Science.gov

Sample records for quantiferon tb gold

  1. Snapshot of Quantiferon TB gold testing in Northern Mexico.

    PubMed

    González-Salazar, F; Vargas-Villarreal, J; Garcialuna-Martínez, F J; Rivera, G; Moreno-Treviño, M G; Montfort-Gardeazabal, J M; Garcialuna-Martínez, E

    2011-12-01

    Most people infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis have an asymptomatic condition named latent tuberculosis. These people do not have bacilli in the corporal secretions and are hard to diagnose by conventional laboratory tests. Diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in México is based on the tuberculin skin test (TST). This test has disadvantages, principally because the vaccine containing the Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is applied to 99% of this population and causes false positive TST outcomes. Recently, interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA) have been demonstrated to be a good test to detect latent tuberculosis with equal or better sensitivity to TST and without interference from BCG. However, in México the IGRA are an uncommon test due to the higher cost compared to TST. The main objective of this work was demonstrate the potential utility of the Quantiferon TB(®) gold in tube (QTB(®)-GIT) test to detect latent TB in a population from northern México. Samples from 106 subjects with close contact, or without contact, with actively infected TB patients were tested to detect LTBI. Our results show a significant difference between individuals in close contact with active TB patients (39.7%) compared to those without contact (3.2%), p < 0.01. The concordance between TST and QTB(®)-GIT was poor (κ = 0.31). Our preliminary results show that the QTB(®)-GIT has better capacity than TST to detect latent tuberculosis infection.

  2. Performance of QuantiFERON TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis infection in brain-dead organ donors in Iran: a brief report.

    PubMed

    Tabarsi, Payam; Yousefzadeh, Amir; Najafizadeh, Katayoun; Droudinia, Atousa; Bayati, Rouzbeh; Marjani, Majid; Shafaghi, Shadi; Farokhzad, Banafsheh; Javanmard, Pedram; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2014-11-01

    With regard to the significant morbidity and mortality due to tuberculosis in lung transplant recipients, the identification of brain-dead organ donors with latent tuberculosis by use of the QuantiFERON TB Gold (QFT-G) test may be of help to reduce the risk of TB reactivation and mortality in lung recipients. This study was conducted in the National Research Institute of Tuber-culosis and Lung Diseases (NRITLD) in Iran, from January to March 2013. A total of 38 conse-cutive brain-dead donors, not currently infected with active tuberculosis, were recruited. The medi-cal records of all the study enrollees were reviewed. A whole-blood IFN- release assay (IGRA) in reaction to early secreted antigenic target 6 (ESAT-6), culture filtrate protein 10 (CFP-10), and TB7.7 antigens, was performed and the released Interferon- was measured via enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The data was analyzed with QFT-G software which was provided by the company. The demographic, characteristics and other variables were entered into SPSS version 11.5. The QFT-G test results of three donors (7.9%) turned out to be positive, negative for 24 donors (63.1%), and indeterminate for 11 cases (28.9%). Our study revealed the potential advantages of QFT-G in lowering the incidence of donor-derived post-transplant tuberculosis among lung recipients. However, a high rate of indeterminate results restricted the performance of QFT-G in this study.

  3. The assessment of cytokines in Quantiferon supernatants for the diagnosis of latent TB infection in a tribal population of Melghat, India.

    PubMed

    Bapat, Prachi R; Husain, Aliabbas A; Daginawala, Hatim F; Agrawal, Neha P; Panchbhai, Milind S; Satav, Ashish R; Taori, Girdhar M; Kashyap, Rajpal S

    2015-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and interferon-gamma release assays (IGRA), namely, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT), remain the standard immunological diagnostic tools for latent tuberculosis (TB) infection (LTBI). However, the sub-optimal detection rates of both of these tests are major impediments in recognizing the population at risk. This study was aimed at evaluating additional cytokines besides interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) as biomarkers for improving LTBI diagnosis in the tribal population of Melghat, India. Seventy-four close TB contacts were stratified by QFT and TST results into: (i) QFT+/TST+ (n = 26), (ii) QFT+/TST- (n = 12), (iii) QFT-/TST- (n = 35) and (iv) QFT-/TST+ (n = 1) groups. A panel of cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, TNF-α and IL-2R) was then evaluated in antigen-stimulated QFT cell-free culture supernatants using IMMULITE-1000, an automated immunoassay analyzer. Cytokine estimation showed significantly higher levels of IL-6 in the QFT+/TST+ group, while significantly higher levels of IL-10 were found in the QFT-/TST- group. Correlation analysis identified a positive correlation between IL-6 and the QFT response (r = 0.6723, P < 0.0001), while a negative correlation was seen between QFT and IL-10 expression (r = -0.3271, P = 0.0044). Similarly, IL-6 was positively correlated with TST levels (r = 0.6631, P <0 .0001), and conversely, a negative correlation was found between TST and IL-10 expression (r = -0.5698, P < 0.0001). The positive and negative predictive values of IL-6 were found to be 92.59 and 93.33%, respectively, and the positive and negative predictive values of IL-10 were 96.55 and 91.18%, respectively. No significant impact of the demographic characteristics on cytokine positivity was observed. Our preliminary results suggest that the evaluation of additional cytokines in QFT cell-free culture supernatants may be valuable for the identification of LTBI. Combining IL-6 and IL-10 with QFT and/or TST could markedly improve the detection

  4. TB Incidence in an Adolescent Cohort in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mahomed, Hassan; Ehrlich, Rodney; Hawkridge, Tony; Hatherill, Mark; Geiter, Lawrence; Kafaar, Fazlin; Abrahams, Deborah Ann; Mulenga, Humphrey; Tameris, Michele; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hanekom, Willem Albert; Verver, Suzanne; Hussey, Gregory Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem globally. Little is known about TB incidence in adolescents who are a proposed target group for new TB vaccines. We conducted a study to determine the TB incidence rates and risk factors for TB disease in a cohort of school-going adolescents in a high TB burden area in South Africa. Methods We recruited adolescents aged 12 to 18 years from high schools in Worcester, South Africa. Demographic and clinical information was collected, a tuberculin skin test (TST) performed and blood drawn for a QuantiFERON TB Gold assay at baseline. Screening for TB cases occurred at follow up visits and by surveillance of registers at public sector TB clinics over a period of up to 3.8 years after enrolment. Results A total of 6,363 adolescents were enrolled (58% of the school population targeted). During follow up, 67 cases of bacteriologically confirmed TB were detected giving an overall incidence rate of 0.45 per 100 person years (95% confidence interval 0.29–0.72). Black or mixed race, maternal education of primary school or less or unknown, a positive baseline QuantiFERON assay and a positive baseline TST were significant predictors of TB disease on adjusted analysis. Conclusion The adolescent TB incidence found in a high burden setting will help TB vaccine developers plan clinical trials in this population. Latent TB infection and low socio-economic status were predictors of TB disease. PMID:23533639

  5. Equal sensitivity of the new generation QuantiFERON-TB Gold plus in direct comparison with the previous test version QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, H; Avsar, K; Göres, R; Mavi, S-C; Hofmann-Thiel, S

    2016-08-01

    QuantiFERON-TB Gold IT analyses interferon-γ release from CD4(+) T cells after stimulation with specific tuberculosis (TB) antigens. Its sensitivity is approximately 80% for active TB. A new test generation (QFTGplus) also analyses the response of CD8(+) T cells. We investigated both test generations in a direct head-to-head comparison in a German pulmonary hospital. Sensitivity rates for active TB were identical, no matter whether diagnosis was bacteriologically confirmed or not.

  6. Performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube test and Tuberculin Skin Test for diagnosis of latent tuberculosis infection in BCG vaccinated health care workers

    PubMed Central

    Babayigit, Cenk; Ozer, Burcin; Inandi, Tacettin; Ozer, Cahit; Duran, Nizami; Gocmen, Orhan

    2014-01-01

    Background Tuberculin skin test (TST) has been used for years as an aid in diagnosing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) but it suffers from a number of well-documented performance and logistic problems. Quantiferon-TB Gold In Tube test (QFT-GIT) has been reported to have better sensitivity and specifity than TST. In this study, it was aimed to compare the performance of a commercial IFN-γ release assay (QFT-GIT) with TST in the diagnosis of HCWs at risk for latent TB infection in BCG vaccinated population. Material/Methods Hundred healthy volunteer health care workers were enrolled. All were subjected to TST and QFT-GIT. Results were compared among Health Care Workers (HCWs) groups in terms of profession, workplace, working duration. Results TST is affected by previous BCG vaccinations and number of cases with QFT-GIT positivity is increased in accordance with the TST induration diameter range. QFT-GIT result was negative in 17 of 32 TST positive (≥15 mm) cases and positive in 4 of 61 cases whose TST diameters are between 6–14 mm, that is attritutable to previous BCG vaccination(s). It was negative in all cases with TST diameters between 0–5 mm. HCWs with positive QFT-GIT results were significantly older than the ones with negative results. Furthermore duration of work was significantly longer in QFT-GIT positive than in negative HCWs. Conclusions There was a moderate concordance between QFT-GIT and TST, when TST result was defined as positive with a ≥15 mm diameter of induration. We suggest that QFT-GIT can be used as an alternative to TST for detection of LTBI, especially in groups with high risk of LTBI and in population with routine BCG vaccination program. PMID:24681806

  7. The Dynamics of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Conversion and Reversion in a Cohort of South African Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Hatherill, Mark; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem A.; Campo, Monica; Hawn, Thomas R.; Wood, Robin; Scriba, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Interferon-γ release assays are used to diagnose tuberculosis infection. In developed countries, high rates of reversion following conversion have been described. Objectives: To assess QuantiFERON TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT) conversion and reversion dynamics in a tuberculosis-endemic setting. Methods: Adolescents aged 12–18 years residing near Cape Town were recruited. Tuberculin skin tests (TSTs) and QFTs were performed at baseline and after 2 years of follow up. Half of the participants had TST and QFT performed at additional time points. Participants were observed for incident tuberculosis disease for up to 5 years. Measurements and Main Results: Among 5,357 participants, 2,751 (51.4%) and 2,987 (55.8%) had positive QFT and TST results, respectively, at baseline. Annualized QFT and TST conversion risks were 14.0 and 13.0%, respectively, and reversion risks were 5.1 and 4.1%, respectively. Concordance was excellent for conversions (κ = 0.74), but poor for reversions (κ = 0.12). Among recent QFT converters, the magnitude of the QFT value was strongly inversely associated with risk of reversion (P < 0.0001). When longitudinal QFT data were analyzed in a cross-sectional manner, the annual risk of infection was 7.3%, whereas inclusion of reversions in the analysis showed that the actual risk of infection was 14.0%. Incident tuberculosis was 8-fold higher among QFT reverters than in participants with all negative QFT results (1.47 vs. 0.18 cases/100 person-years, P = 0.011). Conclusions: In this tuberculosis-endemic setting, annual risk of infection was extremely high, whereas QFT and TST conversion concordance was higher and QFT reversion rates were lower than reported in low-burden settings. PMID:25562578

  8. Accuracy of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Tuberculosis Diagnosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Sali, Michela; Buonsenso, Danilo; Goletti, Delia; D’Alfonso, Pamela; Zumbo, Antonella; Fadda, Giovanni; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Delogu, Giovanni; Valentini, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold assay (QFT-IT) in children with suspected active or latent TB infection (LTBI). Methods A retrospective study was conducted on 621 children (0–14 years old) evaluated for TB infection or disease. Following clinical assessment, children were tested with the QFT-IT assay. Results Among the 140 active TB suspects, we identified 19 cases of active disease. The overall sensitivity for active TB was 87.5%, ranging from 62.5% in children 25–36 months old to 100% in children older than 49 months. The overall specificity for active TB was 93.6%. Among the 481 children tested for LTBI screening, 38 scored positive and all but 2 had at least one risk factor for TB infection. Among the 26 children with indeterminate results, bacterial, viral or fungal pneumonia were later diagnosed in 11 (42.3%) cases and non-TB related extra-pulmonary infections in 12 (46.1%). Conclusions Our results indicate that the children's response to QFT-IT associates to active TB and risk factors for LTBI. Moreover, we show that mitogen response is also found in children of 1 year of age, providing support for QFT-IT use also in young children. PMID:26439935

  9. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity. PMID:27470684

  10. Evaluation of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus for Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Lina; Sasaki, Yuka; Nagai, Hideaki; Ishikawa, Satoru; Takamori, Mikio; Sakashita, Kentaro; Saito, Takefumi; Fukushima, Kiyoyasu; Igarashi, Yuriko; Aono, Akio; Chikamatsu, Kinuyo; Yamada, Hiroyuki; Takaki, Akiko; Mori, Toru; Mitarai, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Performance of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) release assays still needs to be improved. The data on the performance of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Plus (QFT-Plus), a new-generation of QFT assay are limited. This study evaluated the diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus, and compared to that of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT). Blood samples were collected from 162 bacteriologically confirmed tuberculosis (TB) patients and 212 Mycobacterium tuberculosis-uninfected volunteers; these samples were then tested with QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. The IFN-γ concentration of QFT-Plus was lower than that of QFT-GIT in TB patients (p < 0.001). Receiver operating characteristic curves were compared between QFT-GIT and QFT-Plus. Both assays showed area under the curve values over 0.99 without significant difference. Using the conventional cut-off (0.35 IU/mL) for QFT-GIT, QFT-Plus had a lower sensitivity of 91.1% compared to 96.2% (p = 0.008) at its optimum cut-off (0.168 IU/mL) with the same specificity. Moreover, IFN-γ values were significantly reduced with age in QFT-GIT (p = 0.035) but not in QFT-Plus. The diagnostic performance of QFT-Plus was as accurate as that of QFT-GIT despite a lack of TB7.7 antigen and despite the decrease in quantitative values. However, the cut-off value for QFT-Plus should be considered independently from that of QFT-GIT to obtain the best sensitivity without compromising specificity. PMID:27470684

  11. Gold on paper-paper platform for Au-nanoprobe TB detection.

    PubMed

    Veigas, Bruno; Jacob, Jorge M; Costa, Mafalda N; Santos, David S; Viveiros, Miguel; Inácio, João; Martins, Rodrigo; Barquinha, Pedro; Fortunato, Elvira; Baptista, Pedro Viana

    2012-11-21

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains one of the most serious infectious diseases in the world and the rate of new cases continues to increase. The development of cheap and simple methodologies capable of identifying TB causing agents belonging to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex (MTBC), at point-of-need, in particular in resource-poor countries where the main TB epidemics are observed, is of paramount relevance for the timely and effective diagnosis and management of patients. TB molecular diagnostics, aimed at reducing the time of laboratory diagnostics from weeks to days, still require specialised technical personnel and labour intensive methods. Recent nanotechnology-based systems have been proposed to circumvent these limitations. Here, we report on a paper-based platform capable of integrating a previously developed Au-nanoprobe based MTBC detection assay-we call it "Gold on Paper". The Au-nanoprobe assay is processed and developed on a wax-printed microplate paper platform, allowing unequivocal identification of MTBC members and can be performed without specialised laboratory equipment. Upon integration of this Au-nanoprobe colorimetric assay onto the 384-microplate, differential colour scrutiny may be captured and analysed with a generic "smartphone" device. This strategy uses the mobile device to digitalise the intensity of the colour associated with each colorimetric assay, perform a Red Green Blue (RGB) analysis and transfer relevant information to an off-site lab, thus allowing for efficient diagnostics. Integration of the GPS location metadata of every test image may add a new dimension of information, allowing for real-time epidemiologic data on MTBC identification. PMID:23000923

  12. Within-Subject Interlaboratory Variability of QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Tests

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, William C.; Hamilton, Lanette R.; Goodwin, Donald J.; Barrera, Carlos; West, Kevin B.; Racster, Laura; Daniels, Laura J.; Chuke, Stella O.; Campbell, Brandon H.; Bohanon, Jamaria; Jaffar, Atheer T.; Drane, Wanzer; Maserang, David; Mazurek, Gerald H.

    2012-01-01

    Background The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) is a viable alternative to the tuberculin skin test (TST) for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. However, within-subject variability may limit test utility. To assess variability, we compared results from the same subjects when QFT-GIT enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) were performed in different laboratories. Methods Subjects were recruited at two sites and blood was tested in three labs. Two labs used the same type of automated ELISA workstation, 8-point calibration curves, and electronic data transfer. The third lab used a different automated ELISA workstation, 4-point calibration curves, and manual data entry. Variability was assessed by interpretation agreement and comparison of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) measurements. Data for subjects with discordant interpretations or discrepancies in TB Response >0.05 IU/mL were verified or corrected, and variability was reassessed using a reconciled dataset. Results Ninety-seven subjects had results from three labs. Eleven (11.3%) had discordant interpretations and 72 (74.2%) had discrepancies >0.05 IU/mL using unreconciled results. After correction of manual data entry errors for 9 subjects, and exclusion of 6 subjects due to methodological errors, 7 (7.7%) subjects were discordant. Of these, 6 (85.7%) had all TB Responses within 0.25 IU/mL of the manufacturer's recommended cutoff. Non-uniform error of measurement was observed, with greater variation in higher IFN-γ measurements. Within-subject standard deviation for TB Response was as high as 0.16 IU/mL, and limits of agreement ranged from −0.46 to 0.43 IU/mL for subjects with mean TB Response within 0.25 IU/mL of the cutoff. Conclusion Greater interlaboratory variability was associated with manual data entry and higher IFN-γ measurements. Manual data entry should be avoided. Because variability in measuring TB Response may affect interpretation, especially near the cutoff, consideration

  13. Targeted screening and treatment for latent tuberculosis infection using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold is cost-effective in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Burgos, J. L.; Kahn, J. G.; Strathdee, S. A.; Valencia-Mendoza, A.; Bautista-Arredondo, S.; Laniado-Laborin, R.; Castañeda, R.; Deiss, R.; Garfein, R. S.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY OBJECTIVE To assess the cost-effectiveness of screening for latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) using a commercially available detection test and treating individuals at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a middle-income country. DESIGN We developed a Markov model to evaluate the cost per LTBI case detected, TB case averted and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for a cohort of 1000 individuals at high risk for HIV infection over 20 years. Baseline model inputs for LTBI prevalence were obtained from published literature and cross-sectional data from tuberculosis (TB) screening using QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) testing among sex workers and illicit drug users at high risk for HIV recruited through street outreach in Tijuana, Mexico. Costs are reported in 2007 US dollars. Future costs and QALYs were discounted at 3% per year. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate model robustness. RESULTS Over 20 years, we estimate the program would prevent 78 cases of active TB and 55 TB-related deaths. The incremental cost per case of LTBI detected was US$730, cost per active TB averted was US$529 and cost per QALY gained was US$108. CONCLUSIONS In settings of endemic TB and escalating HIV incidence, targeting LTBI screening and treatment among high-risk groups may be highly cost-effective. PMID:19723375

  14. Guidelines for using the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, United States.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Gerald H; Jereb, John; Lobue, Phillip; Iademarco, Michael F; Metchock, Beverly; Vernon, Andrew

    2005-12-16

    On May 2, 2005, a new in vitro test, QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G, Cellestis Limited, Carnegie, Victoria, Australia), received final approval from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration as an aid for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. This test detects the release of interferon-gamma (IFN-g) in fresh heparinized whole blood from sensitized persons when it is incubated with mixtures of synthetic peptides representing two proteins present in M. tuberculosis: early secretory antigenic target-6 (ESAT-6) and culture filtrate protein-10 (CFP-10). These antigens impart greater specificity than is possible with tests using purified protein derivative as the tuberculosis (TB) antigen. In direct comparisons, the sensitivity of QFT-G was statistically similar to that of the tuberculin skin test (TST) for detecting infection in persons with untreated culture-confirmed tuberculosis (TB). The performance of QFT-G in certain populations targeted by TB control programs in the United States for finding latent TB infection is under study. Its ability to predict who eventually will have TB disease has not been determined, and years of observational study of substantial populations would be needed to acquire this information. In July 2005, CDC convened a meeting of consultants and researchers with expertise in the field to review scientific evidence and clinical experience with QFT-G. On the basis of this review and discussion, CDC recommends that QFT-G may be used in all circumstances in which the TST is currently used, including contact investigations, evaluation of recent immigrants, and sequential-testing surveillance programs for infection control (e.g., those for health-care workers). This report provides specific cautions for interpreting negative QFT-G results in persons from selected populations. This report is aimed at public health officials, health-care providers, and laboratory workers with responsibility for TB control activities in the United States.

  15. Utilization of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test in a Two-Step Process with the Tuberculin Skin Test To Evaluate Health Care Workers for Latent Tuberculosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Abdalhamid, Baha; Hinrichs, Steven H.; Garrett, Jodi L.; O'Neill, Jean M.; Hansen-Cain, Kristine M.; Armbrust, Amy A.; Iwen, Peter C.

    2010-01-01

    A cost analysis of combining a tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT-GT) to detect latent tuberculosis in newly hired health care workers was performed. An approximately 50% reduction in the cost of additional care was realized when workers with positive TST results were subsequently screened using the QFT-GT. PMID:20573876

  16. Serial QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and tuberculin skin test to diagnose latent tuberculosis in household Mexican contacts: conversion and reversion rates and associated factors using conventional and borderline zone definitions.

    PubMed

    Monárrez-Espino, Joel; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio; Laflamme, Lucie; Serrano, Carmen J

    2014-11-01

    A cohort of 123 adult contacts was followed for 18-24 months (86 completed the follow-up) to compare conversion and reversion rates based on two serial measures of QuantiFERON (QFT) and tuberculin skin test (TST) (PPD from TUBERSOL, Aventis Pasteur, Canada) for diagnosing latent tuberculosis (TB) in household contacts of TB patients using conventional (C) and borderline zone (BZ) definitions. Questionnaires were used to obtain information regarding TB exposure, TB risk factors and socio-demographic data. QFT (IU/mL) conversion was defined as <0.35 to ≥0.35 (C) or <0.35 to >0.70 (BZ) and reversion was defined as ≥0.35 to <0.35 (C) or ≥0.35 to <0.20 (BZ); TST (mm) conversion was defined as <5 to ≥5 (C) or <5 to >10 (BZ) and reversion was defined as ≥5 to <5 (C). The QFT conversion and reversion rates were 10.5% and 7% with C and 8.1% and 4.7% with the BZ definitions, respectively. The TST rates were higher compared with QFT, especially with the C definitions (conversion 23.3%, reversion 9.3%). The QFT conversion and reversion rates were higher for TST ≥5; for TST, both rates were lower for QFT <0.35. No risk factors were associated with the probability of converting or reverting. The inconsistency and apparent randomness of serial testing is confusing and adds to the limitations of these tests and definitions to follow-up close TB contacts.

  17. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model.

    PubMed

    Moses, Mark W; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8-25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0-2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7-4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3-84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6-64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6-70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections. PMID:27469388

  18. Serial testing for latent tuberculosis using QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube: A Markov model

    PubMed Central

    Moses, Mark W.; Zwerling, Alice; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Denkinger, Claudia M.; Banaei, Niaz; Kik, Sandra V.; Metcalfe, John; Pai, Madhukar; Dowdy, David

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare workers (HCWs) in low-incidence settings are often serially tested for latent TB infection (LTBI) with the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT) assay, which exhibits frequent conversions and reversions. The clinical impact of such variability on serial testing remains unknown. We used a microsimulation Markov model that accounts for major sources of variability to project diagnostic outcomes in a simulated North American HCW cohort. Serial testing using a single QFT with the recommended conversion cutoff (IFN-g > 0.35 IU/mL) resulted in 24.6% (95% uncertainty range, UR: 23.8–25.5) of the entire population testing false-positive over ten years. Raising the cutoff to >1.0 IU/mL or confirming initial positive results with a (presumed independent) second test reduced this false-positive percentage to 2.3% (95%UR: 2.0–2.6%) or 4.1% (95%UR: 3.7–4.5%), but also reduced the proportion of true incident infections detected within the first year of infection from 76.5% (95%UR: 66.3–84.6%) to 54.8% (95%UR: 44.6–64.5%) or 61.5% (95%UR: 51.6–70.9%), respectively. Serial QFT testing of HCWs in North America may result in tremendous over-diagnosis and over-treatment of LTBI, with nearly thirty false-positives for every true infection diagnosed. Using higher cutoffs for conversion or confirmatory tests (for initial positives) can mitigate these effects, but will also diagnose fewer true infections. PMID:27469388

  19. Comparison of the tuberculin skin test and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test in detecting latent tuberculosis in health care workers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The tuberculin skin test (TST) and the QuantiFERON-TB Gold test (QFT) are used to identify latent tuberculosis infections (LTBIs). The aim of this study was to determine the agreement between these two tests among health care workers in Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 177 tuberculosis (TB) laboratory staff and 67 non-TB staff. TST indurations of 10 mm or more were considered positive. The Student’s t-test and the chi-square test were used to compare the mean score and proportion of variables between the TB laboratory staff and the non-TB laboratory staff. Kappa statistics were used to evaluate the agreement between these tests, and logistic regression was used to assess the risk factors associated with positive results for each test. RESULTS: The prevalence of LTBIs according to both the QFT and the TST was 17% (95% confidence interval [CI], 12% to 21%) and 16% (95% CI, 11% to 21%), respectively. The agreement between the QFT and the TST was 77.46%, with a kappa of 0.19 (95% CI, 0.04 to 0.34). CONCLUSIONS: Although the prevalence of LTBI based on the QFT and the TST was not significantly different, the kappa statistic was low between these two tests for the detection of LTBIs. PMID:27457062

  20. Variability of the QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube Test Using Automated and Manual Methods

    PubMed Central

    Whitworth, William C.; Goodwin, Donald J.; Racster, Laura; West, Kevin B.; Chuke, Stella O.; Daniels, Laura J.; Campbell, Brandon H.; Bohanon, Jamaria; Jaffar, Atheer T.; Drane, Wanzer; Sjoberg, Paul A.; Mazurek, Gerald H.

    2014-01-01

    Background The QuantiFERON®-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-GIT) detects Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection by measuring release of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) when T-cells (in heparinized whole blood) are stimulated with specific Mtb antigens. The amount of IFN-γ is determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Automation of the ELISA method may reduce variability. To assess the impact of ELISA automation, we compared QFT-GIT results and variability when ELISAs were performed manually and with automation. Methods Blood was collected into two sets of QFT-GIT tubes and processed at the same time. For each set, IFN-γ was measured in automated and manual ELISAs. Variability in interpretations and IFN-γ measurements was assessed between automated (A1 vs. A2) and manual (M1 vs. M2) ELISAs. Variability in IFN-γ measurements was also assessed on separate groups stratified by the mean of the four ELISAs. Results Subjects (N = 146) had two automated and two manual ELISAs completed. Overall, interpretations were discordant for 16 (11%) subjects. Excluding one subject with indeterminate results, 7 (4.8%) subjects had discordant automated interpretations and 10 (6.9%) subjects had discordant manual interpretations (p = 0.17). Quantitative variability was not uniform; within-subject variability was greater with higher IFN-γ measurements and with manual ELISAs. For subjects with mean TB Responses ±0.25 IU/mL of the 0.35 IU/mL cutoff, the within-subject standard deviation for two manual tests was 0.27 (CI95 = 0.22–0.37) IU/mL vs. 0.09 (CI95 = 0.07–0.12) IU/mL for two automated tests. Conclusion QFT-GIT ELISA automation may reduce variability near the test cutoff. Methodological differences should be considered when interpreting and using IFN-γ release assays (IGRAs). PMID:24466211

  1. Tuberculosis Screening on a Health Science Campus: Use of QuantiFERON-TB Gold Test for Students and Employees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veeser, Peggy Ingram; Smith, Phillip Karl; Handy, Barry; Martin, Sharon R.

    2007-01-01

    Detecting and managing "Mycobacterium tuberculosis" (TB) infection in a health-science center population is a clinical dilemma. Tuberculin skin tests are still the preferred method for detecting present or past infection of TB. The authors discuss the performance of whole blood interferon gamma release assay test commercially known as…

  2. Comparison of QuantiFERON-TB gold in tube test versus tuberculin skin test for screening of latent tuberculosis infection in Saudi Arabia: A population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Balkhy, Hanan H.; El Beltagy, Kamel; El-Saed, Aiman; Aljasir, Badr; Althaqafi, Abdulhakeem; Alothman, Adel F.; Alshalaan, Mohammad; Al-Jahdali, Hamdan

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare QuantiFERON-TB gold in tube (QFT-GIT) test with tuberculin skin test (TST) in detecting latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) among a general population in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: A population-based cross-sectional study was conducted between July 2010 and March 2013 among individuals randomly selected from the list of those receiving care at primary healthcare centers in three provinces of Saudi Arabia; Central, Western, and Eastern provinces. Those younger than 5 years, immunocompromised, had a current or previous history of active TB, LTBI, or who were receiving anti-TB medications were excluded. Informed consent was obtained before the study questionnaire was completed. Participants were then evaluated for LTBI using QFT-GIT test followed immediately by TST. RESULTS: Of the 1369 subjects included in the final analysis, QFT-GIT was positive in 124 (9.1%) and TST was positive in 127 (9.3%). Positive concordance was observed in 49 (3.6%) subjects while negative concordance was observed in 1167 (85.2%) subjects. The overall agreement between the two tests was 88.8% with a significant kappa (κ) test (κ = 0.332, P < 0.001). Concordance was significantly higher in younger age, female gender, single status, students, primary education, living in middle-sized families, and never smoked. CONCLUSIONS: The overall agreement of TST and QFT-GIT for the detection of LTBI among a Saudi general population was 88.8%. QFT-GIT is probably comparable to TST for detecting LTBI in an intermediate TB burden country with high at birth bacille calmette guerin vaccination coverage. Further prospective studies are needed to compare the ability of both tests to predict TB disease. PMID:27512509

  3. TB Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  4. Gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkemo, Harold; Newman, William L.; Ashley, Roger P.

    1998-01-01

    Through the ages, men and women have cherished gold, and many have had a compelling desire to amass great quantities of it -- so compelling a desire, in fact, that the frantic need to seek and hoard gold has been aptly named "gold fever." Gold was among the first metals to be mined because it commonly occurs in its native form -- that is, not combined with other elements -- because it is beautiful and imperishable, and because exquisite objects can be made from it.

  5. Accuracy of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube for diagnosing tuberculosis in a young pediatric population previously vaccinated with Bacille Calmette-Guérin

    PubMed Central

    Vallada, Marcelo Genofre; Okay, Thelma Suely; Del Negro, Gilda Maria B.; Antonio, Claudio Amaral; Yamamoto, Lidia; Ramos, Sonia Regina T. S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the accuracy of an interferongamma release assay (QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube) for diagnosing Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in a young pediatric population. Methods: 195 children previously vaccinated with BCG were evaluated, being 184 healthy individuals with no clinical or epidemiological evidence of mycobacterial infection, and 11 with Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, according to clinical, radiological, and laboratory parameters. A blood sample was obtained from each child and processed according to the manufacturer's instructions. The assay performance was evaluated by a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. Results: In the group of 184 non-infected children, 130 (70.6%) were under the age of four years (mean age of 35 months). In this group, 177 children (96.2%) had negative test results, six (3.2%) had indeterminate results, and one (0.5%) had a positive result. In the group of 11 infected children, the mean age was 58.5 months, and two of them (18%) had negative results. The ROC curve had an area under the curve of 0.88 (95%CI 0.82-0.92; p<0.001), disclosing a predictive positive value of 81.8% for the test (95%CI 46.3-97.4). The assay sensitivity was 81.8% (95%CI 48.2-97.2) and the specificity was 98.8% (95%CI 96-99.8). Conclusions: In the present study, the QuantiFERON-TB Gold in Tube performance for diagnosing M. tuberculosis infection was appropriate in a young pediatric population. PMID:24676183

  6. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis (TB) Overview In developed countries, such as the ... thought to be infected with TB bacteria, Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb ). TB is a chronic bacterial infection. It ...

  7. Tuberculin Skin Test and QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube Test for Diagnosing Latent Tuberculosis Infection among Thai Healthcare Workers.

    PubMed

    Khawcharoenporn, Thana; Apisarnthanarak, Anucha; Sangkitporn, Somchai; Rudeeaneksin, Janisara; Srisungngam, Sopa; Bunchoo, Supranee; Phetsuksiri, Benjawan

    2016-05-20

    A cross-sectional study was conducted on the performance of the tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON(®)-TB Gold In-Tube test (QFT-IT) for detecting latent tuberculosis infection among Thai healthcare workers (HCWs). Each HCW underwent both the TST and QFT-IT during the annual health screening. Among the 260 HCWs enrolled, the median age was 30 years (range 19-60 years), 92% were women, 64% were nurses and nurse assistants, 78% were Bacillus Calmette Guérin vaccinated, and 37% had previously taken the TST. Correlation between TST reaction size and the interferon-γ level was weak (r = 0.29; P < 0.001). Of the HCWs, 38% and 20% had a reactive TST and a positive QFT-IT, respectively. Using QFT-IT positivity as a standard for latent tuberculosis diagnosis, the cut-off for TST reactivity with the best performance was ≥13 mm with a sensitivity, specificity, false positivity, and false negativity of 71%, 70%, 30%, and 29%, respectively (area under the curve 0.73; P < 0.001). The independent factor associated with a false reactive TST was a previous TST (adjusted odds ratio 1.83; P = 0.04). Our findings suggest that the QFT-IT may be the preferred test among HCWs with previous TST. In settings where the QFT-IT is not available, appropriate cut-offs for TST reactivity should be evaluated for use among HCWs.

  8. Tuberculosis (TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Research The New Challenge for TB Research NIAID ... HIV/AIDS Multidrug-Resistant and Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis Research Agenda (PDF) TB Research at NIAID Research ...

  9. A combination of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube assay and the detection of adenosine deaminase improves the diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuanyuan; Ou, Qinfang; Zheng, Jian; Shen, Lei; Zhang, Bingyan; Weng, Xinhua; Shao, Lingyun; Gao, Yan; Zhang, Wenhong

    2016-01-01

    The differential diagnosis of tuberculous pleural effusion (TPE) and malignant pleural effusion (MPE) remains difficult despite the availability of numerous diagnostic tools. The current study aimed to evaluate the performance of the whole blood QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) assay and conventional laboratory biomarkers in differential diagnosis of TPE and MPE in high tuberculosis prevalence areas. A total of 117 patients with pleural effusions were recruited, including 91 with TPE and 26 with MPE. All of the patients were tested with QFT-GIT, and the conventional biomarkers in both blood and pleural effusion were detected. The level of antigen-stimulated QFT-GIT in the whole blood of TPE patients was significantly higher than that of MPE (2.89 vs 0.33 IU/mL, P<0.0001). The sensitivity and specificity of QFT-GIT for the diagnosis of TPE were 93.0% and 60.0%, respectively. Among the biomarkers in blood and pleural effusion, pleural adenosine deaminase (ADA) was the most prominent biomarker, with a cutoff value of 15.35 IU/L. The sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of TPE were 93.4% and 96.2%, respectively. The diagnostic classification tree from the combination of these two biomarkers was 97.8% sensitive and 92.3% specific. Ultimately, the combination of whole blood QFT-GIT with pleural ADA improved both the specificity and positive predictive value to 100%. Thus, QFT-GIT is not superior to pleural ADA in the differential diagnosis of TPE and MPE. Combined whole blood QFT-GIT and pleural ADA detection can improve the diagnosis of TPE. PMID:27485497

  10. Outbreak of Transient Conversions of the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube Test in Laboratory Health Care Worker Screenings

    PubMed Central

    Peracchi, Marta; Zorzi, Diego; Fiorio, Silvia; Fallico, Loredana; Palù, Giorgio

    2012-01-01

    Gamma interferon release assays were recently introduced in health care worker (HCWs) screenings for tuberculosis surveillance. In longitudinal surveys, conversions and reversions are seen, and yet whether these changes are unspecific or are an expression of new infections and microbial clearance remains unclear. In order to further elucidate these changes, we analyzed an outbreak of 15 transient conversions in 53 HCWs who operate in the same laboratory and handle specimens potentially containing Mycobacterium tuberculosis who underwent screening by the QuantiFERON-TB Gold In-Tube (QFT-GIT) test between 11 May and 30 June 2010: 15/46 (33%) negative HCWs showed a conversion and then reverted after 7 to 107 days. To validate these results, an evaluation of methodological procedures and test reliability, as well as an analysis of results obtained during the same period and processed by the same laboratory, was carried out. For the latter purpose, QFT-GIT results determined for 78 ward HCWs who underwent screening during the same period and were employed in departments with at least 3 infectious tuberculosis patients per year or had cared for an infectious patient without airborne precautions were analyzed with the following results: 6/63 (9%) HCWs with negative results in 3 different departments showed transient conversion (P = 0.002; odds ratio, 4.60; 95% confidence interval, 1.62 to 13.04). A retrospective survey of in-house biosafety practices led to determination of a single exposure factor within the laboratory. These data emphasize the validity of the hypothesis that a transient conversion demonstrates the presence of a real tubercular infection and could be an important indicator for occupational biosafety concerns. They also confirm that subjects with recent conversion should be retested before chest radiography and chemotherapy is offered. PMID:22518010

  11. Testing for TB Infection

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  12. Tuberculosis Facts - Testing for TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Testing for TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  13. Tuberculosis Facts - Exposure to TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts Exposure to TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  14. Treatment: Latent TB Infection (LTBI) and TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  15. Questions and Answers about TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Tuberculosis (TB) Note: Javascript is disabled or is not ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Tuberculosis Basic TB Facts How TB Spreads Latent TB ...

  16. TB Is Back.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Natale, Jo Anna

    1992-01-01

    The reemergence of tuberculosis, particularly of new drug-resistant strains, points up the need for well-coordinated school health programs. Immigration effects, growing populations of HIV-infected persons, and relaxed screening procedures are partly responsible for TB's reemergence. Two sidebars offer advice on coping with TB at school and…

  17. Tuberculosis Facts - TB and HIV/AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB and HIV/AIDS What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination

  18. [Present and future perspectives for the rapid molecular diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB].

    PubMed

    Tanasescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non-TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases itis absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases rapid diagnostic methods prove their usefulness. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TBis extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR-TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases. PMID:24734352

  19. [Present and future perspectives for the rapid molecular diagnosis of TB and MDR-TB].

    PubMed

    Tanasescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non-TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases itis absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases rapid diagnostic methods prove their usefulness. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TBis extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR-TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases.

  20. TB Screening Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... a risk that the first TST is a false-negative reaction, a second skin test is given ... species, for example Mycobacterium kansasii , will give a false-positive TST or IGRA result for TB. Positive ...

  1. Tuberculosis (TB): Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Departments & Divisions Home Conditions Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Treating Tuberculosis Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask a ... bones is treated longer. NEXT: Preventive Treatment Diagnosing Tuberculosis History of TB Our Specialists Charles L. Daley, ...

  2. Tuberculosis Facts - You Can Prevent TB

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts You Can Prevent TB What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination TB Facts: You Can Prevent TB What ...

  3. Tuberculosis Facts - TB Can Be Treated

    MedlinePlus

    Tuberculosis (TB) Facts TB Can Be Treated What is TB? “TB” is short for a disease called tuberculosis. TB is spread through the air from one ... Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention Division of Tuberculosis Elimination Page 1 of 2 TB Facts: TB ...

  4. Childhood TB: can the End TB Strategy deliver?

    PubMed

    Seddon, James A; Graham, Stephen M

    2016-03-01

    The accelerated reductions in global TB incidence required to achieve the End TB Strategy goal will result in reductions in the burden of childhood TB. Contact screening and preventive therapy have emerged as important components of TB burden reduction, and family-centered approaches could be an effective route in delivering these activities. Lack of accurate diagnostics for children remains a critical barrier and a need remains for better collaborative and supportive links between the child health and TB control sectors. Irrespective of whether the ambitious targets can be achieved, the unprecedented opportunities provided by the End TB Strategy must be embraced.

  5. TB in Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ugarte-Gil, César; Caro, Godofredo; Aylas, Rula; Castro, César; Lema, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article analyzes the factors associated with vulnerability of the Ashaninka, the most populous indigenous Peruvian Amazonian people, to tuberculosis (TB). By applying a human rights-based analytical framework that assesses public policy against human rights standards and principles, and by offering a step-by-step framework for a full assessment of compliance, it provides evidence of the relationship between the incidence of TB among the Ashaninka and Peru’s poor level of compliance with its human rights obligations. The article argues that one of the main reasons for the historical vulnerability of the Ashaninka to diseases such as TB is a lack of political will on the part of the national government to increase public health spending, ensure that resources reach the most vulnerable population, and adopt and invest in a culturally appropriate health system. PMID:27780999

  6. Affordable TB treatments. South.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    This short article reports the proceedings of a session of the World Health Organization (WHO) on tuberculosis (TB) prevention and management. 15 million persons are infected with both TB and HIV; 11 million of these people are in sub-Saharan Africa. Current TB management relies on finding cases and treating them. According to Paul Nunn of WHO, the role of preventive therapy is unclear. Jensa Bell, of Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, reported on the cost effectiveness of prevention with isoniazid (INH) in sub-Saharan Africa. Direct medical costs of the drug for 6 months are CHF171/year of life saved. When social costs of TB and prevention of secondary cases are included, INH prophylaxis saves money; initial investment is CHF34.50/person treated, while cost averted is CHF36.24/person treated. Mary Mulindwa, of the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, Uganda, studied reasons for nonadherence to TB preventive regimens in a clinical trial. Major reasons included the following: 1) transport difficulties; 2) caring for a sick family member; 3) change of address without informing the home visitor; and 4) stigma of being seen with a health worker. Richard Chaisson, of the CP-CRA004/ACTG177 study group, reported results from a trial comparing prevention with INH for 12 months to rifampin plus pyrazinamide (R/P) for 2 months in 1600 tuberculin-positive, HIV-positive people without active disease in the US, Mexico, Brazil, and Haiti. "Effective therapy" with INH was equal to at least 6 months of continuous adherence; 67% of patients met this standard. 80% of R/P patients were adherent. Over 3 years, there were 26 confirmed cases of TB in the INH group and 19 in the R/P group; these results are equivalent. However, Chaisson noted that the cost and feasibility of R/P treatment in resource-poor settings should be considered.

  7. Affordable TB treatments. South.

    PubMed

    1998-07-01

    This short article reports the proceedings of a session of the World Health Organization (WHO) on tuberculosis (TB) prevention and management. 15 million persons are infected with both TB and HIV; 11 million of these people are in sub-Saharan Africa. Current TB management relies on finding cases and treating them. According to Paul Nunn of WHO, the role of preventive therapy is unclear. Jensa Bell, of Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York, reported on the cost effectiveness of prevention with isoniazid (INH) in sub-Saharan Africa. Direct medical costs of the drug for 6 months are CHF171/year of life saved. When social costs of TB and prevention of secondary cases are included, INH prophylaxis saves money; initial investment is CHF34.50/person treated, while cost averted is CHF36.24/person treated. Mary Mulindwa, of the Joint Clinical Research Centre in Kampala, Uganda, studied reasons for nonadherence to TB preventive regimens in a clinical trial. Major reasons included the following: 1) transport difficulties; 2) caring for a sick family member; 3) change of address without informing the home visitor; and 4) stigma of being seen with a health worker. Richard Chaisson, of the CP-CRA004/ACTG177 study group, reported results from a trial comparing prevention with INH for 12 months to rifampin plus pyrazinamide (R/P) for 2 months in 1600 tuberculin-positive, HIV-positive people without active disease in the US, Mexico, Brazil, and Haiti. "Effective therapy" with INH was equal to at least 6 months of continuous adherence; 67% of patients met this standard. 80% of R/P patients were adherent. Over 3 years, there were 26 confirmed cases of TB in the INH group and 19 in the R/P group; these results are equivalent. However, Chaisson noted that the cost and feasibility of R/P treatment in resource-poor settings should be considered. PMID:12222196

  8. Immunotherapy for TB.

    PubMed

    Doherty, T Mark

    2012-06-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis was one of the first human pathogens to be identified as the cause of a specific disease--TB. TB was also one of the first specific diseases for which immunotherapy was attempted. In more than a century since, multiple different immunotherapies have been attempted, alongside vaccination and antibiotic treatment, with varying degrees of success. Despite this, TB remains a major worldwide health problem that causes nearly 2 million deaths annually and has infected an estimated 2 billion people. A major reason for this is that M. tuberculosis is an ancient human pathogen that has evolved complex strategies for persistence in the human host. It has thus been long understood that, to effectively control TB, we will need to address the ability of the pathogen to establish a persistent, latent infection in most infected individuals. This review discusses what is presently known about the interaction of M. tuberculosis with the immune system, and how this knowledge has been used to design immunotherapeutic strategies.

  9. Multidrug-Resistant TB

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Helen; Coomans, Fons

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The right to enjoy the benefits of scientific progress (REBSP) is a little-known but potentially valuable right that can contribute to rights-based approaches to addressing multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). We argue that better understanding of the REBSP may help to advance legal and civil society action for health rights. While the REBSP does not provide an individual entitlement to have a new drug developed for MDR-TB, it sets up entitlements to expect a state to establish a legislative and policy framework aimed at developing scientific capacity to address the most important health issues and at disseminating the outcomes of scientific research. By making scientific findings available and accessible, people can be enabled to claim the use of science for social benefits. Inasmuch as the market fails to address neglected diseases such as MDR-TB, the REBSP provides a potential counterbalance to frame a positive obligation on states to both marshal their own resources and to coordinate the actions of multiple other actors towards this goal, including non-state actors. While the latter do not hold the same level of accountability as states, the REBSP can still enable the recognition of obligations at a level of “soft law” responsibilities. PMID:27780997

  10. Glycosylated gold nanoparticle libraries for label-free multiplexed lectin biosensing† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5tb01994j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Sarah-Jane; Otten, Lucienne

    2016-01-01

    Glycan/lectin interactions drive a wide range of recognition and signal transduction processes within nature. However, their measurement is complicated or limited by the analytical tools available. Most technologies require fluorescently labelled proteins (e.g. microarrays) or expensive infrastructure (such as surface plasmon resonance). This also limits their application in biosensing, especially for low-resource settings, where detection of pathogens based on glycan binding could speed up diagnosis. Here we employ a library-oriented approach to immobilise a range of monosaccharides onto polymer-stabilised gold nanoparticles to enable rapid and high-throughput evaluation of their binding specificities with a panel of lectins. The red to blue colour shift upon gold nanoparticle aggregation is used as the output, removing the need for labelled protein, enabling compatibility with 96-well microplates. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of a flatbed scanner (or digital camera) to extract biophysical data, ensuring that only minimal resources are required. Finally, linear discriminant analysis is employed to demonstrate how the glyconanoparticles can be applied as a multiplexed biosensor capable of identifying pathogenic lectins without the need for any infrastructure and overcoming some of the issues of lectin promiscuity. PMID:27162639

  11. TB control: challenges and opportunities for India.

    PubMed

    Pai, Madhukar; Daftary, Amrita; Satyanarayana, Srinath

    2016-03-01

    India's TB control programme has treated over 19 million patients, but the incidence of TB continues to be high. TB is a major killer and drug-resistant TB is a growing threat. There are several likely reasons, including social conditions and co-morbidities that fuel the TB epidemic: under-investment by the government, weak programme implementation and management, suboptimal quality of care in the private sector, and insufficient advocacy around TB. Fortunately, India possesses the technical know-how, competence and resources to address these challenges. The End TB Strategy by WHO offers India an excellent blueprint to advance the agenda of TB control.

  12. Species Specific Bacterial Spore Detection Using Lateral-Flow Immunoassay with DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2003-01-01

    A method of detecting bacterial spores incorporates (1) A method of lateral-flow immunoassay in combination with (2) A method based on the luminescence of Tb3+ ions to which molecules of dipicolinic acid (DPA) released from the spores have become bound. The present combination of lateral-flow immunoassay and DPA-triggered Tb luminescence was developed as a superior alternative to a prior lateral-flow immunoassay method in which detection involves the visual observation and/or measurement of red light scattered from colloidal gold nanoparticles. The advantage of the present combination method is that it affords both (1) High selectivity for spores of the species of bacteria that one seeks to detect (a characteristic of lateral-flow immunoassay in general) and (2) Detection sensitivity much greater (by virtue of the use of DPA-triggered Tb luminescence instead of gold nanoparticles) than that of the prior lateral-flow immunoassay method

  13. An African woman with pulmonary cavities: TB or not TB?

    PubMed

    Delsing, C E; Ruesen, C; Boeree, M J; van Damme, P A; Kuipers, S; van Crevel, R

    2014-10-01

    Cavitary lung lesions in patients from developing countries are mostly caused by tuberculosis (TB). However, when TB cannot be confirmed, a primary lung abscess caused by anaerobic bacteria from the mouth should be considered, especially in patients with poor dentition. We present a case of a Sudanese woman with a cavitary lung lesion and severe gingivitis. Bulleidia extructa was isolated as a single pathogen from the pulmonary cavity. PMID:25387555

  14. Building trust on bovine TB.

    PubMed

    Woodroffe, Rosie

    2014-03-01

    Opinion on how best to control bovine TB remains divided, particularly with regard to badgers. Rosie Woodroffe believes that vets have a constructive role to play in the debate and helping farmers locally. PMID:24736823

  15. First-Line Treatment for Tuberculosis (TB), Drug Resistant TB -- A Visual Tour

    MedlinePlus

    ... Skip Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area Tuberculosis Drugs First-Line Treatment of TB for Drug- ... ago. See how these drugs work . Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB) and Second-Line Treatments MDR TB ...

  16. TB deaths reach historic levels. International (global).

    PubMed

    More tuberculosis (TB)-related deaths occurred in 1995 than in any other year in history (almost 3 million, vs. 2.1 million for the TB epidemic around 1990). In the next 50 years, as many as 500 million people may develop TB if current rates continue. More and more of these people will develop multidrug resistant TB. TB affects all social groups. It is the leading fatal infection in youth and adults. HIV positive people are more likely to die from TB than any other condition. More women die from TB than all causes of maternal mortality combined. Almost 50% of the world's refugees may have TB. All people are at risk of TB since TB bacteria, which enter the air via coughing or sneezing, can be suspended in the air for hours. Increased air travel and migration have brought TB back to industrialized countries. Multi-drug resistant TB has emerged in New York City, London, Milan, Paris, Atlanta, Chicago, and cities in developing countries. Governments of industrialized and developing countries have been slow to understand the effects of multi-drug resistant TB for public health. During the 1970s and 1980s, TB was greatly neglected resulting in the current multi-drug resistant TB epidemic. Policy makers have not applied the tools discovered by scientists to help eliminate TB. The World Health Organization recommends directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) to fight TB. DOTS can increase the number of cured TB patients two-fold. It can cure almost 95% of TB patients with medicines costing less than $11 in some areas of the world. Yet DOTS is being used to cure only 10% of all TB patients in the world. If it were used in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, South Africa, and Zaire, about 75% of all TB cases would be cured. In DOTS, health workers, not the TB patient, are responsible for curing the TB patient. Poor patient compliance is responsible for the current TB epidemic because TB patients remain

  17. TB deaths reach historic levels. International (global).

    PubMed

    More tuberculosis (TB)-related deaths occurred in 1995 than in any other year in history (almost 3 million, vs. 2.1 million for the TB epidemic around 1990). In the next 50 years, as many as 500 million people may develop TB if current rates continue. More and more of these people will develop multidrug resistant TB. TB affects all social groups. It is the leading fatal infection in youth and adults. HIV positive people are more likely to die from TB than any other condition. More women die from TB than all causes of maternal mortality combined. Almost 50% of the world's refugees may have TB. All people are at risk of TB since TB bacteria, which enter the air via coughing or sneezing, can be suspended in the air for hours. Increased air travel and migration have brought TB back to industrialized countries. Multi-drug resistant TB has emerged in New York City, London, Milan, Paris, Atlanta, Chicago, and cities in developing countries. Governments of industrialized and developing countries have been slow to understand the effects of multi-drug resistant TB for public health. During the 1970s and 1980s, TB was greatly neglected resulting in the current multi-drug resistant TB epidemic. Policy makers have not applied the tools discovered by scientists to help eliminate TB. The World Health Organization recommends directly observed treatment, short-course (DOTS) to fight TB. DOTS can increase the number of cured TB patients two-fold. It can cure almost 95% of TB patients with medicines costing less than $11 in some areas of the world. Yet DOTS is being used to cure only 10% of all TB patients in the world. If it were used in Bangladesh, Brazil, China, Ethiopia, India, Indonesia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Russian Federation, South Africa, and Zaire, about 75% of all TB cases would be cured. In DOTS, health workers, not the TB patient, are responsible for curing the TB patient. Poor patient compliance is responsible for the current TB epidemic because TB patients remain

  18. WHO's End TB Strategy: From stopping to ending the global TB epidemic.

    PubMed

    Uplekar, Mukund; Raviglione, Mario

    2015-10-01

    The 67th World Health Assembly of 2014 adopted the "End TB Strategy" with a vision of making the world free of tuberculosis (TB) and with the goal of ending the global TB epidemic by the year 2035. World Health Organization's "End TB Strategy" captures this holistic response in its four principles and three pillars. The three high-level indicators of the "End TB Strategy" - reductions in TB deaths, reductions in the TB incidence rate and the percentage of TB patients and their households experiencing catastrophic costs - are relevant to all countries.

  19. Litigation as TB Rights Advocacy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract One thousand people die every day in India as a result of TB, a preventable and treatable disease, even though the Constitution of India, government schemes, and international law guarantee available, accessible, acceptable, quality health care. Failure to address the spread of TB and to provide quality treatment to all affected populations constitutes a public health and human rights emergency that demands action and accountability. As part of a broader strategy, health activists in India employ Public Interest Litigation (PIL) to hold the state accountable for rights violations and to demand new legislation, standards for patient care, accountability for under-spending, improvements in services at individual facilities, and access to government entitlements in marginalized communities. Taking inspiration from right to health PIL cases (PILs), lawyers in a New Delhi-based rights organization used desk research, fact-findings, and the Right To Information Act to build a TB PIL for the Delhi High Court, Sanjai Sharma v. NCT of Delhi and Others (2015). The case argues that inadequate implementation of government TB schemes violates the Constitutional rights to life, health, food, and equality. Although PILs face substantial challenges, this paper concludes that litigation can be a crucial advocacy and accountability tool for people living with TB and their allies. PMID:27781000

  20. Extensively Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other federal agencies and international partners to raise awareness and enhance strategies for TB prevention worldwide by: Strengthening TB services for people living with HIV/AIDS; Guiding preparedness and outbreak investigation responses; Improving ...

  1. TB in Children in the United States

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Related Links TB in Children in the United States TB disease in children under 15 years ... BCG vaccine is not generally used in the United States, because of the low risk of infection ...

  2. Is TB in Your Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerr, Joanne; Elwell, Jack

    2002-01-01

    Points out the importance of effective health education to fight against tuberculosis (TB) which is the number one fatal infectious disease around the world. Describes a science curriculum on tuberculosis that includes information on the facts about tuberculosis, a forum on tuberculosis, and evaluation. (Contains 17 references.) (YDS)

  3. Multicenter evaluation of Seegene Anyplex TB PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinsook; Kim, Jimyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Ihm, Chunhwa; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jayoung; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2014-07-01

    Culture is the gold standard for diagnosis of tuberculosis, but it takes 6 to 8 weeks to confirm the result. This issue is complemented by the detection method using polymerase chain reaction, which is now widely used in a routine microbiology laboratory. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR to assess its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and compared its results with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR, one of the most widely used assays in the world. Five university hospitals located in the Chungcheong area in South Korea participated in the study. A total of 1,167 respiratory specimens ordered for acid-fast bacilli staining and culture were collected for four months, analyzed via the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR, and its results were compared with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. For detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the Anyplex TB PCR were 87.5% and 98.2% respectively, whereas those of the Cobas TaqMan were 92.0% and 98.0% respectively (p value > 0.05). For smear-positive specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 95.2%, which was exactly the same as that of the Cobas TaqMan. For smear-negative specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 69.2%, whereas that of the Cobas TaqMan TB PCR was 84.6%. For detection of MTB, the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR showed excellent diagnostic performance, and high sensitivity and specificity, which were comparable to the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. In conclusion, the Anyplex TB PCR can be a useful diagnostic tool for the early detection of tuberculosis in clinical laboratories.

  4. Gold Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Epner Technology Inc. responded to a need from Goddard Space Flight Center for the ultimate in electroplated reflectivity needed for the Mars Global Surveyor Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). Made of beryllium, the MOLA mirror was coated by Epner Technology Laser Gold process, specially improved for the project. Improved Laser Gold- coated reflectors have found use in an epitaxial reactor built for a large semiconductor manufacturer as well as the waveguide in Braun-Thermoscan tympanic thermometer and lasing cavities in various surgical instruments.

  5. Gold Nanoantennas

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    An array of gold nanoantennas laced into an artificial membrane enhances the fluorescence intensity of three different molecules when they pass through plasmonic hot spots in the array. Watch for the blue, green and red flashes. The photobleaching at the end of each fluorescence event (white flashes) is indicative of single molecule observations.

  6. Gold liposomes

    SciTech Connect

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1996-12-31

    Lipids are an important class of molecules, being found in membranes, HDL, LDL, and other natural structures, serving essential roles in structure and with varied functions such as compartmentalization and transport. Synthetic liposomes are also widely used as delivery and release vehicles for drugs, cosmetics, and other chemicals; soap is made from lipids. Lipids may form bilayer or multilammellar vesicles, micelles, sheets, tubes, and other structures. Lipid molecules may be linked to proteins, carbohydrates, or other moieties. EM study of this essential ingredient of life has lagged, due to lack of direct methods to visualize lipids without extensive alteration. OsO4 reacts with double bonds in membrane phospholipids, forming crossbridges. This has been the method of choice to both fix and stain membranes, thus far. An earlier work described the use of tungstate clusters (W{sub 11}) attached to lipid moieties to form lipid structures and lipid probes. With the development of gold clusters, it is now possible to covalently and specifically link a dense gold sphere to a lipid molecule; for example, reacting a mono-N-hydroxysuccinimide Nanogold cluster with the amino group on phosphatidyl ethanolaminine. Examples of a gold-fatty acid and a gold-phospholipid are shown.

  7. Immunity to TB and targets for immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes

    2012-02-01

    For centuries the treatment of TB has presented an enormous challenge to global health. In the 20th century, the treatment of TB patients with long-term multidrug therapy gave hope that TB could be controlled and cured; however, contrary to these expectations and coinciding with the emergence of AIDS, the world has witnessed a rampant increase in hard-to-treat cases of TB, along with the emergence of highly virulent and multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. Unfortunately, these bacteria are now circulating around the world, and there are few effective drugs to treat them. As a result, the prospects for improved treatment and control of TB in the 21st century have worsened and we urgently need to identify new therapies that deal with this problem. The potential use of immunotherapy for TB is now of greater consideration than ever before, as immunotherapy could potentially overcome the problem of drug resistance. TB immunotherapy targets the already existing host anti-TB immune response and aims to enhance killing of the bacilli. For this purpose, several approaches have been used: the use of anti-Mycobacteria antibodies; enhancing the Th1 protective responses by using mycobacterial antigens or increasing Th1 cytokines; interfering with the inflammatory process and targeting of immunosuppressive pathways and targeting the cell activation/proliferation pathways. This article reviews our current understanding of TB immunity and targets for immunotherapy that could be used in combination with current TB chemotherapy.

  8. TB vaccine development and the End TB Strategy: importance and current status

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Helen A.; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    TB is now the leading, global cause of death due to a single infectious microbe. To achieve the End TB vision of reducing TB by 90% by 2035 we will need new interventions. The objectives of this manuscript are to summarize the status of the clinical TB vaccine pipeline; to assess the challenges facing the TB development field; and to discuss some of the key strategies being embraced by the field to overcome these challenges. Currently, 8 of the 13 vaccines in clinical development are subunit vaccines; 6 of these contain or express either Ag85A or Ag85B proteins. A major challenge to TB vaccine development is the lack of diversity in both the antigens included in TB vaccines, and the immune responses elicited by TB vaccine candidates. Both will need to be expanded to maximise the potential for developing a successful candidate by 2025. Current research efforts are focused on broadening both antigen selection and the range of vaccine-mediated immune responses. Previous and ongoing TB vaccine efficacy trials have built capacity, generated high quality data on TB incidence and prevalence, and provided insight into immune correlates of risk of TB disease. These gains will enable the design of better TB vaccines and, importantly, move these vaccines into efficacy trials more rapidly and at a lower cost than was possible for previous TB vaccine candidates. PMID:27076508

  9. TB an epidemic in Russia's prisons.

    PubMed

    1999-01-01

    Over 100,000 prisoners are infected with tuberculosis (TB) in Russia, which has the highest incarceration rate in the world. Drug-resistant TB is found in thousands of inmates, and approximately 20,000 have died from it within the past 2 years. Although the country now has 50 centers for TB-infected prisoners, many are not being cured because of medicine shortages and failure to complete treatment. Up to 25 percent of TB infections found in Russian jails are multi-drug resistant, as opposed to 4 percent in Russia's general population and under 2 percent in the United States. PMID:11367347

  10. Why healthcare workers are sick of TB.

    PubMed

    von Delft, Arne; Dramowski, Angela; Khosa, Celso; Kotze, Koot; Lederer, Philip; Mosidi, Thato; Peters, Jurgens A; Smith, Jonathan; van der Westhuizen, Helene-Mari; von Delft, Dalene; Willems, Bart; Bates, Matthew; Craig, Gill; Maeurer, Markus; Marais, Ben J; Mwaba, Peter; Nunes, Elizabete A; Nyirenda, Thomas; Oliver, Matt; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2015-03-01

    Dr Thato Mosidi never expected to be diagnosed with tuberculosis (TB), despite widely prevalent exposure and very limited infection control measures. The life-threatening diagnosis of primary extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) came as an even greater shock. The inconvenient truth is that, rather than being protected, Dr Mosidi and thousands of her healthcare colleagues are at an increased risk of TB and especially drug-resistant TB. In this viewpoint paper we debunk the widely held false belief that healthcare workers are somehow immune to TB disease (TB-proof) and explore some of the key factors contributing to the pervasive stigmatization and subsequent non-disclosure of occupational TB. Our front-line workers are some of the first to suffer the consequences of a progressively more resistant and fatal TB epidemic, and urgent interventions are needed to ensure the safety and continued availability of these precious healthcare resources. These include the rapid development and scale-up of improved diagnostic and treatment options, strengthened infection control measures, and focused interventions to tackle stigma and discrimination in all its forms. We call our colleagues to action to protect themselves and those they care for.

  11. Is It Real Gold?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Harold H.

    1999-01-01

    Features acid tests for determining whether jewelry is "real" gold or simply gold-plated. Describes the carat system of denoting gold content and explains how alloys are used to create various shades of gold jewelry. Addresses the question of whether gold jewelry can turn a wearer's skin green by considering various oxidation reactions. (WRM)

  12. TB in Correctional Facilities Is a Public Health Concern

    MedlinePlus

    ... component to TB elimination in the United States. Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ... is essential to these efforts. More Information Reported Tuberculosis in the United States, 2012 TB in Correctional ...

  13. Estimating the cost of TB and its social impact on TB patients and their households

    PubMed Central

    Onazi, O.; Gidado, M.; Onazi, M.; Daniel, O.; Kuye, J.; Obasanya, O.; Odusote, T.; Gande, S.

    2015-01-01

    Illness often poses a significant financial burden on individuals and their households, and tuberculosis (TB) is no exception. Although TB treatment is free in Nigeria, patients are likely to incur costs due to multiple visits during treatment. The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the health-seeking behaviour of TB patients and the costs borne by TB patients in Nigeria, and 2) to assess the social impact of TB disease on TB patients and their families/households. Of 260 TB patients surveyed, the majority (74.7%) were aged between 20 and 49 years. TB patients expended an average of US$52.02 (N = 8323.58, at the rate of US$1 = N = 160) per person on all visits associated with diagnosis and receipt of diagnostic test results. Overall, households experienced a shortfall of about US$57.30 (N = 9174.72) or 24.9% of income loss due to TB illness. Further analysis revealed that 9.7% of TB patients relied on children of school age or below to finance the costs of TB illness. PMID:26400384

  14. Estimating the cost of TB and its social impact on TB patients and their households.

    PubMed

    Onazi, O; Gidado, M; Onazi, M; Daniel, O; Kuye, J; Obasanya, O; Odusote, T; Gande, S

    2015-06-21

    Illness often poses a significant financial burden on individuals and their households, and tuberculosis (TB) is no exception. Although TB treatment is free in Nigeria, patients are likely to incur costs due to multiple visits during treatment. The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the health-seeking behaviour of TB patients and the costs borne by TB patients in Nigeria, and 2) to assess the social impact of TB disease on TB patients and their families/households. Of 260 TB patients surveyed, the majority (74.7%) were aged between 20 and 49 years. TB patients expended an average of US$52.02 (N = 8323.58, at the rate of US$1 = N = 160) per person on all visits associated with diagnosis and receipt of diagnostic test results. Overall, households experienced a shortfall of about US$57.30 (N = 9174.72) or 24.9% of income loss due to TB illness. Further analysis revealed that 9.7% of TB patients relied on children of school age or below to finance the costs of TB illness.

  15. Estimating the cost of TB and its social impact on TB patients and their households.

    PubMed

    Onazi, O; Gidado, M; Onazi, M; Daniel, O; Kuye, J; Obasanya, O; Odusote, T; Gande, S

    2015-06-21

    Illness often poses a significant financial burden on individuals and their households, and tuberculosis (TB) is no exception. Although TB treatment is free in Nigeria, patients are likely to incur costs due to multiple visits during treatment. The purpose of this study was 1) to examine the health-seeking behaviour of TB patients and the costs borne by TB patients in Nigeria, and 2) to assess the social impact of TB disease on TB patients and their families/households. Of 260 TB patients surveyed, the majority (74.7%) were aged between 20 and 49 years. TB patients expended an average of US$52.02 (N = 8323.58, at the rate of US$1 = N = 160) per person on all visits associated with diagnosis and receipt of diagnostic test results. Overall, households experienced a shortfall of about US$57.30 (N = 9174.72) or 24.9% of income loss due to TB illness. Further analysis revealed that 9.7% of TB patients relied on children of school age or below to finance the costs of TB illness. PMID:26400384

  16. Magnetoresistance in nanostructured Tb/Ti and Tb/Si multilayers

    SciTech Connect

    Svalov, A. V.; Kurlyandskaya, G. V.; Vas'kovskiy, V. O.; Sorokin, A. N.; Diercks, D.

    2011-01-15

    Magnetic, magnetoresistive and structural properties were studied for [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers which were prepared by rf-sputtering. The thickness of the Tb layers varied from 1.5 to 12 nm. The thickness of 2 nm nonmagnetic spacers of Ti or Si was kept constant. Both anisotropic and isotropic magnetoresistance was observed in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers. A decrease in the thickness of the terbium layers led to a decrease in the anisotropic contribution to the total magnetoresistance. The negative isotropic magnetoresistanse in [Tb/Ti]{sub n} and [Tb/Si]{sub n} multilayers can be attributed to the giant magnetoresistance (GMR) and/or high field isotropic magnetoresistance. The structure of the samples of both types enabled the existence of the GMR effect.

  17. [The present and future prospects in rapid molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis and MDR-TB (First Part)].

    PubMed

    Tănăsescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases is absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases prove their usefulness rapid diagnostic methods. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB is extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases. PMID:24273995

  18. [The present and future prospects in rapid molecular diagnosis of tuberculosis and MDR-TB (First Part)].

    PubMed

    Tănăsescu, Mihaela; Didilescu, Cristian; Marica, Constantin

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still one of the diseases with a major medical and social impact, and in terms of early diagnosis (which would imply a fair treatment and established at the time), difficulties related to the delay bacilli isolation in culture, decreased susceptibility testing methods to antituberculosis drugs, lack of methods for differentiation of M. Tuberculosis complex germs of non TB Mycobacteria, may have important clinical implications. Traditional testing of anti-TB drug susceptibility on solid Löwenstein-Jensen medium (gold standard) or liquid media can only be performed using grown samples. Determining the time it takes up to 42 days on solid media and 12 days for liquid media. For MDR/XDR TB cases is absolutely essential to reduce the detection time. In these cases prove their usefulness rapid diagnostic methods. Automatic testing in liquid medium, molecular hybridization methods are currently recommended by the current WHO guidelines. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB is extremely useful for the early establishment of an effective treatment tailored more accurately on the spectrum of sensitivity of the resistant strain (thus reducing the risk of developing additional resistance to other drugs) and control the spread of these strains. Genetic diagnostic methods, approved and recommended by the WHO, can reduce the time of diagnosis of TB case and, importantly, the case of MDR TB. They do not replace the current standard diagnostic methods and resistance profile, but complete them in selected cases.

  19. Gold and silver nanoparticles for biomolecule immobilization and enzymatic catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petkova, Galina A.; Záruba, Кamil; Žvátora, Pavel; Král, Vladimír

    2012-06-01

    In this work, a simple method for alcohol synthesis with high enantiomeric purity was proposed. For this, colloidal gold and silver surface modifications with 3-mercaptopropanoic acid and cysteamine were used to generate carboxyl and amine functionalized gold and silver nanoparticles of 15 and 45 nm, respectively. Alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobium brockii (TbADH) and its cofactor (NADPH) were physical and covalent (through direct adsorption and using cross-linker) immobilized on nanoparticles' surface. In contrast to the physical and covalent immobilizations that led to a loss of 90% of the initial enzyme activity and 98% immobilization, the use of a cross-linker in immobilization process promoted a loss to 30% of the initial enzyme activity and >92% immobilization. The yield of NADPH immobilization was about 80%. The best results in terms of activity were obtained with Ag-citr nanoparticle functionalized with carboxyl groups (Ag-COOH), Au-COOH(CTAB), and Au-citr functionalized with amine groups and stabilized with CTAB (Au-NH2(CTAB)) nanoparticles treated with 0.7% and 1.0% glutaraldehyde. Enzyme conformation upon immobilization was studied using fluorescence and circular dichroism spectroscopies. Shift in ellipticity at 222 nm with about 4 to 7 nm and significant decreasing in fluorescence emission for all bioconjugates were observed by binding of TbADH to silver/gold nanoparticles. Emission redshifting of 5 nm only for Ag-COOH-TbADH bioconjugate demonstrated change in the microenvironment of TbADH. Enzyme immobilization on glutaraldehyde-treated Au-NH2(CTAB) nanoparticles promotes an additional stabilization preserving about 50% of enzyme activity after 15 days storage. Nanoparticles attached-TbADH-NADPH systems were used for enantioselective ( ee > 99%) synthesis of ( S)-7-hydroxy-2-tetralol.

  20. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB (M/XDR-TB): problems and solutions.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Rajendra

    2010-10-01

    Multi Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and Extensively Drug Resistant Tuberculosis (XDR-TB) are posing a threat to the control of tuberculosis. The first WHO-IUATLD antituberculosis drug resistance surveillance carried out in 1994 in 35 countries reported the median prevalence of primary and acquired multi drug resistance as 1.4% and 13% respectively. Subsequently, second, third and fourth WHO-IUATLD global drug resistance surveillances were carried out in 1996-99, 1999-2002 and 2002-2007 respectively. Based on drug resistance information from 114 countries, the proportion of MDR-TB among all cases was estimated for countries with no survey information. It was estimated that 4,89,139 cases of MDR-TB emerged in 2006. China and India carry approximately 50% of the global burden. 35 countries and two Special Administrative Regions (SARs) reported data on XDR-TB for the first time in 2006. Multidrug and extensively drug-resistant TB 2010 Global report on Surveillance and response estimated that 4,40,000 cases of MDR-TB emerged globally in 2008 and caused an estimated 1,50,000 deaths. 5.4% of MDR-TB cases were found to have XDR-TB. To date, a cumulative total of 58 countries have confirmed at least one case of XDR-TB. M/XDR-TB is a man-made problem and its emergence can be prevented by prompt diagnosis and effective use of first line drugs in every new patient. The DOTS Plus proposed by WHO highlights the comprehensive management strategy to control MDR-TB. Laboratory services for adequate and timely diagnosis of M/XDR-TB must be strengthened and programmatic management of M/XDR-TB must be scaled up as per target set by global plan. Proper use of second-line drugs must be ensured to cure existing MDR-TB, to reduce its transmission and to prevent XDR-TB. Sound infection control measures to avoid further transmission of M/XDR-TB and research towards development of new diagnostics, drugs and vaccines should be promoted to control M/XDR-TB.

  1. Immunomodulation by vitamin D: implications for TB

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Rene F; Adams, John S; Hewison, Martin

    2011-01-01

    TB remains a major cause of mortality throughout the world. Low vitamin D status has been linked to increased risk of TB and other immune disorders. These observations suggest a role for vitamin D as a modulator of normal human immune function. This article will detail the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which vitamin D regulates the immune system and how vitamin D insufficiency may lead to immune dysregulation. The importance of vitamin D bioavailability as a mechanism for defining the immunomodulatory actions of vitamin D and its impact on TB will also be discussed. The overall aim will be to provide a fresh perspective on the potential benefits of vitamin D supplementation in the prevention and treatment of TB. PMID:22046197

  2. HIV-Associated TB: Facts 2013

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intensified case finding for TB, Isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT), and Infection control) will reduce the burden of ... the 42 countries that reported data for 2012, IPT was provided to 520,000 people living with ...

  3. Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR TB)

    MedlinePlus

    ... prisons, or homeless shelters. If you work in hospitals or health-care settings where TB patients are likely to be seen, you should consult infection control or occupational health experts. Ask about administrative and ...

  4. The global situation of MDR-TB.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Marcos A

    2003-01-01

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis has been reported since the early days of the introduction of chemotherapy. However, most of the evidence was limited to developed countries. In 1992, the Third World Congress on Tuberculosis concluded that there was little recent information on the global magnitude of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), defined as resistance to at least isoniazid and rifampicin. Through the WHO/IUATLD Global Project on Drug-Resistance Surveillance launched in 1994, a large number of reliable and accurate data have allowed us to understand the magnitude of the problem of MDR-TB. The data available suggest that globally MDR-TB is not a problem (median = 1% in 64 countries/geographical sites surveyed) of the same magnitude as that of drug-susceptible tuberculosis. However, MDR-TB is at critical levels in specific regions of the world. Hot spots for MDR-TB include Estonia, Latvia, the Oblasts of Ivanovo and Tomsk in Russia, and the provinces of Henan and Zhejiang Provinces in China. Trends confirm that MDR-TB is limited to local epidemics but the evidence is not yet irrefutable, as many countries have only provided short-term data. Two-thirds of the world's countries and, more importantly, half of the 22 tuberculosis high-burden countries, have not yet provided data. Mathematical modelling suggests that 3.2% (or 273,000) of the world's estimated new tuberculosis cases (95% confidence intervals: 185,000 and 414,000) were MDR-TB in 2000. Adoption of DOTS to prevent the generation of resistant strains and careful introduction of second-line drugs to treat patients with MDR are the top priorities for proper control/containment of MDR-TB. PMID:12758188

  5. Resistant TB: Newer Drugs and Community Approach.

    PubMed

    Gothi, Dipti; Joshi, Jyotsna M

    2011-01-01

    Drug resistance in tuberculosis (TB) is a serious problem compromising both the treatment and control programs. Poor usage of the available anti TB drugs has led to progressive drug resistance-multi drug resistance (MDR), extensively drug-resistance (XDR) and even total drug resistance (TDR). While drug sensitive TB is completely curable, MDR-TB is difficult to treat, XDR and TDR are often fatal. Non availability of new drugs to treat drug resistant cases further complicates the problem. The Global Alliance for Tuberculosis Drug Developments, a non-profit organization with the World Health Organization (WHO) as a partner was formed in February 2000 for the development of new drugs. In the last decade this venture has resulted in several promising new antituberculosis drugs like TMC207 (diaryquinoline), PA-824 (nitroimidazo-oxazine), OPC-67683 (nitroimidazo-oxazole) and SQ 109 (diamine compound). Drug resistance in TB is a man made problem. Therefore, while global efforts towards new drug development must continue it is equally important to have a well defined community approach to prevent the emergence of drug resistance to the existing and newer drugs. The present review article discusses some recent drug patents for the treatment of tuberculosis and the appropriate community approach to prevent and treat drug resistant TB.

  6. Amyloid Templated Gold Aerogels.

    PubMed

    Nyström, Gustav; Fernández-Ronco, María P; Bolisetty, Sreenath; Mazzotti, Marco; Mezzenga, Raffaele

    2016-01-20

    Amyloid fibril-based ultralow-density aerogels are designed by functionalization with gold nanoparticles and microcrystals, leading to hybrids of unprecedented lightness and functionality. By changing the colloidal gold shape, size, and concentration, the gold composition can be tuned to reach contents ≥20 kt equivalent, yet at densities ≈10(3) lighter than any equivalent gold alloys, and combining unique features such as porosity, catalytic properties, pressure sensing, and autofluorescence.

  7. Thermal stability of structure in small gold clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloven'ko, Zh. V.; Gafner, Yu. Ya.; Gafner, S. L.; Redel', L. V.

    2013-12-01

    Limits of thermal stability of the original fcc phase in gold clusters up to 3.5 nm in diameter have been studied. The simulation carried out by the molecular-dynamics method using a modified TB-SMA tight-binding potential has shown that in small Au clusters under the effect of the temperature factor there occurs a transition from the original fcc phase to other structural modifications, including those with a pentagonal symmetry. As the size of gold nanoparticles increases, the polytypic-transition temperature shifts toward the melting temperature of the cluster. The results obtained are compared with the data for copper and nickel nanoparticles with similar sizes. It has been shown that, in the case of nickel and copper clusters, it is the transition from the fcc phase into structures with a pentagonal symmetry, which are not found in the bulk state, that is the governing factor; the gold clusters demonstrate a much more intricate behavior.

  8. Concordant or discordant results by the tuberculin skin test and the quantiFERON-TB test in children reflect immune biomarker profiles.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, S; Jenum, S; Stavrum, R; Ritz, C; Kenneth, J; Vaz, M; Doherty, T M; Grewal, H M S

    2014-01-01

    The tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB-Gold-In-tube (QFTGIT) are adjunctive tests used in the diagnosis of pediatric tuberculosis (TB). Neither test can rule out TB; however, a positive test usually triggers preventive treatment in TB contacts aged <5 years. TST and QFTGIT can give divergent results and it is unclear how discordant results should be interpreted in terms of TB risk and preventive treatment. To understand the immune processes underlying concordant or discordant TST and QFTGIT results, we analyzed immune responses in children from Palamaner Taluk in India (a TB-endemic region with routine neonatal BCG vaccination) who were referred to a TB case verification ward on suspicion of TB. Two hundred and ten children aged <3 years were classified according to their TST and QFTGIT results, and their immune responses analyzed by dual-colour-Reverse-Transcriptase-Multiple-Ligation-dependent-Probe-Amplification, using a panel of 45 genes and a 10-plex antigen-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We show that immune biomarkers FPR1, TNFRSF1A and interferon (IFN)-γ are upregulated (all P<0.05) in concordant test-positive children, whereas BPI is downregulated (P<0.05). In contrast, SEC14L1 (P=0.034) and Interferon gamma-induced protein 10 (IP-10) (P=0.001) are differentially expressed between the TST+QFTGIT- /TST-QFTGIT+ groups. Known TB exposure was more frequent in concordant positive children and results were consistent with elevated expression of genes associated with inflammatory responses. Children with discordant test results displayed a mixed profile with activation of both pro- and anti-inflammatory markers. TST and/or QFTGIT positivity appears to reflect distinct but overlapping aspects of host immunity.

  9. Cell Death and Autophagy in TB

    PubMed Central

    Moraco, Andrew H.; Kornfeld, Hardy

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis has succeeded in infecting one third of the human race though inhibition or evasion of innate and adaptive immunity. The pathogen is a facultative intracellular parasite that uses the niche provided by mononuclear phagocytes for its advantage. Complex interactions determine whether the bacillus will or will not be delivered to acidified lysosomes, whether the host phagocyte will survive infection or die, and whether the timing and mode of cell death works to the advantage of the host or the pathogen. Here we discuss cell death and autophagy in TB. These fundamental processes of cell biology feature in all aspects of TB pathogenesis and may be exploited to the treatment or prevention of TB disease. PMID:25453227

  10. Magnetic Order in TbCo2Zn20 and TbFe2Zn20

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, W.; Christianson, Andrew D; Zarestky, J. L.; Jia, S.; Bud'ko, S. L.; Canfield, P. C.; Piccoli, P. M. B.; Schultz, A. J.

    2010-01-01

    We report neutron di raction studies of TbCo2Zn20 and TbFe2Zn20, two isostructural compounds which exhibit dramatically di erent magnetic behavior. In the case of TbCo2Zn20, magnetic Bragg peaks corresponding to antiferromagnetic order are observed below TN 2.5 K with a propagation vector of (0.5 0.5 0.5). On the other hand, TbFe2Zn20 undergoes a ferromagnetic transition at temperatures as high as 66 K which shows a high sensitivity to sample-to-sample variations. Two samples of TbFe2Zn20 with the same nominal compositions but with substantially di erent mag- netic ordering temperatures (Tc 51 and 66 K) were measured by single crystal neutron di raction. Structural re nements of the neutron di raction data nd no direct signature of atomic site disorder between the two TbFe2Zn20 samples except for subtle di erences in the anisotropic thermal param- eters. The di erences in the anisotropic thermal parameters between the two samples is likely due to very small amounts of disorder. This provides further evidence for the extreme sensitivity of the magnetic properties of TbFe2Zn20 to small sample variations, even small amounts of disorder.

  11. A comparative study of magnetic behaviors in TbNi{sub 2}, TbMn{sub 2} and TbNi{sub 2}Mn

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J. L.; Md Din, M. F.; Hong, F.; Cheng, Z. X.; Dou, S. X.; Kennedy, S. J.; Studer, A. J.; Campbell, S. J.; Wu, G. H.

    2014-05-07

    All TbNi{sub 2}, TbMn{sub 2}, and TbNi{sub 2}Mn compounds exhibit the cubic Laves phase with AB{sub 2}-type structure in spite of the fact that the ratio of the Tb to transition-metal components in TbNi{sub 2}Mn is 1:3. Rietveld refinement indicates that in TbNi{sub 2}Mn the Mn atoms are distributed on both the A (8a) and B (16d) sites. The values of the lattice constants were measured to be a = 14.348 Å (space group F-43 m), 7.618 Å, and 7.158 Å (space group Fd-3 m) for TbNi{sub 2}, TbMn{sub 2}, and TbNi{sub 2}Mn, respectively. The magnetic transition temperatures T{sub C} were found to be T{sub C} = 38 K and T{sub C} = 148 K for TbNi{sub 2} and TbNi{sub 2}Mn, respectively, while two magnetic phase transitions are detected for TbMn{sub 2} at T{sub 1} = 20 K and T{sub 2} = 49 K. Clear magnetic history effects in a low magnetic field are observed in TbMn{sub 2} and TbNi{sub 2}Mn. The magnetic entropy changes have been obtained.

  12. TAIMA (Stop) TB: The Impact of a Multifaceted TB Awareness and Door-to-Door Campaign in Residential Areas of High Risk for TB in Iqaluit, Nunavut

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Gonzalo G.; VanDyk, Deborah D.; Aaron, Shawn D.; Cameron, D. William; Davies, Naomi; Stephen, Natasha; Mallick, Ranjeeta; Momoli, Franco; Moreau, Katherine; Obed, Natan; Baikie, Maureen; Osborne, Geraldine

    2014-01-01

    Background The incidence rate of active tuberculosis (TB) disease in the Canadian Territory of Nunavut has shown a rising trend over the past 10 years. In 2010 it was 60 times greater than the national incidence rate. The objective of the Taima (translates to “stop” in Inuktitut) TB study was to implement and evaluate a public health campaign to enhance existing TB prevention efforts in Nunavut. Methods A TB awareness campaign followed by a door-to-door screening campaign was carried out in Iqaluit, Nunavut. The aim of the campaign was to raise awareness about TB, and to provide in-home screening and treatment for people living in residential areas at high risk for TB. Screening was based on geographic location rather than on individual risk factors. Results During the general awareness campaign an increase in the number of people who requested TB testing at the local public health clinic was observed. However, this increase was not sustained following cessation of the awareness campaign. Targeted TB screening in high risk residential areas in Iqaluit resulted in 224 individuals having TSTs read, and detection of 42 previously unidentified cases of latent TB, (overall yield of 18.8% or number needed to screen = 5.3). These cases of latent TB infection (LTBI) were extra cases that had not been picked up by traditional screening practices (34% relative increase within the community). This resulted in a 33% relative increase in the completion of LTBI treatment within the community. The program directly and indirectly identified 5/17 new cases of active TB disease in Iqaluit during the study period (29.5% of all incident cases). Conclusions While contact tracing investigations remain a cornerstone of TB prevention, additional awareness, screening, and treatment programs like Taima TB may contribute to the successful control of TB in Aboriginal communities. PMID:25033320

  13. Tuberculosis: Learn the Signs and Symptoms of TB Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Emails CDC Features Tuberculosis (TB) Disease: Symptoms & Risk Factors Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by bacteria that ...

  14. Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV (the AIDS Virus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Task Force Tuberculosis: The Connection between TB and HIV Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Order this ... if I am infected with both TB and HIV? If you have HIV, it is important to ...

  15. Drug resistance among TB cases and its clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Chopra, K K

    2015-07-01

    The emergence of M. tuberculosis strains resistant to at least, Isoniazid (INH) and Rifampicin (RIF), the two most potent drugs of first-line anti-TB therapy is termed multidrug drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB). This is a cause of concern to TB Control Programmes worldwide. When MDR-TB strains become resistant to the major second-line drugs, one of the fluouroquinolones and one of the three injectable drugs (Amikacin, Kanamycin and Capreomycin), it is defined as extensively drug resistant TB.(1,2) MDR-TB is a manmade, costly and deadly problem. Rapid diagnosis of MDR-TB is essential for the prompt initiation of effective second-line therapy to improve treatment outcome and limit transmission of the disease.

  16. HIV-1 and the immune response to TB

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Naomi F; Meintjes, Graeme; Wilkinson, Robert J

    2013-01-01

    TB causes 1.4 million deaths annually. HIV-1 infection is the strongest risk factor for TB. The characteristic immunological effect of HIV is on CD4 cell count. However, the risk of TB is elevated in HIV-1 infected individuals even in the first few years after HIV acquisition and also after CD4 cell counts are restored with antiretroviral therapy. In this review, we examine features of the immune response to TB and how this is affected by HIV-1 infection and vice versa. We discuss how the immunology of HIV–TB coinfection impacts on the clinical presentation and diagnosis of TB, and how antiretroviral therapy affects the immune response to TB, including the development of TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. We highlight important areas of uncertainty and future research needs. PMID:23653664

  17. Co-operative transitions of responsive-polymer coated gold nanoparticles; precision tuning and direct evidence for co-operative aggregation† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6tb01336h Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Won, Sangho; Phillips, Daniel J.; Walker, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Responsive polymers and polymer-coated nanoparticles have many potential bio-applications with the crucial parameter being the exact temperature where the transition occurs. Chemical modification of hydrophobic/hydrophilic or ligand binding sites has been widely explored as a tool for controlling this transition, but requires the synthesis of many different components to achieve precise control. This study reports an extensive investigation into the use of blending (i.e. mixing) as a powerful tool to modulate the transition temperature of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) coated gold nanoparticles. By simply mixing two nanoparticles of different compositions, precise control over the transition temperature can be imposed. This was shown to be flexible to all possible mixing parameters (different polymers on different particles, different polymers on same particles and different sized particles with identical/different polymers). Evidence of the co-operative aggregation of differently sized nanoparticles (with different cloud points) is shown using transmission electron microscopy; particles with higher cloud points aggregate with those with lower cloud points with homo-aggregates not seen, demonstrating the co-operative behaviour. These interactions, and the opportunities for transition tuning will have implications in the rational design of responsive biomaterials. PMID:27746916

  18. Boeing TB-29 Superfortress (B-29)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1945-01-01

    Boeing TB-29 Superfortress (B-29): Arriving for use with the NACA right at the end of World War II, this Boeing B-29 Superfortress was used for research into hydraulically boosting flight controls. After just over five years of study at Langley, the B-29 was returned to the Air Force.

  19. TB drug development: immunology at the table

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Carl; Barry, Clifton E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Our understanding of the host-pathogen relationship in tuberculosis can help guide tuberculosis (TB) drug discovery in at least two ways. First, the recognition that host immunopathology affects lesional TB drug distribution means that pharmacokinetic evaluation of drug candidates needs to move beyond measurements of drug levels in blood, whole lungs or alveolar epithelial lining fluid to include measurements in specific types of lesions. Second, by restricting the replication of M. tuberculosis (Mtb) subpopulations in latent TB infection and in active disease, the host immune response puts Mtb into a state associated with phenotypic tolerance to TB drugs selected for their activity against replicating Mtb. This has spurred a major effort to conduct high throughput screens in vitro for compounds that can kill Mtb when it is replicating slowly if at all. Each condition used in vitro to slow Mtb’s replication and thereby model the phenotypically drug-tolerant state has advantages and disadvantages. Lead candidates emerging from such in vitro studies face daunting challenges in the design of proof-of-concept studies in animal models. Moreover, some non-replicating subpopulations of Mtb fail to resume replication when plated on agar, although their viability is demonstrable by other means. There is as yet no widely replicated assay in which to screen compounds for their ability to kill this ‘viable but non-culturable’ subpopulation. Despite these hurdles, drugs that can kill slowly replicating or non-replicating Mtb may offer our best hope for treatment-shortening combination chemotherapy of TB. PMID:25703568

  20. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar

    PubMed Central

    Shewade, H. D.; Kyaw, N. T. T.; Oo, M. M.; Aung, T. K.; Aung, S. T.; Oo, H. N.; Win, T.; Harries, A. D.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: Integrated HIV Care programme, Mandalay, Myanmar. Objectives: To determine time to starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in relation to anti-tuberculosis treatment (ATT) and its association with TB treatment outcomes in patients co-infected with tuberculosis (TB) and the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enrolled from 2011 to 2014. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 1708 TB-HIV patients, 1565 (92%) started ATT first and 143 (8%) started ART first. Treatment outcomes were missing for 226 patients and were thus not included. In those starting ATT first, the median time to starting ART was 8.6 weeks. ART was initiated after 8 weeks in 830 (53%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 7%, with anaemia being an independent predictor. In patients starting ART first, the median time to starting ATT was 21.6 weeks. ATT was initiated within 3 months in 56 (39%) patients. Unsuccessful outcome was found in 12%, and in 20% of those starting ATT within 3 months. Patients with CD4 count <100/mm3 had a four times higher risk of an unsuccessful outcome. Conclusions: Timing of ART in relation to ATT was not an independent risk factor for unsuccessful outcome. Extensive screening for TB with rapid and sensitive diagnostic tests in HIV-infected persons and close monitoring of anaemia and immunosuppression are recommended to further improve TB treatment outcomes among patients with TB-HIV. PMID:27358804

  1. Characteristics and TB treatment outcomes in TB patients with viral hepatitis, New York City, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Bushnell, G; Stennis, N L; Drobnik, A M; Proops, D C; Ahuja, S D; Bornschlegel, K; Fuld, J

    2015-07-01

    Literature surrounding the burden of and factors associated with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in persons with tuberculosis (TB) disease remains limited and focused on populations outside the USA. Cross-matched New York City (NYC) TB and viral hepatitis surveillance data were used to estimate the proportion of NYC adults diagnosed with TB from 2000 to 2010 with a report of viral hepatitis infection and to describe the impact of viral hepatitis infection on TB treatment completion and death. For 9512 TB patients, HCV infection was reported in 4.2% and HBV infection in 3.7%; <1% of TB patients had both HCV and HBV infection. The proportion of TB patients with HCV infection to die before TB treatment completion was larger than in TB patients without a viral hepatitis report (21% vs. 9%); this association remained when stratified by HIV status. There was no significant difference in death before treatment completion for TB patients with HBV infection compared to TB patients without a viral hepatitis report when stratified by HIV status. These findings reinforce the importance of hepatitis testing and providing additional support to TB patients with viral hepatitis infection.

  2. GOLD PLATING PROCESS

    DOEpatents

    Seegmiller, R.

    1957-08-01

    An improved bath is reported for plating gold on other metals. The composition of the plating bath is as follows: Gold cyanide from about 15 to about 50 grams, potassium cyanide from about 70 to about 125 grams, and sulfonated castor oil from about 0.1 to about 10 cc. The gold plate produced from this bath is smooth, semi-hard, and nonporous.

  3. A world of cities and the end of TB

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Amit; Ross, Alex; Rosenberg, Paul; Dye, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The WHO's End TB Strategy aims to reduce TB deaths by 95% and incidence by 90% between 2015 and 2035. As the world rapidly urbanizes, more people could have access to better infrastructure and services to help combat poverty and infectious diseases, including TB. And yet large numbers of people now live in overcrowded slums, with poor access to urban health services, amplifying the burden of TB. An alignment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for health and for urban development provides an opportunity to accelerate the overall decline in infection and disease, and to create cities free of TB. PMID:26884491

  4. Diagnosis and management of TB in children: an update.

    PubMed

    Marquez, Lucila; Starke, Jeffrey R

    2011-12-01

    In recent years, several notable modifications have occurred in the management of TB infection and disease in children. First, we review new data related to infection, including alternative regimens for the treatment of latent TB, management of drug-resistant infection and preventive therapy in the context of HIV infection. Next, we summarize updated WHO guidelines for the treatment of TB in children, explore issues specific to the management of disease in HIV-infected children, and retreatment of TB, and review pediatric recommendations for the management of drug-resistant TB. Finally, we conclude with a discussion of adjunctive therapy and new drugs in development. PMID:22114966

  5. A world of cities and the end of TB.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Amit; Ross, Alex; Rosenberg, Paul; Dye, Christopher

    2016-03-01

    The WHO's End TB Strategy aims to reduce TB deaths by 95% and incidence by 90% between 2015 and 2035. As the world rapidly urbanizes, more people could have access to better infrastructure and services to help combat poverty and infectious diseases, including TB. And yet large numbers of people now live in overcrowded slums, with poor access to urban health services, amplifying the burden of TB. An alignment of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) for health and for urban development provides an opportunity to accelerate the overall decline in infection and disease, and to create cities free of TB. PMID:26884491

  6. Magnetism in nanocrystalline gold.

    PubMed

    Tuboltsev, Vladimir; Savin, Alexander; Pirojenko, Alexandre; Räisänen, Jyrki

    2013-08-27

    While bulk gold is well known to be diamagnetic, there is a growing body of convincing experimental and theoretical work indicating that nanostructured gold can be imparted with unconventional magnetic properties. Bridging the current gap in experimental study of magnetism in bare gold nanomaterials, we report here on magnetism in gold nanocrystalline films produced by cluster deposition in the aggregate form that can be considered as a crossover state between a nanocluster and a continuous film. We demonstrate ferromagnetic-like hysteretic magnetization with temperature dependence indicative of spin-glass-like behavior and find this to be consistent with theoretical predictions, available in the literature, based on first-principles calculations.

  7. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    PubMed

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  8. TIME Impact - a new user-friendly tuberculosis (TB) model to inform TB policy decisions.

    PubMed

    Houben, R M G J; Lalli, M; Sumner, T; Hamilton, M; Pedrazzoli, D; Bonsu, F; Hippner, P; Pillay, Y; Kimerling, M; Ahmedov, S; Pretorius, C; White, R G

    2016-03-24

    Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death from infectious disease worldwide, predominantly affecting low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where resources are limited. As such, countries need to be able to choose the most efficient interventions for their respective setting. Mathematical models can be valuable tools to inform rational policy decisions and improve resource allocation, but are often unavailable or inaccessible for LMICs, particularly in TB. We developed TIME Impact, a user-friendly TB model that enables local capacity building and strengthens country-specific policy discussions to inform support funding applications at the (sub-)national level (e.g. Ministry of Finance) or to international donors (e.g. the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria).TIME Impact is an epidemiological transmission model nested in TIME, a set of TB modelling tools available for free download within the widely-used Spectrum software. The TIME Impact model reflects key aspects of the natural history of TB, with additional structure for HIV/ART, drug resistance, treatment history and age. TIME Impact enables national TB programmes (NTPs) and other TB policymakers to better understand their own TB epidemic, plan their response, apply for funding and evaluate the implementation of the response.The explicit aim of TIME Impact's user-friendly interface is to enable training of local and international TB experts towards independent use. During application of TIME Impact, close involvement of the NTPs and other local partners also builds critical understanding of the modelling methods, assumptions and limitations inherent to modelling. This is essential to generate broad country-level ownership of the modelling data inputs and results. In turn, it stimulates discussions and a review of the current evidence and assumptions, strengthening the decision-making process in general.TIME Impact has been effectively applied in a variety of settings. In South Africa, it

  9. Cross-matching TB and AIDS registries: TB patients with HIV co-infection, United States, 1993-1994.

    PubMed Central

    Moore, M; McCray, E; Onorato, I M

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Because of limited reporting of HIV status in case reports to the national tuberculosis (TB) surveillance system, the authors conducted this study to estimate the proportion of US TB cases with HIV co-infection and to describe demographic and clinical characteristics of co-infected patients. METHODS: The 50 states, New York City, and Puerto Rico submitted the results of cross-matches of TB registries and HIV-AIDS registries. The authors determined the number of TB cases reported for 1993-1994 that were listed in HIV-AIDS registries and analyzed data on demographic and clinical characteristics by match status. RESULTS: Of 49,938 TB cases reported for 1993-1994, 6863 (14%) were listed in AIDS or HIV registries. The proportions of TB-AIDS cases among TB cases varied by reporting area, from 0% to 31%. Anti-TB drug resistance was higher among TB-AIDS cases, particularly resistance to isoniazid and rifampin (multidrug resistance) and rifampin alone, In some areas with low proportions of multidrug-resistant TB cases, however, the difference in multidrug resistance between TB-AIDS patients and non-AIDS TB patients was not found. CONCLUSIONS: The proportion of TB cases with HIV co-infection, particularly in some areas, underscores the importance of the HIV-AIDS epidemic for the epidemiology of TB. Efforts to improve HIV testing as well as reporting of HIV status for TB patients should continue to ensure optimum management of coinfected patients, enhance surveillance activities, and promote judicious resource allocation and targeted prevention and control activities. PMID:10476997

  10. Mass incarceration can explain population increases in TB and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Stuckler, David; Basu, Sanjay; McKee, Martin; King, Lawrence

    2008-09-01

    Several microlevel studies have pinpointed prisons as an important site for tuberculosis (TB) and multidrug-resistant TB in European and central Asian countries. To date, no comparative analyses have examined whether rises in incarceration rates can account for puzzling differences in TB trends among overall populations. Using longitudinal TB and cross-sectional multidrug-resistant TB data for 26 eastern European and central Asian countries, we examined whether and to what degree increases in incarceration account for differences in population TB and multidrug-resistant TB burdens. We find that each percentage point increase in incarceration rates relates to an increased TB incidence of 0.34% (population attributable risk, 95% C.I.: 0.10-0.58%, P < 0.01), after controlling for TB infrastructure; HIV prevalence; and several surveillance, economic, demographic, and political indicators. Net increases in incarceration account for a 20.5% increase in TB incidence or nearly three-fifths of the average total increase in TB incidence in the countries studied from 1991 to 2002. Although the number of prisoners is a significant determinant of differences in TB incidence and multidrug-resistant TB prevalence among countries, the rate of prison growth is a larger determinant of these outcomes, and its effect is exacerbated but not confounded by HIV. Differences in incarceration rates are a major determinant of differences in population TB outcomes among eastern European and central Asian countries, and treatment expansion alone does not appear to resolve the effect of mass incarceration on TB incidence.

  11. Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR- TB) Compared with Non-MDR-TB Infections in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Omar Salad; Hasan, Habsah; Abdullah, Sarimah; Mat Jeab, Mat Zuki; Ba, Zilfalil; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Treating patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strains is more complicated, complex, toxic, expensive, than treating patients with susceptible TB strains. This study aims to compare the treatment outcomes and potential factors associated between patients with MDR-TB and non MDR TB infections in peninsular Malaysia. Methods This study was a retrospective cohort study. Data were collected from the medical records of all registered MDR-TB patients and Non-MDR-TB patients at five TB hospitals in peninsular Malaysia from January 2010 to January 2014. Results A total of 314 subjects were studied, including 105 MDR-TB cases and 209 non-MDR-TB. After TB treatment, 24.8% of the MDR-TB patients and 17.7% of non MDR TB relapsed; 17.1% of the MDR-TB patients and 16.3% of non MDR TB defaulted from TB treatment. A significant difference seen in treatment success rate 17.1% for MDR-TB; 63.1% for non MDR TB (P < 0.001)). Mortality rate were 8.9% for MDR-TB; 13.2% for non MDR TB. Multivariable analysis showed the potential factors associated with poor treatment outcomes were presence of HIV infection (AOR, 1.09; 95%CI: 1.05, 1.75; P = 0.001) and previous TB treatment (AOR, 4.87; 95%CI: 2.84, 8.38; P = 0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that the treatment success rate in patients with non MDR TB infection was higher than MDR-TB. Unsuccessful treatment was seen in MDR-TB associated with potential factors such as history of TB treatment, and presence of HIV infection. PMID:27660541

  12. Treatment Outcomes of Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis (MDR- TB) Compared with Non-MDR-TB Infections in Peninsular Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Elmi, Omar Salad; Hasan, Habsah; Abdullah, Sarimah; Mat Jeab, Mat Zuki; Ba, Zilfalil; Naing, Nyi Nyi

    2016-01-01

    Background Treating patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) strains is more complicated, complex, toxic, expensive, than treating patients with susceptible TB strains. This study aims to compare the treatment outcomes and potential factors associated between patients with MDR-TB and non MDR TB infections in peninsular Malaysia. Methods This study was a retrospective cohort study. Data were collected from the medical records of all registered MDR-TB patients and Non-MDR-TB patients at five TB hospitals in peninsular Malaysia from January 2010 to January 2014. Results A total of 314 subjects were studied, including 105 MDR-TB cases and 209 non-MDR-TB. After TB treatment, 24.8% of the MDR-TB patients and 17.7% of non MDR TB relapsed; 17.1% of the MDR-TB patients and 16.3% of non MDR TB defaulted from TB treatment. A significant difference seen in treatment success rate 17.1% for MDR-TB; 63.1% for non MDR TB (P < 0.001)). Mortality rate were 8.9% for MDR-TB; 13.2% for non MDR TB. Multivariable analysis showed the potential factors associated with poor treatment outcomes were presence of HIV infection (AOR, 1.09; 95%CI: 1.05, 1.75; P = 0.001) and previous TB treatment (AOR, 4.87; 95%CI: 2.84, 8.38; P = 0.001). Conclusion This study revealed that the treatment success rate in patients with non MDR TB infection was higher than MDR-TB. Unsuccessful treatment was seen in MDR-TB associated with potential factors such as history of TB treatment, and presence of HIV infection.

  13. Need for more TB vaccine field sites.

    PubMed

    McShane, Helen

    2009-06-01

    Efforts to control the tuberculosis (TB) epidemic have been challenged by both the geographical overlap with the HIV pandemic, and the emergence of multi - and extensively - drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. There is, therefore, an urgent global need for an improved vaccine. However, the development of an improved vaccine is scientifically and logistically challenging. Immunological correlates or biomarkers of protection are not known and there is no perfect preclinical animal model with which to predict success in humans. Indeed, vaccine development in general is time-consuming and costly. One of the many road-blocks to the development of new TB vaccines is the availability of field sites that are suitable for large scale Phase IIb/III efficacy testing. Because disease incidence is low, even though prevalence is high, Phase IIb efficacy trials involve several thousand subjects, and require lengthy follow-up. Phase III licensure trials will need to be even larger, and are likely to require the involvement of multiple field sites. There is currently inadequate capacity within high-burden TB countries to conduct these essential trials. We need to invest now to expand current capacity if we are to reduce the time taken to develop new vaccines. PMID:19634709

  14. TB control in India--efforts, challenges and priorities.

    PubMed

    Sisodia, R S; Jain, D K; Agarwal, S S; Gupta, Avdhesh

    2011-12-01

    TB control is a long battle. Since after the discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Robert Koch in 1882, endeavours have been made at different levels in the form of control measures like establishment of open-air sanatorium in Tilonia (Ajmer) in 1906, Tuberculosis Dispensary in Mumbai (1917), Tuberculosis Association of India (1939), Mass BCG campaign (1951), Establishment of Chemotherapy centre (TRC Chennai), National Sample Survey (1955-58), National Tuberculosis Institute Bangalore (1961), Developments of National Tuberculosis Programme (1962), Review of NTP by GOI, SIDA & WHO (1992), pilot testing of RNTCP (1993), implementation/expansion of RNTCP across the country (1997-2006). Shopping for health, marketing for TB diagnosis and treatment, MDR-TB, XDR-TB, TB-HIV combination and partnership related challenges are crucial and needs to be addressed .Universal access to DOTS for cutting the chain of transmission of bacilli, reducing the morbidity and mortality and reversing the TB epidemic in line with Millennium Development Goals, surveillance of notification, drug resistance, TB/HIV coinfection, operation researches, development of vaccines, immune therapeutic agents against tuberculosis and expansion of package of care to MDR-TB and XDR-TB would be the priorities for eradicating TB as a public health problem.

  15. Evaluation of two line probe assays for rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, tuberculosis (TB) drug resistance, and non-TB Mycobacteria in HIV-infected individuals with suspected TB.

    PubMed

    Luetkemeyer, Anne F; Kendall, Michelle A; Wu, Xingye; Lourenço, Maria Cristina; Jentsch, Ute; Swindells, Susan; Qasba, Sarojini S; Sanchez, Jorge; Havlir, Diane V; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Sanne, Ian M; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-04-01

    Limited performance data from line probe assays (LPAs), nucleic acid tests used for the rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB), nontuberculosis mycobacteria (NTM), and Mycobacterium tuberculosis drug resistance are available for HIV-infected individuals, in whom paucibacillary TB is common. In this study, the strategy of testing sputum with GenoType MTBDRplus (MTBDR-Plus) and GenoType Direct LPA (Direct LPA) was compared to a gold standard of one mycobacterial growth indicator tube (MGIT) liquid culture. HIV-positive (HIV(+)) individuals with suspected TB from southern Africa and South America with <7 days of TB treatment had 1 sputum specimen tested with Direct LPA, MTBDR-Plus LPA, smear microscopy, MGIT, biochemical identification of mycobacterial species, and culture-based drug-susceptibility testing (DST). Of 639 participants, 59.3% were MGIT M. tuberculosis culture positive, of which 276 (72.8%) were acid-fast bacillus (AFB) smear positive. MTBDR-Plus had a sensitivity of 81.0% and a specificity of 100%, with sensitivities of 44.1% in AFB smear-negative versus 94.6% in AFB smear-positive specimens. For specimens that were positive for M. tuberculosis by MTBDR-Plus, the sensitivity and specificity for rifampin resistance were 91.7% and 96.6%, respectively, and for isoniazid (INH) they were 70.6% and 99.1%. The Direct LPA had a sensitivity of 88.4% and a specificity of 94.6% for M. tuberculosis detection, with a sensitivity of 72.5% in smear-negative specimens. Ten of 639 MGIT cultures grew Mycobacterium avium complex or Mycobacterium kansasii, half of which were detected by Direct LPA. Both LPA assays performed well in specimens from HIV-infected individuals, including in AFB smear-negative specimens, with 72.5% sensitivity for M. tuberculosis identification with the Direct LPA and 44.1% sensitivity with MTBDR-Plus. LPAs have a continued role for use in settings where rapid identification of INH resistance and clinically relevant NTM are priorities.

  16. An Imbalanced Learning based MDR-TB Early Warning System.

    PubMed

    Li, Sheng; Tang, Bo; He, Haibo

    2016-07-01

    As a man-made disease, multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is mainly caused by improper treatment programs and poor patient supervision, most of which could be prevented. According to the daily treatment and inspection records of tuberculosis (TB) cases, this study focuses on establishing a warning system which could early evaluate the risk of TB patients converting to MDR-TB using machine learning methods. Different imbalanced sampling strategies and classification methods were compared due to the disparity between the number of TB cases and MDR-TB cases in historical data. The final results show that the relative optimal predictions results can be obtained by adopting CART-USBagg classification model in the first 90 days of half of a standardized treatment process. PMID:27209184

  17. Axially chiral allenyl gold complexes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Alice; Laguna, Antonio; Gimeno, M Concepción

    2014-09-17

    Unprecedented allenyl gold complexes have been achieved starting from triphenylpropargylphosphonium bromide. Two different coordination modes of the allene isomer of triphenylphosphoniumpropargylide to gold have been found depending on the gold oxidation state. Bromo-, pentafluorophenyl-, and triphenylphosphine-gold(I) allenyl complexes were prepared in which the α carbon coordinates to the gold(I) center. A chiral pentafluorophenyl-gold(III) allenyl complex with the gold atoms coordinated to the γ carbon was also prepared. All the complexes have been structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction showing the characteristic distances for a C═C═C unit.

  18. Possible observation of the dineutron in the 159Tb (n, 2n) 158gTb nuclear reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadenko, Igor

    2016-05-01

    Experimental observation of the 159\\text{Tb}(n, 2n) reaction product was performed with application of the activation technique. Tb specimen of natural composition was irradiated with (d, d) neutrons of 5.39 and 7 MeV energies. Instrumental spectra of Tb specimen were measured with HPGe spectrometer. An unexpected 944.2 keV γ-ray peak was observed. Other γ-ray lines due to 158gTb decay were identified as well. A bonded dineutron emission with the binding energy (Bdn) within limitations 1.3 \\text{MeV}dn<2.8 \\text{MeV} is evidenced by the energy of incident neutrons and by the 158gTb presence in the output channel. The specific nuclear properties of 158Tb as deformed nucleus were discussed to explain a bonded dineutron formation based on theoretical assumptions and calculations, using standard parameters for this mass region.

  19. Blood or Urine IP-10 Cannot Discriminate between Active Tuberculosis and Respiratory Diseases Different from Tuberculosis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Petrone, Linda; Cannas, Angela; Aloi, Francesco; Nsubuga, Martin; Sserumkuma, Joseph; Nazziwa, Ritah Angella; Jugheli, Levan; Lukindo, Tedson; Girardi, Enrico; Reither, Klaus; Goletti, Delia

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. Interferon-γ inducible protein 10 (IP-10), either in blood or in urine, has been proposed as a tuberculosis (TB) biomarker for adults. This study aims to evaluate the potential of IP-10 diagnostics in children from Uganda, a high TB-endemic country. Methods. IP-10 was measured in the blood and urine concomitantly taken from children who were prospectively enrolled with suspected active TB, with or without HIV infection. Clinical/microbiological parameters and commercially available TB-immune assays (tuberculin skin test (TST) and QuantiFERON TB-Gold In-Tube (QFT-IT)) were concomitantly evaluated. Results. One hundred twenty-eight children were prospectively enrolled. The analysis was performed on 111 children: 80 (72%) of them were HIV-uninfected and 31 (27.9%) were HIV-infected. Thirty-three healthy adult donors (HAD) were included as controls. The data showed that IP-10 is detectable in the urine and blood of children with active TB, independent of HIV status and age. However, although IP-10 levels were higher in active TB children compared to HAD, the accuracy of identifying “active TB” was low and similar to the TST and QFT-IT. Conclusion. IP-10 levels are higher in children with respiratory illness compared to controls, independent of “TB status” suggesting that the evaluation of this parameter can be used as an inflammatory marker more than a TB test. PMID:26346028

  20. Preparation and characterization of thermoluminescent aluminium oxide doped with Tb3+ and Tb3+-Mg2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barros, V. S. M.; Azevedo, W. M.; Khoury, H. J.; Linhares Filho, P.

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents the preparation method and the thermoluminescence analysis of aluminium oxide doped with Tb3+ and Tb3+-Mg2+ obtained by Combustion Synthesis (CS). An aqueous solution containing stoichiometric amounts of aluminium, terbium, magnesium nitrates and urea were mixed and introduced in a muffle furnace pre-heated to 500°C. After combustion, the samples were thermally treated at 1300°C and irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source. The TL glow curves of the annealed Al2O3:Tb and Al2O3:Tb,Mg samples presented a well defined TL peak at approximately 200 °C, whereas the samples without heat-treatment presented a large number of TL peaks in the range from 150 to 500°C. These peaks were attributed to amorphous and phase impurities (γ-Al2O3 mixed with the α-phase) still present in the sample. Dose response analysis showed a linear response in the dose range from 0.5 to 5 Gy. These results strongly suggest that CS is a suitable technique to prepare doped aluminium oxide for TL dosimetric applications.

  1. Gold nanoprobes for theranostics

    PubMed Central

    Panchapakesan, Balaji; Book-Newell, Brittany; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rao, Madhusudhana; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Gold nanoprobes have become attractive diagnostic and therapeutic agents in medicine and life sciences research owing to their reproducible synthesis with atomic level precision, unique physical and chemical properties, versatility of their morphologies, flexibility in functionalization, ease of targeting, efficiency in drug delivery and opportunities for multimodal therapy. This review highlights some of the recent advances and the potential for gold nanoprobes in theranostics. PMID:22122586

  2. Gold-bearing skarns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Theodore, Ted G.; Orris, Greta J.; Hammerstrom, Jane M.; Bliss, James D.

    1991-01-01

    In recent years, a significant proportion of the mining industry's interest has been centered on discovery of gold deposits; this includes discovery of additional deposits where gold occurs in skarn, such as at Fortitude, Nevada, and at Red Dome, Australia. Under the classification of Au-bearing skarns, we have modeled these and similar gold-rich deposits that have a gold grade of at least 1 g/t and exhibit distinctive skarn mineralogy. Two subtypes, Au-skarns and byproduct Au-skarns, can be recognized on the basis of gold, silver, and base-metal grades, although many other geological factors apparently are still undistinguishable largely because of a lack of detailed studies of the Au-skarns. Median grades and tonnage for 40 Au-skarn deposits are 8.6 g/t Au, 5.0 g/t Ag, and 213,000 t. Median grades and tonnage for 50 byproduct and Au-skarn deposits are 3.7 g/t Au, 37 g/t Ag, and 330,000 t. Gold-bearing skarns are generally calcic exoskarns associated with intense retrograde hydrosilicate alteration. These skarns may contain economic amounts of numerous other commodities (Cu, Fe, Pb, Zn, As, Bi, W, Sb, Co, Cd, and S) as well as gold and silver. Most Au-bearing skarns are found in Paleozoic and Cenozoic orogenic-belt and island-arc settings and are associated with felsic to intermediate intrusive rocks of Paleozoic to Tertiary age. Native gold, electru, pyrite, pyrrhotite, chalcopyrite, arsenopyrite, sphalerite, galena, bismuth minerals, and magnetite or hematite are the most common opaque minerals. Gangue minerals typically include garnet (andradite-grossular), pyroxene (diopside-hedenbergite), wollastonite, chlorite, epidote, quartz, actinolite-tremolite, and (or) calcite.

  3. Terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots for fluorescent aptasensing of adenosine 5'-triphosphate with unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingdi; Gao, Zhuangqiang; Zhou, Qian; Lin, Youxiu; Lu, Minghua; Tang, Dianping

    2016-12-15

    This work reports on a novel time-resolved fluorescent aptasensing platform for the quantitative monitoring of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) by interaction of dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with terbium ion-coordinated carbon dots (Tb-CDs). To construct such a fluorescent nanoprobe, Tb-CDs with high-efficient fluorescent intensity are first synthesized by the microwave method with terbium ions (Tb(3+)). The aptasensing system consists of ATP aptamer, AuNP and Tb-CD. The dispersive/agglomerate gold nanoparticles are acquired through the reaction of the aptamer with target ATP. Upon target ATP introduction, the aptamers bind with the analytes to form new aptamer-ATP complexes and coat on the surface of AuNPs to inhibit their aggregation in the high salt solution. In this case, the fluorescent signal of Tb-CDs is quenched by the dispersive AuNPs on the basis of the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). At the absence of target analyte, gold nanoparticles tend to aggregate in the high salt state even if the aptamers are present. Thus, the added Tb-CDs maintain their intrinsic fluorescent intensity. Experimental results indicated that the aptasensing system exhibited good fluorescent responses toward ATP in the dynamic range from 40nM to 4.0μM with a detection limit of 8.5nM at 3sblank criterion. The repeatability and intermediate precision is less than 9.5% at three concentrations including 0.04, 0.4 and 2.0μM ATP. The selectivity was acceptable toward guanosine 5'-triphosphate, uridine 5'-triphosphate and cytidine 5'-triphosphate. The methodology was applied to evaluate the blank human serum spiked with target ATP, and the recoveries (at 3 concentration levels) ranged between 97.0% and 103.7%. Importantly, this detection scheme is rapid, simple, cost-effective, and does not require extensive sample preparation or separation.

  4. Metallogeny of gold deposits

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchinson, R.W.

    1985-01-01

    The metallogeny of various gold deposits, particularly their broad temporal and spatial relations, and their relations to other metallic ores, is significant to genetic understanding and also useful in exploration. Archean gold deposits co-exist, both regionally and locally, with certain iron formations, massive base metal and nickel sulfide ores, but these occur generally in differing parts of the host stratigraphic sequences. Gold deposits in marine-eugeosynclinal environments are most important and numerous in Archean rocks. They become increasingly rare in successively younger strata where epithermal deposits in subaerial-continental rocks become important. The hydrothermal systems that formed both were apparently similar; one active in submarine tectonic settings, the other in sub-volcanic continental ones. Gold was apparently first introduced extensively into supracrustal rocks by sub-sea floor hydrothermal processes in Archean time, forming gold-enriched exhalites. These were reworked by metamorphic processes forming epithermal veins in many lode districts, and by sedimentary processes in the Witwatersrand. Epithermal gold deposits were generated where these older, auriferous basement source rocks were affected by younger, plutonic-volcanic-hydrothermal activity.

  5. Getting the Gold Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Epner Technology, Inc., worked with Goddard Space Center to apply gold coating to the Vegetation Canopy Lidar (VCL) mirror. This partnership resulted in new commercial applications for Epner's LaserGold(R) process in the automotive industry. Previously, the company did not have equipment large enough to handle the plating of the stainless steel panels cost effectively. Seeing a chance to renew this effort, Epner Technology and Goddard entered into an agreement by which NASA would fund the facility needed to do the gold-plating, and Epner Technology would cover all other costs as part of their internal research and development. The VCL mirror project proceeded successfully, fulfilling Goddard's needs and leaving Epner Technology with a new facility to provide LaserGold for the automotive industry. The new capability means increased power savings and improvements in both quality and production time for BMW Manufacturing Corporation of Spartanburg, South Carolina, and Cadillac of Detroit, Michigan, as well as other manufacturers who have implemented Epner Technology's LaserGold process. LaserGold(R) is a registered trademark of Epner Technology, Inc.

  6. First Outcome of MDR-TB among Co-Infected HIV/TB Patients from South-West Iran

    PubMed Central

    Motamedifar, Mohammad; Abadi, Ali Reza Hassan; Moghadam, Mahboube Nakhzari

    2015-01-01

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of mortality among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) patients and the majority of them occur in developing countries. The aims of the present study were to determine the frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and other probable associated factors. Methods This 10 year retrospective study was conducted on 824 HIV patients in the south-west of Iran. HIV infection was diagnosed by the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by Western blot. TB diagnosis was based on consistency of the clinical manifestations, chest X-ray, and microscopic examination. Drug susceptibility testing was done by the proportional method on Löwenstein-Jensen media. Results Of 824 HIV patients, 59 (7.2%) were identified as TB co-infected and the majority (86.4%) of them were male. Of the overall TB infected patients, 6 cases (10.2%) showed multidrug-resistant with the mean CD4+ lymphocyte count of 163±166 cells/mm3. The main clinical forms of TB were pulmonary (73%). There was a significant (p<0.05) correlation between TB infection and CD4+ lymphocyte counts ≤200 cells/mm3, gender, prison history, addiction history, and highly active anti-retroviral therapy. Conclusion We reported novel information on frequency of HIV/TB co-infection and multidrug resistant-TB outcome among co-infected patients that could facilitate better management of such infections on a global scale. PMID:26175780

  7. Supporting clinical management of the difficult-to-treat TB cases: the ERS-WHO TB Consilium.

    PubMed

    D'Ambrosio, Lia; Tadolini, Marina; Centis, Rosella; Duarte, Raquel; Sotgiu, Giovanni; Aliberti, Stefano; Dara, Masoud; Migliori, Giovanni Battista

    2015-03-01

    Multi-drug and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR/XDR-TB) are considered a serious threat for TB control and elimination. The outcome of these patients is still largely unsatisfactory as of today, with treatment success rates being consistently below 50% at global level. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that management of MDR-TB cases is supported by a specialized team, including complementary medical professionals able to cover several perspectives (clinical, both for adults and children; surgical; radiological; public health; psychological; nursing, among others). Implementation of such a body (known as Consilium in most of the former Soviet Union countries) is often a pre-requisite to apply for international TB control funding and concessionally priced medicines to treat M/XDR-TB cases. The primary objective of the ERS/WHO TB Consilium is to provide clinical consultation for drug-resistant TB and other difficult-to-treat TB cases, including co-infection with HIV and paediatric cases. Through technical guidance to clinicians managing complex TB cases, the main contribution and outcome of the initiative will be a public health response aimed at achieving correct treatment of affected patients and preventing further development of drug resistance. The Consilum's secondary objective is to ensure monitoring and evaluation of clinical practices on the ground (diagnosis, treatment and prevention).

  8. Gold in minerals and the composition of native gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Robert Sprague; Fleischer, Michael

    1969-01-01

    Gold occurs in nature mainly as the metal and as various alloys. It forms complete series of solid solutions with silver, copper, nickel, palladium, and platinum. In association with the platinum metals, gold occurs as free gold as well as in solid solution. The native elements contain the most gold, followed by the sulfide minerals. Several gold tellurides are known, but no gold selenides have been reported, and only one sulfide, the telluride-sulfide mineral nagyagite, is known. The nonmetallic minerals carry the least gold, and the light-colored minerals generally contain less gold than the dark minerals. Some conclusions in the literature are conflicting in regard to the relation of fineness of native gold to its position laterally and vertically within a lode, the nature of the country rocks, and the location and size of nuggets in a streambed, as well as to the variation of fineness within an individual nugget.

  9. Nanoscale Confinement of All-Optical Magnetic Switching in TbFeCo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tianmin; Wang, Tianhan; Reid, Alexander; Savoini, Matteo; Wu, Xiaofei; Konene, Benny; Granitzka, Patrick; Graves, Catherine; Higley, Daniel; Chen, Zhao; Razinskas, Gary; Hantschmann, Markus; Scherz, Andreas; Stohr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Hecht, Bert; Kimel, Alexey; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo; Durr, Hermann; Durr/Stohr Team; Theo Rasing Team; Arata Tsukamoto Team; Bert Hecht Team

    Gold two-wire antennas structures are placed upon the surface of the all-optical switching film TbFeCo. They resonate with the optical field and create a field enhancement in its vicinity, which is used to confine the area where optical switching can occur. It is demonstrated that single femtosecond optical laser pulses can reverse magnetization in a controllable fashion by such confinement. The magnetic states are imaged using resonant X-ray holography and magnetic circular dichroism. The results not only show the feasibility of controllable switching with antenna assistance but also demonstrate the highly inhomogeneous nature of the switching process, which is attributed to the material's heterogeneity. Research is supported by U.S. DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Sciences and Engineering Division.

  10. LUMINOSITY INCREASES IN GOLD-GOLD OPERATION IN RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    FISCHER,W.AHERNS,L.BAI,M.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    After an exploratory phase, during which a number of beam parameters were varied, the RHIC experiments now demand higher luminosity to study heavy ion collisions in detail. In gold-gold, operation, RHIC delivers now twice the design luminosity. During the last gold-gold operating period (Run-4) the machine delivered 15 times more luminosity than during the previous gold-gold operating period (Run-2), two years ago. We give an overview of the changes that increased the instantaneous luminosity and luminosity lifetime, raised the reliability, and improved the operational efficiency.

  11. HIV-Associated TB in An Giang Province, Vietnam, 2001–2004: Epidemiology and TB Treatment Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Thuy, Trinh Thanh; Shah, N. Sarita; Anh, Mai Hoang; Nghia, Do Trong; Thom, Duong; Linh, Truong; Sy, Dinh Ngoc; Duong, Bui Duc; Chau, Luu Thi Minh; Mai, Phung Thi Phuong; Wells, Charles D.; Laserson, Kayla F.; Varma, Jay K.

    2007-01-01

    Background Mortality is high in HIV-infected TB patients, but few studies from Southeast Asia have documented the benefits of interventions, such as co-trimoxazole (CTX), in reducing mortality during TB treatment. To help guide policy in Vietnam, we studied the epidemiology of HIV-associated TB in one province and examined factors associated with outcomes, including the impact of CTX use. Methodology/Principal Findings We retrospectively abstracted data for all HIV-infected persons diagnosed with TB from 2001–2004 in An Giang, a province in southern Vietnam in which TB patients receive HIV counseling and testing. We used standard WHO definitions to classify TB treatment outcomes. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify risk factors for the composite outcome of death, default, or treatment failure during TB treatment. From 2001–2004, 637 HIV-infected TB patients were diagnosed in An Giang. Of these, 501 (79%) were male, 321 (50%) were aged 25–34 years, and the most common self-reported HIV risk factor was sex with a commercial sex worker in 221 (35%). TB was classified as smear-positive in 531 (83%). During TB treatment, 167 (26%) patients died, 9 (1%) defaulted, and 6 (1%) failed treatment. Of 454 patients who took CTX, 116 (26%) had an unsuccessful outcome compared with 33 (70%) of 47 patients who did not take CTX (relative risk, 0.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.5). Adjusting for male sex, rural residence, TB smear status and disease location, and the occurrence of adverse events during TB treatment in multivariate analysis, the benefit of CTX persisted (adjusted odds ratio for unsuccessful outcome 0.1; CI, 0.1–0.3). Conclusions/Significance In An Giang, Vietnam, HIV-associated TB was associated with poor TB treatment outcomes. Outcomes were significantly better in those taking CTX. This finding suggests that Vietnam should consider applying WHO recommendations to prescribe CTX to all HIV-infected TB patients. PMID:17551587

  12. 46 CFR 35.30-25 - Explosives-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Explosives-TB/ALL. 35.30-25 Section 35.30-25 Shipping... Explosives—TB/ALL. Fulminates or other detonating compounds in bulk in dry condition; explosive compositions... other like explosives shall not be accepted, stored, stowed or transported on board tank vessels....

  13. 46 CFR 35.30-25 - Explosives-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Explosives-TB/ALL. 35.30-25 Section 35.30-25 Shipping... Explosives—TB/ALL. Fulminates or other detonating compounds in bulk in dry condition; explosive compositions... other like explosives shall not be accepted, stored, stowed or transported on board tank vessels....

  14. 46 CFR 35.30-25 - Explosives-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Explosives-TB/ALL. 35.30-25 Section 35.30-25 Shipping... Explosives—TB/ALL. Fulminates or other detonating compounds in bulk in dry condition; explosive compositions... other like explosives shall not be accepted, stored, stowed or transported on board tank vessels....

  15. 46 CFR 35.30-25 - Explosives-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Explosives-TB/ALL. 35.30-25 Section 35.30-25 Shipping... Explosives—TB/ALL. Fulminates or other detonating compounds in bulk in dry condition; explosive compositions... other like explosives shall not be accepted, stored, stowed or transported on board tank vessels....

  16. 46 CFR 35.30-25 - Explosives-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Explosives-TB/ALL. 35.30-25 Section 35.30-25 Shipping... Explosives—TB/ALL. Fulminates or other detonating compounds in bulk in dry condition; explosive compositions... other like explosives shall not be accepted, stored, stowed or transported on board tank vessels....

  17. 46 CFR 34.30-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.30-1 Section 34.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Details § 34.30-1 Application—TB/ALL. Automatic sprinkler systems shall comply with NFPA 13-1996....

  18. 46 CFR 34.10-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.10-1 Section 34.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) On all tankships the provisions of this subpart, with...

  19. 46 CFR 34.50-10 - Location-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Location-TB/ALL. 34.50-10 Section 34.50-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-10 Location—TB/ALL. (a) Approved portable and semiportable...

  20. 46 CFR 34.10-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.10-1 Section 34.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) On all tankships the provisions of this subpart, with...

  1. 46 CFR 34.30-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.30-1 Section 34.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Details § 34.30-1 Application—TB/ALL. Automatic sprinkler systems shall comply with NFPA 13-1996....

  2. 46 CFR 34.50-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.50-1 Section 34.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  3. 46 CFR 34.30-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.30-1 Section 34.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Details § 34.30-1 Application—TB/ALL. Automatic sprinkler systems shall comply with NFPA 13-1996....

  4. 46 CFR 34.50-10 - Location-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Location-TB/ALL. 34.50-10 Section 34.50-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-10 Location—TB/ALL. (a) Approved portable and semiportable...

  5. 46 CFR 34.30-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.30-1 Section 34.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Details § 34.30-1 Application—TB/ALL. Automatic sprinkler systems shall comply with NFPA 13-1996....

  6. 46 CFR 34.10-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.10-1 Section 34.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) On all tankships the provisions of this subpart, with...

  7. 46 CFR 34.50-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.50-1 Section 34.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  8. 46 CFR 34.50-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.50-1 Section 34.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  9. 46 CFR 34.50-5 - Classification-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Classification-TB/ALL. 34.50-5 Section 34.50-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-5 Classification—TB/ALL. (a) Portable and semiportable extinguishers...

  10. 46 CFR 34.10-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.10-1 Section 34.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) On all tankships the provisions of this subpart, with...

  11. 46 CFR 34.01-1 - Applicability-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Applicability-TB/ALL. 34.01-1 Section 34.01-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT General § 34.01-1 Applicability—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this part shall apply to all tank vessels except as otherwise...

  12. 46 CFR 34.50-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.50-1 Section 34.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  13. 46 CFR 34.50-5 - Classification-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Classification-TB/ALL. 34.50-5 Section 34.50-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-5 Classification—TB/ALL. (a) Portable and semiportable extinguishers...

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-35 - Headquarters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Headquarters-TB/ALL. 30.10-35 Section 30.10-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-35 Headquarters—TB/ALL. The term Headquarters means the Office of the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington, DC...

  15. 46 CFR 38.05-20 - Insulation-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation-TB/ALL. 38.05-20 Section 38.05-20 Shipping... Installation § 38.05-20 Insulation—TB/ALL. (a) Where used, tank insulation shall satisfy the following requirements for combustibility, installation, and arrangement: (1) Insulation in a location exposed...

  16. 46 CFR 38.05-20 - Insulation-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation-TB/ALL. 38.05-20 Section 38.05-20 Shipping... Installation § 38.05-20 Insulation—TB/ALL. (a) Where used, tank insulation shall satisfy the following requirements for combustibility, installation, and arrangement: (1) Insulation in a location exposed...

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-45 - Ocean-TB/O.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Ocean-TB/O. 30.10-45 Section 30.10-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-45 Ocean—TB/O. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean...

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-45 - Ocean-TB/O.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Ocean-TB/O. 30.10-45 Section 30.10-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-45 Ocean—TB/O. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean...

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-45 - Ocean-TB/O.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Ocean-TB/O. 30.10-45 Section 30.10-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-45 Ocean—TB/O. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean...

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-45 - Ocean-TB/O.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ocean-TB/O. 30.10-45 Section 30.10-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-45 Ocean—TB/O. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean...

  1. 46 CFR 30.10-45 - Ocean-TB/O.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Ocean-TB/O. 30.10-45 Section 30.10-45 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-45 Ocean—TB/O. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  3. 46 CFR 32.65-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.65-1 Section 32.65-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-1 Application—TB/ALL. The requirements in this subpart apply to all tank vessels,...

  4. 46 CFR 35.35-75 - Emergencies-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergencies-TB/ALL. 35.35-75 Section 35.35-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-75 Emergencies—TB/ALL. In case of emergencies nothing in the regulations in this subchapter shall be construed...

  5. 46 CFR 35.07-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.07-1 Section 35.07-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Logbook Entries § 35.07-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of this subpart shall apply to all...

  6. 46 CFR 32.65-15 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.65-15 Section 32.65-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-15 Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels equipped to carry Grade A, B, C, or D liquids...

  7. 46 CFR 32.57-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.57-1 Section 32.57-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels contracted for on...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-35 - Headquarters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Headquarters-TB/ALL. 30.10-35 Section 30.10-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-35 Headquarters—TB/ALL. The term Headquarters means the Commandant (CG-CVC), Attn: Office of Commercial...

  9. 46 CFR 32.70-15 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.70-15 Section 32.70-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Pumprooms—TB/ALL. Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C or D liquid cargo shall meet the requirements for...

  10. 46 CFR 32.75-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.75-1 Section 32.75-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All wood hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  11. 46 CFR 32.70-10 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.70-10 Section 32.70-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, or C liquids shall be required to conform to...

  12. 46 CFR 35.07-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.07-1 Section 35.07-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Logbook Entries § 35.07-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of this subpart shall apply to all...

  13. 46 CFR 30.10-27 - Flashpoint-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashpoint-TB/ALL. 30.10-27 Section 30.10-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-27 Flashpoint—TB/ALL. The term flashpoint indicates the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at which a...

  14. 46 CFR 35.35-75 - Emergencies-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergencies-TB/ALL. 35.35-75 Section 35.35-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-75 Emergencies—TB/ALL. In case of emergencies nothing in the regulations in this subchapter shall be construed...

  15. 46 CFR 32.75-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.75-1 Section 32.75-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All wood hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  16. 46 CFR 32.40-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.40-1 Section 32.40-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 32.40-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of...

  17. 46 CFR 32.65-15 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.65-15 Section 32.65-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-15 Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels equipped to carry Grade A, B, C, or D liquids...

  18. 46 CFR 32.65-15 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.65-15 Section 32.65-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-15 Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels equipped to carry Grade A, B, C, or D liquids...

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-71 - Tankerman-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Tankerman-TB/ALL. 30.10-71 Section 30.10-71 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-71 Tankerman—TB/ALL. The following ratings are established in part 13 of this chapter. The terms for...

  20. 46 CFR 35.35-75 - Emergencies-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergencies-TB/ALL. 35.35-75 Section 35.35-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-75 Emergencies—TB/ALL. In case of emergencies nothing in the regulations in this subchapter shall be construed...

  1. 46 CFR 32.70-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.70-1 Section 32.70-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All steel hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  2. 46 CFR 35.03-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.03-1 Section 35.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels....

  3. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  4. 46 CFR 32.65-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.65-1 Section 32.65-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-1 Application—TB/ALL. The requirements in this subpart apply to all tank vessels,...

  5. 46 CFR 39.10-1 - Applicability-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., or benzene, to a facility covered by 33 CFR part 154 must meet the requirements prescribed by the... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Applicability-TB/ALL. 39.10-1 Section 39.10-1 Shipping... Applicability—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specified by paragraph (c) of this section, this part applies to each...

  6. 46 CFR 32.40-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.40-1 Section 32.40-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 32.40-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of...

  7. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-71 - Tankerman-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Tankerman-TB/ALL. 30.10-71 Section 30.10-71 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-71 Tankerman—TB/ALL. The following ratings are established in part 13 of this chapter. The terms for...

  9. 46 CFR 31.20-1 - Waters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Waters-TB/ALL. 31.20-1 Section 31.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Waters Operated Over § 31.20-1 Waters—TB/ALL. The certificate of inspection shall show the waters over which the tank...

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-27 - Flashpoint-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flashpoint-TB/ALL. 30.10-27 Section 30.10-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-27 Flashpoint—TB/ALL. The term flashpoint indicates the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at which a...

  11. 46 CFR 35.07-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.07-1 Section 35.07-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Logbook Entries § 35.07-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of this subpart shall apply to all...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-35 - Headquarters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Headquarters-TB/ALL. 30.10-35 Section 30.10-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-35 Headquarters—TB/ALL. The term Headquarters means the Commandant (CG-CVC), Attn: Office of Commercial...

  13. 46 CFR 32.02-10 - Rails-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rails-TB/ALL. 32.02-10 Section 32.02-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Safety Requirements § 32.02-10 Rails—TB/ALL. (a) All tank vessels, except unmanned tank...

  14. 46 CFR 35.35-75 - Emergencies-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergencies-TB/ALL. 35.35-75 Section 35.35-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-75 Emergencies—TB/ALL. In case of emergencies nothing in the regulations in this subchapter shall be construed...

  15. 46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank vessels refers to a vessel covered by...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-11 - Coastwise-TB/C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Coastwise-TB/C. 30.10-11 Section 30.10-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-11 Coastwise—TB/C. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of...

  17. 46 CFR 32.70-15 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.70-15 Section 32.70-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Pumprooms—TB/ALL. Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C or D liquid cargo shall meet the requirements for...

  18. 46 CFR 35.03-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.03-1 Section 35.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels....

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the...

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  1. 46 CFR 32.40-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.40-1 Section 32.40-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 32.40-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of...

  2. 46 CFR 32.02-10 - Rails-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rails-TB/ALL. 32.02-10 Section 32.02-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Safety Requirements § 32.02-10 Rails—TB/ALL. (a) All tank vessels, except unmanned tank...

  3. 46 CFR 32.75-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.75-1 Section 32.75-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All wood hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  4. 46 CFR 35.03-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.03-1 Section 35.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels....

  5. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  6. 46 CFR 32.70-15 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.70-15 Section 32.70-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Pumprooms—TB/ALL. Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C or D liquid cargo shall meet the requirements for...

  7. 46 CFR 32.70-10 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.70-10 Section 32.70-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, or C liquids shall be required to conform to...

  8. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Definitions-TB/ALL. 32.57-5 Section 32.57-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace...

  9. 46 CFR 35.03-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.03-1 Section 35.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels....

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-71 - Tankerman-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Tankerman-TB/ALL. 30.10-71 Section 30.10-71 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-71 Tankerman—TB/ALL. The following ratings are established in part 13 of this chapter. The terms for...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-11 - Coastwise-TB/C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Coastwise-TB/C. 30.10-11 Section 30.10-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-11 Coastwise—TB/C. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank vessels refers to a vessel covered by...

  13. 46 CFR 32.57-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.57-1 Section 32.57-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels contracted for on...

  14. 46 CFR 32.65-15 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.65-15 Section 32.65-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-15 Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels equipped to carry Grade A, B, C, or D liquids...

  15. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-71 - Tankerman-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Tankerman-TB/ALL. 30.10-71 Section 30.10-71 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-71 Tankerman—TB/ALL. The following ratings are established in part 13 of this chapter. The terms for...

  17. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Definitions-TB/ALL. 32.57-5 Section 32.57-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace...

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-35 - Headquarters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Headquarters-TB/ALL. 30.10-35 Section 30.10-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-35 Headquarters—TB/ALL. The term Headquarters means the Office of the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington,...

  19. 46 CFR 31.20-1 - Waters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Waters-TB/ALL. 31.20-1 Section 31.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Waters Operated Over § 31.20-1 Waters—TB/ALL. The certificate of inspection shall show the waters over which the tank...

  20. 46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank vessels refers to a vessel covered by...

  1. 46 CFR 31.20-1 - Waters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Waters-TB/ALL. 31.20-1 Section 31.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Waters Operated Over § 31.20-1 Waters—TB/ALL. The certificate of inspection shall show the waters over which the tank...

  2. 46 CFR 32.70-10 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.70-10 Section 32.70-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, or C liquids shall be required to conform to...

  3. 46 CFR 32.57-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.57-1 Section 32.57-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels contracted for on...

  4. 46 CFR 32.70-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.70-1 Section 32.70-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All steel hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  5. 46 CFR 32.57-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.57-1 Section 32.57-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels contracted for on...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-13 - Cofferdam-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Cofferdam-TB/ALL. 30.10-13 Section 30.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-13 Cofferdam—TB/ALL. The term cofferdam means a void or empty space separating two or more compartments for...

  7. 46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank vessels refers to a vessel covered by...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-13 - Cofferdam-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cofferdam-TB/ALL. 30.10-13 Section 30.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-13 Cofferdam—TB/ALL. The term cofferdam means a void or empty space separating two or more compartments for...

  9. 46 CFR 32.70-10 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.70-10 Section 32.70-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, or C liquids shall be required to conform to...

  10. 46 CFR 32.70-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.70-1 Section 32.70-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All steel hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  11. 46 CFR 35.03-10 - Use-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Use-TB/ALL. 35.03-10 Section 35.03-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-10 Use—TB/ALL. (a) Approved buoyant work vests are considered to be items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-27 - Flashpoint-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flashpoint-TB/ALL. 30.10-27 Section 30.10-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-27 Flashpoint—TB/ALL. The term flashpoint indicates the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at which a...

  13. 46 CFR 35.07-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.07-1 Section 35.07-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Logbook Entries § 35.07-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of this subpart shall apply to all...

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-13 - Cofferdam-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cofferdam-TB/ALL. 30.10-13 Section 30.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-13 Cofferdam—TB/ALL. The term cofferdam means a void or empty space separating two or more compartments for...

  15. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Definitions-TB/ALL. 32.57-5 Section 32.57-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the...

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-27 - Flashpoint-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flashpoint-TB/ALL. 30.10-27 Section 30.10-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-27 Flashpoint—TB/ALL. The term flashpoint indicates the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at which a...

  20. 46 CFR 32.70-15 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.70-15 Section 32.70-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Pumprooms—TB/ALL. Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C or D liquid cargo shall meet the requirements for...

  1. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  2. 46 CFR 35.03-10 - Use-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Use-TB/ALL. 35.03-10 Section 35.03-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-10 Use—TB/ALL. (a) Approved buoyant work vests are considered to be items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard...

  3. 46 CFR 30.10-13 - Cofferdam-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Cofferdam-TB/ALL. 30.10-13 Section 30.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-13 Cofferdam—TB/ALL. The term cofferdam means a void or empty space separating two or more compartments for...

  4. 46 CFR 32.65-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.65-1 Section 32.65-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-1 Application—TB/ALL. The requirements in this subpart apply to all tank vessels,...

  5. 46 CFR 32.70-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.70-1 Section 32.70-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All steel hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the...

  7. 46 CFR 32.65-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.65-1 Section 32.65-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-1 Application—TB/ALL. The requirements in this subpart apply to all tank vessels,...

  8. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  9. 46 CFR 35.03-10 - Use-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Use-TB/ALL. 35.03-10 Section 35.03-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-10 Use—TB/ALL. (a) Approved buoyant work vests are considered to be items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard...

  10. 46 CFR 32.40-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.40-1 Section 32.40-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 32.40-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the...

  13. 46 CFR 30.10-11 - Coastwise-TB/C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Coastwise-TB/C. 30.10-11 Section 30.10-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-11 Coastwise—TB/C. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of...

  14. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  15. 46 CFR 38.05-20 - Insulation-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation-TB/ALL. 38.05-20 Section 38.05-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Design and Installation § 38.05-20 Insulation—TB/ALL. (a) Where used, tank insulation shall satisfy the...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-27 - Flashpoint-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashpoint-TB/ALL. 30.10-27 Section 30.10-27 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-27 Flashpoint—TB/ALL. The term flashpoint indicates the temperature in degrees Fahrenheit at which a...

  17. 46 CFR 30.10-49 - Permit-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permit-TB/ALL. 30.10-49 Section 30.10-49 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-49 Permit—TB/ALL. The term permit refers to endorsement on the certificate of inspection, authorizing the...

  18. 46 CFR 30.10-61 - Rivers-TB/R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rivers-TB/R. 30.10-61 Section 30.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-61 Rivers—TB/R. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels whose navigation is restricted...

  19. 46 CFR 32.70-15 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.70-15 Section 32.70-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Pumprooms—TB/ALL. Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C or D liquid cargo shall meet the requirements for...

  20. 46 CFR 34.01-1 - Applicability-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability-TB/ALL. 34.01-1 Section 34.01-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT General § 34.01-1 Applicability—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this part shall apply to all tank vessels except as otherwise...

  1. 46 CFR 30.10-13 - Cofferdam-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cofferdam-TB/ALL. 30.10-13 Section 30.10-13 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-13 Cofferdam—TB/ALL. The term cofferdam means a void or empty space separating two or more compartments for...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-35 - Headquarters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Headquarters-TB/ALL. 30.10-35 Section 30.10-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-35 Headquarters—TB/ALL. The term Headquarters means the Office of the Commandant, U.S. Coast Guard, Washington,...

  3. 46 CFR 35.07-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.07-1 Section 35.07-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Logbook Entries § 35.07-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specifically noted, the provisions of this subpart shall apply to all...

  4. 46 CFR 32.70-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.70-1 Section 32.70-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All steel hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  5. 46 CFR 30.10-11 - Coastwise-TB/C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Coastwise-TB/C. 30.10-11 Section 30.10-11 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-11 Coastwise—TB/C. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of...

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-5 - Cargo-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cargo-TB/ALL. 30.10-5 Section 30.10-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-5 Cargo—TB/ALL. The term cargo means combustible liquid, flammable liquid, or liquefied flammable gas...

  7. 46 CFR 32.02-10 - Rails-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rails-TB/ALL. 32.02-10 Section 32.02-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Safety Requirements § 32.02-10 Rails—TB/ALL. (a) All tank vessels, except unmanned tank...

  8. 46 CFR 35.03-10 - Use-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use-TB/ALL. 35.03-10 Section 35.03-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-10 Use—TB/ALL. (a) Approved buoyant work vests are considered to be items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard...

  9. 46 CFR 32.57-10 - Construction-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction-TB/ALL. 32.57-10 Section 32.57-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Construction—TB/ALL. (a) The hull, superstructure, structural bulkheads, decks, and deckhouses shall...

  10. 46 CFR 32.65-20 - Pumprooms-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Pumprooms-TB/ALL. 32.65-20 Section 32.65-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-20 Pumprooms—TB/ALL. (a) Tank vessels handling Grade A, B, C, or D liquids shall...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-3 - Approved-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Approved-TB/ALL. 30.10-3 Section 30.10-3 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-3 Approved—TB/ALL. The term approved means approved by the Commandant unless otherwise stated....

  12. 46 CFR 34.50-5 - Classification-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Classification-TB/ALL. 34.50-5 Section 34.50-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-5 Classification—TB/ALL. (a) Portable and semiportable extinguishers...

  13. 46 CFR 32.75-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.75-1 Section 32.75-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. All wood hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  14. 46 CFR 39.10-1 - Applicability-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., or benzene, to a facility covered by 33 CFR part 154 must meet the requirements prescribed by the... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Applicability-TB/ALL. 39.10-1 Section 39.10-1 Shipping... Applicability—TB/ALL. (a) Except as specified by paragraph (c) of this section, this part applies to each...

  15. 46 CFR 32.57-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.57-1 Section 32.57-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels contracted for on...

  16. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lightweight-TB/ALL. 30.10-38 Section 30.10-38 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-38 Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo,...

  17. 46 CFR 32.70-10 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.70-10 Section 32.70-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels carrying Grade A, B, or C liquids shall be required to conform to...

  18. 46 CFR 31.20-1 - Waters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Waters-TB/ALL. 31.20-1 Section 31.20-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Waters Operated Over § 31.20-1 Waters—TB/ALL. The certificate of inspection shall show the waters over which the tank...

  19. 46 CFR 30.10-7 - Certificated-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Certificated-TB/ALL. 30.10-7 Section 30.10-7 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-7 Certificated—TB/ALL. The term certificated when applied to tank vessels refers to a vessel covered by...

  20. 46 CFR 38.05-5 - Markings-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Markings-TB/ALL. 38.05-5 Section 38.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS LIQUEFIED FLAMMABLE GASES Design and Installation § 38.05-5 Markings—TB/ALL. (a)(1) Upon satisfactory completion of tests and inspection, pressure...

  1. 46 CFR 34.10-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.10-1 Section 34.10-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Fire Main System, Details § 34.10-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) On all tankships the provisions of this subpart, with...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-17 - Commandant-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Commandant-TB/ALL. 30.10-17 Section 30.10-17 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-17 Commandant—TB/ALL. The term Commandant means the Commandant of the Coast Guard....

  3. 46 CFR 32.57-5 - Definitions-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions-TB/ALL. 32.57-5 Section 32.57-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL... Definitions—TB/ALL. (a) Standard fire test. A “standard fire test” is one which develops in the test furnace...

  4. 46 CFR 32.65-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.65-1 Section 32.65-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-1 Application—TB/ALL. The requirements in this subpart apply to all tank vessels,...

  5. 46 CFR 34.30-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.30-1 Section 34.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Details § 34.30-1 Application—TB/ALL. Automatic sprinkler systems shall comply with NFPA 13-1996....

  6. 46 CFR 30.10-71 - Tankerman-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Tankerman-TB/ALL. 30.10-71 Section 30.10-71 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-71 Tankerman—TB/ALL. The following ratings are established in part 13 of this chapter. The terms for...

  7. 46 CFR 32.65-15 - Cofferdams-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cofferdams-TB/ALL. 32.65-15 Section 32.65-15 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL..., 1951 § 32.65-15 Cofferdams—TB/ALL. Tank vessels equipped to carry Grade A, B, C, or D liquids...

  8. 46 CFR 32.40-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 32.40-1 Section 32.40-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS SPECIAL EQUIPMENT, MACHINERY, AND HULL REQUIREMENTS Accommodations for Officers and Crew § 32.40-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of...

  9. 46 CFR 35.03-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 35.03-1 Section 35.03-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) Provisions of this subpart shall apply to all tank vessels....

  10. 46 CFR 34.50-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application-TB/ALL. 34.50-1 Section 34.50-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-1 Application—TB/ALL. (a) The provisions of this subpart, with the...

  11. 46 CFR 34.50-10 - Location-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Location-TB/ALL. 34.50-10 Section 34.50-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT Portable and Semiportable Extinguishers § 34.50-10 Location—TB/ALL. (a) Approved portable and semiportable...

  12. 46 CFR 35.35-75 - Emergencies-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergencies-TB/ALL. 35.35-75 Section 35.35-75 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Cargo Handling § 35.35-75 Emergencies—TB/ALL. In case of emergencies nothing in the regulations in this subchapter shall be construed...

  13. Support of vulnerable patients throughout TB treatment in the UK.

    PubMed

    Potter, J L; Inamdar, L; Okereke, E; Collinson, S; Dukes, R; Mandelbaum, M

    2016-06-01

    Despite well-established treatment regimens, tuberculosis (TB) remains a public health burden; it disproportionately affects poor and marginalized populations who may not have access to social support, including migrants, homeless people and those dependent on drugs or alcohol. There is a clearly demonstrated need for housing and other appropriate social support, as part of a package of integrated clinical and social care. However, TB prevention and control efforts in the UK often do not address the specific vulnerabilities of these groups and it can be a challenge to support the continued TB treatment of these underserved populations. This challenge is exacerbated by complex issues concerning funding, immigration and the law. In this paper, we have reviewed current UK guidance and legislation, discussed several case studies and highlighted examples of existing models of community support for TB patients. Finally, we lay out our recommendations for ensuring a co-ordinated, whole system approach to successful TB treatment.

  14. Gold carbenes, gold-stabilized carbocations, and cationic intermediates relevant to gold-catalysed enyne cycloaddition.

    PubMed

    Harris, R J; Widenhoefer, R A

    2016-08-21

    Cationic gold complexes in which gold is bound to a formally divalent carbon atom, typically formulated as gold carbenes or α-metallocarbenium ions, have been widely invoked in a range of gold-catalyzed transformations, most notably in the gold-catalyzed cycloisomerization of 1,n-enynes. Although the existence of gold carbene complexes as intermediates in gold-catalyzed transformations is supported by a wealth of indirect experimental data and by computation, until recently no examples of cationic gold carbenes/α-metallocarbenium ions had been synthesized nor had any cationic intermediates generated via gold-catalyzed enyne cycloaddition been directly observed. Largely for this reason, there has been considerable debate regarding the electronic structure of these cationic complexes, in particular the relative contributions of the carbene (LAu(+)[double bond, length as m-dash]CR2) and α-metallocarbenium (LAu-CR2(+)) forms, which is intimately related to the extent of d → p backbonding from gold to the C1 carbon atom. However, over the past ∼ seven years, a number of cationic gold carbene complexes have been synthesized in solution and generated in the gas phase and cationic intermediates have been directly observed in the gold-catalyzed cycloaddition of enynes. Together, these advances provide insight into the nature and electronic structure of gold carbene/α-metallocarbenium complexes and the cationic intermediates generated via gold-catalyzed enyne cycloaddition. Herein we review recent advances in this area. PMID:27146712

  15. Stimulus Response of Au-NPs@GMP-Tb Core-Shell Nanoparticles: Toward Colorimetric and Fluorescent Dual-Mode Sensing of Alkaline Phosphatase Activity in Algal Blooms of a Freshwater Lake.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Deng, Jingjing; Xue, Yumeng; Shi, Guoyue; Zhou, Tianshu

    2016-01-19

    In this study, we demonstrate a colorimetric and fluorescent dual-mode method for alkaline phosphatase activity (APA) sensing in freshwater lake with stimuli-responsive gold nanoparticles@terbium-guanosine monophosphate (Au-NPs@GMP-Tb) core-shell nanoparticles. Initially, the core-shell nanoparticles were fabricated based on Au-NPs decorated with a fluorescent GMP-Tb shell. Upon being excited at 290 nm, the as-formed Au-NPs@GMP-Tb core-shell nanoparticles emit green fluorescence, and the decorated GMP-Tb shell causes the aggregation of Au-NPs. However, the addition of ALP destroys GMP-Tb shell, resulting in the release of Au-NPs from the shell into the solvent. As a consequence, the aggregated Au-NPs solubilizes with the changes in the UV-vis spectrum of the dispersion, and in the meantime, the fluorescence of GMP-Tb shell turns off, which constitutes a new mechanism for colorimetric and fluorescent dual-mode sensing of APA. With the method developed here, we could monitor the dynamic change of APA during an algal bloom of a freshwater lake, both by the naked eye and further confirmed by fluorometric determination. This study not only offers a new method for on-site visible detection of APA but also provides a strategy for dual-mode sensing mechanisms by the rational design of the excellent optical properties of Au-NPs and the adaptive inclusion properties of the luminescent infinite coordination polymers.

  16. Gold film with gold nitride - A conductor but harder than gold

    SciTech Connect

    Siller, L.; Peltekis, N.; Krishnamurthy, S.; Chao, Y.; Bull, S.J.; Hunt, M.R.C.

    2005-05-30

    The formation of surface nitrides on gold films is a particularly attractive proposition, addressing the need to produce harder, but still conductive, gold coatings which reduce wear but avoid the pollution associated with conventional additives. Here we report production of large area gold nitride films on silicon substrates, using reactive ion sputtering and plasma etching, without the need for ultrahigh vacuum. Nanoindentation data show that gold nitride films have a hardness {approx}50% greater than that of pure gold. These results are important for large-scale applications of gold nitride in coatings and electronics.

  17. Biorecovery of gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eisler, R.

    2003-01-01

    Recovery of ionic and metallic gold (Au) from a wide variety of solutions by selected species of bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, and higher plants is documented. Gold accumulations were up to 7.0 g/kg dry weight (DW) in various species of bacteria, 25.0 g/kg DW in freshwater algae, 84.0 g/kg DW in peat, and 100.0 g/kg DW in dried fungus mixed with keratinous material. Mechanisms of accumulation include oxidation, dissolution, reduction, leaching, and sorption. Uptake patterns are significantly modified by the physicochemical milieu. Crab exoskeletons accumulate up to 4.9 g Au/kg DW; however, gold accumulations in various tissues of living teleosts, decapod crustaceans, and bivalve molluscs are negligible.

  18. Air Travel and TB: an airline perspective.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, Nigel P; Evans, Anthony D; Thibeault, Claude

    2010-03-01

    The commercial airline industry in the 21st century is a global business, able to transport large numbers of people to almost any part of the world within a few hours. There has long been concern in public health circles about the potential for transmission of communicable diseases, such as TB, on board aircraft. The recent threats from novel and emerging infectious diseases including SARS and pandemic flu has facilitated unprecedented levels of cooperation between international industry representatives, regulators and public health authorities in addressing the issues of air travel and communicable disease. This paper reviews the regulatory environment, ways in which the risks are mitigated through aspects of aircraft design, opportunities for prevention by identifying individuals who may be suffering from a communicable disease prior to flight and the approach used in managing suspected cases of communicable disease on board aircraft.

  19. Air Travel and TB: an airline perspective.

    PubMed

    Dowdall, Nigel P; Evans, Anthony D; Thibeault, Claude

    2010-03-01

    The commercial airline industry in the 21st century is a global business, able to transport large numbers of people to almost any part of the world within a few hours. There has long been concern in public health circles about the potential for transmission of communicable diseases, such as TB, on board aircraft. The recent threats from novel and emerging infectious diseases including SARS and pandemic flu has facilitated unprecedented levels of cooperation between international industry representatives, regulators and public health authorities in addressing the issues of air travel and communicable disease. This paper reviews the regulatory environment, ways in which the risks are mitigated through aspects of aircraft design, opportunities for prevention by identifying individuals who may be suffering from a communicable disease prior to flight and the approach used in managing suspected cases of communicable disease on board aircraft. PMID:20478517

  20. First use of bedaquiline in a patient with XDR-TB in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Chua, Angeline Poh-Gek; Hoo, Grace Si-Ru; Chee, Cynthia Bin-Eng; Wang, Yee Tang

    2015-09-23

    Drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB) continues to pose a threat to global control of TB: 3.5% of new and 20.5% of previously treated TB cases were estimated to have multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB in 2013. Approximately 9% of patients with MDR-TB had extensively drug-resistant (XDR)-TB. A 30-year-old Vietnamese woman previously treated for TB in her home country presented with 5 months of cough and shortness of breath 1 year after migrating to Singapore. Xpert MTB/Rif testing showed rpoB gene mutation. Phenotypic drug susceptibility testing revealed XDR-TB. Second and third-line TB drugs were commenced. To strengthen the efficacy of her treatment regimen, the novel anti-TB drug bedaquiline was obtained for the patient on compassionate grounds. We report the first use in Singapore of bedaquiline for the treatment of XDR-TB.

  1. Tuberculosis specific responses following therapy for TB: Impact of HIV co-infection.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, S; Sarro, Y; Diarra, B; Diallo, H; Guindo, O; Dabitao, D; Tall, M; Hammond, A; Kassambara, H; Goita, D; Dembele, P; Traore, B; Hengel, R; Nason, M; Warfield, J; Washington, J; Polis, M; Diallo, S; Dao, S; Koita, O; Lane, H C; Catalfamo, M; Tounkara, A

    2015-07-01

    Characterizing perturbations in the immune response to tuberculosis in HIV can develop insights into the pathogenesis of coinfection. HIV+ TB+ and TB monoinfected (TB+) subjects recruited from clinics in Bamako prior to initiation of TB treatment were evaluated at time-points following initiation of therapy. Flow cytometry assessed CD4+/CD8+ T cell subsets and activation markers CD38/HLA-DR. Antigen specific responses to TB proteins were assessed by intracellular cytokine detection and proliferation. HIV+ TB+ subjects had significantly higher markers of immune activation in the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells compared to TB+ subjects. HIV+ TB+ had lower numbers of TB-specific CD4+ T cells at baseline. Plasma IFNγ levels were similar between HIV+ TB+ and TB+ subjects. No differences were observed in in-vitro proliferative capacity to TB antigens between HIV+ TB+ and TB+ subjects. Subjects with HIV+ TB+ coinfection demonstrate in vivo expansion of TB-specific CD4+ T cells. Immunodeficiency associated with CD4+ T cell depletion may be less significant compared to immunosuppression associated with HIV viremia or untreated TB infection.

  2. Chemistry for oncotheranostic gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Trouiller, Anne Juliette; Hebié, Seydou; El Bahhaj, Fatima; Napporn, Teko W; Bertrand, Philippe

    2015-06-24

    This review presents in a comprehensive ways the chemical methods used to functionalize gold nanoparticles with focus on anti-cancer applications. The review covers the parameters required for the synthesis gold nanoparticles with defined shapes and sizes, method for targeted delivery in tumours, and selected examples of anti-cancers compounds delivered with gold nanoparticles. A short survey of bioassays for oncology based on gold nanoparticles is also presented.

  3. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  4. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  5. 16 CFR Appendix to Part 23 - Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate, Silver, and Platinum Industry...—Exemptions Recognized in the Assay for Quality of Gold Alloy, Gold Filled, Gold Overlay, Rolled Gold Plate... in any assay for quality of a karat gold industry product include springs, posts, and separable...

  6. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.; Furuya, F.R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab')[sub 2] fragments are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy. 7 figs.

  7. Derivatized gold clusters and antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, James F.; Furuya, Frederic R.

    1994-11-01

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be as small as 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies, Fab' or F(ab').sub.2 fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. The gold clusters may contain 6, 8, 9, 11, 13, 55 or 67 gold atoms in their inner core. The clusters may also contain radioactive gold. The antibody-cluster conjugates are useful in electron microscopy applications as well as in clinical applications that include imaging, diagnosis and therapy.

  8. Earth's continental crustal gold endowment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frimmel, H. E.

    2008-03-01

    The analysis of the temporal distribution of gold deposits, combined with gold production data as well as reserve and resource estimates for different genetic types of gold deposit, revealed that the bulk of the gold known to be concentrated in ore bodies was added to the continental crust during a giant Mesoarchaean gold event at a time (3 Ga) when the mantle temperature reached a maximum and the dominant style of tectonic movement changed from vertical, plume-related to subhorizontal plate tectonic. A magmatic derivation of the first generation of crustal gold from a relatively hot mantle that was characterized by a high degree of partial melting is inferred from the gold chemistry, specifically high Os contents. While a large proportion of that gold is still present in only marginally modified palaeoplacer deposits of the Mesoarchaean Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa, accounting for about 40% of all known gold, the remainder has been recycled repeatedly on a lithospheric scale, predominantly by plate-tectonically induced magmatic and hydrothermal fluid circulation, to produce the current variety of gold deposit types. Post-Archaean juvenile gold addition to the continental crust has been limited, but a mantle contribution to some of the largest orogenic or intrusion-related gold deposits is indicated, notably for the Late Palaeozoic Tien Shan gold province. Magmatic fluids in active plate margins seem to be the most effective transport medium for gold mobilization, giving rise to a large proportion of volcanic-arc related gold deposits. Due to their generally shallow crustal level of formation, they have a low preservation potential. In contrast, those gold deposits that form at greater depth are more widespread also in older rocks. This explains the high proportion of orogenic (including intrusion-related) gold (32%) amongst all known gold deposits. The overall proportion of gold concentrated in known ore bodies is only 7 × 10- 7 of the estimated total

  9. Digging for Gold

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2012-01-01

    In the case of higher education, the hills are more like mountains of data that "we're accumulating at a ferocious rate," according to Gerry McCartney, CIO of Purdue University (Indiana). "Every higher education institution has this data, but it just sits there like gold in the ground," complains McCartney. Big Data and the new tools people are…

  10. 'Cascade Gold' raspberry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ‘Cascade Gold’ is a new gold fruited, floricane fruiting raspberry cultivar (Rubus idaeus L.) jointly released by Washington State University (WSU), Oregon State University (OSU) and the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). It has been evaluated at Puyallup, Wash. in plantings from 1988 to 2008. ...

  11. GOLD PRESSURE VESSEL SEAL

    DOEpatents

    Smith, A.E.

    1963-11-26

    An improved seal between the piston and die member of a piston-cylinder type pressure vessel is presented. A layer of gold, of sufficient thickness to provide an interference fit between the piston and die member, is plated on the contacting surface of at least one of the members. (AEC)

  12. Observation of thermomagnetically written domains by Lorentz electron microscopy in Tb-Co and Tb-Fe-Co disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichihara, Katsutarou; Mizusawa, Yumi; Yasuda, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Takao

    1988-05-01

    For better understanding of the read/write properties of magneto-optical disks, thermomagnetically written domains were observed by Lorentz electron microscopy. The domains were written in the quadrilayered medium with 25-nm-thick Tb-Co film and in the trilayered medium with 50-nm-thick Tb-Fe-Co film, which were sputtered on pregrooved resinous substrates. Recording power and frequency were varied at intervals of 3.5 mm in a radial direction of the disk, and each recording position was observed individually. Qualitative understanding of the read/write properties, such as carrier-to-noise ratio (C/N) and jitter, were well achieved from Lorentz images of the domains. It is found that the C/N value of the Tb-Fe-Co film with a higher figure of merit (Rθk ) is lower than that of the Tb-Co film with a lower value of Rθk . The reason for this is believed to be due to a larger variation in domain shape in the Tb-Fe-Co film compared to the Tb-Co film. A careful observation based upon the image processing of domain bits reveals that the jitter is mainly caused by the irregularity of the domain shape near the edge in the Tb-Fe-Co film.

  13. Active Case Finding of Tuberculosis (TB) in an Emergency Room in a Region with High Prevalence of TB in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise Rossato; Müller, Alice Mânica; Tomasini, Karina da Silva; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso Roth; Golub, Jonathan E.; Conde, Marcus Barreto

    2014-01-01

    Setting Public hospital emergency room (ER) in Porto Alegre, Brazil, a setting with high prevalence of tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Objective To determine the prevalence of PTB, using a symptom based active case finding (ACF) strategy in the ER of a public hospital in an area with high prevalence of TB and HIV, as well as variables associated with pulmonary TB diagnosis. Methods Cross sectional study. All patients ≥18 years seeking care at the ER were screened for respiratory symptoms and those with cough ≥2 weeks were invited to provide a chest radiograph and two unsupervised samples of sputum for acid-fast bacilli smear and culture. Results Among 31,267 admissions, 6,273 (20.1%) reported respiratory symptoms; 197 reported cough ≥2 weeks, of which pulmonary TB was diagnosed in 30. In multivariate analysis, the variables associated with a pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosis were: age (OR 0.94, 95% CI: 0.92–0.97; p<0.0001), sputum production (OR 0.18, 95% CI 0.06–0.56; p = 0.003), and radiographic findings typical of TB (OR 12.11, 95% CI 4.45–32.93; p<0.0001). Conclusions This study identified a high prevalence of pulmonary TB among patients who sought care at the emergency department of a tertiary hospital, emphasizing the importance of regular screening of all comers for active TB in this setting. PMID:25211158

  14. Tuberculosis preventive therapy: an underutilised strategy to reduce individual risk of TB and contribute to TB control.

    PubMed

    Churchyard, Gavin J; Chaisson, Richard E; Maartens, Gary; Getahun, Haileyesus

    2014-05-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a global health problem, and South Africa (SA) has one of the world's worst TB epidemics. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimated in 1999 that one-third of the world's population was latently infected with TB. In SA up to 88% of HIV-uninfected young adults (31 - 35 years) are latently infected with TB. In the most recent meta-analysis, 6 - 12 months of isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT) was associated with a lower incidence of active TB than placebo (relative risk (RR) 0.68; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.54 - 0.85), with the greatest benefit among individuals with a positive tuberculin skin test (TST) (RR 0.38; 95% CI 0.25 - 0.57). A clinical trial of IPT given with antiretroviral therapy (ART) for 12 months reduced TB incidence by 37% compared with ART alone (hazard ratio (HR) 0.63; 95% CI 0.41 - 0.94). The effect of IPT is limited in high-burden countries. IPT for 36 months v. 6 months reduced TB incidence among HIV-positive, TST-positive participants by 74% (HR 0.26; 95% CI 0.09 - 0.80). A study of more than 24 000 goldminers confirmed that IPT is safe, with only 0.5% experiencing adverse events. A meta-analysis of studies of IPT since 1951 did not show an increased risk of developing resistance. Alternative TB preventive therapy regimens, including high-dose isoniazid and rifapentine given weekly for 3 months, have been shown to have similar efficacy to IPT. Mathematical modelling suggests that scaling up continuous IPT targeted to HIV-positive persons, when used in combination with other treatment and prevention strategies, may substantially improve TB control. PMID:25212199

  15. Drug-resistant TB: deadly, costly and in need of a vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Manjelievskaia, Janna; Erck, Dara; Piracha, Samina; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-01-01

    TB is an underappreciated public health threat in developed nations. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million TB cases and 1.5 million deaths occurred worldwide; 3.3% of these cases resulted from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains. These figures underestimate the economic burden associated with MDR-TB and XDR-TB, as the cost of treating disease caused by these strains can be 9–25 times higher than treating drug-susceptible TB. Developing new drugs, improved diagnostics and new TB vaccines are critical components of a strategy to combat TB in general, and drug-resistant TB in particular. Because Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has demonstrated a capacity to develop resistance to drugs developed to combat it, it is unlikely that drug-resistant MTB would be ‘resistant’ to vaccines capable of preventing disease or established infection with drug-sensitive MTB strains. Accordingly, the development of TB vaccines represents an important long-term investment in preventing the spread of drug-resistant TB and achieving WHO's goal of ending the global TB epidemic by 2035. Our current understanding of the epidemiology of drug-resistant TB and the interventions needed to limit its spread, reviewed in this article, illustrates the need for increased financial support for developing new TB drugs, diagnostics and vaccines to meet the WHO goal of TB elimination by 2035. PMID:26884499

  16. Drug-resistant TB: deadly, costly and in need of a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Manjelievskaia, Janna; Erck, Dara; Piracha, Samina; Schrager, Lewis

    2016-03-01

    TB is an underappreciated public health threat in developed nations. In 2014, an estimated 9.6 million TB cases and 1.5 million deaths occurred worldwide; 3.3% of these cases resulted from multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) strains. These figures underestimate the economic burden associated with MDR-TB and XDR-TB, as the cost of treating disease caused by these strains can be 9-25 times higher than treating drug-susceptible TB. Developing new drugs, improved diagnostics and new TB vaccines are critical components of a strategy to combat TB in general, and drug-resistant TB in particular. Because Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) has demonstrated a capacity to develop resistance to drugs developed to combat it, it is unlikely that drug-resistant MTB would be 'resistant' to vaccines capable of preventing disease or established infection with drug-sensitive MTB strains. Accordingly, the development of TB vaccines represents an important long-term investment in preventing the spread of drug-resistant TB and achieving WHO's goal of ending the global TB epidemic by 2035. Our current understanding of the epidemiology of drug-resistant TB and the interventions needed to limit its spread, reviewed in this article, illustrates the need for increased financial support for developing new TB drugs, diagnostics and vaccines to meet the WHO goal of TB elimination by 2035.

  17. 46 CFR 32.75-1 - Application-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REQUIREMENTS Hull Requirements for Wood Hull Tank Vessels Constructed Prior to November 10, 1936 § 32.75-1 Application—TB/ALL. All wood hull tank vessels, the construction or conversion of which was started prior...

  18. Structural anisotropy in amorphous Fe-Tb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Hufnagel, T.C.; Brennan, S.; Zschack, P.; Clemens, B.M.

    1996-05-01

    We have used conventional and anomalous dispersion x-ray scattering to study the near-neighbor atomic environments in sputter-deposited amorphous Fe-Tb thin films with a large perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. The as-deposited films show a clear structural anisotropy, with more Fe-Tb near neighbor pairs in the out-of-plane direction. Upon annealing, the magnetic anisotropy drops significantly, and we see a corresponding reduction in the structural anisotropy. The number of Fe-Tb near-neighbors increases in the in-plane direction, but does not change in the out-of-plane direction. Therefore, the distribution of Fe-Tb near neighbors becomes more uniform upon annealing. We conclude that the observed reduction in perpendicular magnetic anisotropy energy is a result of this change in structure. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  19. Caecal perforation from TB and the Law of Laplace.

    PubMed

    Khan, Amad N; Khalid, Salema; Chaudhry, Mohammad Naushad; Ho, Cherrie

    2015-05-13

    A 43-year-old man presented to the hospital with haemoptysis. When worked up, his history and examination were highly suggestive of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). He subsequently developed a massive upper gastrointestinal bleed and underwent an emergency laparotomy, which revealed a massively dilated caecum measuring ∼20 cm in diameter. The caecum had perforated due to acute decompensation of intestinal TB. Though common in developing countries, TB is rare in the UK, especially the intestinal kind. The most striking feature of this case is, however, the size of the caecal distension caused by the tubercular inflammation and subsequent perforation-something unheard of in the literature. This massive caecal distention would be explained by the Law of Laplace. In conclusion, massive distension and caecal perforation are possible consequences of intestinal TB, especially in the 48-72 h immediately after starting anti-tubercular therapy.

  20. Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB

    MedlinePlus

    ... Submit Search The CDC Health Disparities in HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STDs, and TB Note: Javascript is ... Hawaiians/Other Pacific Islanders MMWR Publications HIV and AIDS Viral Hepatitis STDs Tuberculosis Training and Networking Resources ...

  1. Global Efforts to Combat TB Epidemic Falling Short

    MedlinePlus

    ... WHO report revealed. But new data collected from India suggests estimates about the total burden of the ... TB. Of these people, 60 percent were from India. Trailing India with high rates of the disease ...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo, oil fuel, lubricating oil, ballast water, fresh water, feedwater in tanks, consumable stores, and...

  3. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo, oil fuel, lubricating oil, ballast water, fresh water, feedwater in tanks, consumable stores, and...

  4. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo, oil fuel, lubricating oil, ballast water, fresh water, feedwater in tanks, consumable stores, and...

  5. 46 CFR 30.10-38 - Lightweight-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Lightweight—TB/ALL. The term lightweight means the displacement of a vessel in metric tons without cargo, oil fuel, lubricating oil, ballast water, fresh water, feedwater in tanks, consumable stores, and...

  6. Tb/Na tobermorite: Thermal behaviour and high temperature products

    SciTech Connect

    Garra, Walter; Marchetti, Fabio; Merlino, Stefano

    2009-06-15

    By heating a sample of Tb/Na tobermorite we obtained a phase which was identified through its X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, as terbium silicate apatite. Subsequently this compound has been directly prepared by solid state reaction and we carried out a structural refinement from XRD data in space group P6{sub 3}/m obtaining cell parameters a=9.39199(4) A and c=6.84041(5) A. Terbium silicate apatite heated in melted NaF led to Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} crystals. - Graphical Abstract: By heating over 900 deg. C Tb/Na tobermorite a terbium silicate apatite was obtained. The same product has been independently prepared and structurally characterized from powder diffraction data. Attempts of crystallizing terbium silicate apatite from melted NaF led to Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} crystals.

  7. Immunotherapy for pulmonary TB: antimicrobial peptides and their inducers.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Cesar Enrique; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Rivas-Santiago, Bruno

    2013-10-01

    TB is an infectious disease that still has an enormous impact on public health worldwide. With the continuous increasing epidemic of multidrug-resistant TB, new drugs and vaccines are urgently needed. In the last decade there has been a broad advance in the knowledge of innate immunity in TB. Together with the growing research regarding immunomodulators, new promising insights have been developed that can contribute in the control of TB. This is the case of antimicrobial peptides, which can be potential therapeutic or adjuvant agents. The current high cost of antimicrobial peptide synthesis may be a current deterrent for treatment; antimicrobial peptide-inducers can be an alternative for low-cost treatment and/or adjuvants.

  8. Silica Exposures in Artisanal Small-Scale Gold Mining in Tanzania and Implications for Tuberculosis Prevention.

    PubMed

    Gottesfeld, Perry; Andrew, Damian; Dalhoff, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Gold miners exposed to crystalline silica are at risk of silicosis, lung cancer, and experience higher incidence rates of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB). Although the hazards associated with mercury exposure in artisanal small-scale gold mining (ASGM) have been well documented, no published data was available on crystalline silica exposures in this population. Air sampling was conducted in the breathing zone of workers in five villages in Tanzania with battery-operated sampling pumps and bulk samples were collected to measure the type and concentration of crystalline silica in the ore. Samples were analyzed at an accredited laboratory with X-ray diffraction. Airborne crystalline silica exposures exceeded recommended limits for all tasks monitored with an average exposure of 16.85 mg/m(3) for underground drilling that was 337 fold greater than the recommended exposure limit (REL) published by the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and 0.19 mg/m(3) for aboveground operations or 4-fold greater than the REL. The exposures measured raise concern for possible acute and chronic silicosis and are known to significantly contribute to TB incidence rates in mining communities. The use of wet methods could greatly reduce exposures and the risk of TB and silicosis in ASGM. Ongoing efforts to address mercury and other hazards in ASGM should incorporate crystalline silica dust controls.

  9. Gold Nanoparticles Cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mironava, Tatsiana

    Over the last two decades gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) have been used for many scientific applications and have attracted attention due to the specific chemical, electronic and optical size dependent properties that make them very promising agents in many fields such as medicine, imagine techniques and electronics. More specifically, biocompatible gold nanoparticles have a huge potential for use as the contrast augmentation agent in X-ray Computed Tomography and Photo Acoustic Tomography for early tumor diagnostic as well these nanoparticles are extensively researched for enhancing the targeted cancer treatment effectiveness such as photo-thermal and radiotherapy. In most biomedical applications biocompatible gold nanoparticles are labeled with specific tumor or other pathology targeting antibodies and used for site specific drug delivery. However, even though gold nanoparticles poses very high level of anti cancer properties, the question of their cytotoxicity ones they are released in normal tissue has to be researched. Moreover, the huge amount of industrially produced gold nanoparticles raises the question of these particles being a health hazard, since the penetration is fairly easy for the "nano" size substances. This study focuses on the effect of AuNPs on a human skin tissue, since it is fall in both categories -- the side effects for biomedical applications and industrial workers and users' exposure during production and handling. Therefore, in the present project, gold nanoparticles stabilized with the biocompatible agent citric acid were generated and characterized by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxic effect of AuNPs release to healthy skin tissue was modeled on 3 different cell types: human keratinocytes, human dermal fibroblasts, and human adipose derived stromal (ADS) cells. The AuNPs localization inside the cell was found to be cell type dependent. Overall cytotoxicity was found to be dependent

  10. 46 CFR 30.10-61 - Rivers-TB/R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rivers-TB/R. 30.10-61 Section 30.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-61 Rivers—TB/R. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or to canals,...

  11. 46 CFR 30.10-61 - Rivers-TB/R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rivers-TB/R. 30.10-61 Section 30.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-61 Rivers—TB/R. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or to canals,...

  12. 46 CFR 30.10-61 - Rivers-TB/R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Rivers-TB/R. 30.10-61 Section 30.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-61 Rivers—TB/R. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or to canals,...

  13. 46 CFR 30.10-61 - Rivers-TB/R.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Rivers-TB/R. 30.10-61 Section 30.10-61 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-61 Rivers—TB/R. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels whose navigation is restricted to rivers and/or to canals,...

  14. Gene expression profiles of bronchoalveolar cells in Pulmonary TB

    PubMed Central

    Raju, Bindu; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Belitskaya-Lévy, Ilana; Dawson, Rod; Ress, Stanley; Gold, Jeffrey A.; Condos, Rany; Pine, Richard; Brown, Stuart; Nolan, Anna; Rom, William N.; Weiden, Michael D.

    2008-01-01

    The host response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis includes macrophage activation, inflammation with increased immune effector cells, tissue necrosis and cavity formation, and fibrosis, distortion, and bronchiectasis. To evaluate the molecular basis of the immune response in the lungs of patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (TB), we used bronchoalveolar lavage to obtain cells at the site of infection. Affymetrix Genechip micro-arrays and cDNA nylon filter microarrays interrogated gene expression in BAL cells from 11 healthy controls and 17 patients with active pulmonary TB. We found altered gene expression for 69 genes in TB versus normal controls that included cell surface markers, cytokines, chemokines, receptors, transcription factors, and complement components. In addition, TB BAL cell gene expression patternssegregated into 2 groups: one suggestive of a T helper type 1 (Th1) cellular immune response with increased STAT-4, IFN-γ receptor, and MIG expression with increased IFN-γ protein levels in BAL fluid; the other group displayed characteristics of Th2 immunity with increased STAT-6, CD81, and IL-10 receptor expression. We were able to demonstrate that a Th2 presentation could change to a Th1 pattern after anti-tuberculous treatment in one TB patient studied serially. These gene expression data support the conclusion that pulmonary TB produces a global change in the BAL cell transcriptome with manifestations of either Th1 or Th2 immunity. PMID:17921069

  15. Strain control of magnetization in TbFe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusad, Ritika; Johannes, M. D.; Fennie, Craig J.

    2015-03-01

    Magnetostrictive materials change their shape upon application of strain and can be used as actuators and sensors. In this work, we perform a computational analysis of a highly magnetostrictive compound, TbFe2, to understand how the lattice and magnetization couple. We use Density Functional Theory (DFT) to investigate the magnitude and direction of the metallic moment as a function of pressure. The localized nature of Tb f-electrons classify this compound as ``strongly-correlated'' and necessitate the simultaneous use of spin-orbit coupling to treat magnetostriction and the DFT +U methodology to capture the physics of the f-electrons. Although, the energy scales involved in spin-lattice interactions are extremely small, we were able to correctly reproduce the correct magnetic ground state and the experimentally observed ferrimagnetic coupling between Tb and Fe atoms in TbFe2. The easy axis in TbFe2 points along one of its body diagonals, which makes the shape of the crystal rhombohedral. Switching of magnetization between the easy axes requires the magnetization to pass through one of the [100] directions. In our study we show that by applying isotropic strain on TbFe2 crystal, we can decrease the energy barrier between [111] and [100] magnetization directions of the crystal.

  16. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide.

    PubMed

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV-Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  17. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E.; Geiss, Roy H.; Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-01

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  18. Temperature-dependent structure of Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Rice, Katherine P.; Russek, Stephen E. Shaw, Justin M.; Usselman, Robert J.; Evarts, Eric R.; Silva, Thomas J.; Nembach, Hans T.; Geiss, Roy H.; Arenholz, Elke; Idzerda, Yves U.

    2015-02-09

    High quality 5 nm cubic Tb-doped magnetite nanoparticles have been synthesized by a wet-chemical method to investigate tailoring of magnetic properties for imaging and biomedical applications. We show that the Tb is incorporated into the octahedral 3+ sites. High-angle annular dark-field microscopy shows that the dopant is well-distributed throughout the particle, and x-ray diffraction measurements show a small lattice parameter shift with the inclusion of a rare-earth dopant. Magnetization and x-ray magnetic circular dichroism data indicate that the Tb spins are unpolarized and weakly coupled to the iron spin lattice at room temperature, and begin to polarize and couple to the iron oxide lattice at temperatures below 50 K. Broadband ferromagnetic resonance measurements show no increase in magnetic damping at room temperature for Tb-doped nanoparticles relative to undoped nanoparticles, further confirming weak coupling between Fe and Tb spins at room temperature. The Gilbert damping constant, α, is remarkably low for the Tb-doped nanoparticles, with α = 0.024 ± 0.003. These nanoparticles, which have a large fixed moment, a large fluctuating moment and optically active rare-earth elements, are potential high-relaxivity T1 and T2 MRI agents with integrated optical signatures.

  19. HIV-Associated TB Syndemic: A Growing Clinical Challenge Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Montales, Maria Theresa; Chaudhury, Arun; Beebe, Alexandria; Patil, Sowmya; Patil, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    The association of tuberculosis (TB) with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome over the past several years has become an emerging syndemic. Approximately 10% of people living with HIV (PLHIV) with latent TB infection will develop active TB disease each year. In this review, we highlight that this phenomenon is not limited to high endemic regions, such as Afro-Asian nations, but globalization/migration is causing increased case detection even in developed nations, such as the United States. Active screening should be performed for TB in PLHIV. A high degree of clinical suspicion for TB is warranted in PLHIV presenting with fever, cough, and unintentional weight loss. HIV–Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) coinfection is often paucibacillary, precluding diagnosis by conventional diagnostics and/or smear microscopy/culture. Improved detection of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB is now possible by incorporation of the GeneXPERT MTB/RIF assay (Cepheid Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA). The World Health Organization recommends instituting immediate therapy for MTB, in conjunction with ongoing or newly introduced anti-retroviral therapy. Vigilance is required to detect drug-induced organ injuries, and early-treatment-induced immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. Collaborating MTB and HIV activities in concentrated HIV epidemic settings should become a high public health priority. PMID:26779470

  20. Green electroluminescence from Tb4O7 films on silicon: Impact excitation of Tb3+ ions by hot carriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chen; Lv, Chunyan; Jiang, Miaomiao; Zhou, Junwei; Li, Dongsheng; Ma, Xiangyang; Yang, Deren

    2016-02-01

    We report on green electroluminescence (EL) due to the intra-4f transitions of the trivalent terbium (Tb3+) ions inherent in a Tb4O7 film that is sandwiched between the ITO film and heavily phosphorous- or boron-doped silicon (n+-Si or p+-Si) substrate, thus forming the so-called metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) device. The onset voltage of such EL is below 10 V. From the current-voltage characteristic and voltage-dependent EL spectra of the aforementioned MOS device, it is derived that the Tb-related green EL results from the impact excitation of Tb3+ ions by the hot electrons (holes), which stem from the electric-field acceleration of the electrons (holes) injected from the n+-Si (p+-Si) substrate via the trap-assisted tunneling mechanism.

  1. TB screening among people living with HIV/AIDS in resource-limited settings.

    PubMed

    Date, Anand; Modi, Surbhi

    2015-04-15

    Tuberculosis (TB) continues to be the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among people living with HIV (PLHIV), making improved prevention and treatment of HIV-associated TB critical to ensuring long-term survival of PLHIV. TB screening among PLHIV is central to implementation of the World Health Organization's 3 I's interventions for reducing the impact of the TB and HIV syndemics. Effective TB screening will result in the identification of PLHIV with presumptive TB disease (ie, those with a positive symptom screen who require appropriate evaluation, including the use of diagnostic tools such as the Xpert MTB/RIF assay) and those eligible for isoniazid preventive therapy (ie, those who have a negative clinical symptom screen or who have a positive screen but are found not to have TB disease). Identification of PLHIV with presumptive TB also facilitates implementation of basic administrative measures for TB infection control, including fast tracking of coughing patients and separation from noncoughing PLHIV to reduce TB transmission. By contributing to the early diagnosis of TB disease among PLHIV, TB screening is also critical to facilitate early initiation of antiretroviral treatment among PLHIV diagnosed with TB disease who might not otherwise be eligible for antiretroviral treatment based on CD4 count or clinical staging. TB screening thus serves as a gateway for multiple TB/HIV interventions and is an integral part of routine clinical services for PLHIV at each clinic visit.

  2. Multidrug-resistant TB and HIV in Thailand: overlapping, but not independently associated, risk factors.

    PubMed

    Akksilp, Somsak; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Rienthong, Somsak; Sirinak, Chawin; Ngamlert, Keerataya; Mankatittham, Wiroj; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Sumnapun, Surin; Yamada, Norio; Monkongdee, Patama; Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Burapat, Channawong; Wells, Charles D; Tappero, Jordan W; Varma, Jay K

    2009-09-01

    The HIV and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemics are closely linked. In Thailand as part of a sentinel surveillance system, we collected data prospectively about pulmonary TB cases treated in public clinics. A subset of HIV-infected TB patients identified through this system had additional data collected for a research study. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify factors associated with MDR-TB. Of 10,428 TB patients, 2,376 (23%) were HIV-infected; 145 (1%) had MDR-TB. Of the MDR-TB cases, 52 (37%) were HIV-infected. Independent risk factors for MDR-TB included age 18-29 years old, male sex, and previous TB treatment, but not HIV infection. Among new patients, having an injection drug use history was a risk factor for MDR-TB. Of 539 HIV-infected TB patients in the research study, MDR-TB was diagnosed in 19 (4%); the only significant risk factors were previous TB treatment and previous hepatitis. In Thailand, HIV is common among MDR-TB patients, but is not an independent risk factor for MDR-TB. Populations at high risk for HIV-young adults, men, injection drug users - should be prioritized for drug susceptibility testing.

  3. Multi-drug resistant TB and HIV in Thailand: overlapping, but not independently associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Akksilp, Somsak; Wattanaamornkiat, Wanpen; Kittikraisak, Wanitchaya; Nateniyom, Sriprapa; Rienthong, Somsak; Sirinak, Chawin; Ngamlert, Keerataya; Mankatittham, Wiroj; Sattayawuthipong, Wanchai; Sumnapun, Surin; Yamada, Norio; Monkongdee, Patama; Anuwatnonthakate, Amornrat; Burapat, Channawong; Wells, Charles D; Tappero, Jordan W; Varma, Jay K

    2009-11-01

    The HIV and multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) epidemics are closely linked. In Thailand as part of a sentinel surveillance system, we collected data prospectively about pulmonary TB cases treated in public clinics. A subset of HIV-infected TB patients identified through this system had additional data collected for a research study. We conducted multivariate analysis to identify factors associated with MDR-TB. Of 10,428 TB patients, 2,376 (23%) were HIV-infected; 145 (1%) had MDR-TB. Of the MDR-TB cases, 52 (37%) were HIV-infected. Independent risk factors for MDR-TB included age 18-29 years old, male sex, and previous TB treatment, but not HIV infection. Among new patients, having an injection drug use history was a risk factor for MDR-TB. Of 539 HIV-infected TB patients in the research study, MDR-TB was diagnosed in 19 (4%); the only significant risk factors were previous TB treatment and previous hepatitis. In Thailand, HIV is common among MDR-TB patients, but is not an independent risk factor for MDR-TB. Populations at high risk for HIV-young adults, men, injection drug users - should be prioritized for drug susceptibility testing.

  4. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  5. 'Pot of Gold'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows the rock dubbed 'Pot of Gold' (upper left), located near the base of the 'Columbia Hills' in Gusev Crater. The rock's nodules and layered appearance have inspired rover team members to investigate the rock's detailed chemistry in coming sols. This picture was taken on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  6. Tuning of magnetic ordering by Y substitution onto Tb site in the nanocrystalline TbMnO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Keka R.; Shukla, Rakesh; Kaushik, S. D.; Mukadam, M. D.; Siruguri, V.; Tyagi, A. K.; Yusuf, S. M.

    2015-10-01

    We report the magnetic properties, of nano-crystalline powders Tb1-xYxMnO3 (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4), as perceived by neutron diffraction, and elucidate the effect of Tb site substitution on the magnetic structure of TbMnO3. All samples crystallized in the orthorhombic structure conforming to space group Pnma, and exhibited an incommensurate collinear antiferromagnetic ordering of the Mn ions below ˜40 K. Furthermore, at T ≤ 20 K, all these samples showed a change in magnetic structure (of Mn moments) to a spiral ordering down to 2 K, the lowest measured temperature. For the samples with x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2, a short-ranged two dimensional (2D) ordering of Tb moments was also observed at 2 K. However, for the other samples (x = 0.3 and 0.4), no magnetic ordering of Tb moments was found down to 2 K. So with Y substitution, a crossover from 2D ordering to a disordering of Tb moments was observed. The moments at the Mn site were found to be lower than the full Mn3+ (4μB) moment for all the samples below 40 K. The magnetic properties of all the samples studied by us in nano form are more pronounced than those of the reported single crystals of same compositions [V. Yu. Ivanov et al., JETP Lett. 91, 392-397 (2010)].

  7. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  8. TB-HIV co-infection: a catastrophic comradeship.

    PubMed

    Narendran, G; Swaminathan, S

    2016-04-01

    The symbiotic association of tuberculosis (TB) and HIV poses a challenge to human survival. HIV complicates every aspect of TB including presentation, diagnosis and treatment. HIV-TB patients encounter unique problems like drug-drug interactions, cumulative toxicity, immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), lower plasma drug levels and emergence of drug resistance during treatment despite adherence. TB may also be overdiagnosed in HIV due to a number of diseases that closely resemble TB. Notable among them are non-tuberculous mycobacteria, Pneumocystis Jirovecii and Nocardia. Even though diagnostic procedures have improved over the years, patients in developing countries usually seek health care at later stage of the disease. Research data ascertains the duration of therapy for TB to be 6 months with rifampicin and isoniazid, reinforced with ethambutol and pyrazinamide in the first 2 months. The schedule of therapy is still debatable with daily regimens being preferred in the context of HIV. Many reasons exist for persistence of Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (M.TB) in sputum, or delayed-clearance of TB from sputum smears in HIV, apart from emergence of drug resistance and non-compliance. Acquired rifampicin resistance (ARR) is a unique phenomenon complicating HIV-associated TB when an intermittent regimen of antituberculosis therapy (ATT) is used without timely initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), especially in patients harbouring isoniazid-resistant strains Immune restoration is often incomplete ('swiss cheese' pattern) even with effective HAART if not started early. Immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) is the paradoxical worsening of the patient's condition often with radiological deterioration, due to an enhanced immune response with HAART. IRIS occurs despite an effective virological suppression and a favourable response to ATT. The incidence of IRIS in HIV has reached up to 54%, requiring utilization of experts

  9. When gold is not noble: Nanoscale gold catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, A.; Abbet, S.; Heiz, U.; Schneider, W.D.; Haekkinen, H.; Barnett, R.N.; Landman, U.

    1999-12-02

    While inert as bulk material, nanoscale gold particles dispersed on oxide supports exhibit a remarkable catalytic activity. Temperature-programmed reaction studies of the catalyzed combustion of CO on size-selected small monodispersed Au{sub n} (n {le} 20) gold clusters supported on magnesia, and first-principle simulations, reveal the microscopic origins of the observed unusual catalytic activity, with Au{sub 8} found to be the smallest catalytically active size. Partial electron transfer from the surface to the gold cluster and oxygen-vacancy F-center defects are shown to play an essential role in the activation of nanosize gold clusters as catalysts for the combustion reaction.

  10. Tracking and Treating Mobile Populations. The TB Net System. Migrant Clinicians Network Monograph Series. = El Sistema de Red para la TB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Migrant Clinicians Network, Inc., Austin, TX.

    A comprehensive tracking and referral network that helps provide continuity of care for mobile populations with active tuberculosis (TB) or TB infection is considered essential for effective treatment of TB. However, the interstate referral system that exists between state health departments has been highly inefficient for serving migrant…

  11. Timing of antiretroviral therapy and TB treatment outcomes in patients with TB-HIV in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Thi, A M; Shewade, H D; Kyaw, N T T; Oo, M M; Aung, T K; Aung, S T; Oo, H N; Win, T; Harries, A D

    2016-06-21

    Contexte : Programme intégré de prise en charge du virus de l'immunodéficience humaine (VIH), Mandalay, Myanmar.Objectifs : Chez les patients atteints de tuberculose (TB) et VIH enrôlés entre 2011 et 2014, déterminer la date du début du traitement antirétroviral (TAR) en relation avec le traitement antituberculeux (ATT) et son association avec le résultat d'ATT.Schéma : Etude rétrospective de cohorte.Résultats : Sur 1708 patients TB-VIH, 1565 (92%) ont débuté l'ATT en premier et 143 (8%) ont commencé le TAR en premier. Le résultat du traitement a été manquant pour 226 patients qui n'ont pas été inclus. Chez les patients ayant débuté l'ATT en premier, le délai médian de mise en route du TAR a été de 8,6 semaines. L'initiation du TAR a été retardée d'un délai médian de 8 semaines chez 830 (53%) patients. Parmi ces patients, 7% ont eu un résultat médiocre, avec une anémie qui a constitué un facteur de risque indépendant. Chez les patients ayant débuté le TAR en premier, le délai médian de mise en route de l'ATT a été de 21,6 semaines. L'ATT a été initié au cours des 3 mois chez 56 (39%) patients. Le traitement a échoué chez 12% des patients et chez 20% de ceux qui ont débuté l'ATT dans les 3 mois. Les patients ayant des CD4 <100/mm(3) ont eu un risque quatre fois plus élevé d'échec.Conclusions: La chronologie du TAR en rapport avec l'ATT n'a pas été un facteur de risque indépendant d'échec du traitement. Un dépistage extensif de la TB avec des tests de diagnostic rapides et sensibles chez les personnes infectées par le VIH et un suivi étroit de l'anémie et de l'immunosuppression sont recommandés afin d'améliorer encore le résultat du traitement de TB parmi les patients TB-VIH.

  12. Incomplete fusion in 16O+159Tb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Vijay R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Shuaib, Mohd.; Yadav, Abhishek; Bala, Indu; Sharma, Manoj K.; Gupta, S.; Singh, D. P.; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Bhowmik, R. K.

    2016-02-01

    In heavy-ion induced reactions, incomplete fusion (ICF) has been found to be a process of greater importance and of distinct nature even at slightly above the barrier energies where complete fusion (CF) is supposed to be dominant. However, the studies are limited to a few projectile target combinations only. To confirm the distinctly different decay patterns observed in case of CF and ICF residues, and to understand the role of high ℓ-values in the onset of ICF, a particle-γ-coincidence technique has been employed to measure spin-distributions and feeding intensity profiles of CF and ICF residues populated via xn / pxn / αxn-channels in 16O+159Tb interactions at Elab ≈ 83.5 ± 1.5, 88.5 ± 1.5, 93.5 ± 1.5 and 97.6 ± 1.4 MeV. The Gamma Detector Array and the Charged Particles Detector Array have been used to detect prompt γ-rays in coincidence with charged particles (p and α). CF-α and ICF-α channels have been identified from backward (B)- and forward (F)-α-gated-γ-spectra, respectively. Reaction dependent decay patterns (thus, the feeding intensity profiles) have been observed in different α emitting channels. The CF channels are found to be widely populated and strongly fed over a broad spin range. In case of ICF-α channels, narrow range feeding was observed only for high-spin states or the low spin states were not populated. The mean ℓ-values involved in the production of ICF- αxn-channels are found to be higher than those involved in the production of CF- αxn-channels associated with fusion-evaporation reactions.

  13. Watching single gold nanorods grow.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhongqing; Qi, Hua; Li, Min; Tang, Bochong; Zhang, Zhengzheng; Han, Ruiling; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zhao, Yuliang

    2012-05-01

    The consecutive evolution process of single gold nanorods is monitored using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The single-crystal gold nanorods investigated are grown directly on surfaces to which gold seed particles are covalently linked. The growth kinetics for single nanorods is derived from the 3D information recorded by AFM. A better understanding of the seed-mediated growth mechanism may ultimately lead to the direct growth of aligned nanorods on surfaces. PMID:22378704

  14. Wavelength dependence of Verdet constant of Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Permin, D. A.; Balabanov, S. S.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of the magneto-active material—Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics with Tb3+ ion concentrations of 10%, 20%, 30%, and 100% (Tb2O3)—were prepared and studied. The wavelength dependence of Verdet constant in the 380 nm-1750 nm range was approximated for all investigated ceramic samples and was predicted for a pure Tb2O3 material. Tb2O3 ceramics demonstrates a more than three times higher Verdet constant in comparison with terbium gallium garnet crystal or ceramics. The linear dependence of the Verdet constant on Tb3+ ion concentration in the Tb3+:Y2O3 ceramics was demonstrated. The obtained data will be useful for fabricating magneto-optical elements of Faraday devices based on Tb3+:Y2O3 with arbitrary Tb3+ ion concentration operating at room temperature in the wavelength range of 380 nm-1750 nm.

  15. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  16. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  17. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as...

  18. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  19. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  20. The extractive metallurgy of gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kongolo, K.; Mwema, M. D.

    1998-12-01

    Mössbauer spectroscopy has been successfully used in investigation of the gold compounds present in ores and the gold species which occur during the process metallurgy of this metal. This paper is a survey of the basic recovery methods and techniques used in extractive metallurgy of gold. Process fundamentals on mineral processing, ore leaching, zinc dust cementation, adsorption on activated carbon, electrowinning and refining are examined. The recovery of gold as a by-product of the copper industry is also described. Alternative processing methods are indicated in order to shed light on new interesting research topics where Mössbauer spectroscopy could be applied.

  1. Surface-stabilized gold nanocatalysts

    DOEpatents

    Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Yan, Wenfu [Oak Ridge, TN

    2009-12-08

    A surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst includes a solid support having stabilizing surfaces for supporting gold nanoparticles, and a plurality of gold nanoparticles having an average particle size of less than 8 nm disposed on the stabilizing surfaces. The surface-stabilized gold nanocatalyst provides enhanced stability, such as at high temperature under oxygen containing environments. In one embodiment, the solid support is a multi-layer support comprising at least a first layer having a second layer providing the stabilizing surfaces disposed thereon, the first and second layer being chemically distinct.

  2. Evolution of magnetoelectric properties of Sc-diluted TbMnO3.

    PubMed

    Cuartero, V; Blasco, J; García, J; Stankiewicz, J; Subías, G; Rodriguez-Velamazán, J A; Ritter, C

    2013-05-15

    The magnetoelectric properties of the TbMn(1-x)Sc(x)O3 series have been studied at low temperatures by means of heat capacity, magnetic measurements and impedance spectroscopy. TbMnO3 exhibits as expected three transitions upon lowering the temperature corresponding to the magnetic ordering of the two sublattices (Mn and Tb) and the ferroelectric transition. Ferroelectricity disappears with Sc dilution for x > 0.1 because the non-collinear magnetic arrangement is destroyed. The dilution of Mn with a non-magnetic ion is also detrimental to the magnetic ordering of both Mn and Tb sublattices. The system evolves to a magnetic glassy state for the intermediate compositions. Formal TbScO3 shows Sc-deficiency and long range magnetic ordering of Tb(3+) moments in the ab-plane brought by the direct interaction between Tb(3+) ions. This ordering is different from the one found in TbMnO3 due to the lack of magnetic coupling between Tb- and Mn-sublattices. A small substitution of Sc by Mn in TbScO3 destroys the Tb ordering giving rise to a magnetic glass behaviour. This effect is ascribed to the partial polarization of Tb sublattice by the paramagnetic Mn which competes with the direct Tb-Tb exchange. PMID:23604245

  3. Risk factors for TB and HIV coinfection in Scotland, 2001 to 2010.

    PubMed

    McDonald, E; Smith-Palmer, A; Wallace, L A; Blatchford, O

    2015-03-19

    The number of patients with tuberculosis (TB) increased steadily in Scotland between 2005 and 2010. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has been a contributory factor to increases in TB in a number of comparable industrialised countries. This study investigated the extent of, and risk factors for, TB and HIV coinfection in Scotland from 2001 to 2010. Patients with TB in the national TB database were linked to those in the national HIV database using probabilistic data linkage. Patient records were anonymised to maintain confidentiality. From 2001 to 2010, 106/4, 097 (2.6%, 95% CI: 2.1 to 3.1) TB patients matched with HIV patients, equating to a 10-year incidence of 2.1 cases per million population. Patients with both TB and HIV were more often born outside the United Kingdom,were of black African ethnicity, had refugee status and had extra-thoracic lymph node involvement or cryptic/disseminated TB disease. Individuals with TB and HIV coinfection were younger and symptomatic for a shorter time before their diagnosis of TB, compared with TB patients without HIV. TB and HIV coinfection was relatively uncommon in Scotland in the study period. Clinicians should recognise the potential for HIV infection among TB patients and the importance of offering an HIV test to all TB patients.

  4. [Human resource capacity building on TB laboratory work for TB control program--through the experience of international TB laboratory training course for TB control at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis, JATA, Japan].

    PubMed

    Fujiki, Akiko; Kato, Seiya

    2008-06-01

    The international training course on TB laboratory work for national tuberculosis program (NTP) has been conducted at the Research Institute of Tuberculosis since 1975 funded by Japan International Cooperation Agency in collaboration with WHO Western Pacific Regional Office. The aim of the course is to train key personnel in TB laboratory field for NTP in resource-limited countries. The course has trained 265 national key personnel in TB laboratory service from 57 resource-limited countries in the last 33 years. The number of participants trained may sound too small in the fight against the large TB problem in resource-limited countries. However, every participant is playing an important role as a core and catalyst for the TB control program in his/her own country when they were back home. The curriculum is composed of technical aspects on TB examination, mainly sputum microscopy in addition since microscopy service is provided at many centers that are deployed in a widely spread area, the managerial aspect of maintaining quality TB laboratory work at the field laboratory is another component of the curriculum. Effective teaching methods using materials such as artificial sputum, which is useful for panel slide preparation, and technical manuals with illustrations and pictures of training procedure have been developed through the experience of the course. These manuals are highly appreciated and widely used by the front line TB workers. The course has also contributed to the expansion of EQA (External Quality Assessment) system on AFB microscopy for the improvement of the quality of TB laboratory service of NTP. The course is well-known for not only having a long history, but also for its unique learning method emphasizing "Participatory Training", particularly for practicum sessions to master the skills on AFB microscopy. The method in learning AFB microscopy, which was developed by the course, was published as a training manual by IUATLD, RIT and USAID. As it is

  5. Gold nanoparticle assemblies stabilized by bis(phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) complexes through van der Waals interactions

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Yuki; Noro, Shin-ichiro; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle assemblies possess diverse application potential, ranging from industrial nanotechnology to medical biotechnology. Because the structures and properties of assemblies are directly affected by the stabilization mechanism between the organic molecules serving as protecting ligands and the gold nanoparticle surface, it is crucial to find and investigate new stabilization mechanisms. Here, we report that π-conjugated phthalocyanine rings can serve as stabilizing ligands for gold nanoparticles. Bis(phthalocyaninato)lutetium(III) (LuPc2) or bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(III) (TbPc2), even though complex, do not have specific binding units and stabilize gold nanoparticles through van der Waals interaction between parallel adsorbed phthalocyanine ligands and the gold nanoparticle surface. AC magnetic measurements and the electron-transport properties of the assemblies give direct evidence that the phthalocyanines are isolated from each other. Each nanoparticle shows weak electronic coupling despite the short internanoparticle distance (~1 nm), suggesting Efros–Shklovskii-type variable-range hopping and collective single-electron tunnelling behaviours. PMID:24441566

  6. Gold nanoparticle assemblies stabilized by bis(phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) complexes through van der Waals interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noda, Yuki; Noro, Shin-Ichiro; Akutagawa, Tomoyuki; Nakamura, Takayoshi

    2014-01-01

    Gold nanoparticle assemblies possess diverse application potential, ranging from industrial nanotechnology to medical biotechnology. Because the structures and properties of assemblies are directly affected by the stabilization mechanism between the organic molecules serving as protecting ligands and the gold nanoparticle surface, it is crucial to find and investigate new stabilization mechanisms. Here, we report that π-conjugated phthalocyanine rings can serve as stabilizing ligands for gold nanoparticles. Bis(phthalocyaninato)lutetium(III) (LuPc2) or bis(phthalocyaninato)terbium(III) (TbPc2), even though complex, do not have specific binding units and stabilize gold nanoparticles through van der Waals interaction between parallel adsorbed phthalocyanine ligands and the gold nanoparticle surface. AC magnetic measurements and the electron-transport properties of the assemblies give direct evidence that the phthalocyanines are isolated from each other. Each nanoparticle shows weak electronic coupling despite the short internanoparticle distance (~1 nm), suggesting Efros-Shklovskii-type variable-range hopping and collective single-electron tunnelling behaviours.

  7. Preparation and Optical Properties of Y2O3:Tb3+ Nanoballs.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongquan; Qi, Ye; Wu, Yanbo; Zhang, Jinsu; Chen, Baojiu

    2016-04-01

    Y2O3:Tb3+ nanoballs were synthesized via the urea homogeneous precipitation method (UPM). The resulting Y2O3:Tb3+ phosphors were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectra, and general photoluminescence spectra. The particle sizes estimated using X-ray diffractometry and scanning electron microcopy were about 50-200 nm. The emission intensity of the Y2O3:Tb3+ was low when the doping concentra- tions of Tb3+ were higher. The optimum concentration of Tb3+ for synthesis of Y2O3:Tb3+ nanocrystals is 1%. PMID:27451731

  8. Engaging informal providers in TB control: what is the potential in the implementation of the WHO Stop TB Strategy? A discussion paper.

    PubMed

    Kaboru, Berthollet Bwira; Uplekar, Mukund; Lönnroth, Knut

    2011-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) Stop TB Strategy calls for involvement of all healthcare providers in tuberculosis (TB) control. There is evidence that many people with TB seek care from informal providers before or after diagnosis, but very little has been done to engage these informal providers. Their involvement is often discussed with regard to DOTS (directly observed treatment - short course), rather than to the implementation of the comprehensive Stop TB Strategy. This paper discusses the potential contribution of informal providers to all components of the WHO Stop TB Strategy, including DOTS, programmatic management of multi-drug-resistant TB (MDR-TB), TB/HIV collaborative activities, health systems strengthening, engaging people with TB and their communities, and enabling research.The conclusion is that with increased stewardship by the national TB program (NTP), informal providers might contribute to implementation of the Stop TB Strategy. NTPs need practical guidelines to set up and scale up initiatives, including tools to assess the implications of these initiatives on complex dimensions like health systems strengthening.

  9. Mineral resource of the month: gold

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    George, Micheal W.

    2009-01-01

    The article presents information on the valuable mineral called gold. It states that early civilizations valued gold because of its scarcity, durability and characteristics yellow color. By the late 20th century, gold was used as an industrial metal because of its unique physicochemical properties. The U.S. has several productive deposits of gold, including placer, gold-quartz lode, epithermal and Carlin-type gold deposits.

  10. Nanoscale Confinement of All-Optical Magnetic Switching in TbFeCo--Competition with Nanoscale Heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tian-Min; Wang, Tianhan; Reid, Alexander H; Savoini, Matteo; Wu, Xiaofei; Koene, Benny; Granitzka, Patrick; Graves, Catherine E; Higley, Daniel J; Chen, Zhao; Razinskas, Gary; Hantschmann, Markus; Scherz, Andreas; Stöhr, Joachim; Tsukamoto, Arata; Hecht, Bert; Kimel, Alexey V; Kirilyuk, Andrei; Rasing, Theo; Dürr, Hermann A

    2015-10-14

    Single femtosecond optical laser pulses, of sufficient intensity, are demonstrated to reverse magnetization in a process known as all-optical switching. Gold two-wire antennas are placed on the all-optical switching film TbFeCo. These structures are resonant with the optical field, and they create a field enhancement in the near-field which confines the area where optical switching can occur. The magnetic switching that occurs around and below the antenna is imaged using resonant X-ray holography and magnetic circular dichroism. The results not only show the feasibility of controllable switching with antenna assistance but also demonstrate the highly inhomogeneous nature of the switching process, which is attributed to the process depending on the material's heterogeneity. PMID:26312732

  11. Incidence of and Risk Factors for Tuberculosis (TB) in Gastric Cancer Patients in an Area Endemic for TB

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Wen-Liang; Hung, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Chen, Ming-Huang; Lo, Su-Shun; Shyr, Yi-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Chao, Yee

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To date, there have been few reports investigating the relationship between tuberculosis (TB) and gastric cancer. We conducted a nationwide population-based matched cohort study using data retrieved from Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database to determine the incidence of and risk factors for TB in patients diagnosed with gastric cancer. From 2000 to 2011, we identified 36,972 gastric cancer patients and normal subjects from the general population matched for age, sex, and comorbidities at a 1:1 ratio. The data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. Compared with the matched cohort, gastric cancer patients exhibited a higher risk for TB (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.25, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.65–3.05, P < 0.001), and those with TB exhibited higher mortality (adjusted HR 1.59, 95% CI 1.41–1.79, P < 0.001). Old age (adjusted HR 2.40, 95% CI 1.92–2.99, P < 0.001), male sex (adjusted HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.76–2.57, P < 0.001), diabetes mellitus (adjusted HR 1.28, 95% CI 1.05–1.56, P = 0.013), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (adjusted HR 1.44, 95% CI 1.19–1.75, P < 0.001) were identified as independent risk factors for TB in gastric cancer patients. Dyslipidemia was an independent protective factor for both TB (adjusted HR 2.13, 95% CI 1.73–2.62, P < 0.001) and mortality (adjusted HR 1.11, 95% CI 1.08–1.15, P < 0.001) in gastric cancer patients. Old age, male sex, diabetes mellitus, and COPD were independent risk factors for TB in gastric cancer. High-risk gastric cancer patients, especially those in TB-endemic areas, should be regularly screened for TB. PMID:26632751

  12. When cyclopropenes meet gold catalysts

    PubMed Central

    Miege, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    Summary Cyclopropenes as substrates entered the field of gold catalysis in 2008 and have proven to be valuable partners in a variety of gold-catalyzed reactions. The different contributions in this growing research area are summarized in this review. PMID:21804867

  13. The Gold at Fort Knox.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, William C.

    1994-01-01

    Maintains that, although U.S. currency today is pure fiat money and not backed by gold or any other precious metal, students frequently ask, "But what about the gold at Fort Knox?" Describes what is really located at Fort Knox, why it is there, its implications for public policy. (CFR)

  14. Antibody-gold cluster conjugates

    DOEpatents

    Hainfeld, J.F.

    1988-06-28

    Antibody- or antibody fragment-gold cluster conjugates are shown wherein the conjugate size can be about 5.0 nm. Methods and reagents are disclosed in which antibodies or Fab' fragments thereof are covalently bound to a stable cluster of gold atoms. 2 figs.

  15. Gold-promoted styrene polymerization.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Juan; Hormigo, A Jesús; de Frémont, Pierre; Nolan, Steven P; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Pérez, Pedro J

    2008-02-14

    Styrene can be polymerized at room temperature in the presence of equimolar mixtures of the gold(III) complexes (NHC)AuBr3 (NHC = N-heterocyclic carbene ligand) and NaBAr'4, in the first example of a gold-induced olefin polymerization reaction.

  16. Magnetic phase diagram of Tb{sub 3}Co

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, N.V.; Markin, P.E.; Nakotte, H.; Lacerda, A.

    1997-08-01

    The orthorhombic Tb{sub 3}Co compound exhibits both ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic behavior below the critical temperature T{sub t} = 72 K as evidenced by metamagnetic transitions along the a- and b-axes and ferromagnetic magnetization process along the c-axis. In the temperature interval between T{sub t} and the Neel temperature T{sub N} = 82 field-induced transitions along all three axes are observed. This behavior results from the complex noncomplanar magnetic structure of Tb{sub 3}Co. The metamagnetic transitions are accompanied by a significant magnetoresistance effect. The Tb{sub 3}Co single crystal has permanent magnet properties along the c-axis with the highest energy up to 140 Mg Oe at T < 4.2 K.

  17. Effects of Tb3+ concentration on the La2Sr3(BO3)4: X% Tb3+ polycrystalline nanophosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlotswa, D. V.; Madihlaba, R. M.; Koao, L. F.; Onani, M. O.; Dejene, F. B.

    2016-01-01

    A new green phosphor, La2Sr3(BO3)4): x% Tb3+ was fabricated by solution-combustion method using urea as a fuel and ammonium nitrate as an oxidizer. The phosphor was characterised using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL. The results exhibit that La2Sr3(BO3)4): x% Tb3+ phosphor has the strongest excitation at 209 nm with a full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of 20 nm, and can emit bright green light at 545 nm under 209 nm excitation. The optimum concentration for Tb3+ in La2Sr3(BO3)4): x% Tb3+ is 0.033 mol%. The prominent green luminescence was due to the 5D4-7F5 transition of Tb3+ ion. Herein, the green phosphors are promising good candidates employed in tri-color lamps.

  18. The Ru complex and hollow gold nanoparticles branched-hydrogel as signal probe for construction of electrochemiluminescent aptasensor.

    PubMed

    Gui, Guo-Feng; Zhuo, Ying; Chai, Ya-Qin; Xiang, Yun; Yuan, Ruo

    2016-03-15

    In this work, a novel Ru complex and hollow gold nanoparticles branched-poly(N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide) hydrogel composites (pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs) were prepared and used as electrogenerated chemiluminescence (ECL) signal probe to construct aptasensor for ultrasensitive detection of thrombin (TB). Herein, [Ru(phen)2(cpaphen)](2+) linked N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide and hollow gold nanoparticles functionalized N-(3-aminopropyl)methacrylamide were used as two polymer monomers to prepare pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs composites via free-radical polymerization. The obtained hydrogel composite, containing amount of Ru complex and HGNPs, were used as effective tag-carriers for the immobilization of thrombin binding aptamer II (TBA II) to form the pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs labeled TBA II (pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs-TBA II). For building the interface of the aptasensor, dendritic gold nanoparticles reduced by poly(ethyleneimine) (PEI@DGNPs) were modified on the carbon nanotube-nafion (CNTs-Nf) coated electrode through electrostatic adsorption, which was used not only as matrix for immobilization of thrombin binding aptamer I (TBA I) but also as enhancer to amplify the ECL signal because PEI is an efficient co-reactant of Ru complex. Target TB was sandwiched between pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs-TBA II and TBA I, resulting in the ECL signals relevant to the TB concentrations. Combining the novel pNAMA-Ru-HGNPs containing amount of Ru complex as the ECL signal probe and PEI@DGNPs as the enhancer for signal amplification, the sandwich ECL aptasensor was constructed for the detection of TB with a wide range of 1.0 fM to 10 pM and a low detection of 0.54 fM. PMID:26385731

  19. The adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykman, Lev A.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Staroverov, Sergey A.; Pristensky, Dmitry V.; Shchyogolev, Sergey Yu.; Khlebtsov, Nikolai G.

    2006-06-01

    A new variant of a technique for in vivo production of antibodies to various antigens with colloidal-gold nanoparticles as carrier is discussed. With this technique we obtained highly specific and relatively high-titre antibodies to different antigens. The antibodies were tested by an immunodot assay with gold nanoparticle markers. Our results provide the first demonstration that immunization of animals with colloidal gold complexed with either haptens or complete antigens gives rise to highly specific antibodies even without the use of complete Freund's adjuvant. These findings may attest to the adjuvanticity of gold nanoparticles itself. We provide also experimental results and discussion aimed at elucidation of possible mechanisms of the discovered colloidal-gold-adjuvanticity effect.

  20. Gold electrodes from recordable CDs

    PubMed

    Angnes; Richter; Augelli; Kume

    2000-11-01

    Gold electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry and electroanalytical chemistry. The notable performance when used in stripping analysis of many ionic species and the extraordinary affinity of thio compounds for its surface make these electrodes very suitable for many applications. This paper reports a simple and novel way to construct gold electrodes (CDtrodes) using recordable CDs as the gold source. The nanometer thickness of the gold layer of recordable disks (50-100 nm) favors the construction of band nanoelectrodes with areas as small as 10(-6) cm2. The plane surface can be easily used for the construction of conventional-sized gold electrodes for batch or flow injection analysis or even to obtain electrodes as large as 100 cm2. The low price of commercial recordable CDs allows a "one way use". The evaluation and applicability of these electrodes in the form of nanoelectrodes, in batch and associated with flow cells, are illustrated in this paper.

  1. Advocacy, partnership and political commitment for TB vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Ole F; Chan, Sharon; Chappell, Janice; Guo, Yan; Leite, Luciana C C

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Advancing the Pipeline: A Vision for the Next Decade, Engaging the BRICS: Basic Research to Manufacturing, and Regulatory and Access Issues for New TB Vaccines. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30]. PMID:27402313

  2. Advocacy, partnership and political commitment for TB vaccine research.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Ole F; Chan, Sharon; Chappell, Janice; Guo, Yan; Leite, Luciana C C

    2016-08-01

    The 4th Global Forum on TB Vaccines, convened in Shanghai, China, from 21 - 24 April 2015, brought together a wide and diverse community involved in tuberculosis vaccine research and development to discuss the current status of, and future directions for this critical effort. This paper summarizes the sessions on Advancing the Pipeline: A Vision for the Next Decade, Engaging the BRICS: Basic Research to Manufacturing, and Regulatory and Access Issues for New TB Vaccines. Summaries of all sessions from the 4th Global Forum are compiled in a special supplement of Tuberculosis. [August 2016, Vol 99, Supp S1, S1-S30].

  3. Reaching out to take on TB in Somalia.

    PubMed

    Moore, David A J; Granat, Simo M

    2014-01-01

    Among the many challenges facing populations disrupted by complex emergencies, personal security and food security rank much higher than access to healthcare. However, over time health needs assume increasing importance. Many complex crises occur in settings where the background incidence of TB is already high; social and economic conditions in crises are then highly conducive to amplification of the existing TB problem. Innovative approaches to delivery of diagnostic and treatment services, transition planning and integration with other healthcare providers and services are vital. In the extremely challenging environment of Somalia, multiple partners are making headway though collaboration and innovation.

  4. Optical properties of gold-silica-gold multilayer nanoshells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Ying; Fleming, Ryan C; Drezek, Rebekah A

    2008-11-24

    The spectral and angular radiation properties of gold-silica-gold multilayer nanoshells are investigated using Mie theory for concentric multilayer spheres. The spectral tunability of multilayer nanoshells is explained and characterized by a plasmon hybridization model and a universal scaling principle. A thinner intermediate silica layer, scaled by particle size, red shifts the plasmon resonance. This shift is relatively insensitive to the overall particle size and follows the universal scaling principle with respect to the resonant wavelength of a conventional silica-gold core-shell nanoshell. The extra tunability provided by the inner core further shifts the extinction peak to longer wavelengths, which is difficult to achieve on conventional sub-100 nm nanoshells due to limitations in synthesizing ultrathin gold coatings. We found multilayer nanoshells to be more absorbing with a larger gold core, a thinner silica layer, and a thinner outer gold shell. Both scattering intensity and angular radiation pattern were found to differ from conventional nanoshells due to spectral modulation from the inner core. Multilayer nanoshells may provide more backscattering at wavelengths where silica-gold core-shell nanoshells predominantly forward scatter. PMID:19030045

  5. Exploring anti-TB leads from natural products library originated from marine microbes and medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueting; Chen, Caixia; He, Wenni; Huang, Pei; Liu, Miaomiao; Wang, Qian; Guo, Hui; Bolla, Krishna; Lu, Yan; Song, Fuhang; Dai, Huanqin; Liu, Mei; Zhang, Lixin

    2012-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) and TB-HIV co-infection have become a great threat to global health. However, the last truly novel drug that was approved for the treatment of TB was discovered 40 years ago. The search for new effective drugs against TB has never been more intensive. Natural products derived from microbes and medicinal plants have been an important source of TB therapeutics. Recent advances have been made to accelerate the discovery rate of novel TB drugs including diversifying strategies for environmental strains, high-throughput screening (HTS) assays, and chemical diversity. This review will discuss the challenges of finding novel natural products with anti-TB activity from marine microbes and plant medicines, including biodiversity- and taxonomy-guided microbial natural products library construction, target- and cell-based HTS, and bioassay-directed isolation of anti-TB substances from traditional medicines.

  6. Gold-catalyzed homogeneous oxidative cross-coupling reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guozhu; Peng, Yu; Cui, Li; Zhang, Liming

    2009-01-01

    Oxidizing gold? A gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycle is essential for the first oxidative cross-coupling reaction in gold catalysis. By using Selectfluor for gold(I) oxidation, this chemistry reveals the synthetic potential of incorporating gold(I)/gold(III) catalytic cycles into contemporary gold chemistry and promises a new area of gold research by merging powerful gold catalysis and oxidative metal-catalyzed cross-coupling reactions.

  7. Tuning of magnetic ordering by Y substitution onto Tb site in the nanocrystalline TbMnO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Keka R. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Mukadam, M. D.; Yusuf, S. M. E-mail: smyusuf@barc.gov.in; Shukla, Rakesh; Tyagi, A. K.; Kaushik, S. D.; Siruguri, V.

    2015-10-28

    We report the magnetic properties, of nano-crystalline powders Tb{sub 1−x}Y{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (x = 0, 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4), as perceived by neutron diffraction, and elucidate the effect of Tb site substitution on the magnetic structure of TbMnO{sub 3}. All samples crystallized in the orthorhombic structure conforming to space group Pnma, and exhibited an incommensurate collinear antiferromagnetic ordering of the Mn ions below ∼40 K. Furthermore, at T ≤ 20 K, all these samples showed a change in magnetic structure (of Mn moments) to a spiral ordering down to 2 K, the lowest measured temperature. For the samples with x = 0, 0.1, and 0.2, a short-ranged two dimensional (2D) ordering of Tb moments was also observed at 2 K. However, for the other samples (x = 0.3 and 0.4), no magnetic ordering of Tb moments was found down to 2 K. So with Y substitution, a crossover from 2D ordering to a disordering of Tb moments was observed. The moments at the Mn site were found to be lower than the full Mn{sup 3+} (4μ{sub B}) moment for all the samples below 40 K. The magnetic properties of all the samples studied by us in nano form are more pronounced than those of the reported single crystals of same compositions [V. Yu. Ivanov et al., JETP Lett. 91, 392–397 (2010)].

  8. “I Can Also Serve as an Inspiration”: A Qualitative Study of the TB&Me Blogging Experience and Its Role in MDR-TB Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Horter, Shona; Stringer, Beverley; Venis, Sarah; du Cros, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2011, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) established a blogging project, “TB&Me,” to enable patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) to share their experiences. By September 2012, 13 MDR-TB patients had blogged, either directly or with assistance, from the UK, Australia, Philippines, Swaziland, Central African Republic, Uganda, South Africa, India, and Armenia. Due to the lack of research on the potential for social media to support MDR-TB treatment and the innovative nature of the blog, we decided to conduct a qualitative study to examine patient and staff experiences. Our aim was to identify potential risks and benefits associated with blogging to enable us to determine whether social media had a role to play in supporting patients with MDR-TB. Methods and Findings Participants were identified and selected purposively. TB&Me bloggers, project staff, MSF headquarters staff involved with TB and WHO European Region TB policy advisors were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Twenty interviews were conducted (five with bloggers). Data analysis drew upon principles of grounded theory, with constant comparison of data, cases and categories, and attention to deviant cases. We found that the TB&Me blog was associated with identified health benefits, with no reported instances of harm. There were three main findings: blogging was reported as useful for adherence to DR-TB treatment and supportive of the treatment-taking process by all bloggers and project staff; blogging provided support to patients (peer support, shared experience and reduction in isolation); and the blog was perceived as giving patients strength and voice. Conclusion The TB&Me blog was seen to be associated with positive identified health and emotional benefits. Component 5 of the Stop TB Global Plan highlights the importance of empowering TB patients and communities. Blogging could be a useful tool to help achieve that ambition. PMID:25251404

  9. Direct two-photon excitation of Sm3+, Eu3+, Tb3+, Tb.DOTA-, and Tb.propargylDO3A in solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Thomas Just; Blackburn, Octavia A.; Tropiano, Manuel; Faulkner, Stephen

    2012-07-01

    We have observed direct two-photon excitation of samarium, europium and terbium ions in solution upon near IR excitation using a tuneable pulsed light source, and have also studied two-photon processes in a pair of related terbium complexes, namely [Tb.DOTA]- and Tb.propargylDO3A. Direct two-photon excitation of lanthanides is observed in simple systems in the absence of sensitizing chromophores. Where even simple chromophores such as a triple bond are present in the complex, then single and two-photon excitation of chromophore excited states competes with direct two-photon excitation of the ions and is the dominant pathway for sensitizing formation of the lanthanide excited state.

  10. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions. PMID:27108675

  11. Synthesis of gold structures by gold-binding peptide governed by concentration of gold ion and peptide.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jungok; Kim, Dong-Hun; Lee, Sylvia J; Rheem, Youngwoo; Myung, Nosang V; Hur, Hor-Gil

    2016-08-01

    Although biological synthesis methods for the production of gold structures by microorganisms, plant extracts, proteins, and peptide have recently been introduced, there have been few reports pertaining to controlling their size and morphology. The gold ion and peptide concentrations affected on the size and uniformity of gold plates by a gold-binding peptide Midas-11. The higher concentration of gold ions produced a larger size of gold structures reached 125.5 μm, but an increased amount of Midas-11 produced a smaller size of gold platelets and increased the yield percentage of polygonal gold particles rather than platelets. The mechanisms governing factors controlling the production of gold structures were primarily related to nucleation and growth. These results indicate that the synthesis of gold architectures can be controlled by newly isolated and substituted peptides under different reaction conditions.

  12. 46 CFR 35.40-6 - Emergency lights-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency lights-TB/ALL. 35.40-6 Section 35.40-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-6 Emergency lights—TB/ALL. Emergency lights must be marked in accordance...

  13. 46 CFR 35.40-6 - Emergency lights-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency lights-TB/ALL. 35.40-6 Section 35.40-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-6 Emergency lights—TB/ALL. Emergency lights must be marked in accordance...

  14. 46 CFR 35.40-30 - Instructions for changing steering gear-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Instructions for changing steering gear-TB/ALL. 35.40-30... Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-30 Instructions for changing steering gear—TB/ALL. Instructions in at... different steps to be taken in changing to the emergency steering gear. Each clutch, gear wheel,...

  15. 46 CFR 35.40-30 - Instructions for changing steering gear-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Instructions for changing steering gear-TB/ALL. 35.40-30... Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-30 Instructions for changing steering gear—TB/ALL. Instructions in at... different steps to be taken in changing to the emergency steering gear. Each clutch, gear wheel,...

  16. 46 CFR 35.40-20 - Emergency equipment-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency equipment-TB/ALL. 35.40-20 Section 35.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-20 Emergency equipment—TB/ALL. Each locker and space where emergency equipment...

  17. 46 CFR 35.40-20 - Emergency equipment-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency equipment-TB/ALL. 35.40-20 Section 35.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-20 Emergency equipment—TB/ALL. Each locker and space where emergency equipment...

  18. 46 CFR 35.40-35 - Rudder orders-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Rudder orders-TB/ALL. 35.40-35 Section 35.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-35 Rudder orders—TB/ALL. At all steering stations, there shall be installed a...

  19. 46 CFR 35.40-25 - Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL. 35.40-25 Section 35.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-25 Fire extinguishers—TB/ALL. Each fire extinguisher shall be marked with a...

  20. 46 CFR 35.40-20 - Emergency equipment-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency equipment-TB/ALL. 35.40-20 Section 35.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-20 Emergency equipment—TB/ALL. Each locker and space where emergency equipment...

  1. 46 CFR 35.40-20 - Emergency equipment-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency equipment-TB/ALL. 35.40-20 Section 35.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-20 Emergency equipment—TB/ALL. Each locker and space where emergency equipment...

  2. 46 CFR 35.40-25 - Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL. 35.40-25 Section 35.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-25 Fire extinguishers—TB/ALL. Each fire extinguisher shall be marked with a...

  3. 46 CFR 35.40-25 - Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL. 35.40-25 Section 35.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-25 Fire extinguishers—TB/ALL. Each fire extinguisher shall be marked with a...

  4. 46 CFR 35.40-25 - Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL. 35.40-25 Section 35.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-25 Fire extinguishers—TB/ALL. Each fire extinguisher shall be marked with a...

  5. 46 CFR 35.40-35 - Rudder orders-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Rudder orders-TB/ALL. 35.40-35 Section 35.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-35 Rudder orders—TB/ALL. At all steering stations, there shall be installed a...

  6. Addressing diabetes mellitus as part of the strategy for ending TB

    PubMed Central

    Harries, Anthony D.; Kumar, Ajay M.V.; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Lin, Yan; Zachariah, Rony; Lönnroth, Knut; Kapur, Anil

    2016-01-01

    As we enter the new era of Sustainable Development Goals, the international community has committed to ending the TB epidemic by 2030 through implementation of an ambitious strategy to reduce TB-incidence and TB-related mortality and avoiding catastrophic costs for TB-affected families. Diabetes mellitus (DM) triples the risk of TB and increases the probability of adverse TB treatment outcomes such as failure, death and recurrent TB. The rapidly escalating global epidemic of DM means that DM needs to be addressed if TB-related milestones and targets are to be achieved. WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease's Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis and Diabetes, launched in 2011, provides a template to guide policy makers and implementers to combat the epidemics of both diseases. However, more evidence is required to answer important questions about bi-directional screening, optimal ways of delivering treatment, integration of DM and TB services, and infection control. This should in turn contribute to better and earlier TB case detection, and improved TB treatment outcomes and prevention. DM and TB collaborative care can also help guide the development of a more effective and integrated public health approach for managing non-communicable diseases. PMID:26884497

  7. 46 CFR 35.40-6 - Emergency lights-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Emergency lights-TB/ALL. 35.40-6 Section 35.40-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-6 Emergency lights—TB/ALL. Emergency lights must be marked in accordance...

  8. 46 CFR 35.40-6 - Emergency lights-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Emergency lights-TB/ALL. 35.40-6 Section 35.40-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-6 Emergency lights—TB/ALL. Emergency lights must be marked in accordance...

  9. 46 CFR 35.40-6 - Emergency lights-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Emergency lights-TB/ALL. 35.40-6 Section 35.40-6 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL § 35.40-6 Emergency lights—TB/ALL. Emergency lights must be marked in accordance...

  10. Risk Factors for Primary Pulmonary TB in Almaty Region, Kazakhstan: A Matched Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    ZHUSSUPOV, Baurzhan; HERMOSILLA, Sabrina; TERLIKBAYEVA, Assel; AIFAH, Angela; MA, Xin; ZHUMADILOV, Zhaxybay; ABILDAYEV, Tleukhan; DARISHEVA, Meruyert; BERIKKHANOVA, Kulzhan

    2016-01-01

    Background: This study examined the association between incident pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) and social and behavioral characteristics in Almaty Oblast, Kazakhstan from 2012 to 2013. Methods: We used a matched case-control design to estimate the role of factors for acquiring pulmonary TB. Totally 324 individuals were recruited from Sep 2012 to Mar 2013. Participants included 110 TB index cases with newly detected pulmonary TB. Each case was matched with one household and one community control. A total of 107 household and 107 community controls were included to the study. Adjusted odds ratios measuring associations between TB and risk factors were calculated by using a conditional multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: TB cases were more likely to be younger, recent smokers and have diabetes, when compared to household controls. Between TB cases and community controls, TB was significantly associated with age, non-married family status, living in a rented home, recent smoker, and having diabetes. Comparing TB cases with community controls, we found that foreign birth was marginally associated with incident TB case status. Conclusion: Our findings confirm the role of modifiable risk factors for TB in Kazakhstan; highlighting the importance of developing interventions addressing social determinants and proximate risk factors for high TB burden regions. PMID:27252913

  11. Addressing diabetes mellitus as part of the strategy for ending TB.

    PubMed

    Harries, Anthony D; Kumar, Ajay M V; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Lin, Yan; Zachariah, Rony; Lönnroth, Knut; Kapur, Anil

    2016-03-01

    As we enter the new era of Sustainable Development Goals, the international community has committed to ending the TB epidemic by 2030 through implementation of an ambitious strategy to reduce TB-incidence and TB-related mortality and avoiding catastrophic costs for TB-affected families. Diabetes mellitus (DM) triples the risk of TB and increases the probability of adverse TB treatment outcomes such as failure, death and recurrent TB. The rapidly escalating global epidemic of DM means that DM needs to be addressed if TB-related milestones and targets are to be achieved. WHO and the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease's Collaborative Framework for Care and Control of Tuberculosis and Diabetes, launched in 2011, provides a template to guide policy makers and implementers to combat the epidemics of both diseases. However, more evidence is required to answer important questions about bi-directional screening, optimal ways of delivering treatment, integration of DM and TB services, and infection control. This should in turn contribute to better and earlier TB case detection, and improved TB treatment outcomes and prevention. DM and TB collaborative care can also help guide the development of a more effective and integrated public health approach for managing non-communicable diseases.

  12. 46 CFR 35.40-35 - Rudder orders-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Rudder orders-TB/ALL. 35.40-35 Section 35.40-35 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-35 Rudder orders—TB/ALL. At all steering stations, there shall be installed a...

  13. 46 CFR 35.40-25 - Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Fire extinguishers-TB/ALL. 35.40-25 Section 35.40-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-25 Fire extinguishers—TB/ALL. Each fire extinguisher shall be marked with a...

  14. 46 CFR 35.40-20 - Emergency equipment-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency equipment-TB/ALL. 35.40-20 Section 35.40-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Posting and Marking Requirements-TB/ALL. § 35.40-20 Emergency equipment—TB/ALL. Each locker and space where emergency equipment...

  15. Anomalous Hall effect studies on Tb-Fe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekhar, P.; Deepak Kumar, K.; Markandeyulu, G.

    2016-08-01

    Tbx Fe100-x (with x=11, 25, 31 and 44) thin films were prepared with the substrates kept at a temperature of 300 °C and the Hall resistivities and electrical resistivities were investigated in the temperature range 25-300 K. The sign of Hall resistivity is found to change from positive for x=31 to negative for x=44 film at temperatures 25 K and 300 K, reflecting the compensation of Tb and Fe magnetic moments between these two compositions. Perpendicular magnetic anisotropy was observed in the films of x=25 and 31 at 25 K as well as at 300 K. The Hall resistivity is seen to increase for the films of x=11 and 31 with increasing temperature, while it decreases for the films of x=25 and 44 with increasing temperature. The temperature coefficients of electrical resistivities of these films are seen to be positive. The presence of perpendicular magnetic anisotropy (refers to magnetic anisotropy, in this paper) in the temperature range 25-300 K in Tb25Fe75 and Tb31Fe69 and their metallic nature are indicators that the Tb-Fe films deposited at higher temperatures are more suitable for magneto optic data storage applications than their amorphous counterparts, due to the stability of the former.

  16. Neutron Studies of Tb2Mo2O7

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, Jason; Ehlers, Georg; Diallo, Souleymane Omar

    2012-01-01

    We have used the new high energy resolution spectrometer (BaSiS), at the Spallation Neutron Source in Oak Ridge, to conclusively prove the existence of a low energy mode at 0.34(1) meV in the spin glass Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}. This mode is reminiscent of the excitation observed in the ordered phases of both Tb{sub 2}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 7} and Tb{sub 2}Sn{sub 2}O{sub 7}. The dynamical nature of the transition seen in the magnetization at {approx} 25 K suggests that this frustrated magnet shows a dynamic crossover between a high-temperature phase of poorly correlated, quickly relaxing spins to a low-temperature regime with much slower, short ranged spin correlations extending no further than to the next nearest neighbor. Existing theories explain the spin glass transition in terms of a phase transition and order parameters, and assume the existence of a distinct spin glass phase. There is no evidence for such a phase in Tb{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 7}.

  17. Can IMA-RNTCP stop TB by 2050?

    PubMed

    Sisodia, R S; Jain, D K; Agarwal, S S; Gupta, Avdhesh

    2011-10-01

    Tuberculosis has been with mankind since time immemorial. No other disease has so much sociological, economic and health significance as tuberculosis. In the poorly functioning tuberculosis control programme, the ratio of incidence to prevalence may be as high as 1: 3.5. Experience and observations from both developed and developing countries have demonstrated that if case detection and cure rates in smear positive cases are consistently achieved to 70 % and 85 % respectively, the incidence would decline to 5% annually while prevalence decline very rapidly, being reduced to less than half of its previous level within three years. Since RNTCP India is based on scientific principles of DOTS strategy, its effective clinical and public health management, committed and co-ordinated efforts of public and private partners (IMA) would certainly lead to decline the prevalence (already declined from 586/1,00,000 in 1990 to 185/1,00,000 population in 2008 - 68 % reduction), mortality rate from 42/ 1,00,000 in 1990 to 21/1,00,000 in 2015 (already reduced to 24/1,00,000 in 2008 - 43 % reduction) as target set under indicator 23 of TB-related Millennium Development Goal. This kind of impact would result in halting and reversing TB Incidence to pave way for future effective control of TB, which may not remain a public health problem by 2050. Thus, TB control is a winnable battle. PMID:22482323

  18. Predicting Efficient Antenna Ligands for Tb(III) Emission

    SciTech Connect

    Samuel, Amanda P.S.; Xu, Jide; Raymond, Kenneth

    2008-10-06

    A series of highly luminescent Tb(III) complexes of para-substituted 2-hydroxyisophthalamide ligands (5LI-IAM-X) has been prepared (X = H, CH{sub 3}, (C=O)NHCH{sub 3}, SO{sub 3}{sup -}, NO{sub 2}, OCH{sub 3}, F, Cl, Br) to probe the effect of substituting the isophthalamide ring on ligand and Tb(III) emission in order to establish a method for predicting the effects of chromophore modification on Tb(III) luminescence. The energies of the ligand singlet and triplet excited states are found to increase linearly with the {pi}-withdrawing ability of the substituent. The experimental results are supported by time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations performed on model systems, which predict ligand singlet and triplet energies within {approx}5% of the experimental values. The quantum yield ({Phi}) values of the Tb(III) complex increases with the triplet energy of the ligand, which is in part due to the decreased non-radiative deactivation caused by thermal repopulation of the triplet. Together, the experimental and theoretical results serve as a predictive tool that can be used to guide the synthesis of ligands used to sensitize lanthanide luminescence.

  19. Research Advances: New Weapon in War on TB

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Angela G.

    2005-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which usually attacks the lung and is spread through the air from one person to another. Researchers from Johnson & Johnson Pharmaceutical Research and Development, the Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control and The Pitie-Salpetriere School of Medicine began their…

  20. Can IMA-RNTCP stop TB by 2050?

    PubMed

    Sisodia, R S; Jain, D K; Agarwal, S S; Gupta, Avdhesh

    2011-10-01

    Tuberculosis has been with mankind since time immemorial. No other disease has so much sociological, economic and health significance as tuberculosis. In the poorly functioning tuberculosis control programme, the ratio of incidence to prevalence may be as high as 1: 3.5. Experience and observations from both developed and developing countries have demonstrated that if case detection and cure rates in smear positive cases are consistently achieved to 70 % and 85 % respectively, the incidence would decline to 5% annually while prevalence decline very rapidly, being reduced to less than half of its previous level within three years. Since RNTCP India is based on scientific principles of DOTS strategy, its effective clinical and public health management, committed and co-ordinated efforts of public and private partners (IMA) would certainly lead to decline the prevalence (already declined from 586/1,00,000 in 1990 to 185/1,00,000 population in 2008 - 68 % reduction), mortality rate from 42/ 1,00,000 in 1990 to 21/1,00,000 in 2015 (already reduced to 24/1,00,000 in 2008 - 43 % reduction) as target set under indicator 23 of TB-related Millennium Development Goal. This kind of impact would result in halting and reversing TB Incidence to pave way for future effective control of TB, which may not remain a public health problem by 2050. Thus, TB control is a winnable battle.

  1. 46 CFR 31.20-1 - Waters-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... other than the Great Lakes; rivers; or inland waters tributary to the Gulf of Mexico. ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Waters Operated Over § 31.20-1 Waters—TB/ALL. The certificate of inspection shall show the waters over which the tank...

  2. 46 CFR 30.10-11 - Coastwise-TB/C.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS GENERAL PROVISIONS Definitions § 30.10-11 Coastwise—TB/C. Under this designation shall be included all tank vessels normally navigating the waters of any ocean or the Gulf of Mexico 20 nautical miles or less offshore....

  3. SMOS ocean salinity performance and TB bias correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meirold-Mautner, I.; Mugerin, C.; Vergely, J.-L.; Spurgeon, P.; Rouffi, F.; Meskini, N.

    2009-04-01

    In the framework of the SMOS ocean salinity mission, a validation study has been carried out to determine the performance at Level 1 (brightness temperatures, TB) and Level 2 (sea surface salinity, SSS) products that can be expected. For this purpose a processing chain has been developed which includes the instrument simulator SEPS-GS to generate Level 0 products as well as the Level 1 and 2 prototype processors: based on geophysical input data, Level 0, 1 and 2 products are simulated and compared to the so-called perfect instrument, i.e. TB's directly obtained from forward models without passing through the Level 1 processor and thus avoiding image reconstruction. Comparisons that have been carried out at Level 1 and Level 2 products reveal systematic TB biases which in turn cause a significant bias in retrieved SSS. Depending on the position in the SMOS field of view we obtain TB biases up to 4K which translate into SSS biases near the centre of the track of up to 3 psu. Such values are too high in order to attain the required 0.1 psu (at Level 3) precision. Consequently, a characterisation of this bias as well as correction methods have been investigated. Our results show that the bias is stationary for constant scenes but varies as soon as inhomogeneous (realistic) scenes are observed. Possible techniques to reduce this bias are presented along with their consequences on the SSS retrieval.

  4. Bovine TB and the 'singleton protocol': reward without risk

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ‘Singleton Protocol” was initiated in 1996 by the Irish Department of Agriculture Fisheries and Food to address the shortfall in specificity of the single intradermal comparative cervical test (SICCT) for bTB. Findings from Murray et al., demonstrate that singleton candidates (i.e., from low ris...

  5. 46 CFR 35.03-10 - Use-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... vests shall not be accepted in lieu of any portion of the required number of approved life preservers... GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS OPERATIONS Work Vests § 35.03-10 Use—TB/ALL. (a) Approved buoyant work vests are considered to be items of safety apparel and may be carried aboard...

  6. 20th-Century Gold Rush.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wargo, Joseph G.

    1992-01-01

    Presents Nevada's gold rush activities spurred by technological advancements in search methods. Describes the events that led to the twentieth-century gold rush, the techniques for finding deposits and the geological formation process of disseminated gold deposits. Vignettes present the gold extraction process, cross-section, and profile of a…

  7. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  8. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2014-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  9. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  10. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  11. 41 CFR 101-45.002 - Gold.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Gold. 101-45.002 Section... PERSONAL PROPERTY § 101-45.002 Gold. (a) Gold will be sold in accordance with this section and part 102-38 of the Federal Management Regulation. (b) Sales of gold shall be processed to— (1) Use the sealed...

  12. Enhancement of gold recovery using bioleaching from gold concentrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. H.; Cho, K. H.; Kim, B. J.; Choi, N. C.; Park, C. Y.

    2012-04-01

    The gold in refractory ores is encapsulated as fine particles (sometimes at a molecular level) in the crystal structure of the sulfide (typically pyrite with or without arsenopyrite) matrix. This makes it impossible to extract a significant amount of refractory gold by cyanidation since the cyanide solution cannot penetrate the pyrite/arsenopyrite crystals and dissolve gold particles, even after fine grinding. To effectively extract gold from these ores, an oxidative pretreatment is necessary to break down the sulfide matrix. The most popular methods of pretreatment include nitric acid oxidation, roasting, pressure oxidation and biological oxidation by microorganisms. This study investigated the bioleaching efficiency of Au concentrate under batch experimental conditions (adaptation cycles and chemical composition adaptation) using the indigenous acidophilic bacteria collected from gold mine leachate in Sunsin gold mine, Korea. We conducted the batch experiments at two different chemical composition (CuSO4 and ZnSO4), two different adaptation cycles 1'st (3 weeks) and 2'nd (6 weeks). The results showed that the pH in the bacteria inoculating sample decreased than initial condition and Eh increased. In the chemical composition adaptation case, the leached accumulation content of Fe and Pb was exhibited in CuSO4 adaptation bacteria sample more than in ZnSO4 adaptation bacteria samples, possibly due to pre-adaptation effect on chalcopyrite (CuFeS2) in gold concentrate. And after 21 days on the CuSO4 adaptation cycles case, content of Fe and Pb was appeared at 1'st adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 1.82 and Pb - 25.81 times per control sample) lower than at 2'nd adaptation bacteria sample(Fe - 2.87 and Pb - 62.05 times per control sample). This study indicates that adaptation chemical composition and adaptation cycles can play an important role in bioleaching of gold concentrate in eco-/economic metallurgy process.

  13. Gold-Catalyzed Synthesis of Heterocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcadi, Antonio

    2014-04-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Synthesis of Heterocycles via Gold-Catalyzed Heteroatom Addition to Unsaturated C-C Bonds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cyclization of Polyunsaturated Compounds * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds via α-Oxo Gold Carbenoid * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Cycloaddition Reactions * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Derivatives through Gold-Catalyzed Activation of Carbonyl Groups and Alcohols * Synthesis of Heterocyclic Compounds through Gold-Mediated C-H Bond Functionalization * Gold-Catalyzed Domino Cyclization/Oxidative Coupling Reactions * Conclusions * References

  14. Protein-mediated autoreduction of gold salts to gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Basu, Nivedita; Bhattacharya, Resham; Mukherjee, Priyabrata

    2008-09-01

    Here we report for the first time that proteins can function as unique reducing agents to produce gold nanoparticles from gold salts. We demonstrate that three different proteins, namely, bovine serum albumin (BSA), Rituximab (RIT--an anti-CD20 antibody) and Cetuximab (C225--anti-EGFR antibody), reduce gold salts to gold nanoparticles (GNP). Interestingly, among all the three proteins tested, only BSA can reduce gold salts to gold nanotriangles (GNT). BSA-induced formation of GNT can be controlled by carefully selecting the reaction condition. Heating or using excess of ascorbic acid (AA) as additional reducing agent shifts the reaction towards the formation of GNP with flower-like morphology, whereas slowing down the reaction either by cooling or by adding small amount of AA directs the synthesis towards GNT formation. GNT is formed only at pH 3; higher pHs (pH 7 and pH 10) did not produce any nanoparticles, suggesting the involvement of specific protein conformation in GNT formation. The nanomaterials formed by this method were characterized using UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This is an important finding that will have uses in various nanotechnological applications, particularly in the green synthesis of novel nanomaterials based on protein structure.

  15. Perspectives on the History of Bovine TB and the Role of Tuberculin in Bovine TB Eradication

    PubMed Central

    Good, Margaret; Duignan, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a significant disease of animals and humans worldwide. Bovine tuberculosis is caused by Mycobacteria with an extremely wide host range and serious, although currently probably underdiagnosed, zoonotic potential. Where bovine tuberculosis controls are effective, human zoonotic TB, due to Mycobacterium bovis or M. caprae, is uncommon and clinical cases are infrequent in cattle. Therefore, the control and ultimate eradication of bovine tuberculosis is desirable. Tuberculin tests are the primary screening tool used in bovine eradication. The choice of tuberculin test is dependent on the environment in which it is to be used. Tuberculin potency is critical to test performance, and the accurate determination of potency is therefore particularly important. The design of a control or eradication programme should take into consideration the fundamental scientific knowledge, the epidemiological profile of disease, the experience of other eradication programmes, and the presence, in the same ecosystem, of maintenance hosts, in which infection is self-sustaining and which are capable of transmitting infection. A control or eradication programme will necessarily require modification as it progresses and must be under constant review to identify the optimal desirable goals, the efficacy of policy, and constraints to progress. PMID:21547209

  16. Colloidal Synthesis of Gold Semishells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Fernández, Denis; Pérez-Juste, Jorge; Pastoriza-Santos, Isabel; Liz-Marzán, Luis M

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a novel and scalable colloid chemistry strategy to fabricate gold semishells based on the selective growth of gold on Janus silica particles (500 nm in diameter) partly functionalized with amino groups. The modulation of the geometry of the Janus silica particles allows us to tune the final morphology of the gold semishells. This method also provides a route to fabricating hollow gold semishells through etching of the silica cores with hydrofluoric acid. The optical properties were characterized by visible near-infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy and compared with simulations performed using the boundary element method (BEM). These revealed that the main optical features are located beyond the NIR region because of the large core size. PMID:24551496

  17. Gold based bulk metallic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroers, Jan; Lohwongwatana, Boonrat; Johnson, William L.; Peker, Atakan

    2005-08-01

    Gold-based bulk metallic glass alloys based on Au-Cu-Si are introduced. The alloys exhibit a gold content comparable to 18-karat gold. They show very low liquidus temperature, large supercooled liquid region, and good processibility. The maximum casting thickness exceeds 5mm in the best glassformer. Au49Ag5.5Pd2.3Cu26.9Si16.3 has a liquidus temperature of 644K, a glass transition temperature of 401K, and a supercooled liquid region of 58K. The Vickers hardness of the alloys in this system is ˜350Hv, twice that of conventional 18-karat crystalline gold alloys. This combination of properties makes the alloys attractive for many applications including electronic, medical, dental, surface coating, and jewelry.

  18. Gold, currencies and market efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav; Vosvrda, Miloslav

    2016-05-01

    Gold and currency markets form a unique pair with specific interactions and dynamics. We focus on the efficiency ranking of gold markets with respect to the currency of purchase. By utilizing the Efficiency Index (EI) based on fractal dimension, approximate entropy and long-term memory on a wide portfolio of 142 gold price series for different currencies, we construct the efficiency ranking based on the extended EI methodology we provide. Rather unexpected results are uncovered as the gold prices in major currencies lay among the least efficient ones whereas very minor currencies are among the most efficient ones. We argue that such counterintuitive results can be partly attributed to a unique period of examination (2011-2014) characteristic by quantitative easing and rather unorthodox monetary policies together with the investigated illegal collusion of major foreign exchange market participants, as well as some other factors discussed in some detail.

  19. GOLD: The Genomes Online Database

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kyrpides, Nikos; Liolios, Dinos; Chen, Amy; Tavernarakis, Nektarios; Hugenholtz, Philip; Markowitz, Victor; Bernal, Alex

    Since its inception in 1997, GOLD has continuously monitored genome sequencing projects worldwide and has provided the community with a unique centralized resource that integrates diverse information related to Archaea, Bacteria, Eukaryotic and more recently Metagenomic sequencing projects. As of September 2007, GOLD recorded 639 completed genome projects. These projects have their complete sequence deposited into the public archival sequence databases such as GenBank EMBL,and DDBJ. From the total of 639 complete and published genome projects as of 9/2007, 527 were bacterial, 47 were archaeal and 65 were eukaryotic. In addition to the complete projects, there were 2158 ongoing sequencing projects. 1328 of those were bacterial, 59 archaeal and 771 eukaryotic projects. Two types of metadata are provided by GOLD: (i) project metadata and (ii) organism/environment metadata. GOLD CARD pages for every project are available from the link of every GOLD_STAMP ID. The information in every one of these pages is organized into three tables: (a) Organism information, (b) Genome project information and (c) External links. [The Genomes On Line Database (GOLD) in 2007: Status of genomic and metagenomic projects and their associated metadata, Konstantinos Liolios, Konstantinos Mavromatis, Nektarios Tavernarakis and Nikos C. Kyrpides, Nucleic Acids Research Advance Access published online on November 2, 2007, Nucleic Acids Research, doi:10.1093/nar/gkm884]

    The basic tables in the GOLD database that can be browsed or searched include the following information:

    • Gold Stamp ID
    • Organism name
    • Domain
    • Links to information sources
    • Size and link to a map, when available
    • Chromosome number, Plas number, and GC content
    • A link for downloading the actual genome data
    • Institution that did the sequencing
    • Funding source
    • Database where information resides
    • Publication status and information

    • Photochemical synthesis of gold nanorods.

      PubMed

      Kim, Franklin; Song, Jae Hee; Yang, Peidong

      2002-12-01

      Gold nanorods have been synthesized by photochemically reducing gold ions within a micellar solution. The aspect ratio of the rods can be controlled with the addition of silver ions. This process reported here is highly promising for producing uniform nanorods, and more importantly it will be useful in resolving the growth mechanism of anisotropic metal nanoparticles due to its simplicity and the relatively slow growth rate of the nanorods. PMID:12452700

  1. Spectral characteristics and energy transfer from Ce3+ to Tb3+ in compounds Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shmurak, S. Z.; Kedrov, V. V.; Kiselev, A. P.; Fursova, T. N.; Smyt'ko, I. M.

    2016-03-01

    The structure, IR absorption spectra, morphology, and spectral characteristics of compounds Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 have been investigated. It has been shown that the Tb3+ luminescence excitation spectrum of the Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 compounds is dominated by a broad band coinciding with the excitation band of Ce3+ ions, which clearly indicates energy transfer from the Ce3+ ions to the Tb3+ ions. The spectral position of this band depends on the structural state of the sample: in the structures of calcite and vaterite, the band has maxima at ~339 and ~367 nm, respectively. By varying the ratio between the calcite and vaterite phases in the sample, it is possible to purposefully change the Tb3+ luminescence excitation spectrum, which is important for the optimization of the spectral characteristics of Lu1 - x - y Ce x Tb y BO3 when it is used in light-emitting diode sources. An estimate has been obtained for the maximum distance between Ce3+ and Tb3+ ions, which corresponds to electronic excitation energy transfer. It has been shown that the high intensity of Tb3+ luminescence in these compounds is due to the high efficiency of electronic excitation energy transfer from the Ce3+ ions to the Tb3+ ions as a result of the dipole-dipole interaction.

  2. Are we doing enough to stem the tide of acquired MDR-TB in countries with high TB burden? Results of a mixed method study in Chongqing, China.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Ehiri, John; Oren, Eyal; Hu, Daiyu; Luo, Xingneng; Liu, Ying; Li, Daikun; Wang, Qingya

    2014-01-01

    Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) represents a threat to health and development in countries with high TB burden. China's MDR-TB prevalence rate of 6.8% is the highest in the world. Interventions to remove barriers against effective TB control, and prevention of MDR-TB are urgently needed in the country. This paper reports a cross-sectional questionnaire survey of 513 pulmonary TB (PTB) patients, and qualitative interviews of 10 healthcare workers (HCWs), and 15 PTB patients. The objective was to assess barriers against effective control of PTB and prevention of MDR-TB by elucidating the perspectives of patients and healthcare providers. Results showed that more than half of the patients experienced patient delay of over 12.5 days. A similar proportion also experienced detection delay of over 30 days, and delay in initiating treatment of over 31 days. Consulting a non-TB health facility ≥3 times before seeking care at TB dispensary was a risk factor for both detection delay [AOR (95% CI): 1.89(1.07, 3.34) and delay in initiating treatment[AOR (95% CI): 1.88 (1.06, 3.36). Results revealed poor implementation of Directly Observed Therapy (DOT), whereby treatment of 34.3% patients was never monitored by HCWs. Only 31.8% patients had ever accessed TB health education before their TB diagnosis. Qualitative data consistently disclosed long patient delay, and indicated that patient's poor TB knowledge and socioeconomic barriers were primary reasons for patient delay. Seeking care and being treated at a non-TB hospital was an important reason for detection delay. Patient's long work hours and low income increased risk for treatment non-adherence. Evidence-based measures to improve TB health seeking behavior, reduce patient and detection delays, improve the quality of DOT, address financial and system barriers, and increase access to TB health promotion are urgently needed to address the burgeoning prevalence of MDR-TB in China.

  3. Comparison of the dynamic magnetomechanical properties of Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe2 and Tb0.30Dy0.70Fe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, D.; Piercy, A. R.

    1994-11-01

    Comparison is made between the magnetomechanical properties of Tb0.27Dy0.73Fe2 (27 Tb) and Tb0.30Dy0.70Fe2 (30 Tb), two commercially available composition of the giant magnetostrictive alloy Terfenol-D. The quasi-static magnetostriction (as a function of bias field) and the dynamic strain coefficient (as a function of bias field and frequency) are shown for the two composition at room temperature, using stress bias values of 0 and 9 MPa. The energy loss per cycle as a function of frequency is also given. The data for the static magnetostriction versus bias field shows 30 Tb to exhibit a significantly greater increase in initial slope and saturation strain when stress bias is applied compared to that seen for 27 Tb, which possesses superior magnetostriction at zero stress bias. A similar trend is observed in the data for the dynamic strain coefficient with 30 Tb again performing better under stress bias. The widening of the static strain hysteresis loop observed for stressed 30 Tb is seen to manifest itself in the low frequency energy loss per cycle; however 27 Tb is observed to possess the higher eddy current loss at 1 kHz. Data for the ratio d/chi, a quantity which is dependent only on magnetization processes and material constants, are shown which suggests that the application of a stress bias affects the magnetization processes, but differently for the two compositions.

  4. Changes of Tb Emission by Non-radiative Energy Transfer from Dy in Gd2O2S:Tb Phosphor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saraee, Kh. Rezaee Ebrahim; Zadeh, M. Darvish; Mostajaboddavati, M.; Kharieky, A. Aghay

    2016-10-01

    In this study, the Gd2O2S:Tb1.5Dy x=0.3,0.6,0.9 nanophosphor were synthesized by the homogenous precipitation method followed with a sulfur reaction. The fluorescence of Gd2O2S:Tb1.5,Dy nanophosphors, and the energy transfer between dysprosium (Dy) and Tb have been studied. Although, the two weak emissions of Dy were observed, the terbium (Tb) emission was increased due to energy transfer from Dy ions to Tb ions. The results illustrated that the co-activator of Dy had a significant influence on the spectral properties of the Gd2O2S:Tb1.5 nanophosphor with an optimal amount of Dy (0.3 mol%). Moreover, Gd2O2S:Tb1.5 and Gd2O2S:Tb1.5,Dy nanophosphors screens were prepared with 10 mg/cm2 coating thickness. The scintillation properties of these screens have been investigated. We found a Gd2O2S:Tb1.5,Dy0.3 scintillator can be employed in x-ray imaging applications.

  5. Gold, coal and oil.

    PubMed

    Dani, Sergio U

    2010-03-01

    Jared Diamond has hypothesized that guns, germs and steel account for the fate of human societies. Here I propose an extension of Diamond's hypothesis and put it in other terms and dimensions: gold, coal and oil account not only for the fate of human societies but also for the fate of mankind through the bodily accumulation of anthropogenic arsenic, an invisible weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change. The background is clear; arsenic species fulfill seven criteria for a weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change: (i) bioavailability to all living organisms; (ii) imperceptibility; (iii) acute toxicity; (iv) bioaccumulation and chronic toxicity; (v) adverse impact on reproductive fitness and reproductive outcomes and early-age development and growth in a wide range of microbial, plant and animal species including man; (vi) widespread geographical distribution, mobility and ecological persistence on a centennial to millennial basis and (vii) availability in necessary and sufficient amounts to exert evolutionarily meaningful effects. The proof is becoming increasingly feasible as human exploitation of gold, coal and oil deposits cause sustainable rises of arsenic concentrations in the biosphere. Paradoxically, humans are among the least arsenic-resistant organisms because humans are long-lived, encephalized and complex social metazoans. An arsenic accumulation model is presented here to describe how arsenic accumulates in the human body with increasing age and at different provisionally safe exposure levels. Arsenic accumulates in the human body even at daily exposure levels which are within the lowest possible WHO provisional tolerance limits, yielding bodily arsenic concentrations which are above WHO provisional limits. Ongoing consequences of global scale arsenic poisoning of mankind include age-specific rises in morbidity and mortality followed by adaptive changes. The potential rise of successful forms of inborn resistance to arsenic in humans

  6. Gold, coal and oil.

    PubMed

    Dani, Sergio U

    2010-03-01

    Jared Diamond has hypothesized that guns, germs and steel account for the fate of human societies. Here I propose an extension of Diamond's hypothesis and put it in other terms and dimensions: gold, coal and oil account not only for the fate of human societies but also for the fate of mankind through the bodily accumulation of anthropogenic arsenic, an invisible weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change. The background is clear; arsenic species fulfill seven criteria for a weapon of mass extinction and evolutionary change: (i) bioavailability to all living organisms; (ii) imperceptibility; (iii) acute toxicity; (iv) bioaccumulation and chronic toxicity; (v) adverse impact on reproductive fitness and reproductive outcomes and early-age development and growth in a wide range of microbial, plant and animal species including man; (vi) widespread geographical distribution, mobility and ecological persistence on a centennial to millennial basis and (vii) availability in necessary and sufficient amounts to exert evolutionarily meaningful effects. The proof is becoming increasingly feasible as human exploitation of gold, coal and oil deposits cause sustainable rises of arsenic concentrations in the biosphere. Paradoxically, humans are among the least arsenic-resistant organisms because humans are long-lived, encephalized and complex social metazoans. An arsenic accumulation model is presented here to describe how arsenic accumulates in the human body with increasing age and at different provisionally safe exposure levels. Arsenic accumulates in the human body even at daily exposure levels which are within the lowest possible WHO provisional tolerance limits, yielding bodily arsenic concentrations which are above WHO provisional limits. Ongoing consequences of global scale arsenic poisoning of mankind include age-specific rises in morbidity and mortality followed by adaptive changes. The potential rise of successful forms of inborn resistance to arsenic in humans

  7. Rifampicin Mono-Resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: A Significant Phenomenon in a High Prevalence TB-HIV Region

    PubMed Central

    Coovadia, Yacoob Mahomed; Mahomed, Sharana; Pillay, Melendhran; Werner, Lise; Mlisana, Koleka

    2013-01-01

    Setting The dual epidemics of HIV-TB including MDR-TB are major contributors to high morbidity and mortality rates in South Africa. Rifampicin (RIF) resistance is regarded as a proxy for MDR-TB. Currently available molecular assays have the advantage of rapidly detecting resistant strains of MTB, but the GeneXpert does not detect isoniazid (INH) resistance and the GenoTypeMTBDRplus(LPA) assay may underestimate resistance to INH. Increasing proportions of rifampicin mono-resistance resistance (RMR) have recently been reported from South Africa and other countries. Objective This laboratory based study was conducted at NHLS TB Laboratory, Durban, which is the reference laboratory for culture and susceptibility testing in KwaZulu-Natal. We retrospectively determined, for the period 2007 to 2009, the proportion of RMR amongst Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) isolates, that were tested for both RIF and INH, using the gold standard of culture based phenotypic drug susceptibility testing (DST). Gender and age were also analysed to identify possible risk factors for RMR. Design MTB culture positive sputum samples from 16,748 patients were analysed for susceptibility to RIF and INH during the period 2007 to 2009. RMR was defined as MTB resistant to RIF and susceptible to INH. For the purposes of this study, only the first specimen from each patient was included in the analysis. Results RMR was observed throughout the study period. The proportion of RMR varied from a low of 7.3% to a high of 10.0% [overall 8.8%]. Overall, males had a 42% increased odds of being RMR as compared to females. In comparison to the 50 plus age group, RMR was 37% more likely to occur in the 25–29 year age category. Conclusion We report higher proportions of RMR ranging from 7.3% to 10% [overall 8.8%] than previously reported in the literature. To avoid misclassification of RMR, detected by the GeneXpert, as MDR-TB, culture based phenotypic DST must be performed on a second specimen, as

  8. Phenotypic variability in childhood TB: implications for diagnostic endpoints in tuberculosis vaccine trials.

    PubMed

    Mulenga, Humphrey; Moyo, Sizulu; Workman, Lesley; Hawkridge, Tony; Verver, Suzanne; Tameris, Michele; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Hanekom, Willem; Mahomed, Hassan; Hussey, Gregory; Hatherill, Mark

    2011-06-10

    The endpoint definition for infant tuberculosis (TB) vaccine trials should match the TB disease phenotype expected in the control arm of the study population. Our aim was to analyse selected combinations of the clinical, radiological, and microbiological features of pulmonary TB among children investigated under vaccine trial conditions, in order to estimate case frequency for a range of expected TB phenotypes. Two thousand one hundred and eighty five South African children were investigated over a nine-year period (2001-2009). Evidence of TB exposure and classical symptoms were several times more common than chest radiography (CXR) compatible with TB, or positive Mycobacterium tuberculosis culture. Discordance between clinical, radiological, and microbiological features was common in individual children. Up to one third of children with compatible CXR, and up to half the children who were M. tuberculosis culture positive, were asymptomatic. The culture positive rate fell over time, although rates of TB exposure and compatible chest radiography increased. Consequently, the annual incidence of diagnostic combinations that included M. tuberculosis culture fell to <0.2%. However, in this study population (children <2 years of age), annual incidence of the TB disease phenotype that included the triad of TB exposure, symptoms, and compatible CXR, approached 1% (n=848 per 100,000). These findings allow modelling of expected TB case frequency in multi-centre infant TB vaccine trials, based upon benchmarking of diagnostic data against the key indicator variables that constitute the building blocks of a trial endpoint. PMID:21527304

  9. PEPFAR support for the scaling up of collaborative TB/HIV activities.

    PubMed

    Howard, Andrea A; Gasana, Michel; Getahun, Haileyesus; Harries, Anthony; Lawn, Stephen D; Miller, Bess; Nelson, Lisa; Sitienei, Joseph; Coggin, William L

    2012-08-15

    The US President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) has supported a comprehensive package of care in which interventions to address HIV-related tuberculosis (TB) have received increased funding and support in recent years. PEPFAR's TB/HIV programming is based on the World Health Organization's 12-point policy for collaborative TB/HIV activities, which are integrated into PEPFAR annual guidance. PEPFAR implementing partners have provided crucial support to TB/HIV collaboration, and as a result, PEPFAR-supported countries in sub-Saharan Africa have made significant gains in HIV testing and counseling of TB patients and linkages to HIV care and treatment, intensified TB case finding, and TB infection control. PEPFAR's support of TB/HIV integration has also included significant investment in health systems, including improved laboratory services and educating and enlarging the workforce. The scale-up of antiretroviral therapy along with support of programs to increase HIV counseling and testing and improve linkage and retention in HIV care may have considerable impact on TB morbidity and mortality, if used synergistically with isoniazid preventive therapy, intensified case finding, and infection control. Issues to be addressed by future programming include accelerating implementation of isoniazid preventive therapy, increasing access and ensuring appropriate use of new TB diagnostics, supporting early initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV-infected TB patients, and strengthening systems to monitor and evaluate program implementation.

  10. Towards earlier inclusion of Children in Tuberculosis (TB) drugs trials: Consensus statements from an Expert Panel

    PubMed Central

    Nachman, Sharon; Ahmed, Amina; Amanullah, Farhana; Becerra, Mercedes C; Botgros, Radu; Brigden, Grania; Browning, Renee; Gardiner, Elizabeth; Hafner, Richard; Hesseling, Anneke; How, Cleotilde; Jean-Philippe, Patrick; Lessem, Erica; Makhene, Mamodikoe; Mbelle, Nontombi; Marais, Ben; McIlleron, Helen; Mc Neeley, David F; Mendel, Carl; Murray, Stephen; Navarro, Eileen; Oramasionwu, Gloria E; Porcalla, Ariel R; Powell, Clydette; Powell, Mair; Rigaud, Mona; Rouzier, Vanessa; Samson, Pearl; Schaaf, H. Simon; Shah, Seema; Starke, Jeff; Swaminathan, Soumya; Wobudeya, Eric; Worrell, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Children represent a significant proportion of the global tuberculosis (TB) burden, and may be disproportionately more affected by its most severe clinical manifestations. Currently available treatments for pediatric drug-susceptible (DS) and drug-resistant (DR) TB, albeit generally effective, are hampered by high pill burden, long duration of treatment, coexistent toxicities, and an overall lack of suitable, child-friendly formulations. The complex and burdensome nature of administering the existing regimens to treat DS TB also contributes to the rise of DR TB strains. Despite the availability and use of these therapies for decades, a dearth of dosing evidence in children underscores the importance of sustained efforts for TB drug development to better meet the treatment needs of children with TB. Several new TB drugs and regimens with promising activity against both DS and DR TB strains have recently entered clinical development and are in various phases of clinical evaluation in adults or have received marketing authorization for adults. However, initiation of clinical trials to evaluate these drugs in children is often deferred, pending the availability of complete safety and efficacy data in adults or after drug approval. This document summarizes consensus statements from an international panel of childhood TB opinion leaders which support the initiation of evaluation of new TB drugs and regimens in children at earlier phases of the TB Drug development cycle. PMID:25957923

  11. Access to and affordability of healthcare for TB patients in China: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shenglan; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Hong; Chin, Daniel P

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the background, aim and objectives of the project entitled "China-the Gates Foundation Collaboration on TB Control in China" that has been underway for many years. It also summarizes the key findings of the nine papers included in this special issue, which used data from the baseline survey of Phase II of the project. Data were collected from the survey of TB and MDR-TB patients, from designated hospitals, health insurance agencies and the routine health information systems, as well as key informant interviews and focus group discussions with relevant key stakeholders. Key issues discussed in this series of papers include the uses of TB services and anti-TB medicines and their determining factors related to socio-economic and health systems development; expenditures on TB care and the financial burden incurred on TB patients; and the impact of health insurance schemes implemented in China on financial protection. PMID:26822583

  12. [Management of tuberculosis (TB) cases from view points of public health].

    PubMed

    Satoh, Ken; Motomiya, Masakichi

    2011-08-01

    Tuberculosis control law was enacted in 1951 and has been the basis for the management of TB cases over the long post-war period. This law has legalized the use of public founds for the treatment of TB patients for the first time and has provided the authentic basis for mandatory hospitalization, routine health examination, vaccination, notification and registration of TB cases. However, this law was abrogated in 2001 and was joined to the comprehensive infectious diseases control law, in order to facilitate a prophylactic measure against TB infection and to protect human rights of TB patients. Concurrently the medical care system and the formalities connected to hospitalization treatment of TB patients were reviewed. The purpose of the present overview is to explain how TB cases are managed under the newly-enacted law.

  13. Access to and affordability of healthcare for TB patients in China: issues and challenges.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shenglan; Wang, Lixia; Wang, Hong; Chin, Daniel P

    2016-01-29

    This paper introduces the background, aim and objectives of the project entitled "China-the Gates Foundation Collaboration on TB Control in China" that has been underway for many years. It also summarizes the key findings of the nine papers included in this special issue, which used data from the baseline survey of Phase II of the project. Data were collected from the survey of TB and MDR-TB patients, from designated hospitals, health insurance agencies and the routine health information systems, as well as key informant interviews and focus group discussions with relevant key stakeholders. Key issues discussed in this series of papers include the uses of TB services and anti-TB medicines and their determining factors related to socio-economic and health systems development; expenditures on TB care and the financial burden incurred on TB patients; and the impact of health insurance schemes implemented in China on financial protection.

  14. Aerosol immunisation for TB: matching route of vaccination to route of infection.

    PubMed

    Manjaly Thomas, Zita-Rose; McShane, Helen

    2015-03-01

    TB remains a very significant global health burden. There is an urgent need for better tools for TB control, which include an effective vaccine. Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the currently licensed vaccine, confers highly variable protection against pulmonary TB, the main source of TB transmission. Replacing BCG completely or boosting BCG with another vaccine are the two current strategies for TB vaccine development. Delivering a vaccine by aerosol represents a way to match the route of vaccination to the route of infection. This route of immunisation offers not only the scientific advantage of delivering the vaccine directly to the respiratory mucosa, but also practical and logistical advantages. This review summarises the state of current TB vaccine candidates in the pipeline, reviews current progress in aerosol administration of vaccines in general and evaluates the potential for TB vaccine candidates to be administered by the aerosol route.

  15. Crystal structure of RbAl 2Tb 4F 22: a second example of mixed-valence fluoroterbate with a random distribution of Tb 3+ and Tb 4+ ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josse, Michaël; Dubois, Marc; El-Ghozzi, Malika; Avignant, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    A new mixed-valence (III/IV) terbium fluoride RbAl 2Tb 4F 22 was obtained by direct fluorination of the stoichiometric mixture 1 RbCl + 2 AlF 3 + 4 TbF 4 at 650 °C under pure fluorine gas flow. The structure of RbAl 2Tb 4F 22 has been determined from single-crystal X-ray diffraction data and refined to a conventional R=0.020(R=0.023) from 676 independent reflections (29 parameters). This compound crystallizes in the tetragonal system, space group I4/mmm (No. 139) with a=10.662(2) Å and c=6.911(3) Å, Z=2. The structure is built of chains of edge-sharing TbF 8 dodecahedra surrounding the Tb 3+ and Tb 4+ ions randomly distributed over a unique crystallographic site. These chains arranged in a tetragonal packing are further held together by sharing vertices to form the three-dimensional framework which encompasses two kinds of channels parallel to the c tetragonal axis. The first ones accommodate the Rb + ions in 8-coordination. The second ones are occupied by isolated zigzag chains of trans-corner-sharing [AlF 6] 3- octahedra linked to four Tb chains by sharing equatorial fluorines. A structural relationship between RbAl 2Tb 4F 22 and BaY 2F 8 has been established.

  16. Neutral and warm white light emission in Tb3+/Sm3+ zinc phosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza-Rocha, A. N.; Muñoz H., G.; Speghini, A.; Bettinelli, M.; Caldiño, U.

    2015-09-01

    A spectroscopy analysis of Tb3+ and Tb3+/Sm3+ doped zinc phosphate glasses based on emission spectra and decay time profiles was performed. The Tb3+ singly doped glass shows a green overall emission with x = 0.258 and y = 0.429 CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates, upon Tb3+ excitation at 318 nm. Under co-excitations of Tb3+ and Sm3+ at 344, 361 and 374 nm, the Tb3+/Sm3+ co-doped glasses display neutral and warm white overall emissions with CIE1931 chromaticity coordinates in ranges of x = 0.407-0.487 and y = 0.437-0.485, color temperature in the range of 2447-4024 K and quantum yield up to 12.38%, depending on the excitation wavelength and relative amount of Tb3+ and Sm3+. In all cases, it was observed that the Sm3+ emission is enhanced by the addition of Tb3+, which is correlated with a quenching of the Tb3+ emission as consequence of a non-radiative Tb3+ → Sm3+ energy transfer process. The non-radiative nature of the energy transfer process was inferred by the shortening of the Tb3+ emission decay time observed in the Tb3+/Sm3+ co-doped zinc phosphate glasses. An analysis of the Tb3+ emission decay time profiles by the Inokuti-Hirayama model suggests that an interaction electric dipole-dipole into the Tb3+-Sm3+ clusters might dominate in the energy transfer process with efficiency and probability of 0.23-0.25 and 96.22-111.35 s-1, respectively.

  17. Tubby-RFP Balancers for Developmental Analysis: FM7c 2xTb-RFP, CyO 2xTb-RFP and TM3 2xTb-RFP

    PubMed Central

    Pina, Cara; Pignoni, Francesca

    2012-01-01

    We report here the construction of Tubby-RFP balancers for the X, 2nd and 3rd chromosomes of Drosophila melanogaster. The insertion of a 2xTb-RFP transgene on the FM7c, CyO and TM3 balancer chromosomes introduces two easily scorable, dominant, developmental markers. The strong Tb phenotype is visible to the naked eye at the larval L2, L3 and pupal stages. The RFP associated with the cuticle is easily detected at all stages from late embryo to adult with the use of a fluorescence stereomicroscope. The FM7c Bar 2xTb-RFP, CyO Cy 2xTb-RFP and TM3 Sb 2xTb-RFP balancers will greatly facilitate the analysis of lethals and other developmental mutants in L2/L3 larvae and pupae, but also provide coverage of other stages beginning in late embryogenesis through to the adult. PMID:21913310

  18. Predictive value of the tuberculin skin test and QuantiFERON-tuberculosis Gold In-Tube test for development of active tuberculosis in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Seyhan, Ekrem Cengiz; Gunluoglu, Gulşah; Gunluoglu, Mehmet Zeki; Tural, Seda; Sökücü, Sinem

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hemodialysis (HD) patients are at increased risk of reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) compared with the general population. QuantiFERON-TB Gold (QFT-G) for LTBI detection is more promising than tuberculin skin test (TST) in HD patients. AIM: In our study, we evaluated the value of the TST and QFT-G In-Tube (QFG-IT) test in the development of active tuberculosis (TB), in the HD patients, and in healthy controls. METHODS: The study enrolled 95 HD patients and ninety age-matched, healthy controls. The TST and QFG-IT were performed. All the subjects were followed up 5 years for active TB disease. RESULTS: Compared to the healthy controls, a high prevalence of LTBI was found in the HD patients by QFG-IT (41% vs. 25%). However, no significant difference was detected by TST (32% vs. 31%). Four HD patients and one healthy control progressed to active TB disease within the 5-year follow-up. For active TB discovered subjects, QFG-IT was positive in all, but TST was positive in two (one patient and one healthy control). In HD patients; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of QFG-IT, and TST for active TB was 100% and 25%, 62% and 67%, 10%, and 3%, and 100% and 95%, respectively. Receiver operating curve analysis revealed that the results are significantly different (P = 0.04). CONCLUSION: QFG-IT test is a more useful diagnostic method than TST for detecting those who will progress to active TB in HD patients. PMID:27168859

  19. Gold nanoparticle (AuNPs) and gold nanopore (AuNPore) catalysts in organic synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takale, Balaram S; Bao, Ming; Yamamoto, Yoshinori

    2014-04-01

    Organic synthesis using gold has gained tremendous attention in last few years, especially heterogeneous gold catalysis based on gold nanoparticles has made its place in almost all organic reactions, because of the robust and green nature of gold catalysts. In this context, gold nanopore (AuNPore) with a 3D metal framework is giving a new dimension to heterogeneous gold catalysts. Interestingly, AuNPore chemistry is proving better than gold nanoparticles based chemistry. In this review, along with recent advances, major discoveries in heterogeneous gold catalysis are discussed.

  20. Piloting Upfront Xpert MTB/RIF Testing on Various Specimens under Programmatic Conditions for Diagnosis of TB & DR-TB in Paediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Raizada, Neeraj; Sachdeva, Kuldeep Singh; Swaminathan, Soumya; Kulsange, Shubhangi; Khaparde, Sunil D.; Nair, Sreenivas Achuthan; Khanna, Ashwani; Chopra, Kamal Kishore; Hanif, Mahmud; Sethi, Gulshan Rai; Umadevi, K. R.; Keshav Chander, G.; Saha, Brojakishore; Shah, Amar; Parmar, Malik; Ghediya, Mayank; Jaju, Jyoti; Boehme, Catharina; Paramasivan, Chinnambedu Nainarappan

    2015-01-01

    Background India accounts for one-fifth of the global TB incidence. While the exact burden of childhood TB is not known, TB remains one of the leading causes of childhood mortality in India. Bacteriological confirmation of TB in children is challenging due to difficulty in obtaining quality specimens, in the absence of which diagnosis is largely based on clinical judgement. While testing multiple specimens can potentially contribute to higher proportion of laboratory confirmed paediatric TB cases, lack of high sensitivity tests adds to the diagnostic challenge. We describe here our experiences in piloting upfront Xpert MTB/RIF testing, for diagnosis of TB in paediatric population in respiratory and extra pulmonary specimens, as recently recommended by WHO. Method Xpert MTB/RIF testing was offered to all paediatric (0–14 years) presumptive TB cases (both pulmonary and extra-pulmonary) seeking care at public and private health facilities in the project areas covering 4 cities of India. Results Under this pilot project, 8,370 paediatric presumptive TB & presumptive DR-TB cases were tested between April and–November 2014. Overall, 9,149 specimens were tested, of which 4,445 (48.6%) were non-sputum specimens. Xpert MTB/RIF gave 9,083 (99.2%, CI 99.0–99.4) valid results. Of the 8,143 presumptive TB cases enrolled, 517 (6.3%, CI 5.8–6.9) were bacteriologically confirmed. TB detection rates were two fold higher with Xpert MTB/RIF as compared to smear microscopy. Further, a total of 60 rifampicin resistant TB cases were detected, of which 38 were detected among 512 presumptive TB cases while 22 were detected amongst 227 presumptive DR-TB cases tested under the project. Conclusion Xpert MTB/RIF with advantages of quick turnaround testing-time, high proportion of interpretable results and feasibility of rapid rollout, substantially improved the diagnosis of bacteriologically confirmed TB in children, while simultaneously detecting rifampicin resistance. PMID:26469691

  1. Modeling of gold production in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muda, Nora; Ainuddeen, Nasihah Rasyiqah; Ismail, Hamizun; Umor, Mohd Rozi

    2013-04-01

    This study was conducted to identify the main factors that contribute to the gold production and hence determine the factors that affect to the development of the mining industry in Malaysia. An econometric approach was used by performing the cointegration analysis among the factors to determine the existence of long term relationship between the gold prices, the number of gold mines, the number of workers in gold mines and the gold production. The study continued with the Granger analysis to determine the relationship between factors and gold production. Results have found that there are long term relationship between price, gold production and number of employees. Granger causality analysis shows that there is only one way relationship between the number of employees with gold production in Malaysia and the number of gold mines in Malaysia.

  2. The TB Structural Genomics Consortium: A decade of progress

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Nicholas; Habel, Jeff E.; Johnston, Jodie M.; Krieger, Inna; Miallau, Linda; Sankaranarayanan, Ramasamy; Morse, Robert P.; Bruning, John; Swanson, Stephanie; Kim, Haelee; Kim, Chang-Yub; Li, Hongye; Bulloch, Esther M.; Payne, Richard J.; Manos-Turvey, Alexandra; Hung, Li-Wei; Baker, Edward N.; Lott, J. Shaun; James, Michael N.G.; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Eisenberg, David S.; Sacchettini, James C.; Goulding, Celia W.

    2012-01-01

    Summary The TB Structural Genomics Consortium is a worldwide organization of collaborators whose mission is the comprehensive structural determination and analyses of Mycobacterium tuberculosis proteins to ultimately aid in tuberculosis diagnosis and treatment. Congruent to the overall vision, Consortium members have additionally established an integrated facilities core to streamline M. tuberculosis structural biology and developed bioinformatics resources for data mining. This review aims to share the latest Consortium developments with the TB community, including recent structures of proteins that play significant roles within M. tuberculosis. Atomic resolution details may unravel mechanistic insights and reveal unique and novel protein features, as well as important protein-protein and protein-ligand interactions, which ultimately leads to a better understanding of M. tuberculosis biology and may be exploited for rational, structure-based therapeutics design. PMID:21247804

  3. Dosimetric investigations of Tb3+-doped strontium silicate phosphor.

    PubMed

    Barve, R A; Suriyamurthy, N; Panigrahi, B S; Venkatraman, B

    2015-03-01

    Tb(3+)-doped SrSiO(3) phosphor synthesised by co-precipitation technique exhibits intense green emission due to cross-relaxation phenomena between Tb(3+) ions. Dosimetric properties of this phosphor have been investigated using thermoluminescence (TL) technique. A dosimetrically useful glow peak observed was at 581 K along with a linear dose response over the wide dose range (100 mGy-4 Gy). TL parameters such as trap depth (E), frequency factor (s) and the order of kinetics (b) are determined by different methods such as Chen's peak shape, initial rise, isothermal decay and variable heating rate methods. Results of these methods are compared and reported in this study.

  4. Compact Tb doped fiber optic current sensor with high sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Duanni; Srinivasan, Sudharsanan; Bowers, John E

    2015-11-16

    A highly sensitive fiber optic current sensor using terbium doped fiber is presented. The Verdet constant of the terbium doped fiber at 1300nm is found to be 19.5μrad/A using both a polarimetric and interferometric type sensor. Measurements on a Sagnac-loop sensor using 10cm of terbium doped fiber placed inside a solenoid show over 40dB of open loop dynamic range as well as a minimum detectable current of 0.1mA. Extrapolations of our measurements show that in a practical setup with Tb fiber wrapped around a current carrying wire, the optimal configuration is a 0.5m piece of Tb fiber with a noise limit of 22mA/√Hz. This sensor is promising for current sensing applications that require high sensitivity and small size, weight, and power. PMID:26698480

  5. Nitroimidazoles for the treatment of TB: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Tathagata; Boshoff, Helena

    2011-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains a leading cause of death resulting from an infectious agent, and the spread of multi- and extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis poses a threat to management of global health. New drugs that effectively shorten the duration of treatment and are active against drug-resistant strains of this pathogen are urgently required to develop effective chemotherapies to combat this disease. Two nitroimidazoles, PA-824 and OPC-67683, are currently in Phase II clinical trials for the treatment of TB and the outcome of these may determine the future directions of drug development for anti-tubercular nitroimidazoles. In this review we summarize the development of these nitroimidazoles and alternative analogs in these series that may offer attractive alternatives to PA-824 and OPC-67683 for further development in the drug-discovery pipeline. Lastly, the potential pitfalls in the development of nitroimidazoles as drugs for TB are discussed. PMID:21879846

  6. Magnetostructural phase transformations in Tb 1-x Mn 2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zou, Junding; Paudyal, Durga; Liu, Jing; Mudryk, Yaroslav; Pecharsky, Vitalij K.; Gschneidner, Karl A.

    2015-01-16

    Magnetism and phase transformations in non-stoichiometric Tb1-xMn2 (x = 0.056, 0.039) have been studied as functions of temperature and magnetic field using magnetization, heat capacity, and X-ray powder diffraction measurements. Lowering the temperature, the compounds sequentially order ferrimagnetically and antiferromagnetically, and finally, exhibit spin reorientation transitions. Moreover, these structural distortions from room temperature cubic to low temperature rhombohedral structures occur at TN, and are accompanied by large volume changes reaching ~-1.27% and -1.42%, respectively. First principles electronic structure calculations confirm the phase transformation from the ferrimagnetic cubic structure to the antiferromagnetic rhombohedral structure in TbMn2.

  7. Evaluation of three refurbished Guralp CMG-3TB seismometers.

    SciTech Connect

    Hart, Darren M.; Merchant, Bion J.

    2014-05-01

    The overall objective of testing the Guralp CMG-3TB refurbished seismometers is to determine whether or not the refurbished sensors exhibit better data quality and require less maintenance when deployed than the original Guralp CMG-3TBs. SNL will test these 3 refurbished Guralps to verify performance specifications. The specifications that will be evaluated are sensitivity, bandwidth, self-noise, output impedance, clip-level, dynamic range over application passband, verify mathematical response and calibration response parameters for amplitude and phase.

  8. Optical properties of Ce^{3+}/Tb^{3+}-codoped borosilicate glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuboi, T.

    2004-05-01

    Absorption spectra, luminescence spectra and luminescence decay time are investigated for a borosilicate glass containing low 0.1 wt% Ce^{3+} and high 15 wt% Tb^{3+} concentrations, together with the time-resolved luminescence. A broad absorption band due to parity allowed f{to}d transition is observed for Ce^{3+}. Sharp absorption bands are observed in 3100 1600 nm region which are due to the 7F{6}to 7F{J} (J=0, 1, 2, 3, 4) transition of Tb^{3+}, while much weak absorption bands due to the spin-forbidden 7F{6}to 5D{J} (J=2, 3, 4), 5G{J} (J=3, 5, 6), 5L{J} (J=7, 8, 9, 10), 5H{J} (J=4, 5, 6), 5I{J} (J=7, 8) and 5F{J} (J=2, 4) transitions are observed in visible-UV region. By excitation with 266 nm laser line, two broad UV emission bands due to Ce^{3+} are observed at 360 and 390 nm besides the intense green emission bands due to the 5D{4}to 7F{J} (J=6, 5, 4, 3) transition of Tb^{3+} and weak blue emission bands due to the 5D{3}to 7F{J} (J=6, 5, 4, 3) transition. The decay time of the UV, blue and green emission is estimated to be 17 ns, 3.8 μ s and 2.17 ms, respectively. The rise time of the green emission is about 4 μ s after the Ce^{3+} emission and the Tb^{3+} blue emission. No rise time is observed for the latter emission.

  9. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h. PMID:24359519

  10. Phage based green chemistry for gold ion reduction and gold retrieval.

    PubMed

    Setyawati, Magdiel I; Xie, Jianping; Leong, David T

    2014-01-22

    The gold mining industry has taken its toll on the environment, triggering the development of more environmentally benign processes to alleviate the waste load release. Here, we demonstrate the use of bacteriophages (phages) for biosorption and bioreduction of gold ions from aqueous solution, which potentially can be applied to remediate gold ions from gold mining waste effluent. Phage has shown a remarkably efficient sorption of gold ions with a maximum gold adsorption capacity of 571 mg gold/g dry weight phage. The product of this phage mediated process is gold nanocrystals with the size of 30-630 nm. Biosorption and bioreduction processes are mediated by the ionic and covalent interaction between gold ions and the reducing groups on the phage protein coat. The strategy offers a simple, ecofriendly and feasible option to recover of gold ions to form readily recoverable products of gold nanoparticles within 24 h.

  11. A Selective Na(+) Aptamer Dissected by Sensitized Tb(3+) Luminescence.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenhu; Ding, Jinsong; Liu, Juewen

    2016-08-17

    A previous study of two RNA-cleaving DNAzymes, NaA43 and Ce13d, revealed the possibility of a common Na(+) aptamer motif. Because Na(+) binding to DNA is a fundamental biochemical problem, the interaction between Ce13d and Na(+) was studied in detail by using sensitized Tb(3+) luminescence spectroscopy. Na(+) displaces Tb(3+) from the DNAzyme, and thus quenches the emission from Tb(3+) . The overall requirement for Na(+) binding includes the hairpin and the highly conserved 16-nucleotide loop in the enzyme strand, along with a few unpaired nucleotides in the substrate. Mutation studies indicate good correlation between Na(+) binding and cleavage activity, thus suggesting a critical role of Na(+) binding for the enzyme activity. Ce13d displayed a Kd of ∼20 mm with Na(+) (other monovalent cations: 40-60 mm). The Kd values for other metal ions are mainly due to non-specific competition. With a single nucleotide mutation, the specific Na(+) binding was lost. Another mutant improved Kd to 8 mm with Na(+) . This study has demonstrated a Na(+) aptamer with important biological implications and analytical applications. It has also defined the structural requirements for Na(+) binding and produced an improved mutant. PMID:27238890

  12. Titan scan TB 10/15 operating performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitham, K.; Mendonsa, R.; Anamkath, H.; Gower, F.; Zante, A.

    1997-02-01

    June of 1993 marked the installation of Titan Beta's first commercially designed LINAC for the exclusive use of the sterilization of new medical products at its contract sterilization facility located in Denver, Colorado. This system, a 10 MeV, 10 kW RF Linac has been operating successfully, since that time, at its planned duty cycle of up to 7,000 hours per year. More recently, Titan commissioned its second sterilization facility, located in San Diego, California, in the past summer of 1995. This facility incorporates a Titan Beta Model TB-10/15 RF Linac, a design based on the Denver machine with upgrades that have addressed marketing requirements and Denver's operational data. In addition to the San Diego machine, Titan Beta has recently completed the installation and validation of an identical TB-10/15 Linac at the BSE Mediscan facility located in Austria. Both the San Diego and Austrian machines were assembled, tested and installed within 11-12 months after receipt of order, and were fully operational and ready for facility integration and commissioning within 2-3 weeks after arrival on-site. Due to the high duty cycle at which these machines operate, the customer quickly acquires an in depth understanding of their operating performance. Because of this, Beta maintains constant communication with the users and compiles and maintains maintenance logs to trend systems performance. This paper describes the TB 10/15's in the field and presents their operating performance.

  13. Patient Reported Delays in Seeking Treatment for Tuberculosis among Adult and Pediatric TB Patients and TB Patients Co-Infected with HIV in Lima, Peru: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.; Alban, Rebecca E.; Dimos Jones, Christy; Powell, Amy R.; Oberhelman, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB) remains a significant public health challenge worldwide, and particularly in Peru with one of the highest incidence rates in Latin America. TB patient behavior has a direct influence on whether a patient will receive timely diagnosis and successful treatment of their illness. Objectives: The objective was to understand the complex factors that can impact TB patient health seeking behavior. Methods: In-depth interviews were conducted with adult and parents of pediatric patients receiving TB treatment (n = 43), within that group a sub-group was also co-infected with HIV (n = 11). Results: Almost all of the study participants recognized delays in seeking either their child’s or their own diagnosis of their TB symptoms. The principal reasons for treatment-seeking delays were lack of knowledge and confusion of TB symptoms, fear and embarrassment of receiving a TB diagnosis, and a patient tendency to self-medicate prior to seeking formal medical attention. Conclusion: Health promotion activities that target patient delays have the potential to improve individual patient outcomes and mitigate the spread of TB at a community level. PMID:25566523

  14. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China.

    PubMed

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests. PMID:27149911

  15. Fast and intense green emission of Tb3+ in borosilicate glass modified by Cu+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Fanshu; Liu, Siyuan; Wang, Yang; Mao, Jiayi; Li, Xinxi; Wang, Yiqun; Chen, Guorong

    2015-10-01

    We present photoluminescence properties of Tb3+ doped borosilicate glasses modified by Cu+. Around 5-time enhanced emission at 541 nm due to the superposed emission of Tb3+ and Cu+ is observed under the deep UV excitation. Excitation spectra demonstrate a greatly increased absorption of Tb3+ ions in the deep UV region towards the Cu+ excitation band, while the shortened Cu+ emission lifetime of glasses in association with presence of Tb3+ ions implies an energy transfer process from Cu+ to Tb3+ ions. Meanwhile, the Tb3+ emission lifetime is significantly shortened from the conventional millisecond level (~4 ms) to the microsecond regime up to around 90 μs. This most likely starts with the role of Cu+ as a co-activator by initiating the d-f orbital hybridization process via an interaction with Tb3+, thus relaxing the spin forbidden transition of Tb3+ ions to the partially allowed one. Moreover, combination of emissions from Cu+ and Tb3+ ions generates a composite green emission with adjustable CIE (Commission Internationale de L’Eclairage) chromaticity coordinates achievable by co-doping Cu+/Tb3+ in the different ratio and/or altering the excitation wavelength from deep UV to near UV region.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of MDR and XDR tuberculosis with the MeltPro TB assay in China

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yu; Dong, Haiyan; Tan, Yaoju; Deng, Yunfeng; Cai, Xingshan; Jing, Hui; Xia, Hui; Li, Qiang; Ou, Xichao; Su, Biyi; Li, Xuezheng; Zhang, Zhiying; Li, Junchen; Zhang, Jiankang; Huan, Shitong; Zhao, Yanlin

    2016-01-01

    New diagnostic methods have provided a promising solution for rapid and reliable detection of drug-resistant TB strains. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of the MeltPro TB assay in identifying multidrug-resistant (MDR-) and extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) patients from sputum samples. The MeltPro TB assay was evaluated using sputum samples from 2057 smear-positive TB patients. Phenotypic Mycobacterial Growth Indicator Tube (MGIT) 960 drug susceptibility testing served as a reference standard. The sensitivity of the MeltPro TB assay was 94.2% for detecting resistance to rifampicin and 84.9% for detecting resistance to isoniazid. For second-line drugs, the assay showed a sensitivity of 83.3% for ofloxacin resistance, 75.0% for amikacin resistance, and 63.5% for kanamycin resistance. However, there was a significant difference for detecting kanamycin resistance between the two pilot sites in sensitivity, which was 53.2% in Guangdong and 81.5% in Shandong (P = 0.015). Overall, the MeltPro TB assay demonstrated good performance for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB, with a sensitivity of 86.7% and 71.4%, respectively. The MeltPro TB assay is an excellent alternative for the detection of MDR- and XDR-TB cases in China, with high accuracy, short testing turn-around time, and low unit price compared with other tests. PMID:27149911

  17. The effect of HIV coinfection, HAART and TB treatment on cytokine/chemokine responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigens in active TB patients and latently Mtb infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Kassa, Desta; de Jager, Wilco; Gebremichael, Gebremedhin; Alemayehu, Yodit; Ran, Leonie; Fransen, Justin; Wolday, Dawit; Messele, Tsehaynesh; Tegbaru, Belete; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Baarle, Debbie

    2016-01-01

    Identification of Mtb specific induced cytokine/chemokine host biomarkers could assist in developing novel diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic tools for TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, IL-10, IP-10 and MIP-1α were measured in supernatants of whole blood stimulated with Mtb specific fusion protein ESAT-6/CFP-10 using xMAP technology. The study groups were HIV positive TB patients (HIV(+)TB(+)), HIV negative TB patients (HIV(-)TB(+)), HIV positive tuberculin skin test positive (TST+) (HIV(+)TST(+)), HIV negative TST+ (HIV(-)TST(+)), and HIV(-)TST(-) individuals. Compared to HIV(-)TST(-), latent TB infection led to increased levels of IP-10, IFN-γ and IL-17, while levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were increased with active TB. Levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 were increased in HIV(-)TST(+) individuals compared to HIV(-)TB(+) patients. HIV coinfection decreased the level of IFN-γ, IL-17, IP-10 and IL-2. After six months (M6) of anti-TB treatment (ATT) in HIV(-)TB(+) patients, IFN-γ, IL-10, and MIP-1α levels normalized. After M6 and M18 of ATT plus HAART in HIV(+)TB(+) patients, levels of MIP-1α and IL-10 normalized, while this was not the case for IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-17, and IP-10 levels. In HIV(+)TST(+) patients on HAART, levels of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-10 and MIP-1α normalized, while no change in the levels of IL-2 and IP-10 were observed. In conclusion, the simultaneous measurement of IFN-γ, IL-17 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing LTBI; IL-2 and IP-10 may assist in diagnosing active TB; while IFN-γ, IL-17, MIP-1α, and IL-10 levels could help to discriminate LTBI and active TB. In addition, IL-10 and MIP-1α levels could help to monitor responses to TB treatment and HAART.

  18. Scaling up of HIV-TB collaborative activities: Achievements and challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rajesh; Shah, Amar; Sachdeva, K S; Sreenivas, A N; Gupta, R S; Khaparde, S D

    2016-01-01

    India has been implementing HIV/TB collaborative activities since 2001 with rapid scale-up of infrastructure across the country during past decade in National AIDS Control Programme and Revised National TB Control Programme. India has shown over 50% reduction in new infections and around 35% reduction in AIDS-related deaths, thereby being one of the success stories globally. Substantial progress in the implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities has occurred in India and it is marching towards target set out in the Global Plan to Stop TB and endorsed by the UN General Assembly to halve HIV associated TB deaths by 2015. While the successful approaches have led to impressive gains in HIV/TB control in India, there are emerging challenges including newer pockets with rising HIV trends in North India, increasing drug resistance, high mortality among co-infected patients, low HIV testing rates among TB patients in northern and eastern states in India, treatment delays and drop-outs, stigma and discrimination, etc. In spite of these difficulties, established HIV/TB coordination mechanisms at different levels, rapid scale-up of facilities with decentralisation of treatment services, regular joint supervision and monitoring, newer initiatives like use of rapid diagnostics for early diagnosis of TB among people living with HIV, TB notification, etc. have led to success in combating the threat of HIV/TB in India. This article highlights the steps taken by India, one of the largest HIV/TB programmes in world, in scaling up of the joint HIV-TB collaborative activities, the achievements so far and discusses the emerging challenges which could provide important lessons for other countries in scaling up their programmes. PMID:27235937

  19. Scaling up of HIV-TB collaborative activities: Achievements and challenges in India.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Rajesh; Shah, Amar; Sachdeva, K S; Sreenivas, A N; Gupta, R S; Khaparde, S D

    2016-01-01

    India has been implementing HIV/TB collaborative activities since 2001 with rapid scale-up of infrastructure across the country during past decade in National AIDS Control Programme and Revised National TB Control Programme. India has shown over 50% reduction in new infections and around 35% reduction in AIDS-related deaths, thereby being one of the success stories globally. Substantial progress in the implementation of collaborative TB/HIV activities has occurred in India and it is marching towards target set out in the Global Plan to Stop TB and endorsed by the UN General Assembly to halve HIV associated TB deaths by 2015. While the successful approaches have led to impressive gains in HIV/TB control in India, there are emerging challenges including newer pockets with rising HIV trends in North India, increasing drug resistance, high mortality among co-infected patients, low HIV testing rates among TB patients in northern and eastern states in India, treatment delays and drop-outs, stigma and discrimination, etc. In spite of these difficulties, established HIV/TB coordination mechanisms at different levels, rapid scale-up of facilities with decentralisation of treatment services, regular joint supervision and monitoring, newer initiatives like use of rapid diagnostics for early diagnosis of TB among people living with HIV, TB notification, etc. have led to success in combating the threat of HIV/TB in India. This article highlights the steps taken by India, one of the largest HIV/TB programmes in world, in scaling up of the joint HIV-TB collaborative activities, the achievements so far and discusses the emerging challenges which could provide important lessons for other countries in scaling up their programmes.

  20. Raman and crystal field studies of Tb-O bonds in TbM n2O5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, S.; Jandl, S.; Balli, M.; Laverdière, J.; Fournier, P.; Dimitrov, D. Z.

    2016-09-01

    We have studied the temperature dependence of TbM n2O5 Raman-active phonons and its T b3 + crystal field (CF) excitations. Interestingly, the Raman intensities of some phonons are significantly reduced below ˜180 K . Such behaviors are also observed in HoM n2O5 and YM n2O5 systems. A connection between the Raman intensities and the nearest-neighbor mean-square relative displacement σ2 is established. Also, some of the T b3 + and H o3 + CF excitations become broader below ˜180 K . These results are discussed in terms of the disorder induced by the Tb-O bond splitting.

  1. Gold nanoparticles for photoacoustic imaging

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wanwan; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a biomedical imaging modality that provides functional information regarding the cellular and molecular signatures of tissue by using endogenous and exogenous contrast agents. There has been tremendous effort devoted to the development of PA imaging agents, and gold nanoparticles as exogenous contrast agents have great potential for PA imaging due to their inherent and geometrically induced optical properties. The gold-based nanoparticles that are most commonly employed for PA imaging include spheres, rods, shells, prisms, cages, stars and vesicles. This article provides an overview of the current state of research in utilizing these gold nanomaterials for PA imaging of cancer, atherosclerotic plaques, brain function and image-guided therapy. PMID:25600972

  2. Prevalence and Diagnosis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection in Young Children in the Absence of a Gold Standard

    PubMed Central

    Ascaso, Carlos; Malheiro, Adriana; Bührer, Samira; Martinez-Espinosa, Flor; Abellana, Rosa

    2016-01-01

    Introduction For adequate disease control the World Health Organization has proposed the diagnosis and treatment of latent tuberculous infection (LTBI) in groups of risk of developing the disease such as children. There is no gold standard (GS) test for the diagnosis of LTBI. The objective of this study was to estimate the prevalence of LTBI in young children in contact with a household case of tuberculosis (TB-HCC) and determine the accuracy and precision of the Tuberculin Skin Test (TST) and QuantiFERON-TB Gold in-tube (QFT) used in the absence of a GS. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional study in children up to 6 years of age in Manaus/Brazil during the years 2009–2010. All the children had been vaccinated with the BCG and were classified into two groups according to the presence of a TB-HCC or no known contact with tuberculosis (TB). The variables studied were: the TST and QFT results and the intensity and length of exposure to the index tuberculosis case. We used the latent class model to determine the prevalence of LTBI and the accuracy of the tests. Results Fifty percent of the children with TB-HCC had LTBI, with the prevalence depending on the intensity and length of exposure to the index case. The sensitivity and specificity of TST were 73% [95% confidence interval (CI): 53–91] and 97% (95%CI: 89–100), respectively, versus 53% (95%CI: 41–66) and 81% (95%CI:71–90) for QFT. The positive predictive value of TST in children with TB-HCC was 91% (95%CI: 61–99), being 74% for QFT (95%CI: 47–95). Conclusions This is one of the first studies to estimate the prevalence of LTBI in children and the parameters of the main diagnostic tests using a latent class model. Our results suggest that children in contact with an index case have a high risk of infection. The accuracy and the predictive value of the two tests did not significantly differ. Combined use of the two tests showed scarce improvement in the diagnosis of LTBI. PMID:27783642

  3. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms and associated factors in tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Naidoo, Pamela; Matseke, Gladys; Louw, Julia; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2013-01-01

    High rates of tuberculosis (TB) and TB/HIV co-infection is often linked with mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which is further associated with poor health outcomes. In a country such as South Africa where rates of these infectious diseases are high, it is concerning that there is limited/no data on prevalence rates of mental disorders such as PTSD and its associated factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and associated factors in TB, TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa. Brief screening self-report tools were used to measure: PTSD symptoms, psychological distress (anxiety and depression) and alcohol misuse. Other relevant measures, such as adherence to medication, stressful life events and sexual risk-taking behaviours, were obtained through structured questions. A total of 4900 public primary care adult patients from clinics in high TB burden districts from three provinces in South Africa participated. All the patients screened positive for TB (either new or retreatment cases). The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 29.6%. Patients who screened positive for PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were more likely to be on antidepressant medication. Factors that predicted PTSD symptoms were poverty, residing in an urban area, psychological distress, suicide attempt, alcohol and/or drug use before sex, unprotected sex, TB-HIV co-infected and the number of other chronic conditions. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV.

  4. Prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms and associated factors in tuberculosis (TB), TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Peltzer, Karl; Naidoo, Pamela; Matseke, Gladys; Louw, Julia; McHunu, Gugu; Tutshana, Bomkazi

    2013-01-01

    High rates of tuberculosis (TB) and TB/HIV co-infection is often linked with mental health issues such as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, which is further associated with poor health outcomes. In a country such as South Africa where rates of these infectious diseases are high, it is concerning that there is limited/no data on prevalence rates of mental disorders such as PTSD and its associated factors. Therefore, the aim of this study was to establish the prevalence of PTSD symptoms and associated factors in TB, TB retreatment and/or TB-HIV co-infected primary public health-care patients in three districts in South Africa. Brief screening self-report tools were used to measure: PTSD symptoms, psychological distress (anxiety and depression) and alcohol misuse. Other relevant measures, such as adherence to medication, stressful life events and sexual risk-taking behaviours, were obtained through structured questions. A total of 4900 public primary care adult patients from clinics in high TB burden districts from three provinces in South Africa participated. All the patients screened positive for TB (either new or retreatment cases). The prevalence of PTSD symptoms was 29.6%. Patients who screened positive for PTSD symptoms and psychological distress were more likely to be on antidepressant medication. Factors that predicted PTSD symptoms were poverty, residing in an urban area, psychological distress, suicide attempt, alcohol and/or drug use before sex, unprotected sex, TB-HIV co-infected and the number of other chronic conditions. Health-care systems should be strengthened to improve delivery of mental health care, by focusing on existing programmes and activities, such as those which address the prevention and treatment of TB and HIV. PMID:23061988

  5. Surface Bacterial-Spore Assay Using Tb3+/DPA Luminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponce, Adrian

    2007-01-01

    Equipment and a method for rapidly assaying solid surfaces for contamination by bacterial spores are undergoing development. The method would yield a total (nonviable plus viable) spore count of a surface within minutes and a viable-spore count in about one hour. In this method, spores would be collected from a surface by use of a transparent polymeric tape coated on one side with a polymeric adhesive that would be permeated with one or more reagent(s) for detection of spores by use of visible luminescence. The sticky side of the tape would be pressed against a surface to be assayed, then the tape with captured spores would be placed in a reader that illuminates the sample with ultraviolet light and counts the green luminescence spots under a microscope to quantify the number of bacterial spores per unit area. The visible luminescence spots seen through the microscope would be counted to determine the concentration of spores on the surface. This method is based on the chemical and physical principles of methods described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, including Live/Dead Spore Assay Using DPA-Triggered Tb Luminescence (NPO-30444), Vol. 27, No. 3 (March 2003), page 7a. To recapitulate: The basic idea is to exploit the observations that (1) dipicolinic acid (DPA) is present naturally only in bacterial spores; and (2) when bound to Tb3+ ions, DPA triggers intense green luminescence of the ions under ultraviolet excitation; (3) DPA can be released from the viable spores by using L-alanine to make them germinate; and (4) by autoclaving, microwaving, or sonicating the sample, one can cause all the spores (non-viable as well as viable) to release their DPA. One candidate material for use as the adhesive in the present method is polydimethysiloxane (PDMS). In one variant of the method for obtaining counts of all (viable and nonviable) spores the PDMS would be doped with TbCl3. After collection of a sample, the spores immobilized on the sticky tape surface

  6. Recent Developments in Australian Gold Extraction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiele, Rodney B.

    1995-01-01

    Describes new technologies that have greatly improved the extraction efficiency of gold ore, including: altering plant layout to promote efficiency, engaging Filiblast forced oxidation and bioxidation systems, and updating the electrowinning procedure at the gold recovery stage. (JRH)

  7. Economic geology: Gold buried by oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaillard, Fabrice; Copard, Yoann

    2015-03-01

    The Witwatersrand Basin in South Africa contains extraordinary amounts of gold. Thermodynamic calculations suggest that the gold may have accumulated there in response to a perfect storm of conditions available only during the Archaean.

  8. Colloidal gold nanorods: from reduction to growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyoungweon; El-Sayed, Mostafa; Srinivasarao, Mohan

    2005-03-01

    Formation of gold nanorods(NRs) in controlled reduction condition was investigated. Gold NRs were synthesized by seed mediated method where pre-made gold nanospheres were added to a growth solution containing surfactants, reducing agent and compound of gold ion and surfactant. Reduction mechanism was manipulated by changing catalytic activity of seed. Seed of different size and capping agent coverage led to different dispersity of NRs since seed plays a role as catalyst as well as nucleation site. The difference between the redox potentials of gold species and reducing agent(δE) was controlled by the strength of reducing agent and the stability of the gold compound. As δE leading to changing the morphology of resulting gold NRs. The surface of gold NRs with a series of aspect ratio was functionalized by thiolated beta cyclodextrin which binds preferentially to the end of NRs and promotes the orientation of rod-rod pair even without host-guest interaction.

  9. Local level epidemiological analysis of TB in people from a high incidence country of birth

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The setting for this analysis is the low tuberculosis (TB) incidence state of New South Wales (NSW), Australia. Local level analysis of TB epidemiology in people from high incidence countries-of-birth (HIC) in a low incidence setting has not been conducted in Australia and has not been widely reported. Local level analysis could inform measures such as active case finding and targeted earlier diagnosis. The aim of this study was to use a novel approach to identify local areas in an Australian state that have higher TB rates given the local areas’ country of birth profiles. Methods TB notification data for the three year period 2006–2008 were analysed by grouping the population into those from a high-incidence country-of-birth and the remainder. Results During the study period there were 1401 notified TB cases in the state of NSW. Of these TB cases 76.5% were born in a high-incidence country. The annualised TB notification rate for the high-incidence country-of-birth group was 61.2/100,000 population and for the remainder of the population was 1.8/100,000. Of the 152 Local Government Areas (LGA) in NSW, nine had higher and four had lower TB notification rates in their high-incidence country-of-birth populations when compared with the high-incidence country-of-birth population for the rest of NSW. The nine areas had a higher proportion of the population with a country of birth where TB notification rates are >100/100,000. Those notified with TB in the nine areas also had a shorter length of stay in Australia than the rest of the state. The areas with higher TB notification rates were all in the capital city, Sydney. Among LGAs with higher TB notification rates, four had higher rates in both people with a high-incidence country of birth and people not born in a high-incidence country. The age distribution of the HIC population was similar across all areas, and the highest differential in TB rates across areas was in the 5–19 years age group

  10. Structural Motifs of Gold Nanoparticles.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cleveland, C. L.; Luedtke, W. D.; Landman, Uzi

    1996-03-01

    Through an extensive search, involving energy minimization using embedded atom potentials, we found(R.L. Whetten et al./), submitted to Nature (1995). that the energetically optimal sequence for AuN clusters (30 <= N <= 3000 atoms) consists of fcc crystallites, with a truncated-octahedral (TO) morphological motif, and variants thereof. These predictions for bare gold particles, and for particles coated by sef-assembled thiol monolayers, are discussed in light of recent experiments on the preparation and characterization (including mass spectrometry, electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction) of nanocrystalline gold molecules (see Ref. 2).

  11. MDR-TB Antibody Response (Western Blot) to Fractions of Isoniazid and Rifampicin Resistant Antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Hadizadeh Tasbiti, Alireza; Yari, Shamsi; Ghanei, Mostafa; Shokrgozar, Mohammad Ali; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza

    2015-12-01

    Drug-resistant TB poses a major threat to control of TB worldwide. Despite progress in the detection of Multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) cases, a major diagnostic gap remains: 55% of reported TB patients estimated to have MDR-TB were not detected in 2013. MDR-TB antigens were conjugated to CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B. Specific polyclonal antibodies against MDR-TB Ags were prepared in rabbits using two boosted injections of the MDR-TB antigen. The antibodies were purified and treated with susceptible TB to remove any non-specific and cross-reactive antibodies. In the present study, comparative analysis of electrophoretic pattern of different antigens of INH/RIF-resistant TB were studied for identifying protein profiles. A RIF-resistant TB antigen was shown here to have different protein profiles from INH-resistant TB isolate. The results of Western blotting analysis showed that in the RIF- and INH-resistant antigenic fractions some bands of 14.4 and 45 kDa as immunogenic were common. Moreover, four bands of RIF-resistant TB antigen fractions (16, 19, 21, and 45 KDa) and one band of INH-resistant TB (about 26 KDa) were detected as diagnostic antigens. This study suggests that the Western blot is an accurate test to survey INH- and RIF-resistant TB antigens of M. tuberculosis infection. These findings indicate that MDR-TB diagnosis (based on Ag detection) could be useful in the identification of disease stages that precede symptomatic and microbiologically positive TB, such as subclinical and incipient TB.

  12. Formation, structure, and orientation of gold silicide on gold surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, A. K.; Bauer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The formation of gold silicide on Au films evaporated onto Si(111) surfaces is studied by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) and low-energy electron diffraction (LEED). Surface condition, film thickness, deposition temperature, annealing temperature, and heating rate during annealing are varied. Several oriented crystalline silicide layers are observed.

  13. Immunoendocrine interactions during HIV-TB coinfection: implications for the design of new adjuvant therapies.

    PubMed

    Suarez, Guadalupe Veronica; Vecchione, Maria Belen; Angerami, Matias Tomas; Sued, Omar; Bruttomesso, Andrea Claudia; Bottasso, Oscar Adelmo; Quiroga, Maria Florencia

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, around 14 million individuals are coinfected with both tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In coinfected individuals, both pathogens weaken immunological system synergistically through mechanisms that are not fully understood. During both HIV and TB infections, there is a chronic state of inflammation associated to dramatic changes in immune cytokine and endocrine hormone levels. Despite this, the relevance of immunoendocrine interaction on both the orchestration of an effective immune response against both pathogens and the control of the chronic inflammation induced during HIV, TB, or both infections is still controversial. The present study reviews immunoendocrine interactions occurring during HIV and TB infections. We also expose our own findings on immunoendocrine cross talk in HIV-TB coinfection. Finally, we evaluate the use of adrenal hormones and their derivatives in immune-therapy and discuss the use of some of these compounds like the adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of TB in HIV patients. PMID:26075241

  14. Immunoendocrine Interactions during HIV-TB Coinfection: Implications for the Design of New Adjuvant Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Guadalupe Veronica; Vecchione, Maria Belen; Angerami, Matias Tomas; Sued, Omar; Bruttomesso, Andrea Claudia; Bottasso, Oscar Adelmo

    2015-01-01

    Worldwide, around 14 million individuals are coinfected with both tuberculosis (TB) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). In coinfected individuals, both pathogens weaken immunological system synergistically through mechanisms that are not fully understood. During both HIV and TB infections, there is a chronic state of inflammation associated to dramatic changes in immune cytokine and endocrine hormone levels. Despite this, the relevance of immunoendocrine interaction on both the orchestration of an effective immune response against both pathogens and the control of the chronic inflammation induced during HIV, TB, or both infections is still controversial. The present study reviews immunoendocrine interactions occurring during HIV and TB infections. We also expose our own findings on immunoendocrine cross talk in HIV-TB coinfection. Finally, we evaluate the use of adrenal hormones and their derivatives in immune-therapy and discuss the use of some of these compounds like the adjuvant for the prevention and treatment of TB in HIV patients. PMID:26075241

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis and tunable luminescence of NaBaPO4:Eu2+/Tb3+ phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Zhen; Guan, Jinyu; Song, Juanjuan; Xu, Yongchun

    2015-12-01

    NaBaPO4:Eu2+/Tb3+ phosphors were synthesized by the hydrothermal process. The phase structure of obtained samples was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction. The morphology and size were obtained by field emission scanning electron microscope. Under the excitation at 346 nm, NaBaPO4:Eu2+/Tb3+ phosphors exhibited the emission band originating from the 4f65d1 → 4f7 transitions of Eu2+ and the emission bands originating from the 5D4 → 7Fj transitions of Tb3+. The intensities and lifetimes of Eu2+ decrease with increasing Tb3+ concentrations. On the basis of luminescence properties of NaBaPO4:Eu2+/Tb3+ phosphors, we can conclude the energy transfer occurs between Eu2+ and Tb3+ in NaBaPO4 host.

  16. Enhancement of Tb-Yb quantum cutting emission by inverse opal photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Qiu, Jianbei; Song, Zhiguo; Yang, Zhengwen; Yin, Zhaoyi; Zhou, Dacheng; Wang, Siqin

    2016-04-01

    Yb3+, Tb3+ co-doped YPO4 inverse opal photonic crystal was prepared directly by sol-gel technique in combination with self-assembly method. With the influence of the photonic band gap, quantum cutting emission of Tb3+, Yb3+ was investigated in photonic crystals by photoluminescence and fluorescence lifetime. The result clearly shows that, when the spontaneous emission of donor Tb3+ is inhibited by photonic band gap, Tb3+-Yb3+ quantum cutting quantum efficiency from Tb3+ to Yb3+ could be enhanced from 131.2% to 140.5%. The mechanisms for the influence of the photonic band gap on quantum cutting process of Tb3+ and Yb3+ are discussed. We believe that the present work will be valuable for the foundational study of quantum cutting energy transfer process and application of quantum cutting optical devices in spectral modification materials for silicon solar cells.

  17. Overcoming the global crisis: "yes, we can", but also for TB ... ?

    PubMed

    Ottenhoff, Tom H M

    2009-08-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) poses formidable challenges to global health at the public health-, scientific- and political level. Causing almost two million deaths every year, this ancient disease represents a continuing global crisis. The writing on the wall is that TB is resurging in more virulent and treatment-resistant forms. Our tools to combat TB are dangerously out of date and ineffective. Besides new tools (TB drugs, vaccines, diagnostics), we also need new strategies to identify key Mycobacterium tuberculosis/human host interactions, since it is here that we can most likely find Mtb's Achilles' heel. Equally important is that we build high-quality clinical trial capacity and biobanks for TB biomarker identification. But most important is a global commitment at all levels to roll back TB before it outwits us again.

  18. Investing to end epidemics: the role of the Global Fund to control TB by 2030.

    PubMed

    Kunii, Osamu; Yassin, Mohammed A; Wandwalo, Eliud

    2016-03-01

    The Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria provides over three-quarters of all international financing towards TB programs with US$4.7 billion disbursed, supporting provision of treatment for 13.2 million patients with smear-positive TB and 210 000 patients with multidrug-resistant TB in over 100 countries since 2002. In 2013, the Global Fund launched a new funding model that, among others, is advancing strategic investments to maximize impact, addressing 'missing' TB cases, enhancing a synergistic response to TB/HIV dual epidemics, and building resilient and sustainable systems for health. A new Global Fund Strategy is under development through consultation with various stakeholders, with which the Global Fund will work to play a more catalytic role and foster innovations to end the TB epidemic. PMID:26884492

  19. 46 CFR 35.07-10 - Actions required to be logged-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Actions required to be logged-TB/ALL. 35.07-10 Section... Entries § 35.07-10 Actions required to be logged—TB/ALL. (a) General—TB/ALL. The actions and observations noted in this section shall be entered in the Official Logbook or in logs or records considered to...

  20. Comparing patient care seeking pathways in three models of hospital and TB programme collaboration in China

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Public hospitals in China play an important role in tuberculosis (TB) control. Three models of hospital and TB control exist in China. The dispensary model is the most common one in which a TB dispensary provides both clinical and public health care. The specialist model is similar to the former except that a specialist TB hospital is located in the same area. The specialist hospital should treat only complicated TB cases but it also treats simple cases in practice. The integrated model is a new development to integrate TB service in public hospitals. Patients were diagnosed, treated and followed up in this public hospital in this model while the TB dispensary provides public health service as case reporting and mass education. This study aims to compare patient care seeking pathways under the three models, and to provide policy recommendation for the TB control system reform in China. Methods Six sites, two in each model, were selected across four provinces, with 293 newly treated uncomplicated TB patients being randomly selected. Results The majority (68%) of TB patients were diagnosed in hospitals. Patients in the integrated model presented the simplest care seeking pathways, with the least number of providers visited (2.2), shortest treatment delays (2 days) and the least medical expenditure (2729RMB/401USD). On the contrary, patients in the specialist model had the highest number of provider visits (4), longest treatment delays (23 days) and the highest medical expenditure (11626RMB/1710USD). Logistic regression suggested that patients who were hospitalised tended to have longer treatment delays and higher medical expenditure. Conclusion Specialist hospital treating uncomplicated cases not using the standard regimens posed a threat to TB control. The integrated model has shortened patient treatment pathways, and reduced patient costs; therefore, it could be considered as the direction for future reform of China’s TB control system. PMID