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Sample records for quantitative phase tomography

  1. Quantitative ultrasonic computed tomography using phase-insensitive pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeqiri, Bajram; Baker, Christian; Alosa, Giuseppe; Wells, Peter N. T.; Liang, Hai-Dong

    2013-08-01

    The principle of using ultrasonic computed tomography (UCT) clinically for mapping tissue acoustic properties was suggested almost 40 years ago. Despite strong research activity, UCT been unable to rival its x-ray counterpart in terms of the ability to distinguish tissue pathologies. Conventional piezoelectric detectors deployed in UCT are termed phase-sensitive (PS) and it is well established that this property can lead to artefacts related to refraction and phase-cancellation that mask true tissue structure, particularly for reconstructions involving attenuation. Equally, it has long been known that phase-insensitive (PI) detectors are more immune to this effect, although sufficiently sensitive devices for clinical use have not been available. This paper explores the application of novel PI detectors to UCT. Their operating principle is based on exploiting the pyroelectric properties of the piezoelectric polymer polyvinylidene difluoride. An important detector performance characteristic which makes it particularly suited to UCT, is the lack of directionality of the PI response, relative to the PS detector mode of operation. The performance of the detectors is compared to conventional PS detection methods, for quantitatively assessing the attenuation distribution within various test objects, including a two-phase polyurethane phantom. UCT images are presented for a range of single detector apertures; tomographic reconstruction images being compared with the known structure of phantoms containing inserts as small as 3 mm, which were readily imaged. For larger diameter inserts (>10 mm), the transmitter-detector combination was able to establish the attenuation coefficient of the insert to within ±10% of values determined separately from plane-wave measurements on representative material plaques. The research has demonstrated that the new PI detectors are significantly less susceptible to refraction and phase-cancellation artefacts, generating realistic images in

  2. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    SciTech Connect

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-28

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke’s tabulated data.

  3. Quantitative phase tomography by using x-ray microscope with Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Norio; Tsuburaya, Yuji; Shimada, Akihiro; Aoki, Sadao

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative phase tomography was evaluated by using a differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter. A 3D x-ray phase image of polystyrene beads was obtained at 5.4 keV. The reconstructed refractive index was fairly good agreement with the Henke's tabulated data.

  4. Diffraction optical tomography using a quantitative phase imaging unit

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoohyun; Yaqoob, Zahid; Lee, KyeoReh; Kang, Jeon Woong; Choi, Youngwoon; Hosseini, Poorya; So, Peter T. C.; Park, YongKeun

    2015-01-01

    A simple and practical method to measure three-dimensional (3-D) refractive index (RI) distributions of biological cells is presented. A common-path self-reference interferometry consisting of a compact set of polarizers is attached to a conventional inverted microscope equipped with a beam scanning unit, which can precisely measure multiple 2-D holograms of a sample with high phase stability for various illumination angles, from which accurate 3-D optical diffraction tomograms of the sample can be reconstructed. 3-D RI tomograms of nonbiological samples such as polystyrene microspheres, as well as biological samples including human red blood cells and breast cancer cells, are presented. PMID:25503034

  5. Quantitative imaging of murine osteoarthritic cartilage by phase-contrast micro-computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Ruan, Merry Z C; Dawson, Brian; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Gannon, Francis; Heggeness, Michael; Lee, Brendan H L

    2013-02-01

    The mouse is an optimal model organism in which gene-environment interactions can be used to study the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA). The gold standard for arthritis research in mice is based on histopathology and immunohistochemistry, which are labor-intensive, prone to sampling bias and technical variability, and limited in throughput. The aim of this study was to develop a new technique that assesses mouse cartilage by integrating quantitative volumetric imaging techniques. A novel mouse model of OA was generated by cruciate ligament transection (CLT) and evaluated by histopathology and immunohistochemistry. Knee joint specimens were then imaged using a new technique that combines high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) and phase-contrast optics followed by quantitative analyses. A comparative analysis was also performed in a previously established mouse model of OA generated by destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM). Phase-contrast micro-CT achieved cellular resolution of chondrocytes and quantitative assessment of parameters such as articular cartilage volume and surface area. In mouse models of OA generated by either CLT or DMM, we showed that phase-contrast micro-CT distinguished control and OA cartilage by providing quantitative measures with high reproducibility and minimal variability. Features of OA at the cellular or tissue level could also be observed in images generated by phase-contrast micro-CT. We established an imaging technology that comprehensively assessed and quantified the 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional changes of articular cartilage. Application of this technology will facilitate the rapid and high-throughput assessment of genetic and therapeutic models of OA in mice. Copyright © 2013 by the American College of Rheumatology.

  6. High-Resolution and Quantitative X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography for Mouse Brain Research.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yan; Lin, Xiaojie; Yuan, Falei; Yang, Guo-Yuan; Zhao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Imaging techniques for visualizing cerebral vasculature and distinguishing functional areas are essential and critical to the study of various brain diseases. In this paper, with the X-ray phase-contrast imaging technique, we proposed an experiment scheme for the ex vivo mouse brain study, achieving both high spatial resolution and improved soft-tissue contrast. This scheme includes two steps: sample preparation and volume reconstruction. In the first step, we use heparinized saline to displace the blood inside cerebral vessels and then replace it with air making air-filled mouse brain. After sample preparation, X-ray phase-contrast tomography is performed to collect the data for volume reconstruction. Here, we adopt a phase-retrieval combined filtered backprojection method to reconstruct its three-dimensional structure and redesigned the reconstruction kernel. To evaluate its performance, we carried out experiments at Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The results show that the air-tissue structured cerebral vasculatures are highly visible with propagation-based phase-contrast imaging and can be clearly resolved in reconstructed cross-images. Besides, functional areas, such as the corpus callosum, corpus striatum, and nuclei, are also clearly resolved. The proposed method is comparable with hematoxylin and eosin staining method but represents the studied mouse brain in three dimensions, offering a potential powerful tool for the research of brain disorders.

  7. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Zhen; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, several algorithms that allow for quantitative photoacoustic reconstruction of tissue optical, acoustic and physiological properties are described in a finite-element method based framework. These quantitative reconstruction algorithms are compared, and the merits and limitations associated with these methods are discussed. In addition, a multispectral approach is presented for concurrent reconstructions of multiple parameters including deoxyhaemoglobin, oxyhaemoglobin and water concentrations as well as acoustic speed. Simulation and in vivo experiments are used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the reconstruction algorithms presented. PMID:19581254

  8. Depth-dependent displacement sensitivity analysis and the influence of Doppler angle for quantitative assessment of mechanical properties using phase-sensitive spectral domain optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, Gillian; Subhash, Hrebesh; Alexandrov, Sergey; Leahy, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) asesses the mechanical properties of samples by applying a mechanical stimulation and detecting the resulting sample displacement using optical coherence tomography (OCT). OCE methods which utilise the phase of the OCT signal offer the potential to detect displacements on the sub-nanometre scale. However, the displacement sensitivity achieveable is directly related to the signal-to-noise ratio and phase stability of the underlying OCT system. Furthermore, the estimation of Doppler angle is imperative in accurately measuring the sample displacement. This work evaluates the contributions of each of these parameters for quantitative assessment of mechanical properties using phase-sensitive spectral domain OCT.

  9. Compressive Phase Contrast Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Maia, Filipe; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Padmore, Howard A.; Parkinson, Dula Y.; Pien, Jack; Schirotzek, Andre; Yang, Chao

    2010-09-01

    When x-rays penetrate soft matter, their phase changes more rapidly than their amplitude. Interference effects visible with high brightness sources creates higher contrast, edge enhanced images. When the object is piecewise smooth (made of big blocks of a few components), such higher contrast datasets have a sparse solution. We apply basis pursuit solvers to improve SNR, remove ring artifacts, reduce the number of views and radiation dose from phase contrast datasets collected at the Hard X-Ray Micro Tomography Beamline at the Advanced Light Source. We report a GPU code for the most computationally intensive task, the gridding and inverse gridding algorithm (non uniform sampled Fourier transform).

  10. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Lipid, Protein, and Water Contents via X-Ray Phase-Contrast Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Willner, Marian; Viermetz, Manuel; Marschner, Mathias; Scherer, Kai; Braun, Christian; Fingerle, Alexander; Noël, Peter; Rummeny, Ernst; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography is an emerging imaging technology with powerful capabilities for three-dimensional (3D) visualization of weakly absorbing objects such as biological soft tissues. This technique is an extension of existing X-ray applications because conventional attenuation-contrast images are simultaneously acquired. The complementary information provided by both the contrast modalities suggests that enhanced material characterization is possible when performing combined data analysis. In this study, we describe how protein, lipid, and water concentrations in each 3D voxel can be quantified by vector decomposition. Experimental results of dairy products, porcine fat and rind, and different human soft tissue types are presented. The results demonstrate the potential of phase-contrast imaging as a new analysis tool. The 3D representations of protein, lipid, and water contents open up new opportunities in the fields of biology, medicine, and food science. PMID:27003308

  11. Experimental compressive phase space tomography

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lei; Lee, Justin; Oh, Se Baek; Barbastathis, George

    2012-01-01

    Phase space tomography estimates correlation functions entirely from snapshots in the evolution of the wave function along a time or space variable. In contrast, traditional interferometric methods require measurement of multiple two–point correlations. However, as in every tomographic formulation, undersampling poses a severe limitation. Here we present the first, to our knowledge, experimental demonstration of compressive reconstruction of the classical optical correlation function, i.e. the mutual intensity function. Our compressive algorithm makes explicit use of the physically justifiable assumption of a low–entropy source (or state.) Since the source was directly accessible in our classical experiment, we were able to compare the compressive estimate of the mutual intensity to an independent ground–truth estimate from the van Cittert–Zernike theorem and verify substantial quantitative improvements in the reconstruction. PMID:22513541

  12. Volumetric quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with topological and geometrical features on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has attracted significant interest in recent years for its ability to provide significantly improved image contrast in low absorbing materials such as soft biological tissue. In the research context of cartilage imaging, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize structural details of human patellar cartilage matrix and capture changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the use of geometrical and topological features for volumetric characterization of such chondrocyte patterns in the presence (or absence) of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance of SIM-derived geometrical features (AUC: 0.90 ± 0.09) significantly outperform Minkowski Functionals volume (AUC: 0.54 ± 0.02), surface (AUC: 0.72 ± 0.06), mean breadth (AUC: 0.74 ± 0.06) and Euler characteristic (AUC: 0.78 ± 0.04) (p < 10−4). These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as diagnostic imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:26142112

  13. Phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography: quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix with topological and geometrical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-03-01

    Current assessment of cartilage is primarily based on identification of indirect markers such as joint space narrowing and increased subchondral bone density on x-ray images. In this context, phase contrast CT imaging (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows a direct examination of chondrocyte patterns and their correlation to osteoarthritis through visualization of cartilage soft tissue. This study investigates the use of topological and geometrical approaches for characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the radial zone of the knee cartilage matrix in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. For this purpose, topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals and geometric features derived from the Scaling Index Method (SIM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of healthy and osteoarthritic specimens of human patellar cartilage. The extracted features were then used in a machine learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with high-dimensional geometrical feature vectors derived from SIM (0.95 ± 0.06) which outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.001). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving SIM-derived geometrical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  14. Laser refractive tomography of phase objects

    SciTech Connect

    Raskovskaya, I L

    2013-06-30

    The principles are outlined of laser refractive tomography - a method for reconstructing the values of the refractive index in the cross sections of phase objects, which involves the use of three-dimensional refractive images (3D refractograms) of structured laser radiation. A simulation algorithm is realised and examples are provided of characteristic 3D refractograms obtained by solving the direct problem of refraction of structured radiation. A method was developed for reconstructing the values of refractive index under conditions of strong refraction, which is based on the visualisation of ray trajectories inside an optically inhomogeneous medium. A classification is made of possible approaches to the solution of the inverse problem of refraction based on the visualisation of ray trajectories. Examples are given of cross section reconstruction and quantitative diagnostics of phase objects. (laser imaging)

  15. Quantitative microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Guo, Gaofeng; Jiang, Huabei

    2010-07-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (MI-TAT) is an imaging modality that exploits dielectric contrast while producing images with high ultrasound resolution. Existing reconstruction algorithms for MI-TAT are qualitative and can image only the distribution of the absorbed microwave energy or power loss density. Here the authors describe a method for quantitative MI-TAT and obtain the distribution of dielectric property which directly correlates with tissue structural and functional information. The authors implement the quantitative MI-TAT method based on the finite-element (FE) solution to the Helmholtz equation for electromagnetic field coupled with the thermoacoustic wave equation. Regularization techniques are also used in the FE-based reconstruction algorithm. Simulation results are obtained under various practical scenarios including different noise levels, different contrast levels between the heterogeneity and background region, and multiple targets with various sizes and shapes. The quantitative MI-TAT method described can provide accurate recovery of conductivity distribution in heterogeneous media and is insensitive to noise effect.

  16. Quantitative positron emission tomography in brain research.

    PubMed

    Heurling, Kerstin; Leuzy, Antoine; Jonasson, My; Frick, Andreas; Zimmer, Eduardo R; Nordberg, Agneta; Lubberink, Mark

    2017-09-01

    The application of positron emission tomography (PET) in brain research has increased substantially during the past 20years, and is still growing. PET provides a unique insight into physiological and pathological processes in vivo. In this article we introduce the fundamentals of PET, and the methods available for acquiring quantitative estimates of the parameters of interest. A short introduction to different areas of application is also given, including basic research of brain function and in neurology, psychiatry, drug receptor occupancy studies, and its application in diagnostics of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Our aim is to inform the unfamiliar reader of the underlying basics and potential applications of PET, hoping to inspire the reader into considering how the technique could be of benefit for his or her own research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Computer-aided diagnosis in phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography for quantitative characterization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Glaser, Christian; Wismuller, Axel

    2013-10-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ±0.08 ) and "Euler characteristic" (AUC: 0.94 ±0.07 ), and GLCM-derived feature "Correlation" (AUC: 0.93 ±0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy.

  18. Computer-Aided Diagnosis in Phase Contrast Imaging X-Ray Computed Tomography for Quantitative Characterization of ex vivo Human Patellar Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Glaser, Christian; Wismüller, Axel

    2014-01-01

    Visualization of ex vivo human patellar cartilage matrix through the phase contrast imaging X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has been previously demonstrated. Such studies revealed osteoarthritis-induced changes to chondrocyte organization in the radial zone. This study investigates the application of texture analysis to characterizing such chondrocyte patterns in the presence and absence of osteoarthritic damage. Texture features derived from Minkowski functionals (MF) and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) were extracted from 842 regions of interest (ROI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These texture features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with the MF features perimeter (AUC: 0.94 ± 0.08) and “Euler characteristic” (AUC: 0.94 ± 0.07), and GLCM-derived feature “Correlation” (AUC: 0.93 ± 0.07). These results suggest that such texture features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix, enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. PMID:23744660

  19. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided. PMID:26831383

  20. Fourier phase in Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Uttam, Shikhar; Liu, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Phase of an electromagnetic wave propagating through a sample-of-interest is well understood in the context of quantitative phase imaging in transmission-mode microscopy. In the past decade, Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography has been used to extend quantitative phase imaging to the reflection-mode. Unlike transmission-mode electromagnetic phase, however, the origin and characteristics of reflection-mode Fourier phase are poorly understood, especially in samples with a slowly varying refractive index. In this paper, the general theory of Fourier phase from first principles is presented, and it is shown that Fourier phase is a joint estimate of subresolution offset and mean spatial frequency of the coherence-gated sample refractive index. It is also shown that both spectral-domain phase microscopy and depth-resolved spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy are special cases of this general theory. Analytical expressions are provided for both, and simulations are presented to explain and support the theoretical results. These results are further used to show how Fourier phase allows the estimation of an axial mean spatial frequency profile of the sample, along with depth-resolved characterization of localized optical density change and sample heterogeneity. Finally, a Fourier phase-based explanation of Doppler optical coherence tomography is also provided.

  1. Quantitative tomography simulations and reconstruction algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, H E; Aufderheide, M B; Goodman, D; Schach von Wittenau, A; Logan, C; Hall, J; Jackson, J; Slone, D

    2000-11-01

    X-ray, neutron and proton transmission radiography and computed tomography (CT) are important diagnostic tools that are at the heart of LLNLs effort to meet the goals of the DOE's Advanced Radiography Campaign. This campaign seeks to improve radiographic simulation and analysis so that radiography can be a useful quantitative diagnostic tool for stockpile stewardship. Current radiographic accuracy does not allow satisfactory separation of experimental effects from the true features of an object's tomographically reconstructed image. This can lead to difficult and sometimes incorrect interpretation of the results. By improving our ability to simulate the whole radiographic and CT system, it will be possible to examine the contribution of system components to various experimental effects, with the goal of removing or reducing them. In this project, we are merging this simulation capability with a maximum-likelihood (constrained-conjugate-gradient-CCG) reconstruction technique yielding a physics-based, forward-model image-reconstruction code. In addition, we seek to improve the accuracy of computed tomography from transmission radiographs by studying what physics is needed in the forward model. During FY 2000, an improved version of the LLNL ray-tracing code called HADES has been coupled with a recently developed LLNL CT algorithm known as CCG. The problem of image reconstruction is expressed as a large matrix equation relating a model for the object being reconstructed to its projections (radiographs). Using a constrained-conjugate-gradient search algorithm, a maximum likelihood solution is sought. This search continues until the difference between the input measured radiographs or projections and the simulated or calculated projections is satisfactorily small. We developed a 2D HADES-CCG CT code that uses full ray-tracing simulations from HADES as the projector. Often an object has axial symmetry and it is desirable to reconstruct into a 2D r-z mesh with a limited

  2. Volumetric quantitative characterization of human patellar cartilage with topological and geometrical features on phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B; Coan, Paola; Huber, Markus B; Diemoz, Paul C; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-11-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has attracted significant interest in recent years for its ability to provide significantly improved image contrast in low absorbing materials such as soft biological tissue. In the research context of cartilage imaging, previous studies have demonstrated the ability of PCI-CT to visualize structural details of human patellar cartilage matrix and capture changes to chondrocyte organization induced by osteoarthritis. This study evaluates the use of geometrical and topological features for volumetric characterization of such chondrocyte patterns in the presence (or absence) of osteoarthritic damage. Geometrical features derived from the scaling index method (SIM) and topological features derived from Minkowski Functionals were extracted from 1392 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of ex vivo human patellar cartilage specimens. These features were subsequently used in a machine learning task with support vector regression to classify VOIs as healthy or osteoarthritic; classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC). Our results show that the classification performance of SIM-derived geometrical features (AUC: 0.90 ± 0.09) is significantly better than Minkowski Functionals volume (AUC: 0.54 ± 0.02), surface (AUC: 0.72 ± 0.06), mean breadth (AUC: 0.74 ± 0.06) and Euler characteristic (AUC: 0.78 ± 0.04) (p < 10(-4)). These results suggest that such geometrical features can provide a detailed characterization of the chondrocyte organization in the cartilage matrix in an automated manner, while also enabling classification of cartilage as healthy or osteoarthritic with high accuracy. Such features could potentially serve as diagnostic imaging markers for evaluating osteoarthritis progression and its response to different therapeutic intervention strategies.

  3. Multigrid-based reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengfu; Montcel, Bruno; Yuan, Zhen; Liu, Wanyu; Vray, Didier

    2015-01-01

    This paper proposes a multigrid inversion framework for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction. The forward model of optical fluence distribution and the inverse problem are solved at multiple resolutions. A fixed-point iteration scheme is formulated for each resolution and used as a cost function. The simulated and experimental results for quantitative photoacoustic tomography reconstruction show that the proposed multigrid inversion can dramatically reduce the required number of iterations for the optimization process without loss of reliability in the results. PMID:26203371

  4. Optical coherence Doppler tomography for quantitative cerebral blood flow imaging

    PubMed Central

    You, Jiang; Du, Congwu; Volkow, Nora D.; Pan, Yingtian

    2014-01-01

    Optical coherence Doppler tomography (ODT) is a promising neurotechnique that permits 3D imaging of the cerebral blood flow (CBF) network; however, quantitative CBF velocity (CBFv) imaging remains challenging. Here we present a simple phase summation method to enhance slow capillary flow detection sensitivity without sacrificing dynamic range for fast flow and vessel tracking to improve angle correction for absolute CBFv quantification. Flow phantom validation indicated that the CBFv quantification accuracy increased from 15% to 91% and the coefficient of variation (CV) decreased 9.3-fold; in vivo mouse brain validation showed that CV decreased 4.4-/10.8- fold for venular/arteriolar flows. ODT was able to identify cocaine-elicited microischemia and quantify CBFv disruption in branch vessels and capillaries that otherwise would have not been possible. PMID:25401033

  5. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-11-01

    Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging of arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Sridharan, Shamira; Katz, Aron; Soto-Adames, Felipe; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Classification of arthropods is performed by characterization of fine features such as setae and cuticles. An unstained whole arthropod specimen mounted on a slide can be preserved for many decades, but is difficult to study since current methods require sample manipulation or tedious image processing. Spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM) is a quantitative phase imaging (QPI) technique that is an add-on module to a commercial phase contrast microscope. We use SLIM to image a whole organism springtail Ceratophysella denticulata mounted on a slide. This is the first time, to our knowledge, that an entire organism has been imaged using QPI. We also demonstrate the ability of SLIM to image fine structures in addition to providing quantitative data that cannot be obtained by traditional bright field microscopy. PMID:26334858

  7. A wavelet phase filter for emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, E.T.; Lin, B.

    1995-07-01

    The presence of a high level of noise is a characteristic in some tomographic imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET). Wavelet methods can smooth out noise while preserving significant features of images. Mallat et al. proposed a wavelet based denoising scheme exploiting wavelet modulus maxima, but the scheme is sensitive to noise. In this study, the authors explore the properties of wavelet phase, with a focus on reconstruction of emission tomography images. Specifically, they show that the wavelet phase of regular Poisson noise under a Haar-type wavelet transform converges in distribution to a random variable uniformly distributed on [0, 2{pi}). They then propose three wavelet-phase-based denoising schemes which exploit this property: edge tracking, local phase variance thresholding, and scale phase variation thresholding. Some numerical results are also presented. The numerical experiments indicate that wavelet phase techniques show promise for wavelet based denoising methods.

  8. Quantitative oxygenation venography from MRI phase.

    PubMed

    Fan, Audrey P; Bilgic, Berkin; Gagnon, Louis; Witzel, Thomas; Bhat, Himanshu; Rosen, Bruce R; Adalsteinsson, Elfar

    2014-07-01

    To demonstrate acquisition and processing methods for quantitative oxygenation venograms that map in vivo oxygen saturation (SvO2 ) along cerebral venous vasculature. Regularized quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is used to reconstruct susceptibility values and estimate SvO2 in veins. QSM with ℓ1 and ℓ2 regularization are compared in numerical simulations of vessel structures with known magnetic susceptibility. Dual-echo, flow-compensated phase images are collected in three healthy volunteers to create QSM images. Bright veins in the susceptibility maps are vectorized and used to form a three-dimensional vascular mesh, or venogram, along which to display SvO2 values from QSM. Quantitative oxygenation venograms that map SvO2 along brain vessels of arbitrary orientation and geometry are shown in vivo. SvO2 values in major cerebral veins lie within the normal physiological range reported by (15) O positron emission tomography. SvO2 from QSM is consistent with previous MR susceptometry methods for vessel segments oriented parallel to the main magnetic field. In vessel simulations, ℓ1 regularization results in less than 10% SvO2 absolute error across all vessel tilt orientations and provides more accurate SvO2 estimation than ℓ2 regularization. The proposed analysis of susceptibility images enables reliable mapping of quantitative SvO2 along venograms and may facilitate clinical use of venous oxygenation imaging. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. GPC and quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Villangca, Mark Jayson; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) is a light efficient method for generating speckle-free contiguous optical distributions using binary-only or analog phase levels. It has been used in applications such as optical trapping and manipulation, active microscopy, structured illumination, optical security, parallel laser marking and labelling and recently in contemporary biophotonics applications such as for adaptive and parallel two-photon optogenetics and neurophotonics. We will present our most recent GPC developments geared towards these applications. We first show a very compact static light shaper followed by the potential of GPC for biomedical and multispectral applications where we experimentally demonstrate the active light shaping of a supercontinuum laser over most of the visible wavelength range. Finally, we discuss how GPC can be advantageously applied for Quantitative Phase Imaging (QPI).

  10. Direct coupling of tomography and phase problems

    DOE PAGES

    Gürsoy, Doğa

    2017-08-15

    A generalization of the ptychographic phase problem is presented for recovering refractive properties of a three-dimensional object in a tomography setting. This approach, which ignores the lateral overlapping probe requirements in existing ptychography algorithms, can enable the reconstruction of objects using highly flexible acquisition patterns and pave the way for sparse and rapid data collection with lower radiation exposure.

  11. Quantitative photoacoustic tomography based on the radiative transfer equation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Lei; Sun, Yao; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-06-15

    We describe a method for quantitative photoacoustic tomography (PAT) based on the radiative transfer equation (RTE) coupled with the Helmholtz photoacoustic wave equation. This RTE-based quantitative PAT allows for accurate recovery of absolute absorption coefficient images of heterogeneous media and provides significantly improved image reconstruction for the cases where the photon diffusion approximation may fail. The method and associated finite element reconstruction algorithm are validated using a series of tissuelike phantom experiments.

  12. Quantitative ultrasonic phased array imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady J.; Schmerr, Lester W., Jr.; Sedov, Alexander

    2014-02-01

    When imaging with ultrasonic phased arrays, what do we actually image? What quantitative information is contained in the image? Ad-hoc delay-and-sum methods such as the synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) and the total focusing method (TFM) fail to answer these questions. We have shown that a new quantitative approach allows the formation of flaw images by explicitly inverting the Thompson-Gray measurement model. To examine the above questions, we have set up a software simulation test bed that considers a 2-D scalar scattering problem of a cylindrical inclusion with the method of separation of variables. It is shown that in SAFT types of imaging the only part of the flaw properly imaged is the front surface specular response of the flaw. Other responses (back surface reflections, creeping waves, etc.) are improperly imaged and form artifacts in the image. In the case of TFM-like imaging the quantity being properly imaged is an angular integration of the front surface reflectivity. The other, improperly imaged responses are also averaged, leading to a reduction in some of the artifacts present. Our results have strong implications for flaw sizing and flaw characterization with delay-and-sum images.

  13. Longitudinal phase space tomography with space charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, S.; Lindroos, M.; Koscielniak, S.

    2000-12-01

    Tomography is now a very broad topic with a wealth of algorithms for the reconstruction of both qualitative and quantitative images. In an extension in the domain of particle accelerators, one of the simplest algorithms has been modified to take into account the nonlinearity of large-amplitude synchrotron motion. This permits the accurate reconstruction of longitudinal phase space density from one-dimensional bunch profile data. The method is a hybrid one which incorporates particle tracking. Hitherto, a very simple tracking algorithm has been employed because only a brief span of measured profile data is required to build a snapshot of phase space. This is one of the strengths of the method, as tracking for relatively few turns relaxes the precision to which input machine parameters need to be known. The recent addition of longitudinal space charge considerations as an optional refinement of the code is described. Simplicity suggested an approach based on the derivative of bunch shape with the properties of the vacuum chamber parametrized by a single value of distributed reactive impedance and by a geometrical coupling coefficient. This is sufficient to model the dominant collective effects in machines of low to moderate energy. In contrast to simulation codes, binning is not an issue since the profiles to be differentiated are measured ones. The program is written in Fortran 90 with high-performance Fortran extensions for parallel processing. A major effort has been made to identify and remove execution bottlenecks, for example, by reducing floating-point calculations and recoding slow intrinsic functions. A pointerlike mechanism which avoids the problems associated with pointers and parallel processing has been implemented. This is required to handle the large, sparse matrices that the algorithm employs. Results obtained with and without the inclusion of space charge are presented and compared for proton beams in the CERN protron synchrotron booster. Comparisons

  14. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; de la Zerda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects. PMID:26869724

  15. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; Zerda, Adam de la

    2016-01-11

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  16. Quantitative contrast-enhanced optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winetraub, Yonatan; SoRelle, Elliott D.; Liba, Orly; de la Zerda, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed a model to accurately quantify the signals produced by exogenous scattering agents used for contrast-enhanced Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT). This model predicts distinct concentration-dependent signal trends that arise from the underlying physics of OCT detection. Accordingly, we show that real scattering particles can be described as simplified ideal scatterers with modified scattering intensity and concentration. The relation between OCT signal and particle concentration is approximately linear at concentrations lower than 0.8 particle per imaging voxel. However, at higher concentrations, interference effects cause signal to increase with a square root dependence on the number of particles within a voxel. Finally, high particle concentrations cause enough light attenuation to saturate the detected signal. Predictions were validated by comparison with measured OCT signals from gold nanorods (GNRs) prepared in water at concentrations ranging over five orders of magnitude (50 fM to 5 nM). In addition, we validated that our model accurately predicts the signal responses of GNRs in highly heterogeneous scattering environments including whole blood and living animals. By enabling particle quantification, this work provides a valuable tool for current and future contrast-enhanced in vivo OCT studies. More generally, the model described herein may inform the interpretation of detected signals in modalities that rely on coherence-based detection or are susceptible to interference effects.

  17. Quantitative analysis in medicine using photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Haisch, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    Photoacoustic imaging, or photoacoustic tomography, is a 2D or 3D optical imaging method based on localized optical absorption of pulsed laser radiation. By a spatially resolved detection of the following thermoelastic expansion, the local distribution of the absorption can be determined. The technique has been proven to have significant potential for the imaging of human and animal organs and single blood vessels, combining high contrast with good spatial resolution. The contrast is based on the specific optical absorption of certain components in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, for most applications of blood. Generally, the images represent the local distribution of blood in a qualitative or semiquantitative way. Although photoacoustic imaging is capable of revealing absolute and spatially resolved concentrations of endogenous (such as oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin) or artificial (such as tumor markers) chromophores, only a very limited number of publications have dealt with this demanding task. In this report, the problems involved and possible solutions are reviewed and summarized.

  18. Computed Tomography of Transverse Phase Space

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, A.; Johnstone, C.; Johnstone, J.

    2016-09-19

    Two computed tomography techniques are explored to reconstruct beam transverse phase space using both simulated beam and multi-wire profile data in the Fermilab Muon Test Area ("MTA") beamline. Both Filtered Back-Projection ("FBP") and Simultaneous Algebraic Reconstruction Technique ("SART") algorithms [2] are considered and compared. Errors and artifacts are compared as a function of each algorithm’s free parameters, and it is shown through simulation and MTA beamline profiles that SART is advantageous for reconstructions with limited profile data.

  19. Quantitative coherent-scatter-computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batchelar, Deidre L.; Westmore, Michael S.; Lai, Hao; Cunningham, Ian A.

    1998-07-01

    Conventional means of diagnosiing and assessing the progression of osteoporosis, including radiographic absorptiometry and quantitative CT, are directly or indirectly dependent upon bone density. This is, how ever, not always a reliable indicator of fracture risk. Changes in the trabecular structure and bone mineral content (BMC) are thought to provide a better indication of the change of spontaneous fractures occurring. Coherent-scatter CT (CSCT) is a technique which produces images based on the low angle (0 - 10 degrees) x-ray diffraction properties of tissue. Diffraction patterns from an object are acquired using first-generation CT geometry with a diagnostic x-ray image intensifier based system. These patterns are used to reconstruct a series of maps of the angle dependent coherent scatter cross section in a tomographic slice which are dependent upon the molecular structure of the scatterer. Hydroxyapatite has a very different cross section to that of soft tissue, and the CSCT method may, therefore, form the basis for a more direct measure of BMC. Our original CSCT images suffered from a 'cupping' artifact, resulting in increased intensities for pixels at the periphery of the object. This artifact, which is due to self-attenuation of scattered x rays, caused a systematic error of up to 20% in cross-sections measured from a CT image. This effect has been removed by monitoring the transmitted intensity using a photodiode mounted on the primary beam stop, and normalizing the scatter intensity to that of the transmitted beam for each projection. Images reconstructed from data normalized in this way do not exhibit observable attenuation artifacts. Elimination of this artifact enables the determination of accurate quantitative measures of BMC at each pixel in a tomograph.

  20. A Phase Space Tomography Diagnostic for Pitz

    SciTech Connect

    D.J. Holder; B.D. Muratori; F.E. Hannon; S. Khodyachykh; A. Oppelt

    2006-06-26

    The Photo Injector Test Facility at DESY in Zeuthen (PITZ) is a European collaboration developing RF photocathode electron guns for light source and linear collider projects. As part of the collaborative work being partially funded by the EU's FP6 programme, CCLRC Daresbury Laboratory and DESY are designing and building a phase space tomography diagnostic based on a set of multiple quadrupoles and view screens. In order to measure the beam emittance, four screens with intermediate quadrupole doublets will be used. The equipment will be installed and tested at PITZ as part of the facility upgrade presently ongoing. Following simulations of the gun using the ASTRA code at a range of energies, simulations of the electron beam parameters through the matching and tomography sections must be undertaken in order to specify the optimum arrangement of magnets and screens.

  1. [Quantitative computerized tomography in the study of osteoporosis. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Mecozzi, B; Anselmetti, G C

    1992-01-01

    In the diagnosis of osteoporosis there are, today, several techniques for investigating bone mineral density. In this work the authors evaluate the sensitivity of Computed Tomography in the diagnosis of this metabolic disease, because of the built-in competence of this method in determining the density of the anatomical tissues. In a randomised study the Authors performed Single Energy Quantitative Computed Tomography (SEQCT) in estimating the bone mineral density of lumbar vertebrae in 44 female patients. The data obtained were correlated, using the Student "t" test, to the measurements acquired, in the same group of patients, employing Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DEXA), 27 patients, and Total Body DEXA, 17 patients. Results revealed a good correlation between SEQCT and DEXA (R = 0.89) and statistical significance (p < 0.001). On the contrary there is not a good correlation (R = 0.58) if SEQCT is compared to Total Body DEXA. According to our experience Quantitative Computed Tomography is useful in diagnosis osteoporosis and it should be performed in all post-menopausal patients. This method, which has a high level of precision, is cheap and easily adaptable to every Computed Tomography. Because of the high X-ray dose rate, only DEXA should be performed in monitoring patients undergoing therapy.

  2. Elliptical-anisotropic eikonal phase velocity tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Biondi, B. L.; Nichols, D.

    2015-02-01

    We formulated an anisotropic eikonal tomography approach for phase velocities based on a two-dimensional elliptical-anisotropic wave equation. We can fit the parameters of the ellipse directly from measured first-order traveltime surface gradients and constrain these parameters to vary smoothly over space. The method is applied to Scholte waves in virtual seismic sources from stations in the Life of Field Seismic Ocean Bottom Cable array installed over the Ekofisk field. The fast directions of the azimuthally anisotropic Scholte wave velocities form a large circular pattern over the Ekofisk field. This pattern dominates the Scholte wave phase velocities at Ekofisk between 0.7 and 1.1 Hz. It results from the overburden stress state and from seafloor subsidence induced by decades of hydrocarbon extraction.

  3. Quantitative phase microscopy with asynchronous digital holography.

    PubMed

    Chalut, Kevin J; Brown, William J; Wax, Adam

    2007-03-19

    We demonstrate a new method of measuring quantitative phase in imaging of biological materials. This method, asynchronous digital holography, employs knowledge of a moving fringe created by acousto-optic modulators to execute phase-shifting interferometry using two near-simultaneous interferograms. The method can be used to obtain quantitative phase images of dynamic biological samples on millisecond time scales. We present results on a standard sample, and on live cell samples.

  4. Quantitative phase microscopy with asynchronous digital holography

    PubMed Central

    Brown, William J.; Wax, Adam

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a new method of measuring quantitative phase in imaging of biological materials. This method, asynchronous digital holography, employs knowledge of a moving fringe created by acousto-optic modulators to execute phase-shifting interferometry using two near-simultaneous interferograms. The method can be used to obtain quantitative phase images of dynamic biological samples on millisecond time scales. We present results on a standard sample, and on live cell samples. PMID:19532543

  5. Geographic and demographic variabilities of quantitative parameters in stress myocardial computed tomography perfusion.

    PubMed

    Park, Jinoh; Kim, Hyun-Sook; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Yang, Dong Hyun; Koo, Hyun Jung; Kang, Joon-Won; Kim, Young-Hak

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the geographic and demographic variabilities of the quantitative parameters of computed tomography perfusion (CTP) of the left ventricular (LV) myocardium in patients with normal coronary artery on computed tomography angiography (CTA). From a multicenter CTP registry of stress and static computed tomography, we retrospectively recruited 113 patients (mean age, 60 years; 57 men) without perfusion defect on visual assessment and minimal (< 20% of diameter stenosis) or no coronary artery disease on CTA. Using semiautomatic analysis software, quantitative parameters of the LV myocardium, including the myocardial attenuation in stress and rest phases, transmural perfusion ratio (TPR), and myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI), were evaluated in 16 myocardial segments. In the lateral wall of the LV myocardium, all quantitative parameters except for MPRI were significantly higher compared with those in the other walls. The MPRI showed consistent values in all myocardial walls (anterior to lateral wall: range, 25% to 27%; p = 0.401). At the basal level of the myocardium, all quantitative parameters were significantly lower than those at the mid- and apical levels. Compared with men, women had significantly higher values of myocardial attenuation and TPR. Age, body mass index, and Framingham risk score were significantly associated with the difference in myocardial attenuation. Geographic and demographic variabilities of quantitative parameters in stress myocardial CTP exist in healthy subjects without significant coronary artery disease. This information may be helpful when assessing myocardial perfusion defects in CTP.

  6. In vivo validation of quantitative frequency domain fluorescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Ghijsen, Michael; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-12-01

    We have developed a hybrid frequency domain fluorescence tomography and magnetic resonance imaging system (MRI) for small animal imaging. The main purpose of this system is to obtain quantitatively accurate fluorescence concentration and lifetime images using a multi-modality approach. In vivo experiments are undertaken to evaluate the system. We compare the recovered fluorescence parameters with and without MRI structural a priori information. In addition, we compare two optical background heterogeneity correction methods: Born normalization and utilizing diffuse optical tomography (DOT) functional a priori information. The results show that the concentration and lifetime of a 4.2-mm diameter indocyanine green inclusion located 15 mm deep inside a rat can be recovered with less than a 5% error when functional a priori information from DOT and structural a priori information from MRI are utilized.

  7. Quantitative cone beam X-ray luminescence tomography/X-ray computed tomography imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Dongmei; Zhu, Shouping Chen, Xueli; Chao, Tiantian; Cao, Xu; Zhao, Fengjun; Huang, Liyu; Liang, Jimin

    2014-11-10

    X-ray luminescence tomography (XLT) is an imaging technology based on X-ray-excitable materials. The main purpose of this paper is to obtain quantitative luminescence concentration using the structural information of the X-ray computed tomography (XCT) in the hybrid cone beam XLT/XCT system. A multi-wavelength luminescence cone beam XLT method with the structural a priori information is presented to relieve the severe ill-posedness problem in the cone beam XLT. The nanophosphors and phantom experiments were undertaken to access the linear relationship of the system response. Then, an in vivo mouse experiment was conducted. The in vivo experimental results show that the recovered concentration error as low as 6.67% with the location error of 0.85 mm can be achieved. The results demonstrate that the proposed method can accurately recover the nanophosphor inclusion and realize the quantitative imaging.

  8. Quantitative damage imaging using Lamb wave diffraction tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Yan; Ruan, Min; Zhu, Wen-Fa; Chai, Xiao-Dong

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the diffraction tomography for quantitative imaging damages of partly through-thickness holes with various shapes in isotropic plates by using converted and non-converted scattered Lamb waves generated numerically. Finite element simulations are carried out to provide the scattered wave data. The validity of the finite element model is confirmed by the comparison of scattering directivity pattern (SDP) of circle blind hole damage between the finite element simulations and the analytical results. The imaging method is based on a theoretical relation between the one-dimensional (1D) Fourier transform of the scattered projection and two-dimensional (2D) spatial Fourier transform of the scattering object. A quantitative image of the damage is obtained by carrying out the 2D inverse Fourier transform of the scattering object. The proposed approach employs a circle transducer network containing forward and backward projections, which lead to so-called transmission mode (TMDT) and reflection mode diffraction tomography (RMDT), respectively. The reconstructed results of the two projections for a non-converted S0 scattered mode are investigated to illuminate the influence of the scattering field data. The results show that Lamb wave diffraction tomography using the combination of TMDT and RMDT improves the imaging effect compared with by using only the TMDT or RMDT. The scattered data of the converted A0 mode are also used to assess the performance of the diffraction tomography method. It is found that the circle and elliptical shaped damages can still be reasonably identified from the reconstructed images while the reconstructed results of other complex shaped damages like crisscross rectangles and racecourse are relatively poor. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474195, 11274226, 11674214, and 51478258).

  9. Shifted helical computed tomography to optimize cardiac positron emission tomography-computed tomography coregistration: quantitative improvement and limitations.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Nils P; Pan, Tinsu; Gould, K Lance

    2010-10-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) uses CT attenuation correction but suffers from misregistration artifacts. However, the quantitative accuracy of helical versus cine CT in the same patient after optimized coregistration by shifting both CT data as needed for each patient is unknown. We studied 293 patients undergoing cardiac perfusion PET-CT using helical CT attenuation correction for comparison to cine CT. Objective, quantitative criteria identified perfusion abnormalities that were associated visually with PET-CT misregistration. Custom software shifted CT data to optimize coregistration with quantitative artifact improvement. The majority (58.1%) of cases with both helical and shifted helical CT data (n  = 93) had artifacts that improved or resolved by software shifting helical CT data. Translation of shifted helical CT was greatest in the x-direction (8.8 ± 3.3 mm) and less in the y- and z-directions (approximately 3.5 mm). The magnitude of differences in quantitative end points was greatest for helical (p  =  .0001, n  =  177 studies), less for shifted helical but significant (p  =  .0001, n  =  93 studies), and least for cine (not significant, n  =  161 studies) CT compared to optimal attenuation correction for each patient. Frequent artifacts owing to attenuation-emission misregistration are substantially corrected by software shifting helical CT scans to achieve proper coregistration that, however, remains on average significantly inferior to cine CT attenuation quantitatively.

  10. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies.

    PubMed

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Lagreze, Wolf A; Schuman, Joel S; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U; Albrecht, Philipp

    2016-06-14

    To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. © 2016 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. The APOSTEL recommendations for reporting quantitative optical coherence tomography studies

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Herranz, Andrés; Balk, Lisanne J.; Oberwahrenbrock, Timm; Saidha, Shiv; Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H.; Lagreze, Wolf A.; Schuman, Joel S.; Villoslada, Pablo; Calabresi, Peter; Balcer, Laura; Petzold, Axel; Green, Ari J.; Paul, Friedemann; Brandt, Alexander U.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To develop consensus recommendations for reporting of quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) study results. Methods: A panel of experienced OCT researchers (including 11 neurologists, 2 ophthalmologists, and 2 neuroscientists) discussed requirements for performing and reporting quantitative analyses of retinal morphology and developed a list of initial recommendations based on experience and previous studies. The list of recommendations was subsequently revised during several meetings of the coordinating group. Results: We provide a 9-point checklist encompassing aspects deemed relevant when reporting quantitative OCT studies. The areas covered are study protocol, acquisition device, acquisition settings, scanning protocol, funduscopic imaging, postacquisition data selection, postacquisition data analysis, recommended nomenclature, and statistical analysis. Conclusions: The Advised Protocol for OCT Study Terminology and Elements recommendations include core items to standardize and improve quality of reporting in quantitative OCT studies. The recommendations will make reporting of quantitative OCT studies more consistent and in line with existing standards for reporting research in other biomedical areas. The recommendations originated from expert consensus and thus represent Class IV evidence. They will need to be regularly adjusted according to new insights and practices. PMID:27225223

  12. Quantitative fluorescence tomography using a trimodality system: in vivo validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Roeck, Werner W.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-07-01

    A fully integrated trimodality fluorescence, diffuse optical, and x-ray computed tomography (FT/DOT/XCT) system for small animal imaging is reported in this work. The main purpose of this system is to obtain quantitatively accurate fluorescence concentration images using a multimodality approach. XCT offers anatomical information, while DOT provides the necessary background optical property map to improve FT image accuracy. The quantitative accuracy of this trimodality system is demonstrated in vivo. In particular, we show that a 2-mm-diam fluorescence inclusion located 8 mm deep in a nude mouse can only be localized when functional a priori information from DOT is available. However, the error in the recovered fluorophore concentration is nearly 87%. On the other hand, the fluorophore concentration can be accurately recovered within 2% error when both DOT functional and XCT structural a priori information are utilized together to guide and constrain the FT reconstruction algorithm.

  13. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.L.; Genant, H.K.; Cann, C.E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G.S.; Kolb, F.O.; Reiser, U.J.

    1985-05-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid- induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements.

  14. Quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis of olecranon fractures.

    PubMed

    Lubberts, Bart; Janssen, Stein; Mellema, Jos; Ring, David

    2016-05-01

    Olecranon fractures have variable size of the proximal fragment, patterns of fragmentation, and subluxation of the ulnohumeral joint that might be better understood and categorized on the basis of quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography analysis. Mayo type I fractures are undisplaced, Mayo type II are displaced and stable, and Mayo type III are displaced and unstable. The last is categorized into anterior and posterior dislocations. The purpose of this study was to further clarify fracture morphology between Mayo type I, II, and III fractures. Three-dimensional models were created for a consecutive series of 78 patients with olecranon fractures that were evaluated with computed tomography. We determined the total number of fracture fragments, the volume and articular surface area of each fracture fragment, and the degree of displacement of the most proximal olecranon fracture fragment. Displaced olecranon fractures were more comminuted than nondisplaced fractures (P = .02). Displaced fractures without ulnohumeral subluxation were smallest in terms of both volume (P < .001) and articular surface involvement (P < .001) of the most proximal olecranon fracture fragment. There was no difference in average displacement of the proximal fragment between displaced fractures with and without ulnohumeral subluxation (P = .74). Anterior olecranon fracture-dislocations created more displaced (P = .04) and smaller proximal fragments than posterior fracture-dislocations (P = .005), with comparable fragmentation on average (P = .60). The ability to quantify volume, articular surface area, displacement, and fragmentation using quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography should be considered when increased knowledge of fracture morphology and fracture patterns might be useful. Copyright © 2016 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma.

    PubMed

    Grenier, Philippe A; Fetita, Catalin I; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-02-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5-10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively.

  16. Quantitative computed tomography imaging of airway remodeling in severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Fetita, Catalin I.; Brillet, Pierre-Yves

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous condition and approximately 5–10% of asthmatic subjects have severe disease associated with structure changes of the airways (airway remodeling) that may develop over time or shortly after onset of disease. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging of the tracheobronchial tree and lung parenchyma has improved during the last 10 years, and has enabled investigators to study the large airway architecture in detail and assess indirectly the small airway structure. In severe asthmatics, morphologic changes in large airways, quantitatively assessed using 2D-3D airway registration and recent algorithms, are characterized by airway wall thickening, luminal narrowing and bronchial stenoses. Extent of expiratory gas trapping, quantitatively assessed using lung densitometry, may be used to assess indirectly small airway remodeling. Investigators have used these quantitative imaging techniques in order to attempt severity grading of asthma, and to identify clusters of asthmatic patients that differ in morphologic and functional characteristics. Although standardization of image analysis procedures needs to be improved, the identification of remodeling pattern in various phenotypes of severe asthma and the ability to relate airway structures to important clinical outcomes should help target treatment more effectively. PMID:26981458

  17. Sinonasal Angiomatous Polyp: Evaluation With 2-Phase Helical Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Changwei; Wang, Qiushi; Guo, Qiyong; Wang, Zhenhai; Lu, Xiaomei; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Sinonasal angiomatous polyp (SAP) is a rare benign nontumorous lesion and previously considered lack of characteristic computed tomography (CT) findings. This study aimed to evaluate 2-phase helical CT for characterization of SAP. Twelve patients with pathologically confirmed SAP underwent 2-phase helical CT preoperatively. After injection of 80 mL contrast material at a rate of 3 mL/s, early and delayed phases were obtained with delays of 30 and 120 s, respectively. The degree and pattern of enhancement were visually analyzed. The attenuation changes were also analyzed quantitatively by measuring CT values and compared with those of the internal maxillary artery (IMA). All 12 cases showed vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement at both early and delayed phases. An irregular linear, nodular, and patchy enhancement pattern was found at the early phase, and enlarged and fused together, that is, progressive enhancement pattern was found at the delayed phase. There was no significant difference between the CT values of SAP and those of the IMA at the plain, arterial phase, and delayed phase (53 ± 6 Hounsfield units [HU] vs 56 ± 7 HU, 187 ± 56 HU vs 209 ± 71 HU, and 143 ± 22 HU vs 139 ± 19 HU, respectively, P = 0.361, 0.429, and 0.613, respectively). Vessel-like marked heterogeneous enhancement was a characteristic CT feature of SAP, and progressive enhancement on 2-phase helical CT could further convince the diagnosis. PMID:26200632

  18. Glasses for 3D ultrasound computer tomography: phase compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapf, M.; Hopp, T.; Ruiter, N. V.

    2016-03-01

    Ultrasound Computer Tomography (USCT), developed at KIT, is a promising new imaging system for breast cancer diagnosis, and was successfully tested in a pilot study. The 3D USCT II prototype consists of several hundreds of ultrasound (US) transducers on a semi-ellipsoidal aperture. Spherical waves are sequentially emitted by individual transducers and received in parallel by many transducers. Reflectivity volumes are reconstructed by synthetic aperture focusing (SAFT). However, straight forward SAFT imaging leads to blurred images due to system imperfections. We present an extension of a previously proposed approach to enhance the images. This approach includes additional a priori information and system characteristics. Now spatial phase compensation was included. The approach was evaluated with a simulation and clinical data sets. An increase in the image quality was observed and quantitatively measured by SNR and other metrics.

  19. Clinical efficacy of 2-phase versus 4-phase computed tomography for localization in primary hyperparathyroidism

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Adriana G.; Shada, Amber L.; Martin, Allison N.; Raghavan, Prashant; Durst, Christopher R.; Mukherjee, Sugoto; Gaughen, John R.; Ornan, David A.; Hanks, John B.; Smith, Philip W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Four-dimensional computed tomography is being used increasingly for localization of abnormal glands in primary hyperparathyroidism. We hypothesized that compared with traditional 4-phase imaging, 2-phase imaging would halve the radiation dose without compromising parathyroid localization and clinical outcomes. Methods A transition from 4-phase to 2-phase imaging was instituted between 2009 and 2010. A pre-post analysis was performed on patients undergoing operative treatment with a parathyroid protocol computed tomography, and relevant data were correlated with operative findings. Sensitivity, positive predictive value, technical success, and cure rates were calculated. The Fisher exact test or χ2 test assessed the significance of 2-phase and 4-phase imaging and operative findings. Results Twenty-seven patients had traditional four-dimensional computed tomography and 35 had modified 2-phase computed tomography. Effective radiation doses were 6.8 mSy for 2-phase and 14 mSv for 4-phase. Four-phase computed tomography had a sensitivity and positive predictive value of 93% and 96%, respectively. Two-phase computed tomography had a comparable sensitivity and positive predictive value of 97% and 94%, respectively. Eight patients with discordant imaging had an average parathyroid weight of 240 g compared with 1,300 g for all patients. Technical surgical success (90% for 4-phase computed tomography versus 91% 2-phase computed tomography) and normocalcemia rates at 6 months (88% for both) did not differ between computed tomography protocols. Computed tomography correctly predicted multiglandular disease and localization for reoperations in 88% and 90% of cases, respectively, with no difference by computed tomography protocol. Conclusion With regard to surgical outcomes and localization, 2-phase parathyroid computed tomography is equivalent to 4-phase for parathyroid localization, including small adenomas, reoperative cases, and multiglandular disease. Two-phase

  20. Hybrid diffraction tomography without phase information.

    PubMed

    Gbur, Greg; Wolf, Emil

    2002-11-01

    We introduce a hybrid tomographic method, based on recent investigations concerning the connection between computed tomography and diffraction tomography, that allows direct reconstruction of scattering objects from intensity measurements. This technique is noniterative and is intuitively easier to understand and easier to implement than some other methods described in the literature. The manner in which the new method reduces to computed tomography at short wavelengths is discussed. Numerical examples of reconstructions are presented.

  1. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  2. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  3. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-Koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-07-01

    Technetium pertechnetate (TcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of TcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of TcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent TcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other TcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring TcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake.

  4. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Technetium pertechnetate (99mTcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of 99mTcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of 99mTcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent 99mTcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Results: Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal–Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other 99mTcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Conclusions: Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring 99mTcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake. PMID:27399139

  5. Quantitative Cardiac Positron Emission Tomography: The Time Is Coming!

    PubMed Central

    Sciagrà, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    In the last 20 years, the use of positron emission tomography (PET) has grown dramatically because of its oncological applications, and PET facilities are now easily accessible. At the same time, various groups have explored the specific advantages of PET in heart disease and demonstrated the major diagnostic and prognostic role of quantitation in cardiac PET. Nowadays, different approaches for the measurement of myocardial blood flow (MBF) have been developed and implemented in user-friendly programs. There is large evidence that MBF at rest and under stress together with the calculation of coronary flow reserve are able to improve the detection and prognostication of coronary artery disease. Moreover, quantitative PET makes possible to assess the presence of microvascular dysfunction, which is involved in various cardiac diseases, including the early stages of coronary atherosclerosis, hypertrophic and dilated cardiomyopathy, and hypertensive heart disease. Therefore, it is probably time to consider the routine use of quantitative cardiac PET and to work for defining its place in the clinical scenario of modern cardiology. PMID:24278760

  6. Bayesian parameter estimation in spectral quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben T.; Arridge, Simon R.; Kaipio, Jari P.; Tarvainen, Tanja

    2016-03-01

    Photoacoustic tomography (PAT) is an imaging technique combining strong contrast of optical imaging to high spatial resolution of ultrasound imaging. These strengths are achieved via photoacoustic effect, where a spatial absorption of light pulse is converted into a measurable propagating ultrasound wave. The method is seen as a potential tool for small animal imaging, pre-clinical investigations, study of blood vessels and vasculature, as well as for cancer imaging. The goal in PAT is to form an image of the absorbed optical energy density field via acoustic inverse problem approaches from the measured ultrasound data. Quantitative PAT (QPAT) proceeds from these images and forms quantitative estimates of the optical properties of the target. This optical inverse problem of QPAT is illposed. To alleviate the issue, spectral QPAT (SQPAT) utilizes PAT data formed at multiple optical wavelengths simultaneously with optical parameter models of tissue to form quantitative estimates of the parameters of interest. In this work, the inverse problem of SQPAT is investigated. Light propagation is modelled using the diffusion equation. Optical absorption is described with chromophore concentration weighted sum of known chromophore absorption spectra. Scattering is described by Mie scattering theory with an exponential power law. In the inverse problem, the spatially varying unknown parameters of interest are the chromophore concentrations, the Mie scattering parameters (power law factor and the exponent), and Gruneisen parameter. The inverse problem is approached with a Bayesian method. It is numerically demonstrated, that estimation of all parameters of interest is possible with the approach.

  7. Single-stage reconstruction algorithm for quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haltmeier, Markus; Neumann, Lukas; Rabanser, Simon

    2015-06-01

    The development of efficient and accurate image reconstruction algorithms is one of the cornerstones of computed tomography. Existing algorithms for quantitative photoacoustic tomography (qPAT) currently operate in a two-stage procedure: first an inverse source problem for the acoustic wave propagation is solved, whereas in a second step the optical parameters are estimated from the result of the first step. Such an approach has several drawbacks. In this paper we therefore propose the use of single-stage reconstruction algorithms for qPAT, where the optical parameters are directly reconstructed from the observed acoustical data. In that context we formulate the image reconstruction problem of qPAT as a single nonlinear inverse problem by coupling the radiative transfer equation with the acoustic wave equation. The inverse problem is approached by Tikhonov regularization with a convex penalty in combination with the proximal gradient iteration for minimizing the Tikhonov functional. We present numerical results, where the proposed single-stage algorithm shows an improved reconstruction quality at a similar computational cost.

  8. Weighted filtered backprojection for quantitative fluorescence optical projection tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darrell, A.; Meyer, H.; Marias, K.; Brady, M.; Ripoll, J.

    2008-07-01

    Reconstructing images from a set of fluorescence optical projection tomography (OPT) projections is a relatively new problem. Several physical aspects of fluorescence OPT necessitate a different treatment of the inverse problem to that required for non-fluorescence tomography. Given a fluorophore within the depth of field of the imaging system, the power received by the optical system, and therefore the CCD detector, is related to the distance of the fluorophore from the objective entrance pupil. Additionally, due to the slight blurring of images of sources positioned off the focal plane, the CCD image of a fluorophore off the focal plane is lower in intensity than the CCD image of an identical fluorophore positioned on the focal plane. The filtered backprojection (FBP) algorithm does not take these effects into account and so cannot be expected to yield truly quantitative results. A full model of image formation is introduced which takes into account the effects of isotropic emission and defocus. The model is used to obtain a weighting function which is used in a variation of the FBP algorithm called weighted filtered backprojection (WFBP). This new algorithm is tested with simulated data and with experimental data from a phantom consisting of fluorescent microspheres embedded in an agarose gel.

  9. Quantitative computed tomography imaging in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Lalita; Fernandes, Yasmin; Mesquita, Anthony Menezes

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease having small airway inflammation, emphysema, and pulmonary hypertension. It is now clear that spirometry alone cannot differentiate each component. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is increasingly used to quantify the amount of emphysema and small airway involvement in COPD. Inspiratory CT guides in assessing emphysema while expiratory CT identifies areas of air trapping which is a surrogate of small airway inflammation. By constructing a three-dimensional model of airways, we can also measure the airway wall thickness of segmental and subsegmental airways. The aim of this review is to present the current knowledge and methodologies in QCT of the lung that aid in identifying discrete COPD phenotypes. PMID:27890994

  10. Using quantitative phase petrology to understand metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Richard

    2015-04-01

    Quantitative phase petrology has become one of the mainstay methods for interpreting metamorphic rocks and processes. Its increased utility has been driven by improvements to end-member thermodynamics, activity-composition relationships and computer programs to undertake calculations. Such improvements now allow us to undertake calculations in increasingly complex chemical systems that more closely reflect those of rocks. Recent progress in activity-composition (a-x) relationships is aimed at developing suites of a-x relationships in large chemical systems that are calibrated together, which will allow a more direct application of the method to metamorphic rocks. In addition, considerable progress has been made in how quantitative phase diagrams can be used to understand features, including chemical potential diagrams for reaction textures, methods for fractionating bulk compositions and methods for modelling open system processes. One feature of calculated phase diagrams is that they present us with a great amount of information, such as mineral assemblages, mineral proportions, phase compositions, volume or density etc. An important aspect to using this information is to understand the potential uncertainties associated with these, which are significant. These uncertainties require that calculated phase diagrams be used with caution to interpret observed features in rocks. Features such as mineral zoning and reaction textures should still be interpreted in a semi-quantitative way, even if based on a fully quantitative diagram. Exercises such as the interpretation of reaction overstepping based on relating phase diagrams to observed mineral core compositions are likely to give spurious results given the infelicities in existing a-x models. Despite these limitations, quantitative phase petrology remains the most useful approach to interpreting the metamorphic history of rocks in that it provides a theoretical framework in which to interpret observed features rather

  11. Quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography measurements of coronoid fractures.

    PubMed

    Mellema, Jos J; Janssen, Stein J; Guitton, Thierry G; Ring, David

    2015-03-01

    Using quantitative 3-dimensional computed tomography (Q3DCT) modeling, we tested the null hypothesis that there was no difference in fracture fragment volume, articular surface involvement, and number of fracture fragments between coronoid fracture types and patterns of traumatic elbow instability. We studied 82 patients with a computed tomography scan of a coronoid fracture using Q3DCT modeling. Fracture fragments were identified and fragment volume and articular surface involvement were measured within fracture types and injury patterns. Kruskal-Wallis test was used to evaluate the Q3DCT data of the coronoid fractures. Fractures of the coronoid tip (n = 45) were less fragmented and had the smallest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with anteromedial facet fractures (n = 20) and base fractures (n = 17). Anteromedial facet and base fractures were more fragmented than tip fractures, and base fractures had the largest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with tip and anteromedial facet fractures. We found similar differences between fracture types described by Regan and Morrey. Furthermore, fractures associated with terrible triad fracture dislocation (n = 42) had the smallest fragment volume, and fractures associated with olecranon fracture dislocations (n = 17) had the largest fragment volume and articular surface area involvement compared with the other injury patterns. Analyzing fractures of the coronoid using Q3DCT modeling demonstrated that fracture fragment characteristics differ significantly between fracture types and injury patterns. Detailed knowledge of fracture characteristics and their association with specific patterns of traumatic elbow instability may assist decision making and preoperative planning. Quantitative 3DCT modeling can provide a more detailed understanding of fracture morphology, which might guide decision making and implant development. Copyright © 2015 American Society for

  12. Quantitative computed tomography for measuring bone mineral density in athletes.

    PubMed

    Dinç, H; Savci, G; Demirci, A; Sadikoğlu, M Y; Tuncel, E; Yavuz, H

    1996-06-01

    We studied the effect of different training patterns on vertebral trabecular and cortical bone mineral density (BMD) in male athletes using quantitative computed tomography. Vertebral trabecular (t) and cortical (c) BMDs of the first three lumbar vertebrae were measured using single energy quantitative computed tomography in 51 athletes including 10 weight lifters (mean age 20 years), 13 soccer players (mean age 27 years), 28 wrestlers (mean age 17 years), and 45 age-matched volunteers (mean age 21 years). Measured BMDs were correlated with age, body height and weight, training hours per week, sports years, and type of physical activity. Vertebral tBMDs were found to be 44%, 23%, and 24% higher in the weight lifters, soccer players, and wrestlers, respectively, compared with the volunteers. The corresponding cBMDs were 18%, 6%, and 11% higher than that of volunteers. There was significant correlation between the trabecular and cBMD, and height of the athletes, sports years, training hours per week, and physical activity. The most significant correlation with BMD was the type of physical activity. Both the height of the subjects and physical activity variables showed variations of 47% and 32% in trabecular and cBMD, respectively. According to the multiple analysis of variance (MANOVA) only the physical activity factor was effective, with a significance level of P < 0.01; the other factors and interactions were not effective (P > 0.05) on trabecular and cBMD. Different training patterns have a different anabolic effect on both trabecular and cBMDs of the vertebrae, and this effect is more pronounced on the trabecular compartment. Weight lifting showed the highest anabolic effect on both trabecular and cBMDs compared with soccer playing and wrestling. Of the independent variables, physical activity showed the highest anabolic effect on the vertebrae. These results may have implications for devising exercise strategies to reduce the possibility of fracture in old age.

