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Sample records for quantitative phosphoproteome analysis

  1. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of T-Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Nagib; Salomon, Arthur R

    2017-01-01

    TCR signaling critically depends on protein phosphorylation across many proteins. Localization of each phosphorylation event relative to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and canonical T-cell signaling proteins will provide clues about the structure of TCR signaling networks. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis by mass spectrometry provides a wide-scale view of cellular phosphorylation networks. However, analysis of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry is still challenging due to the relative low abundance of phosphorylated proteins relative to all proteins and the extraordinary diversity of phosphorylation sites across the proteome. Highly selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides is essential to provide the most comprehensive view of the phosphoproteome. Optimization of phosphopeptide enrichment methods coupled with highly sensitive mass spectrometry workflows significantly improves the sequencing depth of the phosphoproteome to over 10,000 unique phosphorylation sites from complex cell lysates. Here we describe a step-by-step method for phosphoproteomic analysis that has achieved widespread success for identification of serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation. Reproducible quantification of relative phosphopeptide abundance is provided by intensity-based label-free quantitation. An ideal set of mass spectrometry analysis parameters is also provided that optimize the yield of identified sites. We also provide guidelines for the bioinformatic analysis of this type of data to assess the quality of the data and to comply with proteomic data reporting requirements.

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis using iTRAQ method.

    PubMed

    Asano, Tomoya; Nishiuchi, Takumi

    2014-01-01

    The MAPK (mitogen-activated kinase) cascade plays important roles in plant perception of and reaction to developmental and environmental cues. Phosphoproteomics are useful to identify target proteins regulated by MAPK-dependent signaling pathway. Here, we introduce the quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis using a chemical labeling method. The isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) method is a MS-based technique to quantify protein expression among up to eight different samples in one experiment. In this technique, peptides were labeled by some stable isotope-coded covalent tags. We perform quantitative phosphoproteomics comparing Arabidopsis wild type and a stress-responsive mapkk mutant after phytotoxin treatment. To comprehensively identify the downstream phosphoproteins of MAPKK, total proteins were extracted from phytotoxin-treated wild-type and mapkk mutant plants. The phosphoproteins were purified by Pro-Q(®) Diamond Phosphoprotein Enrichment Kit and were digested with trypsin. Resulting peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents and were quantified and identified by MALDI TOF/TOF analyzer. We identified many phosphoproteins that were decreased in the mapkk mutant compared with wild type.

  3. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lima, Beatriz D.; Roepstorff, Peter; Ricart, Carlos A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote, and amastigote. The differentiation from infective trypomastigotes into replicative amastigotes, called amastigogenesis, takes place in vivo inside mammalian host cells after a period of incubation in an acidic phagolysosome. This differentiation process can be mimicked in vitro by incubating tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes in acidic DMEM. Here we used this well-established differentiation protocol to perform a comprehensive quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of T. cruzi amastigogenesis. Samples from fully differentiated forms and two biologically relevant intermediate time points were Lys-C/trypsin digested, iTRAQ-labeled, and multiplexed. Subsequently, phosphopeptides were enriched using a TiO2 matrix. Non-phosphorylated peptides were fractionated via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics procedures were used for protein and phosphopeptide quantitation, identification, and phosphorylation site assignment. We were able to identify regulated proteins and pathways involved in coordinating amastigogenesis. We also observed that a significant proportion of the regulated proteins were membrane proteins. Modulated phosphorylation events coordinated by protein kinases and phosphatases that are part of the signaling cascade induced by incubation in acidic medium were also evinced. To our knowledge, this work is the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics study of T. cruzi amastigogenesis, and these data will serve as a trustworthy basis for future studies, and possibly for new potential drug targets. PMID:25225356

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of porcine muscle within 24 h postmortem.

    PubMed

    Huang, Honggang; Larsen, Martin R; Palmisano, Giuseppe; Dai, Jie; Lametsch, René

    2014-06-25

    Protein phosphorylation can regulate most of the important processes in muscle, such as metabolism and contraction. The postmortem (PM) metabolism and rigor mortis have essential effects on meat quality. In order to identify and characterize the protein phosphorylation events involved in meat quality development, a quantitative mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic study was performed to analyze the porcine muscle within 24h PM using dimethyl labeling combined with the TiSH phosphopeptide enrichment strategy. In total 305 unique proteins were identified, including 160 phosphoproteins with 784 phosphorylation sites. Among these, 184 phosphorylation sites on 93 proteins had their phosphorylation levels significantly changed. The proteins involved in glucose metabolism and muscle contraction were the two largest clusters of phosphoproteins with significantly changed phosphorylation levels in muscle within 24 h PM. The high phosphorylation level of heat shock proteins (HSPs) in early PM may be an adaptive response to slaughter stress and protect muscle cell from apoptosis, as observed in the serine 84 of HSP27. This work indicated that PM muscle proteins underwent significant changes at the phosphorylation level but were relatively stable at the total protein level, suggesting that protein phosphorylation may have important roles in meat quality development through the regulation of proteins involved in glucose metabolism and muscle contraction, thereby affecting glycolysis and rigor mortis development in PM muscle. The manuscript describes the characterization of postmortem (PM) porcine muscle within 24 h postmortem from the perspective of protein phosphorylation using advanced phosphoproteomic techniques. In the study, the authors employed the dimethyl labeling combined with the TiSH phosphopeptide enrichment and LC-MS/MS strategy. This was the first high-throughput quantitative phosphoproteomic study in PM muscle of farm animals. In the work, both the proteome

  5. Integrated quantitative analysis of the phosphoproteome and transcriptome in tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Masaaki; Nagashima, Takeshi; Suzuki, Takashi; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Yumoto, Noriko; Shiraishi, Yuichi; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kuroki, Yoko; Gotoh, Noriko; Ishida, Takanori; Inoue, Satoshi; Kitano, Hiroaki; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko

    2011-01-07

    Quantitative phosphoproteome and transcriptome analysis of ligand-stimulated MCF-7 human breast cancer cells was performed to understand the mechanisms of tamoxifen resistance at a system level. Phosphoproteome data revealed that WT cells were more enriched with phospho-proteins than tamoxifen-resistant cells after stimulation with ligands. Surprisingly, decreased phosphorylation after ligand perturbation was more common than increased phosphorylation. In particular, 17β-estradiol induced down-regulation in WT cells at a very high rate. 17β-Estradiol and the ErbB ligand heregulin induced almost equal numbers of up-regulated phospho-proteins in WT cells. Pathway and motif activity analyses using transcriptome data additionally suggested that deregulated activation of GSK3β (glycogen-synthase kinase 3β) and MAPK1/3 signaling might be associated with altered activation of cAMP-responsive element-binding protein and AP-1 transcription factors in tamoxifen-resistant cells, and this hypothesis was validated by reporter assays. An examination of clinical samples revealed that inhibitory phosphorylation of GSK3β at serine 9 was significantly lower in tamoxifen-treated breast cancer patients that eventually had relapses, implying that activation of GSK3β may be associated with the tamoxifen-resistant phenotype. Thus, the combined phosphoproteome and transcriptome data set analyses revealed distinct signal transcription programs in tumor cells and provided a novel molecular target to understand tamoxifen resistance.

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of acquired cancer drug resistance to pazopanib and dasatinib.

    PubMed

    Vyse, Simon; McCarthy, Frank; Broncel, Malgorzata; Paul, Angela; Wong, Jocelyn P; Bhamra, Amandeep; Huang, Paul H

    2017-08-24

    Acquired drug resistance impacts the majority of patients being treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and remains a key challenge in modern anti-cancer therapy. The lack of clinically effective therapies to overcome resistance represents an unmet need. Understanding the signalling that drives drug resistance will facilitate the development of new salvage therapies to treat patients with secondary TKI resistance. In this study, we utilise mass spectrometry to characterise the global phosphoproteomic alterations that accompany the acquisition of resistance to two FDA-approved TKIs, pazopanib and dasatinib, in the A204 rhabdoid tumour cell line. Our analysis finds that only 6% and 9.7% of the quantified phosphoproteome is altered upon the acquisition of pazopanib and dasatinib resistance, respectively. Pazopanib resistant cells display elevated phosphorylation in cytoskeletal regulatory pathways while dasatinib resistant cells show an upregulation of the insulin receptor/IGF-1R signalling pathway. Drug response profiling rediscovers several previously reported vulnerabilities associated with pazopanib and dasatinib resistance and identifies a new dependency to the second generation HSP90 inhibitor NVP-AUY-922. This study provides a useful resource detailing the candidate signalling determinants of acquired TKI resistance; and reveals a therapeutic approach of inhibiting HSP90 function as a means of salvage therapy to overcome pazopanib and dasatinib resistance. Pazopanib and dasatinib are tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) approved for the treatment of multiple cancer types. Patients who are treated with these drugs are prone to the development of drug resistance and consequently tumour relapse. Here we use quantitative phosphoproteomics to characterise the signalling pathways which are enriched in cells that have acquired resistance to these two drugs. Furthermore, targeted drug screens were used to identify salvage therapies capable of overcoming pazopanib

  7. Urinary proteomic and non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis during pregnancy and non-pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Progress in the fields of protein separation and identification technologies has accelerated research into biofluids proteomics for protein biomarker discovery. Urine has become an ideal and rich source of biomarkers in clinical proteomics. Here we performed a proteomic analysis of urine samples from pregnant and non-pregnant patients using gel electrophoresis and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we also apply a non-prefractionation quantitative phosphoproteomic approach using mTRAQ labeling to evaluate the expression of specific phosphoproteins during pregnancy comparison with non-pregnancy. Results In total, 2579 proteins (10429 unique peptides) were identified, including 1408 from the urine of pregnant volunteers and 1985 from the urine of non-pregnant volunteers. One thousand and twenty-three proteins were not reported in previous studies at the proteome level and were unique to our study. Furthermore, we obtained 237 phosphopeptides, representing 105 phosphoproteins. Among these phosphoproteins, 16 of them were found to be significantly differentially expressed, of which 14 were up-regulated and two were down-regulated in urine samples from women just before vaginal delivery. Conclusion Taken together, these results offer a comprehensive urinary proteomic profile of healthy women during before and after vaginal delivery and novel information on the phosphoproteins that are differentially regulated during the maintenance of normal pregnancy. Our results may provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of pregnancy maintenance, potentially leading to the development of biomarker-based sensitive assays for understanding pregnancy. PMID:24215720

  8. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of early seed development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiehua; Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Lin, Haiyan; Liu, Qing; Zhang, Wen; Li, Zhiyong; Nallamilli, Babi R; Zhang, Jian

    2016-02-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) seed serves as a major food source for over half of the global population. Though it has been long recognized that phosphorylation plays an essential role in rice seed development, the phosphorylation events and dynamics in this process remain largely unknown so far. Here, we report the first large scale identification of rice seed phosphoproteins and phosphosites by using a quantitative phosphoproteomic approach. Thorough proteomic studies in pistils and seeds at 3, 7 days after pollination resulted in the successful identification of 3885, 4313 and 4135 phosphopeptides respectively. A total of 2487 proteins were differentially phosphorylated among the three stages, including Kip related protein 1, Rice basic leucine zipper factor 1, Rice prolamin box binding factor and numerous other master regulators of rice seed development. Moreover, differentially phosphorylated proteins may be extensively involved in the biosynthesis and signaling pathways of phytohormones such as auxin, gibberellin, abscisic acid and brassinosteroid. Our results strongly indicated that protein phosphorylation is a key mechanism regulating cell proliferation and enlargement, phytohormone biosynthesis and signaling, grain filling and grain quality during rice seed development. Overall, the current study enhanced our understanding of the rice phosphoproteome and shed novel insight into the regulatory mechanism of rice seed development.

  9. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Soybean Root Hairs Inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Tran H.; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Clauss, Therese RW; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Hixson, Kim K.; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T.; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-11

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e., roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag 8-plex ITRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nRPLC-MS/MS analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1,625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1,659 non-redundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1,126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5 fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  10. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of soybean root hairs inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Tran Hong Nha; Brechenmacher, Laurent; Aldrich, Joshua T; Clauss, Therese R; Gritsenko, Marina A; Hixson, Kim K; Libault, Marc; Tanaka, Kiwamu; Yang, Feng; Yao, Qiuming; Pasa-Tolić, Ljiljana; Xu, Dong; Nguyen, Henry T; Stacey, Gary

    2012-11-01

    Root hairs are single hair-forming cells on roots that function to increase root surface area, enhancing water and nutrient uptake. In leguminous plants, root hairs also play a critical role as the site of infection by symbiotic nitrogen fixing rhizobia, leading to the formation of a novel organ, the nodule. The initial steps in the rhizobia-root hair infection process are known to involve specific receptor kinases and subsequent kinase cascades. Here, we characterize the phosphoproteome of the root hairs and the corresponding stripped roots (i.e. roots from which root hairs were removed) during rhizobial colonization and infection to gain insight into the molecular mechanism of root hair cell biology. We chose soybean (Glycine max L.), one of the most important crop plants in the legume family, for this study because of its larger root size, which permits isolation of sufficient root hair material for phosphoproteomic analysis. Phosphopeptides derived from root hairs and stripped roots, mock inoculated or inoculated with the soybean-specific rhizobium Bradyrhizobium japonicum, were labeled with the isobaric tag eight-plex iTRAQ, enriched using Ni-NTA magnetic beads and subjected to nanoRPLC-MS/MS1 analysis using HCD and decision tree guided CID/ETD strategy. A total of 1625 unique phosphopeptides, spanning 1659 nonredundant phosphorylation sites, were detected from 1126 soybean phosphoproteins. Among them, 273 phosphopeptides corresponding to 240 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly regulated (>1.5-fold abundance change) in response to inoculation with B. japonicum. The data reveal unique features of the soybean root hair phosphoproteome, including root hair and stripped root-specific phosphorylation suggesting a complex network of kinase-substrate and phosphatase-substrate interactions in response to rhizobial inoculation.

  11. Quantitative analysis of changes in the phosphoproteome of maize induced by the plant hormone salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Wu, Liuji; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Shunxi; Tian, Lei; Pang, Yanjie; Han, Zanping; Wu, Liancheng; Chen, Yanhui

    2015-12-11

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in regulating various physiological and biochemical processes. Our previous study identified several protein kinases responsive to SA, suggesting that phosphorylation events play an important role in the plant response to SA. In this study, we characterized the phosphoproteome of maize in response to SA using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology and TiO2 enrichment method. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, we found a total of 858 phosphoproteins among 1495 phosphopeptides. Among them, 291 phosphopeptides corresponding to 244 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed after SA treatment. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of biological processes, which indicate that the response to SA encompasses a reformatting of major cellular processes. Furthermore, some of the phosphoproteins which were not previously known to be involved with SA were found to have significantly changed phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that other currently unknown SA signaling pathways that result in decreased phosphorylation of downstream targets must be involved. Our study represents the first attempt at global phosphoproteome profiling in response to SA, and provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulated by SA.

  12. Quantitative analysis of changes in the phosphoproteome of maize induced by the plant hormone salicylic acid

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Liuji; Hu, Xiuli; Wang, Shunxi; Tian, Lei; Pang, Yanjie; Han, Zanping; Wu, Liancheng; Chen, Yanhui

    2015-01-01

    Phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) plays an important role in regulating various physiological and biochemical processes. Our previous study identified several protein kinases responsive to SA, suggesting that phosphorylation events play an important role in the plant response to SA. In this study, we characterized the phosphoproteome of maize in response to SA using isotope tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) technology and TiO2 enrichment method. Based on LC-MS/MS analysis, we found a total of 858 phosphoproteins among 1495 phosphopeptides. Among them, 291 phosphopeptides corresponding to 244 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed after SA treatment. The phosphoproteins identified are involved in a wide range of biological processes, which indicate that the response to SA encompasses a reformatting of major cellular processes. Furthermore, some of the phosphoproteins which were not previously known to be involved with SA were found to have significantly changed phosphorylation levels. Many of these changes are phosphorylation decreases, indicating that other currently unknown SA signaling pathways that result in decreased phosphorylation of downstream targets must be involved. Our study represents the first attempt at global phosphoproteome profiling in response to SA, and provides a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms regulated by SA. PMID:26659305

  13. Statistical Analysis of ATM-Dependent Signaling in Quantitative Mass Spectrometry Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Waardenberg, Ashley J

    2017-01-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine protein kinase, which when perturbed is associated with modified protein signaling that ultimately leads to a range of neurological and DNA repair defects. Recent advances in phospho-proteomics coupled with high-resolution mass-spectrometry provide new opportunities to dissect signaling pathways that ATM utilize under a number of conditions. This chapter begins by providing a brief overview of ATM function, its various regulatory roles and then leads into a workflow focused on the use of the statistical programming language R, together with code, for the identification of ATM-dependent substrates in the cytoplasm. This chapter cannot cover statistical properties in depth nor the range of possible methods in great detail, but instead aims to equip researchers with a set of tools to perform analysis between two conditions through examples with R functions.

  14. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of H37Ra and H37Rv Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Verma, Renu; Pinto, Sneha Maria; Patil, Arun Hanumana; Advani, Jayshree; Subba, Pratigya; Kumar, Manish; Sharma, Jyoti; Dey, Gourav; Ravikumar, Raju; Buggi, Shashidhar; Satishchandra, Parthasarathy; Sharma, Kusum; Suar, Mrutyunjay; Tripathy, Srikanth Prasad; Chauhan, Devendra Singh; Gowda, Harsha; Pandey, Akhilesh; Gandotra, Sheetal; Prasad, Thottethodi Subrahmanya Keshava

    2017-03-20

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, accounts for 1.5 million human deaths annually worldwide. Despite efforts to eradicate tuberculosis, it still remains a deadly disease. The two best characterized strains of M. tuberculosis, virulent H37Rv and avirulent H37Ra, provide a unique platform to investigate biochemical and signaling pathways associated with pathogenicity. To delineate the biomolecular dynamics that may account for pathogenicity and attenuation of virulence in M. tuberculosis, we compared the proteome and phosphoproteome profiles of H37Rv and H37Ra strains. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed using high-resolution Fourier transform mass spectrometry. Analysis of exponential and stationary phases of these strains resulted in identification and quantitation of 2709 proteins along with 512 phosphorylation sites derived from 257 proteins. In addition to confirming the presence of previously described M. tuberculosis phosphorylated proteins, we identified 265 novel phosphorylation sites. Quantitative proteomic analysis revealed more than five-fold upregulation of proteins belonging to virulence associated type VII bacterial secretion system in H37Rv when compared to those in H37Ra. We also identified 84 proteins, which exhibited changes in phosphorylation levels between the virulent and avirulent strains. Bioinformatics analysis of the proteins altered in their level of expression or phosphorylation revealed enrichment of pathways involved in fatty acid biosynthesis and two-component regulatory system. Our data provides a resource for further exploration of functional differences at molecular level between H37Rv and H37Ra, which will ultimately explain the molecular underpinnings that determine virulence in tuberculosis.

  15. Lighting Up T Lymphocyte Signaling with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Salamero, Candelas; Castillo-González, Raquel; Navarro, María N

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most abundant post-translational modification, regulating several aspects of protein and cell function. Quantitative phosphoproteomics approaches have expanded the scope of phosphorylation analysis enabling the quantification of changes in thousands of phosphorylation sites simultaneously in two or more conditions. These approaches offer a global view of the impact of cellular perturbations such as extracellular stimuli or gene ablation in intracellular signaling networks. Such great potential also brings on a new challenge: to identify, among the thousands of phosphorylations found in global phosphoproteomics studies, the small subset of site-specific phosphorylations expected to be functionally relevant. This review focus on updating and integrating findings on T lymphocyte signaling generated using global phosphoproteomics approaches, drawing attention on the biological relevance of the obtained data.

  16. Global Analysis of Muscle-specific Kinase Signaling by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Dürnberger, Gerhard; Camurdanoglu, Bahar Z.; Tomschik, Matthias; Schutzbier, Michael; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Herbst, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    The development of the neuromuscular synapse depends on signaling processes that involve protein phosphorylation as a crucial regulatory event. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is the key signaling molecule at the neuromuscular synapse whose activity is required for the formation of a mature and functional synapse. However, the signaling cascade downstream of MuSK and the regulation of the different components are still poorly understood. In this study we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to study the phosphorylation events and their temporal regulation downstream of MuSK. We identified a total of 10,183 phosphopeptides, of which 203 were significantly up- or down-regulated. Regulated phosphopeptides were classified into four different clusters according to their temporal profiles. Within these clusters we found an overrepresentation of specific protein classes associated with different cellular functions. In particular, we found an enrichment of regulated phosphoproteins involved in posttranscriptional mechanisms and in cytoskeletal organization. These findings provide novel insights into the complex signaling network downstream of MuSK and form the basis for future mechanistic studies. PMID:24899341

  17. Global analysis of muscle-specific kinase signaling by quantitative phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Dürnberger, Gerhard; Camurdanoglu, Bahar Z; Tomschik, Matthias; Schutzbier, Michael; Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hudecz, Otto; Mechtler, Karl; Herbst, Ruth

    2014-08-01

    The development of the neuromuscular synapse depends on signaling processes that involve protein phosphorylation as a crucial regulatory event. Muscle-specific kinase (MuSK) is the key signaling molecule at the neuromuscular synapse whose activity is required for the formation of a mature and functional synapse. However, the signaling cascade downstream of MuSK and the regulation of the different components are still poorly understood. In this study we used a quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to study the phosphorylation events and their temporal regulation downstream of MuSK. We identified a total of 10,183 phosphopeptides, of which 203 were significantly up- or down-regulated. Regulated phosphopeptides were classified into four different clusters according to their temporal profiles. Within these clusters we found an overrepresentation of specific protein classes associated with different cellular functions. In particular, we found an enrichment of regulated phosphoproteins involved in posttranscriptional mechanisms and in cytoskeletal organization. These findings provide novel insights into the complex signaling network downstream of MuSK and form the basis for future mechanistic studies. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of neuronal intermediate filament proteins (NF-M/H) in Alzheimer's disease by iTRAQ

    PubMed Central

    Rudrabhatla,*, Parvathi; Grant,*, Philip; Jaffe, Howard; Strong, Michael J.; Pant, Harish C.

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins is one of the major pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Human NF-M/H display a large number of multiple KSP repeats in the carboxy-terminal tail domain, which are phosphorylation sites of proline-directed serine/threonine (pSer/Thr-Pro, KS/T-P) kinases. The phosphorylation sites of NF-M/H have not been characterized in AD brain. Here, we use quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), for the characterization of NF-M/H phosphorylation sites in AD brain. We identified 13 hyperphosphorylated sites of NF-M; 9 Lys-Ser-Pro (KSP) sites; 2 variant motifs, Glu-Ser-Pro (ESP) Ser-736 and Leu-Ser-Pro (LSP) Ser-837; and 2 non-S/T-P motifs, Ser-783 and Ser-788. All the Ser/Thr residues are phosphorylated at significantly greater abundance in AD brain compared with control brain. Ten hyperphosphorylated KSP sites have been identified on the C-terminal tail domain of NF-H, with greater abundance of phosphorylation in AD brain compared with control brain. Our data provide the direct evidence that NF-M/H are hyperphosphorylated in AD compared with control brain and suggest the role of both proline-directed and non-proline-directed protein kinases in AD. This study represents the first comprehensive iTRAQ analyses and quantification of phosphorylation sites of human NF-M and NF-H from AD brain and suggests that aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal intermediate filament proteins is involved in AD.—Rudrabhatla, P., Grant, P., Jaffe, H., Strong, M. J., Pant, H. C. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of neuronal intermediate filament proteins (NF-M/H) in Alzheimer's disease by iTRAQ. PMID:20624930

  19. Multidimensional electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) for quantitative analysis of the proteome and phosphoproteome in clinical and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Loroch, Stefan; Schommartz, Tim; Brune, Wolfram; Zahedi, René Peiman; Sickmann, Albert

    2015-05-01

    Quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics have become key disciplines in understanding cellular processes. Fundamental research can be done using cell culture providing researchers with virtually infinite sample amounts. In contrast, clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research is often restricted to minute sample amounts and requires an efficient analysis with only micrograms of protein. To address this issue, we generated a highly sensitive workflow for combined LC-MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics by refining an ERLIC-based 2D phosphoproteomics workflow into an ERLIC-based 3D workflow covering the global proteome as well. The resulting 3D strategy was successfully used for an in-depth quantitative analysis of both, the proteome and the phosphoproteome of murine cytomegalovirus-infected mouse fibroblasts, a model system for host cell manipulation by a virus. In a 2-plex SILAC experiment with 150 μg of a tryptic digest per condition, the 3D strategy enabled the quantification of ~75% more proteins and even ~134% more peptides compared to the 2D strategy. Additionally, we could quantify ~50% more phosphoproteins by non-phosphorylated peptides, concurrently yielding insights into changes on the levels of protein expression and phosphorylation. Beside its sensitivity, our novel three-dimensional ERLIC-strategy has the potential for semi-automated sample processing rendering it a suitable future perspective for clinical, pre-clinical and biomedical research.

  20. SILAC for global phosphoproteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Pimienta, Genaro; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2009-01-01

    Establishing the phosphorylation pattern of proteins in a comprehensive fashion is an important goal of a majority of cell signaling projects. Phosphoproteomic strategies should be designed in such a manner as to identify sites of phosphorylation as well as to provide quantitative information about the extent of phosphorylation at the sites. In this chapter, we describe an experimental strategy that outlines such an approach using stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) coupled to LC-MS/MS. We highlight the importance of quantitative strategies in signal transduction as a platform for a systematic and global elucidation of biological processes.

  1. Insights Regarding Fungal Phosphoproteomic Analysis.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Liliane F C; Chelius, Cynthia L; Harris, Steven D; Marten, Mark R

    2017-03-10

    Protein phosphorylation is a major means of regulation for cellular processes, and is important in cell signaling, growth, and cell proliferation. To study phosphorylated proteins, high throughput phosphoproteomic technologies, such as reverse phase protein array, phospho-specific flow cytometry, and mass spectrometry (MS) based technologies, have been developed. Among them, mass spectrometry has become the primary tool employed for the identification of phosphoproteins and phosphosites in fungi, leading to an improved understanding of a number of signaling pathways. Using mass spectrometry techniques, researchers have discovered new kinase substrates, established connections between kinases and fungal pathogenicity, and studied the evolutionary lineage of kinases between different fungal species. Further, many specific phosphorylation sites recognized by individual kinases have been described. In this review, we will focus on recent discoveries made in yeast and filamentous fungi using phosphoproteomic analysis.

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals system-wide signaling pathways downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 in breast cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Tingfang; Zhai, Bo; Yu, Yonghao; Kiyotsugu, Yoshikawa; Raschle, Thomas; Etzkorn, Manuel; Seo, Hee-Chan; Nagiec, Michal; Luna, Rafael E.; Reinherz, Ellis L.; Blenis, John; Gygi, Steven P.; Wagner, Gerhard

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide, with an estimated 1.7 million new cases and 522,000 deaths around the world in 2012 alone. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are essential for tumor reoccurrence and metastasis which is the major source of cancer lethality. G protein-coupled receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 4 (CXCR4) is critical for tumor metastasis. However, stromal cell-derived factor 1 (SDF-1)/CXCR4–mediated signaling pathways in breast CSCs are largely unknown. Using isotope reductive dimethylation and large-scale MS-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis, we examined protein phosphorylation induced by SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We quantified more than 11,000 phosphorylation sites in 2,500 phosphoproteins. Of these phosphosites, 87% were statistically unchanged in abundance in response to SDF-1/CXCR4 stimulation. In contrast, 545 phosphosites in 266 phosphoproteins were significantly increased, whereas 113 phosphosites in 74 phosphoproteins were significantly decreased. SDF-1/CXCR4 increases phosphorylation in 60 cell migration- and invasion-related proteins, of them 43 (>70%) phosphoproteins are unrecognized. In addition, SDF-1/CXCR4 upregulates the phosphorylation of 44 previously uncharacterized kinases, 8 phosphatases, and 1 endogenous phosphatase inhibitor. Using computational approaches, we performed system-based analyses examining SDF-1/CXCR4–mediated phosphoproteome, including construction of kinase–substrate network and feedback regulation loops downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. We identified a previously unidentified SDF-1/CXCR4-PKA-MAP2K2-ERK signaling pathway and demonstrated the feedback regulation on MEK, ERK1/2, δ-catenin, and PPP1Cα in SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs. This study gives a system-wide view of phosphorylation events downstream of SDF-1/CXCR4 signaling in breast CSCs, providing a resource for the study of CSC-targeted cancer therapy. PMID

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis reveals system-wide signaling pathways regulated by site-specific phosphorylation on Keratin-8 in skin squamous cell carcinoma derived cell- line.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Richa; Sahu, Indrajit; Soni, Bihari Lal; Sathe, Gajanan J; Datta, Keshava K; Thapa, Pankaj; Sinha, Shruti; Vadivel, Chella Krishna; Dhaka, Bharti; Gowda, Harsha; Vaidya, Milind M

    2017-02-07

    Keratin 8/18, a simple epithelia specific keratin pair, is often aberrantly expressed in squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) where its expression is correlated with increased invasion and poor prognosis. Majority of Keratin 8 (K8) functions are governed by its phosphorylation at Serine(73) (head-domain) and Serine(431) (tail-domain) residues. Although, deregulation of K8 phosphorylation is associated with progression of different carcinomas, its role in skin-SCC and the underlying mechanism is obscure. In this direction, we performed TMT-based quantitative phosphoproteomics by expressing K8 wild type, phosphodead and phosphomimetic mutants in K8-deficient A431 cells. Further analysis of our phosphoproteomics data showed a significant proportion of total phosphoproteome associated with migratory, proliferative and invasive potential of these cells to be differentially phosphorylated. Differential phosphorylation of CDK1(T14,Y15) , EIF4EBP1(T46,T50) , EIF4B(S422) , AKT1S1T246,S247, CTTN1(T401,S405,) Y421 & CAP1(S307/309) in K8-S73A/D mutant and CTTN1(T401,S405,Y421) , BUB1B(S1043) & CARHSP1(S30,S32) in K8-S431A/D mutants as well as some anonymous phosphosites including MYC(S176) , ZYX(S344) and PNN(S692) could be potential candidates associated with K8 phosphorylation mediated tumorigenicity. Biochemical validation followed by phenotypic analysis further confirmed our quantitative phosphoproteomics data. In conclusion, our study provides the first global picture of K8 site- specific phosphorylation function in neoplastic progression of A431 cells and suggests various potential starting points for further mechanistic studies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Quantitative Circadian Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Reveals Extensive Clock Control of Key Components in Physiological, Metabolic, and Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Mani Kant; Nomura, Yuko; Wang, Lei; Nakagami, Hirofumi; Somers, David E

    2015-08-01

    The circadian clock provides adaptive advantages to an organism, resulting in increased fitness and survival. The phosphorylation events that regulate circadian-dependent signaling and the processes which post-translationally respond to clock-gated signals are largely unknown. To better elucidate post-translational events tied to the circadian system we carried out a survey of circadian-regulated protein phosphorylation events in Arabidopsis seedlings. A large-scale mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach employing TiO2-based phosphopeptide enrichment techniques identified and quantified 1586 phosphopeptides on 1080 protein groups. A total of 102 phosphopeptides displayed significant changes in abundance, enabling the identification of specific patterns of response to circadian rhythms. Our approach was sensitive enough to quantitate oscillations in the phosphorylation of low abundance clock proteins (early flowering4; ELF4 and pseudoresponse regulator3; PRR3) as well as other transcription factors and kinases. During constant light, extensive cyclic changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators, implicating direct or indirect regulation by the circadian system. These included proteins influencing transcriptional regulation, translation, metabolism, stress and phytohormones-mediated responses. We validated our analysis using the elf4-211 allele, in which an S45L transition removes the phosphorylation herein identified. We show that removal of this phosphorylatable site diminishes interaction with early flowering3 (ELF3), a key partner in a tripartite evening complex required for circadian cycling. elf4-211 lengthens period, which increases with increasing temperature, relative to the wild type, resulting in a more stable temperature compensation of circadian period over a wider temperature range.

  5. Integrative Network Analysis Combined with Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Transforming Growth Factor-beta Receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a Novel Regulator of Glioblastoma Stem Cell Properties*

    PubMed Central

    Narushima, Yuta; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Koyama-Nasu, Ryo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Inoue, Jun-ichiro; Akiyama, Tetsu; Oyama, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is one of the most malignant brain tumors with poor prognosis and their development and progression are known to be driven by glioblastoma stem cells. Although glioblastoma stem cells lose their cancer stem cell properties during cultivation in serum-containing medium, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating signaling alteration in relation to reduction of stem cell-like characteristics. To elucidate the global phosphorylation-related signaling events, we performed a SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of serum-induced dynamics in glioblastoma stem cells established from the tumor tissues of the patient. Among a total of 2876 phosphorylation sites on 1584 proteins identified in our analysis, 732 phosphorylation sites on 419 proteins were regulated through the alteration of stem cell-like characteristics. The integrative computational analyses based on the quantified phosphoproteome data revealed the relevant changes of phosphorylation levels regarding the proteins associated with cytoskeleton reorganization such as Rho family GTPase and Intermediate filament signaling, in addition to transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 (TGFBR2) as a prominent upstream regulator involved in the serum-induced phosphoproteome regulation. The functional association of transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 with stem cell-like properties was experimentally validated through signaling perturbation using the corresponding inhibitors, which indicated that transforming growth factor-β receptor type-2 could play an important role as a novel cell fate determinant in glioblastoma stem cell regulation. PMID:26670566

  6. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Bacillus subtilis Reveals Novel Substrates of the Kinase PrkC and Phosphatase PrpC*

    PubMed Central

    Ravikumar, Vaishnavi; Shi, Lei; Krug, Karsten; Derouiche, Abderahmane; Jers, Carsten; Cousin, Charlotte; Kobir, Ahasanul; Mijakovic, Ivan; Macek, Boris

    2014-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation on serine, threonine, and tyrosine (Ser/Thr/Tyr) residues plays a critical role in regulation of vital processes in the cell. Despite of considerable progress in our understanding of the role of this modification in bacterial physiology, the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during bacterial growth has rarely been systematically addressed. In addition, little is known about in vivo substrates of bacterial Ser/Thr/Tyr kinases and phosphatases. An excellent candidate to study these questions is the Gram-positive bacterium Bacillus subtilis, one of the most intensively investigated bacterial model organism with both research and industrial applications. Here we employed gel-free phosphoproteomics combined with SILAC labeling and high resolution mass spectrometry to study the proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during the batch growth of B. subtilis. We measured the dynamics of 1666 proteins and 64 phosphorylation sites in five distinct phases of growth. Enzymes of the central carbon metabolism and components of the translation machinery appear to be highly phosphorylated in the stationary phase, coinciding with stronger expression of Ser/Thr kinases. We further used the SILAC workflow to identify novel putative substrates of the Ser/Thr kinase PrkC and the phosphatase PrpC during stationary phase. The overall number of putative substrates was low, pointing to a high kinase and phosphatase specificity. One of the phosphorylation sites affected by both, PrkC and PrpC, was the Ser281 on the oxidoreductase YkwC. We showed that PrkC phosphorylates and PrpC dephosphorylates YkwC in vitro and that phosphorylation at Ser281 abolishes the oxidoreductase activity of YkwC in vitro and in vivo. Our results present the most detailed phosphoproteomic analysis of B. subtilis growth to date and provide the first global in vivo screen of PrkC and PrpC substrates. PMID:24390483

  7. Targeted quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of erythrocyte membranes during blood bank storage.

    PubMed

    Rinalducci, Sara; Longo, Valentina; Ceci, Luigi R; Zolla, Lello

    2015-02-01

    One of the hallmarks of blood bank stored red blood cells (RBCs) is the irreversible transition from a discoid to a spherocyte-like morphology with membrane perturbation and cytoskeleton disorders. Therefore, identification of the storage-associated modifications in the protein-protein interactions between the cytoskeleton and the lipid bilayer may contribute to enlighten the molecular mechanisms involved in the alterations of mechanical properties of stored RBCs. Here we report the results obtained analyzing RBCs after 0, 21 and 35 days of storage under standard blood banking conditions by label free mass spectrometry (MS)-based experiments. We could quantitatively measure changes in the phosphorylation level of crucial phosphopeptides belonging to β-spectrin, ankyrin-1, α-adducin, dematin, glycophorin A and glycophorin C proteins. Data have been validated by both western blotting and pseudo-Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Although each phosphopeptide showed a distinctive trend, a sharp increase in the phosphorylation level during the storage duration was observed. Phosphopeptide mapping and structural modeling analysis indicated that the phosphorylated residues localize in protein functional domains fundamental for the maintenance of membrane structural integrity. Along with previous morphological evidence acquired by electron microscopy, our results seem to indicate that 21-day storage may represent a key point for the molecular processes leading to the erythrocyte deformability reduction observed during blood storage. These findings could therefore be helpful in understanding and preventing the morphology-linked mechanisms responsible for the post-transfusion survival of preserved RBCs.

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteome Analysis of Lysophosphatidic Acid Induced Chemotaxis applying Dual-step ¹⁸O Labeling Coupled with Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Shi-Jian; Wang, Yingchun; Jacobs, Jon M.; Qian, Weijun; Yang, Feng; Tolmachev, Aleksey V.; Du, Xiuxia; Wang, Wei; Moore, Ronald J.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Waters, Katrina M.; Heibeck, Tyler H.; Adkins, Joshua N.; Camp, David G.; Klemke, Richard L.; Smith, Richard D.

    2008-10-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a central cellular regulatory mechanism in modulating protein activity and propagating signals within cellular pathways and networks. Development of more effective methods for the simultaneous identification of phosphorylation sites and quantification of temporal changes in protein phosphorylation could provide important insights into molecular signaling mechanisms in a variety of different cellular processes. Here we present an integrated quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its applications for comparative analysis of Cos-7 cells in response to lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) gradient stimulation. The approach combines trypsin-catalyzed 16O/18O labeling plus 16O/18O-methanol esterification labeling for quantitation, a macro- Immobilized Metal-ion Affinity Chromatography trap for phosphopeptide enrichment, and a monolithic capillary column with integrated electrospray emitter. LC separation and MS/MS is followed by neutral loss-dependent MS/MS/MS for phosphopeptide identification using a linear ion trap (LTQ)-FT mass spectrometer and complementary searching algorithms for interpreting MS/MS spectra. Protein phosphorylation involved in various signaling pathways of cell migration were identified and quantified, such as mitogen-activated protein kinase 1, dual-specificity mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2, and dual-specificity tyrosine-phosphorylation regulated kinase 1b, and a number of Rho GTPase-activating proteins. These results demonstrate the efficiency of this quantitative phosphoproteomics approach and its application for rapid discovery of phosphorylation events associated with gradient sensing and cell chemotaxis.

  9. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals a Role for Serine and Threonine Kinases in the Cytoskeletal Reorganization in Early T Cell Receptor Activation in Human Primary T Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Ruperez, Patricia; Gago-Martinez, Ana; Burlingame, A. L.; Oses-Prieto, Juan A.

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events play a primary role in regulation of almost all aspects of cell function including signal transduction, cell cycle, or apoptosis. Thus far, T cell phosphoproteomics have focused on analysis of phosphotyrosine residues, and little is known about the role of serine/threonine phosphorylation in early activation of the T cell receptor (TCR). Therefore, we performed a quantitative mass spectrometry-based analysis of the global phosphoproteome of human primary T cells in response to 5 min of TCR activation with anti-CD3 antibody. Combining immunoprecipitation with an antiphosphotyrosine antibody, titanium dioxide phosphopeptide enrichment, isobaric tag for the relative and absolute quantitation methodology, and strong cation exchange separation, we were able to identify 2814 phosphopeptides. These unique sites were employed to investigate the site-specific phosphorylation dynamics. Five hundred and seventeen phosphorylation sites showed TCR-responsive changes. We found that upon 5 min of stimulation of the TCR, specific serine and threonine kinase motifs are overrepresented in the set of responsive phosphorylation sites. These phosphorylation events targeted proteins with many different activities and are present in different subcellular locations. Many of these proteins are involved in intracellular signaling cascades related mainly to cytoskeletal reorganization and regulation of small GTPase-mediated signal transduction, probably involved in the formation of the immune synapse. PMID:22499768

  10. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Isolated Mitochondria in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Margaux; Bonhomme, Ludovic; Davanture, Marlène; Zivy, Michel; Lemaire, Claire

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria play a central role in cellular energy metabolism and cell death. Deregulation of mitochondrial functions is associated with several human pathologies (neurodegenerative diseases, neuromuscular diseases, type II diabetes, obesity, cancer). The steadily increasing number of identified mitochondrial phosphoproteins, kinases, and phosphatases in recent years suggests that reversible protein phosphorylation plays an important part in the control of mitochondrial processes. In addition, many mitochondrial phosphoproteins probably still remain to be identified, considering that 30% of proteins are expected to be phosphorylated in eukaryotes. In this chapter, we describe two procedures for the analysis of the mitochondrial phosphoproteome. The first one is a qualitative method that combines blue native and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-BN/SDS-PAGE) and specific phosphoprotein staining. The second one is a quantitative approach that associates mitochondrial peptide labeling, phosphopeptide enrichment, and mass spectrometry.

  11. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Liver Homogenates

    PubMed Central

    Demirkan, Gokhan; Salomon, Arthur R.; Gruppuso, Philip A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Regulation of protein function via reversible phosphorylation is an essential component of cell signaling. Our ability to understand complex phosphorylation networks in the physiological context of a whole organism or tissue remains limited. This is largely due to the technical challenge of isolating serine/threonine phosphorylated peptides from a tissue sample. In the present study, we developed a phosphoproteomic strategy to purify and identify phosphopeptides from a tissue sample by employing protein gel filtration, protein SAX (strong anion exchange) and SCX (strong cation exchange) chromatography, peptide SCX chromatography and TiO2 affinity purification. By applying this strategy to the mass spectrometry-based analysis of rat liver homogenates, we were able to identify with high confidence and quantify over four thousand unique phosphopeptides. Finally, the reproducibility of our methodology was demonstrated by its application to analysis of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathways in liver samples obtained from rats in which hepatic mTOR was activated by refeeding following a period of fasting. PMID:22903715

  12. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of neuronal intermediate filament proteins (NF-M/H) in Alzheimer's disease by iTRAQ.

    PubMed

    Rudrabhatla, Parvathi; Grant, Philip; Jaffe, Howard; Strong, Michael J; Pant, Harish C

    2010-11-01

    Aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal cytoskeletal proteins is one of the major pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease (AD), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Parkinson's disease (PD). Human NF-M/H display a large number of multiple KSP repeats in the carboxy-terminal tail domain, which are phosphorylation sites of proline-directed serine/threonine (pSer/Thr-Pro, KS/T-P) kinases. The phosphorylation sites of NF-M/H have not been characterized in AD brain. Here, we use quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology, isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ), for the characterization of NF-M/H phosphorylation sites in AD brain. We identified 13 hyperphosphorylated sites of NF-M; 9 Lys-Ser-Pro (KSP) sites; 2 variant motifs, Glu-Ser-Pro (ESP) Ser-736 and Leu-Ser-Pro (LSP) Ser-837; and 2 non-S/T-P motifs, Ser-783 and Ser-788. All the Ser/Thr residues are phosphorylated at significantly greater abundance in AD brain compared with control brain. Ten hyperphosphorylated KSP sites have been identified on the C-terminal tail domain of NF-H, with greater abundance of phosphorylation in AD brain compared with control brain. Our data provide the direct evidence that NF-M/H are hyperphosphorylated in AD compared with control brain and suggest the role of both proline-directed and non-proline-directed protein kinases in AD. This study represents the first comprehensive iTRAQ analyses and quantification of phosphorylation sites of human NF-M and NF-H from AD brain and suggests that aberrant hyperphosphorylation of neuronal intermediate filament proteins is involved in AD.

  13. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparison of 2D and 3D Colon Cancer Cell Culture Models.

    PubMed

    Yue, Xiaoshan; Lukowski, Jessica K; Weaver, Eric M; Skube, Susan B; Hummon, Amanda B

    2016-12-02

    Cell cultures are widely used model systems. Some immortalized cell lines can be grown in either two-dimensional (2D) adherent monolayers or in three-dimensional (3D) multicellular aggregates, or spheroids. Here, the quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome of colon carcinoma HT29 cells cultures in 2D monolayers and 3D spheroids were compared with a stable isotope labeling of amino acids (SILAC) labeling strategy. Two biological replicates from each sample were examined, and notable differences in both the proteome and the phosphoproteome were determined by nanoliquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to assess how growth configuration affects molecular expression. A total of 5867 protein groups, including 2523 phosphoprotein groups and 8733 phosphopeptides were identified in the samples. The Gene Ontology analysis revealed enriched GO terms in the 3D samples for RNA binding, nucleic acid binding, enzyme binding, cytoskeletal protein binding, and histone binding for their molecular functions (MF) and in the process of cell cycle, cytoskeleton organization, and DNA metabolic process for the biological process (BP). The KEGG pathway analysis indicated that 3D cultures are enriched for oxidative phosphorylation pathways, metabolic pathways, peroxisome pathways, and biosynthesis of amino acids. In contrast, analysis of the phosphoproteomes indicated that 3D cultures have decreased phosphorylation correlating with slower growth rates and lower cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions. In sum, these results provide quantitative assessments of the effects on the proteome and phosphoproteome of culturing cells in 2D versus 3D cell culture configurations.

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  15. Methods for and Insights from Phosphoproteome Analysis in Marine Microbes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Held, N. A.; Saito, M. A.; McIlvin, M.

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorylation, the dynamic addition of a phosphate group to specific amino acids, is a key regulator of protein activity in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Protein phosphorylation is known to modulate nutrient acquisition, metabolism, growth and reproduction in model organisms, yet little is known about the role of phosphorylation marine organisms. Recent developments in LC-MS/MS make it possible to identify phosphorylation events in the proteome. We tested various methods in marine bacteria and developed a simple approach to phosphoproteome analysis. We then applied this method to cultured isolates of Prochlorococcus and diatom-associated Alteromonas sp. BB2AT2. We began by comparing the phosphoproteomes of these organisms in exponential and stationary phase growth. We conducted iterative experiments to assess completeness of our analysis, similar to the rarefaction approach used to determine sequence depth in ecology. We also explored semi-quantitative changes in protein phosphorylation when cells were subject to phosphate deplete media and/or phosphatase inhibitors. These early studies demonstrate the promise of phosphoproteomics to advance our understanding of bacterial biochemistry and microbe-environment interactions.

  16. Quantitative and Functional Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals that Ethylene Regulates Water Transport via the C-Terminal Phosphorylation of Aquaporin PIP2;1 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qing, Dongjin; