative visit as a quality indicator for surgical patient care, demands some consideration from perioperative nurses. We evaluated the nursing perioperative interventions on postoperative visits, and adjusted them to the needs of the patients with postoperative pain. Our study indicated that 73% of patients visited didn't have postoperative pain whereas 27% had pain. The pain is aggravated when the patient is mobilised, one of the most common signs and symptoms being gastrointestinal changes. Pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures were used in pain management. The results showed that the percentage of patients with postoperative visits needs to be improved. We aim to have high quality perioperative nursing interventions which raise levels of patient satisfaction. PMID:27498440

  13. Dance of the call bells: using ethnography to evaluate patient satisfaction with quality of care.

    PubMed

    Deitrick, Lynn; Bokovoy, Joanna; Stern, Glenn; Panik, Anne

    2006-01-01

    Ethnographic methods can provide insights into patients' perceptions of quality of care. We used ethnographic methods to examine problems related to answering patient call lights on one inpatient unit in the hospital. Communication through call bells consisted of 3 interrelated components. These included answering the call bell, communicating the patient's request, and following through with the request. Results of this study provided a deeper understanding of the nuances of power and control embedded within the issue of patient-caregiver communication and empowered unit staff to find solutions to the call bell problem. PMID:16985401

  14. Health related quality of life and care dependency among elderly hospital patients: an international comparison.

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, Ate; Hakverdioğlu, Gülendam; Muszalik, Marta; Andela, Richtsje; Korhan, Esra Akın; Kędziora-Kornatowska, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    Many countries in Europe and the world have to cope with an aging population. Although health policy in many countries aims at increasing disability-free life expectancy, elderly patients represent a significant proportion of all patients admitted to different hospital departments. The aim of the research was to investigate the relationship between health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and the care dependency status among elderly hospital patients. In 2012, a descriptive survey was administered to a convenience sample of 325 elderly hospital patients (> 60 years) from The Netherlands (N = 125), from Poland (N = 100), and from Turkey (N = 100). We employed the Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy (FACIT) Measurement System and the Care Dependency Scale. FACIT is a collection of HRQOL questionnaires that assess multidimensional health status in people with various chronic illnesses. From demographic variables, gender (female) (r = -0.13, p < 0.05), age and informal care given by family members (r = -0.27 to 0.27, p < 0.01) were significantly correlated with the care dependency status for the whole samples. All HRQOL variables, hearing aid and duration of illness correlated with care dependency status (r = -0.20 to 0.50, p < 0.01). Moreover, the FACIT sum score (Poland and Turkey) and functional wellbeing (The Netherlands) are significantly associated with the decrease in care dependency status. Thus, the FACIT variables are the most powerful indicators for care dependency. The study provides healthcare professionals insight into improvement of quality of care in all three countries.

  15. Quality indicators for patient safety in primary care. A review and Delphi-survey by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    PubMed Central

    Frigola-Capell, Eva; Pareja-Rossell, Clara; Gens-Barber, Montse; Oliva-Oliva, Glòria; Alava-Cano, Fernando; Wensing, Michel; Davins-Miralles, Josep

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Background: Quality indicators are measured aspects of healthcare, reflecting the performance of a healthcare provider or healthcare system. They have a crucial role in programmes to assess and improve healthcare. Many performance measures for primary care have been developed. Only the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care identifies key domains of patient safety in primary care. Objective: To present an international framework for patient safety indicators in primary care. Methods: Literature review and online Delphi-survey, starting from the Catalan model. Results: A set of 30 topics is presented, identified by an international panel and organized according to the Catalan model for patient safety in primary care. Most topic areas referred to specific clinical processes; additional topics were leadership, people management, partnership and resources. Conclusion: The framework can be used to organize indicator development and guide further work in the field. PMID:26339833

  16. Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Kothare, Sanjeev V.; Rosen, Carol L.; Lloyd, Robin M.; Paruthi, Shalini; Thomas, Sherene M.; Troester, Matthew M.; Carden, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, obstructive sleep apnea in children, restless legs syndrome, and narcolepsy. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation of these quality measures in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in children. This document describes measurement methods for five desirable process measures: assessment of symptoms and risk factors of OSA, initiation of an evidence-based action plan, objective evaluation of high-risk children with OSA by obtaining a polysomnogram (PSG), reassessment of signs and symptoms of OSA within 12 months, and documentation of objective assessment of positive airway pressure adherence. When these five process measures are met, clinicians should be able to achieve the two defined outcomes: improve detection of childhood OSA and reduce signs and symptoms of OSA after initiation of a management plan. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with childhood OSA. Citation: Kothare SV, Rosen CL, Lloyd RM, Paruthi S, Thomas SM, Troester MM, Carden KA. Quality measures for the care of pediatric patients with obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):385–404. PMID:25700879

  17. Influence of patient and provider characteristics on quality of care for the myelodysplastic syndromes.

    PubMed

    Abel, Gregory A; Cronin, Angel M; Odejide, Oreofe O; Uno, Hajime; Stone, Richard M; Steensma, David P

    2016-06-01

    Little is known about quality of care for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), or patient and provider factors that influence quality. We identified Medicare enrollees diagnosed with MDS between 2006 and 2011, and analysed linked claims for performance on two widely-accepted quality measures: diagnostic bone marrow cytogenetic testing (diagnostic quality) and pre-treatment iron assessment for patients receiving an erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA; treatment quality). A total of 4575 patients met the criteria for diagnostic quality measurement, and 3379 for treatment quality measurement. In the diagnostic cohort, 74% had a claim for marrow cytogenetic testing 3 months before to 3 months after diagnosis. In multivariate models, younger age (P < 0·001), treatment at a higher-volume MDS centre (P < 0·001), and claims for pancytopenia (P < 0·001) were all associated with higher levels of testing. A borderline result was observed for diagnostic year, with improvement over time (P = 0·06). In the treatment cohort, 56% had evidence of pre-ESA iron assessment, with higher rates for later years of diagnosis (P < 0·001), higher household income (P = 0·03), and those treated at higher-volume centres (P = 0·01). In this large cohort of patients with MDS, quality of care was suboptimal overall, but worse in several specific subgroups. These data suggest that targeted educational and/or process-focused interventions are warranted. PMID:26913376

  18. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  19. Patient quality of life in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions program: a survey study

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Joshua; Rosedahl, Jordan; Finnie, Dawn; Glasgow, Amy; Takahashi, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background Transitional care programs are common interventions aimed at reducing medical complications and associated readmissions for patients recently discharged from the hospital. While organizations strive to reduce readmissions, another important related metric is patient quality of life (QoL). Aims To compare the relationship between QoL in patients enrolled in the Mayo Clinic Care Transitions (MCCT) program versus usual care, and to determine if QoL changed in MCCT participants between baseline and 1-year follow-up. Methods A baseline survey was mailed to MCCT enrollees in March 2013. Those who completed a baseline survey were sent a follow-up survey 1 year later. A cross-sectional survey of usual care participants was mailed in November 2013. We included in our analysis 199 participants (83 in the MCCT and 116 in usual care) aged over 60 years with multiple comorbidities and receiving primary care. Primary outcomes were self-rated QoL; secondary outcomes included self-reported general, physical, and mental health. Intra- and intergroup comparisons of patients were evaluated using Pearson’s chi-squared analysis. Results MCCT participants had more comorbidities and higher elder risk assessment scores than those receiving usual care. At baseline, 74% of MCCT participants reported responses of good-to-excellent QoL compared to 64% after 1 year (P=0.16). Between MCCT and usual care, there was no significant difference in self-reported QoL (P=0.21). Between baseline and follow-up in MCCT patients, and compared to usual care, there were no significant differences in self-reported general, physical, or mental health. Conclusion We detected no difference over time in QoL between MCCT patients and those receiving usual care, and a nonsignificant QoL decline in MCCT participants after 1 year. Progression of chronic disease may overwhelm any QoL improvement attributable to the MCCT intervention. The MCCT interventions may blunt expected declines in QoL, producing

  20. A Conceptual Model for Assessing Quality of Care for Patients Boarding in the Emergency Department: Structure-Process-Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan W.; Singer, Sara J.; Sun, Benjamin C.; Camargo, Carlos A.

    2013-01-01

    Many believe that the “boarding” of emergency department (ED) patients awaiting inpatient beds compromises quality of care. To better study the quality of care of boarded patients, one should identify and understand the mechanisms accounting for any potential differences in care. This paper present a conceptual boarding “structure-process-outcome” model to help assess quality of care provided to boarded patients, and to aid in recognizing potential solutions to improve that quality, if it is deficient. The goal of the conceptual model is to create a practical framework on which a research and policy agenda can be based to measure and improve quality of care for boarded patients. PMID:21496148

  1. Personal values and individual quality of life in palliative care patients.

    PubMed

    Fegg, Martin J; Wasner, Maria; Neudert, Christian; Borasio, Gian Domenico

    2005-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between personal values and individual quality of life (iQoL) in palliative care patients, 75 patients with advanced cancer or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were asked to complete a self-report questionnaire concerning personal values and a semi-structured interview on their iQoL. Sixty-four patients took part in the study (56% cancer, 44% ALS). The most important personal values were benevolence, self-direction, and universalism, whereas power, achievement, and stimulation were the least important. Self-transcendence values were higher than self-enhancement values in all patients. Compared with healthy adults, palliative care patients scored significantly higher in benevolence and lower in self-enhancement values. Conservation values (security, conformity, tradition) were correlated with higher levels of iQoL (P=0.03). There were no significant differences between ALS and cancer patients. These data suggest that conservation values protect the patients' iQoL in the palliative care situation. The observed shift towards self-transcendence values may be related to coping processes of terminally ill patients. The relationship between self-transcendence values and iQoL should be further investigated.

  2. [The sociological evaluation of quality of medical care rendered to the patients with body overweight and obesity].

    PubMed

    Alekseeva, N S; Lobykina, E N; Salmina-Khvostova, O I

    2009-01-01

    The evaluation of quality of medical care rendered to the patients with body overweight and obesity was carried out in the conditions of curative preventive institution and private medical clinics on the municipal level. The study revealed the problems related to the organization of medical care provision to this category of patients addressing to the public medical institutions. The conclusion is made about the need of enhancing the actual system of medical care of patients with body overweight and obesity. It is rational to consider patients' opinion during the optimization of the available high quality medical care.

  3. Optimizing Quality of Care and Patient Safety in Malaysia: The Current Global Initiatives, Gaps and Suggested Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Jarrar, Mu’taman; Rahman, Hamzah Abdul; Don, Mohammad Sobri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Demand for health care service has significantly increased, while the quality of healthcare and patient safety has become national and international priorities. This paper aims to identify the gaps and the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. Design: Review of the current literature. Highly cited articles were used as the basis to retrieve and review the current initiatives for optimizing the quality of care and patient safety. The country health plan of Ministry of Health (MOH) Malaysia and the MOH Malaysia Annual Reports were reviewed. Results: The MOH has set four strategies for optimizing quality and sustaining quality of life. The 10th Malaysia Health Plan promotes the theme “1 Care for 1 Malaysia” in order to sustain the quality of care. Despite of these efforts, the total number of complaints received by the medico-legal section of the MOH Malaysia is increasing. The current global initiatives indicted that quality performance generally belong to three main categories: patient; staffing; and working environment related factors. Conclusions: There is no single intervention for optimizing quality of care to maintain patient safety. Multidimensional efforts and interventions are recommended in order to optimize the quality of care and patient safety in Malaysia. PMID:26755459

  4. Improving the acute care of COPD patients across Gloucestershire: a quality improvement project.

    PubMed

    Miller, Craig; Cushley, Claire; Redler, Kasey; Mitchell, Claire; Aynsley Day, Elizabeth; Mansfield, Helen; Nye, Abigail

    2015-01-01

    Admissions for exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present a significant proportion of patients in the acute medical take. The British Thoracic Society (BTS) provides guidelines for time specific interventions, that should be delivered to those with an acute exacerbation of COPD through the admission care bundle. These include correct diagnosis, correct assessment of oxygenation, early administration of treatment, recognition of respiratory failure, and specialist review. Gloucestershire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (GHNHSFT) chose improvement in acute COPD care to be a local Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) scheme, which enables commissioners to reward excellence by linking a proportion of English healthcare providers' income to the achievement of local quality improvement goals. The effects of initiatives put in place by senior clinicians had waned, and further improvements were required to meet the CQUIN target. The aim of the scheme was to improve compliance with the BTS guidelines and CQUIN scheme for patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Specific bundle paperwork to be used for all patients admitted to the Trust with an exacerbation of COPD was introduced to the Trust in June 2014, with training and education of medical staff at that time. This had improved compliance rates from 10% to 63% by September 2014. Compliance with each intervention was audited through the examination of notes of patients admitted with an exacerbation of COPD. Compliance rates had plateaued over the last three months, and so a focus group involving junior medical staff met in September 2014 to try to increase awareness further, in order to drive greater improvements in care, and meet the CQUIN requirements. Their strategies were implemented, and then compliance with the CQUIN requirements was reaudited as described above. The December 2014 audit results showed a further improvement in overall COPD care, with 73% of patients

  5. Access to and quality of health and social care for rare diseases: patients' and caregivers' experiences.

    PubMed

    Kodra, Y; Morosini, P R; Petrigliano, R; Agazio, E; Salerno, P; Taruscio, D

    2007-01-01

    People suffering from rare diseases, independently of the condition, often experience the same problems in receiving adequate health and social care. It is not clear how these problems differ in severity among different diseases and in different countries and how they change in time. In the framework of the NEPHIRD (Network of Public Health Institutions on Rare Diseases), a European project, funded by DG-SANCO (EU Commission), an effort was made to develop a simple but comprehensive tool to show patients' and/or caregivers' opinions about the quality and accessibility of health and social services. The self-filled questionnaire asks how often patients or caregivers had both negative and positive experiences about the quality and accessibility of health and social services and their opinion on their improvement, on 5-level scales. A pilot survey was carried out in several European Countries among members of Myasthenia Gravis, Neurofibromatosis, Prader Willi and Rett Syndrome volunteers' associations. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed using Stata and Epi Info 2000. In total, 302 questionnaires were completed in France, Italy, Romania, Spain, Turkey and United Kingdom during 2004-05. In general, respondents thought that health care accessibility was worse than quality, and that social care and legal provisions were worse than health care, with some differences among countries. For all diseases, and for both patients and caregivers, the most frequent reported positive experiences were health professionals' kindness and readiness to help (all medians ranged from 3 to 5). As for the efforts for improvement made by public services in the last three years, the opinions were generally favourable. This study has several limitations. However the assessment tool that has been developed has some innovative and interesting features and may be considered a useful attempt to compare patients' and caregivers' experiences for a range of different diseases

  6. Determinants of Quality Care and Mortality for Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer in Virginia

    PubMed Central

    Showalter, Timothy N.; Camacho, Fabian; Cantrell, Leigh A.; Anderson, Roger T.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes for patients with locally advanced cervical cancer are influenced by receipt of all indicated components of quality care: early diagnosis and receipt of external beam radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and brachytherapy. We performed an observational cohort study to evaluate receipt of quality cancer care and mortality after cancer diagnosis among patients with locally advanced cervical cancer in Virginia. We queried the Virginia state cancer registry to identify patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB-IVA cervical cancer who were diagnosed during 2002 to 2012. We evaluated the influence of tumor-related, demographic, and geospatial factors on the receipt of indicated therapies and mortality. Treatment quality score of 0 to 3 was defined based upon the extent of receipt of the components of indicated therapy. A total of 1048 patients were identified; 33.1% received all 3 components of treatment and only 54.0% received brachytherapy. Predictors of higher quality score included younger age group versus 66+ years at diagnosis (18–42 odds ratio [OR] = 12.3, 95% confidence interval: 6.6, 23.0; 42–53 OR = 5.6, CI: 3.3, 9.5; 53–66 OR = 5.5, CI: 3.3, 9.1), lower tumor stages versus IVA (IB2 OR = 3.3, CI: 1.8, 6.2; II OR = 2.7, CI: 1.6, 4.5; IIIx OR = 2.1, CI: 1.3, 3.6), and treatment at a high-volume facility (OR 2.2, CI: 1.2, 4.2). Predictors of increased mortality included earlier year of diagnosis, higher tumor stage, treatment at a lower volume facility, and lower treatment quality score. In a cohort of locally advanced cervical cancer patients in Virginia, we identified a low rate of receipt of complete quality care for cervical cancer and a strong effect of facility volume on quality treatment and survival. Further research is needed to develop strategies to improve access to quality treatment and outcomes for cervical cancer. PMID:26937934

  7. Identifying Quality Indicators Used by Patients to Choose Secondary Health Care Providers: A Mixed Methods Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Saman Sara; Kahlon, Gurnaaz Kaur; Naik, Aditi; Jessel, Amar Singh; Nanavati, Niraj; Shah, Akash; Cox, Benita; Darzi, Ara

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients in health systems across the world can now choose between different health care providers. Patients are increasingly using websites and apps to compare the quality of health care services available in order to make a choice of provider. In keeping with many patient-facing platforms, most services currently providing comparative information on different providers do not take account of end-user requirements or the available evidence base. Objective To investigate what factors were considered most important when choosing nonemergency secondary health care providers in the United Kingdom with the purpose of translating these insights into a ratings platform delivered through a consumer mHealth app. Methods A mixed methods approach was used to identify key indicators incorporating a literature review to identify and categorize existing quality indicators, a questionnaire survey to formulate a ranked list of performance indicators, and focus groups to explore rationales behind the rankings. Findings from qualitative and quantitative methodologies were mapped onto each other under the four categories identified by the literature review. Results Quality indicators were divided into four categories. Hospital access was the least important category. The mean differences between the other three categories hospital statistics, hospital staff, and hospital facilities, were not statistically significant. Staff competence was the most important indicator in the hospital staff category; cleanliness and up-to-date facilities were equally important in hospital facilities; ease of travel to the hospital was found to be most important in hospital access. All quality indicators within the hospital statistics category were equally important. Focus groups elaborated that users find it difficult to judge staff competence despite its importance. Conclusions A mixed methods approach is presented, which supported a patient-centered development and evaluation of a

  8. Quality of care in elder emergency department patients with pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Caterino, Jeffrey M; Hiestand, Brian C; Martin, Daniel R

    2008-01-01

    Background The goals of the study were to assess the relationship between age and processes of care in emergency department (ED) patients admitted with pneumonia and to identify independent predictors of failure to meet recommended quality care measures. Methods This was a prospective cohort study of a pre-existing database undertaken at a university hospital ED in the Midwest. ED patients ≥18 years of age requiring admission for pneumonia, with no documented use of antibiotics in the 24 hours prior to ED presentation were included. Compliance with Pneumonia National Quality Measures was assessed including ED antibiotic administration, antibiotics within 4 hours, oxygenation assessment, and obtaining of blood cultures. Odds ratios were calculated for elders and non-elders. Logistic regression was used to identify independent predictors of process failure. Results One thousand, three hundred seventy patients met inclusion criteria, of which 560 were aged ≥65 years. In multiple variable logistic regression analysis, age ≥65 years was independently associated with receiving antibiotics in the ED (odds ratio [OR] = 2.03, 95% CI 1.28–3.21) and assessment of oxygenation (OR = 2.10, 95% CI, 1.18–3.32). Age had no significant impact on odds of receiving antibiotics within four hours of presentation (OR 1.10, 95% CI 0.84–1.43) or having blood cultures drawn (OR 1.02, 95%CI 0.78–1.32). Certain other patient characteristics were also independently associated with process failure. Conclusion Elderly patients admitted from the ED with pneumonia are more likely to receive antibiotics while in the ED and to have oxygenation assessed in the ED than younger patients. The independent association of certain patient characteristics with process failure provides an opportunity to further increase compliance with recommended quality measures in admitted patients diagnosed with pneumonia. PMID:18447936

  9. How nurses and their work environment affect patient experiences of the quality of care: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare organisations monitor patient experiences in order to evaluate and improve the quality of care. Because nurses spend a lot of time with patients, they have a major impact on patient experiences. To improve patient experiences of the quality of care, nurses need to know what factors within the nursing work environment are of influence. The main focus of this research was to comprehend the views of Dutch nurses on how their work and their work environment contribute to positive patient experiences. Methods A descriptive qualitative research design was used to collect data. Four focus groups were conducted, one each with 6 or 7 registered nurses in mental health care, hospital care, home care and nursing home care. A total of 26 nurses were recruited through purposeful sampling. The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed and subjected to thematic analysis. Results The nurses mentioned essential elements that they believe would improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care: clinically competent nurses, collaborative working relationships, autonomous nursing practice, adequate staffing, control over nursing practice, managerial support and patient-centred culture. They also mentioned several inhibiting factors, such as cost-effectiveness policy and transparency goals for external accountability. Nurses feel pressured to increase productivity and report a high administrative workload. They stated that these factors will not improve patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. Conclusions According to participants, a diverse range of elements affect patient experiences of the quality of nursing care. They believe that incorporating these elements into daily nursing practice would result in more positive patient experiences. However, nurses work in a healthcare context in which they have to reconcile cost-efficiency and accountability with their desire to provide nursing care that is based on patient needs and preferences, and

  10. Dying in Palliative Care Units and in Hospital: A Comparison of the Quality of Life of Terminal Cancer Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viney, Linda L.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Compared quality of life of terminal cancer patients (n=182) in two palliative care units with that of those in general hospital. Patients in specialized palliative care units were found to differ from those dying in hospital, showing less indirectly expressed anger but more positive feelings. They also reported more anxiety about death but less…

  11. Comparison of patient evaluations of health care quality in relation to WHO measures of achievement in 12 European countries.

    PubMed Central

    Kerssens, Jan J.; Groenewegen, Peter P.; Sixma, Herman J.; Boerma, Wienke G. W.; van der Eijk, Ingrid

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To gain insight into similarities and differences in patient evaluations of quality of primary care across 12 European countries and to correlate patient evaluations with WHO health system performance measures (for example, responsiveness) of these countries. METHODS: Patient evaluations were derived from a series of Quote (QUality of care Through patients' Eyes) instruments designed to measure the quality of primary care. Various research groups provided a total sample of 5133 patients from 12 countries: Belarus, Denmark, Finland, Greece, Ireland, Israel, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Portugal, United Kingdom, and Ukraine. Intraclass correlations of 10 Quote items were calculated to measure differences between countries. The world health report 2000 - Health systems: improving performance performance measures in the same countries were correlated with mean Quote scores. FINDINGS: Intra-class correlation coefficients ranged from low to very high, which indicated little variation between countries in some respects (for example, primary care providers have a good understanding of patients' problems in all countries) and large variation in other respects (for example, with respect to prescription of medication and communication between primary care providers). Most correlations between mean Quote scores per country and WHO performance measures were positive. The highest correlation (0.86) was between the primary care provider's understanding of patients' problems and responsiveness according to WHO. CONCLUSIONS: Patient evaluations of the quality of primary care showed large differences across countries and related positively to WHO's performance measures of health care systems. PMID:15042232

  12. Six-month survival and quality of life of intensive care patients with acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Acute kidney injury (AKI) has high incidence among the critically ill and associates with dismal outcome. Not only the long-term survival, but also the quality of life (QOL) of patients with AKI is relevant due to substantial burden of care regarding these patients. We aimed to study the long-term outcome and QOL of patients with AKI treated in intensive care units. Methods We conducted a predefined six-month follow-up of adult intensive care unit (ICU) patients from the prospective, observational, multi-centre FINNAKI study. We evaluated the QOL of survivors with the EuroQol (EQ-5D) questionnaire. We included all participating sites with at least 70% rate of QOL measurements in the analysis. Results Of the 1,568 study patients, 635 (40.5%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 38.0-43.0%) had AKI according to the Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcomes (KDIGO) criteria. Of the 635 AKI patients, 224 (35.3%), as compared to 154/933 (16.5%) patients without AKI, died within six months. Of the 1,190 survivors, 959 (80.6%) answered the EQ-5D questionnaire at six months. The QOL (median with Interquartile range, IQR) measured with the EQ-5D index and compared to age- and sex-matched general population was: 0.676 (0.520-1.00) versus 0.826 (0.812-0.859) for AKI patients, and 0.690 (0.533-1.00) versus 0.845 (0.812-0.882) for patients without AKI (P <0.001 in both). The EQ-5D at the time of ICU admission was available for 774 (80.7%) of the six-month respondents. We detected a mean increase of 0.017 for non-AKI and of 0.024 for AKI patients in the EQ-5D index (P = 0.728). The EQ-5D visual analogue scores (median with IQR) of patients with AKI (70 (50–83)) and patients without AKI (75 (60–87)) were not different from the age- and sex-matched general population (69 (68–73) and 70 (68–77)). Conclusions The health-related quality of life of patients with and without AKI was already lower on ICU admission than that of the age- and sex-matched general

  13. Switching between thienopyridines in patients with acute myocardial infarction and quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Francois; Puymirat, Etienne; Bonello, Laurent; Meneveau, Nicolas; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Motreff, Pascal; Ravan, Ramin; Leclercq, Florence; Ennezat, Pierre-Vladimir; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    Objective In acute coronary syndromes, switching between thienopyridines is frequent. The aims of the study were to assess the association between switching practices and quality of care. Methods Registry study performed in 213 French public university, public non-academic and private hospitals. All consecutive patients admitted for acute myocardial infarction (MI; <48 hours) between 1/10/2010 and 30/11/2010 were eligible. Clinical and biological data were recorded up to 12 months follow-up. Results Among 4101 patients receiving thienopyridines, a switch was performed in 868 (21.2%): 678 (16.5%) from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 190 (4.6%) from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Predictors of switch were ST segment elevation MI presentation, admission to a cardiology unit, previous percutaneous coronary intervention, younger age, body weight >60 kg, no history of stroke, cardiac arrest, anaemia or renal dysfunction. In patients with a switch, eligibility for prasugrel was >82% and appropriate use of a switch was 86% from clopidogrel to prasugrel and 20% from prasugrel to clopidogrel. Quality indicators scored higher in the group with a switch and also in centres where the switch rate was higher. Conclusions As applied in the French Registry on Acute ST-elevation and non ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction (FAST-MI) registry, switching from one P2Y12 inhibitor to another led to a more appropriate prescription and was associated with higher scores on indicators of quality of care. PMID:27252877

  14. Patient Education and Care for Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Placement: A Quality Improvement Study

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Leslie P.; Yamamoto, Kalani T.; Reddy, Vijay; Cobb, Denise; Chamberlin, Alice; Pham, Hien; Sun, Sumi J.; Mallareddy, Madhavi; Saldivar, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Background and Objectives: Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) complications are an important barrier to peritoneal dialysis (PD) utilization. Practice guidelines for PDC placement exist, but it is unknown if these recommendations are followed. We performed a quality improvement study to investigate this issue. ♦ Methods: A prospective observational study involving 46 new patients at a regional US PD center was performed in collaboration with a nephrology fellowship program. Patients completed a questionnaire derived from the International Society for Peritoneal Dialysis (ISPD) catheter guidelines and were followed for early complications. ♦ Results: Approximately 30% of patients reported not being evaluated for hernias, not being asked to visualize their exit site, or not receiving catheter location marking before placement. After insertion, 20% of patients reported not being given instructions for follow-up care, and 46% reported not being taught the warning signs of PDC infection. Directions to manage constipation (57%), immobilize the PDC (68%), or leave the dressing undisturbed (61%) after insertion were not consistently reported. Nearly 40% of patients reported that their PDC education was inadequate. In 41% of patients, a complication developed, with 30% of patients experiencing a catheter or exit-site problem, 11% developing infection, 13% needing PDC revision, and 11% requiring unplanned transfer to hemodialysis because of catheter-related problems. ♦ Conclusions: There were numerous deviations from the ISPD guidelines for PDC placement in the community. Patient satisfaction with education was suboptimal, and complications were frequent. Improving patient education and care coordination for PDC placement were identified as specific quality improvement needs. PMID:23818002

  15. Patient-centered Care.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, April

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient and the individual's particular health care needs. The goal of patient-centered health care is to empower patients to become active participants in their care. This requires that physicians, radiologic technologists and other health care providers develop good communication skills and address patient needs effectively. Patient-centered care also requires that the health care provider become a patient advocate and strive to provide care that not only is effective but also safe. For radiologic technologists, patient-centered care encompasses principles such as the as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept and contrast media safety. Patient-centered care is associated with a higher rate of patient satisfaction, adherence to suggested lifestyle changes and prescribed treatment, better outcomes and more cost-effective care. This article is a Directed Reading. Your access to Directed Reading quizzes for continuing education credit is determined by your area of interest. For access to other quizzes, go to www.asrt.org/store. According to one theory, most patients judge the quality of their healthcare much like they rate an airplane flight. They assume that the airplane is technically viable and is being piloted by competent people. Criteria for judging a particular airline are personal and include aspects like comfort, friendly service and on-time schedules. Similarly, patients judge the standard of their healthcare on nontechnical aspects, such as a healthcare practitioner's communication and "soft skills." Most are unable to evaluate a practitioner's level of technical skill or training, so the qualities they can assess become of the utmost importance in satisfying patients and providing patient-centered care.(1). PMID:19901351

  16. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution.

  17. National healthcare information system in Croatian primary care: the foundation for improvement of quality and efficiency in patient care.

    PubMed

    Gvozdanović, Darko; Koncar, Miroslav; Kojundzić, Vinko; Jezidzić, Hrvoje

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the quality of patient care, while at the same time keeping up with the pace of increased needs of the population for healthcare services that directly impacts on the cost of care delivery processes, the Republic of Croatia, under the leadership of the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare, has formed a strategy and campaign for national public healthcare system reform. The strategy is very comprehensive and addresses all niches of care delivery processes; it is founded on the enterprise information systems that will aim to support end-to-end business processes in the healthcare domain. Two major requirements are in focus: (1) to provide efficient healthcare-related data management in support of decision-making processes; (2) to support a continuous process of healthcare resource spending optimisation. The first project is the Integrated Healthcare Information System (IHCIS) on the primary care level; this encompasses the integration of all primary point-of-care facilities and subjects with the Croatian Institute for Health Insurance and Croatian National Institute of Public Health. In years to come, IHCIS will serve as the main integration platform for connecting all other stakeholders and levels of health care (that is, hospitals, pharmacies, laboratories) into a single enterprise healthcare network. This article gives an overview of Croatian public healthcare system strategy aims and goals, and focuses on properties and characteristics of the primary care project implementation that started in 2003; it achieved a major milestone in early 2007 - the official grand opening of the project with 350 GPs already fully connected to the integrated healthcare information infrastructure based on the IHCIS solution. PMID:18005567

  18. The Effect of Sleep Quality on the Development of Type 2 Diabetes in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Sleep has important effects on physical and mental health, and sleep disorders are associated with increased mortality and morbidity. This study was conducted to evaluate the relationship between sleep duration or sleep quality and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The FACTS (FAmily CohorT Study in primary care) was established to investigate the relations between familial environment and health which was conducted at 22 family medicine outpatient clinics in general hospitals. Total 563 patients without diabetes who received ≥1 year follow-up examination were included in the analysis. We used the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index to determine sleep quality, and a score of ≥5 was considered to define poor sleep quality. Patients taking oral hypoglycemic agents, having a fasting glucose level of >126 mg/dL, or diagnosed with diabetes by physicians were classified as having diabetes. The median follow-up period was 2.5 years. Poor sleep quality was associated with a higher risk of diabetes after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, income, physical activity, and family history of diabetes (relative risk=2.64; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-6.78). As a risk factor for the development of diabetes, poor sleep quality may independently increase the incidence of diabetes. PMID:26839478

  19. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care.

  20. Patients' Perceived Quality of Family Physicians' Primary Care with or without 'Family Medicine' in the Clinic Name

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ka Young; Lim, Kangjin; Choi, Eun Young; Cheong, Yoo Seock

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients' perspectives of family medicine according to the physician's identity and role as a primary-care specialist need to be investigated. This study was conducted to investigate the perceived quality of the primary care of family medicine clinics as assessed by patients in a community setting. Methods Patients (or their guardians) visiting nine community family medicine clinics were surveyed using the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool from April 2014 to June 2014. The scores of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool domains were compared according to the clinics' designation (or not) as 'family medicine' and the patients' recognition (or not) of the physicians as board-certified family medicine specialists. Results A total of 196 subjects responded to the questionnaire. They assessed the community clinics' quality of primary care as moderate to high. Of the clinics, those that were not designated as family medicine scored higher than those that were designated as family medicine (P<0.05). The group of patients that recognized a clinic as that of a board-certified family medicine specialist awarded higher scores than the non-recognition group in the domains of coordination function and personalized care (P<0.05). Conclusion The moderate to high scores for the community family medicine clinics' quality of primary care are encouraging. It seems that patients' recognition of the family physician's role and of the physician-patient relationship has a significant influence on their assessment of the quality of primary care. PMID:27688865

  1. The health mediators-qualified interpreters contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients.

    PubMed

    Roman, Gabriel; Gramma, Rodica; Enache, Angela; Pârvu, Andrada; Moisa, Ştefana Maria; Dumitraş, Silvia; Ioan, Beatrice

    2013-11-01

    In order to assure optimal care of patients with chronic illnesses, it is necessary to take into account the cultural factors that may influence health-related behaviors, health practices, and health-seeking behavior. Despite the increasing number of Romanian Roma, research regarding their beliefs and practices related to healthcare is rather poor. The aim of this paper is to present empirical evidence of specificities in the practice of healthcare among Romanian Roma patients and their caregivers. Using a qualitative exploratory descriptive design, this study is based on data gathered through three focus groups with 30 health mediators in the counties of Iasi and Cluj (Romania). We identified various barriers to access to healthcare for Roma patients: lack of financial resources and health insurance coverage, lack of cognitive resources or lack of personal hygiene, but also important cultural issues, such as the shame of being ill, family function, disclosure of disease-related information, patient's autonomy, attitudes towards illness and health practices, that should be considered in order to create a culturally sensitive environment in Romanian medical facilities:… The role of the health mediators within the context of cultural diversity is also discussed, as cultural brokers contributing to health care quality among Romanian Roma patients Bridging cultural differences may improve patient-healthcare provider relationships, but may have limited impact in reducing ethnic disparities, unless coupled with efforts of Roma communities to get involved in creating and implementing health policies.

  2. Patient-Centered Dialysis Care: Depression, Pain, and Quality of Life.

    PubMed

    Weisbord, Steven D

    2016-01-01

    Remarkable advancements have been made in the provision of chronic dialysis therapy since its inception decades ago. A series of studies inform current dialysis dosing recommendations, while advancements in strategies to treat mineral and bone disease, acid-base and electrolyte disturbances, and anemia have facilitated the management of these well-recognized complications of ESRD. The collective result has been a model of chronic dialysis care focused principally on the achievement of metabolic and dialysis-related targets. In fact, guidelines such as the Kidney Disease Outcomes Quality Initiative put forth by the National Kidney Foundation recommend metrics that characterize successful dialysis care, including the attainment of specific solute clearance targets; maintenance of hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorous, and parathyroid hormone levels within target ranges; and the preferred use of primary arteriovenous fistulae for vascular access. This focus on serologic and dialysis-specific outcomes has helped renal providers manage the biochemical effects related to the loss of kidney function and has reduced ESRD-related morbidity and mortality. Yet, absent from this model of care is an emphasis on the treatment of bothersome symptoms and the impact of such treatment on quality of life (QOL). Among the many symptoms that affect patients on chronic dialysis, depression and pain are particularly common, strongly associated with decrements in QOL, and potentially treatable. This review discusses key research findings and unanswered questions pertaining to the prevalence, significance, and treatment of depression and pain and the effect of such treatment on QOL in patients dependent on chronic dialysis, with the broad goal of incorporating symptom management strategies into a paradigm of patient-centered dialysis care.

  3. Quality of life of caregivers of mentally ill patients in a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Basheer, Sabreen; Anurag, Khera; Garg, Rajat; Kumar, Raj; Vashisht, Shruti

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the quality of life (QOL) and its association with psycho-sociodemographic factors among caregivers of mentally ill patients in a tertiary care hospital in urban India. Materials and Methods: Sample consisted of 100 caregivers attending outpatient services in a tertiary care hospital. Data was collected using World Health Organization QOL-BREF (WHOQOL-BREF) questionnaire. The higher score meant a better QOL. Results: Of 100 caregivers, 66% were men, 47% were parents and 64% were literate. 52% of the caregivers were providing care for 1–5 years. The mean total score of QOL of the study population was 13.34 with the highest score 15.15 in the physical domain, followed by 12.75 in social, 12.96 in environmental, and 12.52 in psychological domain. In a multiple linear regression model, caregiver's elderly age was significantly associated most of the domains of WHOQOL. Conclusion: Caregivers of mentally ill patients have diminished QOL levels. Studies measuring QOL among caregivers can help initiate early intervention among the vulnerable caregivers. This study would help in increasing the awareness among the professional health care workers, to identify at risk caregivers. Health workers by providing better health services and better psycho-education to the caregivers can improve their QOL. PMID:27212818

  4. Intergroup communication between hospital doctors: implications for quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Hewett, David G; Watson, Bernadette M; Gallois, Cindy; Ward, Michael; Leggett, Barbara A

    2009-12-01

    Hospitals involve a complex socio-technical health system, where communication failures influence the quality of patient care. Research indicates the importance of social identity and intergroup relationships articulated through power, control, status and competition. This study focused on interspecialty communication among doctors for patients requiring the involvement of multiple specialist departments. The paper reports on an interview study in Australia, framed by social identity and communication accommodation theories of doctors' experiences of managing such patients, to explore the impact of communication. Interviews were undertaken with 45 doctors working in a large metropolitan hospital, and were analysed using Leximancer (text mining software) and interpretation of major themes. Findings indicated that intergroup conflict is a central influence on communication. Contested responsibilities emerged from a model of care driven by single-specialty ownership of the patient, with doctors allowed to evade responsibility for patients over whom they had no sense of ownership. Counter-accommodative communication, particularly involving interpersonal control, appeared as important for reinforcing social identity and winning conflicts. Strategies to resolve intergroup conflict must address structural issues generating an intergroup climate and evoke interpersonal salience to moderate their effect. PMID:19846246

  5. Quality of Care for Patients with Chronic Respiratory Diseases: Data for Accreditation Plan in Primary Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Kurpas, Donata; Szwamel, Katarzyna; Mroczek, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    There are scarce reports in the literature on factors affecting the assessment of the quality of care for patients with chronic respiratory diseases. Such information is relevant in the accreditation process on implementing the healthcare. The study group consisted of 133 adult patients with chronic respiratory diseases and 125 adult patients with chronic non-respiratory diseases. In the present study, the level of satisfaction from healthcare provided by the primary healthcare unit, disease acceptance, quality of life, health behaviors, and met needs were examined, as well as associations between variables with the use of correspondence analysis. The results are that in patients with chronic respiratory diseases an increase in satisfaction depends on the improvement of well-being in the mental sphere. The lack of problems with obtaining a referral to a specialist and a higher level of fulfilled needs also have a positive effect. Additionally, low levels of satisfaction should be expected in those patients with chronic respiratory diseases who wait for an appointment in front of the office for a long time, report problems with obtaining a referral to additional tests, present a low level of health behaviors, and have a low index of benefits.

  6. Postdischarge quality of care: do age disparities exist among Department of Veterans Affairs ischemic stroke patients?

    PubMed

    Chumbler, Neale R; Jia, Huanguang; Phipps, Michael S; Li, Xinli; Ordin, Diana; Williams, Linda S; Myers, Laura J; Bravata, Dawn M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined whether age disparities existed across postdischarge quality indicators (QIs) for veterans with ischemic stroke who received care at Department of Veterans Affairs medical centers (VAMCs). This retrospective cohort included a national sample of 3,196 veterans who were diagnosed with ischemic stroke and received acute and postdischarge stroke care at 127 VAMCs in fiscal year 2007 (10/1/06 through 9/30/07). Data included an assessment of postdischarge stroke QIs in the outpatient setting during the 6 mo postdischarge. The QIs included measurement of and goal achievement for (1) blood pressure, (2) serum international normalized ratio (INR) for all patients discharged on warfarin, (3) cholesterol (low-density lipoprotein [LDL]) levels, (4) serum glycosylated hemoglobin, and (5) depression treatment. The mean age for the 3,196 veterans included in this study was 67.2 +/- 11.3 yr. Before risk adjustment, there were age differences in (1) depression screening/treatment, (2) blood pressure goals, and (3) LDL levels. After we adjusted for patient sociodemographic, clinical, and facility-level characteristics by using hierarchical linear mixed modeling, none of these differences remained significant but INR goals for patients discharged on warfarin differed significantly by age. After we adjusted for patient and facility characteristics, fewer age differences were found in the postdischarge stroke QIs. Clinical trial registration was not required. PMID:23761007

  7. Better Patient Care At High-Quality Hospitals May Save Medicare Money And Bolster Episode-Based Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Thomas C; Greaves, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Zinner, Michael J; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-09-01

    US policy makers are making efforts to simultaneously improve the quality of and reduce spending on health care through alternative payment models such as bundled payment. Bundled payment models are predicated on the theory that aligning financial incentives for all providers across an episode of care will lower health care spending while improving quality. Whether this is true remains unknown. Using national Medicare fee-for-service claims for the period 2011-12 and data on hospital quality, we evaluated how thirty- and ninety-day episode-based spending were related to two validated measures of surgical quality-patient satisfaction and surgical mortality. We found that patients who had major surgery at high-quality hospitals cost Medicare less than those who had surgery at low-quality institutions, for both thirty- and ninety-day periods. The difference in Medicare spending between low- and high-quality hospitals was driven primarily by postacute care, which accounted for 59.5 percent of the difference in thirty-day episode spending, and readmissions, which accounted for 19.9 percent. These findings suggest that efforts to achieve value through bundled payment should focus on improving care at low-quality hospitals and reducing unnecessary use of postacute care.

  8. Better Patient Care At High-Quality Hospitals May Save Medicare Money And Bolster Episode-Based Payment Models.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Thomas C; Greaves, Felix; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Zinner, Michael J; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-09-01

    US policy makers are making efforts to simultaneously improve the quality of and reduce spending on health care through alternative payment models such as bundled payment. Bundled payment models are predicated on the theory that aligning financial incentives for all providers across an episode of care will lower health care spending while improving quality. Whether this is true remains unknown. Using national Medicare fee-for-service claims for the period 2011-12 and data on hospital quality, we evaluated how thirty- and ninety-day episode-based spending were related to two validated measures of surgical quality-patient satisfaction and surgical mortality. We found that patients who had major surgery at high-quality hospitals cost Medicare less than those who had surgery at low-quality institutions, for both thirty- and ninety-day periods. The difference in Medicare spending between low- and high-quality hospitals was driven primarily by postacute care, which accounted for 59.5 percent of the difference in thirty-day episode spending, and readmissions, which accounted for 19.9 percent. These findings suggest that efforts to achieve value through bundled payment should focus on improving care at low-quality hospitals and reducing unnecessary use of postacute care. PMID:27605651

  9. Defining quality outcomes for complex-care patients transitioning across the continuum using a structured panel process

    PubMed Central

    Jeffs, Lianne; Law, Madelyn P; Straus, Sharon; Cardoso, Roberta; Lyons, Renee F; Bell, Chaim

    2013-01-01

    Background No standardised set of quality measures associated with transitioning complex-care patients across the various healthcare settings and home exists. In this context, a structured panel process was used to define quality measures for care transitions involving complex-care patients across healthcare settings. Methods A modified Delphi consensus technique based on the RAND method was used to develop measures of quality care transitions across the continuum of care. Specific stages included a literature review, individual rating of each measure by each of the panelists (n=11), a face-to-face consensus meeting, and final ranking by the panelists. Results The literature review produced an initial set of 119 measures. To advance to rounds 1 and 2, an aggregate rating of >75% of the measure was required. This analysis yielded 30/119 measures in round 1 and 11/30 measures in round 2. The final round of scoring yielded the following top five measures: (1) readmission rates within 30 days, (2) primary care visit within 7 days postdischarge for high-risk patients, (3) medication reconciliation completed at admission and prior to discharge, (4) readmission rates within 72 h and (5) time from discharge to homecare nursing visit for high-risk patients. Conclusions The five measures identified through this research may be useful as indicators of overall care quality related to care transitions involving complex-care patients across different healthcare settings. Further research efforts are called for to explore the applicability and feasibility of using the quality measures to drive quality improvement across the healthcare system. PMID:23852937

  10. Use of standardized patients to assess quality of tuberculosis care: a pilot, cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Jishnu; Kwan, Ada; Daniels, Ben; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Subbaraman, Ramnath; Bergkvist, Sofi; Das, Ranendra K.; Das, Veena; Pai, Madhukar

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Background Existing studies on quality of tuberculosis care mostly reflect knowledge, not actual practice. Methods We conducted a validation study on the use of standardized patients (SPs) for assessing quality of TB care. Four cases, two for presumed TB and one each for confirmed TB and suspected MDR-TB, were presented by 17 SPs, with 250 SP interactions among 100 consenting providers in Delhi, including qualified (29%), alternative medicine (40%) and informal providers (31%). Validation criteria were: (1) negligible risk and ability to avoid adverse events for providers and SPs; (2) low detection rates of SPs by providers, and (3) data accuracy across SPs and audio verification of SP recall. We used medical vignettes to assess provider knowledge for presumed TB. Correct case management was benchmarked using Standards for TB Care in India (STCI). Findings SPs were deployed with low detection rates (4.7% of 232 interactions), high correlation of recall with audio recordings (r=0.63; 95% CI: 0.53 – 0.79), and no safety concerns. Average consultation length was 6 minutes with 6.2 questions/exams completed, representing 35% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 33%–38%) of essential checklist items. Across all cases, only 52 of 250 (21%; 95% CI: 16%–26%) were correctly managed. Correct management was higher among MBBS doctors (adjusted OR=2.41, 95% CI: 1.17–4.93) as compared to all others. Provider knowledge in the vignettes was markedly more consistent with STCI than their practice. Interpretation The SP methodology can be successfully implemented to assess TB care. Our data suggest a big gap between provider knowledge and practice. PMID:26268690

  11. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: Implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R.

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care. PMID:24461570

  12. Perspectives on quality mental health care from Brazilian and Cape Verdean outpatients: implications for effective patient-centered policies and models of care.

    PubMed

    De Jesus, Maria; Earl, Tara R

    2014-01-01

    Mental health providers are increasingly coming into contact with large and growing multi-racial/ethnic and immigrant patient populations in the United States. Knowledge of patient perspectives on what constitutes quality mental health care is necessary for these providers. The aim of this study was to identify indicators of quality of mental health care that matter most to two underrepresented immigrant patient groups of Portuguese background: Brazilians and Cape Verdeans. A qualitative design was adopted using focus group discussions. Six focus groups of patients (n=24 Brazilians; n=24 Cape Verdeans) who received outpatient mental health treatment through public safety net clinics in the northeast region of the United States were conducted. The Consensual Qualitative Research analytic method allowed us to identify three quality of care domains: provider performance, aspects of mental health care environment, and effectiveness of mental health care treatment. Provider performance was associated with five categories: relational, communication, linguistic, cultural, and technical competencies. Aspects of mental health care environment were linked to two categories: psychosocial and physical environment. Effectiveness of mental health care treatment was related to two categories: therapeutic relationship and treatment outcomes. Study findings provide useful data for the development of more culturally appropriate and effective patient-centered models and policies in mental health care. PMID:24461570

  13. Assessing the financial health of Medicaid managed care plans and the quality of patient care they provide.

    PubMed

    McCue, Michael J; Bailit, Michael H

    2011-06-01

    In many states, Medicaid programs have contracted out the delivery of health care services to publicly traded health plans that are focused on managing the care of Medicaid members. Under the health reform law, states will be expanding the enrollment of their Medicaid programs and these publicly traded companies are expected to capitalize on this growing market. This study examined how publicly traded health plans differ from non-publicly traded ones in terms of administrative expenses, quality of care, and financial stability and found publicly traded plans that focused primarily on Medicaid enrollees paid out the lowest percentage of their Medicaid premium revenues in medical expenses and reported the highest percentage in administrative expenses across different types of health plans. The publicly traded plans also received lower scores for quality-of care measures related to preventive care, treatment of chronic conditions, members' access to care, and customer service.

  14. Quality of life and use of health care resources among patients with chronic depression

    PubMed Central

    Villoro, Renata; Merino, María; Hidalgo-Vega, Alvaro

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study estimates the health-related quality of life and the health care resource utilization of patients diagnosed with chronic depression (CD) in Spain. Patients and methods We used the Spanish National Health Survey 2011–2012, a cross-sectional survey representative at the national level, that selects people aged between 18 and 64 years (n=14,691). We estimated utility indices through the EuroQol five-dimensional descriptive system questionnaire included in the survey. We calculated percentage use of health care resources (medical visits, hospitalizations, emergency services, and drug consumption) and average number of resources used when available. A systematic comparison was made between people diagnosed with CD and other chronic conditions (OCCs). The chi-square test, Mann–Whitney U-test, and Kruskal–Wallis test were used to determine the statistical significance of differences between comparison groups. Multivariate analyses (Poisson regression, logistic regression, and linear regression) were also carried out to assess the relationship between quality of life and consumption of health care resources. Results Approximately, 6.1% of the subjects aged between 18 and 64 years were diagnosed with CD (average age 48.3±11 years, 71.7% females). After controlling for age, sex, and total number of comorbidities, a diagnosis of CD reduced utility scores by 0.09 (P<0.05) vs OCCs, and increased the average number of hospitalizations by 15%, the average number of days at hospital by 51%, and the average number of visits to emergency services by 15% (P<0.05). CD also increased the average number of visits to secondary care by 14% and visits to general practitioners by 4%. People with CD had a higher probability of consuming drugs than people with OCCs (odds ratio [OR]: 1.24, P<0.05), but only 38.6% took antidepressants. Conclusion People with CD had significantly lower health-related quality of life than people with OCCs. CD was associated with

  15. Definition of Life Quality from a Patient versus Health Care Professional Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodend, A. K.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    A survey of Canadian staff members (n=22), rehabilitation patients (N=27), pacemaker patients (n=31), and family members of the patients (N=34) asked what they considered important to the patients' quality of life. Results found marked differences between the groups in the physical, psychological, and activity domains, indicating that quality of…

  16. Stakeholder views regarding patient discharge from intensive care: Suboptimal quality and opportunities for improvement

    PubMed Central

    Li, Pin; Boyd, Jamie M; Ghali, William A; Stelfox, Henry T

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide the first description of intensive care unit (ICU) discharge practices from the perspective of Canadian ICU administrators, and ICU providers from Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. METHODS: The authors identified 140 Canadian ICUs and administered a survey to ICU administrators (unit manager, director) to obtain an institutional perspective. Also surveyed were members of professional critical care associations in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom, using membership distribution lists, to obtain a provider perspective. RESULTS: A total of 118 ICU administrators (114 ICUs [81%]) and 737 ICU providers (denominator unknown) responded to the survey. Administrator and provider respondents reported that ICU physicians are primarily responsible for determining the timing (70% and 77%, respectively) and safety (94% and 96%) for patients discharged from ICU. The majority of respondents indicated that patient summaries (87% and 85%) and medication reconciliation (78% and 79%) were part of their institutions’ discharge process. One-half of respondents reported the use of discharge protocols, while a minority indicated that checklists (46% and 44%), electronic tools (19% and 28%) or outreach follow-up (44% and 33%) were used. The majority of respondents rated current ICU discharge practices to be of medium quality (57% and 58% scored 3 on a five-point scale). Suggested opportunities for improvement included the information provided to patients and families (71% and 59%) and collaboration among hospital units (65% and 66%). CONCLUSION: Findings from the present study revealed the complexity of the ICU discharge process, considerable practice variation, perception of only medium quality and several proposed opportunities for improvement. PMID:25522304

  17. Management matters: the link between hospital organisation and quality of patient care

    PubMed Central

    West, E.

    2001-01-01

    Some hospital trusts and health authorities consistently outperform others on different dimensions of performance. Why? There is some evidence that "management matters", as well as the combined efforts of individual clinicians and teams. However, studies that have been conducted on the link between the organisation and management of services and quality of patient care can be criticised both theoretically and methodologically. A larger, and arguably more rigorous, body of work exists on the performance of firms in the private sector, often conducted within the disciplines of organisational behaviour or human resource management. Studies in these traditions have focused on the effects of decentralisation, participation, innovative work practices, and "complementarities" on outcome variables such as job satisfaction and performance. The aim of this paper is to identify a number of reviews and research traditions that might bring new ideas into future work on the determinants of hospital performance. Ideally, future research should be more theoretically informed and should use longitudinal rather than cross sectional research designs. The use of statistical methods such as multilevel modelling, which allow for the inclusion of variables at different levels of analysis, would enable estimation of the separate contribution that structure and process make to hospital outcomes. Key Words: hospital organisation; hospital performance; management; quality of care PMID:11239143

  18. Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Primary Care Quality Among Type 2 Diabetes Patients, Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ruwei; Shi, Leiyu; Liang, Hailun; Haile, Geraldine Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Racial and ethnic disparities exist in diabetes prevalence, access to diabetes care, diabetes-related complications and mortality rates, and the quality of diabetes care among Americans. We explored racial and ethnic disparities in primary care quality among Americans with type 2 diabetes. Methods We analyzed data on adults with type 2 diabetes derived from the household component of the 2012 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. Multiple regression and multivariate logistic regressions were used to examine the association between race/ethnicity and primary care attributes related to first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination, and clusters of confounding factors were added sequentially. Results Preliminary findings indicated differences in primary care quality between racial/ethnic minorities and whites across measures of first contact, longitudinality, comprehensiveness, and coordination. After controlling for confounding factors, these differences were no longer apparent; all racial/ethnic categories showed similar rates of primary care quality according to the 4 primary care domains of interest in the study. Conclusion Results indicate equitable primary care quality for type 2 diabetes patients across 4 key domains of primary care after controlling for socioeconomic characteristics. Additional research is necessary to support these findings, particularly when considering smaller racial/ethnic groups and investigating outcomes related to diabetes. PMID:27490365

  19. Quality of care for patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 in ‘model practices’ in Slovenia – first results

    PubMed Central

    Mlakar, Mitja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background A new organisation at the primary level, called model practices, introduces a 0.5 full-time equivalent nurse practitioner as a regular member of the team. Nurse practitioners are in charge of registers of chronic patients, and implement an active approach into medical care. Selected quality indicators define the quality of management. The majority of studies confirm the effectiveness of the extended team in the quality of care, which is similar or improved when compared to care performed by the physician alone. The aim of the study is to compare the quality of management of patients with diabetes mellitus type 2 before and after the introduction of model practices. Methods A cohort retrospective study was based on medical records from three practices. Process quality indicators, such as regularity of HbA1c measurement, blood pressure measurement, foot exam, referral to eye exam, performance of yearly laboratory tests and HbA1c level before and after the introduction of model practices were compared. Results The final sample consisted of 132 patients, whose diabetes care was exclusively performed at the primary care level. The process of care has significantly improved after the delivery of model practices. The most outstanding is the increase of foot exam and HbA1c testing. We could not prove better glycaemic control (p>0.1). Nevertheless, the proposed benchmark for the suggested quality process and outcome indicators were mostly exceeded in this cohort. Conclusion The introduction of a nurse into the team improves the process quality of care. Benchmarks for quality indicators are obtainable. Better outcomes of care need further confirmation. PMID:27703537

  20. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Perceived Quality of Primary Care by Hypertensive Patients in Shanghai and Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haitao; Wei, Xiaolin; Wong, Martin Chi-Sang; Wong, Samuel Yeung-Shan; Yang, Nan; Griffiths, Sian M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension should be best managed under primary care settings. This study aimed to compare, between Shanghai and Shenzhen, the perceived quality of primary care in terms of accessibility, continuity, co-ordination, and comprehensiveness among hypertensive patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Shanghai and Shenzhen, China. Multistage random sampling method was used to select 8 community health centers. Data from primary care users were collected through on-site face-to-face interviews using the primary care assessment tool. Good quality standard was set as a value of 3 for each attribute and a value of 18 for total score. We included 568 patients in Shanghai and 128 patients in Shenzhen. Compared with those in Shenzhen, hypertensive patients in Shanghai reported a higher score in co-ordination of information (3.37 vs 3.66; P < 0.001), but lower scores in continuity of care (3.36 vs 3.27; P < 0.001), and comprehensiveness-service provision (3.26 vs 2.79; P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in total scores between the 2 cities (18.19 vs 18.15). Over 3-quarters of hypertensive patients in both cities reported accessibility (97.2% vs 91.4%) and co-ordination of services (76.1% vs 80.5%) under good quality standard, while <1-quarter of them rated continuity of care (23.6% vs 22.7%), co-ordination of information (4.8% vs 21.1%), and comprehensiveness-service availability (15.1% vs 25.0%) under that standard. Compared with Shenzhen, the perceived quality of primary care for hypertensive patients in Shanghai was better in terms of co-ordination of information, but poorer on continuity of care and comprehensiveness-service provision. Our study suggests that there is room for quality improvement in both cities. PMID:26313780

  1. Do Health Care Providers Use Online Patient Ratings to Improve the Quality of Care? Results From an Online-Based Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Uwe

    2016-01-01

    Background Physician-rating websites have become a popular tool to create more transparency about the quality of health care providers. So far, it remains unknown whether online-based rating websites have the potential to contribute to a better standard of care. Objective Our goal was to examine which health care providers use online rating websites and for what purposes, and whether health care providers use online patient ratings to improve patient care. Methods We conducted an online-based cross-sectional study by surveying 2360 physicians and other health care providers (September 2015). In addition to descriptive statistics, we performed multilevel logistic regression models to ascertain the effects of providers’ demographics as well as report card-related variables on the likelihood that providers implement measures to improve patient care. Results Overall, more than half of the responding providers surveyed (54.66%, 1290/2360) used online ratings to derive measures to improve patient care (implemented measures: mean 3.06, SD 2.29). Ophthalmologists (68%, 40/59) and gynecologists (65.4%, 123/188) were most likely to implement any measures. The most widely implemented quality measures were related to communication with patients (28.77%, 679/2360), the appointment scheduling process (23.60%, 557/2360), and office workflow (21.23%, 501/2360). Scaled-survey results had a greater impact on deriving measures than narrative comments. Multilevel logistic regression models revealed medical specialty, the frequency of report card use, and the appraisal of the trustworthiness of scaled-survey ratings to be significantly associated predictors for implementing measures to improve patient care because of online ratings. Conclusions Our results suggest that online ratings displayed on physician-rating websites have an impact on patient care. Despite the limitations of our study and unintended consequences of physician-rating websites, they still may have the potential to

  2. The development of a patient partnership programme and its impact on quality improvements in a comprehensive haemophilia care service.

    PubMed

    Grogan, A; Coughlan, M; O' Mahony, B; McKee, G

    2012-11-01

    It has long been advocated that patient input in service quality development is essential. We have developed a model of quality evaluation and improvement within a comprehensive haemophilia service, and describe the issues and improvements that resulted from the process. The project utilized an action research methodology. Seven patients were recruited from the haemophilia service for the initial focus groups. The main themes initially explored were as follows: patient experience of the outpatient, inpatient and weekend services and provision of information. The focus group data were analysed using basic content analysis. The main themes the initial focus group identified were the need to optimize the annual review, emergency care and inpatient facilities. Following this, the haemophilia care team worked on improving these issues. At the second focus group the patients contributed at a higher level - patient participation. Patients assisted in addressing outstanding issues such as ID alert card content and the algorithm of care for emergency services. Finally, a patient panel was developed and the relationship became one of direct negotiation and partnership with the haemophilia team to address issues within the service. The expectations and needs of patients attending the haemophilia comprehensive care service are complex. The process of including patients as partners at the highest level of patient involvement evolved and proved an effective method of service evaluation and development, facilitating lateral decision-making, not only improving care directly, but also improving the user experience.

  3. Families’ Perspectives of Quality of Life in Pediatric Palliative Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Gaab, Erin Mary

    2015-01-01

    Medical and academic institutions began prioritizing Pediatric Palliative Care (PPC) less than two decades ago. Although policies and institutions claim to improve the Quality of Life (QoL) of PPC patients and their families, family-defined QoL remains ambiguous. This research investigates the definitions of QoL for PPC patients according to their primary caregivers. We conducted qualitative, semi-structured focus groups of the primary caregivers of PPC patients. The transcripts were analysed for themes using inductive thematic analysis. Participants included primary caregivers of children currently receiving PPC from a healthcare institution in California. We identified several factors that primary caregivers considered components of QoL for their children. The ability to communicate and adapt or be accepted underpinned the concept of QoL for families. QoL for PPC patients was defined by primary caregivers as being able to communicate in a respectful, controlled, physically- and socially-comfortable environment. Attempts to improve QoL should focus not only on pain and symptom control, but also on enhancing opportunities for children to communicate and maintain a sense of dignity. PMID:27417355

  4. [Medical guidelines for diabetes mellitus in Saxony. An instrument for interdisciplinary quality management for optimizing patient care].

    PubMed

    Schulze, J; Kunath, H; Rothe, U; Müller, G

    1998-09-01

    Patients with diabetes still have a life expectancy of 5-10 years less and a markedly reduced quality of life than non-diabetic persons. Concepts, models, and contracts aiming at an efficient co-operative care for chronically ill patients have been developed in the new German states to overcome shortage of care. The dual care of motivated diabetic patients by family physicians and experts for metabolic diseases has proven to be efficient both in pilot studies as well as in country-wide investigations. A representative commission for diabetes has developed guidelines for such a structure of dual care. Design and content of these regional developed guidelines about an cooperative evidence based care for diabetic patients fulfills the criteria suggested by international bodies of experts and the medical society for quality assurance. The Saxonian guidelines for diabetes have been successfully implemented step by step in medical offices and hospitals. We are sure that the further implementation of the shared care system diabetes will further improve quality of care. PMID:9842697

  5. Tube feeding in dementia: how incentives undermine health care quality and patient safety.

    PubMed

    Finucane, Thomas E; Christmas, Colleen; Leff, Bruce A

    2007-05-01

    For nursing home residents with advanced dementia, very little evidence is available to show clinical benefit from enteral tube feeding. Although no randomized clinical trials have been done, considerable evidence from studies of weaker design strongly suggest that tube feeding does not reduce the risks of death, aspiration pneumonia, pressure ulcers, other infections, or poor functional outcome. Nationally, however, utilization is high and highly variable. System-wide incentives favor use of tube feeding, and may influence substitute decision-makers, bedside clinicians, gastroenterologists, and administrators regardless of patient preferences or putative medical indications. Underlying the widespread use of this marginally effective therapy is a basic misunderstanding about malnutrition and about aspiration pneumonia. The face value of tube feeding is strong indeed. In addition to the general faith in intervention, the impulse to "do something" when things are going poorly, financial incentives favor tube feeding for gastroenterologists, hospitals, and nursing homes. The desire to avoid regulatory sanctions, bad publicity, and liability exposure creates a further incentive for nursing homes to provide tube feeding. Rational, evidence-based use of tube feeding in advanced dementia will depend fundamentally on improved education. Reimbursement schemes require significant modification to limit the irrational use of tube feeding. Nursing home regulations based more securely on scientific evidence would likely reduce nonbeneficial tube feeding, as would evidence-based tort reform. Quality improvement initiatives could create positive incentives. Realigning incentives in these ways could, we believe, improve the quality of care, quality of life, and safety of these vulnerable individuals, likely with reduced costs of care.

  6. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation.

  7. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high-quality

  8. Emergency Department Waiting Times (EDWaT): A Patient Flow Management and Quality of Care Rating mHealth Application.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Yunus, Faisel

    2014-01-01

    Saudi hospital emergency departments (ED) have suffered from long waiting times, which have led to a delay in emergency patient care. The increase in the population of Saudi Arabia is likely to further stretch the healthcare services due to overcrowding leading to decreased healthcare quality, long patient waits, patient dissatisfaction, ambulance diversions, decreased physician productivity, and increased frustration among medical staff. This will ultimately put patients at risk for poor health outcomes. Time is of the essence in emergencies and to get to an ED that has the shortest waiting time can mean life or death for a patient, especially in cases of stroke and myocardial infarction. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a mHealth Application - EDWaT - that will: provide patient flow information to the emergency medical services staff, help in quick routing of patients to the nearest hospital, and provide an opportunity for patients to review and rate the quality of care received at an ED, which will then be forwarded to ED services administrators. The quality ratings will help patients to choose between two EDs with the same waiting time and distance from their location. We anticipate that the use of EDWaT will help improve ED wait times and the quality of care provision in Saudi hospitals EDs. PMID:25000058

  9. Emergency Department Waiting Times (EDWaT): A Patient Flow Management and Quality of Care Rating mHealth Application.

    PubMed

    Househ, Mowafa; Yunus, Faisel

    2014-01-01

    Saudi hospital emergency departments (ED) have suffered from long waiting times, which have led to a delay in emergency patient care. The increase in the population of Saudi Arabia is likely to further stretch the healthcare services due to overcrowding leading to decreased healthcare quality, long patient waits, patient dissatisfaction, ambulance diversions, decreased physician productivity, and increased frustration among medical staff. This will ultimately put patients at risk for poor health outcomes. Time is of the essence in emergencies and to get to an ED that has the shortest waiting time can mean life or death for a patient, especially in cases of stroke and myocardial infarction. In this paper, we present our work on the development of a mHealth Application - EDWaT - that will: provide patient flow information to the emergency medical services staff, help in quick routing of patients to the nearest hospital, and provide an opportunity for patients to review and rate the quality of care received at an ED, which will then be forwarded to ED services administrators. The quality ratings will help patients to choose between two EDs with the same waiting time and distance from their location. We anticipate that the use of EDWaT will help improve ED wait times and the quality of care provision in Saudi hospitals EDs.

  10. Patient Empowerment Improved Perioperative Quality of Care in Cancer Patients Aged ≥ 65 Years – A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Maren; Eckardt, Rahel; Scholtz, Kathrin; Neuner, Bruno; von Dossow-Hanfstingl, Vera; Sehouli, Jalid; Stief, Christian G.; Wernecke, Klaus-Dieter; Spies, Claudia D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This randomized controlled, clinical prospective interventional trial was aimed at exploring the effect of patient empowerment on short- and long-term outcomes after major oncologic surgery in elderly cancer patients. Methods This trial was performed from February 2011 to January 2014 at two tertiary medical centers in Germany. The study included patients aged 65 years and older undergoing elective surgery for gastro-intestinal, genitourinary, and thoracic cancer. The patients were randomly assigned to the intervention group, i.e. patient empowerment through information booklet and diary keeping, or to the control group, which received standard care. Randomization was done by block randomization in blocks of four in order of enrollment. The primary outcome were 1,postoperative length of hospital stay (LOS) and 2. long-term global health-related quality of life (HRQoL) one year postoperatively. HRQoL was assessed using the EORTC QLQ C30 questionnaire. Secondary outcomes encompassed postoperative stress and complications. Further objectives were the identification of predictors of LOS, and HRQoL at 12 months. Results Overall 652 patients were included. The mean age was 72 ± 4.9 years, and the majority of patients were male (68.6%, n = 447). The ^median of postoperative length of stay was 9 days (IQR 7–14 day). There were no significant differences between the intervention and the control groups in postoperative LOS (p = 0.99) or global HRQoL after one year (women: p = 0.54, men: p = 0.94). While overall complications and major complications occurred in 74% and 24% of the cases, respectively, frequency and severity of complications did not differ significantly between the groups. Patients in the intervention group reported significantly less postoperative pain (p = 0.03) than the control group. Independent predictors for LOS were identified as severity of surgery, length of anesthesia, major postoperative complications, nutritional state, and pre

  11. Interactions between Patients, Providers, and Health Systems and Technical Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Yelin, Edward; Yazdany, Jinoos; Tonner, Chris; Trupin, Laura; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Katz, Patricia; Schmajuk, Gabriela

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Prior studies have established disparities by race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status (SES) in the kind, quantity, and technical quality of SLE care and outcomes. In this study we evaluate whether disparities exist in assessments of interactions with health care providers and health plans and whether such interactions affect the technical quality of SLE care. Methods Data derive from the Lupus Outcomes Study (LOS). Principal data collection is an annual structured phone interview including items from the Consumer Assessment of Health Plans and Interpersonal Processes of Care Scale measuring dimensions of health care interactions. We use general estimating equations to assess whether disparities exist by race/ethnicity and SES in being in the lowest quartile of ratings of such interactions and whether ratings in the lowest quartile of interactions are associated with technical quality of care after adjustment for sociodemographic and disease characteristics. Results In the 2012 LOS interview, there were 793 respondents, of whom 640 had ≥1 visits to their principal SLE provider. Non-white race/ethnicity and education were not associated with low ratings on any dimension of provider or system interaction; poverty was associated only with low ratings of health plan interactions. After adjustment for demographics, SLE status, and health care variables, ratings in the lowest quartile on all dimensions were associated with significantly lower technical quality of care. Conclusions Ratings in the lowest quartile on all dimensions of interactions with providers and the health care system were associated with lower technical quality of care, potentially resulting in poorer SLE outcomes. PMID:25132660

  12. Development of the Primary Care Quality-Homeless (PCQ-H) Instrument: A Practical Survey of Patients' Experiences in Primary Care

    PubMed Central

    Kertesz, Stefan. G.; Pollio, David E.; Jones, Richard N.; Steward, Jocelyn; Stringfellow, Erin J.; Gordon, Adam J.; Johnson, Nancy K.; Kim, Theresa A.; Granstaff, Unita; Austin, Erika L.; Young, Alexander S.; Golden, Joya; Davis, Lori L.; Roth, David L.; Holt, Cheryl L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Homeless patients face unique challenges in obtaining primary care responsive to their needs and context. Patient experience questionnaires could permit assessment of patient-centered medical homes for this population, but standard instruments may not reflect homeless patients' priorities and concerns. Objectives This report describes (a) the content and psychometric properties of a new primary care questionnaire for homeless patients and (b) the methods utilized in its development. Methods Starting with quality-related constructs from the Institute of Medicine, we identified relevant themes by interviewing homeless patients and experts in their care. A multidisciplinary team drafted a preliminary set of 78 items. This was administered to homeless-experienced clients (n=563) across 3 VA facilities and 1 non-VA Health Care for the Homeless Program. Using Item Response Theory, we examined Test Information Function curves to eliminate less informative items and devise plausibly distinct subscales. Results The resulting 33-item instrument (Primary Care Quality-Homeless, PCQ-H) has four subscales: Patient-Clinician Relationship (15 items), Cooperation among Clinicians (3 items), Access/Coordination (11 items) and Homeless-Specific Needs (4 items). Evidence for divergent and convergent validity is provided. Test Information Function (TIF) graphs showed adequate informational value to permit inferences about groups for 3 subscales (Relationship, Cooperation and Access/Coordination). The 3-item Cooperation subscale had lower informational value (TIF<5) but had good internal consistency (alpha=0.75) and patients frequently reported problems in this aspect of care. Conclusions Systematic application of qualitative and quantitative methods supported the development of a brief patient-reported questionnaire focused on the primary care of homeless patients and offers guidance for future population-specific instrument development. PMID:25023918

  13. Knowledge and attitudes of Saudi intensive care unit nurses regarding oral care delivery to mechanically ventilated patients with the effect of healthcare quality accreditation

    PubMed Central

    Alotaibi, AK; Alotaibi, SK; Alshayiqi, M; Ramalingam, S

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a major morbid outcome among intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Providing oral care for intubated patients is an important task by the ICU nursing staff in reducing the mortality and morbidity. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the attitudes and knowledge of ICU nurses regarding oral care delivery to critically ill patients in Saudi Arabian ICUs. The findings were further correlated to the presence of healthcare quality accreditation of the institution. Materials and Methods: The nurses’ knowledge, attitudes, and healthcare quality accreditation status of the hospital were recorded. Two hundred fifteen nurses conveniently selected from 10 random hospitals were included in this study from Riyadh city, Saudi Arabia. This is a cross-sectional study in the form of a questionnaire. Results: When comparing the knowledge of the participants to their level of education, there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups of nurses. The majority of the nurses agreed that the oral cavity is difficult to clean and that oral care delivery is a high priority for mechanically ventilated patients. Furthermore, there was no statistically significant difference in the attitudes between nurses working in accredited and nonaccredited hospitals. Conclusion: The presence of healthcare quality accreditation did not reflect any significance in attitudes or knowledge of the ICU nurses in regard to mechanically ventilated patients. Factors affecting oral care delivery should be evaluated on the personal and institutional level to achieve better understanding of them. PMID:27051375

  14. Does Informatics Enable or Inhibit the Delivery of Patient-centred, Coordinated, and Quality-assured Care: a Delphi Study

    PubMed Central

    Liyanage, H.; Correa, A.; Liaw, S-T.; Kuziemsky, C.; Terry, A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background Primary care delivers patient-centred and coordinated care, which should be quality-assured. Much of family practice now routinely uses computerised medical record (CMR) systems, these systems being linked at varying levels to laboratories and other care providers. CMR systems have the potential to support care. Objective To achieve a consensus among an international panel of health care professionals and informatics experts about the role of informatics in the delivery of patient-centred, coordinated, and quality-assured care. Method The consensus building exercise involved 20 individuals, five general practitioners and 15 informatics academics, members of the International Medical Informatics Association Primary Care Informatics Working Group. A thematic analysis of the literature was carried out according to the defined themes. Results The first round of the analysis developed 27 statements on how the CMR, or any other information system, including paper-based medical records, supports care delivery. Round 2 aimed at achieving a consensus about the statements of round one. Round 3 stated that there was an agreement on informatics principles and structures that should be put in place. However, there was a disagreement about the processes involved in the implementation, and about the clinical interaction with the systems after the implementation. Conclusions The panel had a strong agreement about the core concepts and structures that should be put in place to support high quality care. However, this agreement evaporated over statements related to implementation. These findings reflect literature and personal experiences: whilst there is consensus about how informatics structures and processes support good quality care, implementation is difficult. PMID:26123905

  15. [Geriatric trauma centers - requirements catalog. An initiative to promote and guarantee the quality of care of elderly trauma patients receiving inpatient care].

    PubMed

    Gogol, M; van den Heuvel, D; Lüttje, D; Püllen, R; Reingräber, A C; Schulz, R-J; Veer, A; Wittrich, A

    2014-06-01

    For the care of the elderly, specific geriatric care facilities in hospitals and specialized rehabilitation centers have been established in the last 20 years throughout Germany. In addition, trauma surgery departments in hospitals and clinics also provide comprehensive care for trauma patients. The present requirements catalog was developed with the aim to ensure the standardization and quality assurance of these care facilities. Thus, the structural basics and, in particular, the structured cooperation between geriatrics and trauma surgery are described and defined in terms of structure, process, and outcome quality. The Bundesverband Geriatrie, the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Geriatrie, and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Gerontologie und Geriatrie offer documentation for external and internal use and evaluation of the structures and processes for certification of geriatric trauma centers. Prerequisite for certification is to meet the technical requirements defined in the requirements catalogue or documents derived from it, and proof of a quality management system according to ISO 9001.

  16. Quality of Care for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Dubai: A HEDIS-Like Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Shelagh M.; Osenenko, Katherine M.; Qatami, Lara; Korenblat Donato, Bonnie M.; Korol, Ellen E.; Al Madani, Abdulrazzaq A.; Al Awadi, Fatheya F.; Al-Ansari, Jaber; Maclean, Ross; Levy, Adrian R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As little data are available on the quality of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) care in the Arabian Gulf States, we estimated the proportion of patients receiving recommended monitoring at the Dubai Hospital for T2DM over one year. Methods. Charts from 150 adults with T2DM were systematically sampled and quality of care was assessed during one calendar year, using a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set- (HEDIS-) like assessment. Screening for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), blood pressure, retinopathy, and nephropathy was considered. Patients were classified based on their most recent test in the period, and predictors of receiving quality care were examined. Results. Mean age was 58 years (standard deviation (SD): 12.4 years) and 33% were males. Over the year, 98% underwent HbA1c screening (50% had control and 28% displayed poor control); 91% underwent LDL screening (65% had control); 55% had blood pressure control; 30% had retinopathy screening; and 22% received attention for nephropathy. No individual characteristics examined predicted receiving quality care. Conclusion. Some guideline monitoring was conducted for most patients; and rates of monitoring for selected measures were comparable to benchmarks from the United States. Greater understanding of factors leading to high adherence would be useful for other areas of preventive care and other jurisdictions. PMID:26089885

  17. Quality of Care for Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Dubai: A HEDIS-Like Assessment.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Shelagh M; Osenenko, Katherine M; Qatami, Lara; Korenblat Donato, Bonnie M; Korol, Ellen E; Al Madani, Abdulrazzaq A; Al Awadi, Fatheya F; Al-Ansari, Jaber; Maclean, Ross; Levy, Adrian R

    2015-01-01

    Objective. As little data are available on the quality of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) care in the Arabian Gulf States, we estimated the proportion of patients receiving recommended monitoring at the Dubai Hospital for T2DM over one year. Methods. Charts from 150 adults with T2DM were systematically sampled and quality of care was assessed during one calendar year, using a Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set- (HEDIS-) like assessment. Screening for glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c), low-density lipoprotein (LDL), blood pressure, retinopathy, and nephropathy was considered. Patients were classified based on their most recent test in the period, and predictors of receiving quality care were examined. Results. Mean age was 58 years (standard deviation (SD): 12.4 years) and 33% were males. Over the year, 98% underwent HbA1c screening (50% had control and 28% displayed poor control); 91% underwent LDL screening (65% had control); 55% had blood pressure control; 30% had retinopathy screening; and 22% received attention for nephropathy. No individual characteristics examined predicted receiving quality care. Conclusion. Some guideline monitoring was conducted for most patients; and rates of monitoring for selected measures were comparable to benchmarks from the United States. Greater understanding of factors leading to high adherence would be useful for other areas of preventive care and other jurisdictions.

  18. The Impact of Patient Language Proficiency and Interpreter Service Use on the Quality of Psychiatric Care: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Amy M.; Alegría, Margarita

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of limited English proficiency and use of interpreters on the quality of psychiatric care. Methods A systematic literature search for English-language publications was conducted in PubMed, PsycInfo, and CINAHL and by review of the reference lists of included articles and expert sources. Of 321 citations, 26 peer-reviewed articles met inclusion criteria by reporting primary data on the clinical care for psychiatric disorders among patients with limited proficiency in English or in the providers’ language. Results Little systematic research has addressed the impact of language proficiency or interpreter use on the quality of psychiatric care in contemporary US settings. Therefore, the literature to date is insufficient to inform evidence-based guidelines for improving quality of care among patients with limited English proficiency. Nonetheless, evaluation in a patient’s non-primary language can lead to incomplete or distorted mental status assessment whereas assessments conducted via untrained interpreters may contain interpreting errors. Consequences of interpreter errors include clinicians’ failure to identify disordered thought or delusional content. Use of professional interpreters may improve disclosure and attenuate some difficulties. Diagnostic agreement, collaborative treatment planning, and referral for specialty care may be compromised. Conclusions Clinicians should become aware of the types of quality problems that may occur when evaluating patients in a non-primary language or via an interpreter. Given demographic trends in the US, future research should aim to address the deficit in the evidence base to guide clinical practice and policy. PMID:20675834

  19. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress. PMID:26218000

  20. Professional Quality of Life of Veterans Affairs Staff and Providers in a Patient-Centered Care Environment.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Sara M; LaVela, Sherri L

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the work environment prompted by the movement toward patient-centered care have the potential to improve occupational stress among health care workers by improving team-based work activities, collaboration, and employee-driven quality improvement. This study was conducted to examine professional quality of life among providers at patient-centered care pilot facilities. Surveys were conducted with 76 Veterans Affairs employees/providers at facilities piloting patient-centered care interventions, to assess demographics, workplace practices and views (team-based environment, employee voice, quality of communication, and turnover intention), and professional quality of life (compassion satisfaction, burnout, and secondary traumatic stress).Professional quality-of-life subscales were not related to employee position type, age, or gender. Employee voice measures were related to lower burnout and higher compassion satisfaction. In addition, employees who were considering leaving their position showed higher burnout and lower compassion satisfaction scores. None of the work practices showed relationships with secondary traumatic stress.

  1. Toward a Definition of Quality Care for Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2015-09-01

    Health care systems and payers are placing increasing emphasis on the measurement and improvement of quality. The process of quality improvement is complex but can be supported by professional organizations such as the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM). In 2013, the AASM commissioned a series of restless legs syndrome (RLS)-specific quality measures, consisting of process and outcome measures. This article provides an overview of the measure development process and discusses the individual RLS quality measures. These measures were designed to support the goals of improved diagnostic accuracy, decreased symptom severity, and reduced treatment complications. PMID:26329439

  2. The impact of a no-user-fee policy on the quality of patient care/service delivery in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    De La Haye, W; Alexis, S

    2012-03-01

    This paper is a submission to the Sessional Select Committee on Human Resources and Social Development by the Medical Association of Jamaica on September 25, 2011, and presented orally by both authors on October 20, 2011. It explores the impact of the no-user-fee policy on the quality of patient care/service delivery in Jamaica and makes recommendations for reform.

  3. Using vignettes to explore judgements of patients about safety and quality of care: the role of outcome and relationship with the care provider.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Rebecca; Gardner, Peter; Plachcinski, Rachel

    2011-09-01

    BACKGROUND There is a growing body of evidence that safe outcomes and quality care are important to patients. For the patient, evaluations of safety and quality are made on the basis of the interpersonal interactions that they have with health professionals as well as the technical aspects of their care. OBJECTIVE In this study, we investigated the extent to which outcome of care (harm or not) and relationship (good or bad) with the care provider impact on the judgements of responsibility and blame as well as decisions about likelihood of making a complaint. METHOD Ninety-eight mothers made seven ratings of responsibility, blame and action in response to four hypothetical vignettes in a questionnaire. The vignettes described poor quality ante-natal care in which outcome and relationship with the health-care provider were systematically manipulated across different versions of the questionnaire. RESULTS Multivariate analyses showed that participants made significantly more negative ratings in response to vignettes describing a bad outcome and those that described a poor relationship with the health professional. However, whilst ratings of seriousness and likelihood of making a complaint were most influenced by the manipulation of outcome in the vignettes, judgements of blame and responsibility were most effected by the depiction of relationship with the health professional as good or bad. Moreover, for three of the four vignettes, relationship rather than outcome most strongly influenced overall ratings of care. DISCUSSION These findings are discussed in the context of theory and policy developments.

  4. Care Management Medical Home Center Model: Preliminary Results of a Patient-Centered Approach to Improving Care Quality for Diabetic Patients.

    PubMed

    Page, Timothy F; Amofah, St Anthony; McCann, Shelia; Rivo, Julie; Varghese, Asha; James, Terisa; Rivo, Marc; Williams, Mark L

    2015-07-01

    This article presents preliminary findings of the impact of an innovative care management model for diabetic patients. The model was implemented by seven Federally Qualified Health Centers serving 10,000 diabetic patients in Miami-Dade County. A primary intervention of this model is a centralized care management team that makes previsit phone calls to diabetic patients who have scheduled appointments. These previsit phone calls optimize patient knowledge and self-management goals, and provide patient care coordinators with relevant clinical information to optimize the office visit and help to ensure completion of recommended diabetic preventive and chronic care services. Data suggest that following the implementation of this care management model, more diabetic patients are receiving regular care, and compliance with recommended tests and screenings has improved.

  5. The quality of caring relationships

    PubMed Central

    Abma, Tineke A; Oeseburg, Barth; Widdershoven, Guy AM; Verkerk, Marian

    2009-01-01

    In health care, relationships between patients or disabled persons and professionals are at least co-constitutive for the quality of care. Many patients complain about the contacts and communication with caregivers and other professionals. From a care-ethical perspective a good patient-professional relationship requires a process of negotiation and shared understanding about mutual normative expectations. Mismatches between these expectations will lead to misunderstandings or conflicts. If caregivers listen to the narratives of identity of patients, and engage in a deliberative dialogue, they will better be able to attune their care to the needs of patients. We will illustrate this with the stories of three women with multiple sclerosis. Their narratives of identity differ from the narratives that caregivers and others use to understand and identify them. Since identities give rise to normative expectations in all three cases there is a conflict between what the women expect of their caregivers and vice-versa. These stories show that the quality of care, defined as doing the right thing, at the right time, in the right way, for the right person, is dependent on the quality of caring relationships. PMID:22110320

  6. An Android-enabled mobile framework for ensuring quality of life through patient-centric care.

    PubMed

    Koufi, Vassiliki; Malamateniou, Flora; Vassilacopoulos, George

    2012-01-01

    The drive to achieve excellence in healthcare delivery while containing costs, underlies the need for a new generation of applications which facilitate the realization of a patient-centric care model. Under this emerging care model healthcare delivery can be integrated across the continuum of services, from prevention to follow up, and care can be coordinated across all settings. With care moving out into the community, health systems require real-time information to deliver coordinated care to patients. The integration of leading-edge technologies, such as mobile technology, with Personal Health Records (PHRs) can meet this requirement by making comprehensive and unified health information available to authorized users at any point of care or decision making through familiar environments such as Google's Android. This paper presents a framework that provides ubiquitous access to patients' PHRs via Android-enabled mobile devices. Where possible health information access and management is performed in a transparent way, thus enabling healthcare professionals to devote more time on practicing medicine and patients to manage their own health with the least possible intervention. This depends heavily on the context, which is collected by both Android-specific core system services and special purpose software agents with the latter being also responsible for preserving PHR data privacy. PMID:22874352

  7. Telegenetics use in presymptomatic genetic counselling: patient evaluations on satisfaction and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Otten, Ellen; Birnie, Erwin; Ranchor, Adelita V; van Langen, Irene M

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, online counselling has been introduced in clinical genetics to increase patients' access to care and to reduce time and cost for both patients and professionals. Most telegenetics reports so far evaluated online oncogenetic counselling at remote health centres in regions with large travelling distances, generally showing positive patient outcomes. We think online counselling--including the use of supportive tools that are also available during in-person counseling--of presymptomatic patients in their homes can also be feasible and valuable for patients in relatively small regions. We performed a single-centre pilot study of online genetic counselling for 57 patients who were presymptomatic cardiogenetic (n=17), presymptomatic oncogenetic (n=34) and prenatal (3 couples). One-third of presymptomatic patients we approached consented to online counselling. Patient evaluations of practical aspects, satisfaction and psychological outcomes were assessed and compared with a matched control group. Patients managed to fulfil the preparations, were significantly more satisfied with their counsellor and counselling session than controls and were satisfied with the online counselling more than they expected to be beforehand. Psychological outcomes (decreased anxiety and increased control) did not differ with control patients. Technical problems occurred in almost half of online sessions. Nonetheless, online counselling in patients' homes proved to be feasible and was appreciated by a substantial part of presymptomatic patients at our genetics centre in the Netherlands. Based on these outcomes, we conclude online counselling can be a valuable addition to existing counselling options in regular patient care.

  8. Involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management functions in EU hospitals: implementation and impact on patient-centred care strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Sunol, Rosa; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wang, Aolin; Dersarkissian, Maral; Thompson, Caroline A.; Thompson, Andrew; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, N; Kringos, DS; Lombarts, MJMH; Plochg, T; Lopez, MA; Secanell, M; Sunol, R; Vallejo, P; Bartels, P; Kristensen, S; Michel, P; Saillour-Glenisson, F; Vlcek, F; Car, M; Jones, S; Klaus, E; Bottaro, S; Garel, P; Saluvan, M; Bruneau, C; Depaigne-Loth, A; Shaw, C; Hammer, A; Ommen, O; Pfaff, H; Groene, O; Botje, D; Wagner, C; Kutaj-Wasikowska, H; Kutryba, B; Escoval, A; Lívio, A; Eiras, M; Franca, M; Leite, I; Almeman, F; Kus, H; Ozturk, K; Mannion, R; Arah, OA; DerSarkissian, M; Thompson, CA; Wang, A; Thompson, A

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to describe the involvement of patients or their representatives in quality management (QM) functions and to assess associations between levels of involvement and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies. Design A cross-sectional, multilevel study design that surveyed quality managers and department heads and data from an organizational audit. Setting Randomly selected hospitals (n = 74) from seven European countries (The Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain and Turkey). Participants Hospital quality managers (n = 74) and heads of clinical departments (n = 262) in charge of four patient pathways (acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries) participated in the data collection between May 2011 and February 2012. Main Outcome Measures Four items reflecting essential patient-centred care strategies based on an on-site hospital visit: (1) formal survey seeking views of patients and carers, (2) written policies on patients' rights, (3) patient information literature including guidelines and (4) fact sheets for post-discharge care. The main predictors were patient involvement in QM at the (i) hospital level and (ii) pathway level. Results Current levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions in European hospitals are low at hospital level (mean score 1.6 on a scale of 0 to 5, SD 0.7), but even lower at departmental level (mean 0.6, SD 0.7). We did not detect associations between levels of involving patients and their representatives in QM functions and the implementation of patient-centred care strategies; however, the smallest hospitals were more likely to have implemented patient-centred care strategies. Conclusions There is insufficient evidence that involving patients and their representatives in QM leads to establishing or implementing strategies and procedures that facilitate patient-centred care; however, lack of evidence should not be

  9. Caregiver Evaluation of the Quality of End-Of-Life Care (CEQUEL) Scale: The Caregiver's Perception of Patient Care Near Death

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, Philip C.; Prigerson, Holly G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose End-of-life (EOL) measures are limited in capturing caregiver assessment of the quality of EOL care. Because none include caregiver perception of patient suffering or prolongation of death, we sought to develop and validate the Caregiver Evaluation of Quality of End-of-Life Care (CEQUEL) scale to include these dimensions of caregiver-perceived quality of EOL care. Patients and Methods Data were derived from Coping with Cancer (CwC), a multisite, prospective, longitudinal study of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers (N = 275 dyads). Caregivers were assessed before and after patient deaths. CEQUEL's factor structure was examined; reliability was evaluated using Cronbach's α, and convergent validity by the strength of associations between CEQUEL scores and key EOL outcomes. Results Factor analysis revealed four distinct factors: Prolongation of Death, Perceived Suffering, Shared Decision-Making, and Preparation for the Death. Each item loaded strongly on only a single factor. The 13-item CEQUEL and its subscales showed moderate to acceptable Cronbach's α (range: 0.52–0.78). 53% of caregivers reported patients suffering more than expected. Higher CEQUEL scores were positively associated with therapeutic alliance (ρ = .13; p≤.05) and hospice enrollment (z = −2.09; p≤.05), and negatively associated with bereaved caregiver regret (ρ = −.36, p≤.001) and a diagnosis of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (z = −2.06; p≤.05). Conclusion CEQUEL is a brief, valid measure of quality of EOL care from the caregiver's perspective. It is the first scale to include perceived suffering and prolongation of death. If validated in future work, it may prove a useful quality indicator for the delivery of EOL care and a risk indicator for poor bereavement adjustment. PMID:23762467

  10. Referring a patient and family to high-quality palliative care at the close of life: "We met a new personality... with this level of compassion and empathy".

    PubMed

    Teno, Joan M; Connor, Stephen R

    2009-02-11

    Palliative care services are increasingly available to primary care physicians for both expert consultations and services to seriously ill patients. The United States now has more than 1400 hospital-based palliative care teams and more than 4700 hospice programs. We use an illustrative case of a palliative care hospitalization and intervention for a middle-aged man with severe pain from spinal metastases to discuss 4 key questions that a primary care physician faces in caring for the seriously ill patient with difficult symptom management: (1) Should I refer a patient to a hospital-based palliative care team or to hospice services for difficult symptom management? (2) If the patient is referred to a hospital-based palliative care team, what should I, as the primary care physician, expect? (3) When should I refer to hospice services a patient initially referred to a hospital-based palliative care team? and (4) How can I choose a hospice program that will provide competent, coordinated, and compassionate patient- and family-centered care? Primary care physicians now may choose among hospice programs, and the programs may vary in their quality of care. Validated tools to measure patient and family perceptions of the quality of hospice care are now available but progress in defining and measuring the quality of hospice care is still needed before actionable information will be available to guide the choice of hospice programs for physicians and consumers.

  11. Internal quality control of prothrombin time in primary care: comparing the use of patient split samples with lyophilised control materials.

    PubMed

    Stavelin, Anne; Petersen, Per Hyltoft; Sølvik, Una; Sandberg, Sverre

    2009-09-01

    Many primary care laboratories use point-of-care (POC) instruments to monitor patients on anticoagulant treatment. The internal analytical quality control of these instruments is often assessed by analysing lyophilised control materials and/or by sending patient samples to a local hospital laboratory for comparison (split sample). The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of these two models of prothrombin time quality control. The models were evaluated by power functions created by computer simulations based on empirical data from 18 primary care laboratories using the POC instruments Thrombotrack, Coagu-Chek S, or Hemochron Jr. Signature. The control rules 1(2S), 1(3S), exponential weighted moving average, and the deviation limits of +/- 10% and +/- 20% were evaluated by their probability of error detection and false rejections. The total within-lab coefficient of variation was 3.8% and 6.9% for Thrombotrack, 8.9% and 10.5% for CoaguChek S, and 9.4% and 14.8% for Hemochron Jr. Signature for the control sample measurements and the split sample measurements, respectively. The probability of error detection was higher using a lyophilised control material than a patient split sample for all three instruments, whereas the probability of false rejection was similar. A higher probability of error detection occurred when lyophilised control material was used compared with the patient split samples; therefore, lyophilised control material should be used for internal analytical quality control of prothrombin time in primary health care.

  12. Association of the Length of Doctor-Patient Relationship with Primary Care Quality in Seven Family Practices in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yong-Jun; Lee, Seung Hwa; Sung, Nak-Jin; Kim, Soo-Young; Hong, Jee Young

    2013-01-01

    Countries with historically unlimited patient choice of medical provider, such as Korea, have been promoting rational health care pathways. Factors related to the length of doctor-patient relationship (DPR) for enhancing primary care in those countries should be studied. Participants were patients who had visited their family practices on six or more occasions over a period of more than 6 months. Five domains (21 items) of the Korean Primary Care Assessment Tool (first contact, coordination function, comprehensiveness, family/community orientation, and personalized care) and general questions were administered in the waiting rooms. From seven practices, the response rate was 83.7% (495/591). The older the age, the lower the income, the shorter the duration of education, the more the number of diseases the patients had, and in provincial cities rather than in Seoul, the longer length of DPR ( ≥ 4 yr) was shown. The long-term DPR was associated with total primary care quality score (upper [ ≥ 71.4] vs lower [ < 71.4], OR, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.10-2.76), especially with coordination function (OR, 1.01; 95% CI, 1.00-1.02), being adjusted for confounding variables. Strengthening the coordination function may have to be the first consideration in primary care policy in countries like Korea. PMID:23580064

  13. Evaluating quality of care for patients with type 2 diabetes using electronic health record information in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several low and middle-income countries are implementing electronic health records (EHR). In the near future, EHRs could become an efficient tool to evaluate healthcare performance if appropriate indicators are developed. The aims of this study are: a) to develop quality of care indicators (QCIs) for type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) health system; b) to determine the feasibility of constructing QCIs using the IMSS EHR data; and c) to evaluate the quality of care (QC) provided to IMSS patients with T2DM. Methods We used a three-stage mixed methods approach: a) development of QCIs following the RAND-UCLA method; b) EHR data extraction and construction of indicators; c) QC evaluation using EHR data from 25,130 T2DM patients who received care in 2009. Results We developed 18 QCIs, of which 14 were possible to construct using available EHR data. QCIs comprised both process of care and health outcomes. Several flaws in the EHR design and quality of data were identified. The indicators of process and outcomes of care suggested areas for improvement. For example, only 13.0% of patients were referred to an ophthalmologist; 3.9% received nutritional counseling; 63.2% of overweight/obese patients were prescribed metformin, and only 23% had HbA1c <7% (or plasma glucose ≤130 mg/dl). Conclusions EHR data can be used to evaluate QC. The results identified both strengths and weaknesses in the electronic information system as well as in the process and outcomes of T2DM care at IMSS. This information can be used to guide targeted interventions to improve QC. PMID:22672471

  14. Effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, vital signs, and sleep quality of percutaneous coronary intervention patients in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Cho, Mi-Yeon; Min, Eun Sil; Hur, Myung-Haeng; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aromatherapy on the anxiety, sleep, and blood pressure (BP) of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) patients in an intensive care unit (ICU). Fifty-six patients with PCI in ICU were evenly allocated to either the aromatherapy or conventional nursing care. Aromatherapy essential oils were blended with lavender, roman chamomile, and neroli with a 6 : 2 : 0.5 ratio. Participants received 10 times treatment before PCI, and the same essential oils were inhaled another 10 times after PCI. Outcome measures patients' state anxiety, sleeping quality, and BP. An aromatherapy group showed significantly low anxiety (t = 5.99, P < .001) and improving sleep quality (t = -3.65, P = .001) compared with conventional nursing intervention. The systolic BP of both groups did not show a significant difference by time or in a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 4.63, P = .036). The diastolic BP did not show any significant difference by time or by a group-by-time interaction; however, a significant difference was observed between groups (F = 6.93, P = .011). In conclusion, the aromatherapy effectively reduced the anxiety levels and increased the sleep quality of PCI patients admitted to the ICU. Aromatherapy may be used as an independent nursing intervention for reducing the anxiety levels and improving the sleep quality of PCI patients.

  15. Influenza-like-illness and clinically diagnosed flu: disease burden, costs and quality of life for patients seeking ambulatory care or no professional care at all.

    PubMed

    Bilcke, Joke; Coenen, Samuel; Beutels, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    This is one of the first studies to (1) describe the out-of-hospital burden of influenza-like-illness (ILI) and clinically diagnosed flu, also for patients not seeking professional medical care, (2) assess influential background characteristics, and (3) formally compare the burden of ILI in patients with and without a clinical diagnosis of flu. A general population sample with recent ILI experience was recruited during the 2011-2012 influenza season in Belgium. Half of the 2250 respondents sought professional medical care, reported more symptoms (especially more often fever), a longer duration of illness, more use of medication (especially antibiotics) and a higher direct medical cost than patients not seeking medical care. The disease and economic burden were similar for ambulatory ILI patients, irrespective of whether they received a clinical diagnosis of flu. On average, they experienced 5-6 symptoms over a 6-day period; required 1.6 physician visits and 86-91% took medication. An average episode amounted to €51-€53 in direct medical costs, 4 days of absence from work or school and the loss of 0.005 quality-adjusted life-years. Underlying illness led to greater costs and lower quality-of-life. The costs of ILI patients with clinically diagnosed flu tended to increase, while those of ILI patients without clinically diagnosed flu tended to decrease with age. Recently vaccinated persons experienced lower costs and a higher quality-of-life, but this was only the case for patients not seeking professional medical care. This information can be used directly to evaluate the implementation of cost-effective prevention and control measures for influenza. In particular to inform the evaluation of more widespread seasonal influenza vaccination, including in children, which is currently considered by many countries.

  16. The quality of the caregiving relationship in informal care for older adults with dementia and chronic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Spruytte, Nele; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Lammertyn, Frans; Storms, Gerrit

    2002-09-01

    The present study focuses on the dyadic relationship between a family carer and a patient. Besides clarifying the quality of the caregiving relationship in two populations of chronically ill patients, this investigation examines whether patient characteristics, carer characteristics and network characteristics are predictive of relationship quality in dementia caregiving. Partners, children or children-in-law caring for a relative suffering from dementia (N = 144) and partners or parents of persons suffering from chronic mental illness (N = 77) were interviewed with a semi-structured questionnaire. The measurement of relationship quality is based on the literature of Expressed Emotion and covers two dimensions: the level of criticism and the level of warmth. In general, the relationship between a carer and his or her chronically ill relative was marked by a low level of conflict or criticism and a high degree of warmth. The main predictors of a poorer relationship quality were disturbances in the patient's behaviour and the carer's perception of these disturbances. Our results suggest that, rather than limiting investigations to the burden experienced by the family carer, future research and interventions on chronically ill patients should focus on the quality of the carer-patient relationship and its determinants.

  17. Identifying health care quality attributes.

    PubMed

    Ramsaran-Fowdar, Roshnee R

    2005-01-01

    Evaluating health care quality is important for consumers, health care providers, and society. Developing a measure of health care service quality is an important precursor to systems and organizations that value health care quality. SERVQUAL has been proposed as a broad-based measure of service quality that may be applicable to health care settings. Results from a study described in this paper verify SERVQUAL dimensions, but demonstrate additional dimensions that are specific to health care settings. PMID:16318013

  18. Evaluation of Quality, Content, and Use of the Web Site Prepared for Family Members Giving Care to Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Demir, Yasemin; Gozum, Sebahat

    2015-09-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the quality, content, usability, and efficacy of a Web site prepared for the purpose of improving the caregiving capability of family members who provide care for stroke survivors at home. The DISCERN score for the Web site was found to be 4.35 over 5. The first section that assesses reliability of the Web site was 4.38 over 5; mean score of the second section that measures the quality of the provided information on treatment/care options was 4.30, and mean score of the third section that gives a general evaluation of the material was 4.1. The Web site content achieved an average score of 3.47 over 4 after evaluation by experts. The Web site system usability score was found to be 79.4 over 100. The Web site was utilized mostly for exercises in bed (76.3%; n = 29), use of medications, and patient safety (68.4%; n = 26). It was determined that those who were younger and employed and had no previous experience of nursing any patient utilized relatively more from the section of patient nutrition and oral care and married family caregivers from the body hygiene section. The Web site quality and content were judged to be good and reliable to use. The Web site was efficiently used by caregivers. PMID:26125455

  19. Participation in the SUCCESS-A Trial Improves Intensity and Quality of Care for Patients with Primary Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, U.; Kasprowicz, N. S.; Hepp, P.; Schindlbeck, C.; Harbeck, N.; Kiechle, M.; Sommer, H.; Beckmann, M. W.; Friese, K.; Janni, W.; Rack, B.; Scholz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The SUCCESS-A trial is a prospective, multicenter, phase III clinical trial for high-risk primary breast cancer. It compares disease-free survival after randomization in patients treated with fluorouracil, epirubicin and cyclophosphamide followed by 3 cycles of docetaxel (FEC-D) with that of patients treated with 3 cycles of FEC followed by 3 cycles of gemcitabine and docetaxel (FEC-DG). After a second randomization patients were treated with zoledronate for 2 or 5 years. A total of 251 centers took part in the trial and 3754 patients were recruited over a period of 18 months which ended in March 2007. In a questionnaire-based survey we investigated the impact of enrollment in the trial on patient care, the choice of chemotherapy protocol and access to current oncologic information as well as overall satisfaction in the respective centers. Analysis of the 78 questionnaires returned showed that 40 % of the centers had never previously enrolled patients with these indications in clinical studies. Prior to participating in the study, 4 % of the centers prescribed CMF or other protocols in patients with high-primary breast cancer risk, 46 % administered anthracycline-based chemotherapy and 50 % gave taxane-based chemotherapy. Around half of the participating centers noted that intensity of care and overall quality of care became even better and that access to breast cancer-specific information improved through participation in the trial. After their experience with the SUCCESS-A trial, all of the centers stated that they were prepared to enroll patients in clinical phase III trials again in the future. These data indicate that both patients and physicians benefit from clinical trials, as enrollment improves treatment strategies and individual patient care, irrespective of study endpoints. PMID:24771886

  20. Two heads are better than one: the future of patient safety and quality care.

    PubMed

    Mailloux, Cynthia

    2011-06-01

    IPE summits can be used as a mechanism to have students from multiple disciplines explore ethical issues, define professional roles and responsibilities, and encourage interdisciplinary discussion. Students can be facilitated in this process through questions related to each member's role and scope of practice. The goals for students participating in these types of activities are to expand the students' knowledge of other health professions and to promote interprofessional understanding of other health professionals' roles and responsibilities to patient care. It is hopeful that students will reflect upon the identification of healthcare professional roles and responsibilities and use such opportunities to collaborate in ways to improve patient outcomes. PMID:21928551

  1. The MSH Effective and Efficient Utilization Committee: An Approach to Improving Care Quality, Value and Patient Experience.

    PubMed

    Lau, Davina; Livshits, Olga; Stewart, Thomas; Shandling, Maureen; Morgan, Mathew; Snider, Jennifer; Bell, Chaim M

    2014-01-01

    Hospitals are faced with reduced funding but must deliver high-quality care, and increase service capacity (MOHLTC 2013). In response, Mount Sinai Hospital (MSH) has established an organizational approach that engages clinicians and front-line caregivers. MSH's Effective and Efficient Utilization Committee (EEUC) focuses on cross-departmental collaboration to maximize resources, accessibility and quality, while minimizing cost. The challenges were tackled by team coordination guided by senior administration and project management review of evidence-based data supported by health analytics. Over a three-year period, the EEUC has helped reduce wait times, increase service accessibility, provide cost savings and enhance patient experience in several areas.

  2. How Kaiser Permanente uses video ethnography of patients for quality improvement, such as in shaping better care transitions.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, Esther B; Bellows, Jim; Jackson, Ana H; Price, Patricia M

    2012-06-01

    Keeping patients and caregivers at the center of quality improvement is critical. Kaiser Permanente's Care Management Institute adapted video ethnography to achieve this aim, using video to capture interviews with-and observations of-patients and caregivers, identify patient-centered improvement opportunities, and communicate them effectively to clinical and administrative leaders and front-line staff. This method is particularly effective for helping understand the needs of frail elders, patients nearing the end of life, those with multiple chronic conditions, and other vulnerable people who are not well represented in focus groups and patient advisory councils. As part of an initiative to improve care transitions for elders with heart failure, video ethnography contributed to greatly reduced thirty-day hospital readmission rates, helping reduce readmissions at one medical center from 13.6 percent to 9 percent in six months. It also helped improve the reliability of the readmissions reduction program. When embedded within an established quality improvement framework, video ethnography can be an effective tool for innovating new solutions, improving existing processes, and spreading knowledge about how best to meet patient needs.

  3. Monitoring game-based motor rehabilitation of patients at home for better plans of care and quality of life.

    PubMed

    Ponte, S; Gabrielli, S; Jonsdottir, J; Morando, M; Dellepiane, S

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the biomedical, remote monitoring infrastructure developed and currently tested in the EU REHAB@HOME project to support home rehabilitation of the upper extremity of persons post-stroke and in persons with other neurological disorders, such as Multiple Sclerosis patients, in order to track their progress over therapy and improve their Quality of Life. The paper will specifically focus on describing the initial testing of the tele-rehabilitation system's components for patients' biomedical monitoring over therapy, which support the delivery and monitoring of more personalized, engaging plans of care by rehabilitation centers and services. PMID:26737156

  4. Quality of care in African-American patients admitted for congestive heart failure at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ilksoy, Nurcan; Moore, Renee H; Easley, Kirk; Jacobson, Terry A

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the quality of congestive heart failure (CHF) treatment for hospitalized patients varies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the compliance of physicians at a large, inner-city teaching hospital with current evidence-based guidelines. A retrospective review of the medical records of 104 patients admitted with CHF was conducted. Quality-of-care indicators were assessed, including the use of echocardiograms, the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers to appropriate patients, and lifestyle and medication counseling at discharge. The assessment of left ventricular (LV) function was documented in 96.1% of patients (n = 100). A total of 65 patients (92.8%) with systolic dysfunction were considered to be ideal candidates for ACE inhibitor therapy. Of these 65 patients, 58 (89.2%) were discharged on ACE inhibitors. Of 41 patients with LV systolic dysfunction who were considered to be ideal candidates for beta-blocker therapy, only 10 (24.4%) were discharged on beta-blocker therapy. Of all patients with CHF, 50% received discharge counseling on medication compliance, 48% received counseling on a low-salt diet, and only 9% were told to monitor daily weight. This study shows that in a major academic teaching hospital, there is a need for improvement in the use of beta-blocker therapy as well as greater emphasis on patient education strategies regarding diet, medication adherence, and monitoring daily weight. PMID:16490439

  5. Progressive Mobility Protocol Reduces Venous Thromboembolism Rate in Trauma Intensive Care Patients: A Quality Improvement Project.

    PubMed

    Booth, Kathryn; Rivet, Josh; Flici, Richelle; Harvey, Ellen; Hamill, Mark; Hundley, Douglas; Holland, Katelyn; Hubbard, Sandra; Trivedi, Apurva; Collier, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The intensive care unit (ICU) trauma population is at high risk for complications associated with immobility. The purpose of this project was to compare ICU trauma patient outcomes before and after implementation of a structured progressive mobility (PM) protocol. Outcomes included hospital and ICU stays, ventilator days, falls, respiratory failure, pneumonia, or venous thromboembolism (VTE). In the preintervention cohort, physical therapy (PT) consults were placed 53% of the time. This rose to more than 90% during the postintervention period. PT consults seen within 24 hr rose from a baseline 23% pre- to 74%-94% in the 2 highest compliance postintervention months. On average, 40% of patients were daily determined to be too unstable for mobility per protocol guidelines-most often owing to elevated intracranial pressure. During PM sessions, there were no adverse events (i.e., extubation, hypoxia, fall). There were no significant differences in clinical outcomes between the 2 cohorts regarding hospital and ICU stays, average ventilator days, mortality, falls, respiratory failure, or pneumonia overall or within ventilated patients specifically. There was, however, a difference in the incidence of VTE between the preintervention cohort (21%) and postintervention cohort (7.5%) (p = .0004). A PM protocol for ICU trauma patients is safe and may reduce patient deconditioning and VTE complications in this high-risk population. Multidisciplinary commitment, daily protocol reinforcement, and active engagement of patients/families are the cornerstones to success in this ICU PM program. PMID:27618376

  6. Quality of care in American Indian child and adolescent behavioral health: A pilot study of patient and family perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Podlogar, Matthew C.; Novins, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    Research regarding the quality of behavioral health care for American Indian (AI) children and adolescents is extremely limited, and no study has considered the qualitative perspectives of the AI children receiving such services or that of their families. This pilot study investigated AI patient and family perspectives of what quality of care means to them. Data were drawn from interviews of parents (n = 15), and the youth (if they were age 11 or older; n = 11) of 16 children and adolescents who received treatment at three behavioral health programs serving AI communities. Interview transcripts were coded and analyzed for key themes that related to treatment structure, process, and outcomes. According to these participants, the principal indicator of treatment quality was “being able to trust the clinician.” The most valued treatment outcomes for improvement were the youth’s “self-efficacy and self-worth,” “functioning in school,” and “relationship with the family.” Future research is needed on how to best integrate these domains into specific and objective indicators for standardized quality of care assessments of AI child and adolescent behavioral health services. PMID:25961647

  7. Dejection and self-assessment of quality of life in patients with lung cancer subjected to palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina; Krajnik, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study To evaluate the intensity of dejection and self-assessment of quality of life in patients with lung cancer from the start of palliative care until death. Material and methods The study included 63 patients with lung cancer from the start of care until death in palliative medicine centers in Bydgoszcz in 2012–2013. The visual-analogue scale constituting part of the ESAS scale was used to assess dejection, while question number 30 of the EORTC QLQ-C30 was used for self-assessment of quality of life. Results “Moderate” and “very” intense dejection initially occurred in 19 (30%) and 24 (38%), and in the 2nd assessment in as many as 23 (36%) and 30 (48%) patients. Average quality of life deteriorated in this respect by 0.09 in the two-step scale (p = 0.005). Increase in the intensity of “moderate” dejection occurred between the 1st and 3rd assessment. Initially it occurred in 2 (9%) patients and in 14 (66%) during the 3rd assessment. In contrast, the levels of “very” severe dejection did not change significantly between the 1st and the 3rd assessment. The average quality of life deteriorated by 0.23 points (p = 0.004). A significant relationship was found only between analgesic treatment and quality of life (p < 0.0005). Other factors such as age, time from diagnosis to start of treatment, place of residence, sex, or financial condition did not affect the quality of life. Conclusions Self-assessment of the quality of life worsens with time. The intensity of dejection does not change in the last 3 weeks of life. In multivariate analysis, among the selected variables such as age, sex, place of residence, time from diagnosis to start of palliative care, financial condition, and type of painkillers used, only the latter has an impact on self-assessed quality of life. PMID:26843849

  8. Do post-take ward round proformas improve communication and influence quality of patient care?

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, A; Jacob, K; Fulton, J; McGavin, C

    2004-01-01

    The post-take ward round is a critical time for reviewing the initial history, examination and results, and the stage at which further treatment and investigations will be determined. However documentation of this ward round is often inadequate, so the benefits of decision making are lost. The documentation of 95 ward rounds was assessed for key items of information before and after the introduction of a proforma sheet. The introduction of the proforma led to a significant improvement in the documentation of a diagnosis, management plan, prophylaxis for deep vein thrombosis, and resuscitation status (p<0.05), which will have a significant impact on patient care. PMID:15537856

  9. Health-related quality of life mediates associations between multi-morbidity and depressive symptoms in Chinese primary care patients

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Weng Yee; Choi, Edmond Pui Hang; Wan, Eric Yuk Fai; Lam, Cindy Lo Kuen

    2016-01-01

    Background. Qualifying the relationship between multi-morbidity, health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and depressive symptoms in primary care can help to inform the development of appropriate interventions and services which can help to enhance HRQOL in patients with chronic disease. Objective. The objective of this study was to determine whether the physical aspect of HRQOL mediates the relationship between chronic disease multi-morbidity and depressive symptoms in Chinese primary care patients. Methods. A cross-sectional survey was conducted on patients recruited from the waiting rooms of 59 primary care clinics distributed across Hong Kong. About 9259 subjects were included for the mediation model analysis. The primary outcome was level of depressive symptoms as measured by the Patient Health Questionniare 9. The mediation model was tested using a bootstrapping method. Results. The prevalence of chronic disease was 50.4%, with 25.4% having two or more co-morbidities. The relationship between multi-morbidity and depressive symptoms was found to be mediated by the Physical Component Summary score of the SF-12 v2. Further analysis found the general health (GH) and role physical domains of the SF-12 were the strongest mediators, followed by bodily pain and physical functioning (PF). Conclusion. To enhance the functional capacity of primary care patients with co-existing chronic disease and depressive symptoms, health care interventions should be directed at improving the physical aspects of HRQOL, in particular enhancing patients’ GH perception, role functioning and PF, and to better manage chronic pain. PMID:26567547

  10. Improving care in patients with acute coronary syndromes: the Erlanger quality improvement initiative.

    PubMed

    Fesmire, Francis M

    2004-09-01

    Quality improvement (QI) in emergency department (ED) patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) is a complex and dynamic phenomenon. ED physicians are faced with the challenge of multitasking a variety of patient complaints. This chaotic environment frequently hampers the ED physician's ability to properly evaluate and treat chest pain patients. Just as an airplane pilot would never take off without performing the comprehensive preflight operational checklist, the ED physician should have a standardized protocol for the evaluation and treatment of chest pain patients. In this report, we describe Erlanger Medical Center's 10-year QI initiative in developing a successful chest pain protocol for the rapid evaluation and treatment of patients with suspected ACS. Our initiative resulted from a collaborative effort among emergency physicians, cardiologists, nuclear radiologists, nursing staff, and administration. The systematic step-wise approach we utilized at our institution consisted of identification of the problem, development of standardized protocols, hospital-based QI initiatives, and continuation of QI efforts through national initiatives. Through this "building of bridges" among physicians, nursing, and administration, we hope that other institutions will modify our protocols to assist them in the development of their own successful QI program for improving the evaluation, treatment, and disposition of patients with suspected ACS.

  11. “SHOUT” to improve the quality of care delivered to patients with acute kidney injury at Great Western Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brady, Paul; Gorham, James; Kosti, Angeliki; Seligman, William; Courtney, Alona; Mazan, Karolina; Paterson, Stuart; Ramcharitar, Steve; Chandrasekaran, Badri; Juniper, Mark; Greamspet, Mala; Daniel, Jessica; Chalstrey, Sue; Ahmed, Ijaz; Dasgupta, Tanaji

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects up to 20% of all patients admitted to hospital, and is associated with a higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes, increased healthcare costs, as well as long term risks of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal failure. The aim of this project was to improve the quality of care for patients with AKI admitted to the acute medical unit (AMU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH). We assessed awareness and self reported confidence among physicians in our Trust, in addition to basic aspects of care relevant to AKI on our AMU. A multifaceted quality improvement strategy was developed, which included measures to improve awareness such as a Trust wide AKI awareness day, and reconfiguring the admission proforma on our AMU in order to enhance risk assessment, staging, and early response to AKI. Ancillary measures such as the dissemination of flashcards for lanyards containing core information were also used. Follow up assessments showed that foundation year one (FY1) doctors’ self reported confidence in managing AKI increased from 2.8 to 4.2, as measured on a five point Likert scale (P=0.0003). AKI risk assessment increased from 13% to 57% (P=0.07) following a change in the admission proforma. Documentation of the diagnosis of AKI increased from 66% to 95% (P=0.038) among flagged patients. Documentation of urine dip results increased from 33% to 73% (P=0.01), in addition to a rise in appropriate referral for specialist input, although this was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that using the twin approaches of improving awareness, and small changes to systemic factors such as modification of the admission proforma, can lead to significant enhancements in the quality of care of patients with AKI. PMID:26734401

  12. "SHOUT" to improve the quality of care delivered to patients with acute kidney injury at Great Western Hospital.

    PubMed

    Brady, Paul; Gorham, James; Kosti, Angeliki; Seligman, William; Courtney, Alona; Mazan, Karolina; Paterson, Stuart; Ramcharitar, Steve; Chandrasekaran, Badri; Juniper, Mark; Greamspet, Mala; Daniel, Jessica; Chalstrey, Sue; Ahmed, Ijaz; Dasgupta, Tanaji

    2015-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) affects up to 20% of all patients admitted to hospital, and is associated with a higher risk of adverse clinical outcomes, increased healthcare costs, as well as long term risks of chronic kidney disease and end stage renal failure. The aim of this project was to improve the quality of care for patients with AKI admitted to the acute medical unit (AMU) at the Great Western Hospital (GWH). We assessed awareness and self reported confidence among physicians in our Trust, in addition to basic aspects of care relevant to AKI on our AMU. A multifaceted quality improvement strategy was developed, which included measures to improve awareness such as a Trust wide AKI awareness day, and reconfiguring the admission proforma on our AMU in order to enhance risk assessment, staging, and early response to AKI. Ancillary measures such as the dissemination of flashcards for lanyards containing core information were also used. Follow up assessments showed that foundation year one (FY1) doctors' self reported confidence in managing AKI increased from 2.8 to 4.2, as measured on a five point Likert scale (P=0.0003). AKI risk assessment increased from 13% to 57% (P=0.07) following a change in the admission proforma. Documentation of the diagnosis of AKI increased from 66% to 95% (P=0.038) among flagged patients. Documentation of urine dip results increased from 33% to 73% (P=0.01), in addition to a rise in appropriate referral for specialist input, although this was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that using the twin approaches of improving awareness, and small changes to systemic factors such as modification of the admission proforma, can lead to significant enhancements in the quality of care of patients with AKI.

  13. Using baldrige performance excellence program approaches in the pursuit of radiation oncology quality care, patient satisfaction, and workforce commitment.

    PubMed

    Sternick, Edward S

    2011-01-01

    The Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Improvement Act was signed into law in 1987 to advance US business competitiveness and economic growth. Administered by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, the Act created the Baldrige National Quality Program, recently renamed the Baldrige Performance Excellence Program. The comprehensive analytical approaches referred to as the Baldrige Healthcare Criteria, are very well-suited for the evaluation and sustainable improvement of radiation oncology management and operations. A multidisciplinary self-assessment approach is used for radiotherapy program evaluation and development in order to generate a fact-based, knowledge-driven system for improving quality of care, increasing patient satisfaction, enhancing leadership effectiveness, building employee engagement, and boosting organizational innovation. This methodology also provides a valuable framework for benchmarking an individual radiation oncology practice's operations and results against guidelines defined by accreditation and professional organizations and regulatory agencies. PMID:22655229

  14. Caring for Latino patients.

    PubMed

    Juckett, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Latinos comprise nearly 16 percent of the U.S. population, and this proportion is anticipated to increase to 30 percent by 2050. Latinos are a diverse ethnic group that includes many different cultures, races, and nationalities. Barriers to care have resulted in striking disparities in quality of health care for these patients. These barriers include language, lack of insurance, different cultural beliefs, and in some cases, illegal immigration status, mistrust, and illiteracy. The National Standards for Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services address these concerns with recommendations for culturally competent care, language services, and organizational support. Latinos have disproportionately higher rates of obesity and diabetes mellitus. Other health problems include stress, neurocysticercosis, and tuberculosis. It is important to explore the use of alternative therapies and belief in traditional folk illnesses, recognizing that health beliefs are dependent on education, socioeconomic status, and degree of acculturation. Many-but not all-folk and herbal treatments can be safely accommodated with conventional therapy. Physicians must be sensitive to Latino cultural values of simpatia (kindness), personalismo (relationship), respeto (respect), and modestia (modesty). The LEARN technique can facilitate cross-cultural interviews. Some cultural barriers may be overcome by using the "teach back" technique to ensure that directions are correctly understood and by creating a welcoming health care environment for Latino patients. PMID:23317025

  15. A systematic review of Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE)-based healthcare system redesign for quality of care and patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Anping; Carayon, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare systems need to be redesigned to provide care that is safe, effective and efficient, and meets the multiple needs of patients. This systematic review examines how Human Factors and Ergonomics (HFE) is applied to redesign healthcare work systems and processes and improve quality and safety of care. We identified twelve projects representing 23 studies and addressing different physical, cognitive and organizational HFE issues in a variety of healthcare systems and care settings. Some evidence exists for the effectiveness of HFE-based healthcare system redesign in improving process and outcome measures of quality and safety of care. We assessed risk of bias in 16 studies reporting the impact of HFE-based healthcare system redesign and found varying quality across studies. Future research should further assess the impact of HFE on quality and safety of care, and clearly define the mechanisms by which HFE-based system redesign can improve quality and safety of care. Practitioner Summary Existing evidence shows that HFE-based healthcare system redesign has the potential to improve quality of care and patient safety. Healthcare organizations need to recognize the importance of HFE-based healthcare system redesign to quality of care and patient safety, and invest resources to integrate HFE in healthcare improvement activities. PMID:25323570

  16. Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY): impact of an eye health education program on patient knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Lindsay A; Huisingh, Carrie E; McGwin, Gerald; Mennemeyer, Stephen T; Bregantini, Mary; Patel, Nita; Saaddine, Jinan; Crews, John E; Girkin, Christopher A; Owsley, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To assess the impact of the education program of the Eye Care Quality and Accessibility Improvement in the Community (EQUALITY) telemedicine program on at-risk patients’ knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care as well as to assess patient satisfaction with EQUALITY. Patients and methods New or existing patients presenting for a comprehensive eye exam (CEE) at one of two retail-based primary eye clinics were enrolled based on ≥1 of the following at-risk criteria for glaucoma: African Americans ≥40 years of age, Whites ≥50 years of age, diabetes, family history of glaucoma, and/or preexisting diagnosis of glaucoma. A total of 651 patients were enrolled. A questionnaire was administered prior to the patients’ CEE and prior to the patients receiving any of the evidence-based eye health education program; a follow-up questionnaire was administered 2–4 weeks later by phone. Baseline and follow-up patient responses regarding knowledge about glaucoma and attitudes about eye care were compared using McNemar’s test. Logistic regression models were used to assess the association of patient-level characteristics with improvement in knowledge and attitudes. Overall patient satisfaction was summarized. Results At follow-up, all patient responses in the knowledge and attitude domains significantly improved from baseline (P≤0.01 for all questions). Those who were unemployed (odds ratio =0.63, 95% confidence interval =0.42–0.95, P=0.026) or had lower education (odds ratio =0.55, 95% confidence interval =0.29–1.02, P=0.058) were less likely to improve their knowledge after adjusting for age, sex, race, and prior glaucoma diagnosis. This association was attenuated after further adjustment for other patient-level characteristics. Ninety-eight percent (n=501) of patients reported being likely to have a CEE within the next 2 years, whereas 63% (n=326) had a CEE in the previous 2 years. Patient satisfaction with EQUALITY was high (99

  17. Enhancing patient safety and quality of care by improving the usability of electronic health record systems: recommendations from AMIA

    PubMed Central

    Middleton, Blackford; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Dente, Mark A; Hashmat, Bill; Koppel, Ross; Overhage, J Marc; Payne, Thomas H; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Weaver, Charlotte; Zhang, Jiajie

    2013-01-01

    In response to mounting evidence that use of electronic medical record systems may cause unintended consequences, and even patient harm, the AMIA Board of Directors convened a Task Force on Usability to examine evidence from the literature and make recommendations. This task force was composed of representatives from both academic settings and vendors of electronic health record (EHR) systems. After a careful review of the literature and of vendor experiences with EHR design and implementation, the task force developed 10 recommendations in four areas: (1) human factors health information technology (IT) research, (2) health IT policy, (3) industry recommendations, and (4) recommendations for the clinician end-user of EHR software. These AMIA recommendations are intended to stimulate informed debate, provide a plan to increase understanding of the impact of usability on the effective use of health IT, and lead to safer and higher quality care with the adoption of useful and usable EHR systems. PMID:23355463

  18. Enhancing patient safety and quality of care by improving the usability of electronic health record systems: recommendations from AMIA.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Blackford; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Dente, Mark A; Hashmat, Bill; Koppel, Ross; Overhage, J Marc; Payne, Thomas H; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Weaver, Charlotte; Zhang, Jiajie

    2013-06-01

    In response to mounting evidence that use of electronic medical record systems may cause unintended consequences, and even patient harm, the AMIA Board of Directors convened a Task Force on Usability to examine evidence from the literature and make recommendations. This task force was composed of representatives from both academic settings and vendors of electronic health record (EHR) systems. After a careful review of the literature and of vendor experiences with EHR design and implementation, the task force developed 10 recommendations in four areas: (1) human factors health information technology (IT) research, (2) health IT policy, (3) industry recommendations, and (4) recommendations for the clinician end-user of EHR software. These AMIA recommendations are intended to stimulate informed debate, provide a plan to increase understanding of the impact of usability on the effective use of health IT, and lead to safer and higher quality care with the adoption of useful and usable EHR systems.

  19. Enhancing patient safety and quality of care by improving the usability of electronic health record systems: recommendations from AMIA.

    PubMed

    Middleton, Blackford; Bloomrosen, Meryl; Dente, Mark A; Hashmat, Bill; Koppel, Ross; Overhage, J Marc; Payne, Thomas H; Rosenbloom, S Trent; Weaver, Charlotte; Zhang, Jiajie

    2013-06-01

    In response to mounting evidence that use of electronic medical record systems may cause unintended consequences, and even patient harm, the AMIA Board of Directors convened a Task Force on Usability to examine evidence from the literature and make recommendations. This task force was composed of representatives from both academic settings and vendors of electronic health record (EHR) systems. After a careful review of the literature and of vendor experiences with EHR design and implementation, the task force developed 10 recommendations in four areas: (1) human factors health information technology (IT) research, (2) health IT policy, (3) industry recommendations, and (4) recommendations for the clinician end-user of EHR software. These AMIA recommendations are intended to stimulate informed debate, provide a plan to increase understanding of the impact of usability on the effective use of health IT, and lead to safer and higher quality care with the adoption of useful and usable EHR systems. PMID:23355463

  20. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries. PMID:26874326

  1. Attributes of patient-centered primary care associated with the public perception of good healthcare quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Doubova, Svetlana V; Guanais, Frederico C; Pérez-Cuevas, Ricardo; Canning, David; Macinko, James; Reich, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    This study evaluated primary care attributes of patient-centered care associated with the public perception of good quality in Brazil, Colombia, Mexico and El Salvador. We conducted a secondary data analysis of a Latin American survey on public perceptions and experiences with healthcare systems. The primary care attributes examined were access, coordination, provider-patient communication, provision of health-related information and emotional support. A double-weighted multiple Poisson regression with robust variance model was performed. The study included between 1500 and 1503 adults in each country. The results identified four significant gaps in the provision of primary care: not all respondents had a regular place of care or a regular primary care doctor (Brazil 35.7%, Colombia 28.4%, Mexico 22% and El Salvador 45.4%). The communication with the primary care clinic was difficult (Brazil 44.2%, Colombia 41.3%, Mexico 45.1% and El Salvador 56.7%). There was a lack of coordination of care (Brazil 78.4%, Colombia 52.3%, Mexico 48% and El Salvador 55.9%). Also, there was a lack of information about healthy diet (Brazil 21.7%, Colombia 32.9%, Mexico 16.9% and El Salvador 20.8%). The public's perception of good quality was variable (Brazil 67%, Colombia 71.1%, Mexico 79.6% and El Salvador 79.5%). The primary care attributes associated with the perception of good quality were a primary care provider 'who knows relevant information about a patient's medical history', 'solves most of the health problems', 'spends enough time with the patient', 'coordinates healthcare' and a 'primary care clinic that is easy to communicate with'. In conclusion, the public has a positive perception of the quality of primary care, although it has unfulfilled expectations; further efforts are necessary to improve the provision of patient-centered primary care services in these four Latin American countries.

  2. Quality of life among patients receiving palliative care in South Africa and Uganda: a multi-centred study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Quality of life (QOL) is a core outcome of palliative care, yet in African settings there is a lack of evidence on patients' levels of QOL. We aimed to describe QOL among patients with incurable, progressive disease receiving palliative care in South Africa and Uganda, to compare QOL in cancer and HIV, to determine how domains of QOL correlate with overall QOL, and compare levels of QOL in this population with those in other studies using the same tool. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted using the Missoula Vitas Quality of Life Index (MVQOLI), a 26-item QOL questionnaire with five subscales (Function, Symptom, Interpersonal, Well being, Transcendent) covering physical, social, psychological and spiritual domains and one global QOL item. One item in each subscale assesses the subjective importance of the domain on a score from 1 (least important) to 5 (most important), used to weight the contribution of the subscale towards the Total QOL score. The tool was translated into 6 languages and administered to consecutively recruited patients at four facilities in South Africa and one in Uganda. Results 285 patients were recruited, with a mean age of 40.1; 197 (69.1%) were female. Patients' primary diagnoses were HIV (80.7%), cancer (17.9%) and other conditions (1.4%). The mean global QOL score was 2.81 (possible range 0 (worst) to 5 (best)); mean Total score 17.32 (possible range 0 to 30). Patients scored most poorly on Function (mean 0.21), followed by Well being (2.59), Symptoms (5.38), Transcendent (5.50), Interpersonal (9.53) (possible range for subscale scores -30 to 30). Most important to patients were: close relationships (mean 4.13), feeling at peace (4.12), sense of meaning in life (4.10), being active (3.84), physical comfort (2.58). Cancer patients were predominantly recruited at three of the sites; hence comparison with HIV-infected patients was restricted to these sites. HIV+ patients (n = 115) scored significantly worse than cancer

  3. Tuberculosis screening in patients with HIV: use of audit and feedback to improve quality of care in Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Bjerrum, Stephanie; Bonsu, Frank; Hanson-Nortey, Nii Nortey; Kenu, Ernest; Johansen, Isik Somuncu; Andersen, Aase Bengaard; Bjerrum, Lars; Jarbøl, Dorte; Munck, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis screening of people living with HIV (PLHIV) can contribute to early tuberculosis diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. Evidence-based guidelines for tuberculosis screening are available, but literature assessing their implementation and the quality of clinical practice is scarce. Objectives To assess tuberculosis screening practices and the effectiveness of audit and performance feedback to improve quality of tuberculosis screening at HIV care clinics in Ghana. Design Healthcare providers at 10 large HIV care clinics prospectively registered patient consultations during May and October 2014, before and after a performance feedback intervention in August 2014. The outcomes of interest were overall tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultations and provider adherence to the International Standards for Tuberculosis Care and the World Health Organizations’ guidelines for symptom-based tuberculosis screening among PLHIV. Results Twenty-one healthcare providers registered a total of 2,666 consultations; 1,368 consultations before and 1,298 consultations after the feedback intervention. Tuberculosis suspicion rate during consultation increased from 12.6 to 20.9% after feedback (odds ratio, OR 1.83; 95% confidence interval, CI: 1.09–3.09). Before feedback, sputum smear microscopy was requested for 58.7% of patients with suspected tuberculosis, for 47.2% of patients with cough ≥2 weeks, and for 27.5% of patients with a positive World Health Organization (WHO) symptom screen (any of current cough, fever, weight loss or night sweats). After feedback, patients with a positive WHO symptom screen were more likely to be suspected of tuberculosis (OR 2.21; 95% CI: 1.19–4.09) and referred for microscopy (OR 2.71; 95% CI: 1.25–5.86). Conclusions A simple prospective audit tool identified flaws in clinical practices for tuberculosis screening of PLHIV. There was no systematic identification of people with suspected active tuberculosis. We found

  4. Assessment of quality of life in epilepsy patients receiving anti-epileptic drugs in a tertiary care teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Pimpalkhute, Sonali A.; Bajait, Chaitali S.; Dakhale, Ganesh N.; Sontakke, Smita D.; Jaiswal, Kavita M.; Kinge, Parag

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Health-related quality of life (QOL) is an important outcome in epilepsy treatment. Very few studies have been carried out on the quality of life in epilepsy (QOLIE-31) in India. The present study aimed to determine the level of health-related QOLIE-31 in patients of epilepsy. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study conducted in a tertiary care teaching hospital. Respondents were adults aged at least 18-year-old with a diagnosis of epilepsy. QOLIE-31 was used for collecting data on health-related QOL. The unpaired t-test or one-way analysis of variance was used to compare means of QOL scores between groups. Results: Totally, 60 patients of epilepsy were included in the study. The mean (standard deviation) total score of QOLIE-31 was 64.61. A score of cognitive and medication effect were significantly better in carbamazepine group as compared to valproate group. Conclusions: Patients on monotherapy had a better QOL as compared to patients receiving polytherapy. PMID:26600647

  5. Risk factors, quality of care and prognosis in South Asian, East Asian and White patients with stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Stroke has emerged as a significant and escalating health problem for Asian populations. We compared risk factors, quality of care and risk of death or recurrent stroke in South Asian, East Asian and White patients with acute ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Methods Retrospective analysis was performed on consecutive patients with ischemic stroke or intracerebral hemorrhage admitted to 12 stroke centers in Ontario, Canada (July 2003-March 2008) and included in the Registry of the Canadian Stroke Network database. The database was linked to population-based administrative databases to determine one-year risk of death or recurrent stroke. Results The study included 253 South Asian, 513 East Asian and 8231 White patients. East Asian patients were more likely to present with intracerebral hemorrhage (30%) compared to South Asian (17%) or White patients (15%) (p<0.001). Time from stroke to hospital arrival was similarly poor with delays >2 hours for more than two thirds of patients in all ethnic groups. Processes of stroke care, including thrombolysis, diagnostic imaging, antithrombotic medications, and rehabilitation services were similar among ethnic groups. Risk of death or recurrent stroke at one year after ischemic stroke was similar for patients who were White (27.6%), East Asian (24.7%, aHR 0.97, 95% CI 0.78-1.21 vs. White), or South Asian (21.9%, aHR 0.91, 95% CI 0.67-1.24 vs. White). Although risk of death or recurrent stroke at one year after intracerebral hemorrhage was higher in East Asian (35.5%) and White patients (47.9%) compared to South Asian patients (30.2%) (p=0.002), these differences disappeared after adjustment for age, sex, stroke severity and comorbid conditions (aHR 0.89 [0.67-1.19] for East Asian vs White and 0.99 [0.54-1.81] for South Asian vs. White). Conclusion After stratification by stroke type, stroke care and outcomes are similar across ethnic groups in Ontario. Enhanced health promotion is needed to reduce delays to hospital

  6. Prediction of COPD-specific health-related quality of life in primary care COPD patients: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Siebeling, Lara; Musoro, Jammbe Z; Geskus, Ronald B; Zoller, Marco; Muggensturm, Patrick; Frei, Anja; Puhan, Milo A; ter Riet, Gerben

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health-related quality of life (HRQL) is an important patient-reported outcome for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Aim: We developed models predicting chronic respiratory questionnaire (CRQ) dyspnoea, fatigue, emotional function, mastery and overall HRQL at 6 and 24 months using predictors easily available in primary care. Methods: We used the “least absolute shrinkage and selection operator” (lasso) method to build the models and assessed their predictive performance. Results were displayed using nomograms. Results: For each domain-specific CRQ outcome, the corresponding score at baseline was the best predictor. Depending on the domain, these predictions could be improved by adding one to six other predictors, such as the other domain-specific CRQ scores, health status and depression score. To predict overall HRQL, fatigue and dyspnoea scores were the best predictors. Predicted and observed values were on average the same, indicating good calibration. Explained variance ranged from 0.23 to 0.58, indicating good discrimination. Conclusions: To predict COPD-specific HRQL in primary care COPD patients, previous HRQL was the best predictor in our models. Asking patients explicitly about dyspnoea, fatigue, depression and how they cope with COPD provides additional important information about future HRQL whereas FEV1 or other commonly used predictors add little to the prediction of HRQL. PMID:25164146

  7. Can a mobile app improve the quality of patient care provided by trainee doctors? Analysis of trainees’ case reports

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Katie; Bullock, Alison; Dimond, Rebecca; Stacey, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore how a medical textbook app (‘iDoc’) supports newly qualified doctors in providing high-quality patient care. Design The iDoc project, funded by the Wales Deanery, provides new doctors with an app which gives access to key medical textbooks. Participants’ submitted case reports describing self-reported accounts of specific instances of app use. The size of the data set enabled analysis of a subsample of ‘complex’ case reports. Of the 568 case reports submitted by Foundation Year 1s (F1s)/Year 2s (F2s), 142 (25%) detailed instances of diagnostic decision-making and were identified as ‘complex’. We analysed these data against the Quality Improvement (QI) Framework using thematic content analysis. Setting Clinical settings across Wales, UK. Participants Newly qualified doctors (2012–2014; n=114), F1 and F2. Interventions The iDoc app, powered by Dr Companion software, provided newly qualified doctors in Wales with a selection of key medical textbooks via individuals’ personal smartphone. Results Doctors’ use of the iDoc app supported 5 of the 6 QI elements: efficiency, timeliness, effectiveness, safety and patient-centredness. None of the case reports were coded to the equity element. Efficiency was the element which attracted the highest number of case report references. We propose that the QI Framework should be expanding to include ‘learning’ as a 7th element. Conclusions Access to key medical textbooks via an app provides trusted and valuable support to newly qualified doctors during a period of transition. On the basis of these doctors’ self-reported accounts, our evidence indicates that the use of the app enhances efficiency, effectiveness and timeliness of patient-care in addition consolidating a safe, patient-centred approach. We propose that there is scope to extend the QI Framework by incorporating ‘learning’ as a 7th element in recognition of the relationship between providing high-quality care through

  8. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Decisional Engagement Scale (DES-10): A patient-reported psychosocial survey for quality cancer care.

    PubMed

    Hoerger, Michael; Chapman, Benjamin P; Mohile, Supriya G; Duberstein, Paul R

    2016-09-01

    In light of recent health care reforms, we have provided an illustrative example of new opportunities available for psychologists to develop patient-reported measures related to health care quality. Patient engagement in health care decision making has been increasingly acknowledged as a vital component of quality cancer care. We developed the 10-item Decisional Engagement Scale (DES-10), a patient-reported measure of engagement in decision making in cancer care that assesses patients' awareness of their diagnosis, sense of empowerment and involvement, and level of information seeking and planning. The National Institutes of Health's ResearchMatch recruitment tool was used to facilitate Internet-mediated data collection from 376 patients with cancer. DES-10 scores demonstrated good internal consistency reliability (α = .80), and the hypothesized unidimensional factor structure fit the data well. The reliability and factor structure were supported across subgroups based on demographic, socioeconomic, and health characteristics. Higher DES-10 scores were associated with better health-related quality of life (r = .31). In concurrent validity analyses controlling for age, socioeconomic status, and health-related quality of life, higher DES-10 scores were associated with higher scores on quality-of-care indices, including greater awareness of one's treatments, greater preferences for shared decision making, and clearer preferences about end-of-life care. A mini-measure, the DES-3, also performed well psychometrically. In conclusion, DES-10 and DES-3 scores showed evidence of reliability and validity, and these brief patient-reported measures can be used by researchers, clinicians, nonprofits, hospitals, insurers, and policymakers interested in evaluating and improving the quality of cancer care. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27537003

  9. Patient-Centered Care: An Opportunity to Accomplish the “Three Aims” of the National Quality Strategy in the Medicare ESRD Program

    PubMed Central

    O’Hare, Ann M.; Armistead, Nancy; Schrag, Wendy L. Funk; Diamond, Louis

    2014-01-01

    In light of mounting federal government debt and levels of Medicare spending that are widely viewed as unsustainable, commentators have called for a transformation of the United States health care system to deliver better care at lower costs. This article presents the priorities of the Coalition for Supportive Care of Kidney Patients for how clinicians might achieve this transformation for patients with advanced CKD and their families. The authors suspect that much of the high-intensity, high-cost care currently delivered to patients with advanced kidney disease may be unwanted and that the “Three Aims” put forth by the National Quality Strategy of better care for the individual, better health for populations, and reduced health care costs may be within reach for patients with CKD and ESRD. This work describes the coalition’s vision for a more patient-centered approach to the care of patients with kidney disease and argues for more concerted efforts to align their treatments with their goals, values, and preferences. Key priorities to achieve this vision include using improved prognostic models and decision science to help patients, their families, and their providers better understand what to expect in the future; engaging patients and their families in shared decision-making before the initiation of dialysis and during the course of dialysis treatment; and tailoring treatment strategies throughout the continuum of their care to address what matters most to individual patients. PMID:25035275

  10. Periprocedural Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Kohi, Maureen P; Fidelman, Nicholas; Behr, Spencer; Taylor, Andrew G; Kolli, Kanti; Conrad, Miles; Hwang, Gloria; Weinstein, Stefanie

    2015-10-01

    Periprocedural care of patients who undergo image-guided interventions is a task of monumental importance. As physicians who perform procedures, radiologists rely on their noninterpretive skills to optimize patient care. At the center of periprocedural care is proper patient identification. It is imperative to perform the indicated procedure for the correct patient. It is also of great importance to discuss with the patient the nature of the procedure. This conversation should include the indications, risks, benefits, alternatives, and potential complications of the procedure. Once the patient agrees to the procedure and grants informed consent, it is imperative to stop and confirm that the correct procedure is being performed on the correct patient. This universal time-out policy helps decrease errors and improves patient care. To optimize our interpretative and procedural skills, it may be necessary to provide the patient with sedation or anesthesia. However, it is important to understand the continuum of sedation and be able to appropriately monitor the patient and manage the sedation in these patients. To minimize the risks of infection, periprocedural care of patients relies on aseptic or, at times, sterile techniques. Before the procedure, it is important to evaluate the patient's coagulation parameters and bleeding risks and correct the coagulopathy, if needed. During the procedure, the patient's blood pressure and at times the patient's glucose levels will also require monitoring and management. After the procedure, patients must be observed in a recovery unit and deemed safe for discharge. The fundamental components of periprocedural care necessary to enhance patient safety, satisfaction, and care are reviewed to familiarize the reader with the important noninterpretive skills necessary to optimize periprocedural care. PMID:26466184

  11. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    PubMed

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care. PMID:26994564

  12. Evaluation of patients' attitudes to their care during oral and maxillofacial surgical outpatient consultations: the importance of waiting times and quality of interaction between patient and doctor.

    PubMed

    Dimovska, E O F; Sharma, S; Trebble, T M

    2016-06-01

    Knowing what patients think about their care is fundamental to the provision of an effective, quality service, and it can help to direct change and reduce costs. Much of the work in oral and maxillofacial departments concerns the treatment of outpatients, but as little is known about what they think about their care, we aimed to find out which aspects were associated with satisfaction. Consecutive patients (n=244) who attended the oral and maxillofacial outpatient department at Southampton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust over a 7-day period were given a questionnaire to complete before and after their consultation. It included questions with Likert scale responses on environmental, procedural, and interactive aspects of the visit, and a 16-point scale to rank their priorities. A total of 187 patients (77%) completed the questionnaires. No association was found between expected (p=0.93) or actual (p=0.41) waiting times, and 90% of patients were satisfied with their visit. Seeing the doctor, having confidence in the treatment plan, being listened to, and the ability of the doctor to recognise their personal needs, were ranked as important. Environmental and procedural aspects were considered the least important. These findings may be of value in the development of services to improve patient-centred care.

  13. [Nursing care for tracheotomy and tracheostomy patients].

    PubMed

    Nicouleau, Laurence; Cotto, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Nursing care is specific in otorhinolaryngology, particularly in oncology. The three dimensions of the care, technical, relational and educational, are essential and reflect the quality of the patient management which must be multi-disciplinary. PMID:26369746

  14. Patient care in radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrlich, R.A.; McCloskey, E.D.

    1989-01-01

    This book focuses on patient care procedures for radiographers. The authors focus on the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. The authors report on such topics as communication in patient care: safety, medico-legal considerations, transfer and positioning; physical needs; infection control; medication; CPR standards, acute situations; examination of the GI tract; contrast media; special imaging techniques and bedside radiography.

  15. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION AS AN IMPORTANT SKILL FOR QUALITY CARE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Dorit

    2014-10-01

    The increase in the number of older people in the world emphasizes the need to reevaluate and change health care policy and care services priorities. The provision of health care for this growing population has consequently become an important worldwide concern. The purpose of this article is to highlight the challenges stemming from the growing number of elderly people and their need for care. Collaborative and coordinated health care services for elderly people should be focused on the ethical issues deriving from the interpersonal relationships between the professional caregiver and the older person. Any discussion on ethics and aging should be focused on the roles of autonomy, informed consent, respect, advance directive, end of life decisions and privacy. In addition, such a discussion should stress the important role of effective communication and its effect on the older person's adherence with the recommended treatment. The desired consequence should be the empowerment of positive and successful experiences attained by the recipients of the health care services.

  16. EFFECTIVE COMMUNICATION AS AN IMPORTANT SKILL FOR QUALITY CARE IN ELDERLY PATIENTS.

    PubMed

    Rubinstein, Dorit

    2014-10-01

    The increase in the number of older people in the world emphasizes the need to reevaluate and change health care policy and care services priorities. The provision of health care for this growing population has consequently become an important worldwide concern. The purpose of this article is to highlight the challenges stemming from the growing number of elderly people and their need for care. Collaborative and coordinated health care services for elderly people should be focused on the ethical issues deriving from the interpersonal relationships between the professional caregiver and the older person. Any discussion on ethics and aging should be focused on the roles of autonomy, informed consent, respect, advance directive, end of life decisions and privacy. In addition, such a discussion should stress the important role of effective communication and its effect on the older person's adherence with the recommended treatment. The desired consequence should be the empowerment of positive and successful experiences attained by the recipients of the health care services. PMID:27359020

  17. Expanding nurse practice in COPD: is it key to providing high quality, effective and safe patient care?

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Monica J; Dahl, Birthe H

    2013-06-01

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a common and preventable chronic disease, is on the increase, and so are the financial and social burdens associated with it. The management of COPD is particularly challenging, as patients have complex health and social needs requiring life-long monitoring and treatment. In order to address these issues and reduce the burden imposed by COPD, the development of innovative disease management models is vital. Nurses are in a key position to assume a leading role in the management of COPD since they frequently represent the first point of contact for patients and are involved in all stages of care. Although evidence is still limited, an increasing number of studies have suggested that nurse-led consultations and interventions for the management of COPD have the potential to impact positively on the health and quality of life of patients. The role of nurses in the management of COPD around the world could be significantly expanded and strengthened. Providing adequate educational opportunities and support to nurses, as well as addressing funding issues and system barriers and recognising the importance of the expanding roles of nurses, is vital to the well-being of patients with long-term medical conditions such as COPD and to society as a whole, in order to reduce the burden of this disease.

  18. What is quality primary dental care?

    PubMed

    Campbell, S; Tickle, M

    2013-08-01

    In the first paper of a series exploring quality in primary dental care a definition for quality in dentistry is sought. There is a little agreement in academic literature as to what quality really means in primary dental care and without a true understanding it is difficult to measure and improve quality in a systematic way. 'Quality' of healthcare in dentistry will mean different things to practitioners, policy makers and patients but a framework could be modelled on other definitions within different healthcare sectors, with focus on access, equity and overall healthcare experience.

  19. Impoverishment and patients' "willingness" and "ability" to pay for improving the quality of health care in Palestine: an assessment using the contingent valuation method.

    PubMed

    Mataria, Awad; Giacaman, Rita; Khatib, Rana; Moatti, Jean-Paul

    2006-02-01

    This paper examines the impact of impoverishment on patients' preferences with respect to improving the quality of health care, by focusing on the sudden impoverishment experience that affected the Occupied Palestinian Territory (OPT) since the beginning of the second Palestinian Uprising of September 2000. Two random samples of patients (352 and 353 individuals, respectively) were interviewed about their willingness to pay for improving a set of quality attributes in delivery of primary health care, prior and after the occurrence of this crisis situation, using a contingent valuation questionnaire. Impoverishment did not seem to affect the structure of patients' preferences vis-à-vis some essential quality attributes such as "doctor-patient relationship" and "drug availability". However, preferences toward "luxury" quality attributes, e.g., "geographical proximity" and "waiting time", suffered from both income-dependent and income-independent negative impoverishment effects. We conclude that impoverishment might not only affect individuals' availability of resources but also the ability of certain groups of patients, notably women, villagers and the elderly, to adequately express their preferences toward improving the quality of health care delivery. The issue of how willingness to pay results should be interpreted in the light of our study for policy implications was discussed. The study raises strong doubts about the current policy of introducing patients' cost recovery schemes for funding primary health care in the current crisis situation of the OPT.

  20. What are patient factors associated with the quality of diabetes care?: results from the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Recently there has been a growing interest in healthcare quality control in Korea. We examined the association between patient factors and quality indicators of diabetic care among Korean adults with diabetes. Methods We obtained a sample of 335 adults aged 20 or older diagnosed with diabetes from the 2005 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Patient factors were divided into two categories: socioeconomic position and health-related factors. Quality indicators for diabetes care were defined as receiving preventive care services for diabetes complications (e.g., fundus examination, microalbuminuria examination, diabetes education) and diabetes-related clinical outcomes (e.g., HbA1c, blood pressure, LDL-cholesterol). We performed multiple logistic regression analyses for each quality indicator. Results We found that people with lower education levels or shorter duration of diabetes illness were less likely to receive preventive care services for diabetes complications. Women or people with longer duration of diabetes were less likely to reach the glycemic target. Obese diabetic patients were less likely to accomplish adequate control of blood pressure and LDL-cholesterol. Conclusions Several factors of patients with diabetes, such as education level, duration of illness, gender, and obesity grade are associated with the quality of diabetes care. These findings can help inform policy makers about subpopulations at risk in developing a public health strategy in the future. PMID:22913274

  1. Quality of care in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Makharia, Govind K

    2014-11-15

    Crohn's disease (CD) is a chronic and progressive inflammatory disease of the intestine. Overall, healthcare delivery for patients with CD is not optimal at the present time and therefore needs improvement. There are evidences which suggest that there is a variation in the care provided to patients with CD by the inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) experts and community care providers. The delivery of healthcare for patients with CD is often complex and requires coordination between gastroenterologists/IBD specialist, gastrointestinal surgeon, radiologists and IBD nurses. In order to improve the quality of health care for patients with CD, there is need that we focus on large-scale, system-wide changes including creation of IBD comprehensive care units, provision to provide continuous care, efforts to standardize care, and education of the community practitioners. PMID:25400990

  2. 78 FR 69418 - Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act; Exchanges and Qualified Health Plans, Quality Rating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-19

    ... Plans; Exchange Standards for Employers, 77 FR 18310 (Mar. 27, 2012) (to be codified at 45 CFR parts 155... Quality for Exchanges: http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-11-27/pdf/2012-28473.pdf . Importance: the... Rule 78 FR 12834 (Feb. 25, 2013) (to be codified at 45 CFR parts 147, 155 and 156). The draft...

  3. Impact of clinical registries on quality of patient care and health outcomes: protocol for a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Hoque, Dewan Md Emdadul; Kumari, Varuni; Ruseckaite, Rasa; Romero, Lorena; Evans, Sue M

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Many developed countries have regional and national clinical registries aimed at improving health outcomes of patients diagnosed with particular diseases or cared for in particular healthcare settings. Clinical quality registries (CQRs) are clinical registries established with the purpose of monitoring quality of care and providing feedback to improve health outcomes. The aim of this systematic review is to understand the impact of CQRs on (1) mortality/survival; (2) measures of outcome that reflect a process or outcome of healthcare; (3) healthcare utilisation and (4) costs. Methods and analysis The PRISMA-P methodology, checklist and standard strategy using predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria and structured data abstraction tools will be followed. A search of the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and CINAHL will be undertaken, in addition to Google Scholar and grey literature, to identify studies in English covering the period January 1980 to December 2014. Case–control, cohort, randomised controlled trials and controlled clinical trials which describe the registry as an intervention will be eligible for inclusion. Narrative synthesis of study findings will be conducted, guided by a conceptual framework developed to analyse the outcome measure of the registry using defined criteria. If sufficient studies are identified with a similar outcome of interest and measure using the same comparator and time of interval, results will be pooled for random-effects meta-analysis. Test for heterogeneity and sensitivity analysis will be conducted. To identify reporting bias, forest plots and funnel plots will be created and, if required, Egger's test will be conducted. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval is not required as primary data will not be collected. Review results will be published as a part of thesis, peer-reviewed journal and conferences. Trial registration number CRD

  4. Patient satisfaction and perceived quality of care: evidence from a cross-sectional national exit survey of HIV and non-HIV service users in Zambia

    PubMed Central

    Dansereau, Emily; Masiye, Felix; Gakidou, Emmanuela; Masters, Samuel H; Burstein, Roy; Kumar, Santosh

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction among HIV and non-HIV patients in Zambia. Setting Patient exit survey conducted at 104 primary, secondary and tertiary health clinics across 16 Zambian districts. Participants 2789 exiting patients. Primary independent variables Five dimensions of perceived quality of care (health personnel practice and conduct, adequacy of resources and services, healthcare delivery, accessibility of care, and cost of care). Secondary independent variables Respondent, visit-related, and facility characteristics. Primary outcome measure Patient satisfaction measured on a 1–10 scale. Methods Indices of perceived quality of care were modelled using principal component analysis. Statistical associations between perceived quality of care and patient satisfaction were examined using random-effect ordered logistic regression models, adjusting for demographic, socioeconomic, visit and facility characteristics. Results Average satisfaction was 6.9 on a 10-point scale for non-HIV services and 7.3 for HIV services. Favourable perceptions of health personnel conduct were associated with higher odds of overall satisfaction for non-HIV (OR=3.53, 95% CI 2.34 to 5.33) and HIV (OR=11.00, 95% CI 3.97 to 30.51) visits. Better perceptions of resources and services were also associated with higher odds of satisfaction for both non-HIV (OR=1.66, 95% CI 1.08 to 2.55) and HIV (OR=4.68, 95% CI 1.81 to 12.10) visits. Two additional dimensions of perceived quality of care—healthcare delivery and accessibility of care—were positively associated with higher satisfaction for non-HIV patients. The odds of overall satisfaction were lower in rural facilities for non-HIV patients (OR 0.69; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.99) and HIV patients (OR=0.26, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.41). For non-HIV patients, the odds of satisfaction were greater in hospitals compared with health centres/posts (OR 1.78; 95% CI 1.27 to 2.48) and lower at

  5. The Quality Imperative for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Arif H.; Hanson, Laura C.; Casarett, David J.; Dy, Sydney M.; Pantilat, Steven Z.; Lupu, Dale; Abernethy, Amy P.

    2015-01-01

    Palliative medicine must prioritize the routine assessment of the quality of clinical care we provide. This includes regular assessment, analysis, and reporting of data on quality. Assessment of quality informs opportunities for improvement and demonstrates to our peers and ourselves the value of our efforts. In fact, continuous messaging of the value of palliative care services is needed to sustain our discipline; this requires regularly evaluating the quality of our care. As the reimbursement mechanisms for health care in the United States shift from fee-for-service to fee-for-value models, palliative care will be expected to report robust data on quality of care. We must move beyond demonstrating to our constituents (including patients and referrers), “here is what we do,” and increase the focus on “this is how well we do it” and “let’s see how we can do it better.” It is incumbent on palliative care professionals to lead these efforts. This involves developing standardized methods to collect data without adding additional burden, comparing and sharing our experiences to promote discipline-wide quality assessment and improvement initiatives, and demonstrating our intentions for quality improvement on the clinical frontline. PMID:25057987

  6. The Effects of a Self-Care Program on the Severity of Symptoms and Quality of Life of Patients With Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Ghorbani, Mojtaba; Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Purfarzad, Zahra; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a chronic disease that needs special self-care strategies. The current study aimed at determining the effects of a self-care program on the severity of symptoms and quality of life of patients with IBS. In this randomized controlled clinical trial, 119 patients were randomly assigned to the experimental (n = 60) and control (n = 59) groups. Patients in both groups received the usual treatment of IBS by a gastroenterologist. The control group did not receive any intervention, whereas the experimental group was trained in the self-care program. The process of implementing the self-care program included designing and determining the content validity of the self-care training package, individual training, the first follow-up call, group training, and the second follow-up call. The instruments for collecting data were IBS-Quality of Life and IBS-Symptom Severity Scale. Two sets of evaluations (before and 2 months after the intervention) were done for both groups. The data were analyzed using SPSS software, Version 16. The results showed that there was not a significant difference between the two groups in the severity of symptoms and quality of life before the intervention (p > .05); however, the 2 groups were significantly different after the intervention (p < .0001). Implementation of the self-care program resulted in the improvement of quality of life and reduction in the symptom severity in the experimental group after the intervention (p < .0001), whereas no significant changes were observed in the control group (p > .05). Hence, the data supports that self-care program was effective in improving the quality of life and reducing the severity of symptoms in patients with IBS. PMID:27684634

  7. The effects of an interventional program based on self-care model on health-related quality of life outcomes in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ghavidel, Fatemeh; Mohammadzadeh, Shahla; Ravangard, Ramin

    2014-01-01

    Background: Hemodialysis patients have lower quality of life and one of the ways to improve their quality of life is providing self-care education to them using some models including self-care model. This study aimed to determine and evaluate the effects of using self-care model on health and quality of life outcomes in hemodialysis patients. Materials and Methods: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in 2012 on the patients who were referred to a military hospital in Tehran, Iran to be treated with hemodialysis. All 32 patients referred to this hospital in 2012 were selected and studied. Required data were collected using the Short Form-36 (SF-36) standard questionnaire and a researcher-made questionnaire. The educational intervention was implemented using self-care model. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS for Windows version 18.0 and some statistical tests including paired samples t-test, Wilcoxon and McNemar tests. Results: The results showed that the mean and standard deviation (SD) of patients’ parameters including weight and blood pressure improved significantly after the educational intervention compared to before the intervention (P < 0.001). Also, all dimensions of the quality of life of hemodialysis patients, including physical function, role physical, bodily pain, general health, vitality, social function, mental health, and role emotional improved compared to those before the intervention (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Implementing the self-care model increased the quality of life of hemodialysis patients. Therefore, the use of this model in hemodialysis patients is recommended. PMID:25540783

  8. Technology in the OR: AORN Members' Perceptions of the Effects on Workflow Efficiency and Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Carolyn; Baker, Joy Don

    2015-09-01

    This collaborative study sought to describe technology used by AORN members at work, inclusive of radio-frequency identification or barcode scanning (RFID), data collection tools (DATA), workflow or dashboard management tools (DASHBOARD), and environmental services/room decontamination technologies (ENVIRON), and to identify the perceived effects of each technology on workflow efficiency (WFE) and quality patient care (QPC). The 462 respondents to the AORN Technology in the OR survey reported use of technology (USE) in all categories. Eleven of 17 RFID items had a strong positive correlation between the designated USE item and the perceived effect on WFE and QPC. Five of the most-used technology items were found in the DATA category. Two of the five related to Intraoperative Nursing Documentation and the use of the Perioperative Nursing Data Set. The other three related to Imaging Integration for Radiology Equipment, Video Camera Systems, and Fiber-optic Systems. All three elements explored in the DASHBOARD category (ie, Patient Update, OR Case, OR Efficiency) demonstrated approximately 50% or greater perceived effectiveness in WFE and QPC. There was a low reported use of ENVIRON technologies, resulting in limited WFE and QPC data for this category. PMID:26323230

  9. Technology in the OR: AORN Members' Perceptions of the Effects on Workflow Efficiency and Quality Patient Care.

    PubMed

    Sipes, Carolyn; Baker, Joy Don

    2015-09-01

    This collaborative study sought to describe technology used by AORN members at work, inclusive of radio-frequency identification or barcode scanning (RFID), data collection tools (DATA), workflow or dashboard management tools (DASHBOARD), and environmental services/room decontamination technologies (ENVIRON), and to identify the perceived effects of each technology on workflow efficiency (WFE) and quality patient care (QPC). The 462 respondents to the AORN Technology in the OR survey reported use of technology (USE) in all categories. Eleven of 17 RFID items had a strong positive correlation between the designated USE item and the perceived effect on WFE and QPC. Five of the most-used technology items were found in the DATA category. Two of the five related to Intraoperative Nursing Documentation and the use of the Perioperative Nursing Data Set. The other three related to Imaging Integration for Radiology Equipment, Video Camera Systems, and Fiber-optic Systems. All three elements explored in the DASHBOARD category (ie, Patient Update, OR Case, OR Efficiency) demonstrated approximately 50% or greater perceived effectiveness in WFE and QPC. There was a low reported use of ENVIRON technologies, resulting in limited WFE and QPC data for this category.

  10. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality. PMID:26950539

  11. Quantitative comparison of measurements of urgent care service quality.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hong; Prybutok, Victor; Prybutok, Gayle

    2016-01-01

    Service quality and patient satisfaction are essential to health care organization success. Parasuraman, Zeithaml, and Berry introduced SERVQUAL, a prominent service quality measure not yet applied to urgent care. We develop an instrument to measure perceived service quality and identify the determinants of patient satisfaction/ behavioral intentions. We examine the relationships among perceived service quality, patient satisfaction and behavioral intentions, and demonstrate that urgent care service quality is not equivalent using measures of perceptions only, differences of expectations minus perceptions, ratio of perceptions to expectations, and the log of the ratio. Perceptions provide the best measure of urgent care service quality.

  12. [Transparency in patient care -- survey of bedsores on communal level to promote quality assurance].

    PubMed

    Steingass, S; Klein, B; Pavel, K; Ruf, U; Walter, K; Weiss, V

    2004-12-01

    The medical diagnosis of bedsores often applies to open wounds. These wounds are caused by constant pressure to the skin of seniors who cannot change their position in bed or wheelchair without help. In severe cases these wounds extend through all layers of the skin with involvement of muscle and underlying bone. These ulcers can be very painful, so the mobility and quality of life of seniors is thoroughly reduced. Treatment of ulcers costs annually millions of Euro in Germany alone. Primary prevention of bedsores has not yet been established neither in Germany nor in Europe. The first step to improve the situation in a scientific manner has been to set up a comparable database. In order to change that, the German community of Ostalbkreis (part of the German Federal state of Baden-Wurttemberg) developed a process of nursing quality assurance as a project of the local agenda 21, initiated and supported by the health office of the community. Annual networked and anonymous survey from 2001 to 2003, each lasting three months every year, proved that the rate of non stratified prevalence could be reduced. For example the rate of all day spent with bedsores within the community could be reduced from 1.96 % in 2001, to 1.74 % in 2002 and finally to 1.62 % in 2003. During the survey as an additional bonus cooperation of community-organized nursing was optimised and quality assurance in nursing became a pole position of the community. During the QM-process a software was developed to process the survey: it is internet-based, published in the nursing-guide of Ostalbkreis, easy to manage and to establish in any nursing institution or community.

  13. Does a competitive voucher program for adolescents improve the quality of reproductive health care? A simulated patient study in Nicaragua

    PubMed Central

    Meuwissen, Liesbeth E; Gorter, Anna C; Kester, Arnold DM; Knottnerus, J Andre

    2006-01-01

    Background Little is known about how sexual and reproductive (SRH) health can be made accessible and appropriate to adolescents. This study evaluates the impact and sustainability of a competitive voucher program on the quality of SRH care for poor and underserved female adolescents and the usefulness of the simulated patient (SP) method for such evaluation. Methods 28,711 vouchers were distributed to adolescents in disadvantaged areas of Managua that gave free-of-charge access to SRH care in 4 public, 10 non-governmental and 5 private clinics. Providers received training and guidelines, treatment protocols, and financial incentives for each adolescent attended. All clinics were visited by female adolescent SPs requesting contraception. SPs were sent one week before, during (with voucher) and one month after the intervention. After each consultation they were interviewed with a standardized questionnaire. Twenty-one criteria were scored and grouped into four categories. Clinics' scores were compared using non-parametric statistical methods (paired design: before-during and before-after). Also the influence of doctors' characteristics was tested using non-parametric statistical methods. Results Some aspects of service quality improved during the voucher program. Before the program started 8 of the 16 SPs returned 'empty handed', although all were eligible contraceptive users. During the program 16/17 left with a contraceptive method (p = 0.01). Furthermore, more SPs were involved in the contraceptive method choice (13/17 vs.5/16, p = 0.02). Shared decision-making on contraceptive method as well as condom promotion had significantly increased after the program ended. Female doctors had best scores before- during and after the intervention. The improvements were more pronounced among male doctors and doctors older than 40, though these improvements did not sustain after the program ended. Conclusion This study illustrates provider-related obstacles adolescents often

  14. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms. PMID:25171938

  15. Automated medical resident rotation and shift scheduling to ensure quality resident education and patient care.

    PubMed

    Smalley, Hannah K; Keskinocak, Pinar

    2016-03-01

    At academic teaching hospitals around the country, the majority of clinical care is provided by resident physicians. During their training, medical residents often rotate through various hospitals and/or medical services to maximize their education. Depending on the size of the training program, manually constructing such a rotation schedule can be cumbersome and time consuming. Further, rules governing allowable duty hours for residents have grown more restrictive in recent years (ACGME 2011), making day-to-day shift scheduling of residents more difficult (Connors et al., J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 137:710-713, 2009; McCoy et al., May Clin Proc 86(3):192, 2011; Willis et al., J Surg Edu 66(4):216-221, 2009). These rules limit lengths of duty periods, allowable duty hours in a week, and rest periods, to name a few. In this paper, we present two integer programming models (IPs) with the goals of (1) creating feasible assignments of residents to rotations over a one-year period, and (2) constructing night and weekend call-shift schedules for the individual rotations. These models capture various duty-hour rules and constraints, provide the ability to test multiple what-if scenarios, and largely automate the process of schedule generation, solving these scheduling problems more effectively and efficiently compared to manual methods. Applying our models on data from a surgical residency program, we highlight the infeasibilities created by increased duty-hour restrictions placed on residents in conjunction with current scheduling paradigms.

  16. Determinants of Quality in Diabetes Care Process

    PubMed Central

    Gnavi, Roberto; Picariello, Roberta; la Karaghiosoff, Ludmi; Costa, Giuseppe; Giorda, Carlo

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the role of clinical and socioeconomic variables as determinants of adherence to recommended diabetes care guidelines and assess differences in the process of care between diabetologists and general practitioners. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified diabetic residents in Torino, Italy, as of 31 July 2003, using multiple independent data sources. We collected data on several laboratory tests and specialist medical examinations registered during the subsequent 12 months and performed regression analyses to identify associations with quality-of-care indicators based on existing guidelines. RESULTS After 1 year, only 35.8% of patients had undergone a comprehensive assessment. In the multivariate models, factors independently and significantly associated with lower quality of care were age ≥75 years (prevalence rate ratio [PRR] 0.66 [95% CI 0.61–0.70]) and established cardiovascular disease (0.89 [0.86–0.93]). Disease severity (PRR for insulin-treated patients 1.45 [1.38–1.53]) and diabetologist consultation (PRR 3.34 [3.17–3.53]) were positively associated with high quality of care. No clear association emerged between sex and socioeconomic status. These differences were strongly reduced in patients receiving diabetologist care compared with patients receiving general practitioner care only. CONCLUSIONS Despite widespread availability of guidelines and simple screening procedures, a nonnegligible portion of the diabetic population, namely elderly individuals and patients with less severe forms of the disease, are not properly cared for. As practitioners in diabetes centers are more likely to adhere to guidelines than general practitioners, quality in the diabetes care process can be improved by increasing the intensity of disease management programs, with greater participation by general practitioners. PMID:19675196

  17. Comparison of perceived quality amongst migrant and local patients using primary health care delivered by community health centres in Shenzhen, China

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Providing good quality primary health care to all inhabitants is one of the Chinese Government’s health care objectives. However, information is scarce regarding the difference in quality of primary health care delivered to migrants and local residents respectively. This study aimed to compare patients’ perceptions of quality of primary health care between migrants and local patients, and their willingness to use and recommend primary health care to others. Methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted. 787 patients in total were chosen from four randomly drawn Community Health Centers (CHCs) for interviews. Results Local residents scored higher than migrants in terms of their satisfaction with types of drugs available (3.62 vs. 3.45, p = 0.035), attitude of health workers (4.41 vs. 4.14, p = 0.042) and waiting time (4.30 vs. 3.86, p < 0.001). Even though there was no significant difference in overall satisfaction between local residents and migrants (4.16 vs. 3.91, p = 0.159), migrants were more likely to utilize primary health care as the first choice for their usual health problems (94.1% vs. 87.1%, p = 0.032), while local residents were more inclined to recommend Traditional Chinese Medicine to others (65.6% vs. 56.6%, p = 0.026). Conclusions Quality of primary health care given to migrants is less satisfactory than to local residents in terms of attitude of health workers and waiting time. Our study suggests quality of care could be improved through extending opening hours of CHCs and strengthening professional ethics education. Considering CHCs as the first choice by migrants might be due to their health insurance scheme, while locals’ recommendations for traditional Chinese medicine were possibly because of cultural differences. PMID:24779564

  18. Perspectives on Home Care Quality

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Rosalie A.; Kane, Robert L.; Illston, Laurel H.; Eustis, Nancy N.

    1994-01-01

    Home care quality assurance (QA) must consider features inherent in home care, including: multiple goals, limited provider control, and unique family roles. Successive panels of stakeholders were asked to rate the importance of selected home care outcomes. Most highly rated outcomes were freedom from exploitation, satisfaction with care, physical safety, affordability, and physical functioning. Panelists preferred outcome indicators to process and structure, and all groups emphasized “enabling” criteria. Themes highlighted included: interpersonal components of care; normalizing life for clientele; balancing quality of life with safety; developing flexible, negotiated care plans; mechanisms for accountability and case management. These themes were formulated differently according to the stakeholders' role. Providers preferred intermediate outcomes, akin to process. PMID:10140158

  19. Achieving best outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease in China by enhancing the quality of medical care and establishing a learning health-care system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-10

    China has an immediate need to address the rapidly growing population with cardiovascular disease events and the increasing number of people living with this illness. Despite progress in increasing access to services, China faces the dual challenge of addressing gaps in quality of care and producing more evidence to support clinical practice. In this Review, we address opportunities to strengthen performance measurement, programmes to improve quality of care, and national capacity to produce high-impact knowledge for clinical practice. Moreover, we propose recommendations, with implications for other diseases, for how China can immediately make use of its Hospital Quality-Monitoring System and other existing national platforms to assess and improve performance of medical care, and to generate new knowledge to inform clinical decisions and national policies.

  20. Achieving best outcomes for patients with cardiovascular disease in China by enhancing the quality of medical care and establishing a learning health-care system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lixin; Krumholz, Harlan M; Li, Xi; Li, Jing; Hu, Shengshou

    2015-10-10

    China has an immediate need to address the rapidly growing population with cardiovascular disease events and the increasing number of people living with this illness. Despite progress in increasing access to services, China faces the dual challenge of addressing gaps in quality of care and producing more evidence to support clinical practice. In this Review, we address opportunities to strengthen performance measurement, programmes to improve quality of care, and national capacity to produce high-impact knowledge for clinical practice. Moreover, we propose recommendations, with implications for other diseases, for how China can immediately make use of its Hospital Quality-Monitoring System and other existing national platforms to assess and improve performance of medical care, and to generate new knowledge to inform clinical decisions and national policies. PMID:26466053

  1. A pilot study exploring quality of life experienced by patients undergoing negative-pressure wound therapy as part of their wound care treatment compared to patients receiving standard wound care.

    PubMed

    Ousey, Karen J; Milne, Jeanette; Cook, Leanne; Stephenson, John; Gillibrand, Warren

    2014-08-01

    The use of negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been widely documented as a technique to help heal complex wounds. This article presents the findings of a preliminary study which aimed to explore quality of life (QoL) experienced by patients undergoing NPWT as part of their wound care treatment in comparison to that of patients with a wound using traditional (standard) wound care therapies. A quasi-experimental study was undertaken, with patients treated in wound care/vascular clinics with chronic/acute wounds. QoL impact was measured using the Cardiff Wound Impact Schedule and administered post-consent at timed intervals. Our results identified that there were no real differences in QoL scores recorded by patients over the 12-week period. Although there was no overall interaction between the therapies used for wound healing, NPWT did have an effect on social life: during the first 2 weeks of the application of therapy, patients in the NPWT group reported an increase in the social life domain. The authors conclude that true QoL can only be elicited if an accurate baseline is established or if data is collected over a long enough period to allow comparison of scores over time.

  2. Quality of care in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Evensen, Christian T.; Treadwell, Marsha J.; Keller, San; Levine, Roger; Hassell, Kathryn L.; Werner, Ellen M.; Smith, Wally R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Documented deficiencies in adult sickle cell disease (SCD) care include poor access to knowledgeable providers and inadequate treatment in emergency departments (EDs). The aim of this study was to create patient-reported outcome measures of the quality of ambulatory and ED care for adults with SCD. We developed and pilot tested SCD quality of care questions consistent with Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems surveys. We applied psychometric methods to develop scores and evaluate reliability and validity. The participants of this study were adults with SCD (n = 556)—63% aged 18 to 34 years; 64% female; 64% SCD-SS—at 7 US sites. The measure used was Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement information system Quality of Care survey. Most participants (90%) reported at least 1 severe pain episode (pain intensity 7.8 ± 2.3, 0–10 scale) in the past year. Most (81%) chose to manage pain at home rather than the ED, citing negative ED experiences (83%). Using factor analysis, we identified Access, Provider Interaction, and ED Care composites with reliable scores (Cronbach α 0.70–0.83) and construct validity (r = 0.32–0.83 correlations with global care ratings). Compared to general adult Consumer Assessments of Healthcare Providers and Systems scores, adults with SCD had worse care, adjusted for age, education, and general health. Results were consistent with other research reflecting deficiencies in ED care for adults with SCD. The Adult Sickle Cell Quality of Life Measurement Quality of Care measure is a useful self-report measure for documenting and tracking disparities in quality of SCD care. PMID:27583862

  3. Electronic Symptom Reporting Between Patient and Provider for Improved Health Care Service Quality: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Part 2: Methodological Quality and Effects

    PubMed Central

    Berntsen, Gro K Rosvold; Schuster, Tibor; Henriksen, Eva; Horsch, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background We conducted in two parts a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on electronic symptom reporting between patients and providers to improve health care service quality. Part 1 reviewed the typology of patient groups, health service innovations, and research targets. Four innovation categories were identified: consultation support, monitoring with clinician support, self-management with clinician support, and therapy. Objective To assess the methodological quality of the RCTs, and summarize effects and benefits from the methodologically best studies. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and IEEE Xplore for original studies presented in English-language articles between 1990 and November 2011. Risk of bias and feasibility were judged according to the Cochrane recommendation, and theoretical evidence and preclinical testing were evaluated according to the Framework for Design and Evaluation of Complex Interventions to Improve Health. Three authors assessed the risk of bias and two authors extracted the effect data independently. Disagreement regarding bias assessment, extraction, and interpretation of results were resolved by consensus discussions. Results Of 642 records identified, we included 32 articles representing 29 studies. No articles fulfilled all quality requirements. All interventions were feasible to implement in a real-life setting, and theoretical evidence was provided for almost all studies. However, preclinical testing was reported in only a third of the articles. We judged three-quarters of the articles to have low risk for random sequence allocation and approximately half of the articles to have low risk for the following biases: allocation concealment, incomplete outcome data, and selective reporting. Slightly more than one fifth of the articles were judged as low risk for blinding of outcome assessment. Only 1 article had low risk of bias for blinding of

  4. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: A qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the “costly” crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  5. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the "costly" crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system. PMID:25056441

  6. The perspectives of Aboriginal patients and their health care providers on improving the quality of hemodialysis services: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Rix, Elizabeth F; Barclay, Lesley; Stirling, Janelle; Tong, Allison; Wilson, Shawn

    2015-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease has a higher prevalence in Indigenous populations globally. The incidence of end-stage kidney disease in Australian Aboriginal people is eight times higher than non-Aboriginal Australians. Providing services to rural and remote Aboriginal people with chronic disease is challenging because of access and cultural differences. This study aims to describe and analyze the perspectives of Aboriginal patients' and health care providers' experience of renal services, to inform service improvement for rural Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. We conducted a thematic analysis of interviews with Aboriginal patients (n = 18) receiving hemodialysis in rural Australia and health care providers involved in their care (n = 29). An overarching theme of avoiding the "costly" crisis encompassed four subthemes: (1) Engaging patients earlier (prevent late diagnosis, slow disease progression); (2) flexible family-focused care (early engagement of family, flexibility to facilitate family and cultural obligations); (3) managing fear of mainstream services (originating in family dialysis experiences and previous racism when engaging with government organizations); (4) service provision shaped by culture (increased home dialysis, Aboriginal support and Aboriginal-led cultural education). Patients and health care providers believe service redesign is required to meet the needs of Aboriginal hemodialysis patients. Participants identified early screening and improving the relationship of Aboriginal people with health systems would reduce crisis entry to hemodialysis. These strategies alongside improving the cultural competence of staff would reduce patients' fear of mainstream services, decrease the current emotional and family costs of care, and increase efficiency of health expenditure on a challenging and increasingly unsustainable treatment system.

  7. [Quality of care: from theory to practice].

    PubMed

    Guillain, H; Raetzo, M A

    1997-03-29

    Quality of care is growing concern among health care professionals and managers. As a multidimensional concept, it cannot be reduced to simple customer satisfaction. Taking into account the views of the three major players in the health care system-patients, providers and payers-quality can be defined as the capacity to satisfy patients' needs according to professional knowledge and within available resources. Efficacy, efficiency, appropriateness, acceptability, legitimacy and equity are dimensions of health care quality. Contrary to popular belief, quality is neither maximum performance, nor satisfaction at all costs, nor punishment or elimination of "bad apples". In ambulatory medicine, quality implies first of all the ability to master the processes occurring during an office visit. However, although history taking and physical examination are the cornerstones of medical practice, they have not been well studied. Improving quality of care in the ambulatory sector will require better knowledge about medical decision-making processes, in particular identification of the most relevant information required for a decision and the optimal way of obtaining it in any specific clinical situation.

  8. Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care

    MedlinePlus

    Helping You Choose Quality Behavioral Health Care Selecting quality behavioral health care services for yourself, a relative or friend requires special thought and attention. The Joint Commission on ...

  9. Medical interpreters: improvements to address access, equity, and quality of care for limited-English-proficient patients.

    PubMed

    VanderWielen, Lynn M; Enurah, Alexander S; Rho, Helen Y; Nagarkatti-Gude, David R; Michelsen-King, Patricia; Crossman, Steven H; Vanderbilt, Allison A

    2014-10-01

    Limited-English-proficient (LEP) patients in the United States experience a variety of health care disparities associated with language barriers, including reduced clinical encounter time and substandard medical treatment compared with their English-speaking counterparts. In most current U.S. health care settings, interpretation services are provided by personnel ranging from employed professional interpreters to untrained, ad hoc interpreters such as friends, family, or medical staff. Studies have demonstrated that untrained individuals commit many interpretation errors that may critically compromise patient safety and ultimately prove to be life-threatening. Despite documented risks, the U.S. health care system lacks a required standardized certification for medical interpreters. The authors propose that the standardization of medical interpreter training and certification would substantially reduce the barriers to equitable care experienced by LEP patients in the U.S. health care system, including the occurrence of preventable clinical errors. Recent efforts of the U.S. federal court system are cited as a successful and realistic example of how these goals may be achieved. As guided by the evolution of the federal court interpreting certification program, subsequent research will be required to demonstrate the improvements and challenges that would result from national certification standards and policy for medical interpreters. Research should examine cost-effectiveness and ensure that certified interpreting services are appropriately used by health care practitioners. Ongoing commitment is required from lawmakers, health care providers, and researchers to remove barriers to care and to demand that equity remain a consistent goal of our health care system.

  10. A framework for the development and implementation of an advanced practice role for physiotherapists that improves access and quality of care for patients.

    PubMed

    Robarts, Susan; Kennedy, Deborah; MacLeod, Anne Marie; Findlay, Helen; Gollish, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    A new model of care has been implemented at the Sunnybrook Holland Orthopaedic and Arthritic Centre that expands the role of physiotherapists to improve access and quality of care for patients requiring hip and knee replacement surgery. An advanced practice physiotherapist (APP) role was created to support both referral management and post-operative care to reduce surgeon workload and better streamline services. This article describes our nine-step framework for implementing an APP role and can be used as a template for other organizations evolving similar roles. The framework was adapted from the participatory, evidence-based, patient-focused process for the development of an advanced practice nurse role. Key steps include (1) obtaining stakeholder consensus, (2) identifying barriers and facilitators and (3) developing the necessary administrative and training supports as well as clinical protocols and an evaluation framework. Approaching change in a series of small steps (plan-do-study-act [PDSA] methodology) alongside existing processes has facilitated buy-in and role acceptance. The early and continued involvement of decision-makers within the organization has been paramount to successful implementation. In addition, patient input has been central to the evolution of the role, with patient satisfaction a key indicator. The new role and model of care reconfigures traditional roles and introduces a team approach that results in timely access to care for patients. Benefits include an improved assessment process, enhanced education across the care continuum and improved coordination and delivery of services.

  11. Building capacity for quality and safety in critical care: A roundtable discussion from the second international patient safety conference in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Arabi, Yaseen M.; Taher, Saadi; Berenholtz, Sean M.; Alamry, Ahmed; Hijazi, Ra’ed; Alatassi, Abdulaleem; Marini, Abdellatif M.

    2013-01-01

    This paper summarizes the roundtable discussion from the Second International Patient Safety Conference held in April 9-11, 2013, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The objectives of the roundtable discussion were to: (1) review the conceptual framework for building capacity in quality and safety in critical care. (2) examine examples of leading international experiences in building capacity. (3) review the experience in Saudi Arabia in this area. (4) discuss the role of building capacity in simulation for patient safety in critical care and (5) review the experience in building capacity in an ongoing improvement project for severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:24250730

  12. Effects of skin care and makeup under instructions from dermatologists on the quality of life of female patients with acne vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Yoshie; Yoneda, Kozo; Sadahira, Chieko; Katsuura, Junko; Moriue, Tetsuya; Kubota, Yasuo

    2006-11-01

    Acne vulgaris significantly affects patients' quality of life (QOL) and their lives in various ways, including social behavior and body dissatisfaction. This may be heightened by acne's typical involvement of the face. We investigated whether the use of skin care and makeup could influence the QOL of affected patients without deteriorating conventional acne treatments. Fifty female patients with acne were recruited for our study. Twenty-five patients were instructed how to use skin care and cosmetics, while 25 patients received no specific instructions from dermatologists. Both groups received conventional topical and/or oral medication for acne during the study period for 4 weeks. Both groups did not show any significant difference in clinical improvement of acne severity. Two validated QOL questionnaires, World Health Organization (WHO)QOL26 and the Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) were administered to all patients at first visit and 4 weeks later. The mean scores of psychological and overall domains in WHOQOL26 for patients with instructions were improved significantly, while only the overall score was significantly improved for patients without instructions. The total mean scores and all domains except work/school in DLQI for patients with instructions were improved significantly, while the total scores and all domains except discomfort for treatment in DLQI were significantly improved for patients without instructions. Thus, instructions on the use of skin care and cosmetics for female acne patients did not deteriorate acne treatment and influenced patients' QOL effectively. We therefore suggest that instructions for using skin care and cosmetics complement conventional medical treatments for acne.

  13. Quality of congestive heart failure care

    PubMed Central

    Maddocks, Heather; Marshall, J. Neil; Stewart, Moira; Terry, Amanda L.; Cejic, Sonny; Hammond, Jo-Anne; Jordan, John; Chevendra, Vijaya; Denomme, Louisa Bestard; Thind, Amardeep

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To study the feasibility of using electronic medical record (EMR) data from the Deliver Primary Healthcare Information (DELPHI) database to measure quality of care for patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) in primary care and to determine the percentage of patients with CHF receiving the recommended care. DESIGN Items listed on the Ontario Ministry of Health and Long-Term Care Heart Failure Patient Care Flow Sheet (CHF flow sheet) were assessed and measured using EMRs of patients diagnosed with CHF between October 1, 2005, and September 30, 2008. SETTING Ten primary health care practices in southwestern Ontario. PARTICIPANTS Four hundred eighty-eight patients who were considered to have CHF because at least 1 of the following was indicated in their EMRs: an International Classification of Diseases billing code for CHF (category 428), an International Classification of Primary Care diagnosis code for heart failure (ie, K77), or “CHF” reported on the problem list. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Number of CHF flow sheet items that were measurable using EMR data from the DELPHI database. Percentage of patients with CHF receiving required quality-of-care items since the date of diagnosis. RESULTS The DELPHI database contained information on 60 (65.9%) of the 91 items identified using the CHF flow sheet. The recommended tests and procedures were recorded infrequently: 55.5% of patients with CHF had chest radiographs; 32.6% had electrocardiograms; 32.2% had echocardiograms; 30.5% were prescribed angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors; 20.9% were prescribed β-blockers; and 15.8% were prescribed angiotensin II receptor blockers. CONCLUSION Low frequencies of recommended care items for patients with CHF were recorded in the EMR. Physicians explained that CHF care was documented in areas of the EMR that contained patient identifiers, such as the encounter notes, and was therefore not part of the DELPHI database. Extractable information from the EMR

  14. In Quality We Trust; but Quality of Life or Quality of Care?

    PubMed

    Chen, Shan Shan; Unruh, Mark; Williams, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The ESRD program provides medical care to a diverse and medically complex patient population. The care for the ESRD patient population has become increasingly benchmarked with process of care measures. These measures include dialysis adequacy, anemia, nutrition, and vascular access outcomes. These process-related dialysis measures may not improve the care of the individual patient as care relates to the individual's goals and values. There is also evidence that these process measures may not be causally related to quality of life, hospitalization, and survival. The adoption of patient-reported outcomes may shift the balance toward more patient-centered care. However, the extent to which mandated measures of health-related quality of life and patient satisfaction result in improved outcomes remains unclear.

  15. Electronic Health Records and Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Yanamadala, Swati; Morrison, Doug; Curtin, Catherine; McDonald, Kathryn; Hernandez-Boussard, Tina

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Electronic health records (EHRs) were implemented to improve quality of care and patient outcomes. This study assessed the relationship between EHR-adoption and patient outcomes. We performed an observational study using State Inpatient Databases linked to American Hospital Association survey, 2011. Surgical and medical patients from 6 large, diverse states were included. We performed univariate analyses and developed hierarchical regression models relating level of EHR utilization and mortality, readmission rates, and complications. We evaluated the effect of EHR adoption on outcomes in a difference-in-differences analysis, 2008 to 2011. Medical and surgical patients sought care at hospitals reporting no EHR (3.5%), partial EHR (55.2%), and full EHR systems (41.3%). In univariate analyses, patients at hospitals with full EHR had the lowest rates of inpatient mortality, readmissions, and Patient Safety Indicators followed by patients at hospitals with partial EHR and then patients at hospitals with no EHR (P < 0.05). However, these associations were not robust when accounting for other patient and hospital factors, and adoption of an EHR system was not associated with improved patient outcomes (P > 0.05). These results indicate that patients receiving medical and surgical care at hospitals with no EHR system have similar outcomes compared to patients seeking care at hospitals with a full EHR system, after controlling for important confounders. To date, we have not yet seen the promised benefits of EHR systems on patient outcomes in the inpatient setting. EHRs may play a smaller role than expected in patient outcomes and overall quality of care. PMID:27175631

  16. An integrated care facilitation model improves quality of life and reduces use of hospital resources by patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bird, Stephen; Noronha, Michelle; Sinnott, Helen

    2010-01-01

    reduction in their symptoms (P<0.005) and the CHF patients reported an improvement in their overall health and quality of life scores (P<0.001). The outcome measures used in this evaluation suggest that an integrated care facilitation model that is patient focussed, provides an education component to promote greater self-management compliance and delivers a continuum of care through the acute and community health sectors, may reduce the utilisation of acute health care facilities and benefit the patient. PMID:21138701

  17. Quality, Safety and Patient Centered Care--A Dream Come True in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan. An Award winning project of "2015 Quality, Safety & Patient Centered Care Award" at, Chicago USA.

    PubMed

    Jassani, Kashif; Essani, Rozina Roshan; Abbas, Syed Nadeem Husain

    2016-01-01

    Northern Pakistan remains very challenging terrain due to harsh weather all year round presenting an infrastructura, human resource and supply chain challenge of its own. Many times the facility had to move to different locations on emergency and ad hoc basis due to landslides, earthquakes affecting continuity of care. Providing quality healthcare to often resource constraint hard-to-reach areas has always been AKHS,P's unique forte. Breaking barriers for catchment population to access quality healthcare, AKHS,P embarked on an initiative of implementing, achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System international standards certification. This article shares the unique experience of AKHS,P in achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification. After untiring efforts and the hard work of ground staff; AKHS,P achieved ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification as well as 1st Surveillance Audit which itself proved that AKHS,P sustained quality systems and ensured continuous quality improvement in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan. PMID:27180469

  18. Quality, Safety and Patient Centered Care--A Dream Come True in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan. An Award winning project of "2015 Quality, Safety & Patient Centered Care Award" at, Chicago USA.

    PubMed

    Jassani, Kashif; Essani, Rozina Roshan; Abbas, Syed Nadeem Husain

    2016-01-01

    Northern Pakistan remains very challenging terrain due to harsh weather all year round presenting an infrastructura, human resource and supply chain challenge of its own. Many times the facility had to move to different locations on emergency and ad hoc basis due to landslides, earthquakes affecting continuity of care. Providing quality healthcare to often resource constraint hard-to-reach areas has always been AKHS,P's unique forte. Breaking barriers for catchment population to access quality healthcare, AKHS,P embarked on an initiative of implementing, achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 Quality Management System international standards certification. This article shares the unique experience of AKHS,P in achieving and sustaining ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification. After untiring efforts and the hard work of ground staff; AKHS,P achieved ISO 9001:2008 International Quality Management System Certification as well as 1st Surveillance Audit which itself proved that AKHS,P sustained quality systems and ensured continuous quality improvement in the Mountains of Northern Pakistan.

  19. Variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes for cancer patients by place of death: the QUALYCARE study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Emerging trends and new policies suggest that more cancer patients might die at home in the future. However, not all have equal chances of achieving this. Furthermore, there is lack of evidence to support that those who die at home experience better care and a better death than those who die as inpatients. The QUALYCARE study aims to examine variations in the quality and costs of end-of-life care, preferences and palliative outcomes associated with dying at home or in an institution for cancer patients. Methods/Design Mortality followback survey (with a nested case-control study of home vs. hospital deaths) conducted with bereaved relatives of cancer patients in four Primary Care Trusts in London. Potential participants are identified from death registrations and approached by the Office for National Statistics in complete confidence. Data are collected via a postal questionnaire to identify the informal and formal care received in the three months before death and the associated costs, relatives' satisfaction with care, and palliative outcomes for the patients and their relatives. A well-established questionnaire to measure relatives' views on the care integrates four brief and robust tools - the Client Service Receipt Inventory, the Palliative Outcome Scale, the EQ-5 D and the Texas Revised Inventory of Grief. Further questions assess patients and relatives' preferences for place of death. The survey aims to include 500 bereaved relatives (140 who experienced a home death, 205 a hospital death, 115 a hospice death and 40 a nursing home death). Bivariate and multivariate analyses will explore differences in place of death and place of end-of-life care, in preferences for place of death, patients' palliative outcomes and relatives' bereavement outcomes, in relation to place of death. Factors influencing death at home and the costs of end-of-life care by place of death will be identified. Discussion Collecting data on end-of-life care retrospectively from

  20. Palliative patients cared for at home by PAMINO-trained and other GPs – health-related quality of life as measured by QLQ-C15-PAL and POS

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To maintain patients’ quality of life is one of the major goals in palliative home care provided by general practitioners (GPs). GPs need adequate training to care for palliative patients. The paper seeks to evaluate whether a specific training in Germany (PAMINO) has any improving impact on the care of palliative patients and their health-related quality of life. Methods From September 2007 until June 2009, GPs and their palliative care patients with cancer participated in a study to evaluate palliative courses for GPs offered by a regional palliative care initiative (PAMINO). For a period of six months at most or until death, patients were asked monthly to judge their quality of life on the Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 Palliative (QLQ-C15-PAL) of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) and on the Palliative Care Outcome Scale (POS). The ‘Overall quality of life’ scale of the QLQ-C15-PAL takes values between 0 and 100 with higher values indicating a higher quality of life. The POS sum scale takes values between 0 and 40 with higher values indicating worse care outcomes. Patients cared for by PAMINO-trained GPs and patients cared for by other GPs (control group) are compared using t-tests for differences in group means. Results One hundred patients participated in the study; 96 patients filled out the questionnaires at least once. On the QLQ-C15-PAL, mean quality of life of the patient groups of PAMINO-trained and other GPs were 37.7 (SD = 25.5) and 39.4 (SD = 26.3) (p = .76), respectively. On the POS, respective mean values of 13.6 (SD = 5.8) and 12.0 (SD = 6.5) (p = .26) were given. Patients cared for by a PAMINO-trained GP did not report better quality of life and care outcomes than patients cared for by other general practitioners. Conclusions Patients cared for by PAMINO-trained and other GPs in our study did not report differences in quality of life. Quality of life and care

  1. Measurement of Quality to Improve Care in Sleep Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Aronsky, Amy J.; Carden, Kelly A.; Chervin, Ronald D.; Thomas, Sherene M.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The Board of Directors of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Task Force to develop quality measures as part of its strategic plan to promote high quality patient-centered care. Among many potential dimensions of quality, the AASM requested Workgroups to develop outcome and process measures to aid in evaluating the quality of care of five common sleep disorders: restless legs syndrome, insomnia, narcolepsy, obstructive sleep apnea in adults, and obstructive sleep apnea in children. This paper describes the rationale, background, general methods development, and considerations in implementation for these sleep disorder quality measures. The Workgroup papers are published in this issue under the following titles: Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Restless Legs Syndrome, Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Insomnia, Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy, Quality Measures for the Care of Adult Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, and Quality Measures for the Care of Pediatric Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Citation: Morgenthaler TI, Aronsky AJ, Carden KA, Chervin RD, Thomas SM, Watson NF. Measurement of quality to improve care in sleep medicine. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):279–291. PMID:25700883

  2. Orthogeriatric care: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Tarazona-Santabalbina, Francisco José; Belenguer-Varea, Ángel; Rovira, Eduardo; Cuesta-Peredó, David

    2016-01-01

    Hip fractures are a very serious socio-economic problem in western countries. Since the 1950s, orthogeriatric units have introduced improvements in the care of geriatric patients admitted to hospital because of hip fractures. During this period, these units have reduced mean hospital stays, number of complications, and both in-hospital mortality and mortality over the middle term after hospital discharge, along with improvements in the quality of care and a reduction in costs. Likewise, a recent clinical trial has reported greater functional gains among the affected patients. Studies in this field have identified the prognostic factors present upon admission or manifesting themselves during admission and that increase the risk of patient mortality or disability. In addition, improved care afforded by orthogeriatric units has proved to reduce costs. Nevertheless, a number of management issues remain to be clarified, such as the optimum anesthetic, analgesic, and thromboprophylactic protocols; the type of diagnostic and therapeutic approach best suited to patients with cognitive problems; or the efficiency of the programs used in convalescence units or in home rehabilitation care. Randomized clinical trials are needed to consolidate the evidence in this regard. PMID:27445466

  3. Quality of trauma care and trauma registries.

    PubMed

    Pino Sánchez, F I; Ballesteros Sanz, M A; Cordero Lorenzana, L; Guerrero López, F

    2015-03-01

    Traumatic disease is a major public health concern. Monitoring the quality of services provided is essential for the maintenance and improvement thereof. Assessing and monitoring the quality of care in trauma patient through quality indicators would allow identifying opportunities for improvement whose implementation would improve outcomes in hospital mortality, functional outcomes and quality of life of survivors. Many quality indicators have been used in this condition, although very few ones have a solid level of scientific evidence to recommend their routine use. The information contained in the trauma registries, spread around the world in recent decades, is essential to know the current health care reality, identify opportunities for improvement and contribute to the clinical and epidemiological research.

  4. Blood glucose control and quality of health care in non-insulin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes in Spain: a retrospective and cross-sectional observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, A; Calle, A; Vázquez, L; Chacón, F; Polavieja, P; Reviriego, J

    2011-01-01

    Aims To assess blood glucose control and quality of health care provided to non-insulin-treated patients with Type 2 diabetes mellitus in routine clinical practice in Spain. Methods In this observational, retrospective, cross-sectional study, patients were grouped as either having good or suboptimal blood glucose control according to International Diabetes Federation or American Diabetes Association HbA1c goals. Clinical and socio-demographic data and compliance with the main standard level of care recommendations of the International Diabetes Federation were recorded during a routine visit. Correlates of glucose control were analysed by logistic regression. Results Many patients were grouped as having suboptimal control under International Diabetes Federation (61.9%) or American Diabetes Association (45.0%) criteria. The mean number of accomplished International Diabetes Federation recommendations (7.3 out of 11) was higher for endocrinologists (than for internists or primary care physicians), and significantly more patients under their care were in the good glucose control group (than with primary care physicians). More recommendations were associated with blood glucose control using International Diabetes Federation than American Diabetes Association criteria, demanding higher quality of health care for achieving stricter goals. Some recommendations were poorly observed, particularly those concerning patients’ education on diabetes, the prompt prescription of effective treatments and monitoring of complications. Diabetes complications were associated with being in the suboptimal control group. Patients’ education on diabetes and HbA1c monitoring were associated with being in the good control group. Conclusions These results demonstrate the need for improvement in the management of patients with non-insulin-treated Type 2 diabetes in actual clinical practice in Spain. Such improvement would entail a stricter adherence to International Diabetes Federation

  5. RISQy business (Relationships, Incentives, Supports, and Quality): evolution of the British Columbia Model of Primary Care (patient-centered medical home).

    PubMed

    MacCarthy, Dan; Hollander, Marcus J

    2014-01-01

    In 2002, the British Columbia Ministry of Health and the British Columbia Medical Association (now Doctors of BC) came together to form the British Columbia General Practice Services Committee to bring about transformative change in primary care in British Columbia, Canada. This committee's approach to primary care was to respond to an operational problem--the decline of family practice in British Columbia--with an operational solution--assist general practitioners to provide better care by introducing new incentive fees into the fee-for-service payment schedule, and by providing additional training to general practitioners. This may be referred to as a "soft power" approach, which can be summarized in the abbreviation RISQ: focus on Relationships; provide Incentives for general practitioners to spend more time with their patients and provide guidelines-based care; Support general practitioners by developing learning modules to improve their practices; and, through the incentive payments and learning modules, provide better Quality care to patients and improved satisfaction to physicians. There are many similarities between the British Columbian approach to primary care and the US patient-centered medical home.

  6. [Quality of care in adult resuscitation unit].

    PubMed

    Romero Cabrera, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    Nowadays the quality of care has become a key piece in medical assistance. Apart from doing things correctly we should have an objective knowledge of the opinion of the user That opinion could be known thanks to the analysis of the perceived quality care from the patient. From October to December of 2008 a descriptive, transversal and retrospective research has been developed in a resuscitation unit at a third level hospital of the Community of Madrid. This research has been for all the registrations to the service, through the Servqhos questionnaire. The aims of the research were to evaluate the quality perceived at the resuscitation unit; to know the profile of the patient treated and to identify the possible improvements and problems as well. The patients were anonymous and they presented themselves voluntary 19 of 42 registrations in total answered the questionnaire with a rate of reply of 45%. The average age registered were 57 years old with an average of stay of 11 days. The most prevalent pathologies were neoplasias and polytraumatisms. According to the quality perceived by the unity there has not been any relationship among gender study level, labor activity marital status and previous hospital stay. At the area of information to the patient there have been some deficiencies as well as some discrimination from the attending staff. Noise is valuated negatively by the patients. Further to the professionalism, is valuated positively at all the social classes. The global quality perceived of the unity were very good from the patient. PMID:25551917

  7. Approaches to improve quality of care in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    PubMed

    Shah, Rajesh; Hou, Jason K

    2014-07-28

    Studies across medical disciplines have shown gaps in the care recommended in evidence based guidelines and the care actually delivered. Quality improvement projects using systematic audit and feedback interventions such as quality measures, will become increasingly important tools to address these gaps in care. These gaps are also apparent in the care of patients with inflammatory bowel disease. Multiple organizations, including the American Gastroenterology Association and the Crohn's and Colitis Foundation of America, have developed programs designed to implement quality measures to improve the care of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. Early results show promise of improving quality, but numerous barriers remain. Gastroenterologists need to be aware of these processes to provide the highest care possible to patients with IBD. We review the existing literature on approaches to quality improvement and their potential application and barriers when applied to IBD care. PMID:25071321

  8. How Can We Improve Outcomes for Patients and Families Under Palliative Care? Implementing Clinical Audit for Quality Improvement in Resource Limited Settings

    PubMed Central

    Selman, Lucy; Harding, Richard

    2010-01-01

    Palliative care in India has made enormous advances in providing better care for patients and families living with progressive disease, and many clinical services are well placed to begin quality improvement initiatives, including clinical audit. Clinical audit is recognized globally to be essential in all healthcare, as a way of monitoring and improving quality of care. However, it is not common in developing country settings, including India. Clinical audit is a cyclical activity involving: identification of areas of care in need of improvement, through data collection and analysis utilizing an appropriate questionnaire; setting measurable quality of care targets in specific areas; designing and implementing service improvement strategies; and then re-evaluating quality of care to assess progress towards meeting the targets. Outcome measurement is an important component of clinical audit that has additional advantages; for example, establishing an evidence base for the effectiveness of services. In resource limited contexts, outcome measurement in clinical audit is particularly important as it enables service development to be evidence-based and ensures resources are allocated effectively. Key success factors in conducting clinical audit are identified (shared ownership, training, managerial support, inclusion of all members of staff and a positive approach). The choice of outcome measurement tool is discussed, including the need for a culturally appropriate and validated measure which is brief and simple enough to incorporate into clinical practice and reflects the holistic nature of palliative care. Support for clinical audit is needed at a national level, and development and validation of an outcome measurement tool in the Indian context is a crucial next step. PMID:20859465

  9. A quality improvement project to improve the effectiveness and patient-centredness of management of people with mild-to-moderate kidney disease in primary care.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Nicola; Gallagher, Hugh; Jain, Neerja

    2014-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) stages 3 to 5, affects 6-7% of the adult population and is an important risk factor for both advanced kidney disease and cardiovascular disease. This paper describes a quality improvement project that aimed to establish consistent implementation of best practice in people with stage 3-5 kidney disease who were managed in primary care. The intervention was a Care Bundle for CKD. The bundle included three evidence-based, high impact interventions based on National Institute for Care Excellence (NICE, 2008) guidance, with an additional and novel self-management element. 29 GP Practices in England and Wales began the study. They undertook training in clinical management of CKD and in facilitation of self-management, with the self-management content designed and led by patients. Practices were asked to report baseline and then monthly outcome data extracted from practice computer systems. The project team provided implementation and ongoing quality improvement support for participating Practices. Ten Practices dropped out of the study following the training. Data submissions were incomplete in six Practices who continued to apply the care bundle. At the project end, a decision was taken by the study team to perform the final analysis on those thirteen Practices which completed the project and submitted at least six sets of monthly Practice-level outcome data. In these Practices the Care Bundle was applied to under 20% of the registered CKD stage 3 to 5 population in 5 Practices, 20-29% in 3 Practices, 30-49% in 2 Practices and ≥50% in 3 Practices (998 patients in total). Of these, 671 patients (75%) agreed to the self-management component of the intervention. The reliability (at project end) in those who received the Bundle was 100%. The Bundle was applied to an additional 315 patients in the six Practices who completed the project but did not submit regular practice-level monthly data. In the thirteen remaining Practices, the achievement

  10. The professional perspective on patient involvement in the development of quality indicators: a qualitative analysis using the example of chronic heart failure in the German health care setting

    PubMed Central

    Pohontsch, Nadine Janis; Herzberg, Heidrun; Joos, Stefanie; Welti, Felix; Scherer, Martin; Blozik, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Purpose There is an international consensus that quality indicators (QIs) of health care ought to represent patient-relevant aspects. Therefore, patient involvement in the development process is essential. However, there is no methodological gold standard for involving patients in QI development. The aim of this study is to explore experts’ views on the representation of patient-relevant aspects in the QI development process using the QIs developed in the context of the German National Disease Management Guideline for Heart Failure as an example. Methods Semi-structured, open telephone interviews were conducted with 15 German experts (patient representatives, physicians, researchers, and methodologists involved in guideline development or quality assessment). Interview themes were the relevance of the exemplary set of QIs for patients, as well as the legitimacy of, competence of, and collaboration with the patient representative who participated in the development process. Interviews were fully transcribed and content analyzed. Deductive categories derived from the research questions were supplemented by inductively formed categories during the review of the interview material. Results The qualitative analysis suggests a discrepancy between the guidelines’ QIs and those relevant to patients from an expert’s point of view, such as physician-patient communication and quality of counseling. Experts reported only minor communication and cooperation problems while working together in the guideline/QI development team. Concerns existed, for example, regarding the recruitment of patient representatives for diseases without self-help organizations, the financing of patient representation, and the training of patient representatives. Only few potential strategies for improving the process of patient involvement were mentioned. Conclusion Integrating the patients’ perspectives through the recruitment of a patient representative to participate in the development team

  11. Quality care as ethical care: a poststructural analysis of palliative and supportive district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Walshe, Catherine; Luker, Karen A

    2016-03-01

    Quality of care is a prominent discourse in modern health-care and has previously been conceptualised in terms of ethics. In addition, the role of knowledge has been suggested as being particularly influential with regard to the nurse-patient-carer relationship. However, to date, no analyses have examined how knowledge (as an ethical concept) impinges on quality of care. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care and thirteen of their lay carers. Poststructural discourse analysis techniques were utilised to take an ethical perspective on the current way in which quality of care is assessed and produced in health-care. It is argued that if quality of care is to be achieved, patients and carers need to be able to redistribute and redevelop the knowledge of their services in a collaborative way that goes beyond the current ways of working. Theoretical works and extant research are then used to produce tentative suggestions about how this may be achieved.

  12. Effective multidisciplinary working: the key to high-quality care.

    PubMed

    Ndoro, Samuel

    This article explores multidisciplinary team working, inter-disciplinary, trans-disciplinary and effective collaborative practice in order to provide high-quality patient care. It discusses different views on collaboration, some of the issues around cross-discipline and multi-agency working and concerns around promoting 'high-quality' care. It also discusses the importance of evidence-based practice in multidisciplinary teams. Issues around good-quality care, clinical governance and the audit cycle in MDTs are addressed. The article highlights the importance of the 6Cs (care, compassion, competence, communication, courage and commitment) in MDTs if quality care is to be achieved. The article also explores advantages and limitations of multidisciplinary team working, trans-disciplinary working and inter-professional working in developing and delivering high-quality patient-centred care. Further research is needed on how clinical audits can help to improve how MDTs function in order improve the quality of service provided to clients.

  13. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index in older primary care patients with generalized anxiety disorder: psychometrics and outcomes following cognitive behavioral therapy.

    PubMed

    Bush, Amber L; Armento, Maria E A; Weiss, Brandon J; Rhoades, Howard M; Novy, Diane M; Wilson, Nancy L; Kunik, Mark E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2012-08-30

    The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) is a widely used, comprehensive self-report measure of sleep quality and impairment, which has demonstrated good psychometric properties within various populations, including older adults. However, the psychometric properties of the PSQI and its component scores have not been evaluated for older adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Additionally, changes in PSQI global or component scores have not been reported following cognitive-behavioral treatment (CBT) of late-life GAD. This study examined (1) the psychometric properties of the PSQI within a sample of 216 elderly primary care patients age 60 or older with GAD who were referred for treatment of worry and/or anxiety; as well as (2) response to CBT, relative to usual care, for 134 patients with principal or coprincipal GAD. The PSQI demonstrated good internal consistency reliability and adequate evidence of construct validity. Those receiving CBT experienced greater reductions in PSQI global scores at post-treatment, relative to those receiving usual care. Further, PSQI global and component scores pertaining to sleep quality and difficulties falling asleep (i.e., sleep latency and sleep disturbances) demonstrated response to treatment over a 12-month follow-up period. Overall, results highlight the usefulness of the PSQI global and component scores for use in older adults with GAD.

  14. Quality measurement and system change of cancer care delivery.

    PubMed

    Haggstrom, David A; Doebbeling, Bradley N

    2011-12-01

    Cancer care quality measurement and system change may serve as a case example for larger possibilities in the health care system related to other diseases. Cancer care quality gaps and variation exist across both technical and patient-centered cancer quality measures, especially among vulnerable populations. There is a need to develop measures that address the following dimensions of quality and its context: disparities, overuse, patient-centeredness, and uncertainty. Developments that may promote system change in cancer care delivery include changes in the information market, organizational accountability, and consumer empowerment. Information market changes include public cancer care quality reporting, enabled by health information exchange, and incentivized by pay-for-performance. Moving organizational accountability, reimbursement, and quality measurement from individual episodes of care to multiple providers providing coordinated cancer care may address quality gaps associated with the fragmentation of care delivery. Consumer empowerment through new technologies, such as personal health records, may lead to the collection of patient-centered quality measures and promote patient self-management. Across all of these developments, leadership and ongoing research to guide informed system changes will be necessary to transform the cancer care delivery system.

  15. Impact of the Mobile HealthPROMISE Platform on the Quality of Care and Quality of Life in Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Study Protocol of a Pragmatic Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sameer; Rogers, Jason D; Otobo, Emamuzo; Patel, Nishant P; Ullman, Thomas; Colombel, Jean Fred; Moore, Shirley; Sands, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic condition of the bowel that affects over 1 million people in the United States. The recurring nature of disease makes IBD patients ideal candidates for patient-engaged care that is centered on enhanced self-management and improved doctor-patient communication. In IBD, optimal approaches to management vary for patients with different phenotypes and extent of disease and past surgical history. Hence, a single quality metric cannot define a heterogeneous disease such as IBD, unlike hypertension and diabetes. A more comprehensive assessment may be provided by complementing traditional quality metrics with measures of the patient’s quality of life (QOL) through an application like HealthPROMISE. Objective The objective of this pragmatic randomized controlled trial is to determine the impact of the HealthPROMISE app in improving outcomes (quality of care [QOC], QOL, patient adherence, disease control, and resource utilization) as compared to a patient education app. Our hypothesis is that a patient-centric self-monitoring and collaborative decision support platform will lead to sustainable improvement in overall QOL for IBD patients. Methods Participants will be recruited during face-to-face visits and randomized to either an interventional (ie, HealthPROMISE) or control (ie, education app). Patients in the HealthPROMISE arm will be able to update their information and receive disease summary, quality metrics, and a graph showing the trend of QOL (SIBDQ) scores and resource utilization over time. Providers will use the data for collaborative decision making and quality improvement interventions at the point of care. Patients in the control arm will enter data at baseline, during office visits, and at the end of the study but will not receive any decision support (trend of QOL, alert, or dashboard views). Results Enrollment in the trial will be starting in first quarter of 2015. It is intended that up to 300

  16. Empathy and quality of care.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reynolds, William J

    2002-01-01

    Empathy is a complex multi-dimensional concept that has moral cognitive emotive and behavioural components Clinical empathy involves an ability to: (a) understand the patient's situation, perspective, and feelings (and their attached meanings); (b) to communicate that understanding and check its accuracy; and (c) to act on that understanding with the patient in a helpful (therapeutic) way. Research on the effect of empathy on health outcomes in primary care is lacking, but studies in mental health and in nursing suggest it plays a key role. Empathy can be improved and successfully taught at medical school especially if it is embedded in the students actual experiences with patients. A variety of assessment and feedback techniques have also been used in general medicine psychiatry and nursing. Further work is required to determine if clinical empathy needs to be, and can be, improved in the primary care setting. PMID:12389763

  17. The ascension health experience: maximizing the chief nursing officer role in a large, multihospital system to advance patient care quality and safety.

    PubMed

    Hendrich, Ann L; Batcheller, Joyce; Ellison, Darcy A; Janik, Angela M; Jeffords, Nina B; Miller, Linda; Perlich, Gwynn L; Staffileno, Gerri; Strom, Maria; Williams, Cynthia

    2012-01-01

    Ascension Health is the largest Catholic and nonprofit health system in the United States, encompassing 70 acute care hospitals organized into 34 health ministries. Consistent with its distributed leadership model, Ascension Health has created a Chief Nursing Officer (CNO) Advisory Council to provide strategic direction and thought leadership on major system-level initiatives that impact quality, safety, operational performance, nursing leadership, and patient care delivery. The council fosters systemwide CNO engagement and dialogue through a unique structure of regional CNO work teams called "pods," each of which is chaired by a member of the council. This communication structure has facilitated consensus on major system initiatives at Ascension Health related to clinical goals, patient safety, nursing leadership, and systemwide capital investments. This article describes the history, structure, goals, processes, and successes of the CNO Advisory Council shared governance model.

  18. Providing Palliative Care to LGBTQ Patients.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Nina; Wholihan, Dorothy

    2016-09-01

    Nurses should be familiar with and equipped to address the challenges that arise when caring for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer-identified (LGBTQ) patients. LGBTQ individuals have increased rates of certain physical diseases and are at greater risk of suffering from stress-sensitive mental health issues. Negative social attitudes, widespread discrimination and stigma, physical and psychological victimization, and less social support with aging contribute to the complexity of care for these individuals. Open communication, welcoming and accepting attitudes and environments, and sensitivity to unique multidimensional issues improve care to LGBTQ patients with serious advanced illness. Nursing can reach this vulnerable minority and positively impact the quality of care. PMID:27497022

  19. Techniques change, but quality care does not.

    PubMed

    Krecko, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    The technical tools and complexity of cases for young practitioners are not the same as those used by their predecessors, but the aim is the same: quality ethical care at the highest level. The challenges of building the ethical practice today include building trust in a world where patients have access to media depictions of a society of greed, the temptations of over-treatment, and a need for an evidence base to one's practice.

  20. Techniques change, but quality care does not.

    PubMed

    Krecko, Lindsey

    2009-01-01

    The technical tools and complexity of cases for young practitioners are not the same as those used by their predecessors, but the aim is the same: quality ethical care at the highest level. The challenges of building the ethical practice today include building trust in a world where patients have access to media depictions of a society of greed, the temptations of over-treatment, and a need for an evidence base to one's practice. PMID:20415128

  1. Schizophrenia in the Netherlands: Continuity of Care with Better Quality of Care for Less Medical Costs

    PubMed Central

    van der Lee, Arnold; de Haan, Lieuwe; Beekman, Aartjan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with schizophrenia need continuous elective medical care which includes psychiatric treatment, antipsychotic medication and somatic health care. The objective of this study is to assess whether continuous elective psychiatric is associated with less health care costs due to less inpatient treatment. Methods Data concerning antipsychotic medication and psychiatric and somatic health care of patients with schizophrenia in the claims data of Agis Health Insurance were collected over 2008–2011 in the Netherlands. Included were 7,392 patients under 70 years of age with schizophrenia in 2008, insured during the whole period. We assessed the relationship between continuous elective psychiatric care and the outcome measures: acute treatment events, psychiatric hospitalization, somatic care and health care costs. Results Continuous elective psychiatric care was accessed by 73% of the patients during the entire three year follow-up period. These patients received mostly outpatient care and accessed more somatic care, at a total cost of €36,485 in three years, than those without continuous care. In the groups accessing fewer or no years of elective care 34%-68% had inpatient care and acute treatment events, while accessing less somatic care at average total costs of medical care from €33,284 to €64,509. Conclusions Continuous elective mental and somatic care for 73% of the patients with schizophrenia showed better quality of care at lower costs. Providing continuous elective care to the remaining patients may improve health while reducing acute illness episodes. PMID:27275609

  2. Do GPs know their patients with cancer? Assessing the quality of cancer registration in Dutch primary care: a cross-sectional validation study

    PubMed Central

    Sollie, Annet; Roskam, Jessika; Sijmons, Rolf H; Numans, Mattijs E; Helsper, Charles W

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To assess the quality of cancer registry in primary care. Design and setting A cross-sectional validation study using linked data from primary care electronic health records (EHRs) and the Netherlands Cancer Registry (NCR). Population 290 000 patients, registered with 120 general practitioners (GPs), from 50 practice centres in the Utrecht area, the Netherlands, in January 2013. Intervention Linking the EHRs of all patients in the Julius General Practitioners’ Network database at an individual patient level to the full NCR (∼1.7 million tumours between 1989 and 2011), to determine the proportion of matching cancer diagnoses. Full-text EHR extraction and manual analysis for non-matching diagnoses. Main outcome measures Proportions of matching and non-matching breast, lung, colorectal and prostate cancer diagnoses between 2007 and 2011, stratified by age category, cancer type and EHR system. Differences in year of diagnosis between the EHR and the NCR. Reasons for non-matching diagnoses. Results In the Primary Care EHR, 60.6% of cancer cases were registered and coded in accordance with the NCR. Of the EHR diagnoses, 48.9% were potentially false positive (not registered in the NCR). Results differed between EHR systems but not between age categories or cancer types. The year of diagnosis corresponded in 80.6% of matching coded diagnoses. Adding full-text EHR analysis improved results substantially. A national disease registry (the NCR) proved incomplete. Conclusions Even though GPs do know their patients with cancer, only 60.6% are coded in concordance with the NCR. Reusers of coded EHR data should be aware that 40% of cases can be missed, and almost half can be false positive. The type of EHR system influences registration quality. If full-text manual EHR analysis is used, only 10% of cases will be missed and 20% of cases found will be wrong. EHR data should only be reused with care. PMID:27633642

  3. The effect of continuing care on patient's quality-of-life after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person wards

    PubMed Central

    Alimohammadi, Nasrollah; Eslami, Manijeh; Yousefi, Hojatollah; Tabesh, Homayoon

    2015-01-01

    Background: Today, lumbar herniation discs, a prevalent problem with a sign of lumbar and feet pain in society. Removal of disk by surgery decrease pain but reduce quality-of-life (QOL). In some cases, lake of following and caring of patient after surgery, herniation disc recurrent. Previous studies show that patient education and followings is important, therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of continuing care on patient QOL after disc surgery in neurosurgery and very important person (VIP) ward in Al-Zahra Hospital. Materials and Methods: This study is a clinical trial conducted on 64 patients hospitalized in the neurosurgery and VIP wards of Al-Zahra Hospital, in Isfahan, Iran, in 2013. The patients were selected by simple sampling method and were randomly assigned to two groups (study and control). Patients’ response to short form-36 questionnaire before and 4 weeks and 3 months after continuing care in study group, and simultaneously, in the control group. Results: Repeated measures ANOVA showed a significant difference in mean of physical and psychological dimensions before and 4 weeks and 3 months after intervention in study group (P < 0.05), but in control group, the difference was not significant (P = 0.8). Pairwise comparison of mean physical and psychological dimensions at different time points by Fisher's least significant difference showed that there was a significant difference in the intervention group (P < 0.022). But in the control group, there was no significant difference between pairs of time points (P > 0.18). Conclusion: Continuing care improves dimensions of patients’ QOL, and it is recommended as a nursing and nonmedical intervention in disc surgery patients. PMID:27462648

  4. Postacute rehabilitation quality of care: toward a shared conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Jesus, Tiago Silva; Hoenig, Helen

    2015-05-01

    There is substantial interest in mechanisms for measuring, reporting, and improving the quality of health care, including postacute care (PAC) and rehabilitation. Unfortunately, current activities generally are either too narrow or too poorly specified to reflect PAC rehabilitation quality of care. In part, this is caused by a lack of a shared conceptual understanding of what construes quality of care in PAC rehabilitation. This article presents the PAC-rehab quality framework: an evidence-based conceptual framework articulating elements specifically pertaining to PAC rehabilitation quality of care. The widely recognized Donabedian structure, process, and outcomes (SPO) model furnished the underlying structure for the PAC-rehab quality framework, and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) framed the functional outcomes. A comprehensive literature review provided the evidence base to specify elements within the SPO model and ICF-derived framework. A set of macrolevel-outcomes (functional performance, quality of life of patient and caregivers, consumers' experience, place of discharge, health care utilization) were defined for PAC rehabilitation and then related to their (1) immediate and intermediate outcomes, (2) underpinning care processes, (3) supportive team functioning and improvement processes, and (4) underlying care structures. The role of environmental factors and centrality of patients in the framework are explicated as well. Finally, we discuss why outcomes may best measure and reflect the quality of PAC rehabilitation. The PAC-rehab quality framework provides a conceptually sound, evidence-based framework appropriate for quality of care activities across the PAC rehabilitation continuum.

  5. Improving the quality of anticoagulation of patients with atrial fibrillation in managed care organizations: results of the managing anticoagulation services trial.

    PubMed

    Matchar, David B; Samsa, Gregory P; Cohen, Stuart J; Oddone, Eugene Z; Jurgelski, Annette E

    2002-07-01

    Randomized trials have indicated that well-managed anticoagulation with warfarin could prevent more than half of the strokes related to atrial fibrillation. However, many patients with atrial fibrillation who are eligible for this therapy either do not receive it or are not maintained within an optimal prothrombin time-international normalized ratio (INR) range. We sought to determine whether an anticoagulation service within a managed care organization would be a feasible alternative for providing anticoagulation care. We performed a multi-site randomized trial in six large managed care organizations in the United States. Subjects were aged 65 years or older and had nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. At each site, physician practices were divided into two geographically defined practice clusters; each site was randomly assigned to have one intervention and one control cluster. The intervention cluster received an anticoagulation service that satisfied specifications for high-quality anticoagulation care and was coordinated through the managed care organization. Control clusters continued with their usual provider-based care. We measured the proportion of time that warfarin-treated patients in each of the clusters (intervention and control) were in the target range for the INR at baseline, and again during a follow-up period. Five of the six selected sites succeeded at developing an anticoagulation service. Patients in the intervention and control clusters had similar demographic characteristics, contraindications to warfarin, and risk factors for stroke. Among patients (n = 144 in the intervention clusters; n = 118 in the control clusters) for whom data were available during the baseline and follow-up periods, the changes in percentages of time in the target range were similar for those in the intervention clusters (baseline: 47.7%; follow-up: 55.6%) and in the control clusters (baseline: 49.1%; follow-up: 52.3%; intervention effect: 5%; 95% confidence interval: -5

  6. Occurrence and quality of anticoagulant treatment of chronic atrial fibrillation in primary health care in Sweden: a retrospective study on electronic patient records

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Gunnar H; Björholt, Ingela

    2004-01-01

    Background Chronic atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac disorder. The literature indicates varying proportions of those treated with anticoagulants, and varying intensity of anticoagulation. Electronic patient records are providing us with clinical data concerning management of anticoagulant treatment in real-life practice that is useful for audits. We aimed to assess warfarin treatment for chronic atrial fibrillation in primary health care with regard to prevalence, incidence, the proportion treated and the quality of anticoagulation control. Methods Five primary health care centres in Stockholm with a registered population of 75146 participated in a one-year retrospective study of electronic patient records up until May 2000. All patients over 18 years of age with an encounter labelled 'Atrial fibrillation' were identified, and all records of patients on warfarin treatment were manually reviewed. Main outcome measures were number of patients with chronic atrial fibrillation, number of patients on wafarin treatment, and time within the therapeutic prothrombin range. Results In total, 419 patients had chronic atrial fibrillation, giving a prevalence of 0.60% (age-adjusted 0.62%), the age group 65 years or older accounted for 91.6%, and 50.1% were women. Out of these, 50.4% (211 patients) were established on warfarin treatment for chronic atrial fibrillation (0.28% of the population), and there was a predominance of men (p = 0.02). Fifty-four patients started treatment with warfarin for chronic atrial fibrillation (0.07% of the population). Among 25 randomly selected patients on established treatment, the proportion of time within the therapeutic range was 70.2%. Among 24 randomly selected patients starting treatment, the proportion of time with therapeutic values was 54.2% and 66.9% the first and second months of treatment, respectively. Conclusions Chronic atrial fibrillation is common among the elderly in primary health care, and about half of these

  7. Defining Quality Child Care: Multiple Stakeholder Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrist, Amanda W.; Thompson, Stacy D.; Norris, Deborah J.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple perspectives regarding the definition of quality child care, and how child care quality can be improved, were examined using a focus group methodology. Participants were representatives from stakeholder groups in the child care profession, including child care center owners and directors (3 groups), parents (3 groups), child caregivers (3…

  8. Examining the Effects of Remote Monitoring Systems on Activation, Self-care, and Quality of Life in Older Patients With Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Lee, Jung-Ah; Moore, Alison A.; Motie, Marjan; Ghasemzadeh, Hassan; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Mangione, Carol M.

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of remote monitoring systems (RMSs) in healthcare has grown exponentially and has improved the accessibility to and ability of patients to engage in treatment intensification. However, research describing the effects of RMSs on activation, self-care, and quality of life (QOL) in older patients with heart failure (HF) is limited. Objective The aim of this study was to compare the effects of a 3-month RMS intervention on activation, self-care, and QOL of older patients versus a reference group matched on age, gender, race, and functional status (ie, New York Heart Association classification) who received standard discharge instructions after an acute episode of HF exacerbation requiring hospitalization. Methods A total of 21 patients (mean age, 72.7 ± 8.9 years; range, 58–83 years; 52.4% women) provided consent and were trained to measure their weight, blood pressure, and heart rate at home with an RMS device and transmit this information every day for 3 months to a centralized information system. The system gathered all data and dispatched alerts when certain clinical conditions were met. Results The baseline sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of the 2 groups were comparable. Over time, participants in the RMS group showed greater improvements in activation, self-care, and QOL compared with their counterparts. Data showed moderately strong associations between increased activation, self-care, and QOL. Conclusion Our preliminary data show that the use of an RMS is feasible and effective in promoting activation, self-care, and QOL. A larger-scale randomized clinical trial is warranted to show that the RMS is a new and effective method for improving clinical management of older adults with chronic HF. PMID:24365871

  9. Using patients’ experiences to identify priorities for quality improvement in breast cancer care: patient narratives, surveys or both?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients’ experiences have become central to assessing the performance of healthcare systems worldwide and are increasingly being used to inform quality improvement processes. This paper explores the relative value of surveys and detailed patient narratives in identifying priorities for improving breast cancer services as part of a quality improvement process. Methods One dataset was collected using a narrative interview approach, (n = 13) and the other using a postal survey (n = 82). Datasets were analyzed separately and then compared to determine whether similar priorities for improving patient experiences were identified. Results There were both similarities and differences in the improvement priorities arising from each approach. Day surgery was specifically identified as a priority in the narrative dataset but included in the survey recommendations only as part of a broader priority around improving inpatient experience. Both datasets identified appointment systems, patients spending enough time with staff, information about treatment and side effects and more information at the end of treatment as priorities. The specific priorities identified by the narrative interviews commonly related to ‘relational’ aspects of patient experience. Those identified by the survey typically related to more ‘functional’ aspects and were not always sufficiently detailed to identify specific improvement actions. Conclusions Our analysis suggests that whilst local survey data may act as a screening tool to identify potential problems within the breast cancer service, they do not always provide sufficient detail of what to do to improve that service. These findings may have wider applicability in other services. We recommend using an initial preliminary survey, with better use of survey open comments, followed by an in-depth qualitative analysis to help deliver improvements to relational and functional aspects of patient experience. PMID:22913525

  10. Quality of health care: the responsibility of health care professionals in delivering high quality services.

    PubMed

    Giangrande, A

    1998-11-01

    According to a recent definition, quality of care consists of the degree to which health services increase the likelihood of desired health outcomes and are consistent with current professional knowledge; a definition that introduces both requirements of outcomes and the appropriateness of the process used. Clearly many different figures are interested in quality assessment initiatives in the health care field and these include patients, administrators and doctors each having different perspective. Doctors obviously pay greater attention to technical quality and results, giving greater emphasis to the health of the individual patient, tending to give priority to technical excellence and interaction between patient and doctor. Although the perspective of health care professionals is widely acknowledged to be important and useful, other perspectives on quality have been emphasised in recent years. The most important of these is the recognition that care must be responsive to the preferences and values of the consumers of health care services. In complete harmony with one's own professional commitment, the attention to the perspectives of patients must give physician the chance to identify methods of measuring and verifying quality which take account of the expectations of the many groups with an interest in improving the functioning of the health system. A global approach in the health field is needed the more specialization advances. The quality of medicine lies in its capacity to integrate what science says is appropriate and to be recommended, what can be reconciled with human rights and the self determination of the patient and what can be achieved by optimising available resources. In this complex context, the doctor could take on both the role of the person who decides on the use of resources and the one of social mediator. PMID:9894749

  11. Health care quality in NHS hospitals.

    PubMed

    Youssef, F N; Nel, D; Bovaird, T

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals provide the same type of service, but they do not all provide the same quality of service. No one knows this better than patients. Reports the results of a market research exercise initiated to ascertain the different factors which patients of health care identify as being necessary to provide error-free service quality in the NHS hospitals. To measure patients' satisfaction with NHS hospitals, the internationally-used market research technique called SERVQUAL was used in order to measure patients' expectations before admission, record their perceptions after discharge from the hospital, and then to close the gap between them. This technique compares expectations with perceptions of service received across five broad dimensions of service quality, namely: tangibility; reliability; responsiveness; assurance; and empathy. This analysis covered 174 patients who had completed the SERVQUAL questionnaire, including patients who had had treatment in surgical, orthopaedic, spinal injury, medicinal, dental and other specialties in the West Midlands region. Recorded the average weighted NHS service quality score overall for the five dimensions as significantly negative.

  12. Health care quality in NHS hospitals.

    PubMed

    Youssef, F N; Nel, D; Bovaird, T

    1996-01-01

    Hospitals provide the same type of service, but they do not all provide the same quality of service. No one knows this better than patients. Reports the results of a market research exercise initiated to ascertain the different factors which patients of health care identify as being necessary to provide error-free service quality in the NHS hospitals. To measure patients' satisfaction with NHS hospitals, the internationally-used market research technique called SERVQUAL was used in order to measure patients' expectations before admission, record their perceptions after discharge from the hospital, and then to close the gap between them. This technique compares expectations with perceptions of service received across five broad dimensions of service quality, namely: tangibility; reliability; responsiveness; assurance; and empathy. This analysis covered 174 patients who had completed the SERVQUAL questionnaire, including patients who had had treatment in surgical, orthopaedic, spinal injury, medicinal, dental and other specialties in the West Midlands region. Recorded the average weighted NHS service quality score overall for the five dimensions as significantly negative. PMID:10156537

  13. Assessing quality of care for African Americans with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Peters, Rosalind M; Benkert, Ramona; Dinardo, Ellen; Templin, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    African Americans bear a disproportionate burden of hypertension. A causal-modeling design, using Donabedian's Quality Framework, tested hypothesized relationships among structure, process, and outcome variables to assess quality of care provided to this population. Structural assessment revealed that administrative and staff organization affected patients' trust in their provider and satisfaction with their care. Interpersonal process factors of racism, cultural mistrust, and trust in providers had a significant effect on satisfaction, and perceived racism had a negative effect on blood pressure (BP). Poorer quality in technical processes of care was associated with higher BP. Findings support the utility of Donabedian's framework for assessing quality of care in a disease-specific population.

  14. Digital subtraction angiography: patient preparation and care.

    PubMed

    Hunt, A H

    1987-08-01

    The use of digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is increasing. Nurses must be prepared to provide quality care to patients who have this relatively new method for radiographically studying the blood vessels. A description of DSA and its applications is provided. Patient preparation, assessment, teaching, and management are described. Complications of the procedure and their management are presented. PMID:2958568

  15. Standardized handoff report form in clinical nursing education: An educational tool for patient safety and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Lim, Fidelindo; Pajarillo, Edmund J Y

    2016-02-01

    Effective change-of-shift handoff communication is a core competency in the generalist education of nurses. The use of a standardized handoff tool that fosters higher order thinking and clinical reasoning is fundamental in clinical education and nursing practice (AACN, 2008). A checklist that prompts students to implement evidence-based safety alerts will increase students' confidence and autonomy, prevent errors, promote patient safety, and successfully transform theoretical learning into competent practice. High-quality handoffs and contextualized post-conference debriefing using key items in the handoff form will help increase students' feelings of precision, accuracy, improve their self-image, and enhance their sense of professional belonging. PMID:26573150

  16. A comparison of the quality of hypertension management in primary care between Shanghai and Shenzhen: a cohort study of 3196 patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Haitao; Wei, Xiaolin; Wong, Martin C; Yang, Nan; Wong, Samuel Y; Lao, Xiangqian; Griffiths, Sian M

    2015-02-01

    Strong primary care is in urgent need for the management and control of hypertension. This study aimed to compare the quality of hypertensive care delivered by community health centers (CHCs) in Shanghai and Shenzhen. Multistage random sampling method was used to select 4 CHCs in each city as study settings. A cohort of hypertensive patients under the hypertensive management program in the CHCs was selected from the electronic information system by using a systematic random sampling method. Binary logistic regression models were constructed for comparison between the 2 cities. A total of 3196 patients' records were assessed. The proportions of hypertensive patients who received advice on smoking cessation (33.8 vs 7.7%, P < 0.001), increasing physical activity (52.4 vs 16.8%, P < 0.001), low-sodium diet (72.0 vs 64.1%, P < 0.001), and regular follow-up (37.8 vs 8.6%, P < 0.001) were higher in Shenzhen than in Shanghai. However, the drug treatment rate in Shenzhen was lower than that in Shanghai (74.2 vs 95.2%, P < 0.001). The hypertension control rate in Shenzhen was lower than that in Shanghai (76.3 vs 83.2%, P < 0.001). Better performance in the process of hypertensive care in terms of increasing physical activity advice, low-sodium diet advice, regular follow-up, and drug prescription was associated with a higher rate of hypertension control. The study indicates that primary care is effective in managing hypertension irrespective of management and operation models of CHCs in urban China. Our study suggests that improvements in the process of hypertensive care may lead to better hypertension control. PMID:25654383

  17. Medication adherence in patients with diabetes mellitus: does physician drug dispensing enhance quality of care? Evidence from a large health claims database in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A; Reich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The drug-dispensing channel is a scarcely explored determinant of medication adherence, which is considered as a key indicator for the quality of care among patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated the difference in adherence between diabetes patients who obtained their medication directly from a prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large health care claims database from 2011 to 2014. Patients with diabetes of all ages and receiving at least one oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) prescription were included. We calculated patients’ individual adherence to OADs defined as the proportion of days covered (PDC), which was measured over 1 year after patient identification. Good adherence was defined as PDC ≥80%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the PDC and the dispensing channel (PD, pharmacy). Results We identified a total of 10,430 patients prescribed drugs by a dispensing physician and 16,292 patients receiving drugs from a pharmacy. Medication adherence was poor in both patient groups: ~40% of the study population attained good adherence to OADs. We found no significant impact of PD on the adherence level in diabetes patients. Covariates associated significantly with good adherence were older age groups, male sex, occurrence of comorbidity and combined diabetes drug therapy. Conclusion In conclusion, adherence to antihyperglycemic medication is suboptimal among patients with diabetes. The results of this study provide evidence that the dispensing channel does not have an impact on adherence in Switzerland. Certainly, medication adherence needs to be improved in both supply settings. Physicians as well as pharmacists are encouraged to develop and implement useful tools to increase patients’ adherence behavior. PMID:27695299

  18. Medication adherence in patients with diabetes mellitus: does physician drug dispensing enhance quality of care? Evidence from a large health claims database in Switzerland

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Carola A; Reich, Oliver

    2016-01-01

    Background The drug-dispensing channel is a scarcely explored determinant of medication adherence, which is considered as a key indicator for the quality of care among patients with diabetes mellitus. In this study, we investigated the difference in adherence between diabetes patients who obtained their medication directly from a prescribing physician (physician dispensing [PD]) or via a pharmacy. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted using a large health care claims database from 2011 to 2014. Patients with diabetes of all ages and receiving at least one oral antidiabetic drug (OAD) prescription were included. We calculated patients’ individual adherence to OADs defined as the proportion of days covered (PDC), which was measured over 1 year after patient identification. Good adherence was defined as PDC ≥80%. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to assess the relationship between the PDC and the dispensing channel (PD, pharmacy). Results We identified a total of 10,430 patients prescribed drugs by a dispensing physician and 16,292 patients receiving drugs from a pharmacy. Medication adherence was poor in both patient groups: ~40% of the study population attained good adherence to OADs. We found no significant impact of PD on the adherence level in diabetes patients. Covariates associated significantly with good adherence were older age groups, male sex, occurrence of comorbidity and combined diabetes drug therapy. Conclusion In conclusion, adherence to antihyperglycemic medication is suboptimal among patients with diabetes. The results of this study provide evidence that the dispensing channel does not have an impact on adherence in Switzerland. Certainly, medication adherence needs to be improved in both supply settings. Physicians as well as pharmacists are encouraged to develop and implement useful tools to increase patients’ adherence behavior.

  19. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure ( zhǐ yā) with valerian ( xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint ( xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1-1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate ( shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella ( yìn táng), Wind Pool ( fēng chí), and Gushing Spring ( yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night. PMID:26587395

  20. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure (指壓 zhǐ yā) with valerian (纈草 xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint (穴位 xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1–1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate (神門 shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella (印堂 yìn táng), Wind Pool (風池 fēng chí), and Gushing Spring (湧泉 yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night. PMID:26587395

  1. Effect of acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome in a cardiac intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Gorji, Mohammad Ali Heidari; Rezaie, Somayeh; Pouresmail, Zahra; Cherati, Jamshid Yazdani

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this three-group double-blind clinical trial study was to investigate the effect of acupressure ( zhǐ yā) with valerian ( xié cǎo) oil 2.5% on the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in a coronary intensive care unit (CCU). This study was conducted on 90 patients with ACS in Mazandaran Heart Center (Sari, Iran) during 2013. The patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups. Patients in the acupressure with valerian oil 2.5% group (i.e., valerian acupressure group) received bilateral acupoint ( xué wèi) massage with two drops of valerian oil for 2 minutes for three nights; including every point this treatment lasted in total 18 minutes. Patients in the acupressure group received massage at the same points with the same technique but without valerian oil. Patients in the control group received massage at points that were 1-1.5 cm from the main points using the same technique and for the same length of time. The quality and quantity of the patients' sleep was measured by the St. Mary's Hospital Sleep Questionnaire (SMHSQ). After the intervention, there was a significant difference between sleep quality and sleep quantity in the patients in the valerian acupressure group and the acupressure group, compared to the control group (p < 0.05). Patients that received acupressure with valerian oil experienced improved sleep quality; however, this difference was not statistically significant in comparison to the acupressure only group. Acupressure at the ear spirit gate ( shén mén), hand Shenmen, glabella ( yìn táng), Wind Pool ( fēng chí), and Gushing Spring ( yǒng quán) acupoints can have therapeutic effects and may improve the quality and quantity of sleep in patients with ACS. Using these techniques in combination with herbal medicines such valerian oil can have a greater impact on improving sleep and reducing waking during the night.

  2. Monitoring Quality of Nursing Care

    PubMed Central

    Haussmann, R. K. Dieter; Hegyvary, Sue Thomas; Newman, John F.; Bishop, Annelle C.

    1974-01-01

    The first phase of a cooperative project to develop and pilot-test an improved system for monitoring the quality of nursing care is described. Evaluation criteria from existing methodologies were grouped in a comprehensive framework of nursing objectives and subobjectives, and both the framework and the criteria developed were tested statistically. The master criteria list was placed in a computer file, from which criteria subsets are systematically selected for actual quality monitoring. The methodology has been used in two pilot hospitals; in the second phase of the project, now under way, the system is being implemented in a wider sample of hospitals to further test the validity of the conceptual framework and the reliability of individual criteria. PMID:4414709

  3. Put a Face to a Name (Part A): The Effects of Photographic Aids on Patient Satisfaction, Clinician Communication, and Quality of Care

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-04

    Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Patient Recall of Their Clinical Care Team; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Clinician-patient Communication; Effects of Photographic Aids (Photos of Faces) on Overall Patient Satisfaction

  4. Faecal incontinence and health related quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Findings from a tertiary care center in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Subasinghe, Duminda; Navarathna, Navarathna Mudiyanselage Meththananda; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu Nandadeva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the frequency and severity of faecal incontinence (FI) and its effect on the quality of life (QOL) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All patients who attended surgical and medical gastroenterology outpatient clinics in a tertiary care center with an established diagnosis of either ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) over a period of 10 mo were included in this study. Before enrollment into the study, the patients were explained about the study and informed consent was obtained. The patients with unidentified colitis were excluded. The data on demographics, disease characteristics, FI (Vaizey score), and quality of life (IBD-Q) were collected. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. RESULTS: There were 184 patients (women = 101, 54.9%; UC = 153, 83.2%) with a female preponderance for UC (male/female ratio = 1:1.5) and a male preponderance for CD (male/female = 2:1). Forty-eight (26%) patients reported symptoms of FI. Among the patients with FI, 70.8% were women (n = 34) and 29.2% were men (n = 14) with an average age of 52.7 years (range, 20-78 years). Average age of onset of FI was 48.6 (range, 22-74) years. Ten percent (n = 5) reported regular FI. Incontinence to flatus was seen in 33.3% (n = 16), to liquid faeces in 56.2% (n = 27), to solid faeces in 6.2% (n = 3) and to all three in 4.1% (n = 2). Twenty-one percent (n = 10) complained of disruption of their physical and social activity. There was no association between FI and type of IBD. Significant associations were found between FI and age (P = 0.005) and gender (P < 0.001). QOL in our cohort of patients was significantly affected by FI. CONCLUSION: In our study, nearly a quarter of patients reported FI. There was a significant correlation between FI and QOL. Therefore, enquiring about FI in IBD patients can lead to identification of this debilitating condition. This will enable early referral for continence care in this group of patients.

  5. Faecal incontinence and health related quality of life in inflammatory bowel disease patients: Findings from a tertiary care center in South Asia

    PubMed Central

    Subasinghe, Duminda; Navarathna, Navarathna Mudiyanselage Meththananda; Samarasekera, Dharmabandhu Nandadeva

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the frequency and severity of faecal incontinence (FI) and its effect on the quality of life (QOL) in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) patients. METHODS: All patients who attended surgical and medical gastroenterology outpatient clinics in a tertiary care center with an established diagnosis of either ulcerative colitis (UC) or Crohn’s disease (CD) over a period of 10 mo were included in this study. Before enrollment into the study, the patients were explained about the study and informed consent was obtained. The patients with unidentified colitis were excluded. The data on demographics, disease characteristics, FI (Vaizey score), and quality of life (IBD-Q) were collected. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 21. RESULTS: There were 184 patients (women = 101, 54.9%; UC = 153, 83.2%) with a female preponderance for UC (male/female ratio = 1:1.5) and a male preponderance for CD (male/female = 2:1). Forty-eight (26%) patients reported symptoms of FI. Among the patients with FI, 70.8% were women (n = 34) and 29.2% were men (n = 14) with an average age of 52.7 years (range, 20-78 years). Average age of onset of FI was 48.6 (range, 22-74) years. Ten percent (n = 5) reported regular FI. Incontinence to flatus was seen in 33.3% (n = 16), to liquid faeces in 56.2% (n = 27), to solid faeces in 6.2% (n = 3) and to all three in 4.1% (n = 2). Twenty-one percent (n = 10) complained of disruption of their physical and social activity. There was no association between FI and type of IBD. Significant associations were found between FI and age (P = 0.005) and gender (P < 0.001). QOL in our cohort of patients was significantly affected by FI. CONCLUSION: In our study, nearly a quarter of patients reported FI. There was a significant correlation between FI and QOL. Therefore, enquiring about FI in IBD patients can lead to identification of this debilitating condition. This will enable early referral for continence care in this group of patients. PMID:27602247

  6. Five Policies to Promote Palliative Care for Patients with ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Diane E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Patients with ESRD experience complex and costly care that does not always meet their needs. Palliative care, which focuses on improving quality of life and relieving suffering for patients with serious illnesses, could address a large unmet need among patients with ESRD. Strengthening palliative care is a top policy priority for health reform efforts based on strong evidence that palliative care improves value. This commentary outlines palliative care policies for patients with ESRD and is directed at policymakers, dialysis providers, nephrology professional societies, accreditation organizations, and funding agencies who play a key role in the delivery and determination of quality of ESRD care. Herein we suggest policies to promote palliative care for patients with ESRD by addressing key barriers, including the lack of access to palliative care, lack of capacity to deliver palliative care, and a limited evidence base. We also provide examples of how these policies could be implemented within the existing ESRD care infrastructure. PMID:23744000

  7. Five policies to promote palliative care for patients with ESRD.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Manjula Kurella; Meier, Diane E

    2013-10-01

    Patients with ESRD experience complex and costly care that does not always meet their needs. Palliative care, which focuses on improving quality of life and relieving suffering for patients with serious illnesses, could address a large unmet need among patients with ESRD. Strengthening palliative care is a top policy priority for health reform efforts based on strong evidence that palliative care improves value. This commentary outlines palliative care policies for patients with ESRD and is directed at policymakers, dialysis providers, nephrology professional societies, accreditation organizations, and funding agencies who play a key role in the delivery and determination of quality of ESRD care. Herein we suggest policies to promote palliative care for patients with ESRD by addressing key barriers, including the lack of access to palliative care, lack of capacity to deliver palliative care, and a limited evidence base. We also provide examples of how these policies could be implemented within the existing ESRD care infrastructure. PMID:23744000

  8. Quality assurance in the ambulatory care setting.

    PubMed

    Tyler, R D

    1989-01-01

    One of the most utilitarian developments in the field of quality assurance in health care has been the introduction of industrial concepts of quality management. These concepts, coupled with buyer demand for accountability, are bringing new perspectives to health care quality assurance. These perspectives provide a new view of quality assurance as a major responsibility and strategic opportunity for management; a competitive and marketable commodity; and a method of improving safety, effectiveness, and satisfaction with medical care.

  9. Strategic service quality management for health care.

    PubMed

    Anderson, E A; Zwelling, L A

    1996-01-01

    Quality management has become one of the most important and most debated topics within the service sector. This is especially true for health care, as the controversy rages on how the existing American system should be restructured. Health care reform aimed at reducing costs and ensuring access to all Americans cannot be allowed to jeopardize the quality of care. As such, total quality management (TQM) has become a vital ingredient to strategic planning within the health care domain. At the heart of any such quality improvement effort is the issue of measurement. TQM cannot be effectively utilized as a competitive weapon unless quality can be accurately defined, measured, evaluated, and monitored over time. Through such analysis a hospital can elect how to expend its limited resources toward those quality improvement projects which will impact customer perceptions of service quality the most. Thus, the purpose of this report is to establish a framework by which to approach the issue of quality measurement, delineate the various components of quality that exist in health care, and explore how these elements affect one another. We propose that the issue of quality measurement in health care be approached as an integration of service quality attributes common to other service organizations and technical quality attributes unique to health care. We hope that this research will serve as a first step toward the synthesis of the various quality attributes inherent in the health care domain and encourage other researchers to address the interactions of the various quality attributes. PMID:8763215

  10. 'Busyness' and the preclusion of quality palliative district nursing care.

    PubMed

    Nagington, Maurice; Luker, Karen; Walshe, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Ethical care is beginning to be recognised as care that accounts for the views of those at the receiving end of care. However, in the context of palliative and supportive district nursing care, the patients' and their carers' views are seldom heard. This qualitative research study explores these views. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with 26 patients with palliative and supportive care needs receiving district nursing care, and 13 of their carers. Participants were recruited via community nurses and hospices between September 2010 and October 2011. Post-structural discourse analysis is used to examine how discourses operate on a moral level. One discourse, 'busyness', is argued to preclude a moral form of nursing care. The discourse of friendship is presented to contrast this. Discussion explores Gallagher's 'slow ethics' and challenges the currently accepted ways of measuring to improve quality of care concluding that quality cannot be measured.

  11. Standards of care for patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Abad, Miguel Ángel; Ariza, Rafael Ariza; Aznar, Juan José; Batlle, Enrique; Beltrán, Emma; de Dios Cañete, Juan; de Miguel, Eugenio; Escudero, Alejandro; Fernández-Carballido, Cristina; Gratacós, Jordi; Loza, Estíbaliz; Linares, Luis Francisco; Montilla, Carlos; Ramos, Manuel Moreno; Mulero, Juan; Queiro, Rubén; Raya, Enrique; Lozano, Carlos Rodríguez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Sanz, Jesús; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos; Zarco, Pedro; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Juanola, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    To define and give priory to standards of care in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). A systematic literature review on SpA standards of care and a specific search in relevant and related sources was performed. An expert panel was established who developed the standards of care and graded their priority (high, mild, low, or no priority) following qualitative methodology and Delphi process. An electronic survey was sent to a representative sample of 167 rheumatologists all around the country, who also gave priority to the standards of care (same scale). A descriptive analysis is presented. The systematic literature review retrieved no article specifically related to SpA patients. A total of 38 standards of care were obtained-12 related to structure, 20 to process, and 6 to result. Access to care, treatment, and safety standards of care were given a high priority by most of rheumatologists. Standards not directly connected to daily practice were not given such priority, as standards which included a time framework. The standards generated for the performance evaluation (including patient and professionals satisfaction) were not considered especially important in general. This set of standards of care should help improve the quality of care in SpA patients.

  12. Standards of care for patients with spondyloarthritis.

    PubMed

    Abad, Miguel Ángel; Ariza, Rafael Ariza; Aznar, Juan José; Batlle, Enrique; Beltrán, Emma; de Dios Cañete, Juan; de Miguel, Eugenio; Escudero, Alejandro; Fernández-Carballido, Cristina; Gratacós, Jordi; Loza, Estíbaliz; Linares, Luis Francisco; Montilla, Carlos; Ramos, Manuel Moreno; Mulero, Juan; Queiro, Rubén; Raya, Enrique; Lozano, Carlos Rodríguez; Moreno, Jesús Rodríguez; Sanz, Jesús; Silva-Fernández, Lucía; Torre Alonso, Juan Carlos; Zarco, Pedro; Fernández-Sueiro, José Luis; Juanola, Xavier

    2014-02-01

    To define and give priory to standards of care in patients with spondyloarthritis (SpA). A systematic literature review on SpA standards of care and a specific search in relevant and related sources was performed. An expert panel was established who developed the standards of care and graded their priority (high, mild, low, or no priority) following qualitative methodology and Delphi process. An electronic survey was sent to a representative sample of 167 rheumatologists all around the country, who also gave priority to the standards of care (same scale). A descriptive analysis is presented. The systematic literature review retrieved no article specifically related to SpA patients. A total of 38 standards of care were obtained-12 related to structure, 20 to process, and 6 to result. Access to care, treatment, and safety standards of care were given a high priority by most of rheumatologists. Standards not directly connected to daily practice were not given such priority, as standards which included a time framework. The standards generated for the performance evaluation (including patient and professionals satisfaction) were not considered especially important in general. This set of standards of care should help improve the quality of care in SpA patients. PMID:24390635

  13. Quality of Care: A National Sample.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Monica

    This survey of 25 day care centers in 5 regions of Italy was designed to determine the characteristics of competent centers and the effects of differing local regulations on the quality of care provided. The Infant and Toddler Environment Rating Scale (ITERS) and a questionnaire were utilized to assess the quality of the day care centers in the…

  14. Comprehensive care of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a care model.

    PubMed

    Güell, Maria Rosa; Antón, Antonio; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Puy, Carmen; Pradas, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that presents with muscle weakness, causing progressive difficulty in movement, communication, eating and ultimately, breathing, creating a growing dependence on family members and other carers. The ideal way to address the problems associated with the disease, and the decisions that must be taken, is through multidisciplinary teams. The key objectives of these teams are to optimise medical care, facilitate communication between team members, and thus to improve the quality of care. In our centre, we have extensive experience in the care of patients with ALS through an interdisciplinary team whose aim is to ensure proper patient care from the hospital to the home setting. In this article, we describe the components of the team, their roles and our way of working.

  15. Comprehensive care of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients: a care model.

    PubMed

    Güell, Maria Rosa; Antón, Antonio; Rojas-García, Ricardo; Puy, Carmen; Pradas, Jesus

    2013-12-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating neurodegenerative disease that presents with muscle weakness, causing progressive difficulty in movement, communication, eating and ultimately, breathing, creating a growing dependence on family members and other carers. The ideal way to address the problems associated with the disease, and the decisions that must be taken, is through multidisciplinary teams. The key objectives of these teams are to optimise medical care, facilitate communication between team members, and thus to improve the quality of care. In our centre, we have extensive experience in the care of patients with ALS through an interdisciplinary team whose aim is to ensure proper patient care from the hospital to the home setting. In this article, we describe the components of the team, their roles and our way of working. PMID:23540596

  16. Marketing quality and value to the managed care market.

    PubMed

    Kazmirski, G

    1998-11-01

    Quantifying quality and marketing care delivery have been long-term challenges in the health care market. Insurers, employers, other purchasers of care, and providers face a constant challenge in positioning their organizations in a proactive, competitive niche. Tools that measure patient's self-reported perception of health care needs and expectations have increased the ability to quantify quality of care delivery. When integrated with case management and disease management strategies, outcomes reporting and variance analysis tracking can be packaged to position a provider in a competitive niche.

  17. Patient perspectives on the promptness and quality of care of road traffic incident victims in Peru: a cross-sectional, active surveillance study

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, J Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Background: Road injuries are the second-leading cause of disease and injury in the Andean region of South America. Adequate management of road traffic crash victims is important to prevent and reduce deaths and serious long-term injuries. Objective: To evaluate the promptness of health care services provided to those injured in road traffic incidents (RTIs) and the satisfaction with those services during the pre-hospital and hospital periods. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study with active surveillance to recruit participants in emergency departments at eight health care facilities in three Peruvian cities: a large metropolitan city (Lima) and two provincial cities (an urban center in the southern Andes and an urban center in the rainforest region), between August and September 2009. The main outcomes of interest were promptness of care, measured by time between injury and each service offered, as well as patient satisfaction measured by the Service Quality (SERVQUAL) survey. We explored the association between outcomes and city, type of health care facility (HCF), and type of provider. Results: We recruited 644 adults seeking care for RTIs. This active surveillance strategy yielded 34% more events than anticipated, suggesting under-reporting in traditional registries. Median response time between a RTI and any care at a HCF was 33 minutes overall and only 62% of participants received professional care during the initial “golden” hour after the RTI. After adjustment for various factors, there was strong evidence of higher global dissatisfaction levels among those receiving care at public HCFs compared to private ones (odds ratio (OR) 5.05, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.88-13.54). This difference was not observed when provincial sites were compared to Lima (OR 1.41, 95% CI 0.42-4.70). Conclusions: Response time to RTIs was adequate overall, though a large proportion of RTI victims could have received more prompt care. Overall, dissatisfaction was

  18. What are purchasers looking for in managed care quality?

    PubMed

    Lipson, E H

    1993-01-01

    Spurred by competition and the growth of managed care, providers are seeking new approaches for satisfying the needs of health care purchases. Increasingly, these purchasers are focusing on the value of managed care arrangements, especially the degree to which they manage quality. Underlying the emerging focus on quality are concerns about "undercare," potential legal liability, and the economics of quality. Purchasers are sensitive to the quality of service and the experience of their patients, as well as the clinical quality of the care they receive, and many employers are now engaged in a systematic effort to assess both of these dimensions of quality. The emergence of national data banks, practice standards, and accreditation programs offers additional tools for strengthening provider accountability for quality.

  19. 77 FR 42738 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Coalition for Quality and Patient...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-20

    ... confidential information regarding the quality and safety of health care delivery. The Patient Safety and... activities to improve patient safety and the quality of health care delivery. HHS issued the Patient Safety... HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations:......

  20. [Team Care and Patient Safety].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Michio

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of patient safety management is to nurture an environment which provides optimal care for each patient through the cooperation of each healthcare staff member based on the idea of team care. This is based on the safety culture of an organization that places value on sharing information. Laboratory medicine is expected to become more important in the areas of staff, patient, and community education.

  1. A nurse practitioner patient care team: implications for pediatric oncology.

    PubMed

    Golden, Julia Rose

    2014-01-01

    The role of the pediatric advanced practice registered nurse continues to evolve within the ever-changing field of health care. In response to increased demand for health care services and because of a variety of changes in the health care delivery system, nurse practitioner patient care teams are an emerging trend in acute care settings. Care provided by nurse practitioner teams has been shown to be effective, efficient, and comprehensive. In addition to shorter hospital stays and reduced costs, nurse practitioner teams offer increased quality and continuity of care, and improved patient satisfaction. Nurse practitioner patient care teams are well suited to the field of pediatric oncology, as patients would benefit from care provided by specialized clinicians with a holistic focus. This article provides health care professionals with information about the use of nurse practitioner patient care teams and implications for use in pediatric oncology.

  2. HCFA's health care quality improvement program: the medical informatics challenge.

    PubMed Central

    Grant, J B; Hayes, R P; Pates, R D; Elward, K S; Ballard, D J

    1996-01-01

    The peer-review organizations (PROs) were created by Congress in 1984 to monitor the cost and quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. In order to do this, the Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) contracted with the PROs through a series of contracts referred to as "Scopes of Work." Under the Fourth Scope of Work, the HCFA initiated the Health Care Quality Improvement Program (HCQIP) in 1990, as an application of the principles of continuous quality improvement. Since then, the PROs have participated with health care providers in cooperative projects to improve the quality of primarily inpatient care provided to Medicare beneficiaries. Through HCFA-supplied administrative data and clinical data abstracted from patient records, the PROs have been able to identify opportunities for improvements in patient care. In May 1995, the HCFA proposed a new Fifth Scope of Work, which will shift the focus of HCQIP from inpatient care projects to projects in outpatient and managed care settings. This article describes the HCQIP process, the types of data used by the PROs to conduct cooperative projects with health care providers, and the informatics challenges in improving the quality of care received by Medicare beneficiaries. PMID:8750387

  3. African Primary Care Research: Quality improvement cycles

    PubMed Central

    Mash, Bob

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Improving the quality of clinical care and translating evidence into clinical practice is commonly a focus of primary care research. This article is part of a series on primary care research and outlines an approach to performing a quality improvement cycle as part of a research assignment at a Masters level. The article aims to help researchers design their quality improvement cycle and write their research project proposal. PMID:26245438

  4. Parkinson patients as partners in care.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Mark A; Sanjak, Mohammed; Englert, Danielle; Iyer, Sanjay; Quinlan, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    Increasing physical activity, as part of an active lifestyle, is an important health goal for individuals with Parkinson's disease (PD). Exercise can positively impact health related quality of life. Given this, how can we promote physically active lifestyles among PD patients (most of whom are sedentary)? Here we suggest that health care professionals could significantly expand their impact by collaborating with PD patients and their spouses (or caregivers) as partners-in-care. We outline reasons why partners-in-care approaches are important in PD, including the need to increase social capital, which deals with issues of trust and the value of social networks in linking members of a community. We then present results of a qualitative study involving partners-in-care exercise beliefs among 19 PD patients and spouses, and conclude with our perspective on future benefits of this approach. PMID:24262175

  5. Critical paths: maximizing patient care coordination.

    PubMed

    Spath, P L

    1995-01-01

    1. With today's emphasis on horizontal and vertical integration of patient care services and the new initiatives prompted by these challenges, OR nurses are considering new methods for managing the perioperative period. One such method is the critical path. 2. A critical path defines an optimal sequencing and timing of interventions by physicians, nurses, and other staff members for a particular diagnosis or procedure, designed to better use resources, maximize quality of care, and minimize delays. 3. Hospitals implementing path-based patient care have reported cost reductions and improved team-work. Critical paths have been shown to reduce patient care costs by improving hospital efficiency, not merely by reducing physician practice variations.

  6. Education in stroke: strategies to improve stroke patient care.

    PubMed

    Gompertz, Patrick; Slack, Andrew; Vogel, Mira; Burrows, Sharon; Clark, Philippa

    2002-07-01

    'Stroke units save lives', but organized care requires expert staff and regular training to be effective. However, the quality of inpatient care for stroke remains poor, and stroke education is often fragmented between the health-care professions. This review describes some national and local strategies aimed at ensuring that all patients are cared for by expert staff.

  7. [The patient pathway, an essential element of the care project].

    PubMed

    Despiau, Frédéric; Bombail, Marie; Le Duff, Gérard; Peoc'h, Nadia; Labatut, Raymonde; Ceaux, Christine

    2015-05-01

    Constructing an innovative care project in oncology, common to two healthcare institutions with different statuses, was a challenge for the directors of nursing of the Claudius-Regaud Institute and Toulouse university hospital. The patient care pathway was a major organisational element of the project, keyto ensuring high quality patient care, from the diagnosis through to the personalised post-cancer plan. PMID:26126375

  8. Total quality in acute care hospitals: guidelines for hospital managers.

    PubMed

    Holthof, B

    1991-08-01

    Quality improvement can not focus exclusively on peer review and the scientific evaluation of medical care processes. These essential elements have to be complemented with a focus on individual patient needs and preferences. Only then will hospitals create the competitive advantage needed to survive in an increasingly market-driven hospital industry. Hospital managers can identify these patients' needs by 'living the patient experience' and should then set the hospital's quality objectives according to its target patients and their needs. Excellent quality program design, however, is not sufficient. Successful implementation of a quality improvement program further requires fundamental changes in pivotal jobholders' behavior and mindset and in the supporting organizational design elements.

  9. Promoting Patient- and Family-Centered Care Through Personal Stories.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Beverley H

    2016-03-01

    Patient- and family-centered care is an approach to the planning, delivery, and evaluation of health care that is grounded in mutually beneficial partnerships among patients, their families, and health care professionals. It redefines the relationships in health care by placing an emphasis on collaborating with patients of all ages, and their families, at all levels of care, in all health care settings, and in organizational change and improvement. This collaboration ensures that health care is responsive to an individual's priorities, preferences, and values. In patient- and family-centered care, patients define their "family" and determine how they and their family will participate in care and decision making. While patient- and family-centered care can improve the experience of care, safety, and quality, it also can improve the learning environment for students and trainees. The author shares personal stories to illustrate the core concepts of patient- and family-centered care, when they are present in health care interactions, and when they are not. Drawing from these stories and the author's experience in working with academic medical centers and other health care organizations over many decades, recommendations for changes in medical education are suggested that can contribute to the development of a health care workforce with the skills and commitment to partner respectfully, effectively, and authentically with patients and families. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act gives new impetus for building a health care delivery system and related educational programs to support patient- and family-centered practice. PMID:26796094

  10. Better Quality of Care or Healthier Patients? Hospital Utilization by Medicare Advantage and Fee-for-Service Enrollees.

    PubMed

    Nicholas, Lauren Hersch

    2013-05-15

    Do differences in rates of use among managed care and Fee-for-Service Medicare beneficiaries reflect selection bias or successful care management by insurers? I demonstrate a new method to estimate the treatment effect of insurance status on health care utilization. Using clinical information and risk-adjustment techniques on data on acute admission that are unrelated to recent medical care, I create a proxy measure of unobserved health status. I find that positive selection accounts for between one-quarter and one-third of the risk-adjusted differences in rates of hospitalization for ambulatory care sensitive conditions and elective procedures among Medicare managed care and Fee-for-Service enrollees in 7 years of Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases from Arizona, Florida, New Jersey and New York matched to Medicare enrollment data. Beyond selection effects, I find that managed care plans reduce rates of potentially preventable hospitalizations by 12.5 per 1,000 enrollees (compared to mean of 46 per 1,000) and reduce annual rates of elective admissions by 4 per 1,000 enrollees (mean 18.6 per 1,000).

  11. Electronic Symptom Reporting Between Patient and Provider for Improved Health Care Service Quality: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials. Part 1: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Henriksen, Eva; Horsch, Alexander; Schuster, Tibor; Berntsen, Gro K Rosvold

    2012-01-01

    Background Over the last two decades, the number of studies on electronic symptom reporting has increased greatly. However, the field is very heterogeneous: the choices of patient groups, health service innovations, and research targets seem to involve a broad range of foci. To move the field forward, it is necessary to build on work that has been done and direct further research to the areas holding most promise. Therefore, we conducted a comprehensive review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) focusing on electronic communication between patient and provider to improve health care service quality, presented in two parts. Part 2 investigates the methodological quality and effects of the RCTs, and demonstrates some promising benefits of electronic symptom reporting. Objective To give a comprehensive overview of the most mature part of this emerging field regarding (1) patient groups, (2) health service innovations, and (3) research targets relevant to electronic symptom reporting. Methods We searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, and IEEE Xplore for original studies presented in English-language articles published from 1990 to November 2011. Inclusion criteria were RCTs of interventions where patients or parents reported health information electronically to the health care system for health care purposes and were given feedback. Results Of 642 records identified, we included 32 articles representing 29 studies. The included articles were published from 2002, with 24 published during the last 5 years. The following five patient groups were represented: respiratory and lung diseases (12 studies), cancer (6), psychiatry (6), cardiovascular (3), and diabetes (1). In addition to these, 1 study had a mix of three groups. All included studies, except 1, focused on long-term conditions. We identified four categories of health service innovations: consultation support (7 studies), monitoring with clinician support (12), self

  12. Assuring Quality Health Care in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Letvak, Susan; Rhew, Denise

    2015-01-01

    The provision of quality healthcare is an international mandate. The provision of quality healthcare for mental health patients poses unique challenges. Nowhere is this challenge greater than in the emergency department. The purpose of this manuscript is to describe evidence-based initiatives for improving the quality of care of mental health patients in the emergency department. Specifically, the use of telepsychiatry and reducing provider biases will be presented. PMID:27417792

  13. Is health care ready for Six Sigma quality?

    PubMed

    Chassin, M R

    1998-01-01

    Serious, widespread problems exist in the quality of U.S. health care: too many patients are exposed to the risks of unnecessary services; opportunities to use effective care are missed; and preventable errors lead to injuries. Advanced practitioners of industrial quality management, like Motorola and General Electric, have committed themselves to reducing the frequency of defects in their business processes to fewer than 3.4 per million, a strategy known as Six Sigma Quality. In health care, quality problems frequently occur at rates of 20 to 50 percent, or 200,000 to 500,000 per million. In order to approach Six Sigma levels of quality, the health care sector must address the underlying causes of error and make important changes: adopting new educational models; devising strategies to increase consumer awareness; and encouraging public and private investment in quality improvement.

  14. Quality of care and quality of life: convergence or divergence?

    PubMed

    Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients' quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy

  15. The transition from 'informed patient' care to 'patient informed' care.

    PubMed

    Gardiner, Ruth

    2008-01-01

    We are in the midst of a real change in the application of information technology to support the delivery of healthcare. We are seeing a shift from the 'informed patient' which has resulted from improved access to healthcare information, primarily from the Web, to the 'participative patient' as we move into Web 2.0 territory. The last decade has seen significant strides in the application of healthcare information to support patient care including: Increased access to healthcare related information by the patient through access to healthcare information on the Web (1.0). The development of electronic patient/health records. Improved access to knowledge for care professionals has enabled the dissipation of professional clinical skills with the introduction of nurse practitioners and increased use of therapies. Improved access to patient related information across disciplines is beginning to enable the shift from acute based to community based care. The introduction of home care technologies has enabled self monitoring in supporting self care. There are also developments in the way care is provided with an increasing diversity of healthcare providers with the challenges this has presented in exchanging patient related information to support continuity of care. We are now at another major turning point that could present greater challenges for healthcare professionals, organisations and the patient or client. These developments include: The application of information sharing services commonly referred to as Web 2.0. As a result we are seeing a transition from the 'informed patient' to the 'participative patient' that will present increasing challenges for healthcare professionals and healthcare organisations in adapting care to embrace this evolution. New entrants to the ehealth market are now emerging such as Google and Microsoft who are competing to 'own' the 'healthcare consumer'. Open source solutions for EPR/EHRs are now emerging that will challenge the

  16. Value Based Care and Patient-Centered Care: Divergent or Complementary?

    PubMed

    Tseng, Eric K; Hicks, Lisa K

    2016-08-01

    Two distinct but overlapping care philosophies have emerged in cancer care: patient-centered care (PCC) and value-based care (VBC). Value in healthcare has been defined as the quality of care (measured typically by healthcare outcomes) modified by cost. In this conception of value, patient-centeredness is one important but not necessarily dominant quality measure. In contrast, PCC includes multiple domains of patient-centeredness and places the patient and family central to all decisions and evaluations of quality. The alignment of PCC and VBC is complicated by several tensions, including a relative lack of patient experience and preference measures, and conceptions of cost that are payer-focused instead of patient-focused. Several strategies may help to align these two philosophies, including the use of patient-reported outcomes in clinical trials and value determinations, and the purposeful integration of patient preference in clinical decisions and guidelines. Innovative models of care, including accountable care organizations and oncology patient-centered medical homes, may also facilitate alignment through improved care coordination and quality-based payment incentives. Ultimately, VBC and PCC will only be aligned if patient-centered outcomes, perspectives, and preferences are explicitly incorporated into the definitions and metrics of quality, cost, and value that will increasingly influence the delivery of cancer care.

  17. Consumer Participation in Quality Improvements for Chronic Disease Care: Development and Evaluation of an Interactive Patient-Centered Survey to Identify Preferred Service Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Christine L; Bryant, Jamie; Roos, Ian A; Henskens, Frans A; Paul, David J

    2014-01-01

    Background With increasing attention given to the quality of chronic disease care, a measurement approach that empowers consumers to participate in improving quality of care and enables health services to systematically introduce patient-centered initiatives is needed. A Web-based survey with complex adaptive questioning and interactive survey items would allow consumers to easily identify and prioritize detailed service initiatives. Objective The aim was to develop and test a Web-based survey capable of identifying and prioritizing patient-centered initiatives in chronic disease outpatient services. Testing included (1) test-retest reliability, (2) patient-perceived acceptability of the survey content and delivery mode, and (3) average completion time, completion rates, and Flesch-Kincaid reading score. Methods In Phase I, the Web-based Consumer Preferences Survey was developed based on a structured literature review and iterative feedback from expert groups of service providers and consumers. The touchscreen survey contained 23 general initiatives, 110 specific initiatives available through adaptive questioning, and a relative prioritization exercise. In Phase II, a pilot study was conducted within 4 outpatient clinics to evaluate the reliability properties, patient-perceived acceptability, and feasibility of the survey. Eligible participants were approached to complete the survey while waiting for an appointment or receiving intravenous therapy. The age and gender of nonconsenters was estimated to ascertain consent bias. Participants with a subsequent appointment within 14 days were asked to complete the survey for a second time. Results A total of 741 of 1042 individuals consented to participate (71.11% consent), 529 of 741 completed all survey content (78.9% completion), and 39 of 68 completed the test-retest component. Substantial or moderate reliability (Cohen’s kappa>0.4) was reported for 16 of 20 general initiatives with observed percentage agreement

  18. Assessing patient care in palliative care using the healthcare matrix.

    PubMed

    Arthur, Joseph; Kwon, Jung Hye; Reddy, Suresh; Quinn, Doris C; Bruera, Eduardo; Hui, David

    2013-08-01

    The healthcare matrix is a novel assessment tool that facilitates systematic examination of patient cases using criteria established by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the Institute of Medicine. It is particularly useful for analyzing complex cases, although its use in the palliative care setting has not been documented. We describe here the use of the healthcare matrix to examine the healthcare encounters of a 63 year-old patient with advanced cancer. The healthcare matrix helped us to dissect the physical, psychosocial, logistical, professional, and ethical aspects of care, and to highlight multiple opportunities for quality improvement. In addition to the case example we will be discussing the advantages and disadvantages for using the healthcare matrix and its potential utility in palliative care.

  19. Patient care: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Robert

    The 40 years since St Christopher's Hospice opened has witnessed a burgeoning international interest in palliative care. Its key characteristics comprise a focus on the whole-person (physical, psychological, social, and spiritual), patient-centeredness (partnership with and empowerment of the patient and family), openness and honesty in communication, an acceptance of the inevitability of death coupled with improvement in the quality of life, multi-professional teamwork integrated with community (volunteer) involvement. Although much has been achieved, much remains to be done. Both in resource-poor countries and in more wealthy ones, the scope of palliative care has changed. Initially in the United Kingdom, palliative care was mostly limited to cancer patients but now strenuous efforts are being made to extend coverage to other patient groups, e.g., those with end-stage heart disease or renal failure. In India, with a dearth of chronic care facilities, palliative care services increasingly embrace those with chronic disability as well as progressive end-stage disease. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the devastating impact of AIDS is having a major impact on the development and delivery of palliative care. To maximize the benefits of limited financial and other resources, a strategic approach is necessary. The World Health Organization emphasizes three essential foundation measures: health service policy, public awareness and professional education, and drug availability. However, at the end of the day, if we are truly to honor Cicely Saunders, palliative care must remain a movement with momentum, combining creative charisma with inevitable bureaucratic routinization.

  20. Classification of Patient Care Complexity: Cloud Technology.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira Riboldi, Caren; Macedo, Andrea Barcellos Teixeira; Mergen, Thiane; Dias, Vera Lúcia Mendes; da Costa, Diovane Ghignatti; Malvezzi, Maria Luiza Falsarella; Magalhães, Ana Maria Muller; Silveira, Denise Tolfo

    2016-01-01

    Presentation of the computerized structure to implement, in a university hospital in the South of Brazil, the Patients Classification System of Perroca, which categorizes patients according to the care complexity. This solution also aims to corroborate a recent study at the hospital, which evidenced that the increasing workload presents a direct relation with the institutional quality indicators. The tools used were the Google applications with high productivity interconnecting the topic knowledge on behalf of the nursing professionals and information technology professionals. PMID:27332366

  1. Elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus-the need for high-quality, inpatient diabetes care.

    PubMed

    Bourdel-Marchasson, Isabelle; Sinclair, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Elderly patients (aged > 70 years) with diabetes are at high risk of -hospitalization. We provide a detailed commentary about recent international clinical guidelines and a consensus statement devoted to elderly patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in the context of hospitalization. In emergency departments, the 4 medication agents associated with the greatest number of patient adverse drug events are warfarin, oral glucose-lowering medications, insulin, and antiplatelet agents, all of which are commonly prescribed in older patients with diabetes. Comprehensive gerontological assessment, including review and, if indicated, discontinuation of all potentially unsafe or inappropriate patient medications should be done upstream to reduce the likelihood of adverse drugs events. Severe infections and ischemic heart disease are also frequent causes of acute admission into hospital in patients aged > 75 years. These patients are also likely to be malnourished and nutritional status should be monitored. Nutritional support, combined with specific products to avoid uncontrolled hyperglycemia must be implemented in patients at risk of malnutrition. Early exercise prescription may help patients maintain physical function and prevent the risk of falling. Clinical guidelines should be applied to achieve safe and effective patient target glucose levels. Insulin should be used earlier for its anabolic properties and patients closely monitored to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia and excessive hyperglycemia. The discharge plan needs to address full medical and social needs along with suitable follow-up to ensure a high level of patient safety.

  2. Iowa Child Care Quality Rating System: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Iowa's Child Care Quality Rating System prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile is divided into the following categories: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4) Indicators for Family Child Care Programs;…

  3. Advanced units: quality measures in urgency and emergency care

    PubMed Central

    Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Cordioli, Eduardo; Pedrotti, Carlos Henrique Sartorato; Iervolino, Mauro; Bastos, Antonio da Silva; de Almeida, Luis Roberto Natel; Neves, Henrique Sutton de Sousa; Lottenberg, Claudio Luiz

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate, through care indicators, the quality of services rendered to patients considered urgency and emergency cases at an advanced emergency care unit. Methods We analyzed data from managerial reports of 64,891 medical visits performed in the Emergency Care Unit of the Ibirapuera Unit at Care during the period from June 1st, 2012 through May 31st, 2013. The proposed indicators for the assessment of care were rate of death in the emergency care unit; average length of stay of patients in the unit; rate of unplanned return visits; admission rate for patients screened as level 1 according to the Emergency Severity Index; rate of non-finalized medical consultations; rate of complaints; and door-to-electrocardiogram time. Results The rate of death in the emergency care unit was zero. Five of the 22 patients classified as Emergency Severity Index 1 (22.7%) arrived presenting cardiac arrest. All were treated with cardiopulmonary resuscitation and reestablishment of vital functions. The average length of stay of patients in the unit was 3 hours, 33 minutes, and 7 seconds. The rate of unscheduled return visits at the emergency care unit of the Ibirapuera unit was 13.64%. Rate of complaints was 2.8/1,000 patients seen during the period Conclusion The model of urgency and emergency care in advanced units provides an efficient and efficaious service to patients. Both critically ill patients and those considered less complex can receive proper treatment for their needs. PMID:25628203

  4. Quality of Care in Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prochner, Larry

    1996-01-01

    Examines the quality of care in two mid-19th-century day nurseries in North America. Finds that quality was associated with saving children's lives within a context of charity-based social welfare. The concern for the health and safety of children led to the entrenchment of a custodial model of child care, which proved resilient into the 20th…

  5. Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Quality of Health Care.

    PubMed

    Fiscella, Kevin; Sanders, Mechelle R

    2016-01-01

    The annual National Healthcare Quality and Disparities Reports document widespread and persistent racial and ethnic disparities. These disparities result from complex interactions between patient factors related to social disadvantage, clinicians, and organizational and health care system factors. Separate and unequal systems of health care between states, between health care systems, and between clinicians constrain the resources that are available to meet the needs of disadvantaged groups, contribute to unequal outcomes, and reinforce implicit bias. Recent data suggest slow progress in many areas but have documented a few notable successes in eliminating these disparities. To eliminate these disparities, continued progress will require a collective national will to ensure health care equity through expanded health insurance coverage, support for primary care, and public accountability based on progress toward defined, time-limited objectives using evidence-based, sufficiently resourced, multilevel quality improvement strategies that engage patients, clinicians, health care organizations, and communities. PMID:26789384

  6. Decision support for patient care: implementing cybernetics.

    PubMed

    Ozbolt, Judy; Ozdas, Asli; Waitman, Lemuel R; Smith, Janis B; Brennan, Grace V; Miller, Randolph A

    2004-01-01

    The application of principles and methods of cybernetics permits clinicians and managers to use feedback about care effectiveness and resource expenditure to improve quality and to control costs. Keys to the process are the specification of therapeutic goals and the creation of an organizational culture that supports the use of feedback to improve care. Daily feedback on the achievement of each patient's therapeutic goals provides tactical decision support, enabling clinicians to adjust care as needed. Monthly or quarterly feedback on aggregated goal achievement for all patients on a clinical pathway provides strategic decision support, enabling clinicians and managers to identify problems with supposed "best practices" and to test hypotheses about solutions. Work is underway at Vanderbilt University Medical Center to implement feedback loops in care and management processes and to evaluate the effects.

  7. Change in Health-Related Quality of Life among Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients at Primary Health Care Settings in South Africa: A Prospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Louw, Julia S.; Mabaso, Musawenkosi; Peltzer, Karl

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) remains a major public health challenge in South Africa. However, little attention is paid to the impact of health related quality of life (HRQL) among TB patients at the beginning and at the end of TB treatment. This study assesses factors associated with HRQL among tuberculosis patients in three high risk provinces in South Africa. Methods A prospective cohort study was conducted at primary health care settings. Patients completed the HRQL social functioning (SF)-12 health survey. Comparison of Physical Health Summary Score (PCS) and Mental Health Summary Score (MCS) was assessed at 6 months after treatment. Generalized estimating equations (GEEs) were used to examine the factors associated with changes in HRQL. Results In all patients, after 6 months of treatment there was a significant improvement in HRQL with the biggest increase in the PCS. A higher educational qualification had a strong significant positive effect on the mental HRQL. Psychological distress showed a significant negative association with physical and mental HRQL after six months. Permanent residence showed a significant positive association with mental HRQL among TB patients compared to those living in shack/traditional dwellings. Rating ones health as being good and fair/poor was significantly associated with poor physical HRQL. Twenty drinks or more in the past month had a significant negative effect on the physical HRQL. Conclusion The findings suggest that programmes targeted at improving TB treatment success should have specific interventions for patients with low educational background, impoverished households/communities and those with hazardous or harmful alcohol use. PMID:27137914

  8. Macroergonomics in Healthcare Quality and Patient Safety

    PubMed Central

    Carayon, Pascale; Karsh, Ben-Tzion; Gurses, Ayse P.; Holden, Richard; Hoonakker, Peter; Hundt, Ann Schoofs; Montague, Enid; Rodriguez, Joy; Wetterneck, Tosha B.

    2014-01-01

    The US Institute of Medicine and healthcare experts have called for new approaches to manage healthcare quality problems. In this chapter, we focus on macroergonomics, a branch of human factors and ergonomics that is based on the systems approach and considers the organizational and sociotechnical context of work activities and processes. Selected macroergonomic approaches to healthcare quality and patient safety are described such as the SEIPS model of work system and patient safety and the model of healthcare professional performance. Focused reviews on job stress and burnout, workload, interruptions, patient-centered care, health IT and medical devices, violations, and care coordination provide examples of macroergonomics contributions to healthcare quality and patient safety. Healthcare systems and processes clearly need to be systematically redesigned; examples of macroergonomic approaches, principles and methods for healthcare system redesign are described. Further research linking macroergonomics and care processes/patient outcomes is needed. Other needs for macroergonomics research are highlighted, including understanding the link between worker outcomes (e.g., safety and well-being) and patient outcomes (e.g., patient safety), and macroergonomics of patient-centered care and care coordination. PMID:24729777

  9. Reporting quality of health care to the board.

    PubMed

    Fleming, G A

    1993-01-01

    The reporting of quality of health care to the governing board has long been an enigma. Now we are in the midst of a revolution in health care, as we shift our focus from solely the clinical performance of individuals to a broader scope of assessing and improving all activities around patient services and patient care--i.e., management outcomes integrated with clinical outcomes to help identify opportunities to improve patient care. In addition, apprised of corporate liability for the quality of care provided in health care organizations, governing boards are raising questions and demanding more information. To maintain this high degree of interest in quality of health care, information should be restricted to what the board needs to know. This article will be confined to the hospital's organizationwide quality system of monitoring and evaluating. While medical staff credentialing and privileging are also board responsibilities and quality management activities should be used in the privileging and credentialing process, they will not be addressed in this article. PMID:10129400

  10. Quality in managed care: developments and considerations.

    PubMed

    Spoeri, R K

    1997-01-01

    With the rapid movement of both individuals and groups away from fee-for-service health care into managed care, concerns have been expressed appropriately that the quality of care may be affected adversely. Over the past several years, a number of developments have taken place to respond to these concerns. This quality movement in managed care has not been without some issues and considerations, however. This article first describes the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and the prominent role it has played in this movement. Next, quality improvement study design is addressed in the context of assuring quality, controlling costs, and achieving NCQA accreditation. The effect that capitation, as a payment strategy for providers, has on data quality is then described. Fourth, the value of partnering is explored. Finally, the newest version of NCQA's performance measurement template is discussed: the Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set, version 3.0.

  11. The HIV specialist improves quality of care and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Valenti, William M

    2002-05-01

    HAART has raised the bar for standards of care for HIV/AIDS. As patient outcomes improve, efforts are under way to address the infrastructure needed to continue to provide high-quality HIV care. Standards of care and treatment guidelines are updated regularly in an effort to keep up with our rapidly evolving understanding of HIV medicine. Two professional organizations have been formed in the past several years to address the needs of HIV care providers and patients. While there is slight variation between the 2 groups, both organizations define the HIV specialist in terms of clinical experience and continuing education and recognize that HIV care providers are a diverse group committed to managing this critical and constantly evolving epidemic. Several states have also developed initiatives that address the importance of health care quality and outcomes for people with HIV/AIDS. New York and California lead the way, and surely other states will follow. To ensure quality of care and continued good outcomes for our patients, managed care organizations and other providers of HIV care can now measure their own competence against these existing standards. PMID:12056114

  12. Quality of Care and Quality of Life: Convergence or Divergence?

    PubMed Central

    Alonazi, Wadi B; Thomas, Shane A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the impact of quality of care (QoC) on patients’ quality of life (QoL). In a cross-sectional study, two domains of QoC and the World Health Organization Quality of Life-Bref questionnaire were combined to collect data from 1,059 pre-discharge patients in four accredited hospitals (ACCHs) and four non-accredited hospitals (NACCHs) in Saudi Arabia. Health and well-being are often restricted to the characterization of sensory qualities in certain settings such as unrestricted access to healthcare, effective treatment, and social welfare. The patients admitted to tertiary health care facilities are generally able to present themselves with a holistic approach as to how they experience the impact of health policy. The statistical results indicated that patients reported a very limited correlation between QoC and QoL in both settings. The model established a positive, but ultimately weak and insignificant, association between QoC (access and effective treatment) and QoL (r = 0.349, P = 0.000; r = 0.161, P = 0.000, respectively). Even though the two settings are theoretically different in terms of being able to conceptualize, adopt, and implement QoC, the outcomes from both settings demonstrated insignificant relationships with QoL as the results were quite similar. Though modern medicine has substantially improved QoL around the world, this paper proposes that health accreditation has a very limited impact on improving QoL. This paper raises awareness of this topic with multiple healthcare professionals who are interested in correlating QoC and QoL. Hopefully, it will stimulate further research from other professional groups that have new and different perspectives. Addressing a transitional health care system that is in the process of endorsing accreditation, investigating the experience of tertiary cases, and analyzing deviated data may limit the generalization of this study. Global interest in applying public health policy

  13. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance. PMID:23429226

  14. The business case for health-care quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Swensen, Stephen J; Dilling, James A; Mc Carty, Patrick M; Bolton, Jeffrey W; Harper, Charles M

    2013-03-01

    The business case for health-care quality improvement is presented. We contend that investment in process improvement is aligned with patients' interests, the organization's reputation, and the engagement of their workforce. Four groups benefit directly from quality improvement: patients, providers, insurers, and employers. There is ample opportunity, even in today's predominantly pay-for-volume (that is, evolving toward value-based purchasing) insurance system, for providers to deliver care that is in the best interest of the patient while improving their financial performance.

  15. Defining quality of care: mission impossible?

    PubMed

    Reerink, E

    1990-01-01

    Finding the definition of quality has haunted mankind since the beginning of time. As far back as ancient Egypt and classical Greece, descriptions of quality show man's struggle with a concept that has not yet ended. Since the beginning of this century, descriptions of quality of health care have begun to take form in long lists of categories that make up the elements of quality. This catalog approach to defining quality has been replaced by the evaluative approach since Donabedian's conceptual studies in the 1960s. It has become commonplace now to define quality in evaluative terms: by comparing actual care with preset criteria, a judgement, and consequently a description or definition, can be obtained on real quality of care. In criteria and their derivatives one can document his intentions as to good quality; only after measurement and judgement can one be certain that quality has been described. A frequent source of concern is the erroneous belief that scientific research is synonymous with quality assessment. Research results form the basis of criteria for good care, and as such contribute to quality, but having obtained good research results does not imply that health care is properly and appropriately provided. PMID:1983237

  16. Patient perceptions of quality in discharge instruction.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul Alexander; Drain, Maxwell; Gesell, Sabina B; Mylod, Deirdre M; Kaldenberg, Dennis O; Hamilton, Julie

    2005-10-01

    The present study investigates patient perceptions of the quality of discharge instruction by assessing inpatients' ratings of care and service in the United States over the past 5 years (1997-2001) (n = 4,901,178). As expected, patients' ratings of "instructions given about how to care for yourself at home" showed a strong, consistent positive relationship with overall patient satisfaction from 1997 through 2001. Nevertheless, patient satisfaction with discharge instructions decreased significantly each year (p < 0.001). Patients gave lower ratings to the quality of discharge instruction than to the overall quality of their hospital stay which indicates a failure to match the quality delivered among other services within the hospital. Patient assessments of discharge instruction quality varied systematically among conditions. Patients with musculoskeletal diseases and disorders (MDC-8) rated discharge instruction considerably lower than all other patient groups. Patients' age, sex, self-described health status and length of stay did not predict patients' evaluations of discharge instructions. U.S. hospitals may not be meeting existing AMA and JCAHO standards for patient education and discharge.

  17. Patient Activation and Mental Health Care Experiences Among Women Veterans

    PubMed Central

    Pavao, Joanne; Wong, Ava

    2016-01-01

    We utilized a nationally representative survey of women veteran primary care users to examine associations between patient activation and mental health care experiences. A dose–response relationship was observed, with odds of high quality ratings significantly greater at each successive level of patient activation. Higher activation levels were also significantly associated with preference concordant care for gender-related preferences (use of female providers, women-only settings, and women-only groups as often as desired). Results add to the growing literature documenting better health care experiences among more activated patients, and suggest that patient activation may play an important role in promoting engagement with mental health care. PMID:25917224

  18. Leadership and the quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Firth-Cozens, J; Mowbray, D

    2001-01-01

    The importance of good leadership is becoming increasingly apparent within health care. This paper reviews evidence which shows that it has effects, not only on financial management, but on the quality of care provided. Some theories of leadership are discussed, primarily in terms of how different types of leaders might affect quality in different ways, including the effects that they might have on the stress or wellbeing of their staff which, in turn, is related to the quality of care produced. Finally, the conflicts shown in terms of leadership within the context of health care are discussed, leading to the conclusion that development programmes must be specially tailored to address the complexities of this arena. Key Words: leadership; quality of care; stress; personality PMID:11700372

  19. Future care planning: a first step to palliative care for all patients with advanced heart disease.

    PubMed

    Denvir, M A; Murray, S A; Boyd, K J

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care is recommended for patients with end-stage heart failure with several recent, randomised trials showing improvements in symptoms and quality of life and more studies underway. Future care planning provides a framework for discussing a range of palliative care problems with patients and their families. This approach can be introduced at any time during the patient's journey of care and ideally well in advance of end-of-life care. Future care planning is applicable to a wide range of patients with advanced heart disease and could be delivered systematically by cardiology teams at the time of an unplanned hospital admission, akin to cardiac rehabilitation for myocardial infarction. Integrating cardiology care and palliative care can benefit many patients with advanced heart disease at increased risk of death or hospitalisation. Larger, randomised trials are needed to assess the impact on patient outcomes and experiences.

  20. Re-engineering pharmaceutical care: towards a patient-focused care approach.

    PubMed

    al-Shaqha, W M; Zairi, M

    2000-01-01

    As healthcare reform takes shape, many challenges face hospital pharmacists. An opportunity exists to combine the principles of patient-focused care and pharmaceutical care to redesign the role of pharmacy. To achieve this objective, pharmacy departments should adopt business concepts such as process re-engineering. Process re-engineering is a change management tool which aims to produce dramatic improvement in performance measures by re-designing the process. The goal of restructuring is to increase the amount of time pharmacists spend providing pharmaceutical care to patients. The pharmaceutical care concept is a method of delivering pharmaceutical care services that match individual patient needs with the services provided. This article describes many hospital pharmacy department transitions to a patient focused care environment by adopting the patient focused care concept and the process re-engineering to improve the quality of patient care through systems improvement.

  1. Sex differences in health care provider communication during genital herpes care and patients' health outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Barnack-Tavlaris, Jessica L

    2013-01-01

    Research in primary care medicine demonstrates that health care providers' communication varies depending on their sex, and that these sex differences in communication can influence patients' health outcomes. The present study aimed to examine the extent to which sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to the sensitive context of gynecological care for genital herpes and whether these potential sex differences in communication influence patients' herpes transmission prevention behaviors and herpes-related quality of life. Women (N = 123) from the United States recently diagnosed with genital herpes anonymously completed established measures in which they rated (a) their health care providers' communication, (b) their herpes transmission prevention behaviors, and (c) their herpes-related quality of life. The authors found significant sex differences in health care providers' communication; this finding supports that sex differences in primary care providers' communication extend to gynecological care for herpes. Specifically, patients with female health care providers indicated that their providers engaged in more patient-centered communication and were more satisfied with their providers' communication. However, health care providers' sex did not predict women's quality of life, a finding that suggests that health care providers' sex alone is of little importance in patients' health outcomes. Patient-centered communication was significantly associated with greater quality-of-life scores and may provide a promising avenue for intervention.

  2. Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Recommended Care Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care This is a composite measure based on individual ... Age Group Percentage of Surgical Patients Receiving Recommended Care by Age Group uzrc-9bvr Download these data » ...

  3. Quality of life for chronic psychiatric illnesses and home care

    PubMed Central

    Molu, Nesibe Gunay; Ozkan, Birgul; Icel, Sema

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, mental illnesses are gradually increasing and so does chronic psychiatric patients. As a result of this increase, chronic psychiatric disorders lead the burden of patients and their families. To reduce the burden of mental illnesses on individuals and their families, treatment and care are given including psychosocial, physiological and medical support and social services. To begin with, home care enables both the patient and his or her family to stay at their own houses and not to be bothered with residents or long-term, institutional-based nursing homes. In addition, the home care providers deliver services to the patient’s at their own house. The other advantages of taking care at home is that it eases financial issues in terms of reducing the cost, reduces the patient’s symptoms and improve the individual’s quality of life (QoL). In addition to these, home care also minimizes the burden on outpatient services and provides help for the patient and the family in order to solve their problems and give support. Home care services help patients to get their freedom back and enhance the quality of their lives. Thus, it is necessary to procure and implement these services and supply both the patient and his or her family a high-quality life. Sources of data/ study selection: Literature review was done by using the keywords “home care, patient with chronic mental illness, quality of life, home care nursing” from the sources including PsychINFO, PsychARTICLES, MEDLINE, PubMED, EBSCOHOST and The COCHRANE LIBRARY in the time period of 2005- 2015. PMID:27182272

  4. Prescription for antibiotics at drug shops and strategies to improve quality of care and patient safety: a cross-sectional survey in the private sector in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mbonye, Anthony K; Buregyeya, Esther; Rutebemberwa, Elizeus; Clarke, Siân E; Lal, Sham; Hansen, Kristian S; Magnussen, Pascal; LaRussa, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The main objective of this study was to assess practices of antibiotic prescription at registered drug shops with a focus on upper respiratory tract infections among children in order to provide data for policy discussions aimed at improving quality of care and patient safety in the private health sector in Uganda. Methods A survey was conducted within 57 parishes from August to October 2014 in Mukono District, Uganda. Data was captured on the following variables: drug shop characteristics, training of staff in management of pneumonia, availability of guidelines and basic equipment, available antibiotics, knowledge on treatment of pneumonia in children aged <5 years. The main study outcome was the proportion of private health facilities prescribing an antibiotic. Results A total of 170 registered drug shops were surveyed between August and October 2014. The majority of drug shops, 93.5% were prescribing antibiotics, especially amoxicillin and trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (septrin). The professional qualification of a provider was significantly associated with this practice, p=0.04; where lower cadre staff (nursing assistants and enrolled nurses) overprescribed antibiotics. A third, 29.4% of drug shop providers reported that antibiotics were the first-line treatment for children with diarrhoea; yet the standard guideline is to give oral rehydration salts and zinc tablets. Only few providers, 8.2%, had training on antibiotics, with 10.6% on pneumonia case management. Further to this, 7.1% drug shops had WHO-Integrated Management of Childhood Illness guidelines, and a negligible proportion (<1%) had respiratory timers and baby weighing scales. Although the majority of providers, 82.4%, knew severe signs and symptoms of pneumonia, few, 17.6%, knew that amoxicillin was the first-line drug for treatment of pneumonia in children according to the guidelines. Conclusions There is urgent need to regulate drug shop practices of prescribing and selling

  5. Information retrieval for patient care.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, M.

    1997-01-01

    Doctors need clinical information during most consultations with patients, and much of this need could be satisfied by material from online sources. Advances in data communication technologies mean that multimedia information can be transported rapidly to various clinical care locations. However, selecting the few items of information likely to be useful in a particular clinical situation from the mass of information available is a major problem. Current information retrieval systems are designed primarily for use in research rather than clinical care. The design, implementation, and critical evaluation of new information retrieval systems for clinical care should be guided by knowledgeable clinical users. PMID:9099122

  6. Providing high-quality care in primary care settings

    PubMed Central

    Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Geneau, Robert; Grande, Claudio Del; Denis, Jean-Louis; Hudon, Éveline; Haggerty, Jeannie L.; Bonin, Lucie; Duplain, Réjean; Goudreau, Johanne; Hogg, William

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To gain a deeper understanding of how primary care (PC) practices belonging to different models manage resources to provide high-quality care. Design Multiple-case study embedded in a cross-sectional study of a random sample of 37 practices. Setting Three regions of Quebec. Participants Health care professionals and staff of 5 PC practices. Methods Five cases showing above-average results on quality-of-care indicators were purposefully selected to contrast on region, practice size, and PC model. Data were collected using an organizational questionnaire; the Team Climate Inventory, which was completed by health care professionals and staff; and 33 individual interviews. Detailed case histories were written and thematic analysis was performed. Main findings The core common feature of these practices was their ongoing effort to make trade-offs to deliver services that met their vision of high-quality care. These compromises involved the same 3 areas, but to varying degrees depending on clinic characteristics: developing a shared vision of high-quality care; aligning resource use with that vision; and balancing professional aspirations and population needs. The leadership of the physician lead was crucial. The external environment was perceived as a source of pressure and dilemmas rather than as a source of support in these matters. Conclusion Irrespective of their models, PC practices’ pursuit of high-quality care is based on a vision in which accessibility is a key component, balanced by appropriate management of available resources and of external environment expectations. Current PC reforms often create tensions rather than support PC practices in their pursuit of high-quality care. PMID:24829023

  7. Collaborative patient care protocols: a development process.

    PubMed

    Blaufuss, J; Wynn, J; Hujcs, M

    1993-01-01

    Computerization of these protocols is in progress. This project is funded for one year with projected completion in January 1994. This study will form a framework in which further research can be completed. Utilizing protocols will allow the measurement of nursing decision making by testing relationships between parameters and interventions and by identifying rules for decision making. For example, questions that may be answered include which physiologic parameters do clinicians treat and in what order or priority, as well as what is the impact on patient outcomes in regard to cost of care and complications. Computerized patient care protocols can be further developed to meet patient-specific needs. A computerized data base will facilitate managing large amounts of patient data and tailoring instructions to these patients. One of the goals of this project was to measure the feasibility of developing computerized patient care protocols and implementing them in a critical care setting. Eventually, this experience will facilitate implementing computerized protocols at other sites. An additional benefit is the ability to implement continuous quality improvement strategies in a prospective manner rather than by retrospective review. PMID:10171735

  8. [Quality of life of primary care patients in Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, Brasil: associations with stressful life events and mental health].

    PubMed

    Portugal, Flávia Batista; Campos, Mônica Rodrigues; Gonçalves, Daniel Almeida; Mari, Jair de Jesus; Fortes, Sandra Lúcia Correia Lima

    2016-02-01

    Quality of life (QoL) is a subjective construct, which can be negatively associated with factors such as mental disorders and stressful life events (SLEs). This article seeks to identify the association between socioeconomic and demographic variables, common mental disorders, symptoms suggestive of depression and anxiety, SLEs with QoL in patients attended in Primary Care (PC). It is a transversal study, conducted with 1,466 patients attended in PC centers in the cities of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro in 2009 and 2010. Bivariate analysis was performed using the T-test and four multiple linear regressions for each QoL domain. The scores for the physical, psychological, social relations and environment domains were, respectively, 64.7; 64.2; 68.5 and 49.1. By means of multivariate analysis, associations of the physical domain were found with health problems and discrimination; of the psychological domain with discrimination; of social relations with financial/structural problems; of external causes and health problems; and of the environment with financial/structural problems, external causes and discrimination. Mental health variables, health problems and financial/structural problems were the factors negatively associated with QoL.

  9. Agents for change: nonphysician medical providers and health care quality.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Nathan A; Mcmillen, Marvin A; Gould, James S

    2015-01-01

    Quality medical care is a clinical and public health imperative, but defining quality and achieving improved, measureable outcomes are extremely complex challenges. Adherence to best practice invariably improves outcomes. Nonphysician medical providers (NPMPs), such as physician assistants and advanced practice nurses (eg, nurse practitioners, advanced practice registered nurses, certified registered nurse anesthetists, and certified nurse midwives), may be the first caregivers to encounter the patient and can act as agents for change for an organization's quality-improvement mandate. NPMPs are well positioned to both initiate and ensure optimal adherence to best practices and care processes from the moment of initial contact because they have robust clinical training and are integral to trainee/staff education and the timely delivery of care. The health care quality aspects that the practicing NPMP can affect are objective, appreciative, and perceptive. As bedside practitioners and participants in the administrative and team process, NPMPs can fine-tune care delivery, avoiding the problem areas defined by the Institute of Medicine: misuse, overuse, and underuse of care. This commentary explores how NPMPs can affect quality by 1) supporting best practices through the promotion of guidelines and protocols, and 2) playing active, if not leadership, roles in patient engagement and organizational quality-improvement efforts.

  10. Providing high-quality care for children.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G; Rawson, R

    1997-08-01

    Because home care traditionally has served older patients under Medicare, some providers tend to treat in-home pediatric patients like "little adults." To offer children and their families the specialty care that they require and deserve, one agency limits its services exclusively to pediatrics. PMID:10173116

  11. Application of an oral health-related quality of life questionnaire in primary care patients with orofacial pain and temporomandibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Blanco-Aguilera, Antonio; Biedma-Velázquez, Lourdes; Serrano-del-Rosal, Rafael; González-López, Laura; Blanco-Aguilera, Elena; Segura-Saint-Gerons, Rafael

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To examine whether patients who report orofacial pain (OP) and temporomandibular disorders (TMD) have a poorer perception of their oral health-related quality of life and, if so, to what extent, and to analyze the association between oral health perception, sociodemographic variables and reported pain duration. Study Design: 407 patients treated at the OP and TMD units in the Healthcare District of Cordoba, Spain, diagnosed following the standard criteria accepted by the scientific community – the Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD) – were administered the Spanish version of the Oral Health Impact Profile questionnaire (OHIP-14). Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the degree of association between the patients’ OHIP-14 score and pain duration, pain intensity, and various sociodemographic variables. Results: The observed distribution was 89.4% women and 10.6% men. The mean OHIP-14 score was 20.57 ± 10.73 (mean ± standard deviation). A significant association (p<0.05) was found for gender, age, marital status, chronic pain grade, self-perceived oral health status and pain duration. Conclusions: The analysis of self-perceived oral health status in patients with OP and TMD, as measured by the OHIP-14, showed that oral health is perceived more negatively by women. Moreover, a one-point increase in the Chronic Pain Grade indicator increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 4.6 points, while chronic pain, defined as pain suffered by patients for one year or more, increases the OHIP-14 indicator by 3.2 points. Key words:Orofacial pain, temporomandibular disorders, Oral Health Impact Profile, sociodemographic variables, primary care, Research Diagnostic Criteria for Temporomandibular Disorders (RDC/TMD). PMID:24121906

  12. A Conceptual Framework for Quality of Care

    PubMed Central

    Mosadeghrad, Ali Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive research on defining and measuring health care quality, little attention has been given to different stakeholders’ perspectives of high-quality health care services. The main purpose of this study was to explore the attributes of quality healthcare in the Iranian context. Exploratory in-depth individual and focus group interviews were conducted with key healthcare stakeholders including clients, providers, managers, policy makers, payers, suppliers and accreditation panel members to identify the healthcare service quality attributes and dimensions. Data analysis was carried out by content analysis, with the constant comparative method. Over 100 attributes of quality healthcare service were elicited and grouped into five categories. The dimensions were: efficacy, effectiveness, efficiency, empathy, and environment. Consequently, a comprehensive model of service quality was developed for health care context. The findings of the current study led to a conceptual framework of healthcare quality. This model leads to a better understanding of the different aspects of quality in health care and provides a better basis for defining, measuring and controlling quality of health care services. PMID:23922534

  13. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  14. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  15. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  16. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  17. 42 CFR 494.90 - Condition: Patient plan of care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... personal care, home dialysis and self-care, quality of life, rehabilitation, transplantation, and the... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Condition: Patient plan of care. 494.90 Section 494.90 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN...

  18. Evidence-based medicine and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Dickenson, Donna; Vineis, Paolo

    2002-01-01

    In this paper we set out to examine the arguments for and against the claim that Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM) will improve the quality of care. In particular, we examine the following issues: 1. Are there hidden ethical assumptions in the methodology of EBM? 2. Is there a tension between the duty of care and EBM? 3. How can patient preferences be incorporated into quality guidelines and effectiveness studies? 4. Is there a tension between the quality of a particular intervention and overall quality of care? 5. Are certain branches of medicine and patient groups innately or prima facie disadvantaged by a shift to EBM? In addition we consider a case study in the ethics of EBM, on a clinical trial concerning the collection of umbilical cord blood in utero and ex utero, during or after labour in childbirth.

  19. A collaborative accountable care model in three practices showed promising early results on costs and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Salmon, Richard B; Sanderson, Mark I; Walters, Barbara A; Kennedy, Karen; Flores, Robert C; Muney, Alan M

    2012-11-01

    Cigna's Collaborative Accountable Care initiative provides financial incentives to physician groups and integrated delivery systems to improve the quality and efficiency of care for patients in commercial open-access benefit plans. Registered nurses who serve as care coordinators employed by participating practices are a central feature of the initiative. They use patient-specific reports and practice performance reports provided by Cigna to improve care coordination, identify and close care gaps, and address other opportunities for quality improvement. We report interim quality and cost results for three geographically and structurally diverse provider practices in Arizona, New Hampshire, and Texas. Although not statistically significant, these early results revealed favorable trends in total medical costs and quality of care, suggesting that a shared-savings accountable care model and collaborative support from the payer can enable practices to take meaningful steps toward full accountability for care quality and efficiency.

  20. Effect of Orem Self-Care Program on the Life Quality of Burn Patients Referred to Ghotb-al-Din-e-Shirazi Burn Center, Shiraz, Iran: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Fatemeh; Rahimi Dolatabad, Fatemeh; Yektatalab, Shahrzad; Ayaz, Mehdi; Zare, Najaf; Mansouri, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Advances in treatment and critical care have largely improved the survival following burns; therefore, the importance of quality of life in burn patients is an issue beyond question. The aim of this study was to determine the effects of Orem self-care program on Quality of Life of burn patients. Methods: A randomized clinical trial study was conducted on 110 eligible burn patients who were selected using easy sampling method and allocated randomly into two groups of experiment and control. The instrument for data collection was a questionnaire, containing demographic and burn information and burn-specific health scale–brief (BSHS-B) questionnaire. For the experiment group, 5 sessions of theoretical training and 75-90 minutes of practical training were accomplished. The quality of life of the patients with burns was assessed in three phases by the BSHS-B questionnaire. The data were analyzed in SPSS-17 using Chi-square test, Fisher’s exact test, Independent t-test and repeated measurement multivariate test. Results: After one month and two months of the use of self-care model, the quality of life of the cases improved from 73.33% to 83.78% and 98.12%, respectively (P<0.001). But the changes in the quality of life of the patients in the control group were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: Based on the obtained results of this study, designing and implementing a self-care program based on Orem’s model and the needs of burn patients will improve their quality of life. Therefore, it is recommended that this program should be considered as a part of treatment program for these patients. Trial Registration Number: 2013042112129N1 PMID:25349844

  1. Effectiveness of the Assessment of Burden of COPD (ABC) tool on health-related quality of life in patients with COPD: a cluster randomised controlled trial in primary and hospital care

    PubMed Central

    Slok, Annerika H M; Kotz, Daniel; van Breukelen, Gerard; Chavannes, Niels H; Rutten-van Mölken, Maureen P M H; Kerstjens, Huib A M; van der Molen, Thys; Asijee, Guus M; Dekhuijzen, P N Richard; Holverda, Sebastiaan; Salomé, Philippe L; Goossens, Lucas M A; Twellaar, Mascha; in ‘t Veen, Johannes C C M; van Schayck, Onno C P

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assessing the effectiveness of the Assessment of Burden of COPD (ABC) tool on disease-specific quality of life in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) measured with the St. George's Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ), compared with usual care. Methods A pragmatic cluster randomised controlled trial, in 39 Dutch primary care practices and 17 hospitals, with 357 patients with COPD (postbronchodilator FEV1/FVC ratio <0.7) aged ≥40 years, who could understand and read the Dutch language. Healthcare providers were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group. The intervention group applied the ABC tool, which consists of a short validated questionnaire assessing the experienced burden of COPD, objective COPD parameter (eg, lung function) and a treatment algorithm including a visual display and treatment advice. The control group provided usual care. Researchers were blinded to group allocation during analyses. Primary outcome was the number of patients with a clinically relevant improvement in SGRQ score between baseline and 18-month follow-up. Secondary outcomes were the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) and the Patient Assessment of Chronic Illness Care (PACIC; a measurement of perceived quality of care). Results At 18-month follow-up, 34% of the 146 patients from 27 healthcare providers in the intervention group showed a clinically relevant improvement in the SGRQ, compared with 22% of the 148 patients from 29 healthcare providers in the control group (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.08 to 3.16). No difference was found on the CAT (−0.26 points (scores ranging from 0 to 40); 95% CI −1.52 to 0.99). The PACIC showed a higher improvement in the intervention group (0.32 points (scores ranging from 1 to 5); 95% CI 0.14 to 0.50). Conclusions This study showed that use of the ABC tool may increase quality of life and perceived quality of care. Trial registration number NTR3788; Results. PMID:27401361

  2. ‘The ICECAP-SCM tells you more about what I’m going through’: A think-aloud study measuring quality of life among patients receiving supportive and palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Cara; Kinghorn, Philip; Orlando, Rosanna; Armour, Kathy; Perry, Rachel; Jones, Louise; Coast, Joanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: The ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure is a self-complete questionnaire developed to aid economic evaluation of supportive care interventions. Aim: To determine the feasibility of completing ICECAP–Supportive Care Measure alongside EQ-5D-5L and ICECAP-A (generic measures used in economic evaluation) among patients receiving hospice care, close persons and healthcare professionals. Design: Participants were asked to ‘think aloud’ while completing ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure and two other generic measures used in economic evaluation, EQ-5D-5L and ICECAP-A, and then participate in a semi-structured interview. From verbatim transcripts, five raters identified the frequency of errors in comprehension, retrieval, judgement and response. Qualitative data were analysed using constant comparison. Setting/participants: Eligible patients were identified from one UK hospice by a research nurse. Close persons and healthcare professionals were identified by the patient. In all, 72 semi-structured interviews were conducted with patients (n = 33), close persons (n = 22) and healthcare professionals (n = 17). Results: Patients and close persons reported that the ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure was most appropriate for measuring their quality of life. It appeared more meaningful, easier to complete and had fewest errors (3.9% among patients, 4.5% among close persons) compared to EQ-5D-5L (9.7% among patients, 5.5% among close persons). Healthcare professionals acknowledged the value of the ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure but had fewer errors in completing the EQ-5D-5L (3.5% versus 6.7%). They found it easier to complete because it focuses on observable health states. Conclusions: The ICECAP-Supportive Care Measure is feasible to use and perceived as appropriate for evaluating palliative care interventions. Healthcare professionals with limited knowledge of the patient who act as proxy completers may find the measure difficult to complete. PMID:26819326

  3. Cost-benefit analysis: patient care at neurological intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Kopacević, Lenka; Strapac, Marija; Mihelcić, Vesna Bozan

    2013-09-01

    Modern quality definition relies on patient centeredness and on patient needs for particular services, continuous control of the service provided, complete service quality management, and setting quality indicators as the health service endpoints. The health service provided to the patient has certain costs. Thus, one can ask the following: "To what extent does the increasing cost of patient care with changes in elimination improve the quality of health care and what costs are justifiable?" As stroke is the third leading cause of morbidity and mortality in Europe and worldwide, attention has been increasingly focused on stroke prevention and providing quality care for stroke patients. One of the most common medical/nursing problems in these patients is change in elimination, which additionally affects their mental health.

  4. Enhancing family physician capacity to deliver quality palliative home care

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Denise; Howell, Doris; Brazil, Kevin; Howard, Michelle; Taniguchi, Alan

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT PROBLEM BEING ADDRESSED Family physicians face innumerable challenges to delivering quality palliative home care to meet the complex needs of end-of-life patients and their families. OBJECTIVE OF PROGRAM To implement a model of shared care to enhance family physicians’ ability to deliver quality palliative home care, particularly in a community-based setting. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION Family physicians in 3 group practices (N = 21) in Ontario’s Niagara West region collaborated with an interprofessional palliative care team (including a palliative care advanced practice nurse, a palliative medicine physician, a bereavement counselor, a psychosocial-spiritual advisor, and a case manager) in a shared-care partnership to provide comprehensive palliative home care. Key features of the program included systematic and timely identification of end-of-life patients, needs assessments, symptom and psychosocial support interventions, regular communication between team members, and coordinated care guided by outcome-based assessment in the home. In addition, educational initiatives were provided to enhance family physicians’ knowledge and skills. CONCLUSION Because of the program, participants reported improved communication, effective interprofessional collaboration, and the capacity to deliver palliative home care, 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, to end-of-life patients in the community. PMID:19074714

  5. Oregon Child Care Quality Indicators Program: QRS Profile. The Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Trends, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a profile of Oregon's Child Care Quality Indicators Program prepared as part of the Child Care Quality Rating System (QRS) Assessment Study. The profile consists of several sections and their corresponding descriptions including: (1) Program Information; (2) Rating Details; (3) Quality Indicators for Center-Based Programs; (4)…

  6. [Continuous nursing education to improve the quality of health care].

    PubMed

    Fumić, Nera; Marinović, Marin; Brajan, Dolores

    2014-10-01

    Health care and today's medical and technical achievements and approved standards of treatment provide comprehensive quality, safety and traceability of medical procedures respecting the principles of health protection. Continuous education improves the quality of nursing health care and increases the effectiveness of patient care, consequently maintaining and enhancing patient safety. Patient health problems impose the need of appropriate, planned and timely nursing care and treatment. In providing quality nursing care, attention is focused on the patient and his/her needs in order to maintain and increase their safety, satisfaction, independence and recovery or peaceful death, so the health and nursing practices must be systematized, planned and based on knowledge and experience. Health and nursing care of patients at risk of developing acute and chronic wounds or already suffering from some form of this imply preventive measures that are provided through patient education, motivation, monitoring, early recognition of risk factors and causes, and reducing or removing them through the prescribed necessary medical treatment which is safe depending on the patient health status. Except for preventive measures, nursing care of patients who already suffer from some form of acute or chronic wounds is focused on the care and treatment of damaged tissue by providing appropriate and timely diagnosis, timely and proper evaluation of the wound and patient general status, knowledge and understanding of the wide range of local, oral and parenteral therapy and treatment, aiming to increase patient safety by preventing progression of the patient general condition and local wound status and reducing the possibility of developing infection or other complications of the underlying disease. In the overall patient management, through nursing process, medical interventions are implemented and aimed to maintain and optimize health status, prevent complications of existing diseases and

  7. Predictors of Quality in Family Child Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Gillian; Forer, Barry; Lero, Donna S.; Goelman, Hillel; LaGrange, Annette

    2006-01-01

    This study of 231 regulated family child care providers proposed a theoretical model to explore the effects on quality of: (1) provider level of general education; (2) provider degree of intentionality; (3) provider training and experience in family child care; (4) provider use of support services; and (5) provider work environment. Hierarchical…

  8. Quality management in Irish health care.

    PubMed

    Ennis, K; Harrington, D

    1999-01-01

    This paper reports on the findings from a quantitative research study of quality management in the Irish health-care sector. The study findings suggest that quality management is what hospitals require to become more cost-effective and efficient. The research also shows that the culture of health-care institutions must change to one where employees experience pride in their work and where all are involved and committed to continuous quality improvement. It is recommended that a shift is required from the traditional management structures to a more participative approach. Furthermore, all managers whether from a clinical or an administration background must understand one another's role in the organisation. Finally, for quality to succeed in the health-care sector, strong committed leadership is required to overcome tensions in quality implementation.

  9. [Quality of health care and costs].

    PubMed

    Kinnunen, J; Laitinen, A

    1993-01-01

    The quality of health care is largely discussed issue among health care professionals in Finland. The purpose of this article is to point out some relations between the quality of nursing and the economical costs. The theme is mostly ignored in the published articles and books about quality of nursing and health care. In the previous studies of quality of nursing four main approaches have been introduced 1) practical approach, 2) professionalism, 3) client orientation and 4) research orientation. An important weakness in the approaches is that they are carried out from a point of view of a single profession at the time. Really multiprofessional projects are the exception. Additionally, economic costs have not been included in nursing quality concept or evaluation criterion. The need for quality in any health services is urgent, including nursing. That is because of decreasing resources and changing market oriented steering mechanisms in the Finnish health care system. In this situation the quality of nursing may arise as one important competition factor in the organizations and the units. The costs of poor quality of nursing are not well recognized among professionals. Collaboration between different professionals is a key issue to solve these kind of problems. We need more research about the relations between economic factors and quality of nursing and other health services.

  10. Quality care means valuing care assistants, porters, and cleaners too.

    PubMed

    Toynbee, P

    2003-12-01

    All too often, the focus of the very clever strategy papers produced in the upper reaches of the health department is on the next grand plan. Some of these reforms have been catastrophic for the quality of service that patients experience at ward level. Of these, the contracting out culture introduced in the 1980s and the 1990s has been the worst. Researching my book, Hard work-life in low pay Britain, I took six jobs at around the minimum wage, including work as a hospital porter, as a hospital cleaner, and as a care assistant. These are jobs at the sharp end, up close and very personal to the patients, strongly influencing their experiences of the services they were using. Yet they are low paid, undervalued jobs that fall below the radar of the policy makers. In hospitals they need to be brought back in-house and integrated into a team ethos. Paying these people more would cost more, but it would also harvest great rewards by using their untapped commitment.

  11. Perceived quality of life in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients: a cross-sectional study in primary care on the role of illness perceptions

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Previous research has shown that in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients, it is important to consider not only physical functioning and complaints but also psychological factors, such as illness perceptions, to explain differences in Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL). The objective of this study is to analyse the extent to which the specific dimensions of illness perceptions according to the Common Sense Model (corrected for airflow limitation, dyspnoea and comorbidities) contribute to HRQoL. Method In a cross-sectional study in primary care, 90 COPD patients completed questionnaires: The Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire, the Medical Research Council dyspnoea scale, the Clinical COPD Questionnaire (CCQ) and the Chronic Respiratory Questionnaire (CRQ). Analyses were performed with multiple linear regression. Results When corrected for confounders (airflow limitation, dyspnoea and comorbidities), identity (β = .42) and comprehensibility (β = -.16) were associated with HRQoL (CCQ). Identity, comprehensibility and dyspnoea explained 56% of the variation in HRQoL (R2 = .56). Consequences (β = -.50) and treatment control (β = .20) were associated with HRQoL (the CRQ’s physical domain). They explained 59% of the variation in the CRQ physical (R2 = .59) domain. Treatment control (β = .19) and emotional response (β = -.33) were associated with the CRQ emotional domain. Conclusions Patients who experience fewer symptoms attributed to COPD, who have a better understanding of the disease, who experience less impact of COPD in daily life, who experience better treatment control and who have less of an emotional response have better HRQoL. This study indicates that the HRQoL of COPD patients is associated with illness perceptions as well as with the severity of dyspnoea as experienced by patients. Airflow limitation measures or comorbidities do not add to the explanation of HRQoL. The results of this

  12. How do we measure quality in primary dental care?

    PubMed

    Tickle, M; Campbell, S

    2013-08-01

    In the second paper of a series exploring quality in primary dental care a way to measure quality in dentistry is considered. Unless there are valid and reliable tools to measure quality then quality can never be improved. Measurement tools need to be acceptable to patients if they are to be employed, as well as to busy practices in terms of practicality and costs. Examples such as the General Medical Practitioner's Quality Outcome Framework need to be understood to see if they can be translated to dentistry.

  13. Is Self-Referral Associated with Higher Quality Care?

    PubMed Central

    Pollack, Craig Evan; Rastegar, Afshin; Keating, Nancy L; Adams, John L; Pisu, Maria; Kahn, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess the extent to which patients self-refer to cancer specialists and whether self-referral is associated with better experiences and quality of care. Data Sources Data from surveys and medical record abstraction collected through the Cancer Care Outcomes Research and Surveillance Consortium. Study Design Observational study of patients with lung and colorectal cancer diagnosed from 2003 through 2005 in five geographically defined regions and five integrated health care delivery systems. Methods Multivariable logistic regression models used to assess factors associated with self-referral and propensity score-weighted doubly robust models to test the association between self-referral and experiences/quality of care. Principal Findings Among 5,882 patients, 9.7 percent of lung cancer patients and 14.9 percent of colorectal cancer patients self-referred to at least one cancer specialist. Black patients were less likely to self-refer than white patients (odds ratio: 0.48, 95 percent confidence interval: 0.35, 0.64); patients with high incomes (vs. low) and with a college degree (vs. non-high school graduates) were significantly more likely to self-refer. Self-referral was associated with lower ratings of overall physician communication for patients with lung cancer but, conversely, higher odds of curative surgery among patients with stage I/II lung cancer. Conclusions A small but significant proportion of patients self-referred to their cancer specialists; rates varied by patient race and socioeconomic status. To the extent that self-referral is associated with quality, it may reinforce disparities in care. PMID:25759002

  14. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part II: Three Early Reports on Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2015-09-01

    The 1990 Institute of Medicine report Medicare: A Strategy for Quality Assurance offered a definition of quality in health care and recommendations on how to achieve it. The forces for change would include different activities by the federal government, informed consumers, professionalism, and private initiatives. Eight years later, the National Roundtable report Statement on Quality of Care indicated that there were major problems of underuse, overuse, and misuse of health care services. In the same year, the President's Advisory Commission report Quality First: Better Health Care for All Americans discussed major problems with health care and proposed many initiatives to correct them, and also recommended a Bill of Rights and Responsibilities for the patients. PMID:26244402

  15. Improving Quality of Emergency Care Through Integration of Mental Health.

    PubMed

    Okafor, Martha; Wrenn, Glenda; Ede, Victor; Wilson, Nana; Custer, William; Risby, Emile; Claeys, Michael; Shelp, Frank E; Atallah, Hany; Mattox, Gail; Satcher, David

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to better integrate emergency medical and psychiatric care at a large urban public hospital, identify impact on quality improvement metrics, and reduce healthcare cost. A psychiatric fast track service was implemented as a quality improvement initiative. Data on disposition from the emergency department from January 2011 to May 2012 for patients impacted by the pilot were analyzed. 4329 patients from January 2011 to August 2011 (pre-intervention) were compared with 4867 patients from September 2011 to May 2012 (intervention). There was a trend of decline on overall quality metrics of time to triage and time from disposition to discharge. The trend analysis of the psychiatric length of stay and use of restraints showed significant reductions. Integrated emergency care models are evidence-based approach to ensuring that patients with mental health needs receive proper and efficient treatment. Results suggest that this may also improve overall emergency department's throughput.

  16. Patient care: past, present, and future.

    PubMed

    Twycross, Robert

    The 40 years since St Christopher's Hospice opened has witnessed a burgeoning international interest in palliative care. Its key characteristics comprise a focus on the whole-person (physical, psychological, social, and spiritual), patient-centeredness (partnership with and empowerment of the patient and family), openness and honesty in communication, an acceptance of the inevitability of death coupled with improvement in the quality of life, multi-professional teamwork integrated with community (volunteer) involvement. Although much has been achieved, much remains to be done. Both in resource-poor countries and in more wealthy ones, the scope of palliative care has changed. Initially in the United Kingdom, palliative care was mostly limited to cancer patients but now strenuous efforts are being made to extend coverage to other patient groups, e.g., those with end-stage heart disease or renal failure. In India, with a dearth of chronic care facilities, palliative care services increasingly embrace those with chronic disability as well as progressive end-stage disease. In Sub-Saharan Africa, the devastating impact of AIDS is having a major impact on the development and delivery of palliative care. To maximize the benefits of limited financial and other resources, a strategic approach is necessary. The World Health Organization emphasizes three essential foundation measures: health service policy, public awareness and professional education, and drug availability. However, at the end of the day, if we are truly to honor Cicely Saunders, palliative care must remain a movement with momentum, combining creative charisma with inevitable bureaucratic routinization. PMID:18051016

  17. Measuring health care process quality with software quality measures.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, Ozkan; Demirörs, Onur

    2012-01-01

    Existing quality models focus on some specific diseases, clinics or clinical areas. Although they contain structure, process, or output type measures, there is no model which measures quality of health care processes comprehensively. In addition, due to the not measured overall process quality, hospitals cannot compare quality of processes internally and externally. To bring a solution to above problems, a new model is developed from software quality measures. We have adopted the ISO/IEC 9126 software quality standard for health care processes. Then, JCIAS (Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards for Hospitals) measurable elements were added to model scope for unifying functional requirements. Assessment (diagnosing) process measurement results are provided in this paper. After the application, it was concluded that the model determines weak and strong aspects of the processes, gives a more detailed picture for the process quality, and provides quantifiable information to hospitals to compare their processes with multiple organizations.

  18. [Quality assurance and quality management in intensive care].

    PubMed

    Notz, K; Dubb, R; Kaltwasser, A; Hermes, C; Pfeffer, S

    2015-11-01

    Treatment success in hospitals, particularly in intensive care units, is directly tied to quality of structure, process, and outcomes. Technological and medical advancements lead to ever more complex treatment situations with highly specialized tasks in intensive care nursing. Quality criteria that can be used to describe and correctly measure those highly complex multiprofessional situations have only been recently developed and put into practice.In this article, it will be shown how quality in multiprofessional teams can be definded and assessed in daily clinical practice. Core aspects are the choice of a nursing theory, quality assurance measures, and quality management. One possible option of quality assurance is the use of standard operating procedures (SOPs). Quality can ultimately only be achieved if professional groups think beyond their boundaries, minimize errors, and establish and live out instructions and SOPs.

  19. The organization of multidisciplinary care teams: modeling internal and external influences on cancer care quality.

    PubMed

    Fennell, Mary L; Das, Irene Prabhu; Clauser, Steven; Petrelli, Nicholas; Salner, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Quality cancer treatment depends upon careful coordination between multiple treatments and treatment providers, the exchange of technical information, and regular communication between all providers and physician disciplines involved in treatment. This article will examine a particular type of organizational structure purported to regularize and streamline the communication between multiple specialists and support services involved in cancer treatment: the multidisciplinary treatment care (MDC) team. We present a targeted review of what is known about various types of MDC team structures and their impact on the quality of treatment care, and we outline a conceptual model of the connections between team context, structure, process, and performance and their subsequent effects on cancer treatment care processes and patient outcomes. Finally, we will discuss future research directions to understand how MDC teams improve patient outcomes and how characteristics of team structure, culture, leadership, and context (organizational setting and local environment) contribute to optimal multidisciplinary cancer care.

  20. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  1. Comparing public and private hospital care service quality.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, D; O'Callaghan, M

    1998-01-01

    The study applies the principles behind the SERVQUAL model and uses Donabedian's framework to compare and contrast Malta's public and private hospital care service quality. Through the identification of 16 service quality indicators and the use of a Likert-type scale, two questionnaires were developed. The first questionnaire measured patient pre-admission expectations for public and private hospital service quality (in respect of one another). It also determined the weighted importance given to the different service quality indicators. The second questionnaire measured patient perceptions of provided service quality. Results showed that private hospitals are expected to offer a higher quality service, particularly in the "hotel services", but it was the public sector that was exceeding its patients' expectations by the wider margin. A number of implications for public and private hospital management and policy makers were identified.

  2. Assessing the quality of health care: a consumerist approach.

    PubMed

    Soliman, A A

    1992-01-01

    Recent investigations show that nontechnical interventions influence patients' ratings of the quality of health care, and that these aspects of the medical encounter are as important to the patient as the technical aspects; perhaps more important. This paper adopts a consumerist approach and measures patients' perceptions of health care quality using a scale adapted from the consumer behavior literature (SERVQUAL). The study measures health care quality as well as five of its individual dimensions. The findings indicate that, for the whole sample, patients' ratings of overall quality as well as the ratings of four of the five dimensions of care are negative. Further analysis indicates that many individual aspects (scale items) are rated negatively by each of two age groups (25-65 and over 65 years old), but the gap between perceptions of the younger group and their expectations is greater than that of the senior group. The two dimensions of "assurance" and "empathy" are found to be the most discriminating dimensions between the two groups. Other analyses indicate that age, annual household income, and work status significantly relate to overall quality rating. Marketing and strategic planning implications of the results are discussed. PMID:10124785

  3. Quality nursing care: a qualitative enquiry.

    PubMed

    Hogston, R

    1995-01-01

    In spite of the wealth of literature on quality nursing care, a disparity exists in defining quality. The purpose of this study was an attempt to seek out practising nurses' perceptions of quality nursing care and to present a definition of quality as described by nurses. Eighteen nurses from a large hospital in the south of England were interviewed. Qualitative analysis based on a modified grounded theory approach revealed three categories described as 'structure', 'process' and 'outcome'. This supports previous work on evaluating quality care but postulates that structure, process and outcome could also be used as a mechanism for defining quality. The categories are defined by using the words of the informants in order to explain the essential attributes of quality nursing care. The findings demonstrate how more informants cited quality in terms of process and outcome than structure. It is speculated that the significance of this rests with the fact that nurses have direct control over process and outcome whereas the political and economic climate in which nurses work is beyond their control and decisions over structure lie with their managers.

  4. “The National Surgery Quality Improvement Project” (NSQIP): a new tool to increase patient safety and cost efficiency in a surgical intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The “National Surgical Quality Improvement Program” (NSQIP) is a nationally validated, risk-adjusted database tracking surgical outcomes. NSQIP has been demonstrated to decrease complications, expenses, and mortality. In the study institution, a high rate of nosocomial pneumonia (PNEU) and prolonged ventilator days ≥48 hours (V48) was observed on the surgical service. Methods The hospital studied is a 500 bed university-affiliated teaching hospital performing approximately 20,000 surgical operations per year. A multidisciplinary team was formed and a series of interventions were implemented to address high pneumonia rates and prolonged intubation. Specific interventions included enforcement of protocols and adherence to the Institute for Healthcare Improvement (IHI) ventilator bundles, including head of bed elevation, sedation holidays, extubate when ready, and early nutrition. NSQIP collected pre-operative through 30-day postoperative data prospectively on 1,081 surgical patients in the intensive care unit from January 1, 2010 – July 31, 2012. The variables pneumonia and V48 undergo logistic regression and risk adjusted results of observed versus expected are calculated. Mean and confidence intervals are represented in caterpillar charts and bar graphs. Statistical analysis was via Fisher exact t-test. Results Progressive improvements were observed over a two-year period via three semiannual reports (SAR). Corrective measures showed a decrease in V48 with an observed to expected odds ratio (O: E) improving from 1.5 to 1.04, or 1.9% ( 7/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.11% (12/1080 patients) July 31, 2012 respectively. Similarly, pneumonia rates decreased 1.36% (5/368 patients) July 31, 2011 to 1.2% ( 13/1081 patients) July 31, 2012 with O: E = 1.4 and 1.25 respectively. Statistical significance was achieved (p < .05). Conclusion Given an estimated annual volume of 20,000 cases per year with a cost of $22,097 per episode of pneumonia and

  5. Review of Medicare, Medicaid, and Commercial Quality of Care Measures: Considerations for Assessing Accountable Care Organizations.

    PubMed

    Kessell, Eric; Pegany, Vishaal; Keolanui, Beth; Fulton, Brent D; Scheffler, Richard M; Shortell, Stephen M

    2015-08-01

    Accountable care organizations (ACOs) have proliferated under the Affordable Care Act (ACA). If ACOs are to improve health care quality and lower costs, quality measures will be increasingly important in determining if provider consolidations associated with the development of ACOs are achieving their intended purpose. This article assesses quality measurement across public and private sectors. We reviewed available quality measures for a subset of programs in six organizations and assessed the number and domain of measures (structure, process, outcomes, and patient experience). Two-thirds of all quality measures were categorized as process measures. Outcome measures made up nearly 20 percent of measures. Patient experience and structure measures made up approximately 8 percent and 7 percent, respectively. We propose further improvements to quality measurement initiatives. For example, programs that reward providers should consider reward size and distribution within the organization. Quality improvement initiatives should consider what encourages provider buy-in and participation and the effects on populations with disproportionate health care needs. As the focus of quality initiatives may change from year to year, measures should be periodically revisited to ensure continued improvement and sustainability. Finally, we suggest quality measures that regulators could use prior to ACO formation or in the year or two following formation.

  6. Organizational Cost of Quality Improvement for Depression Care

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuan-Fen; Rubenstein, Lisa V; Kirchner, JoAnn E; Fortney, John C; Perkins, Mark W; Ober, Scott K; Pyne, Jeffrey M; Chaney, Edmund F

    2009-01-01

    Objective We documented organizational costs for depression care quality improvement (QI) to develop an evidence-based, Veterans Health Administration (VA) adapted depression care model for primary care practices that performed well for patients, was sustained over time, and could be spread nationally in VA. Data Sources and Study Setting Project records and surveys from three multistate VA administrative regions and seven of their primary care practices. Study Design Descriptive analysis. Data Collection We documented project time commitments and expenses for 86 clinical QI and 42 technical expert support team participants for 4 years from initial contact through care model design, Plan–Do–Study–Act cycles, and achievement of stable workloads in which models functioned as routine care. We assessed time, salary costs, and costs for conference calls, meetings, e-mails, and other activities. Principle Findings Over an average of 27 months, all clinics began referring patients to care managers. Clinical participants spent 1,086 hours at a cost of $84,438. Technical experts spent 2,147 hours costing $197,787. Eighty-five percent of costs derived from initial regional engagement activities and care model design. Conclusions Organizational costs of the QI process for depression care in a large health care system were significant, and should be accounted for when planning for implementation of evidence-based depression care. PMID:19146566

  7. Variations in the quality of care at radical prostatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Sammon, Jesse; Jhaveri, Jay; Sun, Maxine; Ghani, Khurshid R.; Schmitges, Jan; Jeong, Wooju; Peabody, James O.; Karakiewicz, Pierre I.; Menon, Mani

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative morbidity and mortality is low following radical prostatectomy (RP), though not inconsequential. Due to the natural history of the disease process, the implications of treatment on long-term oncologic control and functional outcomes are of increased significance. Structures, processes and outcomes are the three main determinants of quality of RP care and provide the framework for this review. Structures affecting quality of care include hospital and surgeon volume, hospital teaching status and patient insurance type. Process determinants of RP care have been poorly studied, by and large, but there is a developing trend toward the performance of randomized trials to assess the merits of evolving RP techniques. Finally, the direct study of RP outcomes has been particularly controversial and includes the development of quality of life measurement tools, combined outcomes measures, and the use of utilities to measure operative success based on individual patient priority. PMID:22496709

  8. Software quality assessment for health care systems.

    PubMed

    Braccini, G; Fabbrini, F; Fusani, M

    1997-01-01

    The problem of defining a quality model to be used in the evaluation of the software components of a Health Care System (HCS) is addressed. The model, based on the ISO/IEC 9126 standard, has been interpreted to fit the requirements of some classes of applications representative of Health Care Systems, on the basis of the experience gained both in the field of medical Informatics and assessment of software products. The values resulting from weighing the quality characteristics according to their criticality outline a set of quality profiles that can be used both for evaluation and certification.

  9. The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, andImproving Symptoms:Transforming Institutional Care approach: preliminary data from the implementation of a Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services nursing facility demonstration project.

    PubMed

    Unroe, Kathleen T; Nazir, Arif; Holtz, Laura R; Maurer, Helen; Miller, Ellen; Hickman, Susan E; La Mantia, Michael A; Bennett, Merih; Arling, Greg; Sachs, Greg A

    2015-01-01

    The Optimizing Patient Transfers, Impacting Medical Quality, and Improving Symptoms: Transforming Institutional Care (OPTIMISTIC) project aims to reduce avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay residents enrolled in 19 central Indiana nursing facilities. This clinical demonstration project, funded by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovations Center, places a registered nurse in each nursing facility to implement an evidence-based quality improvement program with clinical support from nurse practitioners. A description of the model is presented, and early implementation experiences during the first year of the project are reported. Important elements include better medical care through implementation of Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers tools and chronic care management, enhanced transitional care, and better palliative care with a focus on systematic advance care planning. There were 4,035 long-stay residents in 19 facilities enrolled in OPTIMISTIC between February 2013 and January 2014. Root-cause analyses were performed for all 910 acute transfers of these long stay residents. Of these transfers, the project RN evaluated 29% as avoidable (57% were not avoidable and 15% were missing), and opportunities for quality improvement were identified in 54% of transfers. Lessons learned in early implementation included defining new clinical roles, integrating into nursing facility culture, managing competing facility priorities, communicating with multiple stakeholders, and developing a system for collecting and managing data. The success of the overall initiative will be measured primarily according to reduction in avoidable hospitalizations of long-stay nursing facility residents. PMID:25537789

  10. The military health care system: providing quality care at a low per capita cost.

    PubMed

    Stinner, Daniel J; Sathiyakumar, Vasanth; Ficke, James R

    2014-10-01

    Orthopaedic trauma constitutes a significant portion of injuries in the military. By focusing on the "Quadruple Aim" of readiness, population health, experience of care, and per capita costs, the Military Health System delivers high-quality care with low costs. We examine the components of military health policy to find avenues of improvement for civilian orthopaedics. Greater emphasis on preventive medicine, alternative clinic structures, and interchangeability will help civilian orthopaedists lower costs and deliver quality patient-centered care similar to current military structure.

  11. Curing and Caring: The Work of Primary Care Physicians With Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    CarolinaApesoa-Varano, Ester; Barker, Judith C.; Hinton, Ladson

    2013-01-01

    The symbolic framework guiding primary care physicians’ (PCPs) practice is crucial in shaping the quality of care for those with degenerative dementia. Examining the relationship between the cure and care models in primary care offers a unique opportunity for exploring change toward a more holistic approach to health care. The aims of this study were to (a) explore how PCPs approach the care of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and (b) describe how this care unfolds from the physicians’ perspectives. This was a cross-sectional study of 40 PCPs who completed semistructured interviews as part of a dementia caregiving study. Findings show that PCPs recognize the limits of the cure paradigm and articulate a caring, more holistic model that addresses the psychosocial needs of dementia patients. However, caring is difficult to uphold because of time constraints, emotional burden, and jurisdictional issues. Thus, the care model remains secondary and temporary. PMID:21685311

  12. Quality and Value in an Evolving Health Care Landscape.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Robin N

    2016-07-01

    Demonstrating and improving value of care continues to be increasingly important in hand surgery. To prepare for emerging models that transition payment from volume to value, hand surgeons will benefit from a clear understanding of quality, cost, and value. National organizations and both public and private payers increasingly advocate for patient-reported outcome measures for pay for reporting and pay for performance initiatives. These are intended to incentivize providers and health systems to improve patient-centered care while minimizing costs. Appreciating the limitations to using patient-reported outcomes in hand surgery can ensure hand surgery is appropriately assessed in novel payment models. PMID:27374791

  13. Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care: Improvements on Colorectal Cancer Quality of Care Indicators during a 3-Year Interval

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M; Jacobsen, Paul B; Lee, Ji-Hyun; Malafa, Mokenge; Fulp, William; Fletcher, Michelle; Smith, Jesusa Corazon R; Brown, Richard; Levine, Richard; Cartwright, Thomas; Abesada-Terk, Guillermo; Kim, George; Alemany, Carlos; Faig, Douglas; Sharp, Philip; Markham, Merry-Jennifer; Shibata, David

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The quality of cancer care has become a national priority; however, there are few ongoing efforts to assist medical oncology practices in identifying areas for improvement. The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care is a consortium of 11 medical oncology practices that evaluates the quality of cancer care across Florida. Within this practice-based system of self-assessment, we determined adherence to colorectal cancer quality of care indicators (QCIs) in 2006, disseminated results to each practice and reassessed adherence in 2009. The current report focuses on evaluating the direction and magnitude of change in adherence to QCIs for colorectal cancer patients between the 2 assessments. STUDY DESIGN Medical records were reviewed for all colorectal cancer patients seen by a medical oncologist in 2006 (n = 489) and 2009 (n = 511) at 10 participating practices. Thirty-five indicators were evaluated individually and changes in QCI adherence over time and by site were examined. RESULTS Significant improvements were noted from 2006 to 2009, with large gains in surgical/pathological QCIs (eg, documenting rectal radial margin status, lymphovascular invasion, and the review of ≥12 lymph nodes) and medical oncology QCIs (documenting planned treatment regimen and providing recommended neoadjuvant regimens). Documentation of perineural invasion and radial margins significantly improved; however, adherence remained low (47% and 71%, respectively). There was significant variability in adherence for some QCIs across institutions at follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The Florida Initiative for Quality Cancer Care practices conducted self-directed quality-improvement efforts during a 3-year interval and overall adherence to QCIs improved. However, adherence remained low for several indicators, suggesting that organized improvement efforts might be needed for QCIs that remained consistently low over time. Findings demonstrate how efforts such as the Florida Initiative for

  14. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  15. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care

    PubMed Central

    El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care. PMID:27493399

  16. Patient's sexual health: do we care enough?

    PubMed

    Ho, Tai Mooi; Fernández, M

    2006-01-01

    It is well documented that sexual problems often accompany chronic health conditions, for example: chronic renal failure, hypertension and diabetes mellitus. One of the responsibilities of a nurse is to provide patients with information concerning their health and treatment to achieve optimum outcomes, thus enhancing patients' quality of life. However, the authors observed that the nursing clinical pathways in their practice seldom reflect the attention given to patient's sexuality. This paper aims to confirm the hypothesis that health professionals do not give sufficient care to patient's sexual health and to define the causes. A descriptive study consisted of close-ended questionnaire was employed. The medical and nursing staff of a Nephrology Department were included in the study (92.6% response rate). Professionals' opinions on the importance of patient's sexual health, difficulty in addressing this issue and attitude were explored. Staff's opinion on the importance of patient's sexual health is moderately high. However, 86% admit that they do not give sufficient attention and 92% never initiate to address sexual issues to patients. The results reveal the impediment being in relation to awkwardness and deficient sex education in dealing with this subject. Some staff have expressed other deterring factors. This study confirms that professionals do not render sufficient care to patient's sexual health due to their conservative attitude and lack of skill in addressing sexuality. The authors therefore suggest some ways in helping to bridge this gap. PMID:17345975

  17. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance. PMID:23903945

  18. Improving organizational climate for excellence in patient care.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Edwin

    2013-01-01

    Managers in health care organizations today are expected to achieve higher-quality patient care at a lower cost. Developing and maintaining a positive organizational climate can help improve motivation and foster higher employee performance. In turn, this will help the organization deliver better patient care at a lower cost. This article offers metrics for assessing organizational climate, analyzes barriers to a positive climate, and explores strategies that managers can use to build the type of climate that fosters high performance.

  19. Quality of tuberculosis care in India: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Satyanarayana, S.; Subbaraman, R.; Shete, P.; Gore, G.; Das, J.; Cattamanchi, A.; Mayer, K.; Menzies, D.; Harries, A. D.; Hopewell, P.; Pai, M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY BACKGROUND While Indian studies have assessed care providers’ knowledge and practices, there is no systematic review on the quality of tuberculosis (TB) care. METHODS We searched multiple sources to identify studies (2000–2014) on providers’ knowledge and practices. We used the International Standards for TB Care to benchmark quality of care. RESULTS Of the 47 studies included, 35 were questionnaire surveys and 12 used chart abstraction. None assessed actual practice using standardised patients. Heterogeneity in the findings precluded meta-analysis. Of 22 studies evaluating provider knowledge about using sputum smears for diagnosis, 10 found that less than half of providers had correct knowledge; 3 of 4 studies assessing self-reported practices by providers found that less than a quarter reported ordering smears for patients with chest symptoms. In 11 of 14 studies that assessed treatment, less than one third of providers knew the standard regimen for drug-susceptible TB. Adherence to standards in practice was generally lower than correct knowledge of those standards. Eleven studies with both public and private providers found higher levels of appropriate knowledge/practice in the public sector. CONCLUSIONS Available evidence suggests suboptimal quality of TB care, particularly in the private sector. Improvement of quality of care should be a priority for India. PMID:26056098

  20. Paying pharmacists for patient care

    PubMed Central

    Houle, Sherilyn K. D.; Grindrod, Kelly A.; Chatterley, Trish; Tsuyuki, Ross T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Expansion of scope of practice and diminishing revenues from dispensing are requiring pharmacists to increasingly adopt clinical care services into their practices. Pharmacists must be able to receive payment in order for provision of clinical care to be sustainable. The objective of this study is to update a previous systematic review by identifying remunerated pharmacist clinical care programs worldwide and reporting on uptake and patient care outcomes observed as a result. Methods: Literature searches were performed in several databases, including MEDLINE, Embase and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, for papers referencing remuneration, pharmacy and cognitive services. Searches of the grey literature and Internet were also conducted. Papers and programs were identified up to December 2012 and were included if they were not reported in our previous review. One author performed data abstraction, which was independently reviewed by a second author. All results are presented descriptively. Results: Sixty new remunerated programs were identified across Canada, the United States, Europe, Australia and New Zealand, ranging in complexity from emergency contraception counseling to minor ailments schemes and comprehensive medication management. In North America, the average fee provided for a medication review is $68.86 (all figures are given in Canadian dollars), with $23.37 offered for a follow-up visit and $15.16 for prescription adaptations. Time-dependent fees were reimbursed at $93.60 per hour on average. Few programs evaluated uptake and outcomes of these services but, when available, indicated slow uptake but improved chronic disease markers and cost savings. Discussion: Remuneration for pharmacists’ clinical care services is highly variable, with few programs reporting program outcomes. Programs and pharmacists are encouraged to examine the time required to perform these activities and the outcomes achieved to ensure that fees are adequate to

  1. Aides' Involvement in Decision-Making and the Quality of Care in Institutional Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raynes, Norma V.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The degree of participation in decision making by direct care staff aides, and its effect on the quality of care for mentally handicapped persons, was assessed among 125 staff of 3 state institutions averaging 1080 patients. (BB)

  2. Effects of stress management program on the quality of nursing care and intensive care unit nurses

    PubMed Central

    Pahlavanzadeh, Saied; Asgari, Zohreh; Alimohammadi, Nasrollah

    2016-01-01

    Background: High level of stress in intensive care unit nurses affects the quality of their nursing care. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the effects of a stress management program on the quality of nursing care of intensive care unit nurses. Materials and Methods: This study is a randomized clinical trial that was conducted on 65 nurses. The samples were selected by stratified sampling of the nurses working in intensive care units 1, 2, 3 in Al-Zahra Hospital in Isfahan, Iran and were randomly assigned to two groups. The intervention group underwent an intervention, including 10 sessions of stress management that was held twice a week. In the control group, placebo sessions were held simultaneously. Data were gathered by demographic checklist and Quality Patient Care Scale before, immediately after, and 1 month after the intervention in both groups. Then, the data were analyzed by Student's t-test, Mann–Whitney, Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) through SPSS software version 18. Results: Mean scores of overall and dimensions of quality of care in the intervention group were significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to pre-intervention (P < 0.001). The results showed that the quality of care in the intervention group was significantly higher immediately after and 1 month after the intervention, compared to the control group (P < 0.001). Conclusions: As stress management is an effective method to improve the quality of care, the staffs are recommended to consider it in improvement of the quality of nursing care. PMID:27186196

  3. Transforming care teams to provide the best possible patient-centered, collaborative care.

    PubMed

    Sevin, Cory; Moore, Gordon; Shepherd, John; Jacobs, Tracy; Hupke, Cindy

    2009-01-01

    Patient experience of care is now a crucial parameter in assessing the quality of healthcare delivered in the United States. Continuity, patient-driven access to care, and being "known" by a provider or practice, particularly for patients with chronic diseases, have been shown to enhance patient satisfaction with care and health outcomes. Healthcare systems are challenged to effectively meet the wants and needs of patients by tailoring interventions based on each person's unique set factors-his or her strengths, preferences, and personal and social context. Creating care teams, a coordinated multidisciplinary group of healthcare professionals, enables a practice to take advantage of the skill sets represented and redesign care delivery with the patient and community as the focal point. This article describes the attributes of highly functioning care teams, how to measure them, and guidance on creating them. A case example illustrates how these ideas work in practice.

  4. Patient involvement in diabetes care: experiences in nine diabetes care groups

    PubMed Central

    de Bruin, Simone R.; Struijs, Jeroen N.; Rijken, Mieke; Nijpels, Giel; Baan, Caroline A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Despite the expected beneficial effects on quality of care, patient involvement in diabetes care groups, which deliver a bundled paid integrated care programme for diabetes type 2, seems to be limited. The aim of this study was to gain insight into levels and methods of patient involvement, into facilitators and barriers, and into the future preferences of care groups and patient representatives. Theory and methods Semi-structured interviews were held with 10 representatives of care groups and 11 representatives of patient advocacy groups. An adapted version of Arnstein's ladder of citizen participation was used to define five levels of patient involvement. Results Patient involvement in care groups was mostly limited to informing and consulting patients. Higher levels, i.e., advising, co-producing and decision-making, were less frequently observed. Care groups and patient representatives perceived largely the same barriers and facilitators and had similar preferences regarding future themes and design of patient involvement. Conclusion Constructive collaboration between diabetes care groups and patient representatives to enhance patient involvement in the future seems viable. Several issues such as the lack of evidence for effectiveness of patient involvement, differences in viewpoints on the role and responsibilities of care groups and perceived barriers need to be addressed. PMID:27118961

  5. Gay patients. Context for care.

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, G.; Saunders, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Gays and lesbians are a part of our society and our practices: real people with real lives, not stereotypes. Understanding their inner world and their social milieu is the first step to providing care that is holistic and appropriate. The "coming out" process and other unique health issues are described. Guidance is provided on how to identify and relate to gay and lesbian patients. PMID:8199524

  6. Quality of Care in the US Territories

    PubMed Central

    Nunez-Smith, Marcella; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Herrin, Jeph; Santana, Calie; Curry, Leslie A.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.; Krumholz, Harlan M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Health care quality in the US territories is poorly characterized. We used process measures to compare the performance of hospitals in the US territories and in the US states. Methods Our sample included nonfederal hospitals located in the United States and its territories discharging Medicare fee-for-service (FFS) patients with a principal discharge diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), heart failure (HF), or pneumonia (PNE) (July 2005–June 2008). We compared risk-standardized 30-day mortality and readmission rates between territorial and stateside hospitals, adjusting for performance on core process measures and hospital characteristics. Results In 57 territorial hospitals and 4799 stateside hospitals, hospital mean 30-day risk-standardized mortality rates were significantly higher in the US territories (P < .001) for AMI (18.8% vs 16.0%), HF (12.3% vs 10.8%), and PNE (14.9% vs 11.4%). Hospital mean 30-day risk-standardized readmission rates (RSRRs) were also significantly higher in the US territories for AMI (20.6% vs 19.8%; P=.04), and PNE (19.4% vs 18.4%; P=.01) but was not significant for HF (25.5% vs 24.5%; P=.07). The higher risk-standardized mortality rates in the US territories remained statistically significant after adjusting for hospital characteristics and core process measure performance. Hospitals in the US territories had lower performance on all core process measures (P< .05). Conclusions Compared with hospitals in the US states, hospitals in the US territories have significantly higher 30-day mortality rates and lower performance on every core process measure for patients discharged after AMI, HF, and PNE. Eliminating the substantial quality gap in the US territories should be a national priority. PMID:21709184

  7. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  8. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman.

    PubMed

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S; Abdulhadi, Nadia N; Coppell, Kirsten J

    2016-08-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002-2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman. PMID:27606104

  9. Care of Patients with Diabetic Foot Disease in Oman

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Ibrahim S.; Abdulhadi, Nadia N.; Coppell, Kirsten J.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major public health challenge and causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Diabetic foot disease is one of the most debilitating and costly complications of diabetes. While simple preventative foot care measures can reduce the risk of lower limb ulcerations and subsequent amputations by up to 85%, they are not always implemented. In Oman, foot care for patients with diabetes is mainly provided in primary and secondary care settings. Among all lower limb amputations performed in public hospitals in Oman between 2002–2013, 47.3% were performed on patients with diabetes. The quality of foot care among patients with diabetes in Oman has not been evaluated and unidentified gaps in care may exist. This article highlights challenges in the provision of adequate foot care to Omani patients with diabetes. It concludes with suggested strategies for an integrated national diabetic foot care programme in Oman.

  10. Initial Steps for Quality Improvement of Obesity Care Across Divisions at a Tertiary Care Pediatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Sheila Z.; Beacher, Daniel R.; Kwon, Soyang; McCarville, Megan A.; Binns, Helen J.; Ariza, Adolfo J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pediatric subspecialists can participate in the care of obese children. Objective: To describe steps to help subspecialty providers initiate quality improvement efforts in obesity care. Methods: An anonymous patient data download, provider surveys and interviews assessed subspecialty providers’ identification and perspectives of childhood obesity and gathered information on perceived roles and care strategies. Participating divisions received summary analyses of quantitative and qualitative data and met with study leaders to develop visions for division/service-specific care improvement. Results: Among 13 divisions/services, subspecialists’ perceived role varied by specialty; many expressed the need for cross-collaboration. All survey informants agreed that identification was the first step, and expressed interest in obtaining additional resources to improve care. Conclusions: Subspecialists were interested in improving the quality and coordination of obesity care for patients across our tertiary care setting. Developing quality improvement projects to achieve greater pediatric obesity care goals starts with engagement of providers toward better identifying and managing childhood obesity. PMID:25233013

  11. Clinical Workflow Observations to Identify Opportunities for Nurse, Physicians and Patients to Share a Patient-centered Plan of Care

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Sarah A.; Gazarian, Priscilla; Stade, Diana; McNally, Kelly; Morrison, Conny; Ohashi, Kumiko; Lehmann, Lisa; Dalal, Anuj; Bates, David W.; Dykes, Patricia C.

    2014-01-01

    Patient- and Family-Centered Care (PFCC) is essential for high quality care in the critical and acute-specialty care hospital setting. Effective PFCC requires clinicians to form an integrated interprofessional team to collaboratively engage with the patient/family and contribute to a shared patient-centered plan of care. We conducted observations on a critical care and specialty unit to understand the plan of care activities and workflow documentation requirements for nurses and physicians to inform the development of a shared patient-centered plan of care to support patient engagement. We identified siloed plan of care documentation, with workflow opportunities to converge the nurses plan of care with the physician planned To-do lists and quality and safety checklists. Integration of nurses and physicians plan of care activities into a shared plan of care is a feasible and valuable step toward interprofessional teams that effectively engage patients in plan of care activities. PMID:25954345

  12. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload.

  13. [WINHO quality indicators for outpatient oncology care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Hermes-Moll, Kerstin; Klein, Gudrun; Buschmann-Maiworm, Regina E; Baumann, Walter; Otremba, Burkhard; Lebahn, Herbert; Steinmetz, H Tilmann; Geraedts, Max; Kleeberg, Ulrich R; Schmitz, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the WINHO indicators project is to describe and enhance the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany with indicators. This paper deals with the development of a set of evidence- and consensus-based meaningful indicators to assess the quality of outpatient oncology care in Germany. These indicators are intended to be applied in assessments of quality of patient care in oncology practices, in quality reports and in peer-to-peer benchmarking. A set of 272 already existing indicators was identified through internet and literature searches. After redundancy reduction and addition of newly developed indicators for areas of ambulatory oncology care that were not yet covered, a preliminary set of 67 indicators was established. The further development of the indicator set was based on a modified version of the two-step RAND/UCLA expert evaluation method, which has been internationally established for developing quality indicator sets. The indicators were modified after the first round of ratings. After completing and assessing the second round of ratings, a set of 46 homogeneously positively rated quality indicators is now available for outpatient oncology care in Germany.

  14. Benchmarking and audit of breast units improves quality of care.

    PubMed

    van Dam, P A; Verkinderen, L; Hauspy, J; Vermeulen, P; Dirix, L; Huizing, M; Altintas, S; Papadimitriou, K; Peeters, M; Tjalma, W

    2013-01-01

    Quality Indicators (QIs) are measures of health care quality that make use of readily available hospital inpatient administrative data. Assessment quality of care can be performed on different levels: national, regional, on a hospital basis or on an individual basis. It can be a mandatory or voluntary system. In all cases development of an adequate database for data extraction, and feedback of the findings is of paramount importance. In the present paper we performed a Medline search on "QIs and breast cancer" and "benchmarking and breast cancer care", and we have added some data from personal experience. The current data clearly show that the use of QIs for breast cancer care, regular internal and external audit of performance of breast units, and benchmarking are effective to improve quality of care. Adherence to guidelines improves markedly (particularly regarding adjuvant treatment) and there are data emerging showing that this results in a better outcome. As quality assurance benefits patients, it will be a challenge for the medical and hospital community to develop affordable quality control systems, which are not leading to excessive workload. PMID:24753926

  15. The American Association of Critical Care Nurse's Beacon Award: a framework for quality.

    PubMed

    Reed, Kevin D

    2008-12-01

    The Beacon Award for Critical Care Excellence recognizes individual critical care units that have met rigid criteria for excellence, exhibiting high-quality standards and exceptional care of patients and their families. Used as a framework for quality, the award criteria focus on structure, process, and outcomes that enable quality to emerge in the critical care environment. The journey toward meeting Beacon Award criteria can produce long-lasting changes that transform unit-based culture and lead to sustained excellence.

  16. Care of the liver transplant patient

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Mamatha; Al-Busafi, Said A; Deschênes, Marc; Ghali, Peter

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an approach to the care of liver transplant (LT) patients, a growing patient population with unique needs. METHODS: A literature search of PubMed for guidelines and review articles using the keywords “liver transplantation”, “long term complications” and “medical management” was conducted, resulting in 77 articles. RESULTS: As a result of being on immunosuppression, LT recipients are at increased risk of infections and must be screened regularly for metabolic complications and malignancies. DISCUSSION: Although immunosuppression is key to maintaining allograft health after transplantation, it comes with its own set of medical issues to follow. Physicians following LT recipients must be aware of the greater risk for hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, renal failure, metabolic bone disease and malignancies in these patients, all of whom require regular monitoring and screening. Vaccination, quality of life, sexual function and pregnancy must be specifically addressed in transplant patients. PMID:24729996

  17. [Without reciprocal recognition there is not quality of care].

    PubMed

    Calvo Rigual, Fernando; Costa Alcaraz, Ana M; García-Conde Brú, Javier; Megía Sanz, María Jesús

    2011-10-01

    Understanding the classic doctor-patient relationship has entered a crisis in medicine today. Communication difficulties, underestimation of empathy, or bringing economic criteria are leading to care styles that facilitate the objectification of patients, contempt for doctors, and indifference of both to collective measures of health. Basic principles of this relationship such as quality, justice, patient autonomy and beneficence may appear weak content. We intend to apply the concept of "reciprocal recognition" from philosophy to "recharge" content different aspects of the clinical relationship: a look "inside", dealing with the identity of the protagonists seek to promote it by using reciprocal recognition of both patient and the professional. In one aspect "external", focusing on the quality of care, a key objective of the clinical relationship. With reciprocal recognition, issues of justice and equity are reinforced through public health, building an identity of citizens with rights.

  18. How grounded theory can improve nursing care quality.

    PubMed

    Nathaniel, Alvita K; Andrews, Tom

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the grounded theory research method and demonstrates how nurses can employ specific grounded theories to improve patient care quality. Because grounded theory is derived from real-world experience, it is a particularly appropriate method for nursing research. An overview of the method and language of grounded theory provides a background for nurses as they read grounded theories and apply newly acquired understandings to predictable processes and patterns of behavior. This article presents 2 exemplar grounded theories with suggestions as to how nurses can apply these and other grounded theories to improve the provision of quality nursing care.

  19. Improving intensive care unit quality using collaborative networks.

    PubMed

    Watson, Sam R; Scales, Damon C

    2013-01-01

    Collaborative networks of intensive care units can help promote a quality-improvement agenda across an entire system or region. Proposed advantages include targeting a greater number of patients, sharing of resources, and common measurement systems for audit and feedback or benchmarking. This review focuses on elements that are essential for the success and sustainability of these collaborative networks, using as examples networks in Michigan and Ontario. More research is needed to understand the mechanisms through which collaborative networks lead to improved care delivery and to demonstrate their cost-effectiveness in comparison with other approaches to system-level quality improvement.

  20. Patient Care, Communication, and Safety in the Mammography Suite.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Leisa

    2016-09-01

    Producing high-quality mammograms requires excellent technical skills along with exemplary communication. Mammographers must be able to address differences in patients' mental states, body habitus, and physical ability to obtain an optimal examination. In addition, every mammographer must practice consistently with patient safety, care, and satisfaction in mind. This article discusses verbal and nonverbal communication strategies, barriers to communication, and the care and safety of patients in the mammography suite who present special challenges. PMID:27601710

  1. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities.

  2. Quality-of-care standards for early arthritis clinics.

    PubMed

    Ivorra, José Andrés Román; Martínez, Juan Antonio; Lázaro, Pablo; Navarro, Federico; Fernandez-Nebro, Antonio; de Miguel, Eugenio; Loza, Estibaliz; Carmona, Loreto

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of early arthritis is associated with improved patient outcomes. One way to achieve this is by organising early arthritis clinics (EACs). The objective of this project was to develop standards of quality for EACs. The standards were developed using the two-round Delphi method. The questionnaire, developed using the best-available scientific evidence, includes potentially relevant items describing the dimensions of quality of care in the EAC. The questionnaire was completed by 26 experts (physicians responsible for the EACs in Spain and chiefs of the rheumatology service in Spanish hospitals). Two hundred and forty-four items (standards) describing the quality of the EAC were developed, grouped by the following dimensions: (1) patient referral to the EAC; (2) standards of structure for an EAC; (3) standards of process; (4) relation between primary care physicians and the EAC; (5) diagnosis and assessment of early arthritis; (6) patient treatment and follow-up in the EAC; (7) research and training in an EAC; and (8) quality of care perceived by the patient. An operational definition of early arthritis was also developed based on eight criteria. The standards developed can be used to measure/establish the requirements, resources, and processes that EACs have or should have to carry out their treatment, research, and educational activities. These standards may be useful to health professionals, patient associations, and health authorities. PMID:23568381

  3. [The quality of chronic care in Germany].

    PubMed

    Fullerton, Birgit; Nolte, Ellen; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    Over the last ten years changes in the legal framework of the German health care system have promoted the development of new health service models to improve chronic care. Recent innovations include the nation-wide introduction of disease management programmes (DMPs), integrated care contracts, community nurse programmes, the introduction of General Practitioner (GP)-centred care contracts, and new opportunities to offer interdisciplinary outpatient care in polyclinics. The aim of this article is to describe the recent developments regarding both the implementation of new health care models by statutory health insurance companies and their evaluation. As part of a European project on the development and validation of disease management evaluation methods (DISMEVAL), we carried out a selective literature search to identify relevant models and evaluation studies. However, on the basis of the currently available evaluation and study results it is difficult to judge whether these developments have actually led to an improvement in the quality of chronic care in Germany. Only for DMPs, evaluation is legally mandatory; its methods are inappropriate, though, for studying the effectiveness of DMPs. Further study results on the effectiveness of DMPs mostly focus on the DMP Diabetes mellitus type II and show consistent improvements regarding process parameters such as regular routine examinations, adherence to treatment guidelines, and quality of life. More research will be needed to determine whether DMPs can also help reduce the incidence of secondary disease and mortality in the long term. PMID:22142877

  4. Compassion: the missing link in quality of care.

    PubMed

    van der Cingel, Margreet

    2014-09-01

    This article discusses the impact of selected findings from a PhD-study that focuses on compassion as a guiding principle for contemporary nursing education and practice. The study, of which the literature review and empirical findings have already been published, looked at compassion as perceived within the relationship of nurses and older persons with a chronic disease. The patient group was chosen because daily life for them is characterized by long-term dependency on care. The literature review resulted in a theoretical framework of compassion that also explores other closely related concepts such as suffering and empathy. The empirical part of the study, in which 61 in-depth interviews and 6 group interviews with patients and nurses took place, showed that compassion is a mirroring process in response to grief. Compassion consists of seven dimensions such as attentiveness and presence, in which saliency, so as to anticipate patients' needs, is of major importance. Compassion is perceived by participants as an indispensable aspect of care, which helps to reveal relevant information in order to establish appropriate outcomes of care. This article focuses on the aspects of the PhD-study in which an analysis of compassion in the context of both modern as well as the history of nursing took place. Currently evidence based practice is regarded as the standard for good quality care. Nevertheless there is an on-going debate about what constitutes good quality care. Within this debate two opposing views are apparent. One view defines good care as care supported by the best scientific evidence. The other view states that good care takes place within the nurse-patient relationship in which the nurse performs professional care based on intuitive knowing. It is suggested that compassion is the (missing) link between these views.

  5. [Measuring quality of life in every oncological patient].

    PubMed

    Aaronson, Neil K; Sprangers, Mirjam A G

    2011-01-01

    There are indications that in cancer patients quality of life is a better predictor of survival than clinical measures such as tumour response and stage of disease. In addition, health care professionals' expectations about the effect of a particular treatment on quality of life often do not correspond with the experience of the patient. These are all reasons for every oncological patient to complete a short questionnaire on quality of life. Using this questionnaire can improve communication between care provider and patient, and also give the care provider insight into the problems that are important to the patient at that time. This insight could subsequently lead to counseling tailored to the patient, and, if necessary, modification of treatment or referral for supportive care. A second aim is to link information on quality of life to clinical pathways and treatment guidelines.

  6. Ensuring quality cancer care: a follow-up review of the Institute of Medicine's 10 recommendations for improving the quality of cancer care in America.

    PubMed

    Spinks, Tracy; Albright, Heidi W; Feeley, Thomas W; Walters, Ron; Burke, Thomas W; Aloia, Thomas; Bruera, Eduardo; Buzdar, Aman; Foxhall, Lewis; Hui, David; Summers, Barbara; Rodriguez, Alma; Dubois, Raymond; Shine, Kenneth I

    2012-05-15

    Responding to growing concerns regarding the safety, quality, and efficacy of cancer care in the United States, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) of the National Academy of Sciences commissioned a comprehensive review of cancer care delivery in the US health care system in the late 1990s. The National Cancer Policy Board (NCPB), a 20-member board with broad representation, performed this review. In its review, the NCPB focused on the state of cancer care delivery at that time, its shortcomings, and ways to measure and improve the quality of cancer care. The NCPB described an ideal cancer care system in which patients would have equitable access to coordinated, guideline-based care and novel therapies throughout the course of their disease. In 1999, the IOM published the results of this review in its influential report, Ensuring Quality Cancer Care. The report outlined 10 recommendations, which, when implemented, would: 1) improve the quality of cancer care, 2) increase the current understanding of quality cancer care, and 3) reduce or eliminate access barriers to quality cancer care. Despite the fervor generated by this report, there are lingering doubts regarding the safety and quality of cancer care in the United States today. Increased awareness of medical errors and barriers to quality care, coupled with escalating health care costs, has prompted national efforts to reform the health care system. These efforts by health care providers and policymakers should bridge the gap between the ideal state described in Ensuring Quality Cancer Care and the current state of cancer care in the United States.

  7. Quality of Care Is Improved by Rapid Short Incubation MALDI-ToF Identification from Blood Cultures as Measured by Reduced Length of Stay and Patient Outcomes as Part of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Bacteremia in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Amanda; Schaus, David

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis has seen an incremental increase in cases of about 13% annually in the USA and accounts for approximately 4400 deaths among pediatric patients. Early identification of the specific pathogen allows the clinician to ensure that the antibiotic coverage is optimal, an intervention that has been shown to improve patient outcomes in sepsis. Our study’s objective was to assess the impact of a rapid Bruker MALDI-Tof identification protocol on pediatric sepsis cases by assessing various indicators. We assessed the quality of care by measuring the following indicators; time to identification of the pathogen, initiation of the most appropriate antibiotic, length of stay (LOS) in hospital and patient outcomes, using a retrospective review over three consecutive years. In total 92 pediatric patients, similar in age and gender distributions were assessed; 37 in 2012, 33 in 2013 and 22 in 2014. The introduction of MALDI-TOF identification in 2013 led to a significant decrease in time to identify a pathogen by 21.03 hours (p = 1.95E-05). A short incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol in 2014 further reduced time to identification by 17.75 hours (p = 2.48E-3). Overall in 2014 this led to a trend to earlier optimization of antibiotics by 20.2 hours (p = 0.14) and a reduction in length of stay after the implementation of MALDI-ToF identification in 2013 of 3.07 days and a further reduction of 8.92 days after the introduction of the rapid short incubation identification protocol using MALDI-Tof in 2014 (P = 0.12). By evaluating the subgroup of patients where antibiotics were changed, our study confirmed that patients received appropriate therapy 48.8% (20.2 hours) earlier compared to conventional methods leading to a decrease in length of stay of 23.65 days after the implementation of MALDI-ToF identification and a further reduction of 9.82 days in 2014 compared to 2012 (p = 0.02). In 2014 outcomes between the patients needing a change in their antibiotic compared to

  8. Quality of Care Is Improved by Rapid Short Incubation MALDI-ToF Identification from Blood Cultures as Measured by Reduced Length of Stay and Patient Outcomes as Part of a Multi-Disciplinary Approach to Bacteremia in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Delport, Johannes A; Strikwerda, Arend; Armstrong, Amanda; Schaus, David; John, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Sepsis has seen an incremental increase in cases of about 13% annually in the USA and accounts for approximately 4400 deaths among pediatric patients. Early identification of the specific pathogen allows the clinician to ensure that the antibiotic coverage is optimal, an intervention that has been shown to improve patient outcomes in sepsis. Our study's objective was to assess the impact of a rapid Bruker MALDI-Tof identification protocol on pediatric sepsis cases by assessing various indicators. We assessed the quality of care by measuring the following indicators; time to identification of the pathogen, initiation of the most appropriate antibiotic, length of stay (LOS) in hospital and patient outcomes, using a retrospective review over three consecutive years. In total 92 pediatric patients, similar in age and gender distributions were assessed; 37 in 2012, 33 in 2013 and 22 in 2014. The introduction of MALDI-TOF identification in 2013 led to a significant decrease in time to identify a pathogen by 21.03 hours (p = 1.95E-05). A short incubation MALDI-TOF identification protocol in 2014 further reduced time to identification by 17.75 hours (p = 2.48E-3). Overall in 2014 this led to a trend to earlier optimization of antibiotics by 20.2 hours (p = 0.14) and a reduction in length of stay after the implementation of MALDI-ToF identification in 2013 of 3.07 days and a further reduction of 8.92 days after the introduction of the rapid short incubation identification protocol using MALDI-Tof in 2014 (P = 0.12). By evaluating the subgroup of patients where antibiotics were changed, our study confirmed that patients received appropriate therapy 48.8% (20.2 hours) earlier compared to conventional methods leading to a decrease in length of stay of 23.65 days after the implementation of MALDI-ToF identification and a further reduction of 9.82 days in 2014 compared to 2012 (p = 0.02). In 2014 outcomes between the patients needing a change in their antibiotic compared to the

  9. How the ESRD quality incentive program could potentially improve quality of life for patients on dialysis.

    PubMed

    Moss, Alvin H; Davison, Sara N

    2015-05-01

    For over 20 years, the quality of medical care of the Medicare ESRD Program has been a concern. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have implemented the ESRD Quality Incentive Program, which uses the principles of value-based purchasing; dialysis providers are paid for performance on predefined quality measures, with a goal of improving patient outcomes and the quality of patient care. The ESRD Quality Incentive Program measures have been criticized, because they are largely disease oriented and use easy-to-obtain laboratory-based indicators, such as Kt/V and hemoglobin, that do not reflect outcomes that are most important to patients and have had a minimal effect on survival or quality of life. A key goal of improving quality of care is to enhance quality of life, a patient-important quality measure that matters more to many patients than even survival. None of the ESRD Quality Incentive Program measures assess patient-reported quality of life. As outlined in the National Quality Strategy, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services are holding providers accountable in six priority domains, in which quality measures have been and are being developed for value-based purchasing. Three measures-patient experience and engagement, clinical care, and care coordination-are particularly relevant to quality care in the ESRD Program; the 2014 ESRD Quality Incentive Program includes six measures, none of which provide data from a patient-centered perspective. Value-based purchasing is a well intentioned step to improve care of patients on dialysis. However, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services need to implement significant change in what is measured for the ESRD Quality Incentive Program to be patient centered and aligned with patients' values, preferences, and needs. This paper provides examples of potential quality measures for patient experience and engagement, clinical care, and care coordination, which if implemented, would be much more likely to

  10. Care left undone’ during nursing shifts: associations with workload and perceived quality of care

    PubMed Central

    Ball, Jane E; Murrells, Trevor; Rafferty, Anne Marie; Morrow, Elizabeth; Griffiths, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Background There is strong evidence to show that lower nurse staffing levels in hospitals are associated with worse patient outcomes. One hypothesised mechanism is the omission of necessary nursing care caused by time pressure—‘missed care’. Aim To examine the nature and prevalence of care left undone by nurses in English National Health Service hospitals and to assess whether the number of missed care episodes is associated with nurse staffing levels and nurse ratings of the quality of nursing care and patient safety environment. Methods Cross-sectional survey of 2917 registered nurses working in 401 general medical/surgical wards in 46 general acute National Health Service hospitals in England. Results Most nurses (86%) reported that one or more care activity had been left undone due to lack of time on their last shift. Most frequently left undone were: comforting or talking with patients (66%), educating patients (52%) and developing/updating nursing care plans (47%). The number of patients per registered nurse was significantly associated with the incidence of ‘missed care’ (p<0.001). A mean of 7.8 activities per shift were left undone on wards that are rated as ‘failing’ on patient safety, compared with 2.4 where patient safety was rated as ‘excellent’ (p <0. 001). Conclusions Nurses working in English hospitals report that care is frequently left undone. Care not being delivered may be the reason low nurse staffing levels adversely affects quality and safety. Hospitals could use a nurse-rated assessment of ‘missed care’ as an early warning measure to identify wards with inadequate nurse staffing. PMID:23898215

  11. Teaching Medical Students about Quality and Cost of Care at Case Western Reserve University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Headrick, Linda A.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    At Case Western University (Ohio), medical students critically analyze the quality and cost of asthma care in the community by studying patients in primary care practices. Each writes a case report, listing all medical charges and comparing them with guidelines for asthma care. Several recommendations for improved care have emerged. (MSE)

  12. Wound care issues in the patient with cancer.

    PubMed

    Gerlach, Mary A

    2005-06-01

    As cancer continues to represent a major health problem in the United States and in other developed countries, MCWs will continue to represent a complex problem for patients and health care professionals alike. Goals of care may range from healing to palliation, depending on the underlying pathology and patient preferences regarding their personal goals of wound or disease management. Palliative wound care should focus on patient comfort and quality of life as the goals, instead of wound. As evidence related to wound healing, products, and technology continues to increase,nurses can be at the forefront of putting into practice the science of wound healing for the benefit of patients.

  13. Measuring technical efficiency of output quality in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Junoy, J P

    1997-01-01

    Presents some examples of the implications derived from imposing the objective of maximizing social welfare, subject to limited resources, on ethical care patients management in respect of quality performance of health services. Conventional knowledge of health economics points out that critically ill patients are responsible for increased use of technological resources and that they receive a high proportion of health care resources. Attempts to answer, from the point of view of microeconomics, the question: how do we measure comparative efficiency in the management of intensive care units? Analyses this question through data from an international empirical study using micro-economic measures of productive efficiency in public services (data envelopment analysis). Results show a 28.8 per cent level of technical inefficiency processing data from 25 intensive care units in the USA. PMID:10169231

  14. Quality in health care: what are the problems and what are the solutions?

    PubMed

    Shipon, D M; Nash, D B

    2000-10-01

    The health care industry must define quality as achieving "desired health outcomes" that are "consistent with current professional knowledge." Once a single definition is established, health care professionals can begin to measure quality and improve the process of health care in this country. Clinical variation and an increasing number of medical mistakes have contributed to rising health care costs and poor quality. Once the industry establishes what is wrong, it can begin to devise some solutions to improve the quality of health care. A six-step strategy to improve quality is suggested: increasing accountability at all levels of the industry, continuous quality improvement, standardization of medicine using guidelines, patient empowerment, improved access to health information through a centralized database, and the need for incentives for patients and medical professionals. Although many physicians are skeptical of such changes, the health care industry clearly must work together to address the issue of quality appropriately.

  15. Improving regional variation using quality of care measures.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Scott A; Gerstenblith, Gary; Herbert, Robert; Anderson, Gerard

    2009-01-01

    There is significant regional variability in the quality of care provided in the United States. This article compares regional performance for three measures that focus on transitions in care, and the care of patients with multiple conditions. Admissions for people with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions, hospital readmissions within 30 days of discharge, and compliance with practice guidelines for people with three chronic conditions (congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and diabetes) were analyzed using data drawn from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' Standard Analytic Files for 5% of a 2004 national sample of Medicare beneficiaries which was divided by hospital referral regions and regional performance. There were significant regional differences in performance which we hypothesize could be improved through better care coordination and system management.

  16. Teaching nurses to provide patient centered evidence-based care through the use of informatics tools that promote safety, quality and effective clinical decisions.

    PubMed

    Norton, Michele; Skiba, Diane J; Bowman, Jeanette

    2006-01-01

    Schools of Nursing face the challenge of providing students with experiences to use evidence-based consumer centric care information tools. To facilitate this challenge, a unique partnership was forged between a school of nursing and a leading clinical information systems corporation. This strategic partnership was created to advance the field of nursing informatics through the sharing of intellectual capital. Through this sharing, the goal is to study how technology can promote patient safety, support evidence-based care and facilitate consumer involvement in health care decisions. This paper describes the design, development and testing of a multimedia product that can be used by schools of nursing. This product can be integrated into a nursing curriculum to promote the use of informatics tools as an integral practice component. The multimedia product embraces the core competencies advocated by the Institute of Medicine's Health Professions Education Report.

  17. Quality and Safety in Health Care, Part VII: Lower Costs and Higher Quality.

    PubMed

    Harolds, Jay A

    2016-02-01

    The Institute of Medicine report entitled The Health Care Imperative: Lowering Costs and Improving Outcomes discussed numerous ways to decrease costs in the health care system without decreasing quality. The use of evidence-based medicine, eliminating wasteful spending such as needlessly high administrative costs, having more preventive services, having a better reimbursement system that emphasized quality, developing a less fragmented and more efficient medical delivery system, having more transparency for patients on the outcomes of different providers, having greater health care literacy for patients, and eliminating fraud were some of the recommendations. The total savings from eliminating unnecessary health care costs was estimated to be over 3 quarters of a trillion dollars each year. PMID:26545019

  18. [Evaluation of care quality in the ICU through a computerized nursing care plan].

    PubMed

    Goñi Viguria, R; García Santolaya, M P; Vázquez Calatayud, M; Margall Coscojuela, M A; Asiaín Erro, M C

    2004-01-01

    The computerized systems that are being implemented for the recording of the Nursing Care Plan may facilitate the performance of continuing follow-up of the care quality. This retrospective descriptive study has been performed in a polyvalent Intensive Care Unit with the following objectives: a) describe the evaluation of the care quality, performed through the computerized record of the Nursing Care Plan; and 2) compare this evaluation with that performed in 1998, when the Nursing Care Plan had not yet been computerized. In the 98 revised computerized Nursing Care Plans, corresponding to the same number of patients with a mean stay of 13.8 days, the following results were obtained. Artificial airway. 74 patients had an endotracheal tube with a mean stay of 5.4 days, 11 patients had a cannula tracheotomy (time period of 45.7 days); no events occurred. Central venous lines: 91 patients were carriers of 163 catheters, the mean presence time was 9.9 days; three with withdrawn due to obstruction, there was one accident withdrawal and two were self-removed. Arterial catheter: the total number of arterial lines, corresponding to 87 patients, was 101 with a mean presence of 6.7 days; 15 obstructions, six accidental withdrawals and four self-removals were recorded. Bladder catheter: 91 patients had a bladder catheter (mean presence 12.9 days); no event occurred. Nasogastric tube: 83 patients were carriers of 98 tubes (63 Salem type and 35 for nutrition), with a mean presence of 10.1 days; five were withdrawn due to obstruction, three accidental withdrawals and 40 self-removed (23 in one patient). Skin integrity: nine patients developed bedsores, eight grade II and two grade III, the mean stay was 26.6 days. No patients had an accidental fall. As study conclusions, it stands out that the preestablished standards for the evaluation of the care were achieved in most and the care quality is maintained in relationship with our 1998 study, remaining within a level considered as

  19. Nursing home closures and quality of care.

    PubMed

    Castle, Nicholas G

    2005-02-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the relationship between quality of care in nursing homes and their likelihood of closure. We hypothesize that lower-quality facilities will be more likely to close than higher-quality facilities. Using the rates of physical restraint use, urethral catheterization, contractures, pressure ulcers, and psychotropic medication use as quality measures from approximately 12,000 facilities from 1992 to 1998, the author examine cross-sectional and change score relationships between these measures and a nursing home's likelihood of closure. The descriptive analysis shows that 621 nursing homes closed in this time period, and the results for physical restraint use were robust in their positive association with closures in most analyses lending some support for this study's hypothesis. However, overall, the author concludes that nursing facility closures are relatively rare events. And the likelihood of closure, even for poor-quality facilities, is low. PMID:15643031

  20. [Strategies for improving care of oncologic patients: SHARE Project results].

    PubMed

    Reñones Crego, María de la Concepción; Fernández Pérez, Dolores; Vena Fernández, Carmen; Zamudio Sánchez, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is a major burden for the patient and its family that requires an individualized management by healthcare professionals. Nurses are in charge of coordinating care and are the closest healthcare professionals to patient and family; however, in Spain, there are not standard protocols yet for the management of oncology patients. The Spanish Oncology Nursing Society developed between 2012 and 2014 the SHARE project, with the aim of establishing strategies to improve quality of life and nursing care in oncology patients. It was developed in 3 phases. First, a literature search and review was performed to identify nursing strategies, interventions and tools to improve cancer patients' care. At the second stage, these interventions were agreed within a group of oncology nursing experts; and at the third phase, a different group of experts in oncology care categorized the interventions to identify the ones with highest priority and most feasible to be implemented. As a result, 3 strategic actions were identified to improve nursing care during cancer treatment: To provide a named nurse to carry out the follow up process by attending to the clinic or telephonic consultation, develop therapeutic education with adapted protocols for each tumor type and treatment and ensure specific training for nurses on the management of the cancer patients. Strategic actions proposed in this paper aim to improve cancer patients' healthcare and quality of life through the development of advanced nursing roles based on a higher level of autonomy, situating nurses as care coordinators to assure an holistic care in oncology patients.

  1. Quality improvement education to improve performance on ulcerative colitis quality measures and care processes aligned with National Quality Strategy priorities.

    PubMed

    Greene, Laurence; Moreo, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have reported suboptimal approaches to patient care. In the United States, the findings have motivated leading gastroenterology organizations to call for initiatives that support clinicians in aligning their practices with quality measures for IBD and priorities of the National Quality Strategy (NQS). We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) education program on ulcerative colitis in which patient charts were audited for 30 gastroenterologists before (n = 300 charts) and after (n = 290 charts) they participated in QI-focused educational activities. Charts were audited for nine measures, selected for their alignment with four NQS priorities: making care safer, ensuring patient engagement, promoting communication, and promoting effective treatment practices. Four of the measures, including guideline-directed vaccinations and assessments of disease type and activity, were part of the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). The other five measures involved counseling patients on various topics in ulcerative colitis management, documentation of side effects, assessment of adherence status, and simplification of dosing. The gastroenterologists also completed baseline and post-education surveys designed to assess qualitative outcomes. One of the educational interventions was a private audit feedback session conducted for each gastroenterologist. The sessions were designed to support participants in identifying measures reflecting suboptimal care quality and developing action plans for improvement. In continuous improvement cycles, follow-up interventions included QI tools and educational monographs. Across the nine chart variables, post-education improvements ranged from 0% to 48%, with a mean improvement of 15.9%. Survey findings revealed improvements in self-reported understanding of quality measures and intentions to apply them to practice, and lower rates of perceived significant barriers to high-quality

  2. Quality improvement education to improve performance on ulcerative colitis quality measures and care processes aligned with National Quality Strategy priorities.

    PubMed

    Greene, Laurence; Moreo, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Studies on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have reported suboptimal approaches to patient care. In the United States, the findings have motivated leading gastroenterology organizations to call for initiatives that support clinicians in aligning their practices with quality measures for IBD and priorities of the National Quality Strategy (NQS). We designed and implemented a quality improvement (QI) education program on ulcerative colitis in which patient charts were audited for 30 gastroenterologists before (n = 300 charts) and after (n = 290 charts) they participated in QI-focused educational activities. Charts were audited for nine measures, selected for their alignment with four NQS priorities: making care safer, ensuring patient engagement, promoting communication, and promoting effective treatment practices. Four of the measures, including guideline-directed vaccinations and assessments of disease type and activity, were part of the CMS Physician Quality Reporting System (PQRS). The other five measures involved counseling patients on various topics in ulcerative colitis management, documentation of side effects, assessment of adherence status, and simplification of dosing. The gastroenterologists also completed baseline and post-education surveys designed to assess qualitative outcomes. One of the educational interventions was a private audit feedback session conducted for each gastroenterologist. The sessions were designed to support participants in identifying measures reflecting suboptimal care quality and developing action plans for improvement. In continuous improvement cycles, follow-up interventions included QI tools and educational monographs. Across the nine chart variables, post-education improvements ranged from 0% to 48%, with a mean improvement of 15.9%. Survey findings revealed improvements in self-reported understanding of quality measures and intentions to apply them to practice, and lower rates of perceived significant barriers to high-quality

  3. Communicating with Patients with Special Health Care Needs.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Kimberly M; Heaton, Lisa J

    2016-07-01

    People with special health care needs (PSHCN) often have difficulty communicating with providers in health care settings, including dental practices. This difficulty can affect access to care as well as the quality of care received. This article provides practical tips and tools dental professionals can use to facilitate communication for a diverse population of PSHCNs. The article discusses communication needs of patients with communication disorders; augmentative and alternative communication; and communication for patients with intellectual disability, psychiatric conditions; and dental fears. Examples are given of communication breakdowns, and descriptions of how communication challenges can be resolved. PMID:27264858

  4. A Review and Characterization of the Various Perceptions of Quality Cancer Care

    PubMed Central

    Colosia, Ann D; Peltz, Gerson; Pohl, Gerhardt; Liu, Esther; Copley-Merriman, Kati; Khan, Shahnaz; Kaye, James A

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND It is important to maintain high-quality cancer care while reducing spending. This requires an understanding of how stakeholders define “quality.” The objective of this literature review was to understand the perceptions patients, physicians, and managed care professionals have about quality cancer care, especially chemotherapy. METHODS A computerized literature search was conducted for articles concerning quality cancer care in patients who received chemotherapy. Among >1100 identified sources, 25 presented interviews/survey results from stakeholders. RESULTS Patients defined quality cancer care as being treated well by providers, having multiple treatment options, and being part of the decision-making process. Waiting to see providers, having problems with referrals, going to different locations for treatment, experiencing billing inaccuracies, and navigating managed care reimbursement negatively affected patients' quality-of-care perceptions. Providers perceived quality cancer care as making decisions based on the risks-benefits of specific chemotherapy regimens and