  13. Quantitation of microcomputed tomography-imaged ocular microvasculature.

    PubMed

    Atwood, Robert C; Lee, Peter D; Konerding, Moritz A; Rockett, Peter; Mitchell, Christopher A

    2010-01-01

    To quantitatively assess microvascular dimensions in the eyes of neonatal wild-type and VEGF(120)-tg mice, using a novel combination of techniques which permit three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction. A novel combination of techniques was developed for the accurate 3D imaging of the microvasculature and demonstrated on the hyaloid vasculature of the neonatal mouse eye. Vascular corrosion casting is used to create a stable replica of the vascular network and X-ray microcomputed tomography (muCT) to obtain the 3D images. In-house computer-aided image analysis techniques were then used to perform a quantitative morphological analysis of the images. With the use of these methods, differences in the numbers of vessel segments, their diameter, and volume of vessels in the vitreous compartment were quantitated in wild-type neonatal mice or littermates over-expressing a labile (nonheparin binding) isoform of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF(120)) from the developing lens. This methodology was instructive in demonstrating that hyaloid vascular networks in VEGFA(120) over-expressing mice have a 10-fold increase in blind-ended, a six-fold increase in connected vessel segments, in addition to a sixfold increase (0.0314 versus 0.0051 mm(3)) in total vitreous vessel volume compared with wild type. These parameters are not readily quantified via histological, ultrastructural, or stereological analysis. The combination of techniques described here provides the first 3D quantitative characterization of vasculature in an organ system; i.e., the neonatal murine intra-ocular vasculature in both wild-type mice and a transgenic model of lens-specific over-expression of VEGF.

  14. Role of computed tomography in quantitative assessment of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Choromańska, Agnieszka; Macura, Katarzyna J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary emphysema, together with chronic bronchitis is a part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and worldwide. There are many methods to diagnose emphysema. Unfortunately many of them, for example pulmonary function tests (PFTs), clinical signs and conventional radiology are able to detect emphysema usually in its late stages when a great portion of lung parenchyma has been already destroyed by the disease. Computed tomography (CT) allows for early detection of emphysema. CT also makes it possible to quantify the total amount of emphysema in the lungs which is important in order to precisely estimate the severity of the disease. Those abilities of CT are important in monitoring the course of the disease and in attempts to prevent its further progression. In this review we discuss currently available methods for imaging emphysema with emphasis on the quantitative assessment of emphysema. To date, quantitative methods have not been widely used clinically, however, the initial results of several research studies regarding this subject are very encouraging. PMID:22802863

  15. Spectral modulation interferometry for quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Ruibo; Chen, Shichao; Li, Chengshuai; Zhu, Yizheng

    2015-01-01

    We propose a spectral-domain interferometric technique, termed spectral modulation interferometry (SMI), and present its application to high-sensitivity, high-speed, and speckle-free quantitative phase imaging. In SMI, one-dimensional complex field of an object is interferometrically modulated onto a broadband spectrum. Full-field phase and intensity images are obtained by scanning along the orthogonal direction. SMI integrates the high sensitivity of spectral-domain interferometry with the high speed of spectral modulation to quantify fast phase dynamics, and its dispersive and confocal nature eliminates laser speckles. The principle and implementation of SMI are discussed. Its performance is evaluated using static and dynamic objects. PMID:25780737

  16. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; Tang, Wei; Kramer, Matthew J.; Cullen, David A.; Poplawsky, Jonathan D.

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology and volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.

  17. Correlative Energy-Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopic Tomography and Atom Probe Tomography of the Phase Separation in an Alnico 8 Alloy

    DOE PAGES

    Guo, Wei; Sneed, Brian T.; Zhou, Lin; ...

    2016-12-21

    Alnico alloys have long been used as strong permanent magnets because of their ferromagnetism and high coercivity. Understanding their structural details allows for better prediction of the resulting magnetic properties. However, quantitative three-dimensional characterization of the phase separation in these alloys is still challenged by the spatial quantification of nanoscale phases. Herein, we apply a dual tomography approach, where correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic (EDS) tomography and atom probe tomography (APT) are used to investigate the initial phase separation process of an alnico 8 alloy upon non-magnetic annealing. STEM-EDS tomography provides information on the morphology andmore » volume fractions of Fe–Co-rich and Νi–Al-rich phases after spinodal decomposition in addition to quantitative information of the composition of a nanoscale volume. Subsequent analysis of a portion of the same specimen by APT offers quantitative chemical information of each phase at the sub-nanometer scale. Furthermore, APT reveals small, 2–4 nm Fe-rich α1 phases that are nucleated in the Ni-rich α2 matrix. From this information, we show that phase separation of the alnico 8 alloy consists of both spinodal decomposition and nucleation and growth processes. Lastly, we discuss the complementary benefits and challenges associated with correlative STEM-EDS and APT.« less

  18. Quantitative flaw characterization with ultrasonic phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Brady John

    Ultrasonic nondestructive evaluation (NDE) is a critical diagnostic tool in many industries. It is used to characterize potentially dangerous flaws in critical components for aerospace, automotive, and energy applications. The use of phased array transducers allows for the extension of traditional techniques and the introduction of new methods for quantitative flaw characterization. An equivalent flaw sizing technique for use in time-of-flight diffraction setups is presented that provides an estimate of the size and orientation of isolated cracks, surface-breaking cracks, and volumetric flaws such as voids and inclusions. Experimental validation is provided for the isolated crack case. A quantitative imaging algorithm is developed that corrects for system effects and wave propagation, making the images formed directly related to the properties of the scatterer present. Simulated data is used to form images of cylindrical and spherical inclusions. The contributions of different signals to the image formation process are discussed and examples of the quantitative nature of the images are shown.

  19. Towards quantitative analysis of retinal features in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Maurizio; Fortunato, Pina; La Torre, Agostino

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to propose a new computer method for quantitative evaluation of representative features of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT). A multi-step approach was devised and positively tested for segmentation of the three main retinal layers: the vitreo-retinal interface and the inner and outer retina. Following a preprocessing step, three regions of interest were delimited. Significant peaks corresponding to high and low intensity strips were located along the OCT A-scan lines and accurate boundaries between different layers were obtained by maximizing an edge likelihood function. For a quantitative description, thickness measurement, densitometry, texture and curvature analyses were performed. As a first application, the effect of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) for the treatment of vitreo-retinal interface syndrome was evaluated. Almost all the parameters, measured on a set of 16 pathologic OCT images, were statistically different before and after IVTA injection (p<0.05). Shape analysis of the internal limiting membrane confirmed the reduction of the pathological traction state. Other significant parameters, such as reflectivity and texture contrast, exhibited relevant changes both at the vitreo-retinal interface and in the inner retinal layers. Texture parameters in the inner and outer retinal layers significantly correlated with the visual acuity restoration. According to these findings an IVTA injection might be considered a possible alternative to surgery for selected patients. In conclusion, the proposed approach appeared to be a promising tool for the investigation of tissue changes produced by pathology and/or therapy.

  20. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K.

    2014-01-01

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical sections of the opaque samples and has the potential to take high-quality intensity and phase images of non-opaque samples such as many biological samples. Because each line scan is recorded by a hologram that may contain the optical aberrations of the system, it opens avenues for a variety of numerical aberration compensation methods and development of full digital adaptive optics confocal system to emulate current hardware-based adaptive optics system for biomedical imaging, especially ophthalmic imaging. Preliminary experiments with a microscope objective of NA 0.65 and 40 × on opaque samples are presented to demonstrate this idea. The measured lateral and axial resolutions of the intensity images from the current system are ~0.64μm and ~2.70μm respectively. The noise level of the phase profile by QPCCM is ~2.4nm which is better than the result by DH. PMID:25089404

  1. Quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Marchesini, Stefano; Kim, Myung K

    2014-07-28

    We present a quantitative phase-contrast confocal microscope (QPCCM) by combining a line-scanning confocal system with digital holography (DH). This combination can merge the merits of these two different imaging modalities. High-contrast intensity images with low coherent noise, and the optical sectioning capability are made available due to the confocality. Phase profiles of the samples become accessible thanks to DH. QPCCM is able to quantitatively measure the phase variations of optical sections of the opaque samples and has the potential to take high-quality intensity and phase images of non-opaque samples such as many biological samples. Because each line scan is recorded by a hologram that may contain the optical aberrations of the system, it opens avenues for a variety of numerical aberration compensation methods and development of full digital adaptive optics confocal system to emulate current hardware-based adaptive optics system for biomedical imaging, especially ophthalmic imaging. Preliminary experiments with a microscope objective of NA 0.65 and 40 × on opaque samples are presented to demonstrate this idea. The measured lateral and axial resolutions of the intensity images from the current system are ~0.64μm and ~2.70μm respectively. The noise level of the phase profile by QPCCM is ~2.4nm which is better than the result by DH.

  2. Quantitative Tomography of Organic Photovoltaic Blends at the Nanoscale.

    PubMed

    Pfannmöller, M; Heidari, H; Nanson, L; Lozman, O R; Chrapa, M; Offermans, T; Nisato, G; Bals, S

    2015-10-14

    The success of semiconducting organic materials has enabled green technologies for electronics, lighting, and photovoltaics. However, when blended together, these materials have also raised novel fundamental questions with respect to electronic, optical, and thermodynamic properties. This is particularly important for organic photovoltaic cells based on the bulk heterojunction. Here, the distribution of nanoscale domains plays a crucial role depending on the specific device structure. Hence, correlation of the aforementioned properties requires 3D nanoscale imaging of materials domains, which are embedded in a multilayer device. Such visualization has so far been elusive due to lack of contrast, insufficient signal, or resolution limits. In this Letter, we introduce spectral scanning transmission electron tomography for reconstruction of entire volume plasmon spectra from rod-shaped specimens. We provide 3D structural correlations and compositional mapping at a resolution of approximately 7 nm within advanced organic photovoltaic tandem cells. Novel insights that are obtained from quantitative 3D analyses reveal that efficiency loss upon thermal annealing can be attributed to subtle, fundamental blend properties. These results are invaluable in guiding the design and optimization of future devices in plastic electronics applications and provide an empirical basis for modeling and simulation of organic solar cells.

  3. Morphological analysis of the proximal femur using quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Donald; Carrera, Guilermo

    2006-01-01

    The anatomy of the proximal femur was studied in 35 specimens using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) and compared with anatomical sections studied by plane radiography and gross dissection. We found the primary supporting structure of the femoral head to be the primary compressive strut, which is a dense column of trabecular bone projecting from the pressure buttress of the medial femoral neck to the epiphyseal scar. Trabecular bone mushroomed from the epiphyseal scar and terminated at right angles to the cortex of the femoral head. We believe the primary compressive strut is the predominant load-bearing structure connecting the femoral head to the femoral neck, as many specimens lacked continuity of the head cortex to the femoral neck. Based on the CT number, the primary compressive strut had similar bone density to cortical structures such as the lesser trochanter, calcar femorale and posterior lateral femoral cortex. Ward’s triangle lacked structural integrity in many cases, and we doubt the significance of tensile trabculae for sharing load. Surgical techniques such as femoral fracture fixation, resurfacing hip arthroplasty and allograft transplantation may benefit from this knowledge. PMID:16896872

  4. Quantitative characterization of developing collagen gels using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levitz, David; Hinds, Monica T.; Choudhury, Niloy; Tran, Noi T.; Hanson, Stephen R.; Jacques, Steven L.

    2010-03-01

    Nondestructive optical imaging methods such as optical coherence tomography (OCT) have been proposed for characterizing engineered tissues such as collagen gels. In our study, OCT was used to image collagen gels with different seeding densities of smooth muscle cells (SMCs), including acellular gels, over a five-day period during which the gels contracted and became turbid with increased optical scattering. The gels were characterized quantitatively by their optical properties, specified by analysis of OCT data using a theoretical model. At 6 h, seeded cell density and scattering coefficient (μs) were correlated, with μs equal to 10.8 cm-1/(106 cells/mL). Seeded cell density and the scattering anisotropy (g) were uncorrelated. Over five days, the reflectivity in SMC gels gradually doubled with little change in optical attenuation, which indicated a decrease in g that increased backscatter, but only a small drop in μs. At five days, a subpopulation of sites on the gel showed substantially higher reflectivity (approximately a tenfold increase from the first 24 h). In summary, the increased turbidity of SMC gels that develops over time is due to a change in the structure of collagen, which affects g, and not simply due to a change in number density of collagen fibers due to contraction.

  5. Concluding Report: Quantitative Tomography Simulations and Reconstruction Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Aufderheide, M B; Martz, H E; Slone, D M; Jackson, J A; Schach von Wittenau, A E; Goodman, D M; Logan, C M; Hall, J M

    2002-02-01

    In this report we describe the original goals and final achievements of this Laboratory Directed Research and Development project. The Quantitative was Tomography Simulations and Reconstruction Algorithms project (99-ERD-015) funded as a multi-directorate, three-year effort to advance the state of the art in radiographic simulation and tomographic reconstruction by improving simulation and including this simulation in the tomographic reconstruction process. Goals were to improve the accuracy of radiographic simulation, and to couple advanced radiographic simulation tools with a robust, many-variable optimization algorithm. In this project, we were able to demonstrate accuracy in X-Ray simulation at the 2% level, which is an improvement of roughly a factor of 5 in accuracy, and we have successfully coupled our simulation tools with the CCG (Constrained Conjugate Gradient) optimization algorithm, allowing reconstructions that include spectral effects and blurring in the reconstructions. Another result of the project was the assembly of a low-scatter X-Ray imaging facility for use in nondestructive evaluation applications. We conclude with a discussion of future work.

  6. Process tomography applied to multi-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyakowski, T.

    1996-03-01

    This paper presents the state of the art in measuring multi-phase flows by using tomographic techniques. The results presented show a wide range of industrial applications of process tomography from the nuclear and chemical to the food industry. This is illustrated by examples of the application of various tomographic sensors to the measurement of geometric or kinematic parameters of multi-phase flows. An application of process tomography for the validation of computational fluid dynamic models and the possibility of constructing a flowmeter for multi-phase flow are addressed.

  7. Element-Specific X-Ray Phase Tomography of 3D Structures at the Nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Claire; Guizar-Sicairos, Manuel; Scagnoli, Valerio; Holler, Mirko; Huthwelker, Thomas; Menzel, Andreas; Vartiainen, Ismo; Müller, Elisabeth; Kirk, Eugenie; Gliga, Sebastian; Raabe, Jörg; Heyderman, Laura J.

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in fabrication techniques to create mesoscopic 3D structures have led to significant developments in a variety of fields including biology, photonics, and magnetism. Further progress in these areas benefits from their full quantitative and structural characterization. We present resonant ptychographic tomography, combining quantitative hard x-ray phase imaging and resonant elastic scattering to achieve ab initio element-specific 3D characterization of a cobalt-coated artificial buckyball polymer scaffold at the nanoscale. By performing ptychographic x-ray tomography at and far from the Co K edge, we are able to locate and quantify the Co layer in our sample to a 3D spatial resolution of 25 nm. With a quantitative determination of the electron density we can determine that the Co layer is oxidized, which is confirmed with microfluorescence experiments.

  8. Bone morphometry and mineral density measurement using quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, D.R.

    1991-01-01

    Application of computed tomography (CT) to the study of bone structure and density was explored and developed. A review of bone mineral densitometry (BMD) methodology and general principles of quantitative CT (QCT) are presented. A method for QCT of the spine was developed using a flexible tissue equivalent reference placed adjacent to the patient. A methodology for the development and production of tissue equivalent materials is also presented. Patient equivalent phantoms were used to characterize the method, and phantom studies were performed at five clinical sites. A protocol is defined for measuring the inside diameter of the lumbar pedicular canal. Data generated from this study has proven invaluable in the planning for lumbar fusion surgery when screws are to be used for immobilization. Pedicular canal data from 33 patients is presented. QCT was also used to quantify several parameters of the femoral shaft for use in hip replacement surgical planning. Parameters studied include inside diameter, BMD, endosteal BMD and proximal shaft morphology. The structure and trabecular BMD of the proximal femur was extensively studied using QCT. A large variation was found in the fat content of marrow within the proximal femur, and phantom studies were performed to quantify the effect of fat on trabecular QCT BMD. Cadaveric trabecular bone samples with marrow were analyzed physically to determine water, fat, non-fat soft tissue, and ash content. Multiple thin-slice CT studies were performed on cadaveric femurs. A structural model of the proximal femur was developed in which the structural support is provided primarily by trabecular bone. This model may have profound implications in the study of femoral fractures and prosthetic hardware design.

  9. Quantitative phase imaging with programmable illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Edwards, Chris; Goddard, Lynford L.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    Even with the recent rapid advances in the field of microscopy, non-laser light sources used for light microscopy have not been developing significantly. Most current optical microscopy systems use halogen bulbs as their light sources to provide a white-light illumination. Due to the confined shapes and finite filament size of the bulbs, little room is available for modification in the light source, which prevents further advances in microscopy. By contrast, commercial projectors provide a high power output that is comparable to the halogen lamps while allowing for great flexibility in patterning the illumination. In addition to their high brightness, the illumination can be patterned to have arbitrary spatial and spectral distributions. Therefore, commercial projectors can be adopted as a flexible light source to an optical microscope by careful alignment to the existing optical path. In this study, we employed a commercial projector source to a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM), which is an outside module for an existing phase contrast (PC) microscope. By replacing the ring illumination of PC with a ring-shaped pattern projected onto the condenser plane, we were able to recover the same result as the original SLIM. Furthermore, the ring illumination is replaced with multiple dots aligned along the same ring to minimize the overlap between the scattered and unscattered fields. This new method minimizes the halo artifact of the imaging system, which allows for a halo-free high-resolution quantitative phase microscopy system.

  10. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    SciTech Connect

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-05

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  11. Development of neutron tomography and phase contrast imaging technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashyap, Y. S.; Agrawal, Ashish; Sarkar, P. S.; Shukla, Mayank; Sinha, Amar

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents design and development of a state of art neutron imaging technique at CIRUS reactor with special reference for techniques adopted for tomography and phase contrast imaging applications. Different components of the beamline such as collimator, shielding, sample manipulator, digital imaging system were designed keeping in mind the requirements of data acquisition time and resolution. The collimator was designed in such a way that conventional and phase contrast imaging can be done using same collimator housing. We have done characterization of fuel pins, study of hydride blisters in pressure tubes hydrogen based cells, two phase flow visualization, and online study of locomotive parts etc. using neutron tomography and radiography technique. We have also done some studies using neutron phase contrast imaging technique on this beamline.

  12. Beam Tomography in Longitudinal Phase Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mane, V.; Wei, J.; Peggs, S.

    1997-05-01

    Longitudinal particle motion in circular accelerators is typically monitored by one dimensional (1-D) profiles. Adiabatic particle motion in 2-D phase space can be reconstructed with tomographic techniques, using 1-D profiles. In this paper, we discuss a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a high pass ramp or Hann filter, for phase space reconstruction. The algorithm uses several projections of the beam at equally spaced angles over half a synchrotron period. A computer program RADON has been developed to process digitized mountain range data and do the phase space reconstruction for the AGS, and later for Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). Analysis has been performed to determine the sensitivity to machine parameters and data acquisition errors. During the Sextant test of RHIC in early 1997, this program has been successfully employed to reconstruct the motion of Au^77+ beam in the AGS.

  13. Dynamic Quantum Tomography Model for Phase-Damping Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czerwiński, Artur; Jamiołkowski, Andrzej

    In this paper we propose a dynamic quantum tomography model for open quantum systems with evolution given by phase-damping channels. Mathematically, these channels correspond to completely positive trace-preserving maps defined by the Hadamard product of the initial density matrix with a time-dependent matrix which carries the knowledge about the evolution. Physically, there is a strong motivation for considering this kind of evolution because such channels appear naturally in the theory of open quantum systems. The main idea behind a dynamic approach to quantum tomography claims that by performing the same kind of measurement at some time instants one can obtain new data for state reconstruction. Thus, this approach leads to a decrease in the number of distinct observables which are required for quantum tomography; however, the exact benefit for employing the dynamic approach depends strictly on how the quantum system evolves in time. Algebraic analysis of phase-damping channels allows one to determine criteria for quantum tomography of systems in question. General theorems and observations presented in the paper are accompanied by a specific example, which shows step by step how the theory works. The results introduced in this paper can potentially be applied in experiments where there is a tendency to look at quantum tomography from the point of view of economy of measurements, because each distinct kind of measurement requires, in general, preparing a separate setup.

  14. Reconstruction methods for phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Raven, C.

    1997-02-01

    Phase contrast imaging with coherent x-rays can be distinguished in outline imaging and holography, depending on the wavelength {lambda}, the object size d and the object-to-detector distance r. When r << d{sup 2}{lambda}, phase contrast occurs only in regions where the refractive index fastly changes, i.e. at interfaces and edges in the sample. With increasing object-to-detector distance we come in the area of holographic imaging. The image contrast outside the shadow region of the object is due to interference of the direct, undiffracted beam and a beam diffracted by the object, or, in terms of holography, the interference of a reference wave with the object wave. Both, outline imaging and holography, offer the possibility to obtain three dimensional information of the sample in conjunction with a tomographic technique. But the data treatment and the kind of information one can obtain from the reconstruction is different.

  15. Noncontact quantitative biomechanical characterization of cardiac muscle using shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V; Martin, James F; Larin, Kirill V

    2014-07-01

    We report on a quantitative optical elastographic method based on shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (SWI-OCT) for biomechanical characterization of cardiac muscle through noncontact elasticity measurement. The SWI-OCT system employs a focused air-puff device for localized loading of the cardiac muscle and utilizes phase-sensitive OCT to monitor the induced tissue deformation. Phase information from the optical interferometry is used to reconstruct 2-D depth-resolved shear wave propagation inside the muscle tissue. Cross-correlation of the displacement profiles at various spatial locations in the propagation direction is applied to measure the group velocity of the shear waves, based on which the Young's modulus of tissue is quantified. The quantitative feature and measurement accuracy of this method is demonstrated from the experiments on tissue-mimicking phantoms with the verification using uniaxial compression test. The experiments are performed on ex vivo cardiac muscle tissue from mice with normal and genetically altered myocardium. Our results indicate this optical elastographic technique is useful as a noncontact tool to assist the cardiac muscle studies.

  16. Phase Space Tomography Using the Cornell ERL DC Gun

    SciTech Connect

    Bazarov, Ivan; Dunham, Bruce; Li, Yulin; Liu, XianGhong; Hannon, Fay

    2008-07-01

    The brightness and quality of electron beams in linac-based light sources are ultimately limited by the properties of the beam in the injector. It is thus important to have knowledge of the phase space distribution in addition to the rms emittance to provide an insight into high beam brightness formation mechanisms. A tomography technique has been used to reconstruct the transverse phase space of the electron beam delivered from the Cornell University ERL DC gun. The tomography diagnostic utilised three solenoid magnets directly after the DC gun and a view-screen. The injector was operated at 250keV in the emittance dominated regime, and the results showed good agreement to the phase space measured using a slit-screen method and that generated from simulation with the particle tracking code ASTRA. Comparison of various reconstruction methods is provided.

  17. Cone beam geometry for small objects in phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonas, P.; Louis, A. K.

    2013-09-01

    Phase contrast tomography has developed rapidly within the last ten years. The new method enables the reconstruction of the refraction index in addition to the attenuation coefficient and can therefore be very well applied to samples which are only weakly absorbing. First studies in phase contract tomography were done using synchrotron devices which are modeled by the so-called parallel geometry. Samples studied so far are special foams and fiber materials, see Cloetens et al (1999 App. Phys. Lett. 75 2912-4), which give almost no contrast due to absorption but provide excellent images in phase contrast. Recently tubes were successfully applied to a variety of applications. These laboratory devices no longer fulfil the requirement of a parallel geometry but need to be treated as a fan/cone beam geometry. In this paper we derive a mathematical model for cone beam geometry in phase contrast tomography in two and three dimensions for objects small compared to the two distances of object to detector and x-ray source to object. All approximations needed are analyzed and an efficient reconstruction method providing both phase and absorption in a single step is derived, based on the method by Louis and Maaß (1990 Inverse Problems 6 427-39). The reconstruction method is successfully tested using numerical examples with simulated phantom data.

  18. Quantitative three-dimensional analysis of embryonic chick morphogenesis via microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun Sup; Min, Jouha; Recknagel, Andrew K; Riccio, Mark; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2011-01-01

    Embryonic development is a remarkably complex and rapidly evolving morphogenetic process. Although many of the early patterning events have been well described, understanding the anatomical changes at later stages where clinically relevant malformations are more likely to be survivable has been limited by the lack of quantitative 3D imaging tools. Microcomputed tomography (Micro-CT) has emerged as a powerful tool for embryonic imaging, but a quantitative analysis of organ and tissue growth has not been conducted. In this study, we present a simple method for acquiring highly detailed, quantitative 3D datasets of embryonic chicks with Micro-CT. Embryos between 4 and 12 days (HH23 and HH40) were labeled with osmium tetroxide (OT), which revealed highly detailed soft tissue anatomy when scanned at 25 μm resolution. We demonstrate tissue boundary and inter-tissue contrast fidelity in virtual 2D sections are quantitatively and qualitatively similar to those of histological sections. We then establish mathematical relationships for the volumetric growth of heart, limb, eye, and brain during this period of development. We show that some organs exhibit constant exponential growth (eye and heart), whereas others contained multiple phases of growth (forebrain and limb). Furthermore, we show that cardiac myocardial volumetric growth differs in a time and chamber specific manner. These results demonstrate Micro-CT is a powerful technique for quantitative imaging of embryonic growth. The data presented here establish baselines from which to compare the effects of genetic or experimental perturbations. Quantifying subtle differences in morphogenesis is increasingly important as research focuses on localized and conditional effects.

  19. Generalized phase-space tomography for intense beams

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D; Bernal, S; Fiorito, R B; Haber, I; Reiser, M; O'Shea, P G; Tian, K; Thangaraj, J.C.T.

    2010-02-01

    Tomographic phase-space mapping in an intense particle beam is reviewed. The diagnostic is extended to beams with space-charge by assuming linear forces and is implemented using either solenoidal or quadrupole focusing lattices. The technique is benchmarked against self-consistent simulation and against a direct experimental sampling of phase-space using a pinhole scan. It is demonstrated that tomography can work for time-resolved phase-space mapping and slice emittance measurement. The technique is applied to a series of proof-of-principle tests conducted at the University of Maryland.

  20. Quantitative phase imaging technologies to assess neuronal activity (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenin, Olivier; Fink, Mathias; Boccara, Claude

    2016-03-01

    Active neurons tends to have a different dynamical behavior compared to resting ones. Non-exhaustively, vesicular transport towards the synapses is increased, since axonal growth becomes slower. Previous studies also reported small phase variations occurring simultaneously with the action potential. Such changes exhibit times scales ranging from milliseconds to several seconds on spatial scales smaller than the optical diffraction limit. Therefore, QPI systems are of particular interest to measure neuronal activity without labels. Here, we report the development of two new QPI systems that should enable the detection of such activity. Both systems can acquire full field phase images with a sub nanometer sensitivity at a few hundreds of frames per second. The first setup is a synchronous combination of Full Field Optical Coherence Tomography (FF-OCT) and Fluorescence wide field imaging. The latter modality enables the measurement of neurons electrical activity using calcium indicators. In cultures, FF-OCT exhibits similar features to Digital Holographic Microscopy (DHM), except from complex computational reconstruction. However, FF-OCT is of particular interest in order to measure phase variations in tissues. The second setup is based on a Quantitative Differential Interference Contrast setup mounted in an epi-illumination configuration with a spectrally incoherent illumination. Such a common path interferometer exhibits a very good mechanical stability, and thus enables the measurement of phase images during hours. Additionally, such setup can not only measure a height change, but also an optical index change for both polarization. Hence, one can measure simultaneously a phase change and a birefringence change.

  1. Lensless transport-of-intensity phase microscopy and tomography with a color LED matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-07-01

    We demonstrate lens-less quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED array. Based on multi-wavelength transport-of- intensity phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of ˜3.7μm and an axial resolution of ˜5μm, over wide large imaging FOV of 24mm2. The resolution and FOV can be further improved by using a larger image sensors with small pixels straightforwardly. This compact, low-cost, robust, portable platform with a decent imaging performance may offer a cost-effective tool for telemedicine needs, or for reducing health care costs for point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  2. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Juergen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. Methods: A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient {mu} and decrement {delta} of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of {mu} and {delta} were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Results: Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of {mu} and {delta}. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. Conclusions: The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  3. Development of a prototype gantry system for preclinical x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Tapfer, Arne; Bech, Martin; Pauwels, Bart; Liu, Xuan; Bruyndonckx, Peter; Sasov, Alexander; Kenntner, Johannes; Mohr, Jurgen; Walter, Marco; Schulz, Joachim; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2011-11-01

    To explore the potential of grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging for clinical applications, a first compact gantry system was developed. It is designed such that it can be implemented into an in-vivo small-animal phase-contrast computed tomography (PC-CT) scanner. The purpose of the present study is to assess the accuracy and quantitativeness of the described gantry in both absorption and phase-contrast. A phantom, containing six chemically well-defined liquids, was constructed. A tomography scan with cone-beam reconstruction of this phantom was performed yielding the spatial distribution of the linear attenuation coefficient μ and decrement δ of the complex refractive index. Theoretical values of μ and δ were calculated for each liquid from tabulated data and compared with the experimentally measured values. Additionally, a color-fused image representation is proposed to display the complementary absorption and phase-contrast information in a single image. Experimental and calculated data of the phantom agree well confirming the quantitativeness and accuracy of the reconstructed spatial distributions of μ and δ. The proposed color-fused image representation, which combines the complementary absorption and phase information, considerably helps in distinguishing the individual substances. The concept of grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) can be implemented into a compact, cone-beam geometry gantry setup. The authors believe that this work represents an important milestone in translating phase-contrast x-ray imaging from previous proof-of-principle experiments to first preclinical biomedical imaging applications on small-animal models.

  4. Cumulative phase delay imaging for contrast-enhanced ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demi, Libertario; van Sloun, Ruud J. G.; Wijkstra, Hessel; Mischi, Massimo

    2015-11-01

    Standard dynamic-contrast enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) imaging detects and estimates ultrasound-contrast-agent (UCA) concentration based on the amplitude of the nonlinear (harmonic) components generated during ultrasound (US) propagation through UCAs. However, harmonic components generation is not specific to UCAs, as it also occurs for US propagating through tissue. Moreover, nonlinear artifacts affect standard DCE-US imaging, causing contrast to tissue ratio reduction, and resulting in possible misclassification of tissue and misinterpretation of UCA concentration. Furthermore, no contrast-specific modality exists for DCE-US tomography; in particular speed-of-sound changes due to UCAs are well within those caused by different tissue types. Recently, a new marker for UCAs has been introduced. A cumulative phase delay (CPD) between the second harmonic and fundamental component is in fact observable for US propagating through UCAs, and is absent in tissue. In this paper, tomographic US images based on CPD are for the first time presented and compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Results show the applicability of this marker for contrast specific US imaging, with cumulative phase delay imaging (CPDI) showing superior capabilities in detecting and localizing UCA, as compared to speed-of-sound US tomography. Cavities (filled with UCA) which were down to 1 mm in diameter were clearly detectable. Moreover, CPDI is free of the above mentioned nonlinear artifacts. These results open important possibilities to DCE-US tomography, with potential applications to breast imaging for cancer localization.

  5. Quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography for noncontact mechanical characterization of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shang; Lopez, Andrew L.; Morikawa, Yuka; Tao, Ge; Li, Jiasong; Larina, Irina V.; Martin, James F.; Larin, Kirill V.

    2015-03-01

    Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is an emerging low-coherence imaging technique that provides noninvasive assessment of tissue biomechanics with high spatial resolution. Among various OCE methods, the capability of quantitative measurement of tissue elasticity is of great importance for tissue characterization and pathology detection across different samples. Here we report a quantitative OCE technique, termed quantitative shear wave imaging optical coherence tomography (Q-SWI-OCT), which enables noncontact measurement of tissue Young's modulus based on the ultra-fast imaging of the shear wave propagation inside the sample. A focused air-puff device is used to interrogate the tissue with a low-pressure short-duration air stream that stimulates a localized displacement with the scale at micron level. The propagation of this tissue deformation in the form of shear wave is captured by a phase-sensitive OCT system running with the scan of the M-mode imaging over the path of the wave propagation. The temporal characteristics of the shear wave is quantified based on the cross-correlation of the tissue deformation profiles at all the measurement locations, and linear regression is utilized to fit the data plotted in the domain of time delay versus wave propagation distance. The wave group velocity is thus calculated, which results in the quantitative measurement of the Young's modulus. As the feasibility demonstration, experiments are performed on tissuemimicking phantoms with different agar concentrations and the quantified elasticity values with Q-SWI-OCT agree well with the uniaxial compression tests. For functional characterization of myocardium with this OCE technique, we perform our pilot experiments on ex vivo mouse cardiac muscle tissues with two studies, including 1) elasticity difference of cardiac muscle under relaxation and contract conditions and 2) mechanical heterogeneity of the heart introduced by the muscle fiber orientation. Our results suggest the

  6. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections

    SciTech Connect

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S.; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2015-04-21

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers.

  7. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S.; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers.

  8. Quantitative evaluation of regularized phase retrieval algorithms on bone scaffolds seeded with bone cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, L.; Langer, M.; Tavella, S.; Ruggiu, A.; Peyrin, F.

    2016-05-01

    In the field of regenerative medicine, there has been a growing interest in studying the combination of bone scaffolds and cells that can maximize newly formed bone. In-line phase-contrast x-ray tomography was used to image porous bone scaffolds (Skelite©), seeded with bone forming cells. This technique allows the quantification of both mineralized and soft tissue, unlike with classical x-ray micro-computed tomography. Phase contrast images were acquired at four distances. The reconstruction is typically performed in two successive steps: phase retrieval and tomographic reconstruction. In this work, different regularization methods were applied to the phase retrieval process. The application of a priori terms for heterogeneous objects enables quantitative 3D imaging of not only bone morphology, mineralization, and soft tissue formation, but also cells trapped in the pre-bone matrix. A statistical study was performed to derive statistically significant information on the different culture conditions.

  9. Quantitative phase-field modeling of two-phase growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Folch, R.; Plapp, M.

    2005-07-01

    A phase-field model that allows for quantitative simulations of low-speed eutectic and peritectic solidification under typical experimental conditions is developed. Its cornerstone is a smooth free-energy functional, specifically designed so that the stable solutions that connect any two phases are completely free of the third phase. For the simplest choice for this functional, the equations of motion for each of the two solid-liquid interfaces can be mapped to the standard phase-field model of single-phase solidification with its quartic double-well potential. By applying the thin-interface asymptotics and by extending the antitrapping current previously developed for this model, all spurious corrections to the dynamics of the solid-liquid interfaces linear in the interface thickness W can be eliminated. This means that, for small enough values of W , simulation results become independent of it. As a consequence, accurate results can be obtained using values of W much larger than the physical interface thickness, which yields a tremendous gain in computational power and makes simulations for realistic experimental parameters feasible. Convergence of the simulation outcome with decreasing W is explicitly demonstrated. Furthermore, the results are compared to a boundary-integral formulation of the corresponding free-boundary problem. Excellent agreement is found, except in the immediate vicinity of bifurcation points, a very sensitive situation where noticeable differences arise. These differences reveal that, in contrast to the standard assumptions of the free-boundary problem, out of equilibrium the diffuse trijunction region of the phase-field model can (i) slightly deviate from Young’s law for the contact angles, and (ii) advance in a direction that forms a finite angle with the solid-solid interface at each instant. While the deviation (i) extrapolates to zero in the limit of vanishing interface thickness, the small angle in (ii) remains roughly constant

  10. Quantitative simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Petibon, Yoann; Huang, Chuan; Reese, Timothy G.; Kolnick, Aleksandra L.; El Fakhri, Georges

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Simultaneous positron emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (PET-MR) is an innovative and promising imaging modality that is generating substantial interest in the medical imaging community, while offering many challenges and opportunities. In this study, we investigated whether MR surface coils need to be accounted for in PET attenuation correction. Furthermore, we integrated motion correction, attenuation correction, and point spread function modeling into a single PET reconstruction framework. We applied our reconstruction framework to in vivo animal and patient PET-MR studies. We have demonstrated that our approach greatly improved PET image quality. PMID:26158055

  11. Cell death monitoring using quantitative optical coherence tomography methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Kolios, Michael C.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2011-03-01

    Cell death is characterized by a series of predictable morphological changes, which modify the light scattering properties of cells. We present a multi-parametric approach to detecting changes in subcellular morphology related to cell death using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells undergoing apoptosis over a period of 48 hours. Integrated backscatter (IB) and spectral slope (SS) were computed from OCT backscatter spectra and statistical parameters were extracted from a generalized gamma (GG) distribution fit to OCT signal intensity histograms. The IB increased by 2-fold over 48 hours with significant increases observed as early as 4 hours. The SS increased in steepness by 2.5-fold with significant changes at 12 hours, while the GG parameters were sensitive to apoptotic changes at 24 to 48 hours. Histology slides indicated nuclear condensation and fragmentation at 24 hours, suggesting the late scattering changes could be related to nuclear structure. A second series of measurements from AML cells treated with cisplatin, colchicine or ionizing radiation suggested that the GG parameters could potentially differentiate between modes of cell death. Distinct cellular morphology was observed in histology slides obtained from cells treated under each condition.

  12. Split-spectrum phase-gradient optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Yali; Pechauer, Alex D.; Chandwani, Rahul; Huang, David

    2016-01-01

    A phase gradient angiography (PGA) method is proposed for optical coherence tomography (OCT). This method allows the use of phase information to map the microvasculature in tissue without the correction of bulk motion and laser trigger jitter induced phase artifacts. PGA can also be combined with the amplitude/intensity to improve the performance. Split-spectrum technique can further increase the signal to noise ratio by more than two times. In-vivo imaging of human retinal circulation is shown with a 70 kHz, 840 nm spectral domain OCT system and a 200 kHz, 1050 nm swept source OCT system. Four different OCT angiography methods are compared. The best performance was achieved with split-spectrum amplitude and phase-gradient angiography. PMID:27570689

  13. High-speed phase-shifting common-path quantitative phase imaging with a piezoelectric actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquoz, Séverine; Nahas, Amir; Sison, Miguel; Lopez, Antonio; Lasser, Theo

    2016-12-01

    We present a phase-shifting quantitative phase imaging technique providing high temporal and spatial phase stability and high acquisition speed. A piezoelectric microfabricated phase modulator allows tunable modulation frequencies up to the kHz range. After assessing the quantitative phase accuracy with technical samples, we demonstrate the high acquisition rate while monitoring cellular processes at temporal scales ranging from milliseconds to hours.

  14. Serial Quantitative Computed Tomography Perfusion in Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Lum, Cheemun; Hogan, Matthew J; Sinclair, John; English, Shane; Lesiuk, Howard; Shankar, Jai; Ayoub, Hala

    2016-05-01

    Computed tomography perfusion (CTP) has been performed to predict which patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage are at risk of developing delayed cerebral ischemia (DCI). Patients with severe arterial narrowing may have significant reduction in perfusion. However, many patients have less severe arterial narrowing. There is a paucity of literature evaluating perfusion changes which occur with mild to moderate narrowing. The purpose of our study was to investigate serial whole-brain CTP/computed tomography angiography in aneurysm-related subarachnoid hemorrhage (aSAH) patients with mild to moderate angiographic narrowing. We retrospectively studied 18 aSAH patients who had baseline and follow-up whole-brain CTP/computed tomography angiography. Thirty-one regions of interest/hemisphere at six levels were grouped by vascular territory. Arterial diameters were measured at the circle of Willis. The correlation between arterial diameter and change in CTP values, change in CTP in with and without DCI, and response to intra-arterial vasodilator therapy in DCI patients was evaluated. There was correlation among the overall average cerebral blood flow (CBF; R=0.49, p<0.04), mean transit time (R=-0.48, p=0.04), and angiographic narrowing. In individual arterial territories, there was correlation between changes in CBF and arterial diameter in the middle cerebral artery (R=0.53, p=0.03), posterior cerebral artery (R=0.5, p=0.03), and anterior cerebral artery (R=0.54, p=0.02) territories. Prolonged mean transit time was correlated with arterial diameter narrowing in the middle cerebral artery territory (R=0.52, p=0.03). Patients with DCI tended to have serial worsening of CBF compared with those without DCI (p=0.055). Our preliminary study demonstrates there is a correlation between mild to moderate angiographic narrowing and serial changes in perfusion in patients with aSAH. Patients developing DCI tended to have progressively worsening CBF compared with those not

  15. Quantitative photo-acoustic tomography with partial data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jie; Yang, Yang

    2012-11-01

    Photo-acoustic tomography is a newly developed hybrid imaging modality that combines a high-resolution modality with a high-contrast modality. We analyze the reconstruction of diffusion and absorption parameters in an elliptic equation and extend an earlier result of Bal and Uhlmann (2010 Inverse Problems 26 085010) to the partial data case. We show that the reconstruction can be uniquely determined by the knowledge of four internal data based on well-chosen partial boundary conditions. Stability of this reconstruction is ensured if a convexity condition is satisfied. A similar stability result is obtained without this geometric constraint if 4n well chosen partial boundary conditions are available, where n is the spatial dimension. The set of well chosen boundary measurements is characterized by some complex geometric optics solutions vanishing on a part of the boundary.

  16. Quantitative Pulmonary Imaging Using Computed Tomography and Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Washko, George R.; Parraga, Grace; Coxson, Harvey O.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of lung function, including spirometry and body plethesmography, are easy to perform and are the current clinical standard for assessing disease severity. However, these lung functional techniques do not adequately explain the observed variability in clinical manifestations of disease and offer little insight into the relationship of lung structure and function. Lung imaging and the image based assessment of lung disease has matured to the extent that it is common for clinical, epidemiologic, and genetic investigation to have a component dedicated to image analysis. There are several exciting imaging modalities currently being used for the non-invasive study of lung anatomy and function. In this review we will focus on two of them, x-ray computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Following a brief introduction of each method we detail some of the most recent work being done to characterize smoking-related lung disease and the clinical applications of such knowledge. PMID:22142490

  17. Quantitative assessment of impedance tomography for temperature measurements in hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Blad, B; Persson, B; Lindström, K

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this study is a non-invasive assessment of the thermal dose in hyperthermia. Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) has previously been given a first trial as a temperature monitoring method together with microwave-induced hyperthermia treatment, but it has not been thoroughly investigated. In the present work we have examined this method in order to investigate the correlation in vitro between the true spatial temperature distribution and the corresponding measured relative resistivity changes. Different hyperthermia techniques, such as interstitial water tubings, microwave-induced, laser-induced and ferromagnetic seeds have been used. The results show that it is possible to find a correlation between the measured temperature values and the tomographically measured relative resistivity changes in tissue-equivalent phantoms. But the uncertainty of the temperature coefficients, which has been observed, shows that the method has to be improved before it can be applied to clinical in vivo applications.

  18. 3D quantitative phase imaging of neural networks using WDT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Taewoo; Liu, S. C.; Iyer, Raj; Gillette, Martha U.; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    White-light diffraction tomography (WDT) is a recently developed 3D imaging technique based on a quantitative phase imaging system called spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). The technique has achieved a sub-micron resolution in all three directions with high sensitivity granted by the low-coherence of a white-light source. Demonstrations of the technique on single cell imaging have been presented previously; however, imaging on any larger sample, including a cluster of cells, has not been demonstrated using the technique. Neurons in an animal body form a highly complex and spatially organized 3D structure, which can be characterized by neuronal networks or circuits. Currently, the most common method of studying the 3D structure of neuron networks is by using a confocal fluorescence microscope, which requires fluorescence tagging with either transient membrane dyes or after fixation of the cells. Therefore, studies on neurons are often limited to samples that are chemically treated and/or dead. WDT presents a solution for imaging live neuron networks with a high spatial and temporal resolution, because it is a 3D imaging method that is label-free and non-invasive. Using this method, a mouse or rat hippocampal neuron culture and a mouse dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuron culture have been imaged in order to see the extension of processes between the cells in 3D. Furthermore, the tomogram is compared with a confocal fluorescence image in order to investigate the 3D structure at synapses.

  19. Three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging via tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Micah H; Gaylord, Thomas K

    2015-11-01

    The field of three-dimensional quantitative phase imaging (3D QPI) is expanding rapidly with applications in biological, medical, and industrial research, development, diagnostics, and metrology. Much of this research has centered on developing optical diffraction tomography (ODT) for biomedical applications. In addition to technical difficulties associated with coherent noise, ODT is not congruous with optical microscopy utilizing partially coherent light, which is used in most biomedical laboratories. Thus, ODT solutions have, for the most part, been limited to customized optomechanical systems which would be relatively expensive to implement on a wide scale. In the present work, a new phase reconstruction method, called tomographic deconvolution phase microscopy (TDPM), is described which makes use of commercial microscopy hardware in realizing 3D QPI. TDPM is analogous to methods used in deconvolution microscopy which improve spatial resolution and 3D-localization accuracy of fluorescence micrographs by combining multiple through-focal scans which are deconvolved by the system point spread function. TDPM is based on the 3D weak object transfer function theory which is shown here to be capable of imaging "nonweak" phase objects with large phase excursions. TDPM requires no phase unwrapping and recovers the entire object spectrum via object rotation, mitigating the need to fill in the "missing cone" of spatial frequencies algorithmically as in limited-angle ODT. In the present work, TDPM is demonstrated using optical fibers, including single-mode, polarization-maintaining, and photonic-crystal fibers as well as an azimuthally varying CO2-laser-induced long-period fiber grating period as test phase objects.

  20. Quantitative analyses of maxillary sinus using computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Perella, Andréia; Rocha, Sara Dos Santos; Cavalcanti, Marcelo de Gusmão Paraiso

    2003-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the precision and accuracy of linear measurements of maxillary sinus made in tomographic films, by comparing with 3D reconstructed images. Linear measurements of both maxillary sinus in computed tomography CT of 17 patients, with or without lesion by two calibrated examiners independently, on two occasions, with a single manual caliper. A third examiner has done the same measurements electronically in 3D-CT reconstruction. The statistical analysis was performed using ANOVA (analyses of variance). Intra-observer percentage error was little in both cases, with and without lesion; it ranged from 1.14% to 1.82%. The inter-observer error was a little higher reaching a 2.08% value. The accuracy presented a higher value. The perceptual accuracy error was higher in samples, which had lesion compared to that which had not. CT had provided adequate precision and accuracy for maxillary sinus analyses. The precision in cases with lesion was considered inferior when compared to that without lesion, but it can't affect the method efficacy.

  1. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  2. Phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated computed tomography/positron emitted tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nagel, C. C. A.; Bosmans, G.; Dekker, A. L. A. J.; Oellers, M. C.; De Ruysscher, D. K. M.; Lambin, P.; Minken, A. W. H.; Lang, N.; Schaefers, K. P.

    2006-06-15

    The motion of lung tumors with respiration causes difficulties in the imaging with computed tomography (CT) and positron emitted tomography (PET). Since an accurate knowledge of the position of the tumor and the surrounding tissues is needed for radiation treatment planning, it is important to improve CT/PET image acquisition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential to improve image acquisition using phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated CT/PET, where data of both modalities were binned retrospectively. Respiration correlated scans were made on a Siemens Biograph Sensation 16 CT/PET scanner which was modified to make a low pitch CT scan and list mode PET scan possible. A lollipop phantom was used in the experiments. The sphere with a diameter of 3.1 cm was filled with approximately 20 MBq {sup 18}F-FDG. Three longitudinal movement amplitudes were tested: 2.5, 3.9, and 4.8 cm. After collection of the raw CT data, list mode PET data, and the respiratory signal CT/PET images were binned to ten phases with the help of in-house-built software. Each PET phase was corrected for attenuation with CT data of the corresponding phase. For comparison, the attenuation correction was also performed with nonrespiration correlated (non-RC) CT data. The volume and the amplitude of the movement were calculated for every phase of both the CT and PET data (with phased attenuation correction). Maximum and average activity concentrations were compared between the phased and nonphased attenuation corrected PET. With a standard non-RC CT/PET scan, the volume was underestimated by as much as 46% in CT and the PET volume was overestimated to 370%. The volumes found with RC-CT/PET scanning had average deviations of 1.9% ({+-}4.8%) and 1.5% ({+-}3.4%) from the actual volume, for the CT and PET volumes, respectively. Evaluation of the maximum activity concentration showed a clear displacement in the images with non-RC attenuation correction, and activity values

  3. Photoacoustic tomography using a Michelson interferometer with quadrature phase detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speirs, Rory W.; Bishop, Alexis I.

    2013-07-01

    We present a pressure sensor based on a Michelson interferometer, for use in photoacoustic tomography. Quadrature phase detection is employed allowing measurement at any point on the mirror surface without having to retune the interferometer, as is typically required by Fabry-Perot type detectors. This opens the door to rapid full surface detection, which is necessary for clinical applications. Theory relating acoustic pressure to detected acoustic particle displacements is used to calculate the detector sensitivity, which is validated with measurement. Proof-of-concept tomographic images of blood vessel phantoms have been taken with sub-millimeter resolution at depths of several millimeters.

  4. Phase-contrast tomography with low-intensity beams

    SciTech Connect

    Rehacek, J.; Hradil, Z.; Zawisky, M.; Dubus, F.; Bonse, U.

    2005-02-01

    In newly developed neutron phase tomography, wave properties of neutrons are exploited for the nondestructive testing of the internal structure of matter. We show how limitations due to small available intensities of present neutron sources can be overcome by using an advanced maximum-likelihood reconstruction algorithm. Unlike the standard filtered back-projection, the developed procedure gives reasonable results also when used on very noisy data or data consisting of only a few measured projections. This is demonstrated by means of simulations and also experimentally. The proposed method leads to considerably shorter measuring times and/or increased precision.

  5. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, S.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Schulz, G.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Müller, B.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-01

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  6. Experimental comparison of grating- and propagation-based hard X-ray phase tomography of soft tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, S.; Schulz, G.; Müller, B.; Zanette, I.; Dominietto, M.; Langer, M.; Rack, A.; Le Duc, G.; David, C.; Mohr, J.; Pfeiffer, F.; Weitkamp, T.

    2014-10-21

    When imaging soft tissues with hard X-rays, phase contrast is often preferred over conventional attenuation contrast due its superior sensitivity. However, it is unclear which of the numerous phase tomography methods yields the optimized results at given experimental conditions. Therefore, we quantitatively compared the three phase tomography methods implemented at the beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: X-ray grating interferometry (XGI), and propagation-based phase tomography, i.e., single-distance phase retrieval (SDPR) and holotomography (HT), using cancerous tissue from a mouse model and an entire heart of a rat. We show that for both specimens, the spatial resolution derived from the characteristic morphological features is about a factor of two better for HT and SDPR compared to XGI, whereas the XGI data generally exhibit much better contrast-to-noise ratios for the anatomical features. Moreover, XGI excels in fidelity of the density measurements, and is also more robust against low-frequency artifacts than HT, but it might suffer from phase-wrapping artifacts. Thus, we can regard the three phase tomography methods discussed as complementary. The application will decide which spatial and density resolutions are desired, for the imaging task and dose requirements, and, in addition, the applicant must choose between the complexity of the experimental setup and the one of data processing.

  7. Screening for osteoporosis after trauma: a new approach using quantitative computed tomography of the skull.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Amber; Waxman, Kenneth; Izfar, Seema; Grotts, Jonathan; Yim, Samantha

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis of osteoporosis is important in the care of elderly patients at risk of trauma. While pelvis computed tomography (CT) is accurate in the measurement of bone mineral density, axial skull CT has not previously been evaluated for this purpose. This study investigated whether data from axial skull CT scans can screen for osteoporosis. Bone density measurements were derived from digital analysis of routine scans of the head and pelvis using quantitative CT. The study took place from October 2010 to November 2011 at a medium-sized community hospital. The first study phase included patients older than 18 years who had both a head and a pelvis CT scan within 30 days. The known diagnostic value for osteoporosis on pelvis CT scans was used to derive a diagnostic value for head CT. The second study phase included adult trauma patients who underwent noncontrast head CT during an initial trauma evaluation. A subgroup analysis was performed during Phase II on patients older than 65 years to identify the incidence of fracture as it is affected by age and bone mineral density. Our data demonstrated that head CT was able to identify osteoporosis with a sensitivity of 0.70, a specificity of 0.81, and an accuracy of 0.76 compared with pelvic CT. Of 261 trauma patients, 54% had bone disease based on axial skull CT criteria. Patients older than 65 years with a positive screen result for osteoporosis on head CT were twice as likely to have a fracture. Analysis of data from head CT scans has the potential to provide a useful screen for osteoporosis. Adding this analysis to CT scans performed for elderly trauma patients could result in improved diagnosis and treatment of osteoporosis. Diagnostic study, level II.

  8. Phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated computed tomography/positron emitted tomography.

    PubMed

    Nagel, C C A; Bosmans, G; Dekker, A L A J; Ollers, M C; De Ruysscher, D K M; Lambin, P; Minken, A W H; Lang, N; Schäfers, K P

    2006-06-01

    The motion of lung tumors with respiration causes difficulties in the imaging with computed tomography (CT) and positronemitted tomography (PET). Since an accurate knowledge of the position of the tumor and the surrounding tissues is needed for radiation treatment planning, it is important to improve CT/PET image acquisition. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential to improve image acquisition using phased attenuation correction in respiration correlated CT/PET, where data of both modalities were binned retrospectively. Respiration correlated scans were made on a Siemens Biograph Sensation 16 CT/PET scanner which was modified to make a low pitch CT scan and list mode PET scan possible. A lollipop phantom was used in the experiments. The sphere with a diameter of 3.1 cm was filled with approximately 20 MBq 18F-FDG. Three longitudinal movement amplitudes were tested: 2.5, 3.9, and 4.8 cm. After collection of the raw CT data, list mode PET data, and the respiratory signal CT/PET images were binned to ten phases with the help of in-house-built software. Each PET phase was corrected for attenuation with CT data of the corresponding phase. For comparison, the attenuation correction was also performed with nonrespiration correlated (non-RC) CT data. The volume and the amplitude of the movement were calculated for every phaseof both the CT and PET data (with phased attenuation correction). Maximum and average activity concentrations were compared between the phased and nonphased attenuation corrected PET. With a standard non-RC CT/PET scan, the volume was underestimated by as much as 46% in CT and the PET volume was overestimated to 370%. The volumes found with RC-CT/PET scanning had average deviations of 1.9% (+/- 4.8%) and 1.5% (+/- 3.4%) from the actual volume, for the CT and PET volumes, respectively. Evaluation of the maximum activity concentration showed a clear displacement in the images with non-RC attenuation correction, and activity values were on

  9. Objective breast tissue image classification using Quantitative Transmission ultrasound tomography

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Bilal; Klock, John; Wiskin, James; Lenox, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QT) is a powerful and emerging imaging paradigm which has the potential to perform true three-dimensional image reconstruction of biological tissue. Breast imaging is an important application of QT and allows non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging of whole breasts in vivo. Here, we report the first demonstration of breast tissue image classification in QT imaging. We systematically assess the ability of the QT images’ features to differentiate between normal breast tissue types. The three QT features were used in Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers, and classification of breast tissue as either skin, fat, glands, ducts or connective tissue was demonstrated with an overall accuracy of greater than 90%. Finally, the classifier was validated on whole breast image volumes to provide a color-coded breast tissue volume. This study serves as a first step towards a computer-aided detection/diagnosis platform for QT. PMID:27934955

  10. Objective breast tissue image classification using Quantitative Transmission ultrasound tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malik, Bilal; Klock, John; Wiskin, James; Lenox, Mark

    2016-12-01

    Quantitative Transmission Ultrasound (QT) is a powerful and emerging imaging paradigm which has the potential to perform true three-dimensional image reconstruction of biological tissue. Breast imaging is an important application of QT and allows non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging of whole breasts in vivo. Here, we report the first demonstration of breast tissue image classification in QT imaging. We systematically assess the ability of the QT images’ features to differentiate between normal breast tissue types. The three QT features were used in Support Vector Machines (SVM) classifiers, and classification of breast tissue as either skin, fat, glands, ducts or connective tissue was demonstrated with an overall accuracy of greater than 90%. Finally, the classifier was validated on whole breast image volumes to provide a color-coded breast tissue volume. This study serves as a first step towards a computer-aided detection/diagnosis platform for QT.

  11. HAADF-STEM atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens: Towards quantitative correlative microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, W; Hernandez-Maldonado, D; Moyon, F; Cuvilly, F; Vaudolon, C; Shinde, D; Vurpillot, F

    2015-12-01

    The geometry of atom probe tomography tips strongly differs from standard scanning transmission electron microscopy foils. Whereas the later are rather flat and thin (<20 nm), tips display a curved surface and a significantly larger thickness. As far as a correlative approach aims at analysing the same specimen by both techniques, it is mandatory to explore the limits and advantages imposed by the particular geometry of atom probe tomography specimens. Based on simulations (electron probe propagation and image simulations), the possibility to apply quantitative high angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron microscopy to of atom probe tomography specimens has been tested. The influence of electron probe convergence and the benefice of deconvolution of electron probe point spread function electron have been established. Atom counting in atom probe tomography specimens is for the first time reported in this present work. It is demonstrated that, based on single projections of high angle annular dark field imaging, significant quantitative information can be used as additional input for refining the data obtained by correlative analysis of the specimen in APT, therefore opening new perspectives in the field of atomic scale tomography.

  12. Quantitative imaging of tumor vasculature using multispectral optoacoustic tomography (MSOT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaszewski, Michal R.; Quiros-Gonzalez, Isabel; Joseph, James; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to evaluate tumor oxygenation in the clinic could indicate prognosis and enable treatment monitoring, since oxygen deficient cancer cells are often more resistant to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a hybrid technique combining the high contrast of optical imaging with spatial resolution and penetration depth similar to ultrasound. We hypothesized that MSOT could reveal both tumor vascular density and function based on modulation of blood oxygenation. We performed MSOT on nude mice (n=8) bearing subcutaneous xenograft PC3 tumors using an inVision 256 (iThera Medical). The mice were maintained under inhalation anesthesia during imaging and respired oxygen content was modified from 21% to 100% and back. After imaging, Hoechst 33348 was injected to indicate vascular perfusion and permeability. Tumors were then extracted for histopathological analysis and fluorescence microscopy. The acquired data was analyzed to extract a bulk measurement of blood oxygenation (SO2MSOT) from the whole tumor using different approaches. The tumors were also automatically segmented into 5 regions to investigate the effect of depth on SO2MSOT. Baseline SO2MSOT values at 21% and 100% oxygen breathing showed no relationship with ex vivo measures of vascular density or function, while the change in SO2MSOT showed a strong negative correlation to Hoechst intensity (r=- 0.92, p=0.0016). Tumor voxels responding to oxygen challenge were spatially heterogeneous. We observed a significant drop in SO2 MSOT value with tumor depth following a switch of respiratory gas from air to oxygen (0.323+/-0.017 vs. 0.11+/-0.05, p=0.009 between 0 and 1.5mm depth), but no such effect for air breathing (0.265+/-0.013 vs. 0.19+/-0.04, p=0.14 between 0 and 1.5mm depth). Our results indicate that in subcutaneous prostate tumors, baseline SO2MSOT levels do not correlate to tumor vascular density or function while the magnitude of the response to oxygen

  13. High-speed quantitative interferometric microscopy based phase imaging cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Liang; Sun, Nan; Yan, Keding; Liu, Fei; Wang, Shouyu

    2014-11-01

    The paper proposed a simple large scale bio-sample phase detecting equipment called gravity driven phase detecting cytometer, which is based on quantitative interferometric microscopy to realize flowing red blood cells phase distribution detection. The method has advantages on high throughput phase detecting and statistical analysis with high detecting speed and in real-time. The statistical characteristics of red blood cells are useful for biological analysis and disease detection. We believe this method is shedding more light on quantitatively measurement of the phase distribution of bio-samples.

  14. Application study of transport intensity equation in quantitative phase reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Xiaojun; Cheng, Wei; Wei, Chunjuan; Xue, Liang; Liu, Weijing; Bai, Baodan; Chu, Fenghong

    2016-10-01

    In order to improve detection speed and accuracy of biological cells, a quantitative non-interference optical phase recovery method is proposed in commercial microscope, taking the red blood cells as the classical phase objects. Three bright field micrographs were collected in the experiment. Utilizing the transport intensity equation (TIE), the quantitative phase distributions of red blood cell are gained and agree well with the previous optical phase models. Analysis shows that the resolution of introduced system reaches sub-micron. This method not only quickly gives quantitative phase distribution of cells, but also measures a large number of cells simultaneously. So it is potential in the use of real-time observing and quantitative analyzing of cells in vivo.

  15. Phase resolved digital signal processing in optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, Johannes F.; Tripathi, Renu; Park, Boris H.; Nassif, Nader

    2002-06-01

    We present phase resolved digital signal processing techniques for Optical Coherence Tomography to correct for the non Gaussian shape of source spectra and for Group Delay Dispersion (GDD). A broadband source centered at 820 nm was synthesized by combining the spectra of two superluminescent diodes to improve axial image resolution in an optical coherence tomography (OCT) system. Spectral shaping was used to reduce the side lobes (ringing) in the axial point spread function due to the non-Gaussian shape of the spectra. Images of onion cells taken with each individual source and the combined sources, respectively, show the improved resolution and quality enhancement in a turbid biological sample. An OCT system operating at 1310 nm was used to demonstrate that the broadening effect of group delay dispersion (GDD) on the coherence function could be eliminated completely by introducing a quadratic phase shift in the Fourier domain of the interferometric signal. The technique is demonstrated by images of human skin grafts with group delay dispersion mismatch between sample and reference arm before and after digital processing.

  16. Treatment modification of yttrium-90 radioembolization based on quantitative positron emission tomography/CT imaging.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ted T; Bourgeois, Austin C; Balius, Anastasia M; Pasciak, Alexander S

    2013-03-01

    Treatment activity for yttrium-90 ((90)Y) radioembolization when calculated by using the manufacturer-recommended technique is only partially patient-specific and may result in a subtumoricidal dose in some patients. The authors describe the use of quantitative (90)Y positron emission tomography/computed tomography as a tool to provide patient-specific optimization of treatment activity and evaluate this new method in a patient who previously received traditional (90)Y radioembolization. The modified treatment resulted in a 40-Gy increase in absorbed dose to tumor and complete resolution of disease in the treated area within 3 months.

  17. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p < 0.001) in dentine as well as a significant increase ( p < 0.001) in enamel was observed during tooth bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  18. Quantitation of the human basal ganglia with Positron Emission Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Bendriem, B.; Dewey, S.L.; Schlyer, D.J.; Wolf, A.P.; Volkow, N.D.

    1990-01-01

    The accurate measurement of the concentration of a radioisotope in small structures with PET requires a correction for quantitation loss due to the partial volume effect and the effect of scattered radiation. To evaluate errors associated with measures in the human basal ganglia (BG) we have built a unilateral model of the BG that we have inserted in a 20 cm cylinder. The recovery coefficient (RC = measured activity/true activity) for our BG phantom has been measured on a CTI tomograph (model 931-08/12) with different background concentrations (contrast) and at different axial locations in the gantry. The BG was visualized on 4 or 5 slices depending on its position in the gantry and on the contrast used. The RC was 0.75 with no background (contrast equal to 1.0). Increasing the relative radioactivity concentration in the background increased the RC from 0.75 to 2.00 when the contrast was {minus}0.7 (BG < Background). The RC was also affected by the size and the shape of the region of interest (ROI) used (RC from 0.75 to 0.67 with ROI size from 0.12 to 1.41 cm{sup 2}). These results show that accurate RC correction depends not only on the volume of the structure but also on its contrast with its surroundings as well as on the selection of the ROI. They also demonstrate that the higher the contrast the more sensitive to axial positioning PET measurements in the BG are. These data provide us with some information about the variability of PET measurements in small structure like the BG and we have proposed some strategies to improve the reproducibility. 18 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Registration of phase-contrast images in propagation-based X-ray phase tomography.

    PubMed

    Weber, L; Hänsch, A; Wolfram, U; Pacureanu, A; Cloetens, P; Peyrin, F; Rit, S; Langer, M

    2017-08-16

    X-ray phase tomography aims at reconstructing the 3D electron density distribution of an object. It offers enhanced sensitivity compared to attenuation-based X-ray absorption tomography. In propagation-based methods, phase contrast is achieved by letting the beam propagate after interaction with the object. The phase shift is then retrieved at each projection angle, and subsequently used in tomographic reconstruction to obtain the refractive index decrement distribution, which is proportional to the electron density. Accurate phase retrieval is achieved by combining images at different propagation distances. For reconstructions of good quality, the phase-contrast images recorded at different distances need to be accurately aligned. In this work, we characterise the artefacts related to misalignment of the phase-contrast images, and investigate the use of different registration algorithms for aligning in-line phase-contrast images. The characterisation of artefacts is done by a simulation study and comparison with experimental data. Loss in resolution due to vibrations is found to be comparable to attenuation-based computed tomography. Further, it is shown that registration of phase-contrast images is nontrivial due to the difference in contrast between the different images, and the often periodical artefacts present in the phase-contrast images if multilayer X-ray optics are used. To address this, we compared two registration algorithms for aligning phase-contrast images acquired by magnified X-ray nanotomography: one based on cross-correlation and one based on mutual information. We found that the mutual information-based registration algorithm was more robust than a correlation-based method. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Quantitative phase imaging of Breast cancer cell based on SLIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Huaqin; Li, Zhifang; Li, Hui; Wu, Shulian

    2016-02-01

    We illustrated a novel optical microscopy technique to observe cell dynamics via spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM). SLIM combines Zemike's phase contrast microscopy and Gabor's holography. When the light passes through the transparent specimens, it could render high contrast intensity and record the phase information from the object. We reconstructed the Breast cancer cell phase image by SLIM and the reconstruction algorithm. Our investigation showed that SLIM has the ability to achieve the quantitative phase imaging (QPI).

  1. Quantitative comparison of analysis methods for spectroscopic optical coherence tomography: reply to comment

    PubMed Central

    Bosschaart, Nienke; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C.G.; Faber, Dirk J.

    2014-01-01

    We reply to the comment by Kraszewski et al on “Quantitative comparison of analysis methods for spectroscopic optical coherence tomography.” We present additional simulations evaluating the proposed window function. We conclude that our simulations show good qualitative agreement with the results of Kraszewski, in support of their conclusion that SOCT optimization should include window shape, next to choice of window size and analysis algorithm. PMID:25401016

  2. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    DOE PAGES

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edgesmore » complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.« less

  3. X-ray computed tomography of wood-adhesive bondlines: Attenuation and phase-contrast effects

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.; Xiao, Xianghui

    2015-07-29

    Microscale X-ray computed tomography (XCT) is discussed as a technique for identifying 3D adhesive distribution in wood-adhesive bondlines. Visualization and material segmentation of the adhesives from the surrounding cellular structures require sufficient gray-scale contrast in the reconstructed XCT data. Commercial wood-adhesive polymers have similar chemical characteristics and density to wood cell wall polymers and therefore do not provide good XCT attenuation contrast in their native form. Here, three different adhesive types, namely phenol formaldehyde, polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate, and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate, are tagged with iodine such that they yield sufficient X-ray attenuation contrast. However, phase-contrast effects at material edges complicate image quality and segmentation in XCT data reconstructed with conventional filtered backprojection absorption contrast algorithms. A quantitative phase retrieval algorithm, which isolates and removes the phase-contrast effect, was demonstrated. The paper discusses and illustrates the balance between material X-ray attenuation and phase-contrast effects in all quantitative XCT analyses of wood-adhesive bondlines.

  4. Non-small cell lung cancer: Spectral computed tomography quantitative parameters for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fengfeng; Dong, Jie; Wang, Xiuting; Fu, Xiaojiao; Zhang, Tong

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the application value of spectral computed tomography (CT)quantitative parameters for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSLC). 84 patients with suspected lung cancer who underwent chest dual-phase enhanced scan with gemstone spectral CT imaging (GSI) mode were selected. GSI quantitative parameters including normalized iodine concentrations (NIC), water concentration, slope of the spectral Hounsfield unit curve (λHU) were measured. The two-sample t test was used to statistically compare these quantitative parameters. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were drawn to establish the optimal threshold values. A total of 144 lymph nodes were included, with 48 metastatic lymph nodes and 96 non-metastatic lymph nodes. The slope of the spectral Hounsfeld unit curve (λHU) measured during both arterial and venous phases were signifcantly higher in metastatic than in benign lymph nodes (P<0.05). The area under the ROC curve (AUC=0.951) of λHU of the arterial phase (AP) was the largest. When the optimal threshold values of λHU was 2.75, the sensitivity, specificity, and overall accuracy in the diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes were 88.2%, 88.4%, 87.0%, respectively. Conventional CT diagnostic criteria established in accordance with size (lymph node maximal short axis diameter ≥10mm) as the basis for judging metastatic lymph node. In quantitative assessment using spectral CT imaging, quantitative parameters showed higher accuracy than qualitative assessment of conventional CT based on the size for preoperative diagnosis of metastatic lymph nodes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Thermal diffusivity estimation with quantitative pulsed phase thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina-Borras, J. E.; Florez-Ospina, Juan F.; Benitez-Restrepo, H. D.; Maldague, X.

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative Pulsed Phase Thermography (PPT) has been only used to estimate defect parameters such as depth and thermal resistance. Here, we propose a thermal quadrupole based method that extends quantitative pulsed phase thermography. This approach estimates thermal diffusivity by solving a inversion problem based on non-linear squares estimation. This approach is tested with pulsed thermography data acquired from a composite sample. We compare our results with another technique established in time domain. The proposed quantitative analysis with PPT provides estimates of thermal diffusivity close to those obtained with the time domain approach. This estimation requires only the a priori knowledge of sample thickness.

  6. Frequency domain optoacoustic tomography using amplitude and phase

    PubMed Central

    Mohajerani, Pouyan; Kellnberger, Stephan; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2014-01-01

    We introduce optoacoustic tomographic imaging using intensity modulated light sources and collecting amplitude and phase information in the frequency domain. Imaging is performed at multiple modulation frequencies. The forward modeling uses the Green's function solution to the pressure wave equation in frequency domain and the resulting inverse problem is solved using regularized least squares minimization. We study the effect of the number of frequencies and of the bandwidth employed on the image quality achieved. The possibility of employing an all-frequency domain optoacoustic imaging for experimental measurements is studied as a function of noise. We conclude that frequency domain optoacoustic tomography may evolve to a practical experimental method using light intensity modulated sources, with advantages over time-domain optoacoustics. PMID:25431755

  7. Computed tomography using broadband Bessel THz beams and phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Bitman, Assaf; Goldring, Sharone; Moshe, Inon; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2014-04-01

    We present new results demonstrating the capability of performing computed tomography (CT) using broadband Bessel terahertz (THz) beams. Nondiffractive beams such as these exhibit propagation-invariant lines of focus with an extended depth-of-field compared to conventional Gaussian beams. Using this property, we demonstrate a considerable improvement in the 3D reconstruction image of a synthetic sample through the backprojection algorithm. Only when THz Bessel beams are used, a full reconstruction of the object structure is made. Moreover, we use phase-contrast mechanism which improves the spatial resolution and reconstructed images. Our results highlight the potential in using nondiffractive Bessel beams to significantly improve 3D-image reconstruction of THz CT.

  8. Quantitative assessment of the retinal microvasculature using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Zhongdi; Lin, Jason; Gao, Chen; Xin, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Roisman, Luis; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-06-01

    Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is clinically useful for the qualitative assessment of the macular microvasculature. However, there is a need for comprehensive quantitative tools to help objectively analyze the OCT angiograms. Few studies have reported the use of a single quantitative index to describe vessel density in OCT angiograms. In this study, we introduce a five-index quantitative analysis of OCT angiograms in an attempt to detect and assess vascular abnormalities from multiple perspectives. The indices include vessel area density, vessel skeleton density, vessel diameter index, vessel perimeter index, and vessel complexity index. We show the usefulness of the proposed indices with five illustrative cases. Repeatability is tested on both a healthy case and a stable diseased case, giving interclass coefficients smaller than 0.031. The results demonstrate that our proposed quantitative analysis may be useful as a complement to conventional OCTA for the diagnosis of disease and monitoring of treatment.

  9. Quantitative assessment of the retinal microvasculature using optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Zhongdi; Lin, Jason; Gao, Chen; Xin, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Chen, Chieh-Li; Roisman, Luis; Gregori, Giovanni; Rosenfeld, Philip J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) is clinically useful for the qualitative assessment of the macular microvasculature. However, there is a need for comprehensive quantitative tools to help objectively analyze the OCT angiograms. Few studies have reported the use of a single quantitative index to describe vessel density in OCT angiograms. In this study, we introduce a five-index quantitative analysis of OCT angiograms in an attempt to detect and assess vascular abnormalities from multiple perspectives. The indices include vessel area density, vessel skeleton density, vessel diameter index, vessel perimeter index, and vessel complexity index. We show the usefulness of the proposed indices with five illustrative cases. Repeatability is tested on both a healthy case and a stable diseased case, giving interclass coefficients smaller than 0.031. The results demonstrate that our proposed quantitative analysis may be useful as a complement to conventional OCTA for the diagnosis of disease and monitoring of treatment. PMID:27286188

  10. Helical X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography without phase stepping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marschner, M.; Willner, M.; Potdevin, G.; Fehringer, A.; Noël, P. B.; Pfeiffer, F.; Herzen, J.

    2016-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) using grating interferometry provides enhanced soft-tissue contrast. The possibility to use standard polychromatic laboratory sources enables an implementation into a clinical setting. Thus, PCCT has gained significant attention in recent years. However, phase-contrast CT scans still require significantly increased measurement times in comparison to conventional attenuation-based CT imaging. This is mainly due to a time-consuming stepping of a grating, which is necessary for an accurate retrieval of the phase information. In this paper, we demonstrate a novel scan technique, which directly allows the determination of the phase signal without a phase-stepping procedure. The presented work is based on moiré fringe scanning, which allows fast data acquisition in radiographic applications such as mammography or in-line product analysis. Here, we demonstrate its extension to tomography enabling a continuous helical sample rotation as routinely performed in clinical CT systems. Compared to standard phase-stepping techniques, the proposed helical fringe-scanning procedure enables faster measurements, an extended field of view and relaxes the stability requirements of the system, since the gratings remain stationary. Finally, our approach exceeds previously introduced methods by not relying on spatial interpolation to acquire the phase-contrast signal.

  11. Emittance and Phase Space Tomography for the Fermilab Linac

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, F.G.G.; Johnstone, C.; Kobilarcik, T.; Koizumi, G.M.; Moore, C.D.; Newhart, D.L.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-01

    The Fermilab Linac delivers a variable intensity, 400-MeV beam to the MuCool Test Area experimental hall via a beam line specifically designed to facilitate measurements of the Linac beam emittance and properties. A 10 m, dispersion-free and magnet-free straight utilizes an upstream quadrupole focusing triplet in combination with the necessary in-straight beam diagnostics to fully characterize the transverse beam properties. Since the Linac does not produce a strictly elliptical phase space, tomography must be performed on the profile data to retrieve the actual particle distribution in phase space. This is achieved by rotating the phase space distribution using different waist focusing conditions of the upstream triplet and performing a deconvolution of the profile data. Preliminary measurements using this diagnostic section are reported here. These data represent a first-pass measurement of the Linac emittance based on various techniques. It is clear that the most accurate representation of the emittance is given by the 3-profile approach. Future work will entail minimizing the beam spot size on MW5 to test and possibly improve the accuracy of the 2-profile approach. The 95% emittance is {approx} 18{pi} in the vertical and {approx} 13{pi} in the horizontal, which is especially larger than anticipated - 8-10{pi} was expected. One possible explanation is that the entire Linac pulse is extracted into the MTA beamline and during the first few microseconds, the feed forward and RF regulation are not stable. This may result in a larger net emittance observed versus beam injected into Booster, where the leading part of the Linac beam pulse is chopped. Future studies will clearly entail a measurement of the emittance vs. pulse length. One additional concern is that the Linac phase space is most likely aperture-defined and non-elliptical in nature. A non-elliptical phase-space determination would require a more elaborate analysis and provide another explanation of the

  12. Single-shot quantitative dispersion phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Niyom; Kang, Jeon Woong; Hillman, Timothy R.; Dasari, Ramachandra R.; Yaqoob, Zahid

    2012-08-01

    We present an imaging modality capable of providing high-speed optical dispersion measurements of live cells. The technique permits wide-field measurement of the optical phase shifts introduced by a sample for multiple discrete wavelengths in a single image capture. Utilizing spatial modulation and the wavelength dependence of the interference-fringe spacing, average refractive index as a function of wavelength is obtained, yielding optical dispersion measurements of the sample under observation. Because of its simple and low-cost design, the technique can be readily integrated into a standard microscope to collect additional diagnostic information about biological cells.

  13. Quantitative phase imaging using grating-based quadrature phase interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jigang; Yaqoob, Zahid; Heng, Xin; Cui, Xiquan; Yang, Changhuei

    2007-02-01

    In this paper, we report the use of holographic gratings, which act as the free-space equivalent of the 3x3 fiber-optic coupler, to perform full field phase imaging. By recording two harmonically-related gratings in the same holographic plate, we are able to obtain nontrivial phase shift between different output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The phase difference can be adjusted by changing the relative phase of the recording beams when recording the hologram. We have built a Mach-Zehnder interferometer using harmonically-related holographic gratings with 600 and 1200 lines/mm spacing. Two CCD cameras at the output ports of the gratings-based Mach-Zehnder interferometer are used to record the full-field quadrature interferograms, which are subsequently processed to reconstruct the phase image. The imaging system has ~12X magnification with ~420μmx315μm field-of-view. To demonstrate the capability of our system, we have successfully performed phase imaging of a pure phase object and a paramecium caudatum.

  14. Corrected coronary opacification decrease from coronary computed tomography angiography: Validation with quantitative 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Benz, Dominik C; Gräni, Christoph; Ferro, Paola; Neumeier, Luis; Messerli, Michael; Possner, Mathias; Clerc, Olivier F; Gebhard, Catherine; Gaemperli, Oliver; Pazhenkottil, Aju P; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Buechel, Ronny R

    2017-07-06

    To assess the functional relevance of a coronary artery stenosis, corrected coronary opacification (CCO) decrease derived from coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) has been proposed. The present study aims at validating CCO decrease with quantitative 13N-ammonia positron emission tomography (PET) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). This retrospective study consists of 39 patients who underwent hybrid CCTA/PET-MPI. From CCTA, attenuation in the coronary lumen was measured before and after a stenosis and corrected to the aorta to calculate CCO and its decrease. Relative flow reserve (RFR) was calculated by dividing the stress myocardial blood flow (MBF) of a vessel territory subtended by a stenotic coronary by the stress MBF of the reference territories without stenoses. RFR was abnormal in 11 vessel territories (27%). CCO decrease yielded a sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value, positive predictive value, and accuracy for prediction of an abnormal RFR of 73%, 70%, 88%, 47%, and 70%, respectively. CCTA-derived CCO decrease has moderate diagnostic accuracy to predict an abnormal RFR in PET-MPI. However, its high negative predictive value to rule out functional relevance of a given lesion may confer clinical implications in the diagnostic work-up of patients with a coronary stenosis.

  15. Image segmentation of nanoscale Zernike phase contrast X-ray computed tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Arjun S.; Mandal, Pratiti; Zhang, Yongjie; Litster, Shawn

    2015-05-14

    Zernike phase contrast is a useful technique for nanoscale X-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging of materials with a low X-ray absorption coefficient. It enhances the image contrast by phase shifting X-ray waves to create changes in amplitude. However, it creates artifacts that hinder the use of traditional image segmentation techniques. We propose an image restoration method that models the X-ray phase contrast optics and the three-dimensional image reconstruction method. We generate artifact-free images through an optimization problem that inverts this model. Though similar approaches have been used for Zernike phase contrast in visible light microscopy, this optimization employs an effective edge detection method tailored to handle Zernike phase contrast artifacts. We characterize this optics-based restoration method by removing the artifacts in and thresholding multiple Zernike phase contrast X-ray CT images to produce segmented results that are consistent with the physical specimens. We quantitatively evaluate and compare our method to other segmentation techniques to demonstrate its high accuracy.

  16. Low-dose phase contrast tomography with conventional x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, C. K. Endrizzi, M.; Diemoz, P. C.; Olivo, A.; Munro, P. R. T.

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: The edge illumination (EI) x-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi) method has been recently further developed to perform tomographic and, thus, volumetric imaging. In this paper, the first tomographic EI XPCi images acquired with a conventional x-ray source at dose levels below that used for preclinical small animal imaging are presented. Methods: Two test objects, a biological sample and a custom-built phantom, were imaged with a laboratory-based EI XPCi setup in tomography mode. Tomographic maps that show the phase shift and attenuating properties of the object were reconstructed, and analyzed in terms of signal-to-noise ratio and quantitative accuracy. Dose measurements using thermoluminescence devices were performed. Results: The obtained images demonstrate that phase based imaging methods can provide superior results compared to attenuation based modalities for weakly attenuating samples also in 3D. Moreover, and, most importantly, they demonstrate the feasibility of low-dose imaging. In addition, the experimental results can be considered quantitative within the constraints imposed by polychromaticity. Conclusions: The results, together with the method's dose efficiency and compatibility with conventional x-ray sources, indicate that tomographic EI XPCi can become an important tool for the routine imaging of biomedical samples.

  17. Quantitative phase retrieval in dynamic laser speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Y. H.; Hung, S. Y.; Janabi-Sharifi, Farrokh; Wang, W.; Liu, Y. S.

    2012-04-01

    The rapid progress of modern manufacturing and inspection technologies has posed stringent requirements on optical techniques for vibration characterization and dynamic testing. Due to its simplicity, accuracy and whole-field characters, laser speckle interferometry has served as one of the major techniques for dynamic measurement. In this paper, a two-step phase shifting method is developed for quantitative speckle phase measurement, which helps to eliminate the specklegrams needed for phase evaluation and facilitate dynamic measurement. Unlike previously reported two-step methods using fringe patterns with known phase shift of π/2, a small unknown phase shift is employed instead in the proposed method, which eliminates the need for phase shifting devices. Further investigation shows that small phase shifts are preferable over large phase shifts in this method. Shearographic experiments conducted have demonstrated the effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  18. Quantitative computed tomography assessment of lung structure and function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Madani, A; Keyzer, C; Gevenois, P A

    2001-10-01

    Accurate diagnosis and quantification of pulmonary emphysema during life is important to understand the natural history of the disease, to assess the extent of the disease, and to evaluate and follow-up therapeutic interventions. Since pulmonary emphysema is defined through pathological criteria, new methods of diagnosis and quantification should be validated by comparisons against histological references. Recent studies have addressed the capability of computed tomography (CT) to quantify pulmonary emphysema accurately. The studies reviewed in this article have been based on CT scans obtained after deep inspiration or expiration, on subjective visual grading and on objective measurements of attenuation values. Especially dedicated software was used for this purpose, which provided numerical data, on both two- and three-dimensional approaches, and compared CT data with pulmonary function tests. More recently, fractal and textural analyses were applied to computed tomography scans to assess the presence, the extent, and the types of emphysema. Quantitative computed tomography has already been used in patient selection for surgical treatment of pulmonary emphysema and in pharmacotherapeutical trials. However, despite numerous and extensive studies, this technique has not yet been standardized and important questions about how best to use computed tomography for the quantification of pulmonary emphysema are still unsolved.

  19. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-03-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue.

  20. X-ray phase contrast tomography by tracking near field speckle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Berujon, Sebastien; Herzen, Julia; Atwood, Robert; Laundy, David; Hipp, Alexander; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques that capture variations in the x-ray phase can yield higher contrast images with lower x-ray dose than is possible with conventional absorption radiography. However, the extraction of phase information is often more difficult than the extraction of absorption information and requires a more sophisticated experimental arrangement. We here report a method for three-dimensional (3D) X-ray phase contrast computed tomography (CT) which gives quantitative volumetric information on the real part of the refractive index. The method is based on the recently developed X-ray speckle tracking technique in which the displacement of near field speckle is tracked using a digital image correlation algorithm. In addition to differential phase contrast projection images, the method allows the dark-field images to be simultaneously extracted. After reconstruction, compared to conventional absorption CT images, the 3D phase CT images show greatly enhanced contrast. This new imaging method has advantages compared to other X-ray imaging methods in simplicity of experimental arrangement, speed of measurement and relative insensitivity to beam movements. These features make the technique an attractive candidate for material imaging such as in-vivo imaging of biological systems containing soft tissue. PMID:25735237

  1. Full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography without additional phase shifters

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Bernhard; Pircher, Michael; Götzinger, Erich; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate a new full range complex spectral domain optical coherence tomography (FRC SD-OCT) method. Other than FRC SD-OCT systems reported in literature, which employed devices such as electro-/acousto optic modulators or piezo-driven mirrors providing the phase modulations necessary for retrieval of the complex-valued signal, the system presented works without any additional phase shifting device. The required phase shift is introduced by the galvanometer scanner used for transversally scanning the sample beam. By means of a slight displacement of the probe beam with respect to the scanning mirror’s pivot axis, the sample arm length and thus the phase is continuously modulated as the beam is scanned in lateral direction. From such modulated spectral data, the complex-valued data yielding a twofold increase of accessible depth range can be calculated using an algorithm based on the Hilbert transform. To demonstrate the performance of our method quantitative measurements of the suppression of mirror images as a function of induced phase shift were performed. In order to validate the FRC SD-OCT technique for high-speed imaging of biological tissue, we present full-range images of the human anterior chamber in vivo. PMID:19550607

  2. Fusion Research of Electrical Tomography with Other Sensors for Two-phase Flow Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiang; Yang, W. Q.

    2012-01-01

    The two-phase flow widely exists in the nature and industrial processes. The measurement of two-phase flows, including gas/solids, gas/liquid and liquid/liquid flows, is still challenging. Fusions of electrical tomography with conventional sensors provide possibilities to improve two-phase flow accurate measurement. In this paper, fusions of (1) electrical resistance tomography (ERT) with electromagnetic (EM) flowmeter, (2) electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) with ERT and (3) ECT with electrostatic sensor are introduced. Some research results of fusion methods are presented and discussed. This paper can provide the theoretical support for the multi-sensor fusion for two-phase flow measurement.

  3. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, Nghia T.; Atwood, Robert C.; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Drakopoulos, Michael

    2012-11-01

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  4. Volumetric monitoring of aqueous two phase system droplets using time-lapse optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.; Bathany, C.; Ahn, Y.; Takayama, S.; Jung, W.

    2016-02-01

    We present a volumetric monitoring method to observe the morphological changes of aqueous two phase system (ATPS) droplets in a microfluidic system. Our method is based on time-lapse optical coherence tomography (OCT) which allows the study of the dynamics of ATPS droplets while visualizing their 3D structures and providing quantitative information on the droplets. In this study, we monitored the process of rehydration and deformation of an ATPS droplet in a microfluidic system and quantified the changes of its volume and velocity under both static and dynamic fluid conditions. Our results indicate that time-lapse OCT is a very promising tool to evaluate the unprecedented features of droplet-based microfluidics.

  5. A fast-converging iterative method for X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Vo, Nghia T.; Breese, Mark B. H.; Atwood, Robert C.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Moser, Herbert O.; Lee, Peter D.

    2012-11-26

    X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography holds great promise for the quantitative analysis of soft materials. However, its applications have been limited, so far, by the fact that direct methods based on the transport-of-intensity equation and the contrast transfer function are sensitive to noise and applicable only to limited types of samples. Here, we propose an iterative method based on the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm (R. W. Gerchberg and W. O. Saxton, Optik 35, 237 (1972)), but overcoming its slow convergence by an acceleration technique, named random signed feedback, which shows an excellent performance, both in numerical simulation and tomographic experiment, of discriminating various polymers even when using 53 keV synchrotron X-rays.

  6. Quantitative computed tomography of the liver in juvenile green sea turtles (Chelonia mydas).

    PubMed

    Bonelli, Marília de Albuquerque; de Oliveira, Daniel Capucho; Costa, Lorena Adão Vescovi Séllos; Forattini, Jannine Garcia; Júnior, João Luiz Rossi; Leite, Flaviana Lima Guião; Costa, Fabiano Séllos

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is a highly sensitive, applicable technique for determining the x-ray attenuation of organs. This technique reveals great precision in the detection of alterations in the x-ray attenuation of hepatic parenchyma, although the lack of studies establishing normal values limits its application in wild animals. The objective of this study was to establish mean hepatic attenuation values in four healthy juvenile sea turtles (Chelonia mydas) using QCT. Helical computed tomography scans were performed and regions of interest selected in the liver after multi-planar reconstruction images were obtained. The mean attenuation value for the hepatic parenchyma in these four turtles was 60.09 +/- 5.3 standard deviation Hounsfield units. Determining normal x-ray attenuation values of the liver increases knowledge of the computed tomographic anatomy of this species and may be useful in the investigation of hepatic diseases.

  7. [Quantitative assessment on artifacts of dental restorative materials in cone beam computed tomography].

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fu-song; Sun, Yu-chun; Xie, Xiao-yan; Wang, Yong; Lv, Pei-jun

    2013-12-18

    To quantitatively evaluate the artifacts appearance of eight kinds of common dental restorative materials, such as zirconia. For the full-crown tooth preparation of mandibular first molar, eight kinds of full-crowns, such as zirconia all-ceramic crown, glass ceramic crown, ceramage crown, Au-Pt based porcelain-fused-metal (PFM) crown, Pure Titanium PFM crown, Co-Cr PFM crown, Ni-Cr PFM crown, and Au-Pd metal crown were fabricated. And natural teeth in vitro were used as controls. These full-crown and natural teeth in vitro were mounted an ultraviolet-curable resin fixed plate. High resolution cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to scan all of the crowns and natural teeth in vitro, and their DICOM data were imported into software MIMICS 10.0. Then, the number of stripes and the maximum diameters of artifacts around the full-crowns were evaluated quantitatively in two-dimensional tomography images. In the two-dimensional tomography images,the artifacts did not appear around the natural teeth in vitro, glass ceramic crown, and ceramage crown. But thr artifacts appeared around the zirconia all-ceramic and metal crown. The number of stripes of artifacts was five to nine per one crown. The maximum diameters of the artifacts were 2.4 to 2.6 cm and 2.2 to 2.7 cm. In the two-dimensional tomography images of CBCT, stripe-like and radical artifacts were caused around the zirconia all-ceramic crown and metal based porcelain-fused-metal crowns. These artifacts could lower the imaging quality of the full crown shape greatly. The artifact was not caused around the natural teeth in vitro, glass ceramic crown, and ceramage crown.

  8. 4D x-ray phase contrast tomography for repeatable motion of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Masato; Uesugi, Kentaro; Yagi, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    X-ray phase contrast tomography based on a grating interferometer was applied to fast and dynamic measurements of biological samples. To achieve this, the scanning procedure in the tomographic scan was improved. A triangle-shaped voltage signal from a waveform generator to a Piezo stage was used for the fast phase stepping in the grating interferometer. In addition, an optical fiber coupled x-ray scientific CMOS camera was used to achieve fast and highly efficient image acquisitions. These optimizations made it possible to perform an x-ray phase contrast tomographic measurement within an 8 min scan with density resolution of 2.4 mg/cm3. A maximum volume size of 13 × 13 × 6 mm3 was obtained with a single tomographic measurement with a voxel size of 6.5 μm. The scanning procedure using the triangle wave was applied to four-dimensional measurements in which highly sensitive three-dimensional x-ray imaging and a time-resolved dynamic measurement of biological samples were combined. A fresh tendon in the tail of a rat was measured under a uniaxial stretching and releasing condition. To maintain the freshness of the sample during four-dimensional phase contrast tomography, the temperature of the bathing liquid of the sample was kept below 10° using a simple cooling system. The time-resolved deformation of the tendon and each fascicle was measured with a temporal resolution of 5.7 Hz. Evaluations of cross-sectional area size, length of the axis, and mass density in the fascicle during a stretching process provided a basis for quantitative analysis of the deformation of tendon fascicle.

  9. Differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions with quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Xiaoyan; Ni, Cheng; Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Xiao; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the value of quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant gastric mucosal lesions from benign gastric mucosal lesions (including gastric inflammation [GI] and normal gastric mucosa [NGM]). This study was approved by the ethics committee, and all patients provided written informed consent. A total of 161 consecutive patients (63 with gastric cancer [GC], 48 with GI, and 50 with NGM) who underwent dual-phase contrast enhanced DESCT scans in the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PVP) were included in this study. Iodine concentration (IC) in lesions was derived from the iodine-based material-decomposition images and normalized to that in the aorta to obtain normalized IC (nIC). The ratios of IC and nIC between the AP and PVP were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for GC and GI was evaluated with reviewing the features including gastric wall thickness, focal, and eccentric on the conventional polychromatic images. All statistical analyses were performed by using statistical software SPSS 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). IC and nIC in GC differed significantly from those in GI and NGM, except for nICAP in comparing GC with GI. Mean nIC values of GC (0.18 ± 0.06 in AP and 0.62 ± 0.16 in PVP) were significantly higher than that of NGM (0.12 ± 0.03 in AP and 0.37 ± 0.08 in PVP) (all P < 0.05). There was also significant difference for IC values in GC, GI, and NGM (24.19 ± 8.27, 19.07 ± 5.82, and 13.61 ± 2.52 mg/mL, respectively, in AP and 28.00 ± 7.01, 24.66 ± 6.55, and 16.94 ± 3.06 mg/mL, respectively, in PVP). Based on Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve analysis, nIC and IC in PVP had high sensitivities of 88.89% and 90.48%, respectively, in differentiating GC from NGM, while the sensitivities were 71.43% and 88.89% during AP. Ratios IC and nIC ratios did not provide adequate diagnostic accuracy with their area under curves

  10. Noise texture and signal detectability in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, Cheng-Ying; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: X-ray phase-contrast tomography (PCT) is a rapidly emerging imaging modality for reconstructing estimates of an object's three-dimensional x-ray refractive index distribution. Unlike conventional x-ray computed tomography methods, the statistical properties of the reconstructed images in PCT remain unexplored. The purpose of this work is to quantitatively investigate noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. Methods: The authors derived explicit expressions for the autocovariance of the reconstructed absorption and refractive index images to characterize noise texture and understand how the noise properties are influenced by the imaging geometry. Concepts from statistical detection theory were employed to understand how the imaging geometry-dependent statistical properties affect the signal detection performance in a signal-known-exactly/background-known-exactly task. Results: The analytical formulas for the phase and absorption autocovariance functions were implemented numerically and compared to the corresponding empirical values, and excellent agreement was found. They observed that the reconstructed refractive images are highly spatially correlated, while the absorption images are not. The numerical results confirm that the strength of the covariance is scaled by the detector spacing. Signal detection studies were conducted, employing a numerical observer. The detection performance was found to monotonically increase as the detector-plane spacing was increased. Conclusions: The authors have conducted the first quantitative investigation of noise propagation in PCT image reconstruction. The reconstructed refractive images were found to be highly spatially correlated, while absorption images were not. This is due to the presence of a Fourier space singularity in the reconstruction formula for the refraction images. The statistical analysis may facilitate the use of task-based image quality measures to further develop and optimize this emerging

  11. Quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willner, M.; Herzen, J.; Grandl, S.; Auweter, S.; Mayr, D.; Hipp, A.; Chabior, M.; Sarapata, A.; Achterhold, K.; Zanette, I.; Weitkamp, T.; Sztrókay, A.; Hellerhoff, K.; Reiser, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-04-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging has received growing interest in recent years due to its high capability in visualizing soft tissue. Breast imaging became the focus of particular attention as it is considered the most promising candidate for a first clinical application of this contrast modality. In this study, we investigate quantitative breast tissue characterization using grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) at conventional polychromatic x-ray sources. Different breast specimens have been scanned at a laboratory phase-contrast imaging setup and were correlated to histopathology. Ascertained tumor types include phylloides tumor, fibroadenoma and infiltrating lobular carcinoma. Identified tissue types comprising adipose, fibroglandular and tumor tissue have been analyzed in terms of phase-contrast Hounsfield units and are compared to high-quality, high-resolution data obtained with monochromatic synchrotron radiation, as well as calculated values based on tabulated tissue properties. The results give a good impression of the method’s prospects and limitations for potential tumor detection and the associated demands on such a phase-contrast breast CT system. Furthermore, the evaluated quantitative tissue values serve as a reference for simulations and the design of dedicated phantoms for phase-contrast mammography.

  12. Lensless phase microscopy and diffraction tomography with multi-angle and multi-wavelength illuminations using a LED matrix.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Sun, Jiasong; Zhang, Jialin; Hu, Yan; Chen, Qian

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrate lensless quantitative phase microscopy and diffraction tomography based on a compact on-chip platform, using only a CMOS image sensor and a programmable color LED matrix. Based on the multi-wavelength phase retrieval and multi-angle illumination diffraction tomography, this platform offers high quality, depth resolved images with a lateral resolution of 3.72μm and an axial resolution of 5μm, across a wide field-of-view of 24mm2. We experimentally demonstrate the success of our method by imaging cheek cells, micro-beads, and fertilized eggs of Parascaris equorum. Such high-throughput and miniaturized imaging device can provide a cost-effective tool for telemedicine applications and point-of-care diagnostics in resource-limited environments.

  13. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Sara; Larsson, Emanuel; Alves, Frauke; Dal Monego, Simeone; Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara; Lorenzon, Andrea; Tromba, Giuliana; Dullin, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging. PMID:24971975

  14. Quantitative evaluation of a single-distance phase-retrieval method applied on in-line phase-contrast images of a mouse lung.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Sara; Larsson, Emanuel; Alves, Frauke; Dal Monego, Simeone; Biffi, Stefania; Garrovo, Chiara; Lorenzon, Andrea; Tromba, Giuliana; Dullin, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography (PBI) has already proven its potential in a great variety of soft-tissue-related applications including lung imaging. However, the strong edge enhancement, caused by the phase effects, often hampers image segmentation and therefore the quantitative analysis of data sets. Here, the benefits of applying single-distance phase retrieval prior to the three-dimensional reconstruction (PhR) are discussed and quantified compared with three-dimensional reconstructions of conventional PBI data sets in terms of contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and preservation of image features. The PhR data sets show more than a tenfold higher CNR and only minor blurring of the edges when compared with PBI in a predominately absorption-based set-up. Accordingly, phase retrieval increases the sensitivity and provides more functionality in computed tomography imaging.

  15. Quantitative assessment on coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) image quality: comparisons between genders and different tube voltage settings

    PubMed Central

    Chian, Teo Chee; Nassir, Norziana Mat; Ibrahim, Mohd Izuan; Yusof, Ahmad Khairuddin Md

    2017-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to quantify and compare the quantitative image quality of coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA) between genders as well as between different tube voltages scan protocols. Methods Fifty-five cases of CCTA were collected retrospectively and all images including reformatted axial images at systolic and diastolic phases as well as images with curved multi planar reformation (cMPR) were obtained. Quantitative image quality including signal intensity, image noise, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of right coronary artery (RCA), left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCx) and left main artery (LM) were quantified using Analyze 12.0 software. Results Six hundred and fifty-seven coronary arteries were evaluated. There were no significant differences in any quantitative image quality parameters between genders. 100 kilovoltage peak (kVp) scanning protocol produced images with significantly higher signal intensity compared to 120 kVp scanning protocol (P<0.001) in all coronary arteries in all types of images. Higher SNR was also observed in 100 kVp scan protocol in all coronary arteries except in LCx where 120 kVp showed better SNR than 100 kVp. Conclusions There were no significant differences in image quality of CCTA between genders and different tube voltages. Lower tube voltage (100 kVp) scanning protocol is recommended in clinical practice to reduce the radiation dose to patient. PMID:28275559

  16. Preliminary evaluation of cryogenic two-phase flow imaging using electrical capacitance tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Huangjun; Yu, Liu; Zhou, Rui; Qiu, Limin; Zhang, Xiaobin

    2017-09-01

    The potential application of the 2-D eight-electrode electrical capacitance tomography (ECT) to the inversion imaging of the liquid nitrogen-vaporous nitrogen (LN2-VN2) flow in the tube is theoretically evaluated. The phase distribution of the computational domain is obtained using the simultaneous iterative reconstruction technique with variable iterative step size. The detailed mathematical derivations for the calculations are presented. The calculated phase distribution for the two detached LN2 column case shows the comparable results with the water-air case, regardless of the much reduced dielectric permittivity of LN2 compared with water. The inversion images of total eight different LN2-VN2 flow patterns are presented and quantitatively evaluated by calculating the relative void fraction error and the correlation coefficient. The results demonstrate that the developed reconstruction technique for ECT has the capacity to reconstruct the phase distribution of the complex LN2-VN2 flow, while the accuracy of the inversion images is significantly influenced by the size of the discrete phase. The influence of the measurement noise on the image quality is also considered in the calculations.

  17. Validation of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography for quantitative gas holdup measurements in centrifugal pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieberle, André; Schäfer, Thomas; Neumann, Martin; Hampel, Uwe

    2015-09-01

    In this article, the capability of high-resolution gamma-ray computed tomography (HireCT) for quantitative gas-liquid phase distribution measurements in commercially available industrial pumps is experimentally investigated. The object of interest thereby operates under two-phase flow conditions. HireCT System comprises a collimated 137Cs isotopic source, a radiation detector arc with a multi-channel signal processing unit, and a rotary unit enabling CT scans of objects with diameters of up to 700 mm. The accuracy of gas holdup measurements was validated on a sophisticated modular test mockup replicating defined gas-liquid distributions, which are expected in impeller chambers of industrial centrifugal pumps under two-phase operation. Stationary as well as rotation-synchronized CT scanning techniques have been analyzed, which are both used to obtain sharply resolved gas phase distributions in rotating structures as well as non-rotating zones. A measuring accuracy of better than 1% absolute for variously distributed static gas holdups in the rotating frame has been verified with the modular test mockup using HireCT.

  18. Whole-cell phase contrast imaging at the nanoscale using Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Michael W. M.; van Riessen, Grant A.; Abbey, Brian; Putkunz, Corey T.; Junker, Mark D.; Balaur, Eugeniu; Vine, David J.; McNulty, Ian; Chen, Bo; Arhatari, Benedicta D.; Frankland, Sarah; Nugent, Keith A.; Tilley, Leann; Peele, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    X-ray tomography can provide structural information of whole cells in close to their native state. Radiation-induced damage, however, imposes a practical limit to image resolution, and as such, a choice between damage, image contrast, and image resolution must be made. New coherent diffractive imaging techniques, such Fresnel Coherent Diffractive Imaging (FCDI), allows quantitative phase information with exceptional dose efficiency, high contrast, and nano-scale resolution. Here we present three-dimensional quantitative images of a whole eukaryotic cell by FCDI at a spatial resolution below 70 nm with sufficient phase contrast to distinguish major cellular components. From our data, we estimate that the minimum dose required for a similar resolution is close to that predicted by the Rose criterion, considerably below accepted estimates of the maximum dose a frozen-hydrated cell can tolerate. Based on the dose efficiency, contrast, and resolution achieved, we expect this technique will find immediate applications in tomographic cellular characterisation. PMID:23887204

  19. Quantitative polarization and flow evaluation of choroid and sclera by multifunctional Jones matrix optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, S.; Hong, Y.-J.; Kasaragod, D.; Makita, S.; Miura, M.; Ikuno, Y.; Yasuno, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative evaluation of optical properties of choroid and sclera are performed by multifunctional optical coherence tomography. Five normal eyes, five glaucoma eyes and one choroidal atrophy eye are examined. The refractive error was found to be correlated with choroidal birefringence, polarization uniformity, and flow in addition to scleral birefringence among normal eyes. The significant differences were observed between the normal and the glaucoma eyes, as for choroidal polarization uniformity, flow and scleral birefringence. An automatic segmentation algorithm of retinal pigment epithelium and chorioscleral interface based on multifunctional signals is also presented.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of registration methods for atlas-based diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xue; Eggebrecht, Adam T.; Culver, Joseph P.; Zhan, Yuxuan; Basevi, Hector; Dehghani, Hamid

    2013-06-01

    In Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT), an atlas-based model can be used as an alternative to a subject-specific anatomical model for recovery of brain activity. The main step of the generation of atlas-based subject model is the registration of atlas model to the subject head. The accuracy of the DOT then relies on the accuracy of registration method. In this work, 11 registration methods are quantitatively evaluated. The registration method with EEG 10/20 systems with 19 landmarks and non-iterative point to point algorithm provides approximately 1.4 mm surface error and is considered as the most efficient registration method.

  1. Automatic segmentation of intravascular optical coherence tomography images for facilitating quantitative diagnosis of atherosclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhao; Kyono, Hiroyuki; Bezerra, Hiram G.; Wilson, David L.; Costa, Marco A.; Rollins, Andrew M.

    2011-03-01

    Quantitative diagnosis of atherosclerosis can be facilitated by automatic segmentation of intravascular Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) images. We report an automatic method of lumen and calcified plaque segmentation for commercial intravascular OCT systems. Lumen segmentation is based on a dynamic programming scheme. Calcified plaque is localized by edge detection and finely traced using an active contour model. The proposed methods yield promising results when applied to clinical images as validated by manual tracing. Lumen segmentation is useful for estimating the coronary artery stenosis and guiding stent implantation. Calcified plaque segmentation can be used to estimate the distribution of superficial calcification and inform strategies for coronary stenting.

  2. Quantitative evaluation of phase processing approaches in susceptibility weighted imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ningzhi; Wang, Wen-Tung; Sati, Pascal; Pham, Dzung L.; Butman, John A.

    2012-03-01

    Susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) takes advantage of the local variation in susceptibility between different tissues to enable highly detailed visualization of the cerebral venous system and sensitive detection of intracranial hemorrhages. Thus, it has been increasingly used in magnetic resonance imaging studies of traumatic brain injury as well as other intracranial pathologies. In SWI, magnitude information is combined with phase information to enhance the susceptibility induced image contrast. Because of global susceptibility variations across the image, the rate of phase accumulation varies widely across the image resulting in phase wrapping artifacts that interfere with the local assessment of phase variation. Homodyne filtering is a common approach to eliminate this global phase variation. However, filter size requires careful selection in order to preserve image contrast and avoid errors resulting from residual phase wraps. An alternative approach is to apply phase unwrapping prior to high pass filtering. A suitable phase unwrapping algorithm guarantees no residual phase wraps but additional computational steps are required. In this work, we quantitatively evaluate these two phase processing approaches on both simulated and real data using different filters and cutoff frequencies. Our analysis leads to an improved understanding of the relationship between phase wraps, susceptibility effects, and acquisition parameters. Although homodyne filtering approaches are faster and more straightforward, phase unwrapping approaches perform more accurately in a wider variety of acquisition scenarios.

  3. Phase Space Tomography: A Simple, Portable and Accurate Technique to Map Phase Spaces of Beams with Space Charge

    SciTech Connect

    Stratakis, D.; Kishek, R. A.; Bernal, S.; Walter, M.; Haber, I.; Fiorito, R.; Thangaraj, J. C. T.; Quinn, B.; Reiser, M.; O'Shea, P. G.; Li, H.

    2006-11-27

    In order to understand the charged particle dynamics, e.g. the halo formation, emittance growth, x-y energy transfer and coupling, knowledge of the actual phase space is needed. Other the past decade there is an increasing number of articles who use tomography to map the beam phase space and measure the beam emittance. These studies where performed at high energy facilities where the effect of space charge was neglible and therefore not considered in the analysis. This work extends the tomography technique to beams with space charge. In order to simplify the analysis linear forces where assumed. By carefully modeling the tomography process using the particle-in-cell code WARP we test the validity of our assumptions and the accuracy of the reconstructed phase space. Finally, we report experimental results of phase space mapping at the University of Maryland Electron Ring (UMER) using tomography.

  4. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P M.; Kleimeyer, J; Rowland, Brad; Gardner, Patrick J.

    2003-04-21

    Quantitative high resolution (0.1 cm -1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L).

  5. Quantitative Rietveld analysis of CAC clinker phases using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guirado, F. . E-mail: francesc.guirado@urv.cat; Gali, S.

    2006-11-15

    The quantitative Rietveld analyses of twenty samples of CAC from four different manufacturers over the world, one synthetic mixture and a NIST standard were performed using synchrotron radiation. As compared with conventional XRD, synchrotron powder diffraction permitted to find new minor phases, improve the characterization of solid solutions of iron rich CAC phases and reduce preferential orientation and microabsorption effects. Diffraction data were complemented with XRF and TG/DT analyses. Synchrotron results were used as a reference test to improve the performance of conventional powder diffraction, by an accurate selection of refinable profile and structural parameters, and permitted to extract several recommendations for conventional quantitative Rietveld procedures. It is shown that with these recommendations in mind, conventional XRD based Rietveld analyses are comparable to those obtained from synchrotron data. In summary, quantitative XRD Rietveld analysis is confirmed as an excellent tool for the CAC cement industry.

  6. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source.

    PubMed

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-05-05

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced--and more challenging--X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches.

  7. X-ray phase-contrast tomography with a compact laser-driven synchrotron source

    PubMed Central

    Eggl, Elena; Schleede, Simone; Bech, Martin; Achterhold, Klaus; Loewen, Roderick; Ruth, Ronald D.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Between X-ray tubes and large-scale synchrotron sources, a large gap in performance exists with respect to the monochromaticity and brilliance of the X-ray beam. However, due to their size and cost, large-scale synchrotrons are not available for more routine applications in small and medium-sized academic or industrial laboratories. This gap could be closed by laser-driven compact synchrotron light sources (CLS), which use an infrared (IR) laser cavity in combination with a small electron storage ring. Hard X-rays are produced through the process of inverse Compton scattering upon the intersection of the electron bunch with the focused laser beam. The produced X-ray beam is intrinsically monochromatic and highly collimated. This makes a CLS well-suited for applications of more advanced––and more challenging––X-ray imaging approaches, such as X-ray multimodal tomography. Here we present, to our knowledge, the first results of a first successful demonstration experiment in which a monochromatic X-ray beam from a CLS was used for multimodal, i.e., phase-, dark-field, and attenuation-contrast, X-ray tomography. We show results from a fluid phantom with different liquids and a biomedical application example in the form of a multimodal CT scan of a small animal (mouse, ex vivo). The results highlight particularly that quantitative multimodal CT has become feasible with laser-driven CLS, and that the results outperform more conventional approaches. PMID:25902493

  8. Quantitative three-dimensional photoacoustic tomography of the finger joints: an in vivo study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yao; Sobel, Eric; Jiang, Huabei

    2009-11-01

    We present for the first time in vivo full three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography (PAT) of the distal interphalangeal joint in a human subject. Both absorbed energy density and absorption coefficient images of the joint are quantitatively obtained using our finite-element-based photoacoustic image reconstruction algorithm coupled with the photon diffusion equation. The results show that major anatomical features in the joint along with the side arteries can be imaged with a 1-MHz transducer in a spherical scanning geometry. In addition, the cartilages associated with the joint can be quantitatively differentiated from the phalanx. This in vivo study suggests that the 3-D PAT method described has the potential to be used for early diagnosis of joint diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis.

  9. Experimental assessment of bone mineral density using quantitative computed tomography in holstein dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    MAETANI, Ayami; ITOH, Megumi; NISHIHARA, Kahori; AOKI, Takahiro; OHTANI, Masayuki; SHIBANO, Kenichi; KAYANO, Mitsunori; YAMADA, Kazutaka

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the measurement of bone mineral density (BMD) by quantitative computed tomography (QCT), comparing the relationships of BMD between QCT and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and between QCT and radiographic absorptiometry (RA) in the metacarpal bone of Holstein dairy cows (n=27). A significant positive correlation was found between QCT and DXA measurements (r=0.70, P<0.01), and a significant correlation was found between QCT and RA measurements (r=0.50, P<0.01). We conclude that QCT provides quantitative evaluation of BMD in dairy cows, because BMD measured by QCT showed positive correlations with BMD measured by the two conventional methods: DXA and RA. PMID:27075115

  10. Quantitative microvascular hemoglobin mapping using visible light spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Chong, Shau Poh; Merkle, Conrad W.; Leahy, Conor; Radhakrishnan, Harsha; Srinivasan, Vivek J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantification of chromophore concentrations in reflectance mode remains a major challenge for biomedical optics. Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography (SOCT) provides depth-resolved spectroscopic information necessary for quantitative analysis of chromophores, like hemoglobin, but conventional SOCT analysis methods are applicable only to well-defined specular reflections, which may be absent in highly scattering biological tissue. Here, by fitting of the dynamic scattering signal spectrum in the OCT angiogram using a forward model of light propagation, we quantitatively determine hemoglobin concentrations directly. Importantly, this methodology enables mapping of both oxygen saturation and total hemoglobin concentration, or alternatively, oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin concentration, simultaneously. Quantification was verified by ex vivo blood measurements at various pO2 and hematocrit levels. Imaging results from the rodent brain and retina are presented. Confounds including noise and scattering, as well as potential clinical applications, are discussed. PMID:25909026

  11. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, P.; Pacile, S.; Nesterets, Y. I.; Mayo, S. C.; Dullin, C.; Dreossi, D.; Arfelli, F.; Thompson, D.; Lockie, D.; McCormack, M.; Taba, S. T.; Brun, F.; Pinamonti, M.; Nickson, C.; Hall, C.; Dimmock, M.; Zanconati, F.; Cholewa, M.; Quiney, H.; Brennan, P. C.; Tromba, G.; Gureyev, T. E.

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  12. Optimization of propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography for breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Baran, P; Pacile, S; Nesterets, Y I; Mayo, S C; Dullin, C; Dreossi, D; Arfelli, F; Thompson, D; Lockie, D; McCormack, M; Taba, S T; Brun, F; Pinamonti, M; Nickson, C; Hall, C; Dimmock, M; Zanconati, F; Cholewa, M; Quiney, H; Brennan, P C; Tromba, G; Gureyev, T E

    2017-03-21

    The aim of this study was to optimise the experimental protocol and data analysis for in-vivo breast cancer x-ray imaging. Results are presented of the experiment at the SYRMEP beamline of Elettra Synchrotron using the propagation-based phase-contrast mammographic tomography method, which incorporates not only absorption, but also x-ray phase information. In this study the images of breast tissue samples, of a size corresponding to a full human breast, with radiologically acceptable x-ray doses were obtained, and the degree of improvement of the image quality (from the diagnostic point of view) achievable using propagation-based phase-contrast image acquisition protocols with proper incorporation of x-ray phase retrieval into the reconstruction pipeline was investigated. Parameters such as the x-ray energy, sample-to-detector distance and data processing methods were tested, evaluated and optimized with respect to the estimated diagnostic value using a mastectomy sample with a malignant lesion. The results of quantitative evaluation of images were obtained by means of radiological assessment carried out by 13 experienced specialists. A comparative analysis was performed between the x-ray and the histological images of the specimen. The results of the analysis indicate that, within the investigated range of parameters, both the objective image quality characteristics and the subjective radiological scores of propagation-based phase-contrast images of breast tissues monotonically increase with the strength of phase contrast which in turn is directly proportional to the product of the radiation wavelength and the sample-to-detector distance. The outcomes of this study serve to define the practical imaging conditions and the CT reconstruction procedures appropriate for low-dose phase-contrast mammographic imaging of live patients at specially designed synchrotron beamlines.

  13. Quantitative analysis of brain edema and swelling on early postmortem computed tomography: comparison with antemortem computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Naoya; Satou, Chihiro; Higuchi, Takeshi; Shiotani, Motoi; Maeda, Haruo; Hirose, Yasuo

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was quantitatively to analyze brain edema and swelling due to early postmortem changes using computed tomography (CT) scans of the head. Review board approval was obtained, and informed consent was waived. A total of 41 patients who underwent head CT before and shortly after death were enrolled. Hounsfield units (HUs) of gray matter (GM) and white matter (WM) were measured at the levels of the basal ganglia, centrum semiovale, and high convexity area on both antemortem and postmortem CT. The length of the minor axis of the third ventricle at the level of the basal ganglia and the width of the central sulcus at the level of high convexity were measured. At each level tested, the HUs of GM and the GM/WM ratios on postmortem CT were significantly lower than those on antemortem CT (P < 0.001). HUs of WM on postmortem CT were slightly higher than those on antemortem CT but without significant difference (P > 0.1). Postmortem CT showed subtle loss of distinction between GM and WM. The size of the third ventricle and the width of the central sulcus did not vary before and after death (P > 0.1). Early postmortem CT shows mild brain edema but does not show brain swelling.

  14. Quantitative 3-D imaging of eukaryotic cells using soft X-ray tomography.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Dilworth Y; McDermott, Gerry; Etkin, Laurence D; Le Gros, Mark A; Larabell, Carolyn A

    2008-06-01

    Imaging has long been one of the principal techniques used in biological and biomedical research. Indeed, the field of cell biology grew out of the first electron microscopy images of organelles in a cell. Since this landmark event, much work has been carried out to image and classify the organelles in eukaryotic cells using electron microscopy. Fluorescently labeled organelles can now be tracked in live cells, and recently, powerful light microscope techniques have pushed the limit of optical resolution to image single molecules. In this paper, we describe the use of soft X-ray tomography, a new tool for quantitative imaging of organelle structure and distribution in whole, fully hydrated eukaryotic Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells. In addition to imaging intact cells, soft X-ray tomography has the advantage of not requiring the use of any staining or fixation protocols--cells are simply transferred from their growth environment to a sample holder and immediately cryofixed. In this way the cells can be imaged in a near native state. Soft X-ray tomography is also capable of imaging relatively large numbers of cells in a short period of time, and is therefore a technique that has the potential to produce information on organelle morphology from statistically significant numbers of cells.

  15. Quantitative cell imaging using single beam phase retrieval method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand, Arun; Chhaniwal, Vani; Javidi, Bahram

    2011-06-01

    Quantitative three-dimensional imaging of cells can provide important information about their morphology as well as their dynamics, which will be useful in studying their behavior under various conditions. There are several microscopic techniques to image unstained, semi-transparent specimens, by converting the phase information into intensity information. But most of the quantitative phase contrast imaging techniques is realized either by using interference of the object wavefront with a known reference beam or using phase shifting interferometry. A two-beam interferometric method is challenging to implement especially with low coherent sources and it also requires a fine adjustment of beams to achieve high contrast fringes. In this letter, the development of a single beam phase retrieval microscopy technique for quantitative phase contrast imaging of cells using multiple intensity samplings of a volume speckle field in the axial direction is described. Single beam illumination with multiple intensity samplings provides fast convergence and a unique solution of the object wavefront. Three-dimensional thickness profiles of different cells such as red blood cells and onion skin cells were reconstructed using this technique with an axial resolution of the order of several nanometers.

  16. Simultaneous Neutron and X-ray Tomography for Quantitative analysis of Geological Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaManna, J.; Hussey, D. S.; Baltic, E.; Jacobson, D. L.

    2016-12-01

    Multiphase flow is a critical area of research for shale gas, oil recovery, underground CO2 sequestration, geothermal power, and aquifer management. It is critical to understand the porous structure of the geological formations in addition to the fluid/pore and fluid/fluid interactions. Difficulties for analyzing flow characteristics of rock cores are in obtaining 3D distribution information on the fluid flow and maintaining the cores in a state for other analysis methods. Two powerful non-destructive methods for obtaining 3D structural and compositional information are X-ray and neutron tomography. X-ray tomography produces information on density and structure while neutrons excel at acquiring the liquid phase and produces compositional information. These two methods can offer strong complementary information but are typically conducted at separate times and often at different facilities. This poses issues for obtaining dynamic and stochastic information as the sample will change between analysis modes. To address this, NIST has developed a system that allows for multimodal, simultaneous tomography using thermal neutrons and X-rays by placing a 90 keVp micro-focus X-ray tube 90° to the neutron beam. High pressure core holders that simulate underground conditions have been developed to facilitate simultaneous tomography. These cells allow for the control of confining pressure, axial load, temperature, and fluid flow through the core. This talk will give an overview the simultaneous neutron and x-ray tomography capabilities at NIST, the benefits of multimodal imaging, environmental equipment for geology studies, and several case studies that have been conducted at NIST.

  17. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  18. Incremental value of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography in 3-phase bone scintigraphy of an accessory navicular bone.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Kumar, Ganesh; Roy, Shambo Guha; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2014-07-01

    Accessory navicular bone is one of the supernumerary ossicles in the foot. Radiography is non diagnostic in symptomatic cases. Accessory navicular has been reported as a cause of foot pain and is usually associated with flat foot. Increased radio tracer uptake on bone scan is found to be more sensitive. We report a case highlighting the significance of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography in methylene diphosphonate bone scan in the evaluation of symptomatic accessory navicular bone where three phase bone scan is equivocal.

  19. Incremental value of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography in 3-phase bone scintigraphy of an accessory navicular bone

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sachin; Karunanithi, Sellam; Agarwal, Krishan Kant; Kumar, Ganesh; Roy, Shambo Guha; Tripathi, Madhavi

    2014-01-01

    Accessory navicular bone is one of the supernumerary ossicles in the foot. Radiography is non diagnostic in symptomatic cases. Accessory navicular has been reported as a cause of foot pain and is usually associated with flat foot. Increased radio tracer uptake on bone scan is found to be more sensitive. We report a case highlighting the significance of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography in methylene diphosphonate bone scan in the evaluation of symptomatic accessory navicular bone where three phase bone scan is equivocal. PMID:25210293

  20. Quantitative 3D high resolution transmission ultrasound tomography: creating clinically relevant images (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiskin, James; Klock, John; Iuanow, Elaine; Borup, Dave T.; Terry, Robin; Malik, Bilal H.; Lenox, Mark

    2017-03-01

    There has been a great deal of research into ultrasound tomography for breast imaging over the past 35 years. Few successful attempts have been made to reconstruct high-resolution images using transmission ultrasound. To this end, advances have been made in 2D and 3D algorithms that utilize either time of arrival or full wave data to reconstruct images with high spatial and contrast resolution suitable for clinical interpretation. The highest resolution and quantitative accuracy result from inverse scattering applied to full wave data in 3D. However, this has been prohibitively computationally expensive, meaning that full inverse scattering ultrasound tomography has not been considered clinically viable. Here we show the results of applying a nonlinear inverse scattering algorithm to 3D data in a clinically useful time frame. This method yields Quantitative Transmission (QT) ultrasound images with high spatial and contrast resolution. We reconstruct sound speeds for various 2D and 3D phantoms and verify these values with independent measurements. The data are fully 3D as is the reconstruction algorithm, with no 2D approximations. We show that 2D reconstruction algorithms can introduce artifacts into the QT breast image which are avoided by using a full 3D algorithm and data. We show high resolution gross and microscopic anatomic correlations comparing cadaveric breast QT images with MRI to establish imaging capability and accuracy. Finally, we show reconstructions of data from volunteers, as well as an objective visual grading analysis to confirm clinical imaging capability and accuracy.

  1. Direct Estimation of Optical Parameters From Photoacoustic Time Series in Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography.

    PubMed

    Pulkkinen, Aki; Cox, Ben T; Arridge, Simon R; Goh, Hwan; Kaipio, Jari P; Tarvainen, Tanja

    2016-11-01

    Estimation of optical absorption and scattering of a target is an inverse problem associated with quantitative photoacoustic tomography. Conventionally, the problem is expressed as two folded. First, images of initial pressure distribution created by absorption of a light pulse are formed based on acoustic boundary measurements. Then, the optical properties are determined based on these photoacoustic images. The optical stage of the inverse problem can thus suffer from, for example, artefacts caused by the acoustic stage. These could be caused by imperfections in the acoustic measurement setting, of which an example is a limited view acoustic measurement geometry. In this work, the forward model of quantitative photoacoustic tomography is treated as a coupled acoustic and optical model and the inverse problem is solved by using a Bayesian approach. Spatial distribution of the optical properties of the imaged target are estimated directly from the photoacoustic time series in varying acoustic detection and optical illumination configurations. It is numerically demonstrated, that estimation of optical properties of the imaged target is feasible in limited view acoustic detection setting.

  2. Thalamocortical input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons measured using quantitative large-scale array tomography

    PubMed Central

    Rah, Jong-Cheol; Bas, Erhan; Colonell, Jennifer; Mishchenko, Yuriy; Karsh, Bill; Fetter, Richard D.; Myers, Eugene W.; Chklovskii, Dmitri B.; Svoboda, Karel; Harris, Timothy D.; Isaac, John T. R.

    2013-01-01

    The subcellular locations of synapses on pyramidal neurons strongly influences dendritic integration and synaptic plasticity. Despite this, there is little quantitative data on spatial distributions of specific types of synaptic input. Here we use array tomography (AT), a high-resolution optical microscopy method, to examine thalamocortical (TC) input onto layer 5 pyramidal neurons. We first verified the ability of AT to identify synapses using parallel electron microscopic analysis of TC synapses in layer 4. We then use large-scale array tomography (LSAT) to measure TC synapse distribution on L5 pyramidal neurons in a 1.00 × 0.83 × 0.21 mm3 volume of mouse somatosensory cortex. We found that TC synapses primarily target basal dendrites in layer 5, but also make a considerable input to proximal apical dendrites in L4, consistent with previous work. Our analysis further suggests that TC inputs are biased toward certain branches and, within branches, synapses show significant clustering with an excess of TC synapse nearest neighbors within 5–15 μm compared to a random distribution. Thus, we show that AT is a sensitive and quantitative method to map specific types of synaptic input on the dendrites of entire neurons. We anticipate that this technique will be of wide utility for mapping functionally-relevant anatomical connectivity in neural circuits. PMID:24273494

  3. Objective interpretation of induced polarization tomography using a quantitative approach for the investigation of periglacial environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banville, David Roy; Fortier, Richard; Dupuis, Christian

    2016-07-01

    The objective interpretation of induced polarization tomography for applications in periglacial environments is sometimes challenging using smoothness-regularized least square inversion because strong resistivity contrasts are often present. Ambiguities arise from the regularization process which smooths the contrast between layers and from artifacts created by the inversion. In periglacial environments, where frozen and thawed ground can coexist with large resistivity contrasts, such artefacts are often found in the models of electrical resistivity. To assess reliable cryohydrogeological models from the inversion of induced polarization tomography, quantitative interpretation criteria are needed. The present work describes a methodology based on forward-inverse modeling to build a cryohydrogeological model from induced polarization data and prior information using the resistivity and chargeability gradients to map transitions between adjacent layers. This methodology is tested on field-data acquired over a coarse grained aquifer within a glaciomarine deposit and ice-rich permafrost mounds within marine sediments. Delineation of the permafrost base is achieved despite the presence of an inversion artefact. The results of the interpretation are used to further constrain the inversion in order to map the ice-content based on the resistivity model and an empirical relationship. The proposed methodology provides a way to extract quantitative information even in difficult environmental settings.

  4. A pilot characterization of quantitative time-domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiao; Gao, Feng; Yi, Xi; Wang, Xin; Wu, Linhui; Zhu, Pingping; Zhang, Limin; Zhao, Huijuan

    2011-02-01

    Quantitative measurements of fluorescent parameters have merited great interest lately for near-infrared fluorescence diffuse optical tomography - the efficient small animal imaging tool. We present a two-dimensional image reconstruction method for time-domain fluorescence diffuse optical tomography, which employs the analytical solution to the Laplace-transformed time-domain photon-diffusion equation to construct the inverse model and introduces a pair of real-domain transform-factors to effectively separate the fluorescent yield and lifetime parameters from the algebraic reconstruction technique solutions to the resultant linear inversions. By use of a specifically designed a multi-channel time-correlated single photon counting system and a normalized Born formulation for the inversion, the proposed scheme in a circular domain is experimentally validated using small-animal-sized cylindrical phantoms that embed several fluorescent targets made from 1%-Intralipid solution and differently contrasting fluorescent agents, where the time-resolved excitation and fluorescence signals are measured on the boundary. The results show that the approach retrieves the positions and shapes of the targets with a reasonable accuracy and simultaneously achieve quantitative reconstruction of the fluorescent yield and lifetime.

  5. Quantitative and Qualitative Imaging in Single Photon Emission Tomography for Nuclear Medicine Applications.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoomi, Mojtaba (Arash).

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. An important goal of single photon emission tomography (SPECT) is the determination of absolute regional radionuclide concentration as a function of time. Quantitative and qualitative studies of SPECT with regard to clinical application is the object of this work. Three basic approaches for image reconstruction and factors which affect the choice of a reconstruction algorithm have been reviewed, discussed and the reconstruction techniques, GRADY and CBP evaluated, based on computer modelling. A sophisticated package of computational subroutines, RECLBL, for image reconstruction and for generation of phantoms, which was fully implemented on PRIME was used throughout this study. Two different systems, a rotating gamma-camera and a prototype scanning-rig have been used to carry out tomography experiments with different phantoms in emission and transmission mode. Performance assessment and reproducibility of the gamma-camera was tested prior to the experimental work. SPECT studies are generally hampered for a number of reasons, the most severe being attenuation and scattering. The effect of scattered photons on image quality was discussed, three distinct techniques were utilised to correct the images and results were compared. Determination of the depth of the source, Am-241 and Tc-99m in the attenuating media, water and TEMEX by analysing the spectroscopic data base on the SPR and spatial resolution was studied, results revealed that both techniques had the same range of depth sensitivity. A method of simultaneous emission and transmission tomography was developed to correct the images for attenuation. The reproducibility of the technique was examined. Results showed that the technique is able to present a promising and a practical approach to more accurate quantitative SPECT imaging. A procedure to evaluate images, under certain conditions has been defined, its properties were evaluated using computer

  6. Computed tomography-based quantitative assessment of lower extremity lymphedema following treatment for gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung Hyun; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop an algorithmic quantitative skin and subcutaneous tissue volume measurement protocol for lower extremity lymphedema (LEL) patients using computed tomography (CT), to verify the usefulness of the measurement techniques in LEL patients, and to observe the structural characteristics of subcutaneous tissue according to the progression of LEL in gynecologic cancer. Methods A program for algorithmic quantitative analysis of lower extremity CT scans has been developed to measure the skin and subcutaneous volume, muscle compartment volume, and the extent of the peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern. The CT venographies of 50 lower extremities from 25 subjects were reviewed in two groups (acute and chronic lymphedema). Results A significant increase in the total volume, subcutaneous volume, and extent of peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern except quantitative muscle volume was identified in the more-affected limb. The correlation of CT-based total volume and subcutaneous volume measurements with volumetry measurement was strong (correlation coefficient: 0.747 and 0.749, respectively). The larger extent of peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern in the subcutaneous tissue was identified in the more-affected limb of chronic lymphedema group. Conclusion CT-based quantitative assessments could provide objective volume measurements and information about the structural characteristics of subcutaneous tissue in women with LEL following treatment for gynecologic cancer. PMID:28028991

  7. Active illumination using a digital micromirror device for quantitative phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Yoon, Jonghee; Park, YongKeun

    2015-11-15

    We present a powerful and cost-effective method for active illumination using a digital micromirror device (DMD) for quantitative phase-imaging techniques. Displaying binary illumination patterns on a DMD with appropriate spatial filtering, plane waves with various illumination angles are generated and impinged onto a sample. Complex optical fields of the sample obtained with various incident angles are then measured via Mach-Zehnder interferometry, from which a high-resolution 2D synthetic aperture phase image and a 3D refractive index tomogram of the sample are reconstructed. We demonstrate the fast and stable illumination-control capability of the proposed method by imaging colloidal spheres and biological cells. The capability of high-speed optical diffraction tomography is also demonstrated by measuring 3D Brownian motion of colloidal particles with the tomogram acquisition rate of 100 Hz.

  8. High-sensitivity quantitative phase microcopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Renjie; Kuang, Cuifang; Hosseini, Poorya; Chowdhary, Ravi; Yaqoob, Zahid; So, Peter T. C.

    2016-03-01

    In the past decade, various quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) techniques have emerged, driven by the need to study biological samples non-invasively. However, the fundamental limit for phase noise is scarcely discussed in the literature. In a typically off-axis phase microscope system, the phase noise is limited to a few milliradians using a moderate camera. Common-path QPMs offer much reduced phase noise compared to typical Mach-Zehnder-based systems. However, further scaling down the phase noise becomes difficult. Here we propose a high-sensitivity common-path QPM that promises to reduce the phase noise by a factor of 10 (assuming the mechanical noise is negligible). This is achieved by a specifically designed signal filter, leaving only the subtle phase fluctuations coming from the dynamics sample scattering. By working at photon shot-noise limited detection, we can magnify the subtle phase contrast which is proportional to the camera well depth. We expect this system to have the height sensitivity similar to an atomic force microcopy, while measuring biological structures with a full field of view in a single-shot. We plan to use this system to study cell dynamics, particularly lamellipodial height fluctuations as well as stiffer cell membrane fluctuations.

  9. Regularized iterative integration combined with non-linear diffusion filtering for phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Burger, Karin; Koehler, Thomas; Chabior, Michael; Allner, Sebastian; Marschner, Mathias; Fehringer, Andreas; Willner, Marian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Noël, Peter

    2014-12-29

    Phase-contrast x-ray computed tomography has a high potential to become clinically implemented because of its complementarity to conventional absorption-contrast.In this study, we investigate noise-reducing but resolution-preserving analytical reconstruction methods to improve differential phase-contrast imaging. We apply the non-linear Perona-Malik filter on phase-contrast data prior or post filtered backprojected reconstruction. Secondly, the Hilbert kernel is replaced by regularized iterative integration followed by ramp filtered backprojection as used for absorption-contrast imaging. Combining the Perona-Malik filter with this integration algorithm allows to successfully reveal relevant sample features, quantitatively confirmed by significantly increased structural similarity indices and contrast-to-noise ratios. With this concept, phase-contrast imaging can be performed at considerably lower dose.

  10. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC)

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification—an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel. PMID:28152023

  11. Single-shot quantitative phase microscopy with color-multiplexed differential phase contrast (cDPC).

    PubMed

    Phillips, Zachary F; Chen, Michael; Waller, Laura

    2017-01-01

    We present a new technique for quantitative phase and amplitude microscopy from a single color image with coded illumination. Our system consists of a commercial brightfield microscope with one hardware modification-an inexpensive 3D printed condenser insert. The method, color-multiplexed Differential Phase Contrast (cDPC), is a single-shot variant of Differential Phase Contrast (DPC), which recovers the phase of a sample from images with asymmetric illumination. We employ partially coherent illumination to achieve resolution corresponding to 2× the objective NA. Quantitative phase can then be used to synthesize DIC and phase contrast images or extract shape and density. We demonstrate amplitude and phase recovery at camera-limited frame rates (50 fps) for various in vitro cell samples and c. elegans in a micro-fluidic channel.

  12. High-speed X-ray phase imaging and X-ray phase tomography with Talbot interferometer and white synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Momose, Atsushi; Yashiro, Wataru; Maikusa, Hirohide; Takeda, Yoshihiro

    2009-07-20

    X-ray Talbot interferometry, which uses two transmission gratings, has the advantage that broad energy bandwidth x-rays can be used. We demonstrate the use of white synchrotron radiation for high-speed X-ray phase imaging and tomography in combination with an X-ray Talbot interferometer. The moiré fringe visibility over 20% was attained, enabling quantitative phase measurement. X-ray phase images with a frame rate of 500 f/s and an X-ray phase tomogram with a scan time of 0.5 s were obtained successfully. This result suggests a breakthrough for time-resolved three-dimensional observation of objects that weakly absorb X-rays, such as soft material and biological objects.

  13. Mass Density Measurement of Mineralized Tissue with Grating-Based X-Ray Phase Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gradl, Regine; Zanette, Irene; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Dierolf, Martin; Rack, Alexander; Zaslansky, Paul; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the mineral content distribution in highly mineralized tissues, such as bones and teeth, is fundamental in understanding a variety of structural questions ranging from studies of the mechanical properties to improved pathological investigations. However, non-destructive, volumetric and quantitative density measurements of mineralized samples, some of which may extend several mm in size, remain challenging. Here, we demonstrate the potential of grating-based x-ray phase tomography to gain insight into the three-dimensional mass density distribution of tooth tissues in a non-destructive way and with a sensitivity of 85 mg/cm3. Density gradients of 13 − 19% over 1 − 2 mm within typical samples are detected, and local variations in density of 0.4 g/cm3 on a length scale of 0.1 mm are revealed. This method proves to be an excellent quantitative tool for investigations of subtle differences in mineral content of mineralized tissues that can change following treatment or during ageing and healing. PMID:28002416

  14. Mass Density Measurement of Mineralized Tissue with Grating-Based X-Ray Phase Tomography.

    PubMed

    Gradl, Regine; Zanette, Irene; Ruiz-Yaniz, Maite; Dierolf, Martin; Rack, Alexander; Zaslansky, Paul; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the mineral content distribution in highly mineralized tissues, such as bones and teeth, is fundamental in understanding a variety of structural questions ranging from studies of the mechanical properties to improved pathological investigations. However, non-destructive, volumetric and quantitative density measurements of mineralized samples, some of which may extend several mm in size, remain challenging. Here, we demonstrate the potential of grating-based x-ray phase tomography to gain insight into the three-dimensional mass density distribution of tooth tissues in a non-destructive way and with a sensitivity of 85 mg/cm3. Density gradients of 13 - 19% over 1 - 2 mm within typical samples are detected, and local variations in density of 0.4 g/cm3 on a length scale of 0.1 mm are revealed. This method proves to be an excellent quantitative tool for investigations of subtle differences in mineral content of mineralized tissues that can change following treatment or during ageing and healing.

  15. Biomechanical cell analysis using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, Adam; Park, Han Sang; Eldridge, William J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging provides nanometer scale sensitivity and has been previously used to study spectral and temporal characteristics of individual cells in vitro, especially red blood cells. Here we extend this work to study the mechanical responses of individual cells due to the influence of external stimuli. Cell stiffness may be characterized by analyzing the inherent thermal fluctuations of cells but by applying external stimuli, additional information can be obtained. The time dependent response of cells due to external shear stress is examined with high speed quantitative phase imaging and found to exhibit characteristics that relate to their stiffness. However, analysis beyond the cellular scale also reveals internal organization of the cell and its modulation due to pathologic processes such as carcinogenesis. Further studies with microfluidic platforms point the way for using this approach in high throughput assays.

  16. Neutron diffractometer INES for quantitative phase analysis of archaeological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imberti, S.; Kockelmann, W.; Celli, M.; Grazzi, F.; Zoppi, M.; Botti, A.; Sodo, A.; Imperiale, M. Leo; de Vries-Melein, M.; Visser, D.; Postma, H.

    2008-03-01

    With the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) a new general purpose neutron powder diffractometer is available at ISIS, characterized by a high resolution at low d-spacings, and particularly suited for the quantitative phase analysis of a wide range of archaeological materials. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction is notable for being a non-destructive technique, allowing a reliable determination of the phase compositions of multiphase artefacts, with or without superficial corrosion layers. A selection of archaeometric studies carried out during the first year of the INES user programme is presented here to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  17. Quantitative phase retrieval with arbitrary pupil and illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Claus, Rene A.; Naulleau, Patrick P.; Neureuther, Andrew R.; Waller, Laura

    2015-10-02

    We present a general algorithm for combining measurements taken under various illumination and imaging conditions to quantitatively extract the amplitude and phase of an object wave. The algorithm uses the weak object transfer function, which incorporates arbitrary pupil functions and partially coherent illumination. The approach is extended beyond the weak object regime using an iterative algorithm. Finally, we demonstrate the method on measurements of Extreme Ultraviolet Lithography (EUV) multilayer mask defects taken in an EUV zone plate microscope with both a standard zone plate lens and a zone plate implementing Zernike phase contrast.

  18. Quantitative appraisal for noise reduction in digital holographic phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Montresor, Silvio; Picart, Pascal

    2016-06-27

    This paper discusses on a quantitative comparison of the performances of different advanced algorithms for phase data de-noising. In order to quantify the performances, several criteria are proposed: the gain in the signal-to-noise ratio, the Q index, the standard deviation of the phase error, and the signal to distortion ratio. The proposed methodology to investigate de-noising algorithms is based on the use of a realistic simulation of noise-corrupted phase data. A database including 25 fringe patterns divided into 5 patterns and 5 different signal-to-noise ratios was generated to evaluate the selected de-noising algorithms. A total of 34 algorithms divided into different families were evaluated. Quantitative appraisal leads to ranking within the considered criteria. A fairly good correlation between the signal-to-noise ratio gain and the quality index has been observed. There exists an anti-correlation between the phase error and the quality index which indicates that the phase errors are mainly structural distortions in the fringe pattern. Experimental results are thoroughly discussed in the paper.

  19. CRITIR: model-based reconstruction for x-ray phase contrast tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xianghui; Mohan, Aditya; Bouman, Charles A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray phase contrast imaging provides greater contrast compared to conventional absorption contrast imaging. It has higher sensitivity in discriminating mass density difference in a sample. Therefore phase contrast imaging has broad applications in dynamic tomography in which signal-to-noise ratio is usually traded off to the desired temporal resolution. Single-distance propagation phase contrast tomography is the most popular approach at many synchrotron facilities. The simple and flexible setup facilitates complicated in situ experiments. There are few phase retrieval algorithms available for phase-contrast image data processing. All the algorithms rely on certain models. In this talk we present a phase retrieval algorithm for phase-contrast tomography that is suitable for large propagation distance under phase-attenuation duality assumption. The validity of the algorithm is proved with both simulated and experimental data. The reconstruction results with the new algorithm show improved accuracy compared to other model based algorithms. The framework of this algorithm may be extended to the scenario in which phase-attenuation assumption is not satisfied, therefore a general model-free phase retrieval approach for single-distance phase contrast tomography.

  20. A quantitative measure of phase correlations in density fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scherrer, Robert J.; Melott, Adrian L.; Shandarin, Sergei F.

    1991-01-01

    A quantitative measure of the phase correlations in a density field is presented based on the location of the maxima of the Fourier components of that field. It is found that this measue can easily detect non-Gaussian behavior either in artificially constructed density fields or those that become non-Gaussian from gravitational clustering of Gaussian initial conditions. It is found that different initial power spectra produce somewhat distinguishable signals, and the signals are robust against sparse sampling.

  1. Added prognostic value of myocardial blood flow quantitation in rubidium-82 positron emission tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Farhad, Hoshang; Dunet, Vincent; Bachelard, Kim; Allenbach, Gilles; Kaufmann, Philipp A; Prior, John O

    2013-12-01

    We studied the respective added value of the quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) and the myocardial flow reserve (MFR) as assessed with (82)Rb positron emission tomography (PET)/CT in predicting major adverse cardiovascular events (MACEs) in patients with suspected myocardial ischaemia. Myocardial perfusion images were analysed semi-quantitatively (SDS, summed difference score) and quantitatively (MBF, MFR) in 351 patients. Follow-up was completed in 335 patients and annualized MACE (cardiac death, myocardial infarction, revascularization, or hospitalization for congestive heart failure or de novo stable angor) rates were analysed with the Kaplan-Meier method in 318 patients after excluding 17 patients with early revascularizations (<60 days). Independent predictors of MACEs were identified by multivariate analysis. During a median follow-up of 624 days (inter-quartile range 540-697), 35 MACEs occurred. An annualized MACE rate was higher in patients with ischaemia (SDS >2) (n = 105) than those without [14% (95% CI = 9.1-22%) vs. 4.5% (2.7-7.4%), P < 0.0001]. The lowest MFR tertile group (MFR <1.8) had the highest MACE rate [16% (11-25%) vs. 2.9% (1.2-7.0%) and 4.3% (2.1-9.0%), P < 0.0001]. Similarly, the lowest stress MBF tertile group (MBF <1.8 mL/min/g) had the highest MACE rate [14% (9.2-22%) vs. 7.3% (4.2-13%) and 1.8% (0.6-5.5%), P = 0.0005]. Quantitation with stress MBF or MFR had a significant independent prognostic power in addition to semi-quantitative findings. The largest added value was conferred by combining stress MBF to SDS. This holds true even for patients without ischaemia. Perfusion findings in (82)Rb PET/CT are strong MACE outcome predictors. MBF quantification has an added value allowing further risk stratification in patients with normal and abnormal perfusion images.

  2. Quantitative imaging of I-124 using positron emission tomography with applications to radioimmunodiagnosis and radioimmunotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlow, K.S.; Graham, M.C.; Lambrecht, R.M.; Cheung, N.K.; Larson, S.M. )

    1991-05-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is potentially useful for the quantitative imaging of radiolabeled antibodies, leading in turn to improved dosimetry in radioimmunotherapy. Iodine-124 is a positron-emitting nuclide with appropriate chemical properties and half-life (4.2 days) for such studies since the radiolabeling of antibodies with iodine is well understood and the half-life permits measurements over several days. Unfortunately, I-124 has a complex decay scheme with many high-energy gamma rays and a positron abundance of only 25%. It has therefore been largely ignored as a PET-imaging nuclide. However, measurements made with phantoms and animals under realistic conditions using a BGO-based PET scanner have shown that satisfactory imaging and quantitation can be achieved. Investigations of spatial resolution, the linearity of regional observed count rate versus activity in the presence of other activity, and the visualization and quantitation of activity in spheres with different surrounding background activities were carried out with phantoms up to 22 cm in diameter. Compared with F-18, spatial resolution was only slightly degraded (13.5 mm FWHM vs 12 mm FWHM) while linearity was the same over a 10:1 activity range (0.015 to 0.15 MBq/ml for I-124). The visualization and quantitation of spheres was also slightly degraded when using similar imaging times. Increasing the imaging time for I-124 reduced the difference. To verify that the technique would work in vivo, measurements were made of human neuroblastoma tumors in rats which had been injected with I-124 labeled 3F8 antibody. Although the number of samples was small, good agreement was achieved between image-based measurements and direct measurements of excised 4-g tumors. Thus quantitative imaging of I-124 labeled antibodies appears to be possible under realistic conditions.

  3. Imaging red blood cell dynamics by quantitative phase microscopy.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Gabriel; Park, YoungKeun; Choi, Wonshik; Dasari, Ramachandra R; Feld, Michael S; Badizadegan, Kamran

    2008-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) play a crucial role in health and disease, and structural and mechanical abnormalities of these cells have been associated with important disorders such as Sickle cell disease and hereditary cytoskeletal abnormalities. Although several experimental methods exist for analysis of RBC mechanical properties, optical methods stand out as they enable collecting mechanical and dynamic data from live cells without physical contact and without the need for exogenous contrast agents. In this report, we present quantitative phase microscopy techniques that enable imaging RBC membrane fluctuations with nanometer sensitivity at arbitrary time scales from milliseconds to hours. We further provide a theoretical framework for extraction of membrane mechanical and dynamical properties using time series of quantitative phase images. Finally, we present an experimental approach to extend quantitative phase imaging to 3-dimensional space using tomographic methods. By providing non-invasive methods for imaging mechanics of live cells, these novel techniques provide an opportunity for high-throughput analysis and study of RBC mechanical properties in health and disease.

  4. A comparative study of x-ray phase micro-tomography: grating based technique vs. high-energy propagation based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqiang; Wu, Xizeng; Xiao, Tiqiao

    2016-03-01

    Among the X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCI) techniques, both propagation-based and grating-based micro-tomography recently dominate the non-destructive three-dimensional inner-structure measurement in biomedical research, especially for visualizing tiny density variations in soft tissues and organs. In order to quantitatively evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of both techniques for comprehensive application through carrying out a comparison study of high energy propagation-based micro-tomography with generalized phase-and-attenuation duality (PAD) phase retrieval and Talbot grating interferometer-based micro-tomography, implemented with two biomedical specimens, mouse fetus and rat brain, on the basis of synchrotron radiation facility. We find that the grating-based micro-tomography is superior in the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) or the mass density resolution, and inferior in the spatial resolution (SR), compared with that of propagation-based micro-tomography. We found that for achieving a given CNR, the grating-based micro-tomography applies about 1.5 times radiation dose involved as compared to the propagation-based micro-tomography with PAD phase retrieval. Additionally, the complex coherent degrees of light source related to the both techniques were duly taken into account in the analysis of their SR comparison. Finally, the mass density distribution of soft biomedical specimens can be estimated using our presented method preliminarily. Our work gives indications for applications and developments of phase sensitive micro-tomography for soft biomedical specimens and low-Z materials.

  5. High-speed X-ray phase tomography with Talbot interferometer and fringe scanning method

    SciTech Connect

    Kibayashi, Shunsuke; Harasse, Sebastien; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2012-07-31

    High-speed X-ray phase tomography based on the Fourier-transform method has been demonstrated with an X-ray Talbot interferometer using white synchrotron radiation. We report the experimental results of high-speed X-ray phase tomography with fringe-scanning method instead of Fourier-transform method to improve spatial resolution without a considerable increase of scan time. To apply fringe-scanning method to high speed tomography, we tested a scan that is a synchronous combination of one-way continuous movements of the sample rotation and the grating displacement. When this scanning method was combined with X-ray phase tomography, we were able to obtain a scan time of 5 s. A comparison of the image quality derived with the conventional approach and with the proposed approach using the fringe-scanning method showed that the latter had better spatial resolution.

  6. Accounting for filter bandwidth improves the quantitative accuracy of bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Shelley L.; Mason, Suzannah K. G.; Glinton, Sophie L.; Cobbold, Mark; Dehghani, Hamid

    2015-09-01

    Bioluminescence imaging is a noninvasive technique whereby surface weighted images of luminescent probes within animals are used to characterize cell count and function. Traditionally, data are collected over the entire emission spectrum of the source using no filters and are used to evaluate cell count/function over the entire spectrum. Alternatively, multispectral data over several wavelengths can be incorporated to perform tomographic reconstruction of source location and intensity. However, bandpass filters used for multispectral data acquisition have a specific bandwidth, which is ignored in the reconstruction. In this work, ignoring the bandwidth is shown to introduce a dependence of the recovered source intensity on the bandwidth of the filters. A method of accounting for the bandwidth of filters used during multispectral data acquisition is presented and its efficacy in increasing the quantitative accuracy of bioluminescence tomography is demonstrated through simulation and experiment. It is demonstrated that while using filters with a large bandwidth can dramatically decrease the data acquisition time, if not accounted for, errors of up to 200% in quantitative accuracy are introduced in two-dimensional planar imaging, even after normalization. For tomographic imaging, the use of this method to account for filter bandwidth dramatically improves the quantitative accuracy.

  7. Automated quantitative assessment of three-dimensional bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ling; Xu, Mingen; Zhang, LieLie; Zhou, QingQing; Luo, Li

    2016-01-01

    Reconstructing and quantitatively assessing the internal architecture of opaque three-dimensional (3D) bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds is difficult but vital to the improvement of 3D bioprinting techniques and to the fabrication of functional engineered tissues. In this study, swept-source optical coherence tomography was applied to acquire high-resolution images of hydrogel scaffolds. Novel 3D gelatin/alginate hydrogel scaffolds with six different representative architectures were fabricated using our 3D bioprinting system. Both the scaffold material networks and the interconnected flow channel networks were reconstructed through volume rendering and binarisation processing to provide a 3D volumetric view. An image analysis algorithm was developed based on the automatic selection of the spatially-isolated region-of–interest. Via this algorithm, the spatially-resolved morphological parameters including pore size, pore shape, strut size, surface area, porosity, and interconnectivity were quantified precisely. Fabrication defects and differences between the designed and as-produced scaffolds were clearly identified in both 2D and 3D; the locations and dimensions of each of the fabrication defects were also defined. It concludes that this method will be a key tool for non-destructive and quantitative characterization, design optimisation and fabrication refinement of 3D bioprinted hydrogel scaffolds. Furthermore, this method enables investigation into the quantitative relationship between scaffold structure and biological outcome. PMID:27231597

  8. Experimental investigation of bone mineral density in Thoroughbreds using quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HIGUCHI, Tohru; NISHIHARA, Kaori; KAYANO, Mitsunori; SASAKI, Naoki; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bone mineral density (BMD) is one of the indications of the strength and health. BMD measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) was compared with that measured by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and radiographic bone aluminum equivalence (RBAE). Limbs were removed from horses that had been euthanized for reasons not associated with this study. Sixteen limbs (left and right metacarpals and metatarsals) from 4 horses were used to compare BMD as measured by QCT with those measured by DXA and RBAE. There was a strong correlation between BMD values measured by QCT and those measured by DXA (R2=0.85); correlation was also observed between values obtained by QCT and those obtained by RBAE (R2=0.61). To investigate changes in BMD with age, 37 right metacarpal bones, including 7 from horses euthanized because of fracture were examined by QCT. The BMD value of samples from horses dramatically increased until 2 years of age and then plateaued, a pattern similar to the growth curve. The BMD values of bone samples from horses euthanized because of fracture were within the population range, and samples of morbid fracture were not included. The relationship between BMD and age provides a reference for further quantitative studies of bone development and remodeling. Quantitative measurement of BMD using QCT may have great potential for the evaluation of bone biology for breeding and rearing management. PMID:26435681

  9. Robust phase-retrieval-based X-ray tomography for morphological assessment of early hepatic echinococcosis infection in rats

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chuanshan; Fan, Xiaoxi; Duan, Yingni; Xiao, Tiqiao; Du, Guohao; Fu, Yanan; Liu, Haigang; Wen, Hao

    2017-01-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast computed micro-tomography (PPCT) dominates the non-destructive, three-dimensional inner-structure measurement in synchrotron-based biomedical research due to its simple experimental setup. To quantitatively visualize tiny density variations in soft tissues and organs closely related to early pathological morphology, an experimental study of synchrotron-based X-ray PPCT combined with generalized phase and attenuation duality (PAD) phase retrieval was implemented with the hepatic echinococcosis (HE) infection rat model at different stages. We quantitatively analyzed and evaluated the different pathological characterizations of hepatic echinococcosis during the development of this disease via our PAD-based PPCT and especially provided evidence that hepatic alveolar echinococcosis invades the liver tissue and spreads through blood flow systems with abundant blood supply in the early stage. Additionally, the infiltration of tiny vesicles in HE lesions can be clearly observed by our PAD-PPCT technique due to the striking contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and mass density resolution, which cannot be found by the medical imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), and ultrasound, in hospitals. The results demonstrated that our PAD-PPCT technique has a great potential for indicating the subtle structural information of pathological changes in soft biomedical specimens, especially helpful for the research of early micro-morphology of diseases. PMID:28886025

  10. Quantitative in vivo optical tomography of cancer progression & vasculature development in adult zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Lockwood, Nicola; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Correia, Teresa; Ellis, Matthew; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Andrews, Natalie; Patel, Rachel; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J.; Brandner, Sebastian; Arridge, Simon; Katan, Matilda; McGinty, James; Frankel, Paul; French, Paul M.W.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a novel approach to study tumour progression and vasculature development in vivo via global 3-D fluorescence imaging of live non-pigmented adult zebrafish utilising angularly multiplexed optical projection tomography with compressive sensing (CS-OPT). This “mesoscopic” imaging method bridges a gap between established ~μm resolution 3-D fluorescence microscopy techniques and ~mm-resolved whole body planar imaging and diffuse tomography. Implementing angular multiplexing with CS-OPT, we demonstrate the in vivo global imaging of an inducible fluorescently labelled genetic model of liver cancer in adult non-pigmented zebrafish that also present fluorescently labelled vasculature. In this disease model, addition of a chemical inducer (doxycycline) drives expression of eGFP tagged oncogenic K-RASV12 in the liver of immune competent animals. We show that our novel in vivo global imaging methodology enables non-invasive quantitative imaging of the development of tumour and vasculature throughout the progression of the disease, which we have validated against established methods of pathology including immunohistochemistry. We have also demonstrated its potential for longitudinal imaging through a study of vascular development in the same zebrafish from early embryo to adulthood. We believe that this instrument, together with its associated analysis and data management tools, constitute a new platform for in vivo cancer studies and drug discovery in zebrafish disease models. PMID:27259259

  11. Quantitative in vivo optical tomography of cancer progression & vasculature development in adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sunil; Lockwood, Nicola; Ramel, Marie-Christine; Correia, Teresa; Ellis, Matthew; Alexandrov, Yuriy; Andrews, Natalie; Patel, Rachel; Bugeon, Laurence; Dallman, Margaret J; Brandner, Sebastian; Arridge, Simon; Katan, Matilda; McGinty, James; Frankel, Paul; French, Paul M W

    2016-07-12

    We describe a novel approach to study tumour progression and vasculature development in vivo via global 3-D fluorescence imaging of live non-pigmented adult zebrafish utilising angularly multiplexed optical projection tomography with compressive sensing (CS-OPT). This "mesoscopic" imaging method bridges a gap between established ~μm resolution 3-D fluorescence microscopy techniques and ~mm-resolved whole body planar imaging and diffuse tomography. Implementing angular multiplexing with CS-OPT, we demonstrate the in vivo global imaging of an inducible fluorescently labelled genetic model of liver cancer in adult non-pigmented zebrafish that also present fluorescently labelled vasculature. In this disease model, addition of a chemical inducer (doxycycline) drives expression of eGFP tagged oncogenic K-RASV12 in the liver of immune competent animals. We show that our novel in vivo global imaging methodology enables non-invasive quantitative imaging of the development of tumour and vasculature throughout the progression of the disease, which we have validated against established methods of pathology including immunohistochemistry. We have also demonstrated its potential for longitudinal imaging through a study of vascular development in the same zebrafish from early embryo to adulthood. We believe that this instrument, together with its associated analysis and data management tools, constitute a new platform for in vivo cancer studies and drug discovery in zebrafish disease models.

  12. Quantitative X-ray computed tomography peritoneography in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma patients receiving intraperitoneal chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Leinwand, Joshua C; Zhao, Binsheng; Guo, Xiaotao; Krishnamoorthy, Saravanan; Qi, Jing; Graziano, Joseph H; Slavkovic, Vesna N; Bates, Gleneara E; Lewin, Sharyn N; Allendorf, John D; Chabot, John A; Schwartz, Lawrence H; Taub, Robert N

    2013-12-01

    Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is used to treat peritoneal surface-spreading malignancies. We sought to determine whether volume and surface area of the intraperitoneal chemotherapy compartments are associated with overall survival and posttreatment glomerular filtration rate (GFR) in malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) patients. Thirty-eight MPM patients underwent X-ray computed tomography peritoneograms during outpatient intraperitoneal chemotherapy. We calculated volume and surface area of contrast-filled compartments by semiautomated computer algorithm. We tested whether these were associated with overall survival and posttreatment GFR. Decreased likelihood of mortality was associated with larger surface areas (p = 0.0201) and smaller contrast-filled compartment volumes (p = 0.0341), controlling for age, sex, histologic subtype, and presence of residual disease >0.5 cm postoperatively. Larger volumes were associated with higher posttreatment GFR, controlling for pretreatment GFR, body surface area, surface area, and the interaction between body surface area and volume (p = 0.0167). Computed tomography peritoneography is an appropriate modality to assess for maldistribution of intraperitoneal chemotherapy. In addition to identifying catheter failure and frank loculation, quantitative analysis of the contrast-filled compartment's surface area and volume may predict overall survival and cisplatin-induced nephrotoxicity. Prospective studies should be undertaken to confirm and extend these findings to other diseases, including advanced ovarian carcinoma.

  13. Imaging and quantitative assessment of long bone vascularization in the adult rat using microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fei, Jia; Jia, Fei; Peyrin, Françoise; Françoise, Peyrin; Malaval, Luc; Vico, Laurence; Laurence, Vico; Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Marie-Hélène, Lafage-Proust

    2010-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a technique for both 3D imaging and quantification of the vascular network of bone tissue in the rat. Five month-old male Wistar rats were divided into tail-suspension (21 days) and control groups. Sixty percent barium sulfate solution was infused into the vena cava. The tibiae were evaluated in 2D and 3D before and after decalcification, using conventional microcomputerized tomography (muCT) at 10 and 5 mum resolution and synchrotron radiation (SR) muCT. The perfusion technique and tomography exhibited excellent bone vasculature imaging. Significant positive correlations were observed between 2D histomorphometric and 3D muCT vascular parameters (P < 0.05). 3DmuCT discriminated significant changes of vessel structures in unloading condition: vessel number decreased by 25%, (P < 0.005), vessel separation increased by 27%, P < 0.01. SRmuCT could image sinusoid clusters in bone. muCT is an accurate and reproducible technique for 3D quantitative evaluation of long bone vascularisation in the rat. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Swept source optical coherence tomography for quantitative and qualitative assessment of dental composite restorations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadr, Alireza; Shimada, Yasushi; Mayoral, Juan Ricardo; Hariri, Ilnaz; Bakhsh, Turki A.; Sumi, Yasunori; Tagami, Junji

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this work was to explore the utility of swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) for quantitative evaluation of dental composite restorations. The system (Santec, Japan) with a center wavelength of around 1300 nm and axial resolution of 12 μm was used to record data during and after placement of light-cured composites. The Fresnel phenomenon at the interfacial defects resulted in brighter areas indicating gaps as small as a few micrometers. The gap extension at the interface was quantified and compared to the observation by confocal laser scanning microscope after trimming the specimen to the same cross-section. Also, video imaging of the composite during polymerization could provide information about real-time kinetics of contraction stress and resulting gaps, distinguishing them from those gaps resulting from poor adaptation of composite to the cavity prior to polymerization. Some samples were also subjected to a high resolution microfocus X-ray computed tomography (μCT) assessment; it was found that differentiation of smaller gaps from the radiolucent bonding layer was difficult with 3D μCT. Finally, a clinical imaging example using a newly developed dental SS-OCT system with an intra-oral scanning probe (Panasonic Healthcare, Japan) is presented. SS-OCT is a unique tool for clinical assessment and laboratory research on resin-based dental restorations. Supported by GCOE at TMDU and NCGG.

  15. Quantitative morphometric evaluation of critical size experimental bone defects by microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Efeoglu, Candan; Fisher, Sheila E; Ertürk, Selda; Oztop, Fikri; Günbay, Sevtap; Sipahi, Aylin

    2007-04-01

    Our aim was to show that microcomputed tomography is a useful tool for acquiring high-resolution three-dimensional tomographic images to assess bone healing, the interface with materials, and the biocompatibility of bone substitutes. Acquired images can be used for non-invasive quantitative morphometric analysis of regenerating bone, leaving the option for conventional histology to be an adjunct used at defined intervals. The temporal characterisation of the mineralisation of bone potentially has a critical role in the understanding of the dynamics of mineralisation of healing bone. This has applications both for degradable and bioactive materials and for pharmaceutical products that act on bone. Formal validation of this promising new technique will be a critical part of continuing studies.

  16. A hybrid fluorescence tomography and x-ray CT system for quantitative molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yuting; Barber, William C.; Iwanczk, Jan S.; Roeck, Werner W.; Nalcioglu, Orhan; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2010-02-01

    A gantry-based hybrid fluorescence and x-ray computed tomography (FT/CT) system is developed for quantitative molecular imaging. The performance of the dual modality FT/CT system is evaluated using an irregular shaped phantom with an inclusion containing Indocyanine-Green (ICG). The anatomical data from CT provides structural a priori information for the FT inverse problem. Although a 4.2 mm diameter inclusion can be resolved in the reconstructed concentration image without any a priori information, ICG concentration in the inclusion is recovered with 75% error. On the other hand, the error in the recovered ICG concentration reduces to 15% when a priori information from CT is utilized. The results demonstrate that accurate fluorophore concentration can only be obtained when x-ray CT structural a priori information is available.

  17. Cell death detection by quantitative three-dimensional single-cell tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Nai-Chia; Hsieh, Tsung-Hsun; Wang, Yu-Ta; Lai, Chien-Chih; Chang, Chia-Kai; Lin, Ming-Yi; Huang, Ding-Wei; Tjiu, Jeng-Wei; Huang, Sheng-Lung

    2012-01-01

    Ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography (UR-OCT) has been used for the first time to our knowledge to study single-cell basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in vitro. This noninvasive, in situ, label-free technique with deep imaging depth enables three-dimensional analysis of scattering properties of single cells with cellular spatial resolution. From three-dimensional UR-OCT imaging, live and dead BCC cells can be easily identified based on morphological observation. We developed a novel method to automatically extract characteristic parameters of a single cell from data volume, and quantitative comparison and parametric analysis were performed. The results demonstrate the capability of UR-OCT to detect cell death at the cellular level. PMID:23024905

  18. Finite element analysis of the hip and spine based on quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, R Dana

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) provides three-dimensional information about bone geometry and the spatial distribution of bone mineral. Images obtained with QCT can be used to create finite element models, which offer the ability to analyze bone strength and the distribution of mechanical stress and physical deformation. This approach can be used to investigate different mechanical loading scenarios (stance and fall configurations at the hip, for example) and to estimate whole bone strength and the relative mechanical contributions of the cortical and trabecular bone compartments. Finite element analyses based on QCT images of the hip and spine have been used to provide important insights into the biomechanical effects of factors such as age, sex, bone loss, pharmaceuticals, and mechanical loading at sites of high clinical importance. Thus, this analysis approach has become an important tool in the study of the etiology and treatment of osteoporosis at the hip and spine.

  19. Quantitative characteristics of sickle cell retinopathy in optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Minhaj; Thapa, Damber; Lim, Jennifer I.; Cao, Dingcai; Yao, Xincheng

    2017-01-01

    Early detection is an essential step for effective intervention of sickle cell retinopathy (SCR). Emerging optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) provides excellent three-dimensional (3D) resolution to enable label-free, noninvasive visualization of retinal vascular structures, promising improved sensitivity in detecting SCR. However, quantitative analysis of SCR characteristics in OCTA images is yet to be established. In this study, we conducted comprehensive analysis of six OCTA parameters, including blood vessel tortuosity, vessel diameter, vessel perimeter index (VPI), area of foveal avascular zone (FAZ), contour irregularity of FAZ and parafoveal avascular density. Compared to traditional retinal thickness analysis, five of these six OCTA parameters show improved sensitivity for SCR detection than retinal thickness. It is observed that the most sensitive parameters were the contour irregularity of FAZ in the superficial layer and avascular density in temporal regions, while the area of FAZ, tortuosity and mean diameter of the vessel were moderately sensitive. PMID:28663862

  20. Diagnosis of breast cancer biopsies using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Kandel, Mikhail E.; Han, Kevin; Luo, Zelun; Macias, Virgilia; Tangella, Krishnarao; Balla, Andre; Popescu, Gabriel

    2015-03-01

    The standard practice in the histopathology of breast cancers is to examine a hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained tissue biopsy under a microscope. The pathologist looks at certain morphological features, visible under the stain, to diagnose whether a tumor is benign or malignant. This determination is made based on qualitative inspection making it subject to investigator bias. Furthermore, since this method requires a microscopic examination by the pathologist it suffers from low throughput. A quantitative, label-free and high throughput method for detection of these morphological features from images of tissue biopsies is, hence, highly desirable as it would assist the pathologist in making a quicker and more accurate diagnosis of cancers. We present here preliminary results showing the potential of using quantitative phase imaging for breast cancer screening and help with differential diagnosis. We generated optical path length maps of unstained breast tissue biopsies using Spatial Light Interference Microscopy (SLIM). As a first step towards diagnosis based on quantitative phase imaging, we carried out a qualitative evaluation of the imaging resolution and contrast of our label-free phase images. These images were shown to two pathologists who marked the tumors present in tissue as either benign or malignant. This diagnosis was then compared against the diagnosis of the two pathologists on H&E stained tissue images and the number of agreements were counted. In our experiment, the agreement between SLIM and H&E based diagnosis was measured to be 88%. Our preliminary results demonstrate the potential and promise of SLIM for a push in the future towards quantitative, label-free and high throughput diagnosis.

  1. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Allner, S; Koehler, T; Fehringer, A; Birnbacher, L; Willner, M; Pfeiffer, F; Noël, P B

    2016-05-21

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  2. Bilateral filtering using the full noise covariance matrix applied to x-ray phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allner, S.; Koehler, T.; Fehringer, A.; Birnbacher, L.; Willner, M.; Pfeiffer, F.; Noël, P. B.

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop an image-based de-noising algorithm that exploits complementary information and noise statistics from multi-modal images, as they emerge in x-ray tomography techniques, for instance grating-based phase-contrast CT and spectral CT. Among the noise reduction methods, image-based de-noising is one popular approach and the so-called bilateral filter is a well known algorithm for edge-preserving filtering. We developed a generalization of the bilateral filter for the case where the imaging system provides two or more perfectly aligned images. The proposed generalization is statistically motivated and takes the full second order noise statistics of these images into account. In particular, it includes a noise correlation between the images and spatial noise correlation within the same image. The novel generalized three-dimensional bilateral filter is applied to the attenuation and phase images created with filtered backprojection reconstructions from grating-based phase-contrast tomography. In comparison to established bilateral filters, we obtain improved noise reduction and at the same time a better preservation of edges in the images on the examples of a simulated soft-tissue phantom, a human cerebellum and a human artery sample. The applied full noise covariance is determined via cross-correlation of the image noise. The filter results yield an improved feature recovery based on enhanced noise suppression and edge preservation as shown here on the example of attenuation and phase images captured with grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography. This is supported by quantitative image analysis. Without being bound to phase-contrast imaging, this generalized filter is applicable to any kind of noise-afflicted image data with or without noise correlation. Therefore, it can be utilized in various imaging applications and fields.

  3. Quantitative microvascular analysis of retinal venous occlusions by spectral domain optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Koulisis, Nicole; Kim, Alice Y.; Chu, Zhongdi; Shahidzadeh, Anoush; Burkemper, Bruce; Olmos de Koo, Lisa C.; Moshfeghi, Andrew A.; Ameri, Hossein; Puliafito, Carmen A.; Isozaki, Veronica L.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Kashani, Amir H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To quantitatively evaluate the retinal microvasculature in human subjects with retinal venous occlusions (RVO) using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Design Retrospective, cross-sectional, observational case series. Participants Sixty subjects (84 eyes) were included (20 BRVO, 14 CRVO, 24 unaffected fellow eyes, and 26 controls). Methods OCTA was performed on a prototype, spectral domain-OCTA system in the 3x3mm central macular region. Custom software was used to quantify morphology and density of retinal capillaries using four quantitative parameters. The vasculature of the segmented retinal layers and nonsegmented whole retina were analyzed. Main outcome measures Fractal dimension (FD), vessel density (VD), skeletal density (SD), and vessel diameter index (VDI) within the segmented retinal layers and nonsegmented whole retina vasculature. Results Nonsegmented analysis of RVO eyes demonstrated significantly lower FD (1.64±0.01 vs 1.715±0.002; p<0.001), VD (0.32±0.01 vs 0.432±0.002; p<0.001), and SD (0.073±0.004 vs 0.099±0.001; p<0.001) compared to controls. Compared to the fellow eye, FD, VD and SD were lower (p<0.001), and VDI was higher (p<0.001). FD, VD, and SD progressively decreased as the extent (or type) of RVO increased (control vs BRVO vs CRVO; p<0.001). In the unaffected fellow eye FD, VD and SD showed significant differences when compared to control eyes or affected RVO eyes (p<0.001). Conclusions Quantitative OCTA of the central 3x3mm macular region demonstrates significant differences in capillary density and morphology among subjects with BRVO and CRVO compared to controls or unaffected fellow eyes in all vascular layers. The unaffected fellow eyes also demonstrate significant differences when compared to controls. OCTA allows for noninvasive, layer-specific, quantitative evaluation of RVO-associated microvascular changes. PMID:28437483

  4. Differential phase microscope and micro-tomography with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hashizume, J.; Goto, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsujimura, T.; Aoki, S.

    2013-10-01

    An x-ray differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter was set up at the bending magnet source BL3C, Photon Factory. A reconstructed phase profile from the differential phase image of an aluminium wire at 5.36 keV was fairly good agreement with the numerical simulation. Phase tomography of a biological specimen, such as an Artemia cyst, could be successfully demonstrated.

  5. Quantitative phase imaging of retinal cells (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaForest, Timothé; Carpentras, Dino; Kowalczuk, Laura; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Moser, Christophe

    2017-02-01

    Vision process is ruled by several cells layers of the retina. Before reaching the photoreceptors, light entering the eye has to pass through a few hundreds of micrometers thick layer of ganglion and neurons cells. Macular degeneration is a non-curable disease of themacula occurring with age. This disease can be diagnosed at an early stage by imaging neuronal cells in the retina and observing their death chronically. These cells are phase objects locatedon a background that presents an absorption pattern and so difficult to see with standard imagingtechniques in vivo. Phase imaging methods usually need the illumination system to be on the opposite side of the sample with respect to theimaging system. This is a constraintand a challenge for phase imaging in-vivo. Recently, the possibility of performing phase contrast imaging from one side using properties of scattering media has been shown. This phase contrast imaging is based on the back illumination generated by the sample itself. Here, we present a reflection phase imaging technique based on oblique back-illumination. The oblique back-illumination creates a dark field image of the sample. Generating asymmetric oblique illumination allows obtaining differential phase contrast image, which in turn can be processed to recover a quantitative phase image. In the case of the eye, a transcleral illumination can generate oblique incident light on the retina and the choroidal layer.The back reflected light is then collected by the eye lens to produce dark field image. We show experimental results of retinal phase imagesin ex vivo samples of human and pig retina.

  6. Quantitative phase measurement for wafer-level optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Wen, Yongfu; Wang, Zhaomin; Yang, Fang; Huang, Lei; Zuo, Chao

    2015-07-01

    Wafer-level-optics now is widely used in smart phone camera, mobile video conferencing or in medical equipment that require tiny cameras. Extracting quantitative phase information has received increased interest in order to quantify the quality of manufactured wafer-level-optics, detect defective devices before packaging, and provide feedback for manufacturing process control, all at the wafer-level for high-throughput microfabrication. We demonstrate two phase imaging methods, digital holographic microscopy (DHM) and Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE) to measure the phase of the wafer-level lenses. DHM is a laser-based interferometric method based on interference of two wavefronts. It can perform a phase measurement in a single shot. While a minimum of two measurements of the spatial intensity of the optical wave in closely spaced planes perpendicular to the direction of propagation are needed to do the direct phase retrieval by solving a second-order differential equation, i.e., with a non-iterative deterministic algorithm from intensity measurements using the Transport-of-Intensity Equation (TIE). But TIE is a non-interferometric method, thus can be applied to partial-coherence light. We demonstrated the capability and disability for the two phase measurement methods for wafer-level optics inspection.

  7. Quantitative phase analysis through scattering media by depth-filtered digital holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goebel, Sebastian; Jaedicke, Volker; Koukourakis, Nektarios; Wiethoff, Helge; Adinda-Ougba, Adamou; Gerhardt, Nils C.; Welp, Hubert; Hofmann, Martin R.

    2013-02-01

    Digital holography (DH) is capable of providing three-dimensional topological surface profiles with axial resolutions in the nanometer range. To achieve such high resolutions requires an analysis of the phase information of the reflected light by means of numerical reconstruction methods. Unfortunately, the phase analysis of structures located in scattering media is usually disturbed by interference with reflected light from different depths. In contrast, low-coherence interferometry and optical coherence tomography (OCT) use broadband light sources to investigate the sample with a coherence gate providing tomographic measurements in scattering samples with a poorer depth-resolution of a few micrometers. We propose a new approach that allows recovering the phase information even through scattering media. The approach combines both techniques by creating synthesized interference patterns from scanned spectra. After applying an inverse Fourier transform to each spectrum, we yield three-dimensional depth-resolved images. Subsequently, contributions of photons scattered from unwanted regions are suppressed by depth-filtering. The back-transformed data can be considered as multiple synthesized holograms and the corresponding phase information can be extracted directly from the depthfiltered spectra. We used this approach to record and reconstruct holograms of a reflective surface through a scattering layer. Our results demonstrate a proof-of-principle, as the quantitative phase-profile could be recovered and effectively separated from scattering influences. Moreover, additional processing steps could pave the way to further applications, i.e. spectroscopic analysis.

  8. Quantitative measurement of ultrasound pressure field by optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Seiji; Yasuda, Jun; Hanayama, Hiroki; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2016-07-01

    A fast and accurate measurement of an ultrasound field with various exposure sequences is necessary to ensure the efficacy and safety of various ultrasound applications in medicine. The most common method used to measure an ultrasound pressure field, that is, hydrophone scanning, requires a long scanning time and potentially disturbs the field. This may limit the efficiency of developing applications of ultrasound. In this study, an optical phase contrast method enabling fast and noninterfering measurements is proposed. In this method, the modulated phase of light caused by the focused ultrasound pressure field is measured. Then, a computed tomography (CT) algorithm used to quantitatively reconstruct a three-dimensional (3D) pressure field is applied. For a high-intensity focused ultrasound field, a new approach that combines the optical phase contrast method and acoustic holography was attempted. First, the optical measurement of focused ultrasound was rapidly performed over the field near a transducer. Second, the nonlinear propagation of the measured ultrasound was simulated. The result of the new approach agreed well with that of the measurement using a hydrophone and was improved from that of the phase contrast method alone with phase unwrapping.

  9. Three-phase material distribution measurements in a vertical flow using gamma-densitometry tomography and electrical-impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    GEORGE,DARIN L.; SHOLLENBERGER,KIM ANN; TORCZYNSKI,JOHN R.; O'HERN,TIMOTHY J.; CECCIO,S.L.

    2000-03-28

    Experiments are presented in which electrical-impedance tomography (EIT) and gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) measurements were combined to simultaneously measure the solid, liquid, and gas radial distributions in a vertical three-phase flow. The experimental testbed was a 19.05-cm diameter bubble column in which gas is injected at the bottom and exits out the top while the liquid and solid phases recirculate. The gas phase was air and the liquid phase was deionized water with added electrolytes. Four different particle classes were investigated for the solid phase: 40--100 {micro}m and 120--200 {micro}m glass beads (2.41 g/cm{sup 3}), and 170--260 {micro}m and 200--700 {micro}m polystyrene beads (1.04 g/cm{sup 3}). Superficial gas velocities of 3 to 30 cm/s and solid volume fractions up to 0.30 were examined. For all experimental conditions investigated, the gas distribution showed only a weak dependence on both particle size and density. Average gas volume fraction as a function of superficial gas velocity can be described to within {+-} 0.04 by curve passing through the center of the data. For most cases the solid particle appeared to be radically uniformly dispersed in the liquid.

  10. Accuracy of early-phase versus dual-phase single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography in the localization of parathyroid disease.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Rajarsi; Muthukrishnan, Ashok; Ferris, Robert L; de Almeida, John R; Duvvuri, Umamaheswar

    2015-06-01

    Preoperative localization for parathyroid disease has improved in recent years with the advent of dual-phase (99m) Tc-sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging. However, dual-phase imaging is associated with increased cost, time, and radiation dose. The aim of this study was to investigate the need for late-phase imaging when using SPECT/CT for the preoperative localization of parathyroid disease. Retrospective chart analysis. A retrospective review of 75 patients who underwent preoperative imaging localization and subsequent surgical resection for parathyroid disease at a tertiary referral center was performed. Of these, 50 patients met study criteria including preoperative SPECT/CT imaging and specific reporting of early- and late-phase focal radiotracer uptake. Localization accuracy was verified with definitive surgical findings confirmed by histological analysis and evidence of biochemical cure. Accurate localization of adenoma(s) was seen in 78.0% of patients using dual-phase SPECT/CT. Early-phase imaging alone localized 76.0%, whereas late-phase imaging alone localized 74.0%. Sensitivity and specificity for dual-phase imaging was 84.8% and 89.6%, respectively. In comparison, early-phase localization alone was found to have a sensitivity/specificity of 84.4%/89.4%; sensitivity/specificity of late-phase scanning alone was found to be 80.4%/89.1%. Dual-phase SPECT/CT scanning did not provide a statistically significant improvement in adenoma localization when compared to early-phase scanning alone. Although further investigation is needed, the results of this study suggest that early-phase SPECT/CT scanning alone may obviate the need for dual-phase SPECT/CT scanning in the initial preoperative localization workup of parathyroid disease. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Quantitative phase-field modeling for boiling phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badillo, Arnoldo

    2012-10-01

    A phase-field model is developed for quantitative simulation of bubble growth in the diffusion-controlled regime. The model accounts for phase change and surface tension effects at the liquid-vapor interface of pure substances with large property contrast. The derivation of the model follows a two-fluid approach, where the diffuse interface is assumed to have an internal microstructure, defined by a sharp interface. Despite the fact that phases within the diffuse interface are considered to have their own velocities and pressures, an averaging procedure at the atomic scale, allows for expressing all the constitutive equations in terms of mixture quantities. From the averaging procedure and asymptotic analysis of the model, nonconventional terms appear in the energy and phase-field equations to compensate for the variation of the properties across the diffuse interface. Without these new terms, no convergence towards the sharp-interface model can be attained. The asymptotic analysis also revealed a very small thermal capillary length for real fluids, such as water, that makes impossible for conventional phase-field models to capture bubble growth in the millimeter range size. For instance, important phenomena such as bubble growth and detachment from a hot surface could not be simulated due to the large number of grids points required to resolve all the scales. Since the shape of the liquid-vapor interface is primarily controlled by the effects of an isotropic surface energy (surface tension), a solution involving the elimination of the curvature from the phase-field equation is devised. The elimination of the curvature from the phase-field equation changes the length scale dominating the phase change from the thermal capillary length to the thickness of the thermal boundary layer, which is several orders of magnitude larger. A detailed analysis of the phase-field equation revealed that a split of this equation into two independent parts is possible for system sizes

  12. Quantitative infrared spectra of vapor phase chemical agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, Pamela M.; Kleimeyer, James; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of pressure broadened (101.3 KPa N2), vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, nitrogen mustard (HN3), sulfur mustard (HD) and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White cell of 5.6 m optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer's law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at the Dugway Proving Ground (DPG).

  13. Quantitative Infrared Spectra of Vapor Phase Chemical Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Steven W.; Johnson, Timothy J.; Chu, P. M.; Kleimeyer, J.; Rowland, Brad

    2003-08-01

    Quantitative, moderately high resolution (0.1 cm-1) infrared spectra have been acquired for a number of nitrogen broadened (1 atm N2) vapor phase chemicals including: Sarin (GB), Soman (GD), Tabun (GA), Cyclosarin (GF), VX, Nitrogen Mustard (HN3), Sulfur Mustard (HD), and Lewisite (L). The spectra are acquired using a heated, flow-through White Cell1 of 5.6 meter optical path length. Each reported spectrum represents a statistical fit to Beer’s law, which allows for a rigorous calculation of uncertainty in the absorption coefficients. As part of an ongoing collaboration with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), cross-laboratory validation is a critical aspect of this work. In order to identify possible errors in the Dugway flow-through system, quantitative spectra of isopropyl alcohol from both NIST and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are compared to similar data taken at Dugway proving Grounds (DPG).

  14. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Michiel A; El-Naggar, Heba M; Boogers, Mark J; Veltman, Caroline E; Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Kroft, Lucia J; Al Younis, Imad; Reiber, Johan H; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria; Scholte, Arthur J

    2013-08-01

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 ± 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS ≥2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5%) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95% CI 2.41-24.7, p < 0.001, and OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.45, p = 0.032, respectively) after correcting for clinical variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. The addition of quantitatively assessed significant stenosis (χ(2) = 20.7) and lesion length (χ(2) = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment (χ(2) = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have incremental value

  15. Evaluation of Quantitative Computed Tomography Cortical Hip Quadrant in a Clinical Trial With Rosiglitazone: A Potential New Study Endpoint.

    PubMed

    Miller, Colin G; Bogado, Cesar C; Nino, Antonio J; Northcutt, Allison R; Yu, Hui Jing; Lewiecki, E Michael; Paul, G; Cobitz, Alexander R; Wooddell, Margaret J; Bilezikian, John P; Fitzpatrick, Lorraine A

    2016-10-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measurements have been used extensively to ascertain information about bone quality and density due to the 3-dimensional information provided and the ability to segment out trabecular and cortical bones. QCT imaging helps to improve our understanding of the role that each bone compartment plays in the pathogenesis and prognosis of fracture. This study was conducted to explore longitudinal changes in femoral neck (FN) cortical bone structure using both volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) and cortical shell thickness assessments via QCT in a double-blind, randomized, multicenter clinical trial in postmenopausal women with type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study also examined whether treatment-associated changes in the cortical bone vBMD and thickness in femoral neck quadrants could be evaluated. Subjects were randomized to rosiglitazone (RSG) or metformin (MET) for 52 wk followed by 24 wk of open-label MET. A subset of 87 subjects underwent QCT scans of the hip at baseline, after 52 wk of double-blind treatment, and after 24 wk of treatment with MET using standard full-body computed tomography scanners. All scans were evaluated and analyzed centrally. Cortical vBMD at the FN was precisely segmented from trabecular bone and used to assess a possible therapeutic effect on this bone compartment. QCT analysis showed reductions in adjusted mean percentage change in vBMD and in absolute cortical thickness occurred with RSG treatment from baseline to week 52, whereas changes with MET were generally minimal. The reductions observed during RSG treatment for 1 yr appeared to partially reverse during the open-label MET phase from weeks 52 to 76. The femoral neck quadrant may provide utility as a potential endpoint in clinical trials for the understanding of the therapeutic effect of new entities on cortical bone vs trabecular bone; however, further clinical validation is needed.

  16. Single beam Fourier transform digital holographic quantitative phase microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, A. Chhaniwal, V. K.; Mahajan, S.; Trivedi, V.; Faridian, A.; Pedrini, G.; Osten, W.; Dubey, S. K.; Javidi, B.

    2014-03-10

    Quantitative phase contrast microscopy reveals thickness or height information of a biological or technical micro-object under investigation. The information obtained from this process provides a means to study their dynamics. Digital holographic (DH) microscopy is one of the most used, state of the art single-shot quantitative techniques for three dimensional imaging of living cells. Conventional off axis DH microscopy directly provides phase contrast images of the objects. However, this process requires two separate beams and their ratio adjustment for high contrast interference fringes. Also the use of two separate beams may make the system more vulnerable to vibrations. Single beam techniques can overcome these hurdles while remaining compact as well. Here, we describe the development of a single beam DH microscope providing whole field imaging of micro-objects. A hologram of the magnified object projected on to a diffuser co-located with a pinhole is recorded with the use of a commercially available diode laser and an arrayed sensor. A Fourier transform of the recorded hologram directly yields the complex amplitude at the image plane. The method proposed was investigated using various phase objects. It was also used to image the dynamics of human red blood cells in which sub-micrometer level thickness variation were measurable.

  17. Unlimited field-of-view optofluidic quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, V.; Paturzo, M.; Marchesano, V.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    Here we show a novel imaging modality, named Space-Time Scanning Interferometry (STSI), which synthesizes interferograms mapped in a hybrid space-time domain. A single linear sensor array is sufficient to create hybrid interferograms with unlimited Field of View (FoV) along the scanning direction, and allowing quantitative phase retrieval by Phase Shifting (PS) interferometry algorithms. We applied the STSI method to microfluidic imaging of biological samples, where the required phase shift between interferograms is intrinsically offered due to the sample movement. Besides, out-of-focus recordings are performed using a single line detector, in order to synthesize an unlimited FoV Space-Time Digital Hologram (STDH) yielding full-field, 3D information. Experimental proofs have been carried out to demonstrate the useful capability of STDH to overcome the trade-off existing between FoV and sample magnification, thus providing a high-throughput, label/free, quantitative, diagnostic tool to study biological elements onboard LoC platforms.

  18. Quantitative 7T phase imaging in premanifest Huntington disease.

    PubMed

    Apple, A C; Possin, K L; Satris, G; Johnson, E; Lupo, J M; Jakary, A; Wong, K; Kelley, D A C; Kang, G A; Sha, S J; Kramer, J H; Geschwind, M D; Nelson, S J; Hess, C P

    2014-09-01

    In vivo MR imaging and postmortem neuropathologic studies have demonstrated elevated iron concentration and atrophy within the striatum of patients with Huntington disease, implicating neuronal loss and iron accumulation in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. We used 7T MR imaging to determine whether quantitative phase, a measurement that reflects both iron content and tissue microstructure, is altered in subjects with premanifest Huntington disease. Local field shift, calculated from 7T MR phase images, was quantified in 13 subjects with premanifest Huntington disease and 13 age- and sex-matched controls. All participants underwent 3T and 7T MR imaging, including volumetric T1 and 7T gradient recalled-echo sequences. Local field shift maps were created from 7T phase data and registered to caudate ROIs automatically parcellated from the 3T T1 images. Huntington disease-specific disease burden and neurocognitive and motor evaluations were also performed and compared with local field shift. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease had smaller caudate volume and higher local field shift than controls. A significant correlation between these measurements was not detected, and prediction accuracy for disease state improved with inclusion of both variables. A positive correlation between local field shift and genetic disease burden was also found, and there was a trend toward significant correlations between local field shift and neurocognitive tests of working memory and executive function. Subjects with premanifest Huntington disease exhibit differences in 7T MR imaging phase within the caudate nuclei that correlate with genetic disease burden and trend with neurocognitive assessments. Ultra-high-field MR imaging of quantitative phase may be a useful approach for monitoring neurodegeneration in premanifest Huntington disease. © 2014 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  19. QUANTITATIVE 7T PHASE IMAGING IN PREMOTOR HUNTINGTON DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    Apple, Alexandra C.; Possin, Katherine L.; Satris, Gabriela; Johnson, Erica; Lupo, Janine M.; Jakary, Angela; Wong, Katherine; Kelley, Douglas A. C.; Kang, Gail A.; Sha, Sharon J.; Kramer, Joel H.; Geschwind, Michael; Nelson, Sarah J.; Hess, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose In vivo MRI and postmortem neuropathological studies have demonstrated elevated iron concentration and atrophy within the striatum of patients with Huntington disease (HD), implicating neuronal loss and iron accumulation in the pathogenesis of this neurodegenerative disorder. We used 7T MRI to determine whether quantitative phase, a putative marker of these endpoints, is altered in subjects with premotor HD. Materials and Methods Local field shift (LFS), calculated from 7T MR phase images, was quantified in 13 subjects with premotor HD and 13 age- and gender-matched controls. All participants underwent 3T and 7T MRI, including volumetric 3T T1 and 7T gradient-recalled echo sequences. LFS maps were created from 7T phase data and registered to caudate ROIs automatically parcellated from the 3T T1 images. HD-specific neurocognitive assessment was also performed and compared to LFS. Results Subjects with premotor HD had smaller caudate nuclear volume and higher LFS than controls. A significant correlation between these measurements was not detected, and prediction accuracy for disease state improved with inclusion of both variables. A positive correlation between LFS and genetic disease burden was also found, and there was a trend towards significant correlations between LFS and neurocognitive tests of working memory and executive function. Conclusion Subjects with premotor HD exhibit differences in 7T MRI phase within the caudate nuclei that correlate with genetic disease burden and trend with neurocognitive assessments. Ultra-high field MRI of quantitative phase may be a useful marker for monitoring neurodegeneration in premanifest HD. PMID:24742810

  20. Evaluation of static and dynamic perfusion cardiac computed tomography for quantitation and classification tasks.

    PubMed

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R; La Riviere, Patrick J; Alessio, Adam M

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac computed tomography (CT) acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. Either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including (1) stratifying patients into categories of ischemia and (2) using a quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimate to evaluate disease severity. In this simulation study, we compare method performance on these classification and quantification tasks for matched radiation dose levels and for different flow states, patient sizes, and injected contrast levels. Under conditions simulated, the dynamic method has low bias in MBF estimates (0 to [Formula: see text]) compared to linearly interpreted static assessment (0.45 to [Formula: see text]), making it more suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, had superior performance ([Formula: see text]) in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients and lower contrast doses [area under the curve [Formula: see text] to 96 versus 0.86]. We also demonstrate that static assessment with a correctly tuned exponential relationship between the apparent CT number and MBF has superior quantification performance to static assessment with a linear relationship and to dynamic assessment. However, tuning the exponential relationship to the patient and scan characteristics will likely prove challenging. This study demonstrates that the selection and optimization of static or dynamic acquisition modes should depend on the specific clinical task.

  1. Quantitative analysis on PUVA-induced skin photodamages using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Juan; Guo, Zhouyi; Liu, Zhiming; Xiong, Honglian; Zeng, Changchun; Jin, Ying

    2009-08-01

    Psoralen plus ultraviolet A radiation (PUVA) therapy is a very important clinical treatment of skin diseases such as vitiligo and psoriasis, but associated with an increased risk of skin photodamages especially photoaging. Since skin biopsy alters the original skin morphology and always requires an iatrogenic trauma, optical coherence tomography (OCT) appears to be a promising technique to study skin damage in vivo. In this study, the Balb/c mice had 8-methoxypsralen (8-MOP) treatment prior to UVA radiation was used as PUVA-induced photo-damaged modal. The OCT imaging of photo-damaged group (modal) and normal group (control) in vivo was obtained of mice dorsal skin at 0, 24, 48, 72 hours after irradiation respectively. And then the results were quantitatively analyzed combined with histological information. The experimental results showed that, PUVA-induced photo-damaged skin had an increase in epidermal thickness (ET), a reduction of attenuation coefficient in OCT images signal, and an increase in brightness of the epidermis layer compared with the control group. In conclusion, noninvasive high-resolution imaging techniques such as OCT may be a promising tool for photobiological studies aimed at assessing photo-damage and repair processes in vivo. It can be used to quantitative analysis of changes in photo-damaged skin, such as the ET and collagen in dermis, provides a theoretical basis for treatment and prevention of skin photodamages.

  2. Electrical impedance tomography-based sensing skin for quantitative imaging of damage in concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallaji, Milad; Seppänen, Aku; Pour-Ghaz, Mohammad

    2014-08-01

    This paper outlines the development of a large-area sensing skin for damage detection in concrete structures. The developed sensing skin consists of a thin layer of electrically conductive copper paint that is applied to the surface of the concrete. Cracking of the concrete substrate results in the rupture of the sensing skin, decreasing its electrical conductivity locally. The decrease in conductivity is detected with electrical impedance tomography (EIT) imaging. In previous works, electrically based sensing skins have provided only qualitative information on the damage on the substrate surface. In this paper, we study whether quantitative imaging of the damage is possible. We utilize application-specific models and computational methods in the image reconstruction, including a total variation (TV) prior model for the damage and an approximate correction of the modeling errors caused by the inhomogeneity of the painted sensing skin. The developed damage detection method is tested experimentally by applying the sensing skin to polymeric substrates and a reinforced concrete beam under four-point bending. In all test cases, the EIT-based sensing skin provides quantitative information on cracks and/or other damages on the substrate surface: featuring a very low conductivity in the damage locations, and a reliable indication of the lengths and shapes of the cracks. The results strongly support the applicability of the painted EIT-based sensing skin for damage detection in reinforced concrete elements and other substrates.

  3. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Live Avian Embryonic Morphogenesis Via Micro-computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Alyssa L.; Jiang, Michael X.; Yalcin, Huseyin C.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Many clinically relevant congenital malformations arise during mid to late embryonic stages. This period is challenging to image quantitatively in live embryos, necessitating the use of multiple specimens with increased experimental variability. Here we establish X-ray and blood-pool computed tomography (CT) contrast agent toxicity and teratogenesis thresholds for 3D Micro-CT imaging of live avian embryos. Day 4 chick embryos micro-injected with Visipaque™ (VP) developed for an additional 6 days without defect. X-ray radiation up to 798 mGy was nontoxic. Peak average contrast of 1,060 HU occurred within 1 hr of imaging at 50 μm resolution. VP-enhanced contrast persisted past 24 hr with delayed accumulation in the allantois. Regional volumes of VP-injected embryos were statistically identical to those of fixed embryos perfused with osmium tetroxide. We further quantified longitudinal volumetric morphogenesis of the allantois over 30 hr. These results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of contrast enhanced quantitative micro-CT imaging for live embryos. PMID:21761480

  4. [Densitometry analysis with quantitative computerized tomography in 530 subjects from Southern Italy].

    PubMed

    Addesso, A M; Cinque, T; Del Vecchio, W; Salvi, V; Schillirò, F

    1996-10-01

    Quantitative measure of bone mineral content (BMC) loss is an important diagnostic indicator for determining the risk of fracture and in following the course of patients undergoing therapy for osteoporosis. Several techniques have been used to evaluate this parameter. Quantitative Computed Tomography (QCT) is the most precise and accurate method allowing selective measurement of trabecular compartment of the vertebrae. Age, sex, ethnic heritage and geographic factors influence BMC variability. The aim of this study is to describe the normal cross-section pattern of age-related spinal bone loss in a Southern Italy population (530 healthy subjects: 450 women, 80 men) and to provide a local data-base for better interpretation of the BMC values. The BMC of lumbar spine was measured by single energy QCT, using a reference phantom with five tubes containing known amounts of CaCO3, placed approximately at the vertebral bodies L2-L4. Results indicate an age-related bone loss with the lowest values at 55-70 years, particularly in women, while no major further decrease was observed in subjects over 65 years. Normal linear BMC decrease rate can be derived from this data.

  5. Quantitative Micro-Computed Tomography Imaging of Vascular Dysfunction in Progressive Kidney Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ehling, Josef; Bábíčková, Janka; Gremse, Felix; Klinkhammer, Barbara M; Baetke, Sarah; Knuechel, Ruth; Kiessling, Fabian; Floege, Jürgen; Lammers, Twan; Boor, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Progressive kidney diseases and renal fibrosis are associated with endothelial injury and capillary rarefaction. However, our understanding of these processes has been hampered by the lack of tools enabling the quantitative and noninvasive monitoring of vessel functionality. Here, we used micro-computed tomography (µCT) for anatomical and functional imaging of vascular alterations in three murine models with distinct mechanisms of progressive kidney injury: ischemia-reperfusion (I/R, days 1-56), unilateral ureteral obstruction (UUO, days 1-10), and Alport mice (6-8 weeks old). Contrast-enhanced in vivo µCT enabled robust, noninvasive, and longitudinal monitoring of vessel functionality and revealed a progressive decline of the renal relative blood volume in all models. This reduction ranged from -20% in early disease stages to -61% in late disease stages and preceded fibrosis. Upon Microfil perfusion, high-resolution ex vivo µCT allowed quantitative analyses of three-dimensional vascular networks in all three models. These analyses revealed significant and previously unrecognized alterations of preglomerular arteries: a reduction in vessel diameter, a prominent reduction in vessel branching, and increased vessel tortuosity. In summary, using µCT methodology, we revealed insights into macro-to-microvascular alterations in progressive renal disease and provide a platform that may serve as the basis to evaluate vascular therapeutics in renal disease.

  6. Intervertebral disc segmentation and volumetric reconstruction from peripheral quantitative computed tomography imaging.

    PubMed

    Wong, Alexander; Mishra, Akshaya; Yates, Justin; Fieguth, Paul; Clausi, David A; Callaghan, Jack P

    2009-11-01

    An automatic system for segmenting and constructing volumetric representations of excised intervertebral discs from peripheral quantitative computed tomography (PQCT) imagery is presented. The system is designed to allow for automatic quantitative analysis of progressive herniation damage to the intervertebral discs under flexion/extension motions combined with a compressive load. Automatic segmentation and volumetric reconstruction of intervertebral disc from PQCT imagery is a very challenging problem due to factors such as streak artifacts and unclear material density separation between contrasted intervertebral disc and surrounding bone in the PQCT imagery, as well as the formation of multiple contrasted regions under axial scans. To address these factors, a novel multiscale level set approach based on the Mumford-Shah energy functional in iterative bilateral scale space is employed to segment the intervertebral disc regions from the PQCT imagery. A Delaunay triangulation is then performed based on the set of points associated with the intervertebral disc regions to construct the volumetric representation of the intervertebral disc. Experimental results show that the proposed system achieves segmentation and volumetric reconstructions of intervertebral discs with mean absolute distance error below 0.8 mm when compared to ground truth measurements. The proposed system is currently in operational use as a visualization tool for studying progressive intervertebral disc damage.

  7. Quantitative Diagnosis of Colorectal Polyps by Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chen; Zhang, Qinqin; Wu, Xiaojing; Tang, Tao; Liu, Hong; Zhu, S. W.; Gao, Bruce Z.; Yuan, X.-C.

    2014-01-01

    The principal aim of this study is to investigate the scattering coefficient of colorectal polyp tissues using an optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique. It combines the existing scattering coefficient model and spectral domain OCT to achieve method of early diagnosis of colorectal polyp in hospitals. Seventeen patients were studied, and a total of 1456 data points were extracted by curve-fitting the OCT signals into a confocal single-backscattering model. The results show that the mean scattering coefficient value for colorectal polyps is 1.91 mm−1 (std: ±0.54 mm−1), which is between the values for normal and malignant tissues. In addition, we studied the difference between adenomatous polyps (n = 15) and inflammatory polyps (n = 2) quantitatively and found that the adenomatous tissues had lower scattering coefficients than the inflammatory ones. The quantitative measurements confirmed that OCT can be used in primary diagnosis to compensate for the deficiencies in methods of pathological diagnosis, with a great potential for early diagnosis of tissues. PMID:24818145

  8. Volumetric Quantitative Computed Tomography Measurement Precision for Volumes and Densities of Tarsal and Metatarsal Bones

    PubMed Central

    Commean, Paul K.; Kennedy, Jared A.; Bahow, Karen A.; Hildebolt, Charles F.; Liu, Lu; Smith, Kirk E.; Hastings, Mary K.; Ju, Tao; Prior, Fred W.; Sinacore, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Diabetic foot diseases, such as ulcerations, infections, and neuropathic (Charcot’s) arthropathy are major complications of diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy and may cause osteolysis (bone loss) in foot bones. The purposes of our study were to make computed tomography (CT) measurements of foot-bone volumes and densities and to determine measurement precision (percent coefficients of variation for root mean square-standard deviations) and least significant changes in these percentages that could be considered biologically real with 95% confidence. Volumetric quantitative CT scans were performed and repeated on 10 young, healthy subjects and 13 subjects with diabetes mellitus and peripheral neuropathy. Two raters used the original- and repeat-scan data sets to make measurements of volumes and bone mineral densities (BMDs) of the tarsal and metatarsal bones of the two feet (24 bones). Precisions for the bones ranged from 0.1% to 0.9% for volume measurements and from 0.6% to 1.9% for BMD measurements. The least significant changes ranged from 0.4% to 2.5% for volume measurements and from 1.5% to 5.4% for BMD measurements. Volumetric quantitative CT provides precise measurements of volume and BMD for metatarsal bones and tarsal bones where diabetic foot diseases commonly occur. PMID:21723764

  9. Application of microcomputed tomography for quantitative analysis of dental root canal obturations.

    PubMed

    Kierklo, Anna; Tabor, Zbisław; Petryniak, Rafał; Dohnalik, Marek; Jaworska, Małgorzata

    2014-03-24

    The aim of the study was to apply microcomputed tomography to quantitative evaluation of voids and to test any specific location of voids in tooth's root canal obturations. Twenty root canals were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal sealer using the thermoplastic compaction method (System B+Obtura II). Roots were scanned and three-dimensional visualization was obtained. The volume and Feret's diameter of I-voids (at the filling/dentine interface) and S-voids (surrounded by filling material) were measured. The results revealed that none of the scanned root canal fillings were void-free. For I-voids, the volume fraction was significantly larger, but their number was lower (P=0.0007), than for S-voids. Both types of voids occurred in characteristic regions (P<0.001). I-voids occurred mainly in the apical third, while S-voids in the coronal third of the canal filling. Within the limitations of this study, our results indicate that microtomography, with proposed semi-automatic algorithm, is a useful tools for three-dimensional quantitative evaluation of dental root canal fillings. In canals filled with thermoplastic gutta-percha and Tubli-Seal, voids at the interface between the filling and canal dentine deserve special attention due to of their periapical location, which might promote apical microleakage. Further studies might help to elucidate the clinical relevance of these results.

  10. Intact Imaging of Human Heart Structure Using X-ray Phase-Contrast Tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yukihiro; Shinohara, Gen; Hoshino, Masato; Morishita, Hiroyuki; Morita, Kiyozo; Oshima, Yoshihiro; Takahashi, Masashi; Yagi, Naoto; Okita, Yutaka; Tsukube, Takuro

    2017-02-01

    Structural examination of human heart specimens at the microscopic level is a prerequisite for understanding congenital heart diseases. It is desirable not to destroy or alter the properties of such specimens because of their scarcity. However, many of the currently available imaging techniques either destroy the specimen through sectioning or alter the chemical and mechanical properties of the specimen through staining and contrast agent injection. As a result, subsequent studies may not be possible. X-ray phase-contrast tomography is an imaging modality for biological soft tissues that does not destroy or alter the properties of the specimen. The feasibility of X-ray phase-contrast tomography for the structural examination of heart specimens was tested using infantile and fetal heart specimens without congenital diseases. X-ray phase-contrast tomography was carried out at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility using the Talbot grating interferometer at the bending magnet beamline BL20B2 to visualize the structure of five non-pretreated whole heart specimens obtained by autopsy. High-resolution, three-dimensional images were obtained for all specimens. The images clearly showed the myocardial structure, coronary vessels, and conduction bundle. X-ray phase-contrast tomography allows high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of human heart specimens. Intact imaging using X-ray phase-contrast tomography can contribute to further structural investigation of heart specimens with congenital heart diseases.

  11. Quantifying morphological parameters of the terminal branching units in a mouse lung by phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeongeun; Kim, Miju; Kim, Seunghwan; Lee, Jinwon

    2013-01-01

    An effective technique of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography was established for the quantitative analysis of the microstructures in the respiratory zone of a mouse lung. Heitzman's method was adopted for the whole-lung sample preparation, and Canny's edge detector was used for locating the air-tissue boundaries. This technique revealed detailed morphology of the respiratory zone components, including terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, with sufficiently high resolution of 1.74 µm isotropic voxel size. The technique enabled visual inspection of the respiratory zone components and comprehension of their relative positions in three dimensions. To check the method's feasibility for quantitative imaging, morphological parameters such as diameter, surface area and volume were measured and analyzed for sixteen randomly selected terminal branching units, each consisting of a terminal bronchiole and a pair of succeeding alveolar sacs. The four types of asymmetry ratios concerning alveolar sac mouth diameter, alveolar sac surface area, and alveolar sac volume are measured. This is the first ever finding of the asymmetry ratio for the terminal bronchioles and alveolar sacs, and it is noteworthy that an appreciable degree of branching asymmetry was observed among the alveolar sacs at the terminal end of the airway tree, despite the number of samples was small yet. The series of efficient techniques developed and confirmed in this study, from sample preparation to quantification, is expected to contribute to a wider and exacter application of phase contrast synchrotron radiation computed tomography to a variety of studies.

  12. Quantitative radiography of magnetic fields using neutron spin phase imaging.

    PubMed

    Piegsa, F M; van den Brandt, B; Hautle, P; Kohlbrecher, J; Konter, J A

    2009-04-10

    We report on a novel neutron radiography technique that uses the Ramsey principle, a method similar to neutron spin echo. For the first time quantitative imaging measurements of magnetic objects and fields could be performed. The strength of the spin-dependent magnetic interaction is detected by a change in the Larmor precession frequency of the neutron spins. Hence, one obtains in addition to the normal attenuation radiography image a so-called neutron spin phase image, which provides a two-dimensional projection of the magnetic field integrated over the neutron flight path.

  13. Quantitative phase-field modeling of dendritic electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cogswell, Daniel A.

    2015-07-01

    A thin-interface phase-field model of electrochemical interfaces is developed based on Marcus kinetics for concentrated solutions, and used to simulate dendrite growth during electrodeposition of metals. The model is derived in the grand electrochemical potential to permit the interface to be widened to reach experimental length and time scales, and electroneutrality is formulated to eliminate the Debye length. Quantitative agreement is achieved with zinc Faradaic reaction kinetics, fractal growth dimension, tip velocity, and radius of curvature. Reducing the exchange current density is found to suppress the growth of dendrites, and screening electrolytes by their exchange currents is suggested as a strategy for controlling dendrite growth in batteries.

  14. Impact of Multiple En Face Image Averaging on Quantitative Assessment from Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography Images.

    PubMed

    Uji, Akihito; Balasubramanian, Siva; Lei, Jianqin; Baghdasaryan, Elmira; Al-Sheikh, Mayss; Sadda, SriniVas R

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the impact of multiple en face image averaging on quantitative measurements of the retinal microvasculature using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Prospective, observational, cross-sectional case series. Twenty-one healthy individuals with normal eyes. Macular OCTA images were acquired from all participants using the Zeiss Cirrus 5000 with Angioplex OCTA software (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, CA). Nine OCTA cube scans per eye were obtained and 9 superficial retinal layer (SRL) and deep retinal layer (DRL) en face OCTA image slabs were averaged individually after registration. Quantitative parameters from the retinal microvasculature were measured on binarized and skeletonized OCTA images and compared with single OCTA images without averaging. Vessel density (VD), vessel length density (VLD), vessel diameter index (VDI), and fractal dimension (FD). Participants with artifact or poor image quality were excluded, leaving 18 eyes for the analysis. After averaging, qualitatively there was apparent reduction in background noise, and fragmented vessels in the images before averaging became continuous with smoother walls and showed sharper contrast in both the SRL and DRL. Binarized and skeletonized derivates of these averaged images also showed fewer line fragments and dots in nonvascular areas and more continuous vessel images than those of images without averaging. In both SRL and DRL, VD (P = 0.0010 and P = 0.0003, respectively), VLD (P < 0.0001 for both), and FD (P < 0.0001 for both) significantly decreased and VDI significantly increased after averaging (P < 0.0001 for both). Averaging of multiple en face OCTA images improves image quality and also significantly impacts quantitative measurements. Reducing noise that could be misinterpreted as flow and annealing discontinuous vessel segments seem to be major mechanisms by which averaging may be of benefit. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc

  15. Quantitative Phase Analysis by the Rietveld Method for Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Lin, Xiaodong; He, Yonghong; Li, Shu; Zi, Run; Lai, Shijun

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative phase analysis (QPA) is helpful to determine the type attribute of the object because it could present the content of the constituents. QPA by Rietveld method requires neither measurement of calibration data nor the use of an internal standard; however, the approximate crystal structure of each phase in a mixture is necessary. In this study, 8 synthetic mixtures composed of potassium nitrate and sulfur were analyzed by Rietveld QPA method. The Rietveld refinement was accomplished with a material analysis using diffraction program and evaluated by three agreement indices. Results showed that Rietveld QPA yielded precise results, with errors generally less than 2.0% absolute. In addition, a criminal case which was broken successfully with the help of Rietveld QPA method was also introduced. This method will allow forensic investigators to acquire detailed information of the material evidence, which could point out the direction for case detection and court proceedings.

  16. Comparison of low- and ultralow-dose computed tomography protocols for quantitative lung and airway assessment.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Emily; Sloan, Chelsea; Newell, John D; Sieren, Jered P; Saylor, Melissa; Vidal, Craig; Hogue, Shayna; De Stefano, Frank; Sieren, Alexa; Hoffman, Eric A; Sieren, Jessica C

    2017-09-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) measures are increasingly being developed and used to characterize lung disease. With recent advances in CT technologies, we sought to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of lung imaging at low- and ultralow-radiation doses with the use of iterative reconstruction (IR), tube current modulation (TCM), and spectral shaping. We investigated the effect of five independent CT protocols reconstructed with IR on quantitative airway measures and global lung measures using an in vivo large animal model as a human subject surrogate. A control protocol was chosen (NIH-SPIROMICS + TCM) and five independent protocols investigating TCM, low- and ultralow-radiation dose, and spectral shaping. For all scans, quantitative global parenchymal measurements (mean, median and standard deviation of the parenchymal HU, along with measures of emphysema) and global airway measurements (number of segmented airways and pi10) were generated. In addition, selected individual airway measurements (minor and major inner diameter, wall thickness, inner and outer area, inner and outer perimeter, wall area fraction, and inner equivalent circle diameter) were evaluated. Comparisons were made between control and target protocols using difference and repeatability measures. Estimated CT volume dose index (CTDIvol) across all protocols ranged from 7.32 mGy to 0.32 mGy. Low- and ultralow-dose protocols required more manual editing and resolved fewer airway branches; yet, comparable pi10 whole lung measures were observed across all protocols. Similar trends in acquired parenchymal and airway measurements were observed across all protocols, with increased measurement differences using the ultralow-dose protocols. However, for small airways (1.9 ± 0.2 mm) and medium airways (5.7 ± 0.4 mm), the measurement differences across all protocols were comparable to the control protocol repeatability across breath holds. Diameters, wall thickness, wall area fraction

  17. Quantitative computed tomography-derived clusters: redefining airway remodeling in asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumit; Hartley, Ruth; Khan, Umair T; Singapuri, Amisha; Hargadon, Beverly; Monteiro, William; Pavord, Ian D; Sousa, Ana R; Marshall, Richard P; Subramanian, Deepak; Parr, David; Entwisle, James J; Siddiqui, Salman; Raj, Vimal; Brightling, Christopher E

    2014-03-01

    Asthma heterogeneity is multidimensional and requires additional tools to unravel its complexity. Computed tomography (CT)-assessed proximal airway remodeling and air trapping in asthmatic patients might provide new insights into underlying disease mechanisms. The aim of this study was to explore novel, quantitative, CT-determined asthma phenotypes. Sixty-five asthmatic patients and 30 healthy subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic characterization and quantitative CT analysis. Factor and cluster analysis techniques were used to determine 3 novel, quantitative, CT-based asthma phenotypes. Patients with severe and mild-to-moderate asthma demonstrated smaller mean right upper lobe apical segmental bronchus (RB1) lumen volume (LV) in comparison with healthy control subjects (272.3 mm(3) [SD, 112.6 mm(3)], 259.0 mm(3) [SD, 53.3 mm(3)], 366.4 mm(3) [SD, 195.3 mm(3)], respectively; P = .007) but no difference in RB1 wall volume (WV). Air trapping measured based on mean lung density expiratory/inspiratory ratio was greater in patients with severe and mild-to-moderate asthma compared with that seen in healthy control subjects (0.861 [SD, 0.05)], 0.866 [SD, 0.07], and 0.830 [SD, 0.06], respectively; P = .04). The fractal dimension of the segmented airway tree was less in asthmatic patients compared with that seen in control subjects (P = .007). Three novel, quantitative, CT-based asthma clusters were identified, all of which demonstrated air trapping. Cluster 1 demonstrates increased RB1 WV and RB1 LV but decreased RB1 percentage WV. On the contrary, cluster 3 subjects have the smallest RB1 WV and LV values but the highest RB1 percentage WV values. There is a lack of proximal airway remodeling in cluster 2 subjects. Quantitative CT analysis provides a new perspective in asthma phenotyping, which might prove useful in patient selection for novel therapies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative evaluation of benzodiazepine receptors in live Papio papio baboons using positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brouillet, E.; Chavoix, C.; Khalili-Varasteh, M.; Bottlaender, M.; Hantraye, P.; Yorke, J.C.; Maziere, M. )

    1990-10-01

    The binding of the 11C-labeled benzodiazepine antagonist Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil) was measured in the neocortex of live Papio papio baboons by positron emission tomography. This allowed us to calculate in vivo (i.e., at physiological temperature, neurotransmitters concentrations, and ionic environment) the apparent density of available benzodiazepine receptors (B'max) and the dissociation constant of Ro 15-1788 (Kd). By coadministering increasing doses of unlabeled Ro 15-1788 with (11C)Ro 15-1788 and assuming that nonsaturable radioactivity indicated the free ligand concentration, we were able to obtain saturation isotherms. We showed that a state of quasiequilibrium was reached 50 min after the administration of the radioligand. Linear Scatchard plots allowed us to calculate B'max at 78 and 50 pmol/ml of cerebral tissue in the occipital and frontal cortices, respectively. In both these areas, Kd is on the order of 6 nM, with a Hill number very close to unity. This indicates that Ro 15-1788 binds in vivo with high affinity to an homogeneous population of saturable sites. A similar measurement was carried out on a naturally photosensitive P. papio baboon. Absolute values of B'max, Kd, and Hill number were similar to those of the control baboons. Although results concerning this baboon can only be considered as a case report, this similarity may suggest that its epileptic syndrome is not related to a large change in B'max or Kd, at least in occipital and frontal cortices. Our results showed that quantitative estimation by positron emission tomography of some characteristics of benzodiazepine receptors is possible in live baboons and may represent a supplementary tool for investigating further the molecular mechanisms of benzodiazepine receptor function in physiological and physiopathological conditions.

  19. Accuracy of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography for measurement of bone quality.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Joshua A; Boyd, Steven K

    2007-12-01

    The introduction of three-dimensional high-resolution peripheral in vivo quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical, Switzerland; voxel size 82 microm) provides a new approach to monitor micro-architectural bone changes longitudinally. The accuracy of HR-pQCT for three important determinants of bone quality, including bone mineral density (BMD), architectural measurements and bone mechanics, was determined through a comparison with micro-computed tomography (microCT) and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Forty measurements from 10 cadaver radii with low bone mass were scanned using the three modalities, and image registration was used for 3D data to ensure identical regions were analyzed. The areal BMD of DXA correlated well with volumetric BMD by HR-pQCT despite differences in dimensionality (R(2) = 0.69), and the correlation improved when non-dimensional bone mineral content was assessed (R(2) = 0.80). Morphological parameters measured by HR-pQCT in a standard patient analysis, including bone volume ratio, trabecular number, derived trabecular thickness, derived trabecular separation, and cortical thickness correlated well with muCT measures (R(2) = 0.59-0.96). Additionally, some non-metric parameters such as connectivity density (R(2) = 0.90) performed well. The mechanical stiffness assessed by finite element analysis of HR-pQCT images was generally higher than for microCT data due to resolution differences, and correlated well at the continuum level (R(2) = 0.73). The validation here of HR-pQCT against gold-standards microCT and DXA provides insight into the accuracy of the system, and suggests that in addition to the standard patient protocol, additional indices of bone quality including connectivity density and mechanical stiffness may be appropriate to include as part of a standard patient analysis for clinical monitoring of bone quality.

  20. Development of grating-based x-ray phase tomography under the ERATO project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momose, Atsushi; Takano, Hidekazu; Hoshino, Masato; Yashiro, Wataru; Wu, Yanlin

    2016-10-01

    We have launched a project to promote grating-based X-ray phase imaging/tomography extensively. Here, two main activities are presented for enabling dynamic, or four-dimensional, X-ray phase tomography and nanoscopic X-ray phase tomography by grating interferometry. For the former, while some demonstrations in this direction were performed with white synchrotron radiation, improvement in image quality by spectrum tuning is described. A preliminary result by a total reflection mirror is presented, and as a next step, preparation of a 10% bandpass filter by a multilayer mirror is reported. For the latter, X-ray microscopes available both at synchrotron radiation facilities and laboratories equipped with a Fresnel zone plate are combined with grating interferometry. Here, a preliminary result with a combination of a Lau interferometer and a laboratory-based X-ray microscope is presented.

  1. X-ray micro-beam techniques and phase contrast tomography applied to biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratini, Michela; Campi, Gaetano; Bukreeva, Inna; Pelliccia, Daniele; Burghammer, Manfred; Tromba, Giuliana; Cancedda, Ranieri; Mastrogiacomo, Maddalena; Cedola, Alessia

    2015-12-01

    A deeper comprehension of the biomineralization (BM) process is at the basis of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine developments. Several in-vivo and in-vitro studies were dedicated to this purpose via the application of 2D and 3D diagnostic techniques. Here, we develop a new methodology, based on different complementary experimental techniques (X-ray phase contrast tomography, micro-X-ray diffraction and micro-X-ray fluorescence scanning technique) coupled to new analytical tools. A qualitative and quantitative structural investigation, from the atomic to the micrometric length scale, is obtained for engineered bone tissues. The high spatial resolution achieved by X-ray scanning techniques allows us to monitor the bone formation at the first-formed mineral deposit at the organic-mineral interface within a porous scaffold. This work aims at providing a full comprehension of the morphology and functionality of the biomineralization process, which is of key importance for developing new drugs for preventing and healing bone diseases and for the development of bio-inspired materials.

  2. Volumetric characterization of human patellar cartilage matrix on phase contrast x-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Coan, Paola; Diemoz, Paul C.; Hobbs, Susan K.; Huber, Markus B.; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    Phase contrast X-ray computed tomography (PCI-CT) has recently emerged as a novel imaging technique that allows visualization of cartilage soft tissue, subsequent examination of chondrocyte patterns, and their correlation to osteoarthritis. Previous studies have shown that 2D texture features are effective at distinguishing between healthy and osteoarthritic regions of interest annotated in the radial zone of cartilage matrix on PCI-CT images. In this study, we further extend the texture analysis to 3D and investigate the ability of volumetric texture features at characterizing chondrocyte patterns in the cartilage matrix for purposes of classification. Here, we extracted volumetric texture features derived from Minkowski Functionals and gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) from 496 volumes of interest (VOI) annotated on PCI-CT images of human patellar cartilage specimens. The extracted features were then used in a machine-learning task involving support vector regression to classify ROIs as healthy or osteoarthritic. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC). The best classification performance was observed with GLCM features correlation (AUC = 0.83 +/- 0.06) and homogeneity (AUC = 0.82 +/- 0.07), which significantly outperformed all Minkowski Functionals (p < 0.05). These results suggest that such quantitative analysis of chondrocyte patterns in human patellar cartilage matrix involving GLCM-derived statistical features can distinguish between healthy and osteoarthritic tissue with high accuracy.

  3. 3D mapping of crystallographic phase distribution using energy-selective neutron tomography.

    PubMed

    Woracek, Robin; Penumadu, Dayakar; Kardjilov, Nikolay; Hilger, Andre; Boin, Mirko; Banhart, John; Manke, Ingo

    2014-06-25

    Nondestructive 3D mapping of crystallographic phases is introduced providing distribution of phase fractions within the bulk (centimeter range) of samples with micrometer-scale resolution. The novel neutron tomography based technique overcomes critical limitations of existing techniques and offers a wide range of potential applications. It is demonstrated for steel samples exhibiting phase transformation after being subjected to tensile and torsional deformation. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Quantitative volumetric breast density estimation using phase contrast mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhentian; Hauser, Nik; Kubik-Huch, Rahel A.; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Stampanoni, Marco

    2015-05-01

    Phase contrast mammography using a grating interferometer is an emerging technology for breast imaging. It provides complementary information to the conventional absorption-based methods. Additional diagnostic values could be further obtained by retrieving quantitative information from the three physical signals (absorption, differential phase and small-angle scattering) yielded simultaneously. We report a non-parametric quantitative volumetric breast density estimation method by exploiting the ratio (dubbed the R value) of the absorption signal to the small-angle scattering signal. The R value is used to determine breast composition and the volumetric breast density (VBD) of the whole breast is obtained analytically by deducing the relationship between the R value and the pixel-wise breast density. The proposed method is tested by a phantom study and a group of 27 mastectomy samples. In the clinical evaluation, the estimated VBD values from both cranio-caudal (CC) and anterior-posterior (AP) views are compared with the ACR scores given by radiologists to the pre-surgical mammograms. The results show that the estimated VBD results using the proposed method are consistent with the pre-surgical ACR scores, indicating the effectiveness of this method in breast density estimation. A positive correlation is found between the estimated VBD and the diagnostic ACR score for both the CC view (p=0.033 ) and AP view (p=0.001 ). A linear regression between the results of the CC view and AP view showed a correlation coefficient γ = 0.77, which indicates the robustness of the proposed method and the quantitative character of the additional information obtained with our approach.

  5. In vitro atherosclerotic plaque and calcium quantitation by intravascular ultrasound and electron-beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Gutfinger, D E; Leung, C Y; Hiro, T; Maheswaran, B; Nakamura, S; Detrano, R; Kang, X; Tang, W; Tobis, J M

    1996-05-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to compare the accuracy of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and electron-beam computed tomography (EBCT) in quantitating human atherosclerotic plaque and calcium. In experiment 1, 12 human atherosclerotic arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS and EBCT. The plaque from each arterial segment was dissected and a volume measurement of the dissected plaque was obtained by water displacement. The plaque from each arterial segment was ashed at 700 degrees F, and the weight of the remaining ashes was used as an estimate of the calcium mass. In experiment II, 11 calcified arterial segments were obtained at autopsy and imaged by using IVUS at one site along the artery. A corresponding histologic cross section stained with Masson's trichrome was prepared. In experiment I, the mean plaque volume measured by water displacement was 165.3 +/- 118.4 microliters. The mean plaque volume calculated by IVUS was 166.1 +/- 114.4 microliters and correlated closely with that by water displacement (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). The mean calcium mass measured by ashing was 19.4 +/- 15.8 mg. The mean calculated calcium mass by EBCT was 19.9 mg and correlated closely with that by ashing (r=0.98, p<0.001). The mean calculated calcium volume by IVUS was 18.6 +/- 11.2 microliters and correlated linearly with the calcium mass by ashing (r = 0.87, p < 0.0003). In experiment II, the mean cross-sectional area of the calcified matrix was 1.71 +/- 0.66 mm2 by histologic examination compared with 1.44 +/- 0.66 mm2 by IVUS. There was a good correlation between the calcified cross-sectional area by histologic examination and IVUS (r = 0.76, p < 0.007); however, IVUS may underestimate the amount of calcium present depending on the intralesional calcium morphologic characteristics. In conclusion, IVUS accurately quantitates atherosclerotic plaque volume as well as the cross-sectional area and volume of intralesional calcium, especially if the

  6. Dynamic quantitative phase imaging for biological objects using a pixelated phase mask

    PubMed Central

    Creath, Katherine; Goldstein, Goldie

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes research in developing a dynamic quantitative phase imaging microscope providing instantaneous measurements of dynamic motions within and among live cells without labels or contrast agents. It utilizes a pixelated phase mask enabling simultaneous measurement of multiple interference patterns derived using the polarization properties of light to track dynamic motions and morphological changes. Optical path difference (OPD) and optical thickness (OT) data are obtained from phase images. Two different processing routines are presented to remove background surface shape to enable quantification of changes in cell position and volume over time. Data from a number of different moving biological organisms and cell cultures are presented. PMID:23162725

  7. Visualization and Pathological Characteristics of Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis with Synchrotron-based X-ray Phase Sensitive Micro-tomography

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huiqiang; Ji, Xuewen; Sun, Li; Xiao, Tiqiao; Xie, Honglan; Fu, Yanan; Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Wenya; Zhang, Xueliang; Lin, Renyong

    2016-01-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PPCT) utilizes highly sensitive phase-contrast technology applied to X-ray micro-tomography, especially with the extensive use of synchrotron radiation (SR). Performing phase retrieval (PR) on the acquired angular projections can enhance image contrast and enable quantitative imaging. We employed the combination of SR-PPCT and PR for the histopathological evaluation of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) disease and demonstrated the validity and superiority of PR-based SR-PPCT. A high-resolution angular projection data set of a human postoperative specimen of HAE disease was acquired, which was processed by graded ethanol concentration fixation (GECF). The reconstructed images from both approaches, with the projection data directly used and preprocessed by PR for tomographic reconstruction, were compared in terms of the tissue contrast-to-noise ratio and density spatial resolution. The PR-based SR-PPCT was selected for microscale measurement and the 3D visualization of HAE disease. Our experimental results demonstrated that the PR-based SR-PPCT technique is greatly suitable for the discrimination of pathological tissues and the characterization of HAE. In addition, this new technique is superior to conventional hospital CT and microscopy for the three-dimensional, non-destructive microscale measurement of HAE. This PR-based SR-PPCT technique has great potential for in situmicroscale histopathological analysis and diagnosis, especially for applications involving soft tissues and organs. PMID:27897249

  8. Visualization and Pathological Characteristics of Hepatic Alveolar Echinococcosis with Synchrotron-based X-ray Phase Sensitive Micro-tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Huiqiang; Ji, Xuewen; Sun, Li; Xiao, Tiqiao; Xie, Honglan; Fu, Yanan; Zhao, Yuan; Liu, Wenya; Zhang, Xueliang; Lin, Renyong

    2016-11-01

    Propagation-based phase-contrast computed tomography (PPCT) utilizes highly sensitive phase-contrast technology applied to X-ray micro-tomography, especially with the extensive use of synchrotron radiation (SR). Performing phase retrieval (PR) on the acquired angular projections can enhance image contrast and enable quantitative imaging. We employed the combination of SR-PPCT and PR for the histopathological evaluation of hepatic alveolar echinococcosis (HAE) disease and demonstrated the validity and superiority of PR-based SR-PPCT. A high-resolution angular projection data set of a human postoperative specimen of HAE disease was acquired, which was processed by graded ethanol concentration fixation (GECF). The reconstructed images from both approaches, with the projection data directly used and preprocessed by PR for tomographic reconstruction, were compared in terms of the tissue contrast-to-noise ratio and density spatial resolution. The PR-based SR-PPCT was selected for microscale measurement and the 3D visualization of HAE disease. Our experimental results demonstrated that the PR-based SR-PPCT technique is greatly suitable for the discrimination of pathological tissues and the characterization of HAE. In addition, this new technique is superior to conventional hospital CT and microscopy for the three-dimensional, non-destructive microscale measurement of HAE. This PR-based SR-PPCT technique has great potential for in situmicroscale histopathological analysis and diagnosis, especially for applications involving soft tissues and organs.

  9. Analysis of edge effects in attenuating phase-shift masks using quantitative phase imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanker, Aamod; Sczyrba, Martin; Connolly, Brid; Neureuther, Andy; Waller, Laura

    2013-09-01

    Thick mask electromagnetic edge effects in attenuating phase-shift masks (ATT-PSM) are analyzed by extracting optical phase at the wafer plane from a series of through focus aerial images with 193nm light. The thick edges of an ATT-PSM can lead to phase distortions, creating asymmetric intensity contrast on either side of focus. Here we use through focus intensity images from an AIMS tool to quantitatively recover phase via the Transport of Intensity Equation (TIE). The TIE can recover the effective phase across the mask due to edge effects by analyzing the through focus image stack. We verify a previously proposed model for edge effects by adding quadrature phase boundary layers at the edges during simulation and compare the simulated through focus images with experimental data. After tuning the real and imaginary part of the boundary layer and the angle of the substrate, the simulated through focus behavior agrees with experiment, giving a measure of the edge effects. This leads to comparable quantitative phase profiles recovered at the wafer plane for simulation and experiment with the ATT-PSM. We expect that the method is applicable for the approximation of topographical effects in other types of thick masks as well.

  10. Evaluation of static and dynamic perfusion cardiac computed tomography for quantitation and classification tasks

    PubMed Central

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Cardiac computed tomography (CT) acquisitions for perfusion assessment can be performed in a dynamic or static mode. Either method may be used for a variety of clinical tasks, including (1) stratifying patients into categories of ischemia and (2) using a quantitative myocardial blood flow (MBF) estimate to evaluate disease severity. In this simulation study, we compare method performance on these classification and quantification tasks for matched radiation dose levels and for different flow states, patient sizes, and injected contrast levels. Under conditions simulated, the dynamic method has low bias in MBF estimates (0 to 0.1  ml/min/g) compared to linearly interpreted static assessment (0.45 to 0.48  ml/min/g), making it more suitable for quantitative estimation. At matched radiation dose levels, receiver operating characteristic analysis demonstrated that the static method, with its high bias but generally lower variance, had superior performance (p<0.05) in stratifying patients, especially for larger patients and lower contrast doses [area under the curve (AUC)=0.95 to 96 versus 0.86]. We also demonstrate that static assessment with a correctly tuned exponential relationship between the apparent CT number and MBF has superior quantification performance to static assessment with a linear relationship and to dynamic assessment. However, tuning the exponential relationship to the patient and scan characteristics will likely prove challenging. This study demonstrates that the selection and optimization of static or dynamic acquisition modes should depend on the specific clinical task. PMID:27175377

  11. Simulation-based evaluation of the resolution and quantitative accuracy of temperature-modulated fluorescence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuting; Nouizi, Farouk; Kwong, Tiffany C.; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-01-01

    Conventional fluorescence tomography (FT) can recover the distribution of fluorescent agents within a highly scattering medium. However, poor spatial resolution remains its foremost limitation. Previously, we introduced a new fluorescence imaging technique termed “temperature-modulated fluorescence tomography” (TM-FT), which provides high-resolution images of fluorophore distribution. TM-FT is a multimodality technique that combines fluorescence imaging with focused ultrasound to locate thermo-sensitive fluorescence probes using a priori spatial information to drastically improve the resolution of conventional FT. In this paper, we present an extensive simulation study to evaluate the performance of the TM-FT technique on complex phantoms with multiple fluorescent targets of various sizes located at different depths. In addition, the performance of the TM-FT is tested in the presence of background fluorescence. The results obtained using our new method are systematically compared with those obtained with the conventional FT. Overall, TM-FT provides higher resolution and superior quantitative accuracy, making it an ideal candidate for in vivo preclinical and clinical imaging. For example, a 4 mm diameter inclusion positioned in the middle of a synthetic slab geometry phantom (D:40 mm × W :100 mm) is recovered as an elongated object in the conventional FT (x = 4.5 mm; y = 10.4 mm), while TM-FT recovers it successfully in both directions (x = 3.8 mm; y = 4.6 mm). As a result, the quantitative accuracy of the TM-FT is superior because it recovers the concentration of the agent with a 22% error, which is in contrast with the 83% error of the conventional FT. PMID:26368884

  12. SU-D-210-03: Limited-View Multi-Source Quantitative Photoacoustic Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, J; Gao, H

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: This work is to investigate a novel limited-view multi-source acquisition scheme for the direct and simultaneous reconstruction of optical coefficients in quantitative photoacoustic tomography (QPAT), which has potentially improved signal-to-noise ratio and reduced data acquisition time. Methods: Conventional QPAT is often considered in two steps: first to reconstruct the initial acoustic pressure from the full-view ultrasonic data after each optical illumination, and then to quantitatively reconstruct optical coefficients (e.g., absorption and scattering coefficients) from the initial acoustic pressure, using multi-source or multi-wavelength scheme.Based on a novel limited-view multi-source scheme here, We have to consider the direct reconstruction of optical coefficients from the ultrasonic data, since the initial acoustic pressure can no longer be reconstructed as an intermediate variable due to the incomplete acoustic data in the proposed limited-view scheme. In this work, based on a coupled photo-acoustic forward model combining diffusion approximation and wave equation, we develop a limited-memory Quasi-Newton method (LBFGS) for image reconstruction that utilizes the adjoint forward problem for fast computation of gradients. Furthermore, the tensor framelet sparsity is utilized to improve the image reconstruction which is solved by Alternative Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). Results: The simulation was performed on a modified Shepp-Logan phantom to validate the feasibility of the proposed limited-view scheme and its corresponding image reconstruction algorithms. Conclusion: A limited-view multi-source QPAT scheme is proposed, i.e., the partial-view acoustic data acquisition accompanying each optical illumination, and then the simultaneous rotations of both optical sources and ultrasonic detectors for next optical illumination. Moreover, LBFGS and ADMM algorithms are developed for the direct reconstruction of optical coefficients from the

  13. Massively parallel data processing for quantitative total flow imaging with optical coherence microscopy and tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylwestrzak, Marcin; Szlag, Daniel; Marchand, Paul J.; Kumar, Ashwin S.; Lasser, Theo

    2017-08-01

    We present an application of massively parallel processing of quantitative flow measurements data acquired using spectral optical coherence microscopy (SOCM). The need for massive signal processing of these particular datasets has been a major hurdle for many applications based on SOCM. In view of this difficulty, we implemented and adapted quantitative total flow estimation algorithms on graphics processing units (GPU) and achieved a 150 fold reduction in processing time when compared to a former CPU implementation. As SOCM constitutes the microscopy counterpart to spectral optical coherence tomography (SOCT), the developed processing procedure can be applied to both imaging modalities. We present the developed DLL library integrated in MATLAB (with an example) and have included the source code for adaptations and future improvements. Catalogue identifier: AFBT_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AFBT_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPLv3 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 913552 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 270876249 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: CUDA/C, MATLAB. Computer: Intel x64 CPU, GPU supporting CUDA technology. Operating system: 64-bit Windows 7 Professional. Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes, CPU code has been vectorized in MATLAB, CUDA code has been parallelized. RAM: Dependent on users parameters, typically between several gigabytes and several tens of gigabytes Classification: 6.5, 18. Nature of problem: Speed up of data processing in optical coherence microscopy Solution method: Utilization of GPU for massively parallel data processing Additional comments: Compiled DLL library with source code and documentation, example of utilization (MATLAB script with raw data) Running time: 1,8 s for one B-scan (150 × faster in comparison to the CPU

  14. Real-time quantitative phase imaging for cell studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Hoa Vinh

    Most biological cells are not clearly visible with a bright field microscope. Several methods have been developed to improve contrast in cell imaging, including use of exogenous contrast agents such as fluorescence microscopy, as well as utilizing properties of light-specimen interaction for optics design, to reveal the endogenous contrast, such as phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy. Although PCM and DIC methods significantly improve the image contrast without the need for staining agents, they only provide qualitative information about the phase change induced by the cells as light passes through them. Quantitative phase imaging (QPI) has recently emerged as an effective imaging tool which provides not only better image contrast but also cell-induced phase shifts in the optical pathlength, thus allowing nanometer-scale measurements of structures and dynamics of the cells. Other important aspects of an imaging system are its imaging speed and throughput. High-throughput, high-speed, real-time quantitative phase imaging with high spatial and temporal sensitivity is highly desirable in many applications including applied physics and biomedicine. In this dissertation, to address this need, I discuss the development of such an imaging system that includes the white light diffraction phase microscopy (wDPM), a new optical imaging method, and image reconstruction/analysis algorithms using graphics processing units (GPUs). wDPM can measure optical pathlength changes at nanometer scale both spatially and temporally with single-shot image acquisition, enabling very fast imaging. I also exploit the broadband spectrum of white light used as the light source in wDPM to develop a system called spectroscopic diffraction phase microscopy (sDPM). This sDPM system allows QPI measurements at several wavelengths, which solves the problem of thickness and refractive index coupling in the phase shifts induced by the cell, and which

  15. Quantitative assessment of lesion detection accuracy, resolution, and reconstruction algorithms in neutron stimulated emission computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Manu N; Kapadia, Anuj J

    2012-07-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the image quality obtained using filtered back-projection (FBP) with Ram-Lak filtering and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM)-with no post-reconstruction filtering in either case-in neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) imaging using Monte Carlo simulations in the context of clinically relevant models of liver iron overload. The ratios of pixel intensities for several regions of interest and lesion shape detection using an active-contours segmentation algorithm are assessed for accuracy across different scanning configurations and reconstruction algorithms. The modulation transfer functions (MTFs) are also computed for the cases under study and are applied to determine a minimum detectable lesion spacing as a form of sensitivity analysis. The accuracy of NSECT imaging in measuring relative tissue concentration is presented for simulated clinical liver cases. When using the 15th iteration, ML-EM provides at least 25% better resolution than FBP and proves to be highly robust under low-signal high-noise conditions prevalent in NSECT. However, FBP gives more accurate lesion pixel intensity ratios and size estimates in some cases; due to advantages provided by both reconstruction algorithms, it is worth exploring the development of an algorithm that is a hybrid of the two. We also show that NSECT imaging can be used to accurately detect 3-cm lesions in backgrounds that are a significant fraction (one-quarter) of the concentration of the lesion, down to a 4-cm spacing between lesions.

  16. The Modern Art of Reading Computed Tomography Images of the Lungs: Quantitative CT.

    PubMed

    Herth, Felix J F; Kirby, Miranda; Sieren, Jered; Herth, Jonas; Schirm, Joshua; Wood, Susan; Schuhmann, Maren

    2017-09-16

    Lung diseases are increasing in prevalence and overall burden worldwide. To stem the tide, more and more national and international guidelines are recommending the use of various diagnostic algorithms that are disease specific. There is growing consensus among the respiratory community that although patient histories and lung function testing are the minimum required for clinical examinations, these tests alone are not sufficient for disease characterization. Therefore, the use of computed tomography (CT) imaging is increasing used in clinical decision making for lung diseases. Lung diseases affect various components of lung, including the small airways, lung parenchyma, the interstitial space and the pulmonary vasculature. Quantitative CT (QCT) methods are emerging and are increasingly available using commercial software to quantify the underlying disease components, and a growing body of evidence suggests that QCT is an important tool in the clinical setting to help accurately and reproducibly detect where the disease is located in the lung, and to quantify the extent and overall severity for several lung diseases. Furthermore, this growing body of evidence has promoted the use of thoracic QCT to the point that it is now considered by many as an indispensable technology for longitudinal analysis and intervention trials. Many QCT imaging measurements are available to the respiratory physician, and the aim of this review is to introduce and describe pulmonary QCT imaging measurements and methodologies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. A Quantitative Approach to Distinguish Pneumonia From Atelectasis Using Computed Tomography Attenuation.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Rachael M; Godwin, J David; Hippe, Dan S; Kicska, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    It is known that atelectasis demonstrates greater contrast enhancement than pneumonia on computed tomography (CT). However, the effectiveness of using a Hounsfield unit (HU) threshold to distinguish pneumonia from atelectasis has never been shown. The objective of the study is to demonstrate that an HU threshold can be quantitatively used to effectively distinguish pneumonia from atelectasis. Retrospectively identified CT pulmonary angiogram examinations that did not show pulmonary embolism but contained nonaerated lungs were classified as atelectasis or pneumonia based on established clinical criteria. The HU attenuation was measured in these nonaerated lungs. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to determine the area under the ROC curve, sensitivity, and specificity of using the attenuation to distinguish pneumonia from atelectasis. Sixty-eight nonaerated lungs were measured in 55 patients. The mean (SD) enhancement was 62 (18) HU in pneumonia and 119 (24) HU in atelectasis (P < 0.001). A threshold of 92 HU diagnosed pneumonia with 97% sensitivity (confidence interval [CI], 80%-99%) and 85% specificity (CI, 70-93). Accuracy, measured as area under the ROC curve, was 0.97 (CI, 0.89-0.99). We have established that a threshold HU value can be used to confidently distinguish pneumonia from atelectasis with our standard CT pulmonary angiogram imaging protocol and patient population. This suggests that a similar threshold HU value may be determined for other scanning protocols, and application of this threshold may facilitate a more confident diagnosis of pneumonia and thus speed treatment.

  18. Micro/nano-computed tomography technology for quantitative dynamic, multi-scale imaging of morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Chelsea L; Recknagel, Andrew K; Butcher, Jonathan T

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and embryonic development are dynamic events challenging to quantify, especially considering the intricate events that happen simultaneously in different locations and time. Micro- and more recently nano-computed tomography (micro/nanoCT) has been used for the past 15 years to characterize large 3D fields of tortuous geometries at high spatial resolution. We and others have advanced micro/nanoCT imaging strategies for quantifying tissue- and organ-level fate changes throughout morphogenesis. Exogenous soft tissue contrast media enables visualization of vascular lumens and tissues via extravasation. Furthermore, the emergence of antigen-specific tissue contrast enables direct quantitative visualization of protein and mRNA expression. Micro-CT X-ray doses appear to be non-embryotoxic, enabling longitudinal imaging studies in live embryos. In this chapter we present established soft tissue contrast protocols for obtaining high-quality micro/nanoCT images and the image processing techniques useful for quantifying anatomical and physiological information from the data sets.

  19. Quantitative Three-Dimensional Imaging of Heterogeneous Materials by Thermal Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J. G.

    2016-07-19

    Infrared thermal imaging based on active thermal excitations has been widely used for nondestructive evaluation ( NDE) of materials. While the experimental systems have remained essentially the same during the last few decades, development of advanced data-processing methods has significantly improved the capabilities of this technology. However, many limitations still exist. One fundamental limitation is the requirement, either explicitly or implicitly, of the tested material to be homogeneous such that detected thermal contrasts may be used to determine an average material property or attributed to flaws. In this paper, a new thermal tomography ( TT) method is introduced, which for the first time can evaluate heterogeneous materials by directly imaging their thermal-property variations with space. It utilizes one-sided flash thermal-imaging data to construct the three-dimensional ( 3D) distribution of thermal effusivity in the entire volume of a test sample. Theoretical analyses for single and multilayer material systems were conducted to validate its formulation and to demonstrate its performance. Experimental results for a ceramic composite plate and a thermal barrier coating ( TBC) sample are also presented. It was shown that thermal diffusion is the primary factor that degrades the spatial resolution with depth for TT; the spatial resolutions in the lateral and axial directions were quantitatively evaluated.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6–18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P < 0.05). Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables) exhibited statistically significant correlations (P < 0.05). The multiple regression model with the greatest R2 had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2)/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4) as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF) of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status. PMID:25878721

  1. Mapping Bone Mineral Density Obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2017-01-01

    Methods for relating or mapping estimates of volumetric Bone Mineral Density (vBMD) obtained by Quantitative Computed Tomography to Bone Volume Fraction (BVF) are outlined mathematically. The methods are based on definitions of bone properties, cited experimental studies and regression relations derived from them for trabecular bone in the proximal femur. Using an experimental range of values in the intertrochanteric region obtained from male and female human subjects, age 18 to 49, the BVF values calculated from four different methods were compared to the experimental average and numerical range. The BVF values computed from the conversion method used data from two sources. One source provided pre bed rest vBMD values in the intertrochanteric region from 24 bed rest subject who participated in a 70 day study. Another source contained preflight vBMD values from 18 astronauts who spent 4 to 6 months on the ISS. To aid the use of a mapping from BMD to BVF, the discussion includes how to formulate them for purpose of computational modeling. An application of the conversions would be used to aid in modeling of time varying changes in vBMD as it relates to changes in BVF via bone remodeling and/or modeling.

  2. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh.

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures. PMID:26078779

  3. Light fluence correction for quantitative determination of tissue absorption coefficient using multi-spectral optoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brochu, Frederic M.; Joseph, James; Tomaszewski, Michal; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2015-07-01

    MultiSpectral Optoacoustic Tomography (MSOT) is a fast developing imaging modality, combining the high resolution and penetration depth of ultrasound with the excellent contrast from optical imaging of tissue. Absorption and scattering of the near infrared excitation light modulates the spectral profile of light as it propagates deep into biological tissue, meaning the images obtained provide only qualitative insight into the distribution of tissue chromophores. The goal of this work is to accurately recover the spectral profile of excitation light by modelling light fluence in the data reconstruction, to enable quantitative imaging. We worked with a commercial small animal MSOT scanner and developed our light fluence correction for its' cylindrical geometry. Optoacoustic image reconstruction pinpoints the sources of acoustic waves detected by the transducers and returns the initial pressure amplitude at these points. This pressure is the product of the dimensionless Grüneisen parameter, the absorption coefficient and the light fluence. Under the condition of constant Grüneisen parameter and well modelled light fluence, there is a linear relationship between the initial pressure amplitude measured in the optoacoustic image and the absorption coefficient. We were able to reproduce this linear relationship in different physical regions of an agarose gel phantom containing targets of known optical absorption coefficient, demonstrating that our light fluence model was working. We also demonstrate promising results of light fluence correction effects on in vivo data.

  4. Quantitative analysis of iris parameters in keratoconus patients using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Bonfadini, Gustavo; Arora, Karun; Vianna, Lucas M; Campos, Mauro; Friedman, David; Muñoz, Beatriz; Jun, Albert S

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between quantitative iris parameters and the presence of keratoconus. Cross-sectional observational study that included 15 affected eyes of 15 patients with keratoconus and 26 eyes of 26 normal age- and sex-matched controls. Iris parameters (area, thickness, and pupil diameter) of affected and unaffected eyes were measured under standardized light and dark conditions using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). To identify optimal iris thickness cutoff points to maximize the sensitivity and specificity when discriminating keratoconus eyes from normal eyes, the analysis included the use of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Iris thickness and area were lower in keratoconus eyes than in normal eyes. The mean thickness at the pupillary margin under both light and dark conditions was found to be the best parameter for discriminating normal patients from keratoconus patients. Diagnostic performance was assessed by the area under the ROC curve (AROC), which had a value of 0.8256 with 80.0% sensitivity and 84.6% specificity, using a cutoff of 0.4125 mm. The sensitivity increased to 86.7% when a cutoff of 0.4700 mm was used. In our sample, iris thickness was lower in keratoconus eyes than in normal eyes. These results suggest that tomographic parameters may provide novel adjunct approaches for keratoconus screening.

  5. Quantitation of postexercise lung thallium-201 uptake during single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Kahn, J.K.; Carry, M.M.; McGhie, I.; Pippin, J.J.; Akers, M.S.; Corbett, J.R.

    1989-03-01

    To test the hypothesis that analysis of lung thallium uptake measured during single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) yields supplementary clinical information as reported for planar imaging, quantitative analysis of lung thallium uptake following maximal exercise was performed in 40 clinically normal subjects (Group 1) and 15 angiographically normal subjects (Group 2). Lung thallium uptake was measured from anterior projection images using a ratio of heart-to-lung activities. Seventy subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) (Group 3) determined by angiography (greater than or equal to 70% luminal stenosis) underwent thallium perfusion SPECT. Thirty-nine percent of these subjects had multivessel and 61% had single vessel CAD. Lung thallium uptake was elevated in 47 of 70 (67%) Group 3 subjects. Group 3 subjects with elevated lung thallium uptake did not differ from Group 3 subjects with normal lung thallium uptake with respect to extent or distribution of coronary artery disease, left ventricular function, or severity of myocardial ischemia as determined by exercise and redistribution thallium SPECT. Thus, the measurement of thallium lung uptake from anterior projection images obtained during SPECT frequently identifies patients with CAD, but it may not provide supplementary information regarding the extent of myocardial ischemia or ventricular dysfunction.

  6. Quantitative upper airway endoscopy with swept-source anatomical optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Wijesundara, Kushal; Zdanski, Carlton; Kimbell, Julia; Price, Hillel; Iftimia, Nicusor; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive imaging of upper airway obstructions in children and adults is needed to improve clinical decision-making. Toward this goal, we demonstrate an anatomical optical coherence tomography (aOCT) system delivered via a small-bore, flexible endoscope to quantify the upper airway lumen geometry. Helical scans were obtained from a proximally-scanned fiber-optic catheter of 820 μm outer diameter and >2 mm focal length. Coupled with a long coherence length wavelength-swept light source, the system exhibited an SNR roll-off of < 10 dB over a 10 mm range. Operating at 10 rotations/s, the average accuracy of segmented cross-sectional areas was found to be −1.4 ± 1.0%. To demonstrate the capability of this system, aOCT was performed on a pediatric airway phantom and on ex vivo swine trachea. The ability for quantitative endoscopy afforded by this system can aid in diagnosis, medical and surgical decision making, and predictive modeling of upper airway obstructive disorders. PMID:24688814

  7. Quantitative computed tomography of humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) mandibles: mechanical implications for rorqual lunge-feeding.

    PubMed

    Field, Daniel J; Campbell-Malone, Regina; Goldbogen, Jeremy A; Shadwick, Robert E

    2010-07-01

    Rorqual whales (Balaenopteridae) lunge at high speed with mouth open to nearly 90 degrees to engulf large volumes of prey-laden water. This feeding process is enabled by extremely large skulls and mandibles that increase mouth area, thereby facilitating the flux of water into the mouth. When these mandibles are lowered during lunge-feeding, they are exposed to high drag, and therefore, may be subject to significant bending forces. We hypothesized that these mandibles exhibited a mechanical design (shape and density distribution) that enables these bones to accommodate high loads during lunge-feeding without exceeding their breaking strength. We used quantitative computed tomography (QCT) to determine the three-dimensional geometry and density distribution of a pair of subadult humpback whale (Megaptera novaeangliae) mandibles (length = 2.10 m). QCT data indicated highest bone density and cross-sectional area, and therefore, high resistance to bending and deflection, from the coronoid process to the middle of the dentary, which then decreased towards the anterior end of the mandible. These results differ from the caudorostral trends of increasing mandibular bone density in mammals, such as humans and the right whale, Eubalaena glacialis, indicating that adaptive bone remodeling is a significant contributing factor in establishing mandibular bone density distributions in rorquals.

  8. Micro/Nano-Computed Tomography Technology for Quantitative Dynamic, Multi-scale Imaging of Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gregg, Chelsea L.; Recknagel, Andrew K.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2015-01-01

    Tissue morphogenesis and embryonic development are dynamic events challenging to quantify, especially considering the intricate events that happen simultaneously in different locations and time. Micro-, and more recently nano-computed tomography (micro/nanoCT), has been used for the past 15 years to characterize large 3D fields of tortuous geometries at high spatial resolution. We and others have advanced micro/nanoCT imaging strategies for quantifying tissue and organ level fate changes throughout morphogenesis. Exogenous soft tissue contrast media enables visualization of vascular lumens and tissues via extravasation. Furthermore, the emergence of antigen specific tissue contrast enables direct quantitative visualization of protein and mRNA expression. Micro-CT X-ray doses appear to be non-embryotoxic, enabling longitudinal imaging studies in live embryos. In this paper we present established soft tissue contrast protocols for obtaining high quality micro/nanoCT images and the image processing techniques useful for quantifying anatomical and physiological information from the datasets. PMID:25245686

  9. Quantitative evaluation of the disintegration of orally rapid disintegrating tablets by X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Otsuka, Makoto; Yamanaka, Azusa; Uchino, Tomohiro; Otsuka, Kuniko; Sadamoto, Kiyomi; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    To measure the rapid disintegration of Oral Disintegrating Tablets (ODT), a new test (XCT) was developed using X-ray computing tomography (X-ray CT). Placebo ODT, rapid disintegration candy (RDC) and Gaster®-D-Tablets (GAS) were used as model samples. All these ODTs were used to measure oral disintegration time (DT) in distilled water at 37±2°C by XCT. DTs were affected by the width of mesh screens, and degree to which the tablet holder vibrated from air bubbles. An in-vivo tablet disintegration test was performed for RDC using 11 volunteers. DT by the in-vivo method was significantly longer than that using the conventional tester. The experimental conditions for XCT such as the width of the mesh screen and degree of vibration were adjusted to be consistent with human DT values. Since DTs by the XCT method were almost the same as the human data, this method was able to quantitatively evaluate the rapid disintegration of ODT under the same conditions as inside the oral cavity. The DTs of four commercially available ODTs were comparatively evaluated by the XCT method, conventional tablet disintegration test and in-vivo method.

  10. Quantitative analysis of angle-resolved scattering properties of ovarian tissue using optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi; Wang, Tianheng; Brewer, Molly

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Angle-resolved optical scattering properties of ovarian tissue, on different optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging planes, were quantitatively measured by fitting the compounded OCT A-lines into a single scattering model. Higher cross correlation value of angle-resolved scattering coefficients between different OCT imaging planes was found in normal ovaries than was present in malignant ovaries. The mean cross correlation coefficient (MCC) was introduced in this pilot study to characterize and differentiate normal, n=6, and malignant, n=4, ovaries. A specificity of 100 percent and a sensitivity of 100 percent were achieved by setting MCC threshold at 0.6. Collagen properties, within the OCT imaging penetration depth, were also qualitatively studied in terms of their content, structure and directivity. The homogeneous three-dimensional collagen fiber network, observed in the normal ovary, effectively explains the stronger cross correlation of angle-resolved scattering properties on different imaging planes while the heterogeneity, observed in the malignant ovary, suggests a weaker correlation. PMID:23085900

  11. Quantitative experimental monitoring of molecular diffusion in clay with positron emission tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulenkampff, Johannes; Zakhnini, Abdelhamid; Gründig, Marion; Lippmann-Pipke, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Clay plays a prominent role as barrier material in the geosphere. The small particle sizes cause extremely small pore sizes and induce low permeability and high sorption capacity. Transport of dissolved species by molecular diffusion, driven only by a concentration gradient, is less sensitive to the pore size. Heterogeneous structures on the centimetre scale could cause heterogeneous effects, like preferential transport zones, which are difficult to assess. Laboratory measurements with diffusion cells yield limited information on heterogeneity, and pore space imaging methods have to consider scale effects. We established positron emission tomography (PET), applying a high-resolution PET scanner as a spatially resolved quantitative method for direct laboratory observation of the molecular diffusion process of a PET tracer on the prominent scale of 1-100 mm. Although PET is rather insensitive to bulk effects, quantification required significant improvements of the image reconstruction procedure with respect to Compton scatter and attenuation. The experiments were conducted with 22Na and 124I over periods of 100 and 25 days, respectively. From the images we derived trustable anisotropic diffusion coefficients and, in addition, we identified indications of preferential transport zones. We thus demonstrated the unique potential of the PET imaging modality for geoscientific process monitoring under conditions where other methods fail, taking advantage of the extremely high detection sensitivity that is typical of radiotracer applications.

  12. Characterization of human oral tissues based on quantitative analysis of optical coherence tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi, Hassan S.; Kosa, Ali; Mahdian, Mina; Moslehpour, Saeid; Alnajjar, Hisham; Tadinada, Aditya

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, five types of tissues, human enamel, human cortical bone, human trabecular bone, muscular tissue, and fatty tissue were imaged ex vivo using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The specimens were prepared in blocks of 5 x 5 x 3 mm (width x length x height). The OCT imaging system was a swept source OCT system operating at wavelengths ranging between 1250 nm and 1360 nm with an average power of 18 mW and a scan rate of 50 to 100 kHz. The imaging probe was placed on top of a 2 x 2 cm stabilizing device to maintain a standard distance from the samples. Ten image samples from each type of tissue were obtained. To acquire images with minimum inhomogeneity, imaging was performed multiple times at different points. Based on the observed texture differences between OCT images of soft and hard tissues, spatial and spectral features were quantitatively extracted from the OCT images. The Radon transform from angles of 0 deg to 90 deg was computed, averaged over all the angles, normalized to peak at unity, and then fitted with Gaussian function. The mean absolute values of the spatial frequency components of the OCT image were considered as a feature, where 2-D fast Fourier transform (FFT) was done to OCT images. These OCT features can reliably differentiate between a range of hard and soft tissues, and could be extremely valuable in assisting dentists for in vivo evaluation of oral tissues and early detection of pathologic changes in tissues.

  13. Emphysema- and airway-dominant COPD phenotypes defined by standardised quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Deepak R; Gupta, Sumit; Burggraf, Dorothe; Vom Silberberg, Suzan J; Heimbeck, Irene; Heiss-Neumann, Marion S; Haeussinger, Karl; Newby, Chris; Hargadon, Beverley; Raj, Vimal; Singh, Dave; Kolsum, Umme; Hofer, Thomas P; Al-Shair, Khaled; Luetzen, Niklas; Prasse, Antje; Müller-Quernheim, Joachim; Benea, Giorgio; Leprotti, Stefano; Boschetto, Piera; Gorecka, Dorota; Nowinski, Adam; Oniszh, Karina; Castell, Wolfgang Zu; Hagen, Michael; Barta, Imre; Döme, Balázs; Strausz, Janos; Greulich, Timm; Vogelmeier, Claus; Koczulla, Andreas R; Gut, Ivo; Hohlfeld, Jens; Welte, Tobias; Lavae-Mokhtari, Mahyar; Ziegler-Heitbrock, Loems; Brightling, Christopher; Parr, David G

    2016-07-01

    EvA (Emphysema versus Airway disease) is a multicentre project to study mechanisms and identify biomarkers of emphysema and airway disease in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The objective of this study was to delineate objectively imaging-based emphysema-dominant and airway disease-dominant phenotypes using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) indices, standardised with a novel phantom-based approach.441 subjects with COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) stages 1-3) were assessed in terms of clinical and physiological measurements, laboratory testing and standardised QCT indices of emphysema and airway wall geometry.QCT indices were influenced by scanner non-conformity, but standardisation significantly reduced variability (p<0.001) and led to more robust phenotypes. Four imaging-derived phenotypes were identified, reflecting "emphysema-dominant", "airway disease-dominant", "mixed" disease and "mild" disease. The emphysema-dominant group had significantly higher lung volumes, lower gas transfer coefficient, lower oxygen (PO2 ) and carbon dioxide (PCO2 ) tensions, higher haemoglobin and higher blood leukocyte numbers than the airway disease-dominant group.The utility of QCT for phenotyping in the setting of an international multicentre study is improved by standardisation. QCT indices of emphysema and airway disease can delineate within a population of patients with COPD, phenotypic groups that have typical clinical features known to be associated with emphysema-dominant and airway-dominant disease.

  14. The effect of slice thickness on quantitation of in vivo renal volume with cine computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Lerman, L.O.; Bentley, M.D.; Bell, M.R.; Rumberger, J.A.; Romero, J.C. )

    1990-02-26

    The development of fast computed tomography (CT) scanners allows the accurate quantitations of the volume (V) of the in-vivo kidney (K) and its component tissues, using 3 mm thick slices. Utilizing thicker slices may potentially enable the use of shorter scan times with less exposure to contrast media. To determine the relative accuracy of such scans, the right Ks of 14 anesthetized dogs were first scanned, using 3mm thick slices, after a venous bolus injection of iohexol (0.5 cc/kg). The images were then averaged to produce 6 and 10 mm thick slices, and the Vs of the Ks, and their cortical and medullary Vs, determined after boundary identification. Following the scans, the Ks were excised and their Vs determined post-mortem by fluid displacement. The whole K Vs obtained with the 6 and 10 mm thick slices correlated well with those obtained with the 3 mm thick slices. The difference between the in vivo and the post-mortem renal and medullary Vs was consistent with the blood, filtrate and urine contents of the in vivo kidney. In conclusion, the use of 6 and 10 mm thick slices resulted in an overestimation of the in vivo cortical V due to a partial volume effect, which was reflected in a consistent overestimation of KV.

  15. Assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography by geometric characterization of trabecular bone structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2016-03-01

    The current clinical standard for measuring Bone Mineral Density (BMD) is dual X-ray absorptiometry, however more recently BMD derived from volumetric quantitative computed tomography has been shown to demonstrate a high association with spinal fracture susceptibility. In this study, we propose a method of fracture risk assessment using structural properties of trabecular bone in spinal vertebrae. Experimental data was acquired via axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) from 12 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. Common image processing methods were used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the vertebral slices creating a circular region of interest (ROI) that excluded cortical bone for each slice. The pixels inside the ROI were converted to values indicative of BMD. High dimensional geometrical features were derived using the scaling index method (SIM) at different radii and scaling factors (SF). The mean BMD values within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a support vector machine to predict the failure load of the specimens. Prediction performance was measured using the root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric and determined that SIM combined with mean BMD features (RMSE = 0.82 +/- 0.37) outperformed MDCT-measured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 +/- 0.33) (p < 10-4). These results demonstrate that biomechanical strength prediction in vertebrae can be significantly improved through the use of SIM-derived texture features from trabecular bone.

  16. Noninvasive Quantitative Evaluation of the Dentin Layer during Dental Procedures Using Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Sinescu, Cosmin; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Bradu, Adrian; Duma, Virgil-Florin; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2015-01-01

    A routine cavity preparation of a tooth may lead to opening the pulp chamber. The present study evaluates quantitatively, in real time, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, the drilled cavities during dental procedures. An established noninvasive imaging technique, Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT), is used. The main scope is to prevent accidental openings of the dental pulp chamber. Six teeth with dental cavities have been used in this ex vivo study. The real time assessment of the distances between the bottom of the drilled cavities and the top of the pulp chamber was performed using an own assembled OCT system. The evaluation of the remaining dentin thickness (RDT) allowed for the positioning of the drilling tools in the cavities in relation to the pulp horns. Estimations of the safe and of the critical RDT were made; for the latter, the opening of the pulp chamber becomes unavoidable. Also, by following the fractures that can occur when the extent of the decay is too large, the dentist can decide upon the right therapy to follow, endodontic or conventional filling. The study demonstrates the usefulness of OCT imaging in guiding such evaluations during dental procedures.

  17. Dynamic phase imaging of host cells attacked by Vibrio vulnificus using quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seungrag; Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Ji Yong; Cha, Mi Hye; Kim, Young Ran; Kim, Dug Young

    2010-02-01

    We present the real time quantitative analysis of Vibrio vulnificus-infected host cells using high stability quantitative phase microscopy (HSQPM). It provides the ability to retrieve the phase or optical path length distribution over the cell from a single interferogram image, which has been measured with nanometer path length sensitivity for long periods of time. We have applied HSQPM to study dynamic cell morphologic changes and to quantify noninvasively cell volumes of rat basophilic leukemia RBL-2H3 cells infected with pathogenic bacteria V. vulnificus strains, wild type (MO6-24/O) and RTX toxin mutant (CMM770). During the process of V. vulnificus wild type infection to RBL-2H3 cells, the dynamic changes of quantitative phase images, cell volumes and areas were observed in real time using HSQPM. In contrast, the dramatic changes were not detected in RBL-2H3 cells infected with RTX toxin mutant. The results showed the good correlation between HSQPM analysis and biochemical assays such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and β-hexosaminidase release assay. We suggest that HSQPM is useful real time quantitative method to study the dynamic process of host cells infected with pathogen in a noninvasive manner.

  18. Phase-referenced Doppler optical coherence tomography in scattering media.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Cameron J; Yazdanfar, Siavash; Westphal, Volker; Rollins, Andrew M

    2005-08-15

    We present a fiber-based, low-coherence interferometer that significantly reduces phase noise by incorporating a second, narrowband, continuous-wave light source as a phase reference. By incorporating this interferometer into a Doppler OCT system, we demonstrate significant velocity noise reduction in reflective and scattering samples using processing techniques amenable to real-time implementation. We also demonstrate 90% suppression of velocity noise in a flow phantom.

  19. Quantitative EEG Signatures through Amplitude and Phase Modulation Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Mark H.; Padmanabha, Akaash

    2017-01-01

    Cortical spatiotemporal signal patterns based on object recognition can be discerned from visual stimulation. These are in the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) patterns, which contain perceptual information gathered from sensory input. A high-density Electroencephalograph (EEG) device consisting of 48 electrodes with a spacing of 5 mm was utilized to measure frontal lobe activity in order to capture event-related potentials from visual stimuli. Four randomized stimuli representing different levels of salient responsiveness were measured to determine if mild stimuli can be discerned from more extreme stimuli. AM/PM response patterns were detected between mild and more salient stimuli across participants. AM patterns presented distinct signatures for each stimulus. AM patterns had the highest number of incidents detected in the middle of the frontal lobe. Through this work, we can expand our encyclopedia of neural signatures to object recognition, and provide a broader understanding of quantitative neural responses to external stimuli. The results provide a quantitative approach utilizing spatiotemporal patterns to analyze where distinct AM patterns can be linked to object perception. PMID:28840113

  20. Quantitative EEG Signatures through Amplitude and Phase Modulation Patterns.

    PubMed

    Myers, Mark H; Padmanabha, Akaash

    2017-01-01

    Cortical spatiotemporal signal patterns based on object recognition can be discerned from visual stimulation. These are in the form of amplitude modulation (AM) and phase modulation (PM) patterns, which contain perceptual information gathered from sensory input. A high-density Electroencephalograph (EEG) device consisting of 48 electrodes with a spacing of 5 mm was utilized to measure frontal lobe activity in order to capture event-related potentials from visual stimuli. Four randomized stimuli representing different levels of salient responsiveness were measured to determine if mild stimuli can be discerned from more extreme stimuli. AM/PM response patterns were detected between mild and more salient stimuli across participants. AM patterns presented distinct signatures for each stimulus. AM patterns had the highest number of incidents detected in the middle of the frontal lobe. Through this work, we can expand our encyclopedia of neural signatures to object recognition, and provide a broader understanding of quantitative neural responses to external stimuli. The results provide a quantitative approach utilizing spatiotemporal patterns to analyze where distinct AM patterns can be linked to object perception.

  1. Visualisation by high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography of gas films on submerged superhydrophobic leaves.

    PubMed

    Lauridsen, Torsten; Glavina, Kyriaki; Colmer, Timothy David; Winkel, Anders; Irvine, Sarah; Lefmann, Kim; Feidenhans'l, Robert; Pedersen, Ole

    2014-10-01

    Floods can completely submerge terrestrial plants but some wetland species can sustain O2 and CO2 exchange with the environment via gas films forming on superhydrophobic leaf surfaces. We used high resolution synchrotron X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography in a novel approach to visualise gas films on submerged leaves of common cordgrass (Spartina anglica). 3D tomograms enabled a hitherto unmatched level of detail regarding the micro-topography of leaf gas films. Gas films formed only on the superhydrophobic adaxial leaf side (water droplet contact angle, Φ=162°) but not on the abaxial side (Φ=135°). The adaxial side of the leaves of common cordgrass is plicate with a longitudinal system of parallel grooves and ridges and the vast majority of the gas film volume was found in large ∼180μm deep elongated triangular volumes in the grooves and these volumes were connected to each neighbouring groove via a fine network of gas tubules (∼1.7μm diameter) across the ridges. In addition to the gas film retained on the leaf exterior, the X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography also successfully distinguished gas spaces internally in the leaf tissues, and the tissue porosity (gas volume per unit tissue volume) ranged from 6.3% to 20.3% in tip and base leaf segments, respectively. We conclude that X-ray phase contrast micro-tomography is a powerful tool to obtain quantitative data of exterior gas features on biological samples because of the significant difference in electron density between air, biological tissues and water.

  2. Quantitative Functional Imaging Using Dynamic Positron Computed Tomography and Rapid Parameter Estimation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koeppe, Robert Allen

    Positron computed tomography (PCT) is a diagnostic imaging technique that provides both three dimensional imaging capability and quantitative measurements of local tissue radioactivity concentrations in vivo. This allows the development of non-invasive methods that employ the principles of tracer kinetics for determining physiological properties such as mass specific blood flow, tissue pH, and rates of substrate transport or utilization. A physiologically based, two-compartment tracer kinetic model was derived to mathematically describe the exchange of a radioindicator between blood and tissue. The model was adapted for use with dynamic sequences of data acquired with a positron tomograph. Rapid estimation techniques were implemented to produce functional images of the model parameters by analyzing each individual pixel sequence of the image data. A detailed analysis of the performance characteristics of three different parameter estimation schemes was performed. The analysis included examination of errors caused by statistical uncertainties in the measured data, errors in the timing of the data, and errors caused by violation of various assumptions of the tracer kinetic model. Two specific radioindicators were investigated. ('18)F -fluoromethane, an inert freely diffusible gas, was used for local quantitative determinations of both cerebral blood flow and tissue:blood partition coefficient. A method was developed that did not require direct sampling of arterial blood for the absolute scaling of flow values. The arterial input concentration time course was obtained by assuming that the alveolar or end-tidal expired breath radioactivity concentration is proportional to the arterial blood concentration. The scale of the input function was obtained from a series of venous blood concentration measurements. The method of absolute scaling using venous samples was validated in four studies, performed on normal volunteers, in which directly measured arterial concentrations

  3. Quantitative pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfone, Christopher

    1998-09-01

    The potential benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion imaging for 3- dimensional radiation treatment planning and dose- response analysis, are currently being investigated. Accurate and precise SPECT quantification may facilitate the development of models to predict radiation-induced pulmonary dysfunction prior to treatment. The purpose of this research was to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy and precision of SPECT filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) image reconstruction methods for measuring absolute and relative activity concentration estimates in the lungs. The investigation is conducted using Monte Carlo simulation and validation, experimental phantom studies and applications to patient data. The scatter response function and scatter fraction (SF) for the lung is measured using Monte Carlo simulation and experimental imaging of point and line sources surrounded by lung density media. The Monte Carlo (experimental) SF value for lung density material is determined to be 14.86% (14.01%) for the line source and 18.88% (20.32%) for the point source. Quantitative experimental evaluation of FBP and ML-EM reconstruction techniques is performed using an anthropomorphic torso phantom containing spherical defects (simulating areas of reduced perfusion) of inner diameters 1.4 cm, 3.4 cm, and 5.6 cm at sphere:background concentration ratios of 0:1, 0.38:1, 0.47:1, 0.51:1, 0.70:1. Quantification is examined as a function of attenuation, scatter constant (k, range = 0.45 to 2.00), total iteration number (5 → 500) and deconvolution (Metz) filter power (X, range = 2.0 to 10.0). Relative (to lung background) and absolute quantification is performed using region of interest (ROI) analysis. A dependence of quantitative accuracy on both defect diameter and density is observed. In general, percent bias increases as defect diameter and density decrease. Also, negative bias in the lung

  4. Quantitative analysis of the right auricle with 256-slice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai-Ying; Gao, Bu-Lang; Pan, Tong; Xiang, Cheng; Zhang, Xue-Jing; Liu, Xiao-Wei; Fan, Qiong-Ying

    2017-04-01

    To quantitatively measure the morphology parameters of the right auricle with 256-slice multidetector computed tomography angiography (MDCTA) in healthy people. A retrospective analysis of 200 patients who had undergone coronary MDCTA with negative findings was performed. The raw imaging data were reconstructed and the right auricular volume, right atrial volume, right auricle height, base long and short axes, base perimeter and area, normal angle, and distance were quantitatively measured. Men had significantly (P < 0.05) greater values than women in the right auricular volume (13.3 ± 4.0 vs. 11.7 ± 3.7 mL) and height (33.0 ± 5.0 vs. 30.5 ± 5.2 mm), the base long axis (34.4 ± 4.1 vs. 33.2 ± 3.9 mm), area (787.6 ± 177.6 vs. 771.0 ± 143.2 mm(2)) and perimeter (119.2 ± 17.5 vs. 115.0 ± 13.0), and the normal distance (22.4 ± 6.6 vs. 20.2 ± 6.7 mm). The normal 95 % reference range for the right auricular parameters was put forward. The right auricular parameters had a good correlation with the right atrium volume, aortic diameter, the body weight, height, and body surface area but a bad correlation with the vertebral body height. Significantly (P < 0.05) greater values were found in the normal angle and distance in subjects below than over 40 years of age. No other significant (P > 0.05) difference existed in the other right auricular parameters. Quantitative measurements of the right auricle can help us get a good understanding of the right auricular morphology and its relationship with surrounding structures and are helpful for cardiac interventions of electrophysiology and radiofrequency ablation.

  5. Quantitative reflection phase mesoscopy by remote coherence tuning of phase-shift interference patterns

    PubMed Central

    Arbel, Elad; Bilenca, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Conventional low-magnification phase-contrast microscopy is an invaluable, yet a qualitative, imaging tool for the interrogation of transparent objects over a mesoscopic millimeter-scale field-of-view in physical and biological settings. Here, we demonstrate that introducing a compact, unbalanced phase-shifting Michelson interferometer into a standard reflected brightfield microscope equipped with low-power infinity-corrected objectives and white light illumination forms a phase mesoscope that retrieves remotely and quantitatively the reflection phase distribution of thin, transparent, and weakly scattering samples with high temporal (1.38 nm) and spatial (0.87 nm) axial-displacement sensitivity and micrometer lateral resolution (2.3 μm) across a mesoscopic field-of-view (2.25 × 1.19 mm2). Using the system, we evaluate the etch-depth uniformity of a large-area nanometer-thick glass grating and show quantitative mesoscopic maps of the optical thickness of human cancer cells without any area scanning. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-principle of the utility of the system for the quantitative monitoring of fluid dynamics within a wide region. PMID:26216719

  6. Novel Application of Quantitative Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography to Predict Early Response to Methimazole in Graves' Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Bang, Ji-In; Kim, Ji-Young; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young

    2017-01-01

    Objective Since Graves' disease (GD) is resistant to antithyroid drugs (ATDs), an accurate quantitative thyroid function measurement is required for the prediction of early responses to ATD. Quantitative parameters derived from the novel technology, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), were investigated for the prediction of achievement of euthyroidism after methimazole (MMI) treatment in GD. Materials and Methods A total of 36 GD patients (10 males, 26 females; mean age, 45.3 ± 13.8 years) were enrolled for this study, from April 2015 to January 2016. They underwent quantitative thyroid SPECT/CT 20 minutes post-injection of 99mTc-pertechnetate (5 mCi). Association between the time to biochemical euthyroidism after MMI treatment and %uptake, standardized uptake value (SUV), functional thyroid mass (SUVmean × thyroid volume) from the SPECT/CT, and clinical/biochemical variables, were investigated. Results GD patients had a significantly greater %uptake (6.9 ± 6.4%) than historical control euthyroid patients (n = 20, 0.8 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001) from the same quantitative SPECT/CT protocol. Euthyroidism was achieved in 14 patients at 156 ± 62 days post-MMI treatment, but 22 patients had still not achieved euthyroidism by the last follow-up time-point (208 ± 80 days). In the univariate Cox regression analysis, the initial MMI dose (p = 0.014), %uptake (p = 0.015), and functional thyroid mass (p = 0.016) were significant predictors of euthyroidism in response to MMI treatment. However, only %uptake remained significant in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (p = 0.034). A %uptake cutoff of 5.0% dichotomized the faster responding versus the slower responding GD patients (p = 0.006). Conclusion A novel parameter of thyroid %uptake from quantitative SPECT/CT is a predictive indicator of an early response to MMI in GD patients. PMID:28458607

  7. Novel Application of Quantitative Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography/Computed Tomography to Predict Early Response to Methimazole in Graves' Disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun Joo; Bang, Ji-In; Kim, Ji-Young; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2017-01-01

    Since Graves' disease (GD) is resistant to antithyroid drugs (ATDs), an accurate quantitative thyroid function measurement is required for the prediction of early responses to ATD. Quantitative parameters derived from the novel technology, single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT), were investigated for the prediction of achievement of euthyroidism after methimazole (MMI) treatment in GD. A total of 36 GD patients (10 males, 26 females; mean age, 45.3 ± 13.8 years) were enrolled for this study, from April 2015 to January 2016. They underwent quantitative thyroid SPECT/CT 20 minutes post-injection of (99m)Tc-pertechnetate (5 mCi). Association between the time to biochemical euthyroidism after MMI treatment and %uptake, standardized uptake value (SUV), functional thyroid mass (SUVmean × thyroid volume) from the SPECT/CT, and clinical/biochemical variables, were investigated. GD patients had a significantly greater %uptake (6.9 ± 6.4%) than historical control euthyroid patients (n = 20, 0.8 ± 0.5%, p < 0.001) from the same quantitative SPECT/CT protocol. Euthyroidism was achieved in 14 patients at 156 ± 62 days post-MMI treatment, but 22 patients had still not achieved euthyroidism by the last follow-up time-point (208 ± 80 days). In the univariate Cox regression analysis, the initial MMI dose (p = 0.014), %uptake (p = 0.015), and functional thyroid mass (p = 0.016) were significant predictors of euthyroidism in response to MMI treatment. However, only %uptake remained significant in a multivariate Cox regression analysis (p = 0.034). A %uptake cutoff of 5.0% dichotomized the faster responding versus the slower responding GD patients (p = 0.006). A novel parameter of thyroid %uptake from quantitative SPECT/CT is a predictive indicator of an early response to MMI in GD patients.

  8. Quantitative spectral K-edge imaging in preclinical photon-counting x-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Anke; Roessl, Ewald; Kneepkens, Esther; Thran, Axel; Brendel, Bernhard; Martens, Gerhard; Proska, Roland; Nicolay, Klaas; Grüll, Holger

    2015-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility and the accuracy of spectral computed tomography (spectral CT) to determine the tissue concentrations and localization of high-attenuation, iodine-based contrast agents in mice. Iodine tissue concentrations determined with spectral CT are compared with concentrations measured with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). All animal procedures were performed according to the US National Institutes of Health principles of laboratory animal care and were approved by the ethical review committee of Maastricht, The Netherlands. Healthy Swiss mice (n = 4) were injected with an iodinated emulsion radiolabeled with indium as multimodal contrast agent for CT and SPECT. The CT and SPECT scans were acquired using a dedicated small-animal SPECT/CT system. Subsequently, scans were performed with a preclinical spectral CT scanner equipped with a photon-counting detector and 6 energy threshold levels. Quantitative data analysis of SPECT and spectral CT scans were obtained using 3-dimensional volumes-of-interest drawing methods. The ICP-MS on dissected organs was performed to determine iodine uptake per organ and was compared with the amounts determined from spectral CT and SPECT. Iodine concentrations obtained with image-processed spectral CT data correlated well with data obtained either with noninvasive SPECT imaging (slope = 0.96, r = 0.75) or with ICP-MS (slope = 0.99, r = 0.89) in tissue samples. This preclinical proof-of-concept study shows the in vivo quantification of iodine concentrations in tissues using spectral CT. Our multimodal imaging approach with spectral CT and SPECT using radiolabeled iodinated emulsions together with ICP-based quantification allows a direct comparison of all methods. Benchmarked against ICP-MS data, spectral CT in the present implementation shows a slight underestimation of organ iodine concentrations compared

  9. Emission Computed Tomography: A New Technique for the Quantitative Physiologic Study of Brain and Heart in Vivo

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Phelps, M. E.; Hoffman, E. J.; Huang, S. C.; Schelbert, H. R.; Kuhl, D. E.

    1978-01-01

    Emission computed tomography can provide a quantitative in vivo measurement of regional tissue radionuclide tracer concentrations. This facility when combined with physiologic models and radioactively labeled physiologic tracers that behave in a predictable manner allow measurement of a wide variety of physiologic variables. This integrated technique has been referred to as Physiologic Tomography (PT). PT requires labeled compounds which trace physiologic processes in a known and predictable manner, and physiologic models which are appropriately formulated and validated to derive physiologic variables from ECT data. In order to effectively achieve this goal, PT requires an ECT system that is capable of performing truly quantitative or analytical measurements of tissue tracer concentrations and which has been well characterized in terms of spatial resolution, sensitivity and signal to noise ratios in the tomographic image. This paper illustrates the capabilities of emission computed tomography and provides examples of physiologic tomography for the regional measurement of cerebral and myocardial metabolic rate for glucose, regional measurement of cerebral blood volume, gated cardiac blood pools and capillary perfusion in brain and heart. Studies on patients with stroke and myocardial ischemia are also presented.

  10. Phase aberration correction by multi-stencils fast marching method using sound speed image in ultrasound computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Xiaolei; Azuma, Takashi; Lin, Hongxiang; Imoto, Haruka; Tamano, Satoshi; Takagi, Shu; Umemura, Shin-Ichiro; Sakuma, Ichiro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2016-04-01

    Reflection image from ultrasound computed tomography (USCT) system can be obtained by synthetic aperture technique, however its quality is decreased by phase aberration caused by inhomogeneous media. Therefore, phase aberration correction is important to improve image quality. In this study, multi-stencils fast marching method (MSFMM) is employed for phase correction. The MSFMM is an accurate and fast solution of Eikonal equation which considers the refraction. The proposed method includes two steps. First, the MSFMM is used to compute sound propagation time from each element to each image gird point using sound speed image of USCT. Second, synthetic aperture technique is employed to obtain reflection image using the computed propagation time. To evaluate the proposed method, both numerical simulation and phantom experiment were conducted. With regard to numerical simulation, both quantitative and qualitative comparisons between reflection images with and without phase aberration correction were given. In the quantitative comparison, the diameters of point spread function (PSF) in reflection images of a two layer structure were presented. In the qualitative comparison, reflection images of simple circle and complex breast modes with phase aberration correction show higher quality than that without the correction. In respect to phantom experiment, a piece of breast phantom with artificial glandular structure inside was scanned by a USCT prototype, and the artificial glandular structure is able to be visible more clearly in the reflection image with phase aberration correction than in that without the correction. In this study, a phase aberration correction method by the MSFMM are proposed for reflection image of the USCT.

  11. Early Assessment of Treatment Responses During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Using Quantitative Analysis of Daily Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Paul, Jijo; Yang, Cungeng; Wu, Hui; Tai, An; Dalah, Entesar; Zheng, Cheng; Johnstone, Candice; Kong, Feng-Ming; Gore, Elizabeth; Li, X Allen

    2017-06-01

    To investigate early tumor and normal tissue responses during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer using quantitative analysis of daily computed tomography (CT) scans. Daily diagnostic-quality CT scans acquired using CT-on-rails during CT-guided RT for 20 lung cancer patients were quantitatively analyzed. On each daily CT set, the contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and lungs were generated and the radiation dose delivered was reconstructed. The changes in CT image intensity (Hounsfield unit [HU]) features in the GTV and the multiple normal lung tissue shells around the GTV were extracted from the daily CT scans. The associations between the changes in the mean HUs, GTV, accumulated dose during RT delivery, and patient survival rate were analyzed. During the RT course, radiation can induce substantial changes in the HU histogram features on the daily CT scans, with reductions in the GTV mean HUs (dH) observed in the range of 11 to 48 HU (median 30). The dH is statistically related to the accumulated GTV dose (R(2) > 0.99) and correlates weakly with the change in GTV (R(2) = 0.3481). Statistically significant increases in patient survival rates (P=.038) were observed for patients with a higher dH in the GTV. In the normal lung, the 4 regions proximal to the GTV showed statistically significant (P<.001) HU reductions from the first to last fraction. Quantitative analysis of the daily CT scans indicated that the mean HUs in lung tumor and surrounding normal tissue were reduced during RT delivery. This reduction was observed in the early phase of the treatment, is patient specific, and correlated with the delivered dose. A larger HU reduction in the GTV correlated significantly with greater patient survival. The changes in daily CT features, such as the mean HU, can be used for early assessment of the radiation response during RT delivery for lung cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Quantitative analysis of aqueous phase composition of model dentin adhesives experiencing phase separation

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Qiang; Park, Jonggu; Parthasarathy, Ranganathan; Pamatmat, Francis; Misra, Anil; Laurence, Jennifer S.; Marangos, Orestes; Spencer, Paulette

    2013-01-01

    There have been reports of the sensitivity of our current dentin adhesives to excess moisture, for example, water-blisters in adhesives placed on over-wet surfaces, and phase separation with concomitant limited infiltration of the critical dimethacrylate component into the demineralized dentin matrix. To determine quantitatively the hydrophobic/hydrophilic components in the aqueous phase when exposed to over-wet environments, model adhesives were mixed with 16, 33, and 50 wt % water to yield well-separated phases. Based upon high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with photodiode array detection, it was found that the amounts of hydrophobic BisGMA and hydrophobic initiators are less than 0.1 wt % in the aqueous phase. The amount of these compounds decreased with an increase in the initial water content. The major components of the aqueous phase were hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and water, and the HEMA content ranged from 18.3 to 14.7 wt %. Different BisGMA homologues and the relative content of these homologues in the aqueous phase have been identified; however, the amount of crosslinkable BisGMA was minimal and, thus, could not help in the formation of a crosslinked polymer network in the aqueous phase. Without the protection afforded by a strong crosslinked network, the poorly photoreactive compounds of this aqueous phase could be leached easily. These results suggest that adhesive formulations should be designed to include hydrophilic multimethacrylate monomers and water compatible initiators. PMID:22331596

  13. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science.

    PubMed

    Mayo, Sheridan C; Stevenson, Andrew W; Wilkins, Stephen W

    2012-05-24

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies.

  14. In-Line Phase-Contrast X-ray Imaging and Tomography for Materials Science

    PubMed Central

    Mayo, Sheridan C.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Wilkins, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography make use of the refraction of X-rays by the sample in image formation. This provides considerable additional information in the image compared to conventional X-ray imaging methods, which rely solely on X-ray absorption by the sample. Phase-contrast imaging highlights edges and internal boundaries of a sample and is thus complementary to absorption contrast, which is more sensitive to the bulk of the sample. Phase-contrast can also be used to image low-density materials, which do not absorb X-rays sufficiently to form a conventional X-ray image. In the context of materials science, X-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography have particular value in the 2D and 3D characterization of low-density materials, the detection of cracks and voids and the analysis of composites and multiphase materials where the different components have similar X-ray attenuation coefficients. Here we review the use of phase-contrast imaging and tomography for a wide variety of materials science characterization problems using both synchrotron and laboratory sources and further demonstrate the particular benefits of phase contrast in the laboratory setting with a series of case studies. PMID:28817018

  15. A compressed sensing based reconstruction algorithm for synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melli, Seyed Ali; Wahid, Khan A.; Babyn, Paul; Montgomery, James; Snead, Elisabeth; El-Gayed, Ali; Pettitt, Murray; Wolkowski, Bailey; Wesolowski, Michal

    2016-01-01

    Synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is increasingly used in pre-clinical imaging. However, it typically requires a large number of projections, and subsequently a large radiation dose, to produce high quality images. To improve the applicability of this imaging technique, reconstruction algorithms that can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time without degrading image quality are needed. The proposed research focused on using a novel combination of Douglas-Rachford splitting and randomized Kaczmarz algorithms to solve large-scale total variation based optimization in a compressed sensing framework to reconstruct 2D images from a reduced number of projections. Visual assessment and quantitative performance evaluations of a synthetic abdomen phantom and real reconstructed image of an ex-vivo slice of canine prostate tissue demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is competitive in reconstruction process compared with other well-known algorithms. An additional potential benefit of reducing the number of projections would be reduction of time for motion artifact to occur if the sample moves during image acquisition. Use of this reconstruction algorithm to reduce the required number of projections in synchrotron source propagation-based X-ray phase contrast computed tomography is an effective form of dose reduction that may pave the way for imaging of in-vivo samples.

  16. Quantification of lower leg arterial calcifications by high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Patsch, Janina M; Zulliger, Martin A; Vilayphou, Nicolas; Samelson, Elizabeth J; Cejka, Daniel; Diarra, Danielle; Berzaczy, Gundula; Burghardt, Andrew J; Link, Thomas M; Weber, Michael; Loewe, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcifications and bone health seem to be etiologically linked via common risk factors such as aging and subclinical chronic inflammation. Epidemiologic studies have shown significant associations between low bone mineral density (BMD), fragility fractures and calcifications of the coronary arteries and the abdominal aorta. In the last decade, high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) has emerged as in-vivo research tool for the assessment of peripheral bone geometry, density, and microarchitecture. Although vascular calcifications are frequently observed as incidental findings in HR-pQCT scans, they have not yet been incorporated into quantitative HR-pQCT analyses. We developed a semi-automated algorithm to quantify lower leg arterial calcifications (LLACs), captured by HR-pQCT. The objective of our study was to determine validity and reliability of the LLAC measure. HR-pQCT scans were downscaled to a voxel size of 250μm. After subtraction of bone volumes from the scans, LLACs were detected and contoured by a semi-automated, dual-threshold seed-point segmentation. LLAC mass (in mg hydroxyapatite; HA) was calculated as the product of voxel-based calcification volume (mm(3)) and mean calcification density (mgHA/cm(3))/1000. To determine validity, we compared LLACs to coronary artery calcifications (CACs), as quantified by multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) and Agatston scoring in forty-six patients on chronic hemodialysis. Moreover, we investigated associations of LLACs with age, time on dialysis, type-2 diabetes mellitus, history of stroke, and myocardial infarction. In a second step, we determined intra- and inter-reader reliability of the LLAC measure. In the validity study, LLACs were present (>0mgHA) in 76% of patients, 78% of patients had CACs (>0mgHA). Median LLAC was 6.65 (0.08-24.40)mgHA and median CAC as expressed by Agatston score was 266.3 (15.88-1877.28). We found a significant positive correlation between

  17. A multi-phase level set framework for source reconstruction in bioluminescence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Huang Heyu; Qu Xiaochao; Liang Jimin; He Xiaowei; Chen Xueli; Yang Da'an; Tian Jie

    2010-07-01

    We propose a novel multi-phase level set algorithm for solving the inverse problem of bioluminescence tomography. The distribution of unknown interior source is considered as piecewise constant and represented by using multiple level set functions. The localization of interior bioluminescence source is implemented by tracing the evolution of level set function. An alternate search scheme is incorporated to ensure the global optimal of reconstruction. Both numerical and physical experiments are performed to evaluate the developed level set reconstruction method. Reconstruction results show that the proposed method can stably resolve the interior source of bioluminescence tomography.

  18. Geometric properties of distal radius and pathogenesis of Colles fracture: a peripheral quantitative computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, S P; Xie, X; Bärenholdt, O

    2001-01-01

    It is well known among clinicians that Colles fracture patients may have normal projected axial bone mineral density and that bone mass is not synonymous with bone strength. The aim of this work was to investigate whether cross-sectional properties of the distal radius in female patients with recent Colles fracture differ from those of a younger group of normal women without fracture. It was hypothesized that patients with Colles fracture had petite distal radii and that cortical thinning and reduced cortical and trabecular volumetric density are dominant features of this fracture type. We used a multilayer high-precision peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) device with a long-term precision error of 0.1% for a dedicated phantom during the measurement period (152 d). Clinical measurements were made at an ultradistal site rich in trabecular bone and a less ultradistal site rich in cortical bone. The results show that the following pQCT variables were significantly reduced in the nonfractured radius of the Colles fracture cases: mean ultradistal trabecular volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical volumetric density, mean ultradistal and distal cortical thickness (p < 0.001 for all differences). The outer cortical diameter, cross-sectional bone area, and cortical bending moment of inertia were not statistically different in the two groups. Thus, it would appear that Colles fracture cases did not have petite distal radii. The results suggest that the deforming force of Colles fracture has a transaxial direction (fall on outstretched arm), resulting in a crush fracture, and that it is not a bending force. We suggest that Colles fracture occurs as a result of the combined effect of a fall on the out-stretched arm, low trabecular and cortical volumetric bone density, and reduced cortical thickness.

  19. [High resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography for the assessment of morphological and mechanical bone parameters].

    PubMed

    Fuller, Henrique; Fuller, Ricardo; Pereira, Rosa Maria R

    2015-01-01

    High resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) is a new technology commercially available for less than 10 years that allows performing in vivo assessment of bone parameters. HR-pQCT assesses the trabecular thickness, trabecular separation, trabecular number and connectivity density and, in addition, cortical bone density and thickness and total bone volume and density in high-definition mode, which additionally allows obtaining digital constructs of bone microarchitecture. The application of mathematics to captured data, a method called finite element analysis (FEA), allows the estimation of the physical properties of the tissue, simulating supported loads in a non-invasive way. Thus, HR-pQCT simultaneously acquires data previously provided separately by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA), magnetic resonance imaging and histomorphometry, aggregating biomechanical estimates previously only possible in extracted tissues. This method has a satisfactory reproducibility, with coefficients of variation rarely exceeding 3%. Regarding accuracy, the method shows a fair to good agreement (r(2) = 0.37-0.97). The main clinical application of this method is in the quantification and monitoring of metabolic bone disorders, more fully evaluating bone strength and fracture risk. In rheumatoid arthritis patients, this allows gauging the number and size of erosions and cysts, in addition to joint space. In osteoarthritis, it is possible to characterize the bone marrow edema-like areas that show a correlation with cartilage breakdown. Given its high cost, HR-pQCT is still a research tool, but the high resolution and efficiency of this method reveal advantages over the methods currently used for bone assessment, with a potential to become an important tool in clinical practice.

  20. High Resolution Peripheral Quantitative Computed Tomography for Assessment of Bone Quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazakia, Galateia

    2014-03-01

    The study of bone quality is motivated by the high morbidity, mortality, and societal cost of skeletal fractures. Over 10 million people are diagnosed with osteoporosis in the US alone, suffering 1.5 million osteoporotic fractures and costing the health care system over 17 billion annually. Accurate assessment of fracture risk is necessary to ensure that pharmacological and other interventions are appropriately administered. Currently, areal bone mineral density (aBMD) based on 2D dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is used to determine osteoporotic status and predict fracture risk. Though aBMD is a significant predictor of fracture risk, it does not completely explain bone strength or fracture incidence. The major limitation of aBMD is the lack of 3D information, which is necessary to distinguish between cortical and trabecular bone and to quantify bone geometry and microarchitecture. High resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography (HR-pQCT) enables in vivo assessment of volumetric BMD within specific bone compartments as well as quantification of geometric and microarchitectural measures of bone quality. HR-pQCT studies have documented that trabecular bone microstructure alterations are associated with fracture risk independent of aBMD.... Cortical bone microstructure - specifically porosity - is a major determinant of strength, stiffness, and fracture toughness of cortical tissue and may further explain the aBMD-independent effect of age on bone fragility and fracture risk. The application of finite element analysis (FEA) to HR-pQCT data permits estimation of patient-specific bone strength, shown to be associated with fracture incidence independent of aBMD. This talk will describe the HR-pQCT scanner, established metrics of bone quality derived from HR-pQCT data, and novel analyses of bone quality currently in development. Cross-sectional and longitudinal HR-pQCT studies investigating the impact of aging, disease, injury, gender, race, and

  1. Characterizing trabecular bone structure for assessing vertebral fracture risk on volumetric quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Mahesh B.; Checefsky, Walter A.; Abidin, Anas Z.; Tsai, Halley; Wang, Xixi; Hobbs, Susan K.; Bauer, Jan S.; Baum, Thomas; Wismüller, Axel

    2015-03-01

    While the proximal femur is preferred for measuring bone mineral density (BMD) in fracture risk estimation, the introduction of volumetric quantitative computed tomography has revealed stronger associations between BMD and spinal fracture status. In this study, we propose to capture properties of trabecular bone structure in spinal vertebrae with advanced second-order statistical features for purposes of fracture risk assessment. For this purpose, axial multi-detector CT (MDCT) images were acquired from 28 spinal vertebrae specimens using a whole-body 256-row CT scanner with a dedicated calibration phantom. A semi-automated method was used to annotate the trabecular compartment in the central vertebral slice with a circular region of interest (ROI) to exclude cortical bone; pixels within were converted to values indicative of BMD. Six second-order statistical features derived from gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) and the mean BMD within the ROI were then extracted and used in conjunction with a generalized radial basis functions (GRBF) neural network to predict the failure load of the specimens; true failure load was measured through biomechanical testing. Prediction performance was evaluated with a root-mean-square error (RMSE) metric. The best prediction performance was observed with GLCM feature `correlation' (RMSE = 1.02 ± 0.18), which significantly outperformed all other GLCM features (p < 0.01). GLCM feature correlation also significantly outperformed MDCTmeasured mean BMD (RMSE = 1.11 ± 0.17) (p< 10-4). These results suggest that biomechanical strength prediction in spinal vertebrae can be significantly improved through characterization of trabecular bone structure with GLCM-derived texture features.

  2. Quantitative Fundus Autofluorescence and Optical Coherence Tomography in Best Vitelliform Macular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Duncker, Tobias; Greenberg, Jonathan P.; Ramachandran, Rithambara; Hood, Donald C.; Smith, R. Theodore; Hirose, Tatsuo; Woods, Russell L.; Tsang, Stephen H.; Delori, François C.; Sparrow, Janet R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative fundus autofluorescence (qAF), spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) segmentation, and multimodal imaging were performed to elucidate the pathogenesis of Best vitelliform macular dystrophy (BVMD) and to identify abnormalities in lesion versus nonlesion fundus areas. Methods. Sixteen patients with a clinical diagnosis of BVMD were studied. Autofluorescence images (30°, 488-nm excitation) were acquired with a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope equipped with an internal fluorescent reference to account for variable laser power and detector sensitivity. The grey levels (GLs) of each image were calibrated to the reference, zero GL, magnification, and normative optical media density, to yield qAF. Horizontal SD-OCT scans were obtained and retinal layers manually segmented. Additionally, color and near-infrared reflectance (NIR-R) images were registered to AF images. All patients were screened for mutations in BEST1. In three additional BVMD patients, in vivo spectrofluorometric measurements were obtained within the vitelliform lesion. Results. Mean nonlesion qAF was within normal limits for age. Maximum qAF within the lesion was markedly increased compared with controls. By SD-OCT segmentation, outer segment equivalent thickness was increased and outer nuclear layer thickness decreased in the lesion. Changes were also present in a transition zone beyond the lesion border. In subclinical patients, no abnormalities in retinal layer thickness were identified. Fluorescence spectra recorded from the vitelliform lesion were consistent with those of retinal pigment epithelial cell lipofuscin. Conclusions. Based on qAF, mutations in BEST1 do not cause increased lipofuscin levels in nonlesion fundus areas. PMID:24526438

  3. Improved reproducibility of high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography for measurement of bone quality.

    PubMed

    MacNeil, Joshua A; Boyd, Steven K

    2008-07-01

    A human high-resolution peripheral quantitative computed tomography scanner (HR-pQCT) (XtremeCT, Scanco Medical, Switzerland) capable of measuring three important indicators of bone quality (micro-architectural morphology, mineralization and mechanical stiffness) has been developed. The goal of this study was to evaluate the reproducibility of male and female HR-pQCT in vivo measurements, and elucidate the causes of error in these measurements through a comparison with in vitro measurements. The best possible short-term reproducibility was found using a set of 10 in vitro measurements without repositioning, and a set of 10 with repositioning. Subsequently, in vivo measurements were performed on 15 male and 15 female subjects at baseline and follow-ups of 1 week and 4 months to determine the short- and long-term reproducibility of the system. In addition to the 2D area matching method used in the standard evaluation protocol, a custom developed 3D registration method was used to find the common region between repeated scans. The best possible reproducibility without movement artifacts and repositioning error was less than 0.5%, while the reproducibility with repositioning error was less than 1.5%. The in vivo reproducibility of density (<1%), morphological (<4.5%) and stiffness (<3.5) measurements was consistently poorer than the reproducibility of cadaver measurements, presumably due to small movement artifacts and repositioning errors. Using 3D image registration, repositioning error was reduced on average by 23% and 8% for measurements of the radius and tibia sites, respectively. This study has provided bounds for the reproducibility of HR-pQCT to monitor bone quality longitudinally, and a basis for clinical study design to determine detectable changes.

  4. Assessment of Regional Bone Density in Fractured Vertebrae Using Quantitative Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany A.G.; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Purpose The aim of this study is to propose and evaluate a new technique to assess bone mineral density of fractured vertebrae using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Overview of Literature There is no available technique to estimate bone mineral density (BMD) at the fractured vertebra because of the alterations in bony structures at the fracture site. Methods Forty patients with isolated fracture from T10 to L2 were analyzed from the vertebrae above and below the fracture level. Apparent density (AD) was measured based on the relationship between QCT images attenuation coefficients and the density of calibration objects. AD of 8 independent regions of interest (ROI) within the vertebral body and 2 ROI within the pedicles of vertebrae above and below the fractured vertebra were measured. At the level of the fractured vertebra, AD was measured at the pedicles, which are typically intact. AD of the fractured vertebral body was linearly interpolated, based on the assumption that AD at the fractured vertebra is equivalent to the average AD measured in vertebrae adjacent to the fracture. Estimated and measured AD of the pedicles at the fractured level were compared to verify our assumption of linear interpolation from adjacent vertebrae. Results The difference between the measured and the interpolated density of the pedicles at the fractured vertebra was 0.006 and 0.003 g/cm3 for right and left pedicle respectively. The highest mean AD located at the pedicles and the lowest mean AD was found at the anterior ROI of the vertebral body. Significant negative correlation exist between age and AD of ROI in the vertebral body. Conclusions This study suggests that the proposed technique is adequate to estimate the AD of a fractured vertebra from the density of adjacent vertebrae. PMID:28243370

  5. Distinct Quantitative Computed Tomography Emphysema Patterns Are Associated with Physiology and Function in Smokers

    PubMed Central

    San José Estépar, Raúl; Mendoza, Carlos S.; Hersh, Craig P.; Laird, Nan; Crapo, James D.; Lynch, David A.; Silverman, Edwin K.; Washko, George R.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Emphysema occurs in distinct pathologic patterns, but little is known about the epidemiologic associations of these patterns. Standard quantitative measures of emphysema from computed tomography (CT) do not distinguish between distinct patterns of parenchymal destruction. Objectives: To study the epidemiologic associations of distinct emphysema patterns with measures of lung-related physiology, function, and health care use in smokers. Methods: Using a local histogram-based assessment of lung density, we quantified distinct patterns of low attenuation in 9,313 smokers in the COPDGene Study. To determine if such patterns provide novel insights into chronic obstructive pulmonary disease epidemiology, we tested for their association with measures of physiology, function, and health care use. Measurements and Main Results: Compared with percentage of low-attenuation area less than −950 Hounsfield units (%LAA-950), local histogram-based measures of distinct CT low-attenuation patterns are more predictive of measures of lung function, dyspnea, quality of life, and health care use. These patterns are strongly associated with a wide array of measures of respiratory physiology and function, and most of these associations remain highly significant (P < 0.005) after adjusting for %LAA-950. In smokers without evidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the mild centrilobular disease pattern is associated with lower FEV1 and worse functional status (P < 0.005). Conclusions: Measures of distinct CT emphysema patterns provide novel information about the relationship between emphysema and key measures of physiology, physical function, and health care use. Measures of mild emphysema in smokers with preserved lung function can be extracted from CT scans and are significantly associated with functional measures. PMID:23980521

  6. Monte-Carlo-based inversion scheme for 3D quantitative photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Bernhard A.; Buchmann, Jens; Prohaska, Steffen; Laufer, Jan

    2017-03-01

    The goal of quantitative photoacoustic tomography (qPAT) is to recover maps of the chromophore distributions from multiwavelength images of the initial pressure. Model-based inversions that incorporate the physical processes underlying the photoacoustic (PA) signal generation represent a promising approach. Monte-Carlo models of the light transport are computationally expensive, but provide accurate fluence distributions predictions, especially in the ballistic and quasi-ballistic regimes. Here, we focus on the inverse problem of 3D qPAT of blood oxygenation and investigate the application of the Monte-Carlo method in a model-based inversion scheme. A forward model of the light transport based on the MCX simulator and acoustic propagation modeled by the k-Wave toolbox was used to generate a PA image data set acquired in a tissue phantom over a planar detection geometry. The combination of the optical and acoustic models is shown to account for limited-view artifacts. In addition, the errors in the fluence due to, for example, partial volume artifacts and absorbers immediately adjacent to the region of interest are investigated. To accomplish large-scale inversions in 3D, the number of degrees of freedom is reduced by applying image segmentation to the initial pressure distribution to extract a limited number of regions with homogeneous optical parameters. The absorber concentration in the tissue phantom was estimated using a coordinate descent parameter search based on the comparison between measured and modeled PA spectra. The estimated relative concentrations using this approach lie within 5 % compared to the known concentrations. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of this approach to recover the blood oxygenation from experimental data.

  7. Quantitative analysis of vascular dimension and plaque composition in coronary multidetector computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olszewski, Mark E.; Wahle, Andreas; Vembar, Mani; Ciancibello, Les; Kerner, Arthur; Beyar, Rafael; Ghersin, Eduard; Subramanyan, Krishna; Sonka, Milan

    2006-03-01

    The noninvasive assessment of coronary atherosclerosis holds great promise for the future of cardiovascular medicine, and multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) has recently taken the lead in this area. Earlier studies have shown the ability of MDCT to visualize the coronary lumen and various types of atherosclerotic plaque. The aims of this project are to design, implement, and validate a complete system for the automated, quantitative analysis of coronary MDCT images. The developed system uses graph algorithms and knowledge-based cost functions to automatically segment the lumen and wall, and then uses pattern classification techniques to identify and quantify the tissue types found within the detected vascular wall. The system has been validated in comparison with expert tracings and labels, as well as in comparison with intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). In the former, the radial position of the lumen and adventitia were compared at 360 corresponding angular locations in 299 vascular cross sections (from 13 vessels in 5 patients: 5 RCA, 4 LAD, 4 LCX). Results show a border positioning error of 0.150 +/- 0.090 mm unsigned / 0.007 +/- 0.001 mm signed for the lumen, and 0.210 +/- 0.120 mm unsigned / 0.020 +/- 0.030 mm signed for the vessel wall. In the comparison with IVUS, the luminal and vascular cross sectional areas were compared in 7 vessels; good correlation was shown for both the lumen (R=0.83) and the vessel wall (R=0.76). The plaque characterization algorithm correctly classified 92% of calcified plaques and 87% of non-calcified plaques.

  8. Detection of Human Brain Cancer Infiltration ex vivo and in vivo Using Quantitative Optical Coherence Tomography*

    PubMed Central

    Kut, Carmen; Chaichana, Kaisorn L.; Xi, Jiefeng; Raza, Shaan M.; Ye, Xiaobu; McVeigh, Elliot R.; Rodriguez, Fausto J.; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Li, Xingde

    2015-01-01

    More complete brain cancer resection can prolong survival and delay recurrence. However, it is challenging to distinguish cancer from non-cancer tissues intraoperatively, especially at the transitional, infiltrative zones. This is especially critical in eloquent regions (e.g. speech and motor areas). This study tested the feasibility of label-free, quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) for differentiating cancer from non-cancer in human brain tissues. Fresh ex vivo human brain tissues were obtained from 32 patients with grades II-IV brain cancer and 5 patients with non-cancer brain pathologies. Based on volumetric OCT imaging data, pathologically confirmed brain cancer tissues (both high-grade and low-grade) had significantly lower optical attenuation values at both cancer core and infiltrated zones when compared with non-cancer white matter, and OCT achieved high sensitivity and specificity at an attenuation threshold of 5.5 mm-1 for brain cancer patients. We also used this attenuation threshold to confirm the intraoperative feasibility of performing in vivo OCT-guided surgery using a murine model harboring human brain cancer. Our OCT system was capable of processing and displaying a color-coded optical property map in real time at a rate of 110-215 frames per second, or 1.2-2.4 seconds for an 8-16 mm3 tissue volume, thus providing direct visual cues for cancer versus non-cancer areas. Our study demonstrates the translational and practical potential of OCT in differentiating cancer from non-cancer tissue. Its intraoperative use may facilitate safe and extensive resection of infiltrative brain cancers and consequently lead to improved outcomes when compared with current clinical standards. PMID:26084803

  9. Quantitative carbon ion beam radiography and tomography with a flat-panel detector.

    PubMed

    Telsemeyer, Julia; Jäkel, Oliver; Martišíková, Mária

    2012-12-07

    High dose gradients are inherent to ion beam therapy. This results in high sensitivity to discrepancies between planned and delivered dose distributions. Therefore an accurate knowledge of the ion stopping power of the traversed tissue is critical. One proposed method to ensure high quality dose deposition is to measure the stopping power by ion radiography. Although the idea of imaging with highly energetic ions is more than forty years old, there is a lack of simple detectors suitable for this purpose. In this study the performance of an amorphous silicon flat-panel detector, originally designed for photon imaging, was investigated for quantitative carbon ion radiography and tomography. The flat-panel detector was exploited to measure the water equivalent thickness (WET) and water equivalent path length (WEPL) of a phantom at the Heidelberg Ion-Beam Therapy Center (HIT). To do so, the ambiguous correlation of detector signal to particle energy was overcome by active or passive variation of carbon ion beam energy and measurement of the signal-to-beam energy correlation. The active method enables one to determine the WET of the imaged object with an uncertainty of 0.5 mm WET. For tomographic WEPL measurements the passive method was exploited resulting in an accuracy of 0.01 WEPL. The developed imaging technique presents a method to measure the two-dimensional maps of WET and WEPL of phantoms with a simple and commercially available detector. High spatial resolution of 0.8 × 0.8 mm(2) is given by the detector design. In the future this powerful tool will be used to evaluate the performance of the treatment planning algorithm by studying WET uncertainties.

  10. Quantitative monitoring of laser-treated engineered skin using optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yujin; Lee, Chan-Young; Baek, Songyee; Kim, Taeho; Kim, Pilun; Lee, Sunghoon; Min, Daejin; Lee, Haekwang; Kim, Jeehyun; Jung, Woonggyu

    2016-03-01

    Nowadays, laser therapy is a common method for treating various dermatological troubles such as acne and wrinkles because of its efficient and immediate skin enhancement. Although laser treatment has become a routine procedure in medical and cosmetic fields, the prevention of side-effects, such as hyperpigmentation, redness and burning, still remains a critical issue that needs to be addressed. In order to reduce the side-effects while attaining efficient therapeutic outcomes, it is essential to understand the light-skin interaction through evaluation of physiological changes before and after laser therapy. In this study, we introduce a quantitative tissue monitoring method based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) for the evaluation of tissue regeneration after laser irradiation. To create a skin injury model, we applied a fractional CO2 laser on a customized engineered skin model, which is analogous to human skin in terms of its basic biological function and morphology. The irradiated region in the skin was then imaged by a high-speed OCT system, and its morphologic changes were analyzed by automatic segmentation software. Volumetric OCT images in the laser treated area clearly visualized the wound healing progress at different time points and provided comprehensive information which cannot be acquired through conventional monitoring methods. The results showed that the laser wound in engineered skins was mostly recovered from within 1~2 days with a fast recovery time in the vertical direction. However, the entire recovery period varied widely depending on laser doses and skin type. Our results also indicated that OCT-guided laser therapy would be a very promising protocol for optimizing laser treatment for skin therapy.

  11. Computational anatomy of the dens axis evaluated by quantitative computed tomography: Implications for anterior screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Gehweiler, Dominic; Wähnert, Dirk; Meier, Norbert; Spruit, Maarten; Raschke, Michael Johannes; Richards, Robert Geoff; Noser, Hansrudi; Kamer, Lukas

    2017-01-05

    The surgical fracture fixation of the odontoid process (dens) of the second cervical vertebra (C2/axis) is a challenging procedure, particularly in elderly patients affected by bone loss, and includes screw positioning close to vital structures. The aim of this study was to provide an extended anatomical knowledge of C2, the bone mass distribution and bone loss, and to understand the implications for anterior screw fixation. One hundred and twenty standard clinical quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans of the intact cervical spine from 60 female and 60 male European patients, aged 18-90 years, were used to compute a three-dimensional statistical model and an averaged bone mass model of C2. Shape and size variability was assessed via principal component analysis (PCA), bone mass distribution by thresholding and via virtual core drilling, and the screw placement via virtual positioning of screw templates. Principal component analysis (PCA) revealed a highly variable anatomy of the dens with size as the predominant variation according to the first principal component (PC) whereas shape changes were primarily described by the remaining PCs. The bone mass distribution demonstrated a characteristic 3D pattern, and remained unchanged in the presence of bone loss. Virtual screw positioning of two 3.5 mm dens screws with a 1 mm safety zone was possible in 81.7% in a standard, parallel position and in additional 15.8% in a twisted position. The approach permitted a more detailed anatomical assessment of the dens axis. Combined with a preoperative QCT it may further improve the diagnostic procedure of odontoid fractures. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.

  12. Assessment of trabecular bone mineral density using quantitative computed tomography in normal cats.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Haengbok; Choi, Wooshin; Lee, Youngjae; Lee, Donghoon; Kim, Juhyung; Kang, Ji-Houn; Na, Kijeong; Chang, Jinhwa; Chang, Dongwoo

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess age-related changes and anatomic variation in trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD) using quantitative computed tomography (QCT) in normal cats. Seventeen normal cats were included in this study and divided into the following 3 age groups:<6 months (n=4), 2-5 years (n=10) and >6 years (n=3). A computed tomographic scan of each vertebra from the 12th thoracic to the 7th lumbar spine and the pelvis was performed with a bone-density phantom (50, 100 and 150 mg/cm(3), calcium hydroxyapatite, CIRS phantom(®)). On the central transverse section, the elliptical region of interest (ROI) was drawn to measure the mean Hounsfield unit (HU) value. Those values were converted to equivalent tBMD (mg/cm(3)) by use of the bone-density phantom and linear regression analysis (r(2) >0.95). The mean tBMD value of the thoracic vertebrae (369.4 ± 31.8 mg/cm(3)) was significantly higher than that of the lumbar vertebrae (285 ± 58.1 mg/cm(3)). The maximum tBMD occurred at the T12, T13 and L1 levels in all age groups. There was a statistically significant difference in the mean tBMD value among the 3 age groups at the T12 (P<0.001), T13 (P<0.001) and L4 levels (P=0.013), respectively. The present study suggests that age-related changes and anatomic variation in tBMD values should be considered when assessing tBMD using QCT in cats with bone disorders.

  13. Polarization-phase tomography of biological fluids polycrystalline structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubolazov, A. V.; Vanchuliak, O. Ya.; Garazdiuk, M.; Sidor, M. I.; Motrich, A. V.; Kostiuk, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Our research is aimed at designing an experimental method of Fourier's laser polarization phasometry of the layers of human effusion for an express diagnostics during surgery and a differentiation of the degree of severity (acute - gangrenous) appendectomy by means of statistical, correlation and fractal analysis of the coherent scattered field. A model of generalized optical anisotropy of polycrystal networks of albumin and globulin of the effusion of appendicitis has been suggested and the method of Fourier's phasometry of linear (a phase shift between the orthogonal components of the laser wave amplitude) and circular (the angle of rotation of the polarization plane) birefringence with a spatial-frequency selection of the coordinate distributions for the differentiation of acute and gangrenous conditions have been analytically substantiated. Comparative studies of the efficacy of the methods of direct mapping of phase distributions and Fourier's phasometry of a laser radiation field transformed by the dendritic and spherolitic networks of albumin and globulin of the layers of effusion of appendicitis on the basis of complex statistical, correlation and fractal analysis of the structure of phase maps.

  14. How little data is enough? Phase-diagram analysis of sparsity-regularized X-ray computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jørgensen, J. S.; Sidky, E. Y.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce phase-diagram analysis, a standard tool in compressed sensing (CS), to the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community as a systematic method for determining how few projections suffice for accurate sparsity-regularized reconstruction. In CS, a phase diagram is a convenient way to study and express certain theoretical relations between sparsity and sufficient sampling. We adapt phase-diagram analysis for empirical use in X-ray CT for which the same theoretical results do not hold. We demonstrate in three case studies the potential of phase-diagram analysis for providing quantitative answers to questions of undersampling. First, we demonstrate that there are cases where X-ray CT empirically performs comparably with a near-optimal CS strategy, namely taking measurements with Gaussian sensing matrices. Second, we show that, in contrast to what might have been anticipated, taking randomized CT measurements does not lead to improved performance compared with standard structured sampling patterns. Finally, we show preliminary results of how well phase-diagram analysis can predict the sufficient number of projections for accurately reconstructing a large-scale image of a given sparsity by means of total-variation regularization. PMID:25939620

  15. How little data is enough? Phase-diagram analysis of sparsity-regularized X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, J S; Sidky, E Y

    2015-06-13

    We introduce phase-diagram analysis, a standard tool in compressed sensing (CS), to the X-ray computed tomography (CT) community as a systematic method for determining how few projections suffice for accurate sparsity-regularized reconstruction. In CS, a phase diagram is a convenient way to study and express certain theoretical relations between sparsity and sufficient sampling. We adapt phase-diagram analysis for empirical use in X-ray CT for which the same theoretical results do not hold. We demonstrate in three case studies the potential of phase-diagram analysis for providing quantitative answers to questions of undersampling. First, we demonstrate that there are cases where X-ray CT empirically performs comparably with a near-optimal CS strategy, namely taking measurements with Gaussian sensing matrices. Second, we show that, in contrast to what might have been anticipated, taking randomized CT measurements does not lead to improved performance compared with standard structured sampling patterns. Finally, we show preliminary results of how well phase-diagram analysis can predict the sufficient number of projections for accurately reconstructing a large-scale image of a given sparsity by means of total-variation regularization.

  16. The measurement of liver fat from single-energy quantitative computed tomography scans.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoguang; Blake, Glen M; Brown, J Keenan; Guo, Zhe; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Fengzhe; Yang, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Li

    2017-06-01

    Studies of soft tissue composition using computed tomography (CT) scans are often semi-quantitative and based on Hounsfield units (HU) measurements that have not been calibrated with a quantitative CT (QCT) phantom. We describe a study to establish the water (H2O) and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) basis set equivalent densities of fat and fat-free liver tissue. With this information liver fat can be accurately measured from any abdominal CT scan calibrated with a suitable phantom. Liver fat content was measured by comparing single-energy QCT (SEQCT) HU measurements of the liver with predicted HU values for fat and fat-free liver tissue calculated from their H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities and calibration data from a QCT phantom. The equivalent densities of fat were derived from a listing of its constituent fatty acids, and those of fat-free liver tissue from a dual-energy QCT (DEQCT) study performed in 14 healthy Chinese subjects. This information was used to calculate liver fat from abdominal SEQCT scans performed in a further 541 healthy Chinese subjects (mean age 62 years; range, 31-95 years) enrolled in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study. The equivalent densities of fat were 941.75 mg/cm(3) H2O and -43.72 mg/cm(3) K2HPO4, and for fat-free liver tissue 1,040.13 mg/cm(3) H2O and 21.34 mg/cm(3) K2HPO4. Liver fat in the 14 subjects in the DEQCT study varied from 0-17.9% [median: 4.5%; interquartile range (IQR): 3.0-7.9%]. Liver fat in the 541 PURE study subjects varied from -0.3-29.9% (median: 4.9%; IQR: 3.4-6.9%). We have established H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities for fat and fat-free liver tissue that allow a measurement of liver fat to be obtained from any abdominal CT scan acquired with a QCT phantom. Although radiation dose considerations preclude the routine use of QCT to measure liver fat, the method described here facilitates its measurement in patients having CT scans performed for other purposes. Further studies

  17. Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Yali; Bailey, Steven T.; Wilson, David J.; Tan, Ou; Klein, Michael L.; Flaxel, Christina J.; Potsaid, Benjamin; Liu, Jonathan J.; Lu, Chen D.; Kraus, Martin F.; Fujimoto, James G.; Huang, David

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To detect and quantify choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography. Design Observational, cross-sectional study. Participants Five normal subjects and five neovascular AMD patients were included. Methods Five eyes with neovascular AMD and five normal age-matched controls were scanned by a high-speed (100,000 A-scans/sec) 1050 nm wavelength swept-source OCT. The macular angiography scan covered a 3×3 mm area and comprised 200×200×8 A-scans acquired in 3.5 sec. Flow was detected using the split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm. Motion artifacts were removed by three dimensional (3D) orthogonal registration and merging of 4 scans. The 3D angiography was segmented into 3 layers: inner retina (to show retinal vasculature), outer retina (to identify CNV), and choroid. En face maximum projection was used to obtain 2D angiograms from the 3 layers. CNV area and flow index were computed from the en face OCT angiogram of the outer retinal layer. Flow (decorrelation) and structural data were combined in composite color angiograms for both en face and cross-sectional views. Main Outcome Measurements CNV angiogram, CNV area, and CNV flow index. Results En face OCT angiograms of CNVs showed sizes and locations that were confirmed by fluorescein angiography. OCT angiography provided more distinct vascular network patterns that were less obscured by subretinal hemorrhage. The en face angiograms also showed areas of reduced choroidal flow adjacent to the CNV in all cases and significantly reduced retinal flow in one case. Cross-sectional angiograms were used to visualize CNV location relative to the retinal pigment epithelium and Bruch’s layer and classify type I and type II CNV. A feeder vessel could be identified in one case. Higher flow indexes were associated with larger CNV and type II CNV. Conclusions OCT angiography provides depth

  18. The measurement of liver fat from single-energy quantitative computed tomography scans

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiaoguang; Brown, J. Keenan; Guo, Zhe; Zhou, Jun; Wang, Fengzhe; Yang, Liqiang; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Li

    2017-01-01

    Background Studies of soft tissue composition using computed tomography (CT) scans are often semi-quantitative and based on Hounsfield units (HU) measurements that have not been calibrated with a quantitative CT (QCT) phantom. We describe a study to establish the water (H2O) and dipotassium hydrogen phosphate (K2HPO4) basis set equivalent densities of fat and fat-free liver tissue. With this information liver fat can be accurately measured from any abdominal CT scan calibrated with a suitable phantom. Methods Liver fat content was measured by comparing single-energy QCT (SEQCT) HU measurements of the liver with predicted HU values for fat and fat-free liver tissue calculated from their H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities and calibration data from a QCT phantom. The equivalent densities of fat were derived from a listing of its constituent fatty acids, and those of fat-free liver tissue from a dual-energy QCT (DEQCT) study performed in 14 healthy Chinese subjects. This information was used to calculate liver fat from abdominal SEQCT scans performed in a further 541 healthy Chinese subjects (mean age 62 years; range, 31–95 years) enrolled in the Prospective Urban Rural Epidemiology (PURE) Study. Results The equivalent densities of fat were 941.75 mg/cm3 H2O and –43.72 mg/cm3 K2HPO4, and for fat-free liver tissue 1,040.13 mg/cm3 H2O and 21.34 mg/cm3 K2HPO4. Liver fat in the 14 subjects in the DEQCT study varied from 0–17.9% [median: 4.5%; interquartile range (IQR): 3.0–7.9%]. Liver fat in the 541 PURE study subjects varied from –0.3–29.9% (median: 4.9%; IQR: 3.4–6.9%). Conclusions We have established H2O and K2HPO4 equivalent densities for fat and fat-free liver tissue that allow a measurement of liver fat to be obtained from any abdominal CT scan acquired with a QCT phantom. Although radiation dose considerations preclude the routine use of QCT to measure liver fat, the method described here facilitates its measurement in patients having CT scans

  19. Quantitative assessment of scatter correction techniques incorporated in next generation dual-source computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobberley, Sean David

    Accurate, cross-scanner assessment of in-vivo air density used to quantitatively assess amount and distribution of emphysema in COPD subjects has remained elusive. Hounsfield units (HU) within tracheal air can be considerably more positive than -1000 HU. With the advent of new dual-source scanners which employ dedicated scatter correction techniques, it is of interest to evaluate how the quantitative measures of lung density compare between dual-source and single-source scan modes. This study has sought to characterize in-vivo and phantom-based air metrics using dual-energy computed tomography technology where the nature of the technology has required adjustments to scatter correction. Anesthetized ovine (N=6), swine (N=13: more human-like rib cage shape), lung phantom and a thoracic phantom were studied using a dual-source MDCT scanner (Siemens Definition Flash. Multiple dual-source dual-energy (DSDE) and single-source (SS) scans taken at different energy levels and scan settings were acquired for direct quantitative comparison. Density histograms were evaluated for the lung, tracheal, water and blood segments. Image data were obtained at 80, 100, 120, and 140 kVp in the SS mode (B35f kernel) and at 80, 100, 140, and 140-Sn (tin filtered) kVp in the DSDE mode (B35f and D30f kernels), in addition to variations in dose, rotation time, and pitch. To minimize the effect of cross-scatter, the phantom scans in the DSDE mode was obtained by reducing the tube current of one of the tubes to its minimum (near zero) value. When using image data obtained in the DSDE mode, the median HU values in the tracheal regions of all animals and the phantom were consistently closer to -1000 HU regardless of reconstruction kernel (chapters 3 and 4). Similarly, HU values of water and blood were consistently closer to their nominal values of 0 HU and 55 HU respectively. When using image data obtained in the SS mode the air CT numbers demonstrated a consistent positive shift of up to 35 HU

  20. Distant metastasis of prostate cancer: early detection of recurrent tumor with dual-phase carbon-11 choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography in two cases.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Tetsuo; Tateishi, Ukihide; Komiyama, Motokiyo; Fujimoto, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Terauchi, Takashi; Moriyama, Noriyuki; Arai, Yasuaki; Sugimura, Kazuro; Kakizoe, Tadao

    2006-09-01

    Several types of recurrence may be detected by radiologic assessment after treatment in patients with prostate cancer. However, early detection of distant metastasis using positron emission tomography has so far never been published. We report two patients who underwent hormone therapy or surgical resection for prostate cancer. They developed distant metastases which were detected on whole body [C-11] choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography with significant elevation of serum PSA level. In one patient, recurrent tumor of the supraclavicular node (6 mm) diminished in size after subsequent hormone therapy. Surgical resection of recurrent tumor of the lung (12 mm) was performed in the other patient, the pathology of which confirmed the metastatic adenocarcinoma derived from the prostate. The recurrent tumor can be correctly detected by dual-phase whole body [C-11] choline positron emission tomography/computed tomography.

  1. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Simon; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Marone, Federica; Modregger, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-05

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show how the refractive index distribution as well as its x, y, and z gradient components can be reconstructed directly from the recorded projection data. The method can equally well be applied at conventional x-ray tube sources, to analyzer based x-ray imaging or neutron imaging. It is demonstrated with measurements of an x-ray phantom and a rat brain using synchrotron radiation.

  2. Three-dimensional motion correction using speckle and phase for in vivo computed optical interferometric tomography

    PubMed Central

    Shemonski, Nathan D.; Ahn, Shawn S.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; South, Fredrick A.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    Over the years, many computed optical interferometric techniques have been developed to perform high-resolution volumetric tomography. By utilizing the phase and amplitude information provided with interferometric detection, post-acquisition corrections for defocus and optical aberrations can be performed. The introduction of the phase, though, can dramatically increase the sensitivity to motion (most prominently along the optical axis). In this paper, we present two algorithms which, together, can correct for motion in all three dimensions with enough accuracy for defocus and aberration correction in computed optical interferometric tomography. The first algorithm utilizes phase differences within the acquired data to correct for motion along the optical axis. The second algorithm utilizes the addition of a speckle tracking system using temporally- and spatially-coherent illumination to measure motion orthogonal to the optical axis. The use of coherent illumination allows for high-contrast speckle patterns even when imaging apparently uniform samples or when highly aberrated beams cannot be avoided. PMID:25574426

  3. Characterization of mouse spinal cord vascular network by means of synchrotron radiation X-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Massimi, Lorenzo; Fratini, Michela; Bukreeva, Inna; Brun, Francesco; Mittone, Alberto; Campi, Gaetano; Spanò, Raffaele; Mastrogiacomo, Milena; de Rosbo, Nicole Kerlero; Bravin, Alberto; Uccelli, Antonio; Cedola, Alessia

    2016-12-01

    High resolution Synchrotron-based X-ray Phase Contrast Tomography (XPCT) allows the simultaneous detection of three dimensional neuronal and vascular networks without using contrast agents or invasive casting preparation. We show and discuss the different features observed in reconstructed XPCT volumes of the ex vivo mouse spinal cord in the lumbo-sacral region, including motor neurons and blood vessels. We report the application of an intensity-based segmentation method to detect and quantitatively characterize the modification in the vascular networks in terms of reduction in experimental visibility. In particular, we apply our approach to the case of the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), i.e. human multiple sclerosis animal model.

  4. Directional edge enhancement in optical tomography of thin phase objects.

    PubMed

    Meneses-Fabian, Cruz; Montes-Perez, Areli; Rodriguez-Zurita, Gustavo

    2011-01-31

    In this paper, we make a proposal to obtain the Hilbert-transform for each entry of the projection data leaving the slice of a thin phase object. These modified projections are stacked in such a way that they form a modified sinogram called Hilbert-sinogram. We prove that the inverse Radon-transform of this sinogram is the directional Hilbert-transform of the slice function, and the reconstructed image is the directional edge enhancement of the distribution function on the slice. The Hilbert-transform is implemented by a 4f optical Fourier-transform correlator and a spatial filter consisting of a phase step of π radians. One important feature of this proposal is to perform a turn of 180° in the spatial filter at a certain value of the projection angle within the range [0°, 360°]. The desired direction of enhancement can be chosen by the proper selection of such turning angle. We present both the mathematical modeling and numerical results.

  5. Rayleigh Wave Phase Velocities in Alaska from Ambient Noise Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepin, K. S.; Li, A.; Yao, Y.

    2016-12-01

    We have analyzed ambient noise data recorded at 136 broadband stations from the USArray Transportable Array and other permanent seismic networks in Alaska and westernmost Canada. Daily cross-correlations are obtained using vertical component seismograms and are stacked to form a single trace for each station pair. Rayleigh wave signals are extracted from the stacked traces and are used to calculate phase velocities in the Alaska region. Preliminary phase velocity maps show similar trends to those from previous studies, but also yield new anomalies given the wider geographical range provided by the Transportable Array. At short periods (6-12s), a high velocity anomaly is observed directly northeast of the Fairweather-Queen Charlotte fault, and a high velocity trend appears in the eastern Yukon terrane between the Denali and Tintina fault, probably reflecting mafic igneous crustal rocks. Significantly slow anomalies are present at the Prince William Sound, Cook Inlet, and the basins in southwestern and central Alaska, indicating sediment effects. The slow anomalies gradually shift to southeastern and south-central Alaska with increasing period (up to 40s), corresponding to the Wrangell volcano belt and the volcano arc near Cook Inlet. A broad high-velocity zone is also observed in central Alaska to the north of the Denali fault at long periods (30-40s). The Yakutat terrane is characterized as a high-velocity anomaly from period 14s to 25s but not imaged at longer periods due to poor resolution.

  6. Silver nanoparticle-induced degranulation observed with quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Jiyong; Bae, Yoonsung; Kim, Dugyoung

    2010-07-01

    Monitoring a degranulation process in a live mast cell is a quite important issue in immunology and pharmacology. Because the size of a granule is normally much smaller than the resolution limit of an optical microscope system, there is no direct real-time live cell imaging technique for observing degranulation processes except for fluorescence imaging techniques. In this research, we propose optical quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) as a new observation tool to study degranulation processes in a live mast cell without any fluorescence labeling. We measure the cell volumes and the cross sectional profiles (x-z plane) of an RBL-2H3 cell and a HeLa cell, before and after they are exposed to calcium ionophore A23187 and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). We verify that the volume and the cross sectional line profile of the RBL-2H3 cell were changed significantly when it was exposed to A23187. When 50 μg/mL of AgNP is used instead of A23187, the measurements of cell volume and cross sectional profiles indicate that RBL-2H3 cells also follow degranulation processes. Degranulation processes for these cells are verified by monitoring the increase of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) and histamine with fluorescent methods.

  7. Quantitative phase imaging for cell culture quality control.

    PubMed

    Kastl, Lena; Isbach, Michael; Dirksen, Dieter; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Kemper, Björn

    2017-03-06

    The potential of quantitative phase imaging (QPI) with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) for quantification of cell culture quality was explored. Label-free QPI of detached single cells in suspension was performed by Michelson interferometer-based self-interference DHM. Two pancreatic tumor cell lines were chosen as cellular model and analyzed for refractive index, volume, and dry mass under varying culture conditions. Firstly, adequate cell numbers for reliable statistics were identified. Then, to characterize the performance and reproducibility of the method, we compared results from independently repeated measurements and quantified the cellular response to osmolality changes of the cell culture medium. Finally, it was demonstrated that the evaluation of QPI images allows the extraction of absolute cell parameters which are related to cell layer confluence states. In summary, the results show that QPI enables label-free imaging cytometry, which provides novel complementary integral biophysical data sets for sophisticated quantification of cell culture quality with minimized sample preparation. © 2017 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  8. CLASSIFICATION AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF GEOGRAPHIC ATROPHY JUNCTIONAL ZONE USING SPECTRAL DOMAIN OPTICAL COHERENCE TOMOGRAPHY.

    PubMed

    Qu, Jinfeng; Velaga, Swetha Bindu; Hariri, Amir H; Nittala, Muneeswar Gupta; Sadda, Srinivas

    2017-08-22

    The junctional zone at the border of areas of geographic atrophy (GA) in eyes with nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration is an important target region for future therapeutic strategies. The goal of this study was to perform a detailed classification and quantitative characterization of the junctional zone using spectral domain optical coherence tomography. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography volume cube scans (Spectralis OCT, 1024 × 37, Automatic Real Time > 9) were obtained from 15 eyes of 11 patients with GA because of nonneovascular age-related macular degeneration. Volume optical coherence tomography data were imported into previously described validated grading software (3D-OCTOR), and manual segmentation of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and photoreceptor layers was performed on all B-scans (total of 555). Retinal pigment epithelium and photoreceptor defect maps were produced for each case. The borders of the photoreceptor defect area and RPE defect area were delineated individually on separate annotation layers. The two outlines were then superimposed to compare the areas of overlap and nonoverlap. The perimeter of the RPE defect area was calculated by the software in pixels. The superimposed outline of the photoreceptor defect area and the RPE defect area was scrutinized to classify the overlap configuration of the junctional zone into one of three categories: Type 0, exact correspondence between the edge of the RPE defect and photoreceptor defect; Type 1, loss of photoreceptors outside and beyond the edge of the RPE defect; Type 2, preservation of photoreceptors beyond the edge of the RPE defect. The relative proportion of the various border configurations was expressed as a percentage of the perimeter of the RPE defect. Each configuration was then classified into four subgroups according to irregularity of the RPE band and the presence of debris. Fifteen eyes of 11 patients (mean age: 79.3 ± 4.3 years; range: 79-94 years) were

  9. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase.

  10. Direct visualization of dispersed lipid bicontinuous cubic phases by cryo-electron tomography

    PubMed Central

    Demurtas, Davide; Guichard, Paul; Martiel, Isabelle; Mezzenga, Raffaele; Hébert, Cécile; Sagalowicz, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    Bulk and dispersed cubic liquid crystalline phases (cubosomes), present in the body and in living cell membranes, are believed to play an essential role in biological phenomena. Moreover, their biocompatibility is attractive for nutrient or drug delivery system applications. Here the three-dimensional organization of dispersed cubic lipid self-assembled phases is fully revealed by cryo-electron tomography and compared with simulated structures. It is demonstrated that the interior is constituted of a perfect bicontinuous cubic phase, while the outside shows interlamellar attachments, which represent a transition state between the liquid crystalline interior phase and the outside vesicular structure. Therefore, compositional gradients within cubosomes are inferred, with a lipid bilayer separating at least one water channel set from the external aqueous phase. This is crucial to understand and enhance controlled release of target molecules and calls for a revision of postulated transport mechanisms from cubosomes to the aqueous phase. PMID:26573367

  11. Quantitative 3D petrography using X-ray tomography 2: Combining information at various resolutions

    SciTech Connect

    Pamukcu, Ayla S.; Gualda, Guilherme A.R.

    2010-12-02

    X-ray tomography is a nondestructive technique that can be used to study rocks and other materials in three dimensions over a wide range of sizes. Samples that range from decimeters to micrometers in size can be analyzed, and micrometer- to centimeter-sized crystals, vesicles, and other particles can be identified and quantified. In many applications, quantification of a large spectrum of sizes is important, but this cannot be easily accomplished using a single tomogram due to a common trade-off between sample size and image resolution. This problem can be circumvented by combining tomograms acquired for a single sample at a variety of resolutions. We have successfully applied this method to obtain crystal size distributions (CSDs) for magnetite, pyroxene + biotite, and quartz + feldspar in Bishop Tuff pumice. Five cylinders of systematically varying size (1-10 mm diameter and height) were analyzed from each of five pumice clasts. Cylinder size is inversely proportional to image resolution, such that resolution ranges from 2.5 to 17 {micro}m/voxel with increasing sample size. This allows quantification of crystals 10-1000 {micro}m in size. We obtained CSDs for each phase in each sample by combining information from all resolutions, each size bin containing data from the resolution that best characterizes crystals of that size. CSDs for magnetite and pyroxene + biotite in late-erupted Bishop pumice obtained using this method are fractal, but do not seem to result from crystal fragmentation. CSDs for quartz + feldspar reveal a population of abundant crystals <35 {micro}m in size, and a population of crystals >50 {micro}m in size, which will be the focus of a separate publication.

  12. Quantitative wood–adhesive penetration with X-ray computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Paris, Jesse L.; Kamke, Frederick A.

    2015-09-01

    Micro X-ray computed tomography (XCT) was used to analyze the 3D adhesive penetration behavior of different wood–adhesive bondlines. Three adhesives, a phenol formaldehyde (PF), a polymeric diphenylmethane diisocyanate (pMDI), and a hybrid polyvinyl acetate (PVA), all tagged with iodine for enhanced X-ray attenuation, were used to prepare single-bondline laminates in two softwoods, Douglas-fir and loblolly pine, and one hardwood, a hybrid polar. Adhesive penetration depth was measured with two separate calculations, and results were compared with 2D fluorescent micrographs. A total of 54 XCT scans were collected, representing six replicates of each treatment type; each replicate, however, consisted of approximately 1500 individual, cross-section slices stacked along the specimen length. As these adhesives were highly modified, the presented results do not indicate typical behavior for their broader adhesive classes. Still, clear penetration differences were observed between each adhesive type, and between wood species bonded with both the PF and pMDI adhesives. Furthermore, penetration results depended on the calculation method used. Two adhesive types with noticeably different resin distributions in the cured bondline, showed relatively similar penetration depths when calculated with a traditional effective penetration equation. However, when the same data was calculated with a weighted penetration calculation, which accounts for both adhesive area and depth, the results appeared to better represent the different distributions depicted in the photomicrographs and tomograms. Additionally, individual replicate comparisons showed variation due to specimen anatomy, not easily observed or interpreted from 2D images. Finally, 3D views of segmented 3D adhesive phases offered unique, in-situ views of the cured adhesive structures. In particular, voids formed by CO2 bubbles generated during pMDI cure were clearly visible in penetrated columns of the solidified

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Early [(18)F]Sodium Fluoride Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography Response to Treatment in Men With Metastatic Prostate Cancer to Bone.

    PubMed

    Harmon, Stephanie A; Perk, Timothy; Lin, Christie; Eickhoff, Jens; Choyke, Peter L; Dahut, William L; Apolo, Andrea B; Humm, John L; Larson, Steven M; Morris, Michael J; Liu, Glenn; Jeraj, Robert

    2017-08-20

    Purpose [(18)F]Sodium fluoride (NaF) positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) is a promising radiotracer for quantitative assessment of bone metastases. This study assesses changes in early NaF PET/CT response measures in metastatic prostate cancer for correlation to clinical outcomes. Patients and Methods Fifty-six patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) with osseous metastases had NaF PET/CT scans performed at baseline and after three cycles of chemotherapy (n = 16) or androgen receptor pathway inhibitors (n = 40). A novel technology, Quantitative Total Bone Imaging, was used for analysis. Global imaging metrics, including maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax) and total functional burden (SUVtotal), were extracted from composite lesion-level statistics for each patient and tracked throughout treatment. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated as a composite end point of progressive events using conventional imaging and/or physician discretion of clinical benefit; NaF imaging was not used for clinical evaluation. Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were conducted between imaging metrics and PFS. Results Functional burden (SUVtotal) assessed midtreatment was the strongest univariable PFS predictor (hazard ratio, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.44 to 2.71; P < .001). Classification of patients based on changes in functional burden showed stronger correlation to PFS than did the change in number of lesions. Various global imaging metrics outperformed baseline clinical markers in predicting outcome, including SUVtotal and SUVmean. No differences in imaging response or PFS correlates were found for different treatment cohorts. Conclusion Quantitative total bone imaging enables comprehensive disease quantification on NaF PET/CT imaging, showing strong correlation to clinical outcomes. Total functional burden assessed after three cycles of hormonal therapy or chemotherapy was predictive of PFS for men with mCRPC. This

  14. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies. PMID:27040492

  15. Experimental Realisation of High-sensitivity Laboratory X-ray Grating-based Phase-contrast Computed Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birnbacher, Lorenz; Willner, Marian; Velroyen, Astrid; Marschner, Mathias; Hipp, Alexander; Meiser, Jan; Koch, Frieder; Schröter, Tobias; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Jürgen; Pfeiffer, Franz; Herzen, Julia

    2016-04-01

    The possibility to perform high-sensitivity X-ray phase-contrast imaging with laboratory grating-based phase-contrast computed tomography (gbPC-CT) setups is of great interest for a broad range of high-resolution biomedical applications. However, achieving high sensitivity with laboratory gbPC-CT setups still poses a challenge because several factors such as the reduced flux, the polychromaticity of the spectrum, and the limited coherence of the X-ray source reduce the performance of laboratory gbPC-CT in comparison to gbPC-CT at synchrotron facilities. In this work, we present our laboratory X-ray Talbot-Lau interferometry setup operating at 40 kVp and describe how we achieve the high sensitivity yet unrivalled by any other laboratory X-ray phase-contrast technique. We provide the angular sensitivity expressed via the minimum resolvable refraction angle both in theory and experiment, and compare our data with other differential phase-contrast setups. Furthermore, we show that the good stability of our high-sensitivity setup allows for tomographic scans, by which even the electron density can be retrieved quantitatively as has been demonstrated in several preclinical studies.

  16. Phase-sensitive multiple reference optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dsouza, Roshan I.; Subhash, Hrebesh; Neuhaus, Kai; Hogan, Josh; Wilson, Carol; Leahy, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Multiple reference OCT (MR-OCT) is a recently developed novel time-domain OCT platform based on a miniature reference arm optical delay, which utilizes a single miniature actuator and a partial mirror to generate recirculating optical delay for extended axial-scan range. MR-OCT technology promises to fit into a robust and cost-effective design, compatible with integration into consumer-level devices for addressing wide applications in mobile healthcare and biometry applications. Using conventional intensity based OCT processing techniques, the high-resolution structural imaging capability of MR-OCT has been recently demonstrated for various applications including in vivo human samples. In this study, we demonstrate the feasibility of implementing phase based processing with MR-OCT for various functional applications such as Doppler imaging and sensing of blood vessels, and for tissue vibrography applications. The MR-OCT system operates at 1310nm with a spatial resolution of ~26 µm and an axial scan rate of 600Hz. Initial studies show a displacement-sensitivity of ~20 nm to ~120 nm for the first 1 to 9 orders of reflections, respectively with a mirror as test-sample. The corresponding minimum resolvable velocity for these orders are ~2.3 µm/sec and ~15 µm/sec respectively. Data from a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model will be shown to demonstrate the feasibility of MR-OCT for imaging in-vivo blood flow.

  17. Investigating mechanically induced phase response of the tissue by using high-speed phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Yuye; Hendon, Christine P.

    2017-02-01

    Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT), a functional extension of OCT, provides depth-resolved phase information with extra contrast. In cardiology, changes in the mechanical properties have been associated with tissue remodeling and disease progression. Here we present the capability of profiling structural deformation of the sample in vivo by using a highly stable swept source OCT system The system, operating at 1300 nm, has an A-line acquisition rate of 200 kHz. We measured the phase noise floor to be 6.5 pm±3.2 pm by placing a cover slip in the sample arm, while blocking the reference arm. We then conducted a vibrational frequency test by measuring the phase response from a polymer membrane stimulated by a pure tone acoustic wave from 10 kHz to 80 kHz. The measured frequency response agreed with the known stimulation frequency with an error < 0.005%. We further measured the phase response of 7 fresh swine hearts obtained from Green Village Packing Company through a mechanical stretching test, within 24 hours of sacrifice. The heart tissue was cut into a 1 mm slices and fixed on two motorized stages. We acquired 100,000 consecutive M-scans, while the sample is stretched at a constant velocity of 10 um/s. The depth-resolved phase image presents linear phase response over time at each depth, but the slope varies among tissue types. Our future work includes refining our experiment protocol to quantitatively measured the elastic modulus of the tissue in vivo and building a tissue classifier based on depth-resolved phase information.

  18. Investigation of qualitative and quantitative factors related to radiological exposure to nursing staff during computed tomography examinations.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hiroshige; Koshida, Kichiro; Ishigamori, Osamu; Matsubara, Kosuke

    2014-11-01

    Radiologists or nurses intermittently stay in computed tomography rooms during computed tomography examinations; these actions are defined as “entrance actions.” The qualitative and quantitative factors related to radiological exposure to computed tomography nursing staff were investigated to identify the protective measures against entrance actions. A questionnaire survey was used to investigate the frequency, motives, and causalities of entrance actions. Individual and area monitoring were simultaneously performed. The mean frequency of entrance actions was 1.2 times mo(−1). The primary motive for entrance actions was to dispel anxieties regarding collateral accidents during computed tomography. The nursing staff particularly engaged in close supervision to help the patients cope with contrast media extravasation. The average personal dose equivalent [Hp(10)] to the nurses was 0.21 mSv mo(−1). The ambient dose equivalent [H*(10)] rate was 1.4–3.7 mSv min(−1) at a distance of 1 m from CT gantry centre. Avoidance of entrance actions and collateral accidents would decrease the occupational exposures to nurses.

  19. Robust numerical phase stabilization for long-range swept-source optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Song, Shaozhen; Xu, Jingjiang; Men, Shaojie; Shen, Tueng T; Wang, Ruikang K

    2017-05-09

    A novel phase stabilization technique is demonstrated with significant improvement in the phase stability of a micro-electromechanical (MEMS) vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) based swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. Without any requirements of hardware modifications, the new fully numerical phase stabilization technique features high tolerance to acquisition jitter, and significantly reduced budget in computational effort. We demonstrate that when measured with biological tissue, this technique enables a phase sensitivity of 89 mrad in highly scattering tissue, with image ranging distance of up to 12.5 mm at A-line scan rate of 100.3 kHz. We further compare the performances delivered by the phase-stabilization approach with conventional numerical approach for accuracy and computational efficiency. Imaging result of complex signal-based optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and Doppler OCTA indicate that the proposed phase stabilization technique is robust, and efficient in improving the image contrast-to-noise ratio and extending OCTA depth range. The proposed technique can be universally applied to improve phase-stability in generic SS-OCT with different scale of scan rates without a need for special treatment. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Quantitative material decomposition using spectral computed tomography with an energy-resolved photon-counting detector.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seungwan; Choi, Yu-Na; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2014-09-21

    Dual-energy computed tomography (CT) techniques have been used to decompose materials and characterize tissues according to their physical and chemical compositions. However, these techniques are hampered by the limitations of conventional x-ray detectors operated in charge integrating mode. Energy-resolved photon-counting detectors provide spectral information from polychromatic x-rays using multiple energy thresholds. These detectors allow simultaneous acquisition of data in different energy ranges without spectral overlap, resulting in more efficient material decomposition and quantification for dual-energy CT. In this study, a pre-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique based on volume conservation was proposed for three-material decomposition. The technique was combined with iterative reconstruction algorithms by using a ray-driven projector in order to improve the quality of decomposition images and reduce radiation dose. A spectral CT system equipped with a CZT-based photon-counting detector was used to implement the proposed dual-energy CT technique. We obtained dual-energy images of calibration and three-material phantoms consisting of low atomic number materials from the optimal energy bins determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The material decomposition process was accomplished by both the proposed and post-reconstruction dual-energy CT techniques. Linear regression and normalized root-mean-square error (NRMSE) analyses were performed to evaluate the quantitative accuracy of decomposition images. The calibration accuracy of the proposed dual-energy CT technique was higher than that of the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique, with fitted slopes of 0.97-1.01 and NRMSEs of 0.20-4.50% for all basis materials. In the three-material phantom study, the proposed dual-energy CT technique decreased the NRMSEs of measured volume fractions by factors of 0.17-0.28 compared to the post-reconstruction dual-energy CT technique. It was concluded that the

  1. Quantitative micro-computed tomography: a non-invasive method to assess equivalent bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Nazarian, Ara; Snyder, Brian D; Zurakowski, David; Müller, Ralph

    2008-08-01

    One of the many applications of micro computed tomography (microCT) is to accurately visualize and quantify cancellous bone microstructure. However, microCT based assessment of bone mineral density has yet to be thoroughly investigated. Specifically, the effects of varying imaging parameters, such as tube voltage (kVp), current (microA), integration time (ms), object to X-ray source distance (mm), projection number, detector array size and imaging media (surrounding the specimen), on the relationship between equivalent tissue density (rhoEQ) and its linear attenuation coefficient (micro) have received little attention. In this study, in house manufactured, hydrogen dipotassium phosphate liquid calibration phantoms (K2HPO4) were employed in addition to a resin embedded hydroxyapatite solid calibration phantoms supplied by Scanco Medical AG Company. Variations in current, integration time and projection number had no effect on the conversion relationship between micro and rhoEQ for the K2HPO4 and Scanco calibration phantoms [p>0.05 for all cases]. However, as expected, variations in scanning tube voltage, object to X-ray source distance, detector array size and imaging media (referring to the solution that surrounds the specimen in the imaging vial) significantly affected the conversion relationship between mu and rhoEQ for K2HPO4 and Scanco calibration phantoms [p<0.05 for all cases]. A multivariate linear regression approach was used to estimate rhoEQ based on attenuation coefficient, tube voltage, object to X-ray source distance, detector array size and imaging media for K2HPO4 liquid calibration phantoms, explaining 90% of the variation in rhoEQ. Furthermore, equivalent density values of bovine cortical bone (converted from attenuation coefficient to equivalent density using the K2HPO4 liquid calibration phantoms) samples highly correlated [R2=0.92] with the ash densities of the samples. In conclusion, Scanco calibration phantoms can be used to assess equivalent

  2. Automatic multi-parametric quantification of the proximal femur with quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Bonaretti, Serena; Saeed, Isra; Harnish, Roy; Recker, Robert; Burghardt, Andrew J.; Keyak, Joyce H.; Harris, Tamara; Khosla, Sundeep; Lang, Thomas F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) imaging is the basis for multiple assessments of bone quality in the proximal femur, including volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD), tissue volume, estimation of bone strength using finite element modeling (FEM), cortical bone thickness, and computational-anatomy-based morphometry assessments. Methods Here, we present an automatic framework to perform a multi-parametric QCT quantification of the proximal femur. In this framework, the proximal femur is cropped from the bilateral hip scans, segmented using a multi-atlas based segmentation approach, and then assigned volumes of interest through the registration of a proximal femoral template. The proximal femur is then subjected to compartmental vBMD, compartmental tissue volume, FEM bone strength, compartmental surface-based cortical bone thickness, compartmental surface-based vBMD, local surface-based cortical bone thickness, and local surface-based cortical vBMD computations. Consequently, the template registrations together with vBMD and surface-based cortical bone parametric maps enable computational anatomy studies. The accuracy of the segmentation was validated against manual segmentations of 80 scans from two clinical facilities, while the multi-parametric reproducibility was evaluated using repeat scans with repositioning from 22 subjects obtained on CT imaging systems from two manufacturers. Results Accuracy results yielded a mean dice similarity coefficient of 0.976±0.006, and a modified Haussdorf distance of 0.219±0.071 mm. Reproducibility of QCT-derived parameters yielded root mean square coefficients of variation (CVRMS) between 0.89-1.66% for compartmental vBMD; 0.20-1.82% for compartmental tissue volume; 3.51-3.59% for FEM bone strength; 1.89-2.69% for compartmental surface-based cortical bone thickness; and 1.08-2.19% for compartmental surface-based cortical vBMD. For local surface-based assessments, mean CVRMS were between 3.45-3.91% and 2

  3. Does peripheral quantitative computed tomography ignore tissue density of cancellous bone?

    PubMed

    Banse, X; Devogelaer, J P

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to determine the capacity of peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to accurately measure the true physical properties of vertebral cancellous bone samples and to predict their stiffness. pQCT bone mineral density (BMD) was first measured in ideal conditions. Ten cubic specimens of vertebral cancellous bone (10 x 10 x 10 mm) were washed with a water jet, defatted, and scanned in saline after elimination of air bubbles; thirteen slices were obtained. Seventy-one unprepared cylindrical samples were scanned in more realistic conditions, which allow further biomechanical testing. After extraction from the vertebral body, the samples were pushed into a plastic tube (no effort was made to remove the marrow or air bubbles), and only four slices were obtained to reduce the duration of scan. For the 81 samples, the true bone volume fraction (BV/TV, %), true apparent density (rho(app), g/cm(3)), and tissue density (rho(tiss), g/cm(3)) (an indicator of the degree of mineralization of the matrix) were then measured using Archimedes principle. rho(app) was closely correlated to BV/TV (r(2) = 0.97). rho(tiss) (1.58 +/- 0.08 g/cm(2)) was almost constant but had some influence on rho(app) (r(2) = 0.03, p < 0.001). The pQCT BMD predicted accurately rho(app) (r(2) = 0.96) and BV/TV (r(2) = 0.93) for the cylinders. For the cubes, in ideal conditions, the same correlations were even better (r(2) > 0.99, both). Analysis of covariance indicated no difference (p > 0.05) in the regressions due to preparation of the samples. The stiffness was better predicted by the true rho(app) (r(2) = 0.87) than by BV/TV (r(2) = 0.83), indicating that stiffness was influenced by small differences in the tissue density. Consequently, the correlation between pQCT BMD and stiffness was excellent (r(2) = 0.84). The fact that pQCT did not ignore this tissue density information compensated for the inaccuracies linked to realistic scanning conditions of the cylinder.

  4. Quantitative analysis of retinal perfusion in mice using optical coherence tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Alnawaiseh, Maged; Brand, Cristin; Bormann, Eike; Wistuba, Joachim; Eter, Nicole; Heiduschka, Peter

    2017-09-07

    To evaluate repeatability of the quantitative analysis of vessel density in the retinas of healthy mice using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A). Seventeen eyes of seventeen healthy mice aged 10-15 weeks (young) and 75-95 weeks (old) were included in this study. OCT-A was performed using RTVue XR Avanti (Optovue Inc., Fremont, California, USA) under general anaesthesia. The retina was imaged twice using a 3 × 3 mm(2) scan. Retinal thickness and flow density data in the superficial and deep retinal OCT angiograms were extracted and analysed. The differences between the flow density values (whole en face) in the first and second sessions were non-significant (superficial retinal OCT angiogram: first session: 45.4 ± 4.1% (39.1-55.3%); second session: 46.1 ± 4.7% (39.1-59.1%); p = 0.14; deep retinal OCT angiogram: first session: 47.1 ± 3.8% (39.4-53.4%); second session: 47.3 ± 3.7% (39.4-53.8%); p = 0.50). The repeatability assessment of retinal thickness yielded intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values ranging between (0.86-0.99) while the ICCs for the flow density measurements ranged from 0.87 to 0.92 for the superficial retinal OCT angiogram and 0.68 to 0.93 for the deep retinal OCT angiogram. Repeated OCT-A measurement of mice retinal vessel density (VD) revealed valid repeatability, indicating that this non-invasive technology is sufficient for longitudinal assessment of vascular changes in various mouse models and thereby opening the way to in-depth, experimental analysis of the vascular aspects of different retinal diseases and monitoring of disease progression and the effects of treatments. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Reliability of clinically relevant 3D foot bone angles from quantitative computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Surgical treatment and clinical management of foot pathology requires accurate, reliable assessment of foot deformities. Foot and ankle deformities are multi-planar and therefore difficult to quantify by standard radiographs. Three-dimensional (3D) imaging modalities have been used to define bone orientations using inertial axes based on bone shape, but these inertial axes can fail to mimic established bone angles used in orthopaedics and clinical biomechanics. To provide improved clinical relevance of 3D bone angles, we developed techniques to define bone axes using landmarks on quantitative computed tomography (QCT) bone surface meshes. We aimed to assess measurement precision of landmark-based, 3D bone-to-bone orientations of hind foot and lesser tarsal bones for expert raters and a template-based automated method. Methods Two raters completed two repetitions each for twenty feet (10 right, 10 left), placing anatomic landmarks on the surfaces of calcaneus, talus, cuboid, and navicular. Landmarks were also recorded using the automated, template-based method. For each method, 3D bone axes were computed from landmark positions, and Cardan sequences produced sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane angles of bone-to-bone orientations. Angular reliability was assessed using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and the root mean square standard deviation (RMS-SD) for intra-rater and inter-rater precision, and rater versus automated agreement. Results Intra- and inter-rater ICCs were generally high (≥ 0.80), and the ICCs for each rater compared to the automated method were similarly high. RMS-SD intra-rater precision ranged from 1.4 to 3.6° and 2.4 to 6.1°, respectively, for the two raters, which compares favorably to uni-planar radiographic precision. Greatest variability was in Navicular: Talus sagittal plane angle and Cuboid: Calcaneus frontal plane angle. Precision of the automated, atlas-based template method versus the raters was comparable to

  6. COMPARISON OF QUANTITATIVE COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY-BASED MEASURES IN PREDICTING VERTEBRAL COMPRESSIVE STRENGTH

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Jenni M.; Loo, Kenneth; Motherway, Julie

    2007-01-01

    Patient-specific measures derived from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans are currently being developed as a clinical tool for vertebral strength prediction. QCT-based measurement techniques vary greatly in structural complexity and generally fall into one of three categories: 1) bone mineral density (BMD), 2) “mechanics of solids” (MOS) models, such as minimum axial rigidity (the product of axial stiffness and vertebral height), or 3) three dimensional finite element (FE) models. There is no clear consensus as to the relative performance of these measures due to differences in experimental protocols, sample sizes and demographics, and outcome metrics. The goal of this study was to directly compare the performance of QCT-based assessment techniques of varying degrees of structural sophistication in predicting experimental vertebral compressive strength. Eighty-one human thoracic vertebrae (T6 – T10) from 44 donors cadavers (F = 32, M = 12; 85 + 8 y.o., max = 97 y.o., min = 54 y.o.) were QCT scanned and destructively tested in uniaxial compression. The QCT scans were processed to generate FE models and various BMD and MOS measures, including trabecular bone mineral density (tBMD), integral bone mineral density (iBMD), and axial rigidity. Bone mineral density was weakly to moderately predictive of compressive strength (R2 = 0.16 and 0.62 for tBMD and iBMD, respectively). Ex vivo vertebral strength was strongly correlated with both axial rigidity (R2 = 0.81) and FE strength measurements (R2 = 0.80), and the predictive capabilities of these two metrics were statistically equivalent (p > 0.05 for differences between FE and axial rigidity). The results of this study indicate that non-invasive predictive measures of vertebral strength should include some level of structural sophistication, specifically, gross geometric and material property distribution information. However, for uniaxial compression of isolated vertebrae, which is the current biomechanical

  7. Validation of Electrical-Impedance Tomography for Measurements of Material Distribution in Two-Phase Flows

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccio, S.L.; George, D.L.; O'Hern, T.J.; Shollenberger, K.A.; Torczynski, J.R.

    1998-10-16

    A series of studies is presented in which an electrical-impedance tomography (EXT) system is validated for two-phase flow measurements. The EIT system, developed at Sandia National Laboratories, is described along with the computer algorithm used for reconstructing phase volume fraction profiles. The algorithm is first tested using numerical data and experimental phantom measurements, with good results. The EIT system is then applied to solid-liquid and gas-liquid flows, and results are compared to an established gamma-densitometry tomography (GDT) system. In the solid-liquid flows, the average solid volume fractions measured by EIT are in good agreement with nominal values; in the gas-liquid flows, average gas volume fractions and radial gas volume fraction profiles from GDT and EIT are also in good agreement.

  8. Propagation-based phase-contrast tomography for high-resolution lung imaging with laboratory sources

    SciTech Connect

    Krenkel, Martin Töpperwien, Mareike; Salditt, Tim; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke

    2016-03-15

    We have performed high-resolution phase-contrast tomography on whole mice with a laboratory setup. Enabled by a high-brilliance liquid-metal-jet source, we show the feasibility of propagation-based phase contrast in local tomography even in the presence of strongly absorbing surrounding tissue as it is the case in small animal imaging of the lung. We demonstrate the technique by reconstructions of the mouse lung for two different fields of view, covering the whole organ, and a zoom to the local finer structure of terminal airways and alveoli. With a resolution of a few micrometers and the wide availability of the technique, studies of larger biological samples at the cellular level become possible.

  9. The effects of iterative reconstruction and kernel selection on quantitative computed tomography measures of lung density.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Alfonso; Ranallo, Frank N; Judy, Philip F; Fain, Sean B

    2017-06-01

    To determine the effects of iterative reconstruction (IR) and high-frequency kernels on quantitative computed tomography (qCT) density measures at reduced X-ray dose. The COPDGene 2 Phantom (CTP 698, The Phantom Laboratory, Salem, NY) with four embedded lung mimicking foam densities (12lb, 20lb, and 4lb), as well as water, air, and acrylic reference inserts, was imaged using a GE 64 slice CT750 HD scanner in helical mode with four current-time products ranging from 12 to 100 mAs. The raw acquired data were reconstructed using standard (STD - low frequency) and Bone (high frequency) kernels with filtered back projection (FBP), 100% ASiR, and Veo reconstruction algorithms. The reference density inserts were manually segmented using Slicer3D (www.slicer.org), and the mean, standard deviation, and histograms of the segmented regions were generated using Fiji (http://fiji.sc/Fiji) for each reconstruction. Measurements of threshold values placed on the cumulative frequency distribution of voxels determined by these measured histograms at 5%, PD5phant , and 15%, PD15phant , (analogous to the relative area below -950 HU (RA-950) and percent density 15 (PD15) in human lung emphysema quantification, respectively), were also performed. The use of high-resolution kernels in conjunction with ASiR and Veo did not significantly affect the mean Hounsfield units (HU) of each of the density standards (< 4 HU deviation) and current-time products within the phantom when compared with the STD+FBP reconstruction conventionally used in clinical applications. A truncation of the scanner reported HU values at -1024 that shifts the mean toward more positive values was found to cause a systematic error in lower attenuating regions. Use of IR drove convergence toward the mean of measured histograms (~100-137% increase in the number measured voxels at the mean of the histogram), while the combination of Bone+ASiR preserved the standard deviation of HU values about the mean compared to STD

  10. Silver nanoparticle-induced degranulation observed with quantitative phase microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenzhong; Lee, Seungrag; Lee, Jiyong; Bae, Yoonsung; Kim, Dugyoung

    2010-02-01

    The use of AgNP is becoming more and more widespread in biomedical field. But compared with the promising bactericidal function, other physiological effects of AgNP on cells are relatively scant. In this research, we propose quantitative phase microscopy (QPM) as a new method to study the degranulation, and AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cell degranulation is studied as well. Firstly, HeLa cells as the cell control and PBS as the solvent control, we measured the cell volume and cross section profile (x-z plane) with QPM. The results showed that the volume and cross section profile changed only the RBL-2H3 cells exposed to calcium ionophore A23187, which demonstrates the validity of QPM in degranulation research. Secondly, 50μg/mL of AgNP was used instead of A23187, and the measurement of cell volume and cross section profile was carried out again. RBL-2H3 cell volume increased immediately after AgNP was added, and cross section profile showed that the cell surface became granulated, but HeLa cell was lack of that effect. Phase images obviously indicated the RBL-2H3 cell deformation. Thirdly, stained with Fluo-3/AM, intracellular calcium Ca2+]i of single RBL-2H3 cell treated with AgNP was observed with fluorescent microscopy; incubated with AgNP for 20min, the supernatant of RBL-2H3 cells was collected and reacted with o-phthalaldehyde (OPA), then the fluorescent intensity of histamine-OPA complex was assayed with spectrofluorometer. The results of Ca2+]i and histamine increase showed that degranulation of AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cell occurred. So, the cell volume was used as a parameter of degranulation in our study and AgNP-induced RBL-2H3 cells degranulation was confirmed by the cell volume increment, cross section profile change, and [Ca2+]i and histamine in supernatant increase.

  11. Phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution for optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates.

    PubMed

    Cámara, Alejandro; Alieva, Tatiana; Rodrigo, José A; Calvo, María L

    2009-06-01

    We propose a simple approach for the phase space tomography reconstruction of the Wigner distribution of paraxial optical beams separable in Cartesian coordinates. It is based on the measurements of the antisymmetric fractional Fourier transform power spectra, which can be taken using a flexible optical setup consisting of four cylindrical lenses. The numerical simulations and the experimental results clearly demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed scheme.

  12. Myelinated mouse nerves studied by X-ray phase contrast zoom tomography.

    PubMed

    Bartels, M; Krenkel, M; Cloetens, P; Möbius, W; Salditt, T

    2015-12-01

    We have used X-ray phase contrast tomography to resolve the structure of uncut, entire myelinated optic, saphenous and sciatic mouse nerves. Intrinsic electron density contrast suffices to identify axonal structures. Specific myelin labeling by an osmium tetroxide stain enables distinction between axon and surrounding myelin sheath. Utilization of spherical wave illumination enables zooming capabilities which enable imaging of entire sciatic internodes as well as identification of sub-structures such as nodes of Ranvier and Schmidt-Lanterman incisures.

  13. Quantum Process Tomography of a Room Temperature Optically-Controlled Phase Shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupchak, Connor; Rind, Samuel; Figueroa, Eden; Stony Brook University Team

    2015-05-01

    We have developed a room temperature setup capable of optically controlled phase shifts on a weak probe field. Our system is realized in a vapor of 87Rb atoms under the conditions of electromagnetically induced transparency utilizing a N-type energy level scheme coupled by three optical fields. By varying the power of the signal field, we can control the size of an optical phase shift experienced by weak coherent state pulses of < n > ~ 1 , propagating through the vapor. We quantify the optical phase shift by measuring the process output via balanced homodyne tomography which provides us with the complete quadrature and phase information of the output states. Furthermore, we measure the output for a set of states over a subspace of the coherent state basis and gain the information to completely reconstruct our phase shift procedure by coherent state quantum process tomography. The reconstruction yields a rank-4 process superoperator which grants the ability to predict how our phase shift process will behave on an arbitrary quantum optical state in the mode of the reconstruction. Our results demonstrate progress towards room temperature systems for possible quantum gates; a key component of a future quantum processor designed to operate at room temperature. US-Navy Office of Naval Research N00141410801, National Science Foundation PHY-1404398, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada.

  14. Integration of Quantitative Positron Emission Tomography Absolute Myocardial Blood Flow Measurements in the Clinical Management of Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Henry; Dilsizian, Vasken

    2016-05-31

    In the >40 years since planar myocardial imaging with(43)K-potassium was introduced into clinical research and management of patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), diagnosis and treatment have undergone profound scientific and technological changes. One such innovation is the current state-of-the-art hardware and software for positron emission tomography myocardial perfusion imaging, which has advanced it from a strictly research-oriented modality to a clinically valuable tool. This review traces the evolving role of quantitative positron emission tomography measurements of myocardial blood flow in the evaluation and management of patients with CAD. It presents methodology, currently or soon to be available, that offers a paradigm shift in CAD management. Heretofore, radionuclide myocardial perfusion imaging has been primarily qualitative or at best semiquantitative in nature, assessing regional perfusion in relative terms. Thus, unlike so many facets of modern cardiovascular practice and CAD management, which depend, for example, on absolute values of key parameters such as arterial and left ventricular pressures, serum lipoprotein, and other biomarker levels, the absolute levels of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow have yet to be incorporated into routine clinical practice even in most positron emission tomography centers where the potential to do so exists. Accordingly, this review focuses on potential value added for improving clinical CAD practice by measuring the absolute level of rest and maximal myocardial blood flow. Physiological principles and imaging fundamentals necessary to understand how positron emission tomography makes robust, quantitative measurements of myocardial blood flow possible are highlighted. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  15. The existence of amorphous phase in Portland cements: Physical factors affecting Rietveld quantitative phase analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Snellings, Ruben Bazzoni, Amélie Scrivener, Karen

    2014-05-01

    Rietveld quantitative phase analysis has become a widespread tool for the characterization of Portland cement, both for research and production control purposes. One of the major remaining points of debate is whether Portland cements contain amorphous content or not. This paper presents detailed analyses of the amorphous phase contents in a set of commercial Portland cements, clinker, synthetic alite and limestone by Rietveld refinement of X-ray powder diffraction measurements using both external and internal standard methods. A systematic study showed that the sample preparation and comminution procedure is closely linked to the calculated amorphous contents. Particle size reduction by wet-grinding lowered the calculated amorphous contents to insignificant quantities for all materials studied. No amorphous content was identified in the final analysis of the Portland cements under investigation.

  16. Differentiating malignant from benign gastric mucosal lesions with quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography: Initial experience.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoyan; Ni, Cheng; Shen, Yaqi; Hu, Xuemei; Chen, Xiao; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu

    2017-01-01

    To investigate the value of quantitative analysis in dual energy spectral computed tomography (DESCT) for differentiating malignant gastric mucosal lesions from benign gastric mucosal lesions (including gastric inflammation [GI] and normal gastric mucosa [NGM]). This study was approved by the ethics committee, and all patients provided written informed consent. A total of 161 consecutive patients (63 with gastric cancer [GC], 48 with GI, and 50 with NGM) who underwent dual-phase contrast enhanced DESCT scans in the arterial phase (AP) and portal venous phase (PVP) were included in this study. Iodine concentration (IC) in lesions was derived from the iodine-based material-decomposition images and normalized to that in the aorta to obtain normalized IC (nIC). The ratios of IC and nIC between the AP and PVP were calculated. Diagnostic confidence for GC and GI was evaluated with reviewing the features including gastric wall thickness, focal, and eccentric on the conventional polychromatic images. All statistical analyses were performed by using statistical software SPSS 17.0 (SPSS, Chicago, IL). IC and nIC in GC differed significantly from those in GI and NGM, except for nICAP in comparing GC with GI. Mean nIC values of GC (0.18 ± 0.06 in AP and 0.62 ± 0.16 in PVP) were significantly higher than that of NGM (0.12 ± 0.03 in AP and 0.37 ± 0.08 in PVP) (all P < 0.05). There was also significant difference for IC values in GC, GI, and NGM (24.19 ± 8.27, 19.07 ± 5.82, and 13.61 ± 2.52 mg/mL, respectively, in AP and 28.00 ± 7.01, 24.66 ± 6.55, and 16.94 ± 3.06 mg/mL, respectively, in PVP). Based on Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve analysis, nIC and IC in PVP had high sensitivities of 88.89% and 90.48%, respectively, in differentiating GC from NGM, while the sensitivities were 71.43% and 88.89% during AP. Ratios IC and nIC ratios did not provide adequate diagnostic accuracy with their area under curves less than

  17. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H.; Arepalli, Chesnal D.; Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S.; Khosa, Faisal; Coy, Adam M.; Tridandapani, Srini

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (P{sub AGG}) and IVS (P{sub IV} {sub S}) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (P{sub CT}). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for P{sub AGG} for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to P

  18. Characterization of cardiac quiescence from retrospective cardiac computed tomography using a correlation-based phase-to-phase deviation measure

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Carson A.; McClellan, James H.; Arepalli, Chesnal D.; Auffermann, William F.; Henry, Travis S.; Khosa, Faisal; Coy, Adam M.; Tridandapani, Srini

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Accurate knowledge of cardiac quiescence is crucial to the performance of many cardiac imaging modalities, including computed tomography coronary angiography (CTCA). To accurately quantify quiescence, a method for detecting the quiescent periods of the heart from retrospective cardiac computed tomography (CT) using a correlation-based, phase-to-phase deviation measure was developed. Methods: Retrospective cardiac CT data were obtained from 20 patients (11 male, 9 female, 33–74 yr) and the left main, left anterior descending, left circumflex, right coronary artery (RCA), and interventricular septum (IVS) were segmented for each phase using a semiautomated technique. Cardiac motion of individual coronary vessels as well as the IVS was calculated using phase-to-phase deviation. As an easily identifiable feature, the IVS was analyzed to assess how well it predicts vessel quiescence. Finally, the diagnostic quality of the reconstructed volumes from the quiescent phases determined using the deviation measure from the vessels in aggregate and the IVS was compared to that from quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner. Three board-certified radiologists, fellowship-trained in cardiothoracic imaging, graded the diagnostic quality of the reconstructions using a Likert response format: 1 = excellent, 2 = good, 3 = adequate, 4 = nondiagnostic. Results: Systolic and diastolic quiescent periods were identified for each subject from the vessel motion calculated using the phase-to-phase deviation measure. The motion of the IVS was found to be similar to the aggregate vessel (AGG) motion. The diagnostic quality of the coronary vessels for the quiescent phases calculated from the aggregate vessel (PAGG) and IVS (PIV S) deviation signal using the proposed methods was comparable to the quiescent phases calculated by the CT scanner (PCT). The one exception was the RCA, which improved for PAGG for 18 of the 20 subjects when compared to PCT (PCT = 2.48; PAGG = 2.07, p = 0

  19. Phase-shifting by means of an electronically tunable lens: quantitative phase imaging of biological specimens with digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos; Doblas, Ana; Saavedra, Genaro; Martínez-Corral, Manuel; García-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    The use of an electronically tunable lens (ETL) to produce controlled phase shifts in interferometric arrangements is shown. The performance of the ETL as a phase-shifting device is experimentally validated in phase-shifting digital holographic microscopy. Quantitative phase maps of a section of the thorax of a Drosophila melanogaster fly and of human red blood cells have been obtained using our proposal. The experimental results validate the possibility of using the ETL as a reliable phase-shifter device.

  20. Quantitative analysis of microscopic X-ray computed tomography imaging: Japanese quail embryonic soft tissues with iodine staining.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Rui; Larsson, Hans C E

    2013-09-01

    Rapid three-dimensional imaging of embryos to better understand the complex process of morphogenesis has been challenging. Recently introduced iodine staining protocols (I2 KI and alcoholic iodine stains) combined with microscopic X-ray computed tomography allows visualization of soft tissues in diverse small organisms and tissue specimens. I2 KI protocols have been developed specifically for small animals, with a limited number of quantitative studies of soft tissue contrasts. To take full advantage of the low X-ray attenuation of ethanol and retain bound iodine while dehydrating the specimen in ethanol, we developed an ethanol I2 KI protocol. We present comparative microscopic X-ray computed tomography analyses of ethanol I2 KI and I2 KI staining protocols to assess the performance of this new protocol to visualize soft tissue anatomy in late stage Japanese quail embryos using quantitative measurements of soft tissue contrasts and sample shrinkage. Both protocols had only 5% shrinkage compared with the original harvested specimen, supporting the use of whole mounts to minimize tissue shrinkage effects. Discrimination within and among the selected organs with each staining protocol and microscopic X-ray computed tomography imaging were comparable to those of a gray scale histological section. Tissue discrimination was assessed using calibrated computed tomography values and a new discrimination index to quantify the degree of computed tomography value overlaps between selected soft tissue regions. Tissue contrasts were dependent on the depth of the tissue within the embryos before the embryos were saturated with each stain solution, and optimal stain saturations for the entire embryo were achieved at 14 and 28 days staining for I2 KI and ethanol I2 KI, respectively. Ethanol I2 KI provided superior soft tissue contrasts by reducing overstaining of fluid-filled spaces and differentially modulating staining of some tissues, such as bronchial and esophageal walls and

  1. Quantitative analysis of microscopic X-ray computed tomography imaging: Japanese quail embryonic soft tissues with iodine staining

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Rui; Larsson, Hans C E

    2013-01-01

    Rapid three-dimensional imaging of embryos to better understand the complex process of morphogenesis has been challenging. Recently introduced iodine staining protocols (I2KI and alcoholic iodine stains) combined with microscopic X-ray computed tomography allows visualization of soft tissues in diverse small organisms and tissue specimens. I2KI protocols have been developed specifically for small animals, with a limited number of quantitative studies of soft tissue contrasts. To take full advantage of the low X-ray attenuation of ethanol and retain bound iodine while dehydrating the specimen in ethanol, we developed an ethanol I2KI protocol. We present comparative microscopic X-ray computed tomography analyses of ethanol I2KI and I2KI staining protocols to assess the performance of this new protocol to visualize soft tissue anatomy in late stage Japanese quail embryos using quantitative measurements of soft tissue contrasts and sample shrinkage. Both protocols had only 5% shrinkage compared with the original harvested specimen, supporting the use of whole mounts to minimize tissue shrinkage effects. Discrimination within and among the selected organs with each staining protocol and microscopic X-ray computed tomography imaging were comparable to those of a gray scale histological section. Tissue discrimination was assessed using calibrated computed tomography values and a new discrimination index to quantify the degree of computed tomography value overlaps between selected soft tissue regions. Tissue contrasts were dependent on the depth of the tissue within the embryos before the embryos were saturated with each stain solution, and optimal stain saturations for the entire embryo were achieved at 14 and 28 days staining for I2KI and ethanol I2KI, respectively. Ethanol I2KI provided superior soft tissue contrasts by reducing overstaining of fluid-filled spaces and differentially modulating staining of some tissues, such as bronchial and esophageal walls and spinal

  2. Structured illumination multimodal 3D-resolved quantitative phase and fluorescence sub-diffraction microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Shwetadwip; Eldridge, Will J.; Wax, Adam; Izatt, Joseph A.

    2017-01-01

    Sub-diffraction resolution imaging has played a pivotal role in biological research by visualizing key, but previously unresolvable, sub-cellular structures. Unfortunately, applications of far-field sub-diffraction resolution are currently divided between fluorescent and coherent-diffraction regimes, and a multimodal sub-diffraction technique that bridges this gap has not yet been demonstrated. Here we report that structured illumination (SI) allows multimodal sub-diffraction imaging of both coherent quantitative-phase (QP) and fluorescence. Due to SI’s conventionally fluorescent applications, we first demonstrate the principle of SI-enabled three-dimensional (3D) QP sub-diffraction imaging with calibration microspheres. Image analysis confirmed enhanced lateral and axial resolutions over diffraction-limited QP imaging, and established striking parallels between coherent SI and conventional optical diffraction tomography. We next introduce an optical system utilizing SI to achieve 3D sub-diffraction, multimodal QP/fluorescent visualization of A549 biological cells fluorescently tagged for F-actin. Our results suggest that SI has a unique utility in studying biological phenomena with significant molecular, biophysical, and biochemical components. PMID:28663887

  3. 28 MHz swept source at 1.0 μm for ultrafast quantitative phase imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Xiaoming; Lau, Andy K. S.; Xu, Yiqing; Tsia, Kevin K.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging high-throughput optical imaging modalities, in particular those providing phase information, necessitate a demanding speed regime (e.g. megahertz sweep rate) for those conventional swept sources; while an effective solution is yet to be demonstrated. We demonstrate a stable breathing laser as inertia-free swept source (BLISS) operating at a wavelength sweep rate of 28 MHz, particularly for the ultrafast interferometric imaging modality at 1.0 μm. Leveraging a tunable dispersion compensation element inside the laser cavity, the wavelength sweep range of BLISS can be tuned from ~10 nm to ~63 nm. It exhibits a good intensity stability, which is quantified by the ratio of standard deviation to the mean of the pulse intensity, i.e. 1.6%. Its excellent wavelength repeatability, <0.05% per sweep, enables the single-shot imaging at an ultrafast line-scan rate without averaging. To showcase its potential applications, it is applied to the ultrafast (28-MHz line-scan rate) interferometric time-stretch (iTS) microscope to provide quantitative morphological information on a biological specimen at a lateral resolution of 1.2 μm. This fiber-based inertia-free swept source is demonstrated to be robust and broadband, and can be applied to other established imaging modalities, such as optical coherence tomography (OCT), of which an axial resolution better than 12 μm can be achieved. PMID:26504636

  4. Quantitative Phase Determination by Using a Michelson Interferometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomarico, Juan A.; Molina, Pablo F.; D'Angelo, Cristian

    2007-01-01

    The Michelson interferometer is one of the best established tools for quantitative interferometric measurements. It has been, and is still successfully used, not only for scientific purposes, but it is also introduced in undergraduate courses for qualitative demonstrations as well as for quantitative determination of several properties such as…

  5. Quantitative Phase Determination by Using a Michelson Interferometer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pomarico, Juan A.; Molina, Pablo F.; D'Angelo, Cristian

    2007-01-01

    The Michelson interferometer is one of the best established tools for quantitative interferometric measurements. It has been, and is still successfully used, not only for scientific purposes, but it is also introduced in undergraduate courses for qualitative demonstrations as well as for quantitative determination of several properties such as…

  6. Correlation of quantitative dual-energy computed tomography iodine maps and abdominal computed tomography perfusion measurements: are single-acquisition dual-energy computed tomography iodine maps more than a reduced-dose surrogate of conventional computed tomography perfusion?

    PubMed

    Stiller, Wolfram; Skornitzke, Stephan; Fritz, Franziska; Klauss, Miriam; Hansen, Jens; Pahn, Gregor; Grenacher, Lars; Kauczor, Hans-Ulrich

    2015-10-01

    Study objectives were the quantitative evaluation of whether conventional abdominal computed tomography (CT) perfusion measurements mathematically correlate with quantitative single-acquisition dual-energy CT (DECT) iodine concentration maps, the determination of the optimum time of acquisition for achieving maximum correlation, and the estimation of the potential for radiation exposure reduction when replacing conventional CT perfusion by single-acquisition DECT iodine concentration maps. Dual-energy CT perfusion sequences were dynamically acquired over 51 seconds (34 acquisitions every 1.5 seconds) in 24 patients with histologically verified pancreatic carcinoma using dual-source DECT at tube potentials of 80 kVp and 140 kVp. Using software developed in-house, perfusion maps were calculated from 80-kVp image series using the maximum slope model after deformable motion correction. In addition, quantitative iodine maps were calculated for each of the 34 DECT acquisitions per patient. Within a manual segmentation of the pancreas, voxel-by-voxel correlation between the perfusion map and each of the iodine maps was calculated for each patient to determine the optimum time of acquisition topt defined as the acquisition time of the iodine map with the highest correlation coefficient. Subsequently, regions of interest were placed inside the tumor and inside healthy pancreatic tissue, and correlation between mean perfusion values and mean iodine concentrations within these regions of interest at topt was calculated for the patient sample. The mean (SD) topt was 31.7 (5.4) seconds after the start of contrast agent injection. The mean (SD) perfusion values for healthy pancreatic and tumor tissues were 67.8 (26.7) mL per 100 mL/min and 43.7 (32.2) mL per 100 mL/min, respectively. At topt, the mean (SD) iodine concentrations were 2.07 (0.71) mg/mL in healthy pancreatic and 1.69 (0.98) mg/mL in tumor tissue, respectively. Overall, the correlation between perfusion values and

  7. Estimation of elastic parameters of ovarian tissue using phase stabilized swept source optical-coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Sreyankar; Wang, Tianheng; Salehi, Hassan; Sanders, Melinda; Brewer, Molly; Zhu, Quing

    2015-03-01

    We have estimated the micro-mechanical properties of ovarian tissue using phase-sensitive swept source optical coherence tomography. Ovary samples were mechanically excited by periodical vibration of an ultrasound transducer. The displacement and strain of the tissues were calculated during loading. Significant difference in strain was observed between the normal and malignant ovary groups, which indicates much softer and heterogeneous tissue structure for malignant ovaries. The initial results show that the phase sensitive swept source optical coherence elastography (OCE) can be an effective tool for characterization of stiffness and other micro-mechanical properties of normal and malignant ovarian tissue.

  8. Enhancing multi-step quantum state tomography by PhaseLift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yiping; Zhao, Qing

    2017-09-01

    Multi-photon system has been studied by many groups, however the biggest challenge faced is the number of copies of an unknown state are limited and far from detecting quantum entanglement. The difficulty to prepare copies of the state is even more serious for the quantum state tomography. One possible way to solve this problem is to use adaptive quantum state tomography, which means to get a preliminary density matrix in the first step and revise it in the second step. In order to improve the performance of adaptive quantum state tomography, we develop a new distribution scheme of samples and extend it to three steps, that is to correct it once again based on the density matrix obtained in the traditional adaptive quantum state tomography. Our numerical results show that the mean square error of the reconstructed density matrix by our new method is improved to the level from 10-4 to 10-9 for several tested states. In addition, PhaseLift is also applied to reduce the required storage space of measurement operator.

  9. 3D quantitative analysis of graphite morphology in high strength cast iron by high-energy x-ray tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, Chih-Pin; Singh, Dileep; Kenesei, Peter; Almer, Jonathan; Hryn, John N.; Huff, Richard

    2015-09-01

    The size and morphology of the graphite particles play a crucial role in determining various mechanical and thermal properties of cast iron. In the present study, we utilized high-energy synchrotron X-ray tomography to perform quantitative 3D-characterization of the distribution of graphite particles in high-strength compacted graphite iron (CGI). The size, shape, and spatial connectivity of graphite were examined. The analysis reveals that the compacted graphite can grow with a coral-tree-like morphology and span several hundred microns in the iron matrix.

  10. Phase-resolved optical coherence tomography and optical Doppler tomography for imaging blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-01-15

    We have developed a novel phase-resolved optical coherence tomography (OCT) and optical Doppler tomography (ODT) system that uses phase information derived from a Hilbert transformation to image blood flow in human skin with fast scanning speed and high velocity sensitivity. Using the phase change between sequential scans to construct flow-velocity imaging, this technique decouples spatial resolution and velocity sensitivity in flow images and increases imaging speed by more than 2 orders of magnitude without compromising spatial resolution or velocity sensitivity. The minimum flow velocity that can be detected with an axial-line scanning speed of 400 Hz and an average phase change over eight sequential scans is as low as 10 {mu}m/s , while a spatial resolution of 10 {mu}m is maintained. Using this technique, we present what are to our knowledge the first phase-resolved OCT/ODT images of blood flow in human skin. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  11. Information-based analysis of X-ray in-line phase tomography with application to the detection of iron oxide nanoparticles in the brain.

    PubMed

    Rositi, Hugo; Frindel, Carole; Langer, Max; Wiart, Marlène; Olivier, Cécile; Peyrin, Françoise; Rousseau, David

    2013-11-04

    The study analyzes noise in X-ray in-line phase tomography in a biomedical context. The impact of noise on detection of iron oxide nanoparticles in mouse brain is assessed. The part of the noise due to the imaging system and the part due to biology are quantitatively expressed in a Neyman Pearson detection strategy with two models of noise. This represents a practical extension of previous work on noise in phase-contrast X-ray imaging which focused on the theoretical expression of the signal-to-noise ratio in mono-dimensional phantoms, taking account of the statistical noise of the imaging system only. We also report the impact of the phase retrieval step on detection performance. Taken together, this constitutes a general methodology of practical interest for quantitative extraction of information from X-ray in-line phase tomography, and is also relevant to assessment of contrast agents with a blob-like signature in high resolution imaging.

  12. Breast tumor segmentation in high resolution x-ray phase contrast analyzer based computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Brun, E.; Grandl, S.; Sztrókay-Gaul, A.; Gasilov, S.; Barbone, G.; Mittone, A.; Coan, P.; Bravin, A.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Phase contrast computed tomography has emerged as an imaging method, which is able to outperform present day clinical mammography in breast tumor visualization while maintaining an equivalent average dose. To this day, no segmentation technique takes into account the specificity of the phase contrast signal. In this study, the authors propose a new mathematical framework for human-guided breast tumor segmentation. This method has been applied to high-resolution images of excised human organs, each of several gigabytes. Methods: The authors present a segmentation procedure based on the viscous watershed transform and demonstrate the efficacy of this method on analyzer based phase contrast images. The segmentation of tumors inside two full human breasts is then shown as an example of this procedure’s possible applications. Results: A correct and precise identification of the tumor boundaries was obtained and confirmed by manual contouring performed independently by four experienced radiologists. Conclusions: The authors demonstrate that applying the watershed viscous transform allows them to perform the segmentation of tumors in high-resolution x-ray analyzer based phase contrast breast computed tomography images. Combining the additional information provided by the segmentation procedure with the already high definition of morphological details and tissue boundaries offered by phase contrast imaging techniques, will represent a valuable multistep procedure to be used in future medical diagnostic applications.

  13. Interface-specific x-ray phase retrieval tomography of complex biological organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltran, M. A.; Paganin, D. M.; Siu, K. K. W.; Fouras, A.; Hooper, S. B.; Reser, D. H.; Kitchen, M. J.

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate interface-specific propagation-based x-ray phase retrieval tomography of the thorax and brain of small animals. Our method utilizes a single propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast image per projection, under the assumptions of (i) partially coherent paraxial radiation, (ii) a static object whose refractive indices take on one of a series of distinct values at each point in space and (iii) the projection approximation. For the biological samples used here, there was a 9-200 fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio of the phase-retrieved tomograms over the conventional attenuation-contrast signal. The ability to 'digitally dissect' a biological specimen, using only a single phase-contrast image per projection, will be useful for low-dose high-spatial-resolution biomedical imaging of form and biological function in both healthy and diseased tissue.

  14. A method to calibrate phase fluctuation in polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2011-06-01

    A phase fluctuation calibration method is presented for polarization-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography (PS-SS-OCT) using continuous polarization modulation. The method consists of the generation of a continuous triggered tone-burst waveform rather than an asynchronous waveform by use of a function generator and the removal of the global phases of the measured Jones matrices by use of matrix normalization. This could remove the use of auxiliary optical components for the phase fluctuation compensation in the system, which reduces the system complexity. Phase fluctuation calibration is necessary to obtain the reference Jones matrix by averaging the measured Jones matrices at sample surfaces. Measurements on an equine tendon sample were made by the PS-SS-OCT system to validate the proposed method.

  15. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  16. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs

    PubMed Central

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-01-01

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium. PMID:25966338

  17. Phase-contrast zoom tomography reveals precise locations of macrophages in mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Krenkel, Martin; Markus, Andrea; Bartels, Matthias; Dullin, Christian; Alves, Frauke; Salditt, Tim

    2015-05-12

    We have performed x-ray phase-contrast tomography on mouse lung tissue. Using a divergent x-ray beam generated by nanoscale focusing, we used zoom tomography to produce three-dimensional reconstructions with selectable magnification, resolution, and field of view. Thus, macroscopic tissue samples extending over several mm can be studied in sub-cellular-level structural detail. The zoom capability and, in particular, the high dose efficiency are enabled by the near-perfect exit wavefront of an optimized x-ray waveguide channel. In combination with suitable phase-retrieval algorithms, challenging radiation-sensitive and low-contrast samples can be reconstructed with minimal artefacts. The dose efficiency of the method is demonstrated by the reconstruction of living macrophages both with and without phagocytized contrast agents. We also used zoom tomography to visualize barium-labelled macrophages in the context of morphological structures in asthmatic and healthy mouse lung tissue one day after intratracheal application. The three-dimensional reconstructions showed that the macrophages predominantly localized to the alveoli, but they were also found in bronchial walls, indicating that these cells might be able to migrate from the lumen of the bronchi through the epithelium.

  18. Quantitative, Three-dimensional Analysis of the Global Corona with Multi-spacecraft Differential Emission Measure Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frazin, Richard A.; Vásquez, Alberto M.; Kamalabadi, Farzad

    2009-08-01

    A previous paper (Frazin et al. 2005b) introduced the concept of differential emission measure tomography (DEMT), which is a three-dimensional (3D) extension of the classical differential emission measure technique for determining the distribution of temperatures in a volume of plasma. The information for the reconstruction in the three spatial dimensions is provided by solar rotation and/or multi-spacecraft views. This paper describes, quantitatively, the procedure for implementing DEMT with data from NASA's STEREO/EUVI instrument, including the radiometry, line-of-sight geometry, and image preparation steps. An example of a quantitative, multiband, 3D reconstruction and local differential emission measure curves are given, and it is demonstrated that, when applicable, DEMT is a simple 3D analysis tool that obviates the need for structure-specific modeling.

  19. Administration of romosozumab improves vertebral trabecular and cortical bone as assessed with quantitative computed tomography and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Christian; Campbell, Graeme M; Peña, Jaime; Borggrefe, Jan; Padhi, Desmond; Kaufman, Allegra; Chang, Sung; Libanati, Cesar; Glüer, Claus-Christian

    2015-12-01

    Romosozumab inhibits sclerostin, thereby increasing bone formation and decreasing bone resorption. This dual effect of romosozumab leads to rapid and substantial increases in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) as measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). In a phase 1b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, romosozumab or placebo was administered to 32 women and 16 men with low aBMD for 3 months, with a further 3-month follow-up: women received six doses of 1 or 2mg/kg every 2 weeks (Q2W) or three doses of 2 or 3mg/kg every 4 weeks (Q4W); men received 1mg/kg Q2W or 3mg/kg Q4W. Quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans at lumbar (L1-2) vertebrae and high-resolution QCT (HR-QCT) scans at thoracic vertebra (T12) were analyzed in a subset of subjects at baseline, month 3, and month 6. The QCT subset included 24 romosozumab and 9 placebo subjects and the HR-QCT subset included 11 romosozumab and 3 placebo subjects. The analyses pooled the romosozumab doses. Linear finite element modeling of bone stiffness was performed. Compared with placebo, the romosozumab group showed improvements at month 3 for trabecular BMD by QCT and HR-QCT, HR-QCT trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and separation, density-weighted cortical thickness, and QCT stiffness (all p<0.05). At month 6, improvements from baseline were observed in QCT trabecular BMD and stiffness, and in HR-QCT BMD, trabecular BV/TV and separation, density-weighted cortical thickness, and stiffness in the romosozumab group (all p<0.05 compared with placebo). The mean (SE) increase in HR-QCT stiffness with romosozumab from baseline was 26.9% ± 6.8% and 35.0% ±6.8% at months 3 and 6, respectively; subjects administered placebo had changes of -2.7% ± 13.4% and -6.4% ± 13.4%, respectively. In conclusion, romosozumab administered for 3 months resulted in rapid and large improvements in trabecular and cortical bone mass and structure as well as whole bone stiffness, which continued 3 months

  20. Electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy method for characterising particles in solid-liquid phase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yanlin; Wang, Mi; Yao, Jun

    2014-04-11

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is one of the process tomography techniques to provide an on-line non-invasive imaging for multiphase flow measurement. With EIT measurements, the images of impedance real part, impedance imaginary part, phase angle, and magnitude can be obtained. However, most of the applications of EIT in the process industries rely on the conductivity difference between two phases in fluids to obtain the concentration profiles. It is not common to use the imaginary part or phase angle due to the dominant change in conductivity or complication in the use of other impedance information. In a solid-liquid two phases system involving nano- or submicro-particles, characterisation of particles (e.g. particle size and concentration) have to rely on the measurement of impedance phase angle or imaginary part. Particles in a solution usually have an electrical double layer associated with their surfaces and can form an induced electrical dipole moment due to the polarization of the electrical double layer under the influence of an alternating electric field. Similar to EIT, electrical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) measurement can record the electrical impedance data, including impedance real part, imaginary part and phase angle (θ), which are caused by the polarization of the electrical double layer. These impedance data are related to the particle characteristics e.g. particle size, particle and ionic concentrations in the aqueous medium, therefore EIS method provides a capability for characterising the particles in suspensions. Electrical impedance tomography based on EIS measurement or namely, electrical impedance tomography spectroscopy (EITS) could image the spatial distribution of particle characteristics. In this paper, a new method, including test set-up and data analysis, for characterisation of particles in suspensions are developed through the experimental approach. The experimental results on tomographic imaging of colloidal particles

  1. [Quantitative cartilage analysis with magnetic resonance tomography (qMRI)--a new era in arthrosis diagnosis?].

    PubMed

    Eckstein, F; Englmeier, K H; Reiser, M

    2002-06-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a new and very powerful method for the diagnostics and monitoring of osteoarthritis. Its advantage is that all articular tissues can be visualized directly and are accessible for three-dimensional analysis. This article reviews qualitative, semi-quantitative, and quantitative studies on articular cartilage with MRI. In particular we discuss pulse sequences and three-dimensional postprocessing methods for quantitative analysis of cartilage volume and thickness, along with their accuracy and precision in healthy volunteers and patients with osteoarthritis. It addition, we present approaches for quantitative analyses of structural/biochemical parameters and for the deformational behavior of cartilage in vivo.

  2. Surface wave phase-velocity tomography based on multichannel cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Ge; Gaherty, James B.

    2015-06-01

    We have developed a new method to retrieve seismic surface wave phase velocity using dense seismic arrays. The method measures phase variations between nearby stations based on waveform cross-correlation. The coherence in waveforms between adjacent stations results in highly precise relative phase estimates. Frequency-dependent phase variations are then inverted for spatial variations in apparent phase velocity via the Eikonal equation. Frequency-dependent surface wave amplitudes measured on individual stations are used to correct the apparent phase velocity to account for multipathing via the Helmholtz equation. By using coherence and other data selection criteria, we construct an automated system that retrieves structural phase-velocity maps directly from raw seismic waveforms for individual earthquakes without human intervention. The system is applied to broad-band seismic data from over 800 events recorded on EarthScope's USArray from 2006 to 2014, systematically building up Rayleigh-wave phase-velocity maps between the periods of 20 and 100 s for the entire continental United States. At the highest frequencies, the resulting maps are highly correlated with phase-velocity maps derived from ambient noise tomography. At all frequencies, we observe a significant contrast in Rayleigh-wave phase velocity between the tectonically active western US and the stable eastern US, with the phase velocity variations in the western US being 1-2 times greater. The Love wave phase-velocity maps are also calculated. We find that overtone contamination may produce systemic bias for the Love-wave phase-velocity measurements.

  3. Characterization of triple-phase computed tomography in dogs with pancreatic insulinoma

    PubMed Central

    FUKUSHIMA, Kenjiro; FUJIWARA, Reina; YAMAMOTO, Kie; KANEMOTO, Hideyuki; OHNO, Koichi; TSUBOI, Masaya; UCHIDA, Kazuyuki; MATSUKI, Naoaki; NISHIMURA, Ryohei; TSUJIMOTO, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    Little information is available regarding triple-phase computed tomography (CT) of canine pancreatic insulinoma. A few case reports with small numbers of cases have indicated that hyper-attenuation in the arterial phase was a common finding on multi-phasic CT in dogs with insulinoma. Our purpose was to clarify the characteristic findings of dogs with insulinoma on triple-phase CT. Nine dogs with insulinoma that underwent triple-phase CT were included in the present study. Attenuation patterns in the arterial phase indicated hypo-attenuation in 4 cases and hyper-attenuation in 2 cases. In the remaining 3 cases, 1 case showed hypo-attenuation and 1 case showed hyper-attenuation in the pancreatic phase, and 1 case presented hyper-attenuation in the later phase. Altogether, 5 cases showed hypo and 4 cases showed hyper-attenuation in at least one phase. The enhancement pattern was homogenous in 7 cases and heterogeneous in 2 cases. Tumor margins were well-defined in 5 cases and ill-defined in 4 cases. Capsule formation was present in 5 cases and absent in 4 cases. In conclusion, it is important to note that hypo-attenuation was as common as hyper-attenuation in dogs with insulinoma in triple-phase CT in at least one phase. Additionally, mass lesions were most conspicuous not only in the arterial phase but in the pancreatic and later phases in some cases. Therefore, it is important to perform triple-phase CT and notice about variable findings for the detection of canine pancreatic insulinoma. PMID:26118410

  4. Quantitative Assessment of Anterior Segment Inflammation in a Rat Model of Uveitis Using Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pepple, Kathryn L.; Choi, Woo June; Wilson, Leslie; Van Gelder, Russell N.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop anterior segment spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) and quantitative image analysis for use in experimental uveitis in rats. Methods Acute anterior uveitis was generated in Lewis rats. A spectral domain anterior segment OCT system was used to image the anterior chamber (AC) and ciliary body at baseline and during peak inflammation 2 days later. Customized MatLab image analysis algorithms were developed to segment the AC, count AC cells, calculate central corneal thickness (CCT), segment the ciliary body and zonules, and quantify the level of ciliary body inflammation with the ciliary body index (CBI). Images obtained at baseline and during peak inflammation were compared. Finally, longitudinal imaging and image analysis was performed over the 2-week course of inflammation. Results Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography identifies structural features of inflammation. Anterior chamber cell counts at peak inflammation obtained by automated image analysis and human grading were highly correlated (r = 0.961), and correlated well with the histologic score of inflammation (r = 0.895). Inflamed eyes showed a significant increase in average CCT (27 μm, P = 0.02) and an increase in average CBI (P < 0.0001). Longitudinal imaging and quantitative image analysis identified a significant change in AC cell and CBI on day 2 with spontaneous resolution of inflammation by day 14. Conclusions Spectral-domain optical coherence tomography provides high-resolution images of the structural changes associated with anterior uveitis in rats. Anterior chamber cell count and CBI determined by semi-automated image analysis strongly correlates with inflammation, and can be used to quantify inflammation longitudinally in single animals. PMID:27388049

  5. Quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells using phase-shifting white light interference microscopy with colour fringe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh Mehta, Dalip; Srivastava, Vishal

    2012-11-01

    We report quantitative phase imaging of human red blood cells (RBCs) using phase-shifting interference microscopy. Five phase-shifted white light interferograms are recorded using colour charge coupled device camera. White light interferograms were decomposed into red, green, and blue colour components. The phase-shifted interferograms of each colour were then processed by phase-shifting analysis and phase maps for red, green, and blue colours were reconstructed. Wavelength dependent refractive index profiles of RBCs were computed from the single set of white light interferogram. The present technique has great potential for non-invasive determination of refractive index variation and morphological features of cells and tissues.

  6. Automatic full compensation of quantitative phase imaging in off-axis digital holographic microscopy.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Carlos; Castañeda, Raúl; Piedrahita-Quintero, Pablo; Garcia-Sucerquia, Jorge

    2016-12-20

    An automatic method that fully compensates the quantitative phase measurements in off-axis digital holographic microscopy (DHM) is presented. The two main perturbations of the quantitative phase measurements in off-axis DHM are automatically removed. While the curvature phase flaw introduced by the microscope objective is avoided by the use of an optimized telecentric imaging system for the recording of the holograms, the remaining phase perturbation due to the tilt of the reference wave is removed by the automatic computation of a digital compensating reference wave. The method has been tested on both nonbiological and biological samples with and improving on the quality of the recovered phase maps.

  7. Increased robustness and speed in low-dose phase-contrast tomography with laboratory sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamir, Anna; Hagen, Charlotte K.; Diemoz, Paul C.; Endrizzi, Marco; Vittoria, Fabio A.; Urbani, Luca; De Coppi, Paolo; Olivo, Alessandro

    2016-10-01

    In this article we discuss three different developments in Edge Illumination (EI) X-ray phase contrast imaging (XPCi), all ultimately aimed at optimising EI computed tomography (CT) for use in different environments, and for different applications. For the purpose of reducing scan times, two approaches are presented; the "reverse projection" acquisition scheme which allows a continuous rotation of the sample, and the "single image" retrieval algorithm, which requires only one frame for retrieval of the projected phase map. These are expected to lead to a substantial reduction of EI CT scan times, a prospect which is likely to promote the translation of EI into several applications, including clinical. The last development presented is the "modified local" phase retrieval. This retrieval algorithm is specifically designed to accurately retrieve sample properties (absorption, refraction, scattering) in cases where high-resolution scans are required in non-ideal environments. Experimental results, using both synchrotron radiation and laboratory sources, are shown for the various approaches.

  8. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-08-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise.

  9. Adaptive anisotropic diffusion for noise reduction of phase images in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Shaoyan; Huang, Yong; Peng, Shizhao; Wu, Yanfeng; Tan, Xiaodi

    2016-01-01

    Phase image in Fourier domain Doppler optical coherence tomography offers additional flow information of investigated samples, which provides valuable evidence towards accurate medical diagnosis. High quality phase images are thus desirable. We propose a noise reduction method for phase images by combining a synthetic noise estimation criteria based on local noise estimator (LNE) and distance median value (DMV) with anisotropic diffusion model. By identifying noise and signal pixels accurately and diffusing them with different coefficients respectively and adaptive iteration steps, we demonstrated the effectiveness of our proposed method in both phantom and mouse artery images. Comparison with other methods such as filtering method (mean, median filtering), wavelet method, probabilistic method and partial differential equation based methods in terms of peak signal-to-noise ratio (PSNR), equivalent number of looks (ENL) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) showed the advantages of our method in reserving image energy and removing noise. PMID:27570687

  10. Zernike Phase Contrast Electron Cryo-Tomography Applied to Marine Cyanobacteria Infected with Cyanophages

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wei; Fu, Caroline; Khant, Htet A.; Ludtke, Steven J.; Schmid, Michael F.; Chiu, Wah

    2015-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-tomography have provided a new opportunity to visualize the internal 3D structures of a bacterium. An electron microscope equipped with Zernike phase contrast optics produces images with dramatically increased contrast compared to images obtained by conventional electron microscopy. Here we describe a protocol to apply Zernike phase plate technology for acquiring electron tomographic tilt series of cyanophage-infected cyanobacterial cells embedded in ice, without staining or chemical fixation. We detail the procedures for aligning and assessing phase plates for data collection, and methods to obtain 3D structures of cyanophage assembly intermediates in the host, by subtomogram alignment, classification and averaging. Acquiring three to four tomographic tilt series takes approximately 12 h on a JEM2200FS electron microscope. We expect this time requirement to decrease substantially as the technique matures. Time required for annotation and subtomogram averaging varies widely depending on the project goals and data volume. PMID:25321408

  11. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography using continuous polarization modulation with arbitrary phase modulation amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Zenghai; Kasaragod, Deepa K.; Matcher, Stephen J.

    2012-03-01

    We demonstrate theoretically and experimentally that the phase retardance and relative optic-axis orientation of a sample can be calculated without prior knowledge of the actual value of the phase modulation amplitude when using a polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography system based on continuous polarization modulation (CPM-PS-OCT). We also demonstrate that the sample Jones matrix can be calculated at any values of the phase modulation amplitude in a reasonable range depending on the system effective signal-to-noise ratio. This has fundamental importance for the development of clinical systems by simplifying the polarization modulator drive instrumentation and eliminating its calibration procedure. This was validated on measurements of a three-quarter waveplate and an equine tendon sample by a fiber-based swept-source CPM-PS-OCT system.

  12. Effects of optical beam angle on quantitative optical coherence tomography (OCT) in normal and surface degenerated bovine articular cartilage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yan-Ping; Saarakkala, Simo; Toyras, Juha; Wang, Li-Ke; Jurvelin, Jukka S.; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative measurement of articular cartilage using optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a potential approach for diagnosing the early degeneration of cartilage and assessing the quality of its repair. However, a non-perpendicular angle of the incident optical beam with respect to the tissue surface may cause uncertainty to the quantitative analysis, and therefore, significantly affect the reliability of measurement. This non-perpendicularity was systematically investigated in the current study using bovine articular cartilage with and without mechanical degradation. Ten fresh osteochondral disks were quantitatively measured before and after artificially induced surface degradation by mechanical grinding. The following quantitative OCT parameters were determined with a precise control of the surface inclination up to an angle of 10° using a step of 2°: optical reflection coefficient (ORC), variation of surface reflection (VSR) along the surface profile, optical roughness index (ORI) and optical backscattering (OBS). It was found that non-perpendicularity caused systematic changes to all of the parameters. ORC was the most sensitive and OBS the most insensitive to the inclination angle. At the optimal perpendicular angle, all parameters could detect significant changes after surface degradation (p < 0.01), except OBS (p > 0.05). Nonsignificant change of OBS after surface degradation was expected since OBS reflected properties of the internal cartilage tissue and was not affected by the superficial mechanical degradation. As a conclusion, quantitative OCT parameters are diagnostically potential for characterizing the cartilage degeneration. However, efforts through a better controlled operation or corrections based on computational compensation mechanism should be made to minimize the effects of non-perpendicularity of the incident optical beam when clinical use of quantitative OCT is considered for assessing the articular cartilage.

  13. Imaging of poly(α-hydroxy-ester) scaffolds with X-ray phase-contrast microcomputed tomography.

    PubMed

    Appel, Alyssa A; Larson, Jeffery C; Somo, Sami; Zhong, Zhong; Spicer, Patrick P; Kasper, F Kurtis; Garson, Alfred B; Zysk, Adam M; Mikos, Antonios G; Anastasio, Mark A; Brey, Eric M

    2012-11-01

    Porous scaffolds based on poly(α-hydroxy-esters) are under investigation in many tissue engineering applications. A biological response to these materials is driven, in part, by their three-dimensional (3D) structure. The ability to evaluate quantitatively the material structure in tissue-engineering applications is important for the continued development of these polymer-based approaches. X-ray imaging techniques based on phase contrast (PC) have shown a tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide a contrast based on alternative X-ray properties (refraction and scatter) in addition to X-ray absorption. In this research, poly(α-hydroxy-ester) scaffolds were synthesized and imaged by X-ray PC microcomputed tomography. The 3D images depicting the X-ray attenuation and phase-shifting properties were reconstructed from the measurement data. The scaffold structure could be imaged by X-ray PC in both cell culture conditions and within the tissue. The 3D images allowed for quantification of scaffold properties and automatic segmentation of scaffolds from the surrounding hard and soft tissues. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on X-ray PC for imaging polymer scaffolds.

  14. Imaging of Poly(α-hydroxy-ester) Scaffolds with X-ray Phase-Contrast Microcomputed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Alyssa A.; Larson, Jeffery C.; Somo, Sami; Zhong, Zhong; Spicer, Patrick P.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Garson, Alfred B.; Zysk, Adam M.; Mikos, Antonios G.; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Porous scaffolds based on poly(α-hydroxy-esters) are under investigation in many tissue engineering applications. A biological response to these materials is driven, in part, by their three-dimensional (3D) structure. The ability to evaluate quantitatively the material structure in tissue-engineering applications is important for the continued development of these polymer-based approaches. X-ray imaging techniques based on phase contrast (PC) have shown a tremendous promise for a number of biomedical applications owing to their ability to provide a contrast based on alternative X-ray properties (refraction and scatter) in addition to X-ray absorption. In this research, poly(α-hydroxy-ester) scaffolds were synthesized and imaged by X-ray PC microcomputed tomography. The 3D images depicting the X-ray attenuation and phase-shifting properties were reconstructed from the measurement data. The scaffold structure could be imaged by X-ray PC in both cell culture conditions and within the tissue. The 3D images allowed for quantification of scaffold properties and automatic segmentation of scaffolds from the surrounding hard and soft tissues. These results provide evidence of the significant potential of techniques based on X-ray PC for imaging polymer scaffolds. PMID:22607529

  15. Single-exposure quantitative phase imaging in color-coded LED microscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonchan; Jung, Daeseong; Joo, Chulmin

    2017-02-01

    Quantitative phase-gradient or phase imaging in LED microscopy has been recently demonstrated. The methods enable measurement of phase distribution of transparent specimens in a simple and cost-effective manner, but require multiple image acquisitions with different source or pupil configurations to improve phase accuracy. Here, we demonstrate a strategy for single-shot quantitative phase imaging in color-coded LED microscopy. We employ a circular LED illumination pattern that is trisected into subregions with equal area, assigned to red, green and blue colors, respectively. Additional color filter is also employed to mitigate the color leakage of light into different color channels of the image sensor. Image acquisition with a color image sensor and subsequent computation based on the weak object transfer function allow for quantitative amplitude and phase measurements of a specimen. We describe computational model and single-shot quantitative phase imaging capability of our method by presenting phase images of calibrated phase sample and dynamics of cells. Phase measurement accuracy is validated with pre-characterized phase plate, and single-shot phase imaging capability is demonstrated with time-lapse imaging of cells acquired at 30 Hz.

  16. High-resolution synchrotron radiation-based phase tomography of the healthy and epileptic brain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bikis, Christos; Janz, Philipp; Schulz, Georg; Schweighauser, Gabriel; Hench, Jürgen; Thalmann, Peter; Deyhle, Hans; Chicherova, Natalia; Rack, Alexander; Khimchenko, Anna; Hieber, Simone E.; Mariani, Luigi; Haas, Carola A.; Müller, Bert

    2016-10-01

    Phase-contrast micro-tomography using synchrotron radiation has yielded superior soft tissue visualization down to the sub-cellular level. The isotropic spatial resolution down to about one micron is comparable to the one of histology. The methods, however, provide different physical quantities and are thus complementary, also allowing for the extension of histology into the third dimension. To prepare for cross-sectional animal studies on epilepsy, we have standardized the specimen's preparation and scanning procedure for mouse brains, so that subsequent histology remains entirely unaffected and scanning of all samples (n = 28) is possible in a realistic time frame. For that, we have scanned five healthy and epileptic mouse brains at the ID19 beamline, ESRF, Grenoble, France, using grating- and propagation-based phase contrast micro-tomography. The resulting datasets clearly show the cortex, ventricular system, thalamus, hypothalamus, and hippocampus. Our focus is on the latter, having planned kainate-induced epilepsy experiments. The cell density and organization in the dentate gyrus and Ammon's horn region were clearly visualized in control animals. This proof of principle was required to initiate experiment. The resulting three-dimensional data have been correlated to histology. The goal is a brain-wide quantification of cell death or structural reorganization associated with epilepsy as opposed to histology alone that represents small volumes of the total brain only. Thus, the proposed technique bears the potential to correlate the gold standard in analysis with independently obtained data sets. Such an achievement also fuels interest for other groups in neuroscience research to closely collaborate with experts in phase micro-tomography.

  17. Quantitative interferometric microscopy with two dimensional Hilbert transform based phase retrieval method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shouyu; Yan, Keding; Xue, Liang

    2017-01-01

    In order to obtain high contrast images and detailed descriptions of label free samples, quantitative interferometric microscopy combining with phase retrieval is designed to obtain sample phase distributions from fringes. As accuracy and efficiency of recovered phases are affected by phase retrieval methods, thus approaches owning higher precision and faster processing speed are still in demand. Here, two dimensional Hilbert transform based phase retrieval method is adopted in cellular phase imaging, it not only reserves more sample specifics compared to classical fast Fourier transform based method, but also overcomes disadvantages of traditional algorithm according to Hilbert transform which is a one dimensional processing causing phase ambiguities. Both simulations and experiments are provided, proving the proposed phase retrieval approach can acquire quantitative sample phases with high accuracy and fast speed.

  18. Quantitative exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography for the enhanced diagnosis of ischemic heart disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmarian, J.J.; Boyce, T.M.; Goldberg, R.K.; Cocanougher, M.K.; Roberts, R.; Verani, M.S. )

    1990-02-01

    The clinical utility of exercise thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography was investigated in 360 consecutive patients who had concomitant coronary arteriography. Tomographic images were assessed visually and from computer-quantified polar maps. Sensitivity for detecting coronary artery disease was comparably high using quantitative and visual analysis, although specificity tended to improve using the former method (87% versus 76%, p = 0.09). Quantitative analysis was superior to the visual method for identifying left anterior descending (81% versus 68%, p less than 0.05) and circumflex coronary artery (77% versus 60%, p less than 0.05) stenoses and detected most patients (92%) with multivessel coronary artery disease. Multivessel involvement was correctly predicted in 65% of the patients with more than one critically stenosed vessel. Exercise variables in patients with significant coronary artery disease were similar whether the tomographic images were normal or abnormal. However, patients with coronary stenoses and normal versus abnormal tomograms had a trend toward more single vessel disease (79% versus 62%, p = 0.07) and moderate coronary stenosis (66% versus 28%, p less than 0.001), but had less proximal left anterior descending artery involvement (8% versus 34%, p = 0.05). Computer-quantified perfusion defect size was directly related to the extent of coronary artery disease. Intra- and interobserver agreement for quantifying defects were excellent (r = 0.98 and 0.97, respectively). In conclusion, quantitative thallium-201 tomography offers improved detection of coronary artery disease, localization of the anatomic site of coronary stenosis, prediction of multivessel involvement and accurate determination of perfusion defect size, while maintaining a high specificity.

  19. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Matthias; Hernandez, Victor H.; Krenkel, Martin; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-01

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  20. Real-time phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography by use of optical Hilbert transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Ding, Zhihua; Ren, Hongwu; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2002-01-01

    We have developed a novel real-time phase-resolved functional optical coherence tomography system that uses optical Hilbert transformation. When we use a resonant scanner in the reference arm of the interferometer, with an axial scanning speed of 4 kHz, the frame rate of both structural and Doppler blood-flow imaging with a size of 100 by 100 pixels is 10 Hz. The system has high sensitivity and a larger dynamic range for measuring the Doppler frequency shift that is due to moving red blood cells. Real-time images of in vivo blood flow in human skin obtained with this interferometer are presented.

  1. Phase contrast tomography of the mouse cochlea at microfocus x-ray sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bartels, Matthias; Krenkel, Martin; Hernandez, Victor H.; Moser, Tobias; Salditt, Tim

    2013-08-19

    We present phase contrast x-ray tomography of functional soft tissue within the bony cochlear capsule of mice, carried out at laboratory microfocus sources with well-matched source, detector, geometry, and reconstruction algorithms at spatial resolutions down to 2 μm. Contrast, data quality and resolution enable the visualization of thin membranes and nerve fibers as well as automated segmentation of surrounding bone. By complementing synchrotron radiation imaging techniques, a broad range of biomedical applications becomes possible as demonstrated for optogenetic cochlear implant research.

  2. Quantitative computed tomographic indexes in diffuse interstitial lung disease: correlation with physiologic tests and computed tomography visual scores.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kyung Eun; Chung, Myung Jin; Jung, Man Pyo; Choe, Bong Keun; Lee, Kyung Soo

    2011-01-01

    To assess the correlation among quantitative indexes of computed tomography (CT), spirometric pulmonary function tests (PFTs), and visual scores (VSs) of CT in patients with diffuse interstitial lung disease (DILD) and to prove the estimated value of CT quantification for the prediction of the possibility of pulmonary function impairment. A total of 157 patients (male to female ratio, 96:61; mean age, 63 ± 11 years) with DILD were enrolled in this study. All patients underwent volume thin-section CT in the supine position at full inspiration. During the same period, 23 people (male to female ratio, 10:13; mean age, 55 ± 13 years) with no history of DILD and with normal PFTs and CT findings were used as a control group. Quantitative indexes were obtained using a commercial CAD system (Brilliance Workspace v3.0; Philips Medical Systems). Quantitative indexes included total lung volume (TLV), mean lung attenuation, variation of lung attenuation, emphysema volume (<-950 Hounsfield units [HU]), functioning lung volume (-700 HU > pixel > -950 HU), and interstitial lung disease volume (>-700 HU). Visual scores were measured semiquantitatively and included the overall extent of pulmonary parenchymal abnormality as well as the extent of consolidation, ground glass opacity, reticulation, and honeycomb opacities. Quantitative indexes were correlated with PFT and VSs using the Pearson correlation test. Quantitative indexes, PFT results, and VSs differed significantly between the DILD group and the control group, except for emphysematous parameters (P < 0.05).Pulmonary function test results showed significant correlation with quantitative indexes in the DILD group. Functioning lung volume showed positive correlation with forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 second (r = 0.80 and 0.73, P < 0.001). Total lung capacity showed positive correlation with TLV (r = 0.83, P < 0.001).Visual scores were correlated with the ratio of a specific volume to TLV (indicated

  3. Quantitative phase microscopy: a new tool for investigating the structure and function of unstained live cells.

    PubMed

    Curl, Claire L; Bellair, Catherine J; Harris, Peter J; Allman, Brendan E; Roberts, Ann; Nugent, Keith A; Delbridge, Lea M D

    2004-12-01

    1. The optical transparency of unstained live cell specimens limits the extent to which information can be recovered from bright-field microscopic images because these specimens generally lack visible amplitude-modulating components. However, visualization of the phase modulation that occurs when light traverses these specimens can provide additional information. 2. Optical phase microscopy and derivatives of this technique, such as differential interference contrast (DIC) and Hoffman modulation contrast (HMC), have been used widely in the study of cellular materials. With these techniques, enhanced contrast is achieved, which is useful in viewing specimens, but does not allow quantitative information to be extracted from the phase content available in the images. 3. An innovative computational approach to phase microscopy, which provides mathematically derived information about specimen phase-modulating characteristics, has been described recently. Known as quantitative phase microscopy (QPM), this method derives quantitative phase measurements from images captured using a bright-field microscope without phase- or interference-contrast optics. 4. The phase map generated from the bright-field images by the QPM method can be used to emulate other contrast image modes (including DIC and HMC) for qualitative viewing. Quantitative phase microscopy achieves improved discrimination of cellular detail, which permits more rigorous image analysis procedures to be undertaken compared with conventional optical methods. 5. The phase map contains information about cell thickness and refractive index and can allow quantification of cellular morphology under experimental conditions. As an example, the proliferative properties of smooth muscle cells have been evaluated using QPM to track growth and confluency of cell cultures. Quantitative phase microscopy has also been used to investigate erythrocyte cell volume and morphology in different osmotic environments. 6. Quantitative

  4. Disturbances in the cerebral perfusion of human immune deficiency virus-1 seropositive asymptomatic subjects: A quantitative tomography study of 18 cases

    SciTech Connect

    Tran Dinh, Y.R.; Mamo, H.; Cervoni, J.; Caulin, C.; Saimot, A.C. , Paris )

    1990-10-01

    Quantitative measurements of cerebral blood flow (CBF) by xenon-133 ({sup 133}Xe) tomography, together with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electroencephalography (EEG), psychometric tests, and laboratory analyses were performed on 18 human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) seropositive asymptomatic subjects. Abnormalities of cerebral perfusion were observed in 16 cases (88%). These abnormalities were particularly frequent in the frontal regions (77% of cases). MRI demonstrated leucoencephalopathy in only two cases. EEG showed only induced diffuse abnormalities in two cases. Psychometric tests showed restricted moderate disturbances in 55% of patients. These disturbances mostly concerned those sectors involved in cognitive functions and memorization. These results indicate that quantitative measurements of CBF by {sup 133}Xe-SPECT is capable of detecting abnormalities of cerebral perfusion at a very early stage (Phase II) of HIV-1 infection. These abnormalities are indications of disturbances resulting from unidentified metabolic or vascular lesions. This technique appears to be superior to MRI at this stage of the disease's development. It could provide objective information leading to earlier treatment, and prove useful in evaluating potential antiviral chemotherapy.

  5. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William; Paquit, Vincent C

    2008-01-01

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  6. Quantitative phase imaging by three-wavelength digital holography.

    PubMed

    Mann, Christopher J; Bingham, Philip R; Paquit, Vincent C; Tobin, Kenneth W

    2008-06-23

    Three-wavelength digital holography is applied to obtain surface height measurements over several microns of range, while simultaneously maintaining the low noise precision of the single wavelength phase measurement. The precision is preserved by the use of intermediate synthetic wavelength steps generated from the three wavelengths and the use of hierarchical optical phase unwrapping. As the complex wave-front of each wavelength can be captured simultaneously in one digital image, real-time performance is achievable.

  7. X-ray computed tomography observations of phase distribution during methane hydrate formation and dissociation process in a sediment sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Taewoong; Lee, Jaehyoung; Lee, Joo Yong; Kim, Se-Joon; Seo, Young-ju

    2016-04-01

    The recovery schemes for natural gas caged in the solid state have not been commercialized. Depressurization has been known as a promising method due to its economic feasibility according to previous lab-scale experiments and simulation studies. However, the results of few field tests showed that the production characteristics of real field differed from that of predicted results. To reliably predict the production performance of real fields, it is necessary to understand quantitative changes of phase distribution and fluid flow in sediments in response to hydrate dissociation by depressurization. In this study, we observed and analyzed the phase distribution and flow behavior during methane hydrate formation and dissociation using X-ray computed tomography which provides high-resolution density distribution. Artificial particles having similar grain size distribution of sandy layers found in real hydrate field were packed into X-ray transparent aluminum vessel. Information on pore distribution within a sediment sample was achieved by comparing CT images between dry condition and fully water-saturated condition. Dynamic changes of phase saturation were observed during gas flooding, through which potential flow pathway was estimated. Hydrate formation and dissociation significantly affected phase distribution and flow pathway. Hydrate distribution was extremely heterogeneous in every tests of hydrate formation repeated with same amount of water. It was inferred that water saturation prior to hydrate formation was not directly correlated to the hydrate distribution. There were definite differences of hydrate dissociation behavior between gas-saturated and water-saturated hydrate-bearing sample. The production of gas and water lasted quite a while even after the production pressure reached the target level of depressurization.

  8. Report of improved performance in Talbot–Lau phase-contrast computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, Thomas Pelzer, Georg; Rieger, Jens; Ritter, André; Anton, Gisela

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many expectations have been raised since the use of conventional x-ray tubes on grating-based x-ray phase-contrast imaging. Despite a reported increase in contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in many publications, there is doubt on whether phase-contrast computed tomography (CT) is advantageous in clinical CT scanners in vivo. The aim of this paper is to contribute to this discussion by analyzing the performance of a phase-contrast CT laboratory setup. Methods: A phase-contrast CT performance analysis was done. Projection images of a phantom were recorded, and image slices were reconstructed using standard filtered back projection methods. The resulting image slices were analyzed by determining the CNRs in the attenuation and phase image. These results were compared to analytically calculated expectations according to the already published phase-contrast CT performance analysis by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. There, a severe mistake was found leading to wrong predictions of the performance of phase-contrast CT. The error was corrected and with the new formulae, the experimentally obtained results matched the analytical calculations. Results: The squared ratios of the phase-contrast CNR and the attenuation CNR obtained in the authors’ experiment are five- to ten-fold higher than predicted by Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)]. The effective lateral spatial coherence length deduced outnumbers the already optimistic assumption of Raupach and Flohr [Med. Phys. 39, 4761–4774 (2012)] by a factor of 3. Conclusions: The authors’ results indicate that the assumptions made in former performance analyses are pessimistic. The break-even point, when phase-contrast CT outperforms attenuation CT, is within reach even with realistic, nonperfect gratings. Further improvements to state-of-the-art clinical CT scanners, like increasing the spatial resolution, could change the balance in favor of phase-contrast computed tomography

  9. Quantitative Evaluation of the Natural Progression of Keratoconus Using Three-Dimensional Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Hisataka; Maeda, Naoyuki; Shintani, Ayumi; Nakagawa, Tomoya; Fuchihata, Mutsumi; Higashiura, Ritsuko; Nishida, Kohji

    2016-07-01

    We quantified the chronologic progression of keratoconus using anterior segment optical coherence tomography (AS-OCT). A total of 217 eyes from 113 patients with keratoconus, keratoconus suspect, or forme fruste keratoconus were evaluated by corneal tomography using swept-source OCT. Age-dependent changes in the radius of the posterior best-fit sphere (Rpost), minimum corneal thickness (Tmin), and distance from the thinnest point to the corneal vertex (Dmin) were examined over follow-up periods of up to 5.79 years and were analyzed using generalized estimating equation (GEE) nonlinear regression model. Annual changes in Rpost (mean, -0.017 mm) and Tmin (-2.69 μm) were significantly higher in younger patients (P < 0.01, GEE nonlinear regression) and in patients with higher maximal K value (Kmax; P < 0.01, GEE nonlinear regression), whereas no changes were observed in Dmin. Even in patients 30 years or older, 14% of eyes revealed remarkable progression in Rpost. In eyes with acute hydrops, annual changes in Rpost (-0.22 mm) and Tmin (-33.8 μm) before acute corneal hydrops were more than 10 times faster than those in other eyes (P < 0.001, GEE nonlinear regression). Chronologic measurements of corneal tomography in keratoconus demonstrated that the progression of steepening at posterior corneal surface was found not only in patients under 30 years but also in older patients, particularly in advanced keratoconus. The rate of progression can be measured by mapping of corneal curvature and thickness using OCT, and the risk of progression was greater in younger patients with steeper Kmax.

  10. Quantitative evaluation of dental abfraction and attrition using a swept-source optical coherence tomography system.

    PubMed

    Marcauteanu, Corina; Bradu, Adrian; Sinescu, Cosmin; Topala, Florin Ionel; Negrutiu, Meda Lavinia; Podoleanu, Adrian Gh

    2014-02-01

    A fast swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system is employed to acquire volumes of dental tissue, in order to monitor the temporal evolution of dental wear. An imaging method is developed to evaluate the volume of tissue lost in ex vivo artificially induced abfractions and attritions. The minimal volume (measured in air) that our system could measure is 2352 μm3. A volume of 25,000 A-scans is collected in 2.5 s. All these recommend the SS-OCT method as a valuable tool for dynamic evaluation of the abfraction and attrition with remarkable potential for clinical use.

  11. Application of quantitative computed tomography for assessment of trabecular bone mineral density, microarchitecture and mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Mao, Song Shou; Li, Dong; Luo, Yanting; Syed, Younus Saleem; Budoff, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a common metabolic bone disease, causing increased skeletal fragility characterized by a low bone mass and trabecular microarchitectural deterioration. Assessment of the bone mineral density (BMD) is the primary determinant of skeletal fragility. Computed tomography (CT)-based trabecular microarchitectural and mechanical assessments are important methods to evaluate the skeletal strength. In this review, we focus the feasibility of QCT BMD measurement using a calibration phantom or phantomless. The application of QCT could extend the bone mineral density assessment to all patients who underwent a heart, lung, whole-body, and as well as all routine clinical implications of CT scan. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Noninvasive, repetitive, quantitative measurement of gene expression from a bicistronic message by positron emission tomography, following gene transfer with adenovirus.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qianwa; Gotts, Jeff; Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar; Barrio, Jorge; Phelps, Michael E; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Herschman, Harvey R

    2002-07-01

    Gene therapy protocols are hampered by the inability to monitor the location, magnitude, and duration of ectopic gene expression following DNA delivery. Consequently, it is difficult to establish quantitative correlations and/or causal relationships between therapeutic gene expression and phenotypic responses in treated individuals. One approach to monitor "therapeutic gene" expression indirectly is to incorporate reporter genes that can be imaged in vivo into bicistronic transcription units, along with the therapeutic genes. Expression of the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) can both be monitored, in vivo, by positron-emission tomography (PET). We created ad.DTm, an adenovirus containing a cytomegalovirus (CMV) early promoter-driven transcription unit, in which the D2R gene is placed proximal to an encephalomyocarditis virus internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) and a modified HSV1-tk gene is placed distal to the IRES. Following intravenous ad.DTm injection into mice, correlated hepatic D2R and HSV1-sr39tk PET reporter gene expression was demonstrated. Repeated microPET scanning quantitated both D2R-dependent sequestration of a positron-emitting ligand and HSV1-TK-dependent sequestration of a positron-emitting product. It is possible, in living mice, to investigate noninvasively and to measure quantitatively and repeatedly correlated expression of two coding regions from a bicistronic transcription unit over a 3-month period following adenovirus delivery.

  13. Quantitative analysis of heterogeneous spatial distribution of Arabidopsis leaf trichomes using micro X-ray computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kaminuma, Eli; Yoshizumi, Takeshi; Wada, Takuji; Matsui, Minami; Toyoda, Tetsuro

    2008-11-01

    Quantitative morphological traits may be defined based on the 3D anatomy reconstructed from micro X-ray computed tomography (microCT) images. In this study, the heterogeneous spatial distribution of trichomes (hairs) on the adaxial leaf blade surface in Arabidopsis was evaluated in terms of 3D quantitative traits, including trichome number, average nearest-neighbour distance between trichomes, and proportion of large trichomes. The data reflect spatial heterogeneity in the radial direction, in that a greater number of trichomes were observed on the leaf blade margins relative to the non-margins, a distribution effect caused by the CAPRICE (CPC) and GLABRA3 (GL3) genes, which have previously been shown to affect trichome density. We further determined that the proportion of large trichomes on the blade mid-rib increases from the proximal end to the distal leaf tip in both wild-type plants and GL3 mutants. Our results indicate that the CPC [corrected] gene affects trichome distribution, rather than trichome growth, causing trichome initiation at the proximal base rather than the distal tip. On the other hand, CPC does affect trichome growth and developmental progression. Hence, quantitative phenotyping based on microCT enables precise phenotypic description for elucidation of gene control in morphological mutants.

  14. Quantitative characterization of mechanically indented in vivo human skin in adults and infants using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Pande, Paritosh; Shelton, Ryan L.; Joa, Frank; Moore, Dave; Gillman, Elisa; Kidd, Kimberly; Nolan, Ryan M.; Odio, Mauricio; Carr, Andrew; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-03-01

    Influenced by both the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the tissue constituents and the time-evolved redistribution of fluid within the tissue, the biomechanical response of skin can reflect not only localized pathology but also systemic physiology of an individual. While clinical diagnosis of skin pathologies typically relies on visual inspection and manual palpation, a more objective and quantitative approach for tissue characterization is highly desirable. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometry-based imaging modality that enables in vivo assessment of cross-sectional tissue morphology with micron-scale resolution, which surpasses those of most standard clinical imaging tools, such as ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. This pilot study investigates the feasibility of characterizing the biomechanical response of in vivo human skin using OCT. OCT-based quantitative metrics were developed and demonstrated on the human subject data, where a significant difference between deformed and nondeformed skin was revealed. Additionally, the quantified postindentation recovery results revealed differences between aged (adult) and young (infant) skin. These suggest that OCT has the potential to quantitatively assess the mechanically perturbed skin as well as distinguish different physiological conditions of the skin, such as changes with age or disease.

  15. Quantitative phase imaging by wide field lensless digital holographic microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinda-Ougba, A.; Koukourakis, N.; Essaidi, A.; Ger­hardt, N. C.; Hofmann, M. R.

    2015-05-01

    Wide field, lensless microscopes have been developed for telemedicine and for resource limited setting [1]. They are based on in-line digital holography which is capable to provide amplitude and phase information resulting from numerical reconstruction. The phase information enables achieving axial resolution in the nanometer range. Hence, such microscopes provide a powerful tool to determine three-dimensional topologies of microstructures. In this contribution, a compact, low-cost, wide field, lensless microscope is presented, which is capable of providing topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material. Our setup consist only of two main components: a CMOSsensor chip and a laser diode without any need of a pinhole. We use this very simple setup to record holograms of microobjects. A wide field of view of ~24 mm², and a lateral resolution of ~2 μm are achieved. Moreover, amplitude and phase information are obtained from the numerical reconstruction of the holograms using a phase retrieval algorithm together with the angular spectrum propagation method. Topographic information of highly transparent micro-objects is obtained from the phase data. We evaluate our system by recording holograms of lines with different depths written by a focused laser beam. A reliable characterization of laser written microstructures is crucial for their functionality. Our results show that this system is valuable for determination of topological profiles of microstructures in transparent material.

  16. Online quantitative phase imaging of vascular endothelial cells under fluid shear stress utilizing digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odenthal-Schnittler, Maria; Schnittler, Hans Joachim; Kemper, Björn

    2016-03-01

    We have explored the utilization of quantitative phase imaging with digital holographic microscopy (DHM) as a novel tool for quantifying the dynamics of morphologic parameters (morphodynamics) of confluent endothelial cell layers under fluid shear stress conditions. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to fluid shear stress in a transparent cone/plate flow device (BioTech-Flow-System) and imaged with a modular setup for quantitative DHM phase imaging for up to 48 h. The resulting series of quantitative phase image sequences were analyzed for the average surface roughness of the cell layers and cell alignment. Our results demonstrate that quantitative phase imaging is a powerful and reliable tool to quantify the dynamics of morphological adaptation of endothelial cells to fluid shear stress.

  17. Improved diagnostic differentiation of renal cystic lesions with phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noel, Peter B.; Willner, Marian; Fingerle, Alexander; Herzen, Julia; Münzel, Daniela; Hahn, Dieter; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2012-03-01

    The diagnostic quality of phase-contrast computed tomography (PCCT) is one the unexplored areas in medical imaging; at the same time, it seems to offer the opportunity as a fast and highly sensitive diagnostic tool. Conventional computed tomography (CT) has had an enormous impact on medicine, while it is limited in soft-tissue contrast. One example that portrays this challenge is the differentiation between benign and malignant renal cysts. In this work we report on a feasibility study to determine the usefulness of PCCT in differentiation of renal cysts. A renal phantom was imaged with a grating-based PCCT system consisting of a standard rotating anode x-ray tube (40 kV, 70 mA) and a Pilatus II photoncounting detector (pixel size: 172 μm). The phantom is composed of a renal equivalent soft-tissue and cystic lesions grouped in non-enhancing cyst and hemorrhage series and an iodine enhancing series. The acquired projection images (absorption and phase-contrast) are reconstructed with a standard filtered backprojection algorithm. For evaluation both reconstructions are compared in respect to contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and subjective image quality. We found that with PCCT a significantly improved differentiation between hemorrhage renal cysts from contrast enhancing malignant cysts is possible. If comparing PCCT and CT with respect to CNR and SNR, PCCT shows significant improvements. In conclusion, PCCT has the potential to improve the diagnostics and characterization of renal cysts without using any contrast agents. These results in combination with a non-synchrotron setup indicate a future paradigm shift in diagnostic computed tomography.

  18. Quantitative and Qualitative Comparison of Single-Source Dual-Energy Computed Tomography and 120-kVp Computed Tomography for the Assessment of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Bhosale, Priya; Le, Ott; Balachandran, Aprana; Fox, Patricia; Paulson, Eric; Tamm, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) between pancreatic-phase dual-energy computed tomography (DECT) and 120-kVp CT for pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). Seventy-eight patients underwent multiphasic pancreatic imaging protocols for PDA (40, DECT; 38, 120-kVp CT [control]). Using pancreatic phase, CNR and SNR for PDA were obtained for DECT at monochromatic energies 50 through 80 keV, iodine material density images, and 120-kVp images. Using a 5-point scale (1, excellent; 5, markedly limited), images were qualitatively assessed by 2 radiologists in consensus for PDA detection, extension, vascular involvement, and noise. Wilcoxon signed rank and 2-sample tests were used to compare the qualitative measures, CNR and SNR, for DECT and 120-kVp images. Bonferroni correction was applied. Iodine material density image had significantly higher CNR and SNR for PDA than any monochromatic energy images (P < 0.0001) and the 120-kVp images. Qualitatively, 70-keV images were rated highest in the categories of tumor extension and vascular invasion and were similar to 120-kVp images. Our results indicate that DECT improves PDA lesion conspicuity compared with routine 120-kVp CT, which may allow for better detection of PDA.

  19. Combined Fluorescence and X-Ray Tomography for Quantitative In Vivo Detection of Fluorophore

    PubMed Central

    Barber, W. C.; Lin, Y.; Nalcioglu, O.; Iwanczyk, J. S.; Hartsough, N. E.; Gulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Initial results from a novel dual modality preclinical imager which combines non-contact fluorescence tomography (FT) and x-ray computed tomography (CT) for preclinical functional and anatomical in vivo imaging are presented. The anatomical data from CT provides a priori information to the FT reconstruction to create overlaid functional and anatomical images with accurate localization and quantification of fluorophore distribution. Phantoms with inclusions containing Indocyanine-Green (ICG), and with heterogeneous backgrounds including iodine in compartments at different concentrations for CT contrast, have been imaged with the dual modality FT/CT system. Anatomical information from attenuation maps and optical morphological information from absorption and scattering maps are used as a priori information in the FT reconstruction. Although ICG inclusions can be located without the a priori information, the recovered ICG concentration shows 75% error. When the a priori information is utilized, the ICG concentration can be recovered with only 15% error. Developing the ability to accurately quantify fluorophore concentration in anatomical regions of interest may provide a powerful tool for in vivo small animal imaging. PMID:20082529

  20. Phase-contrast tomography of neuronal tissues: from laboratory- to high resolution synchrotron CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Töpperwien, Mareike; Krenkel, Martin; Müller, Kristin; Salditt, Tim

    2016-10-01

    Assessing the three-dimensional architecture of neuronal tissues with sub-cellular resolution presents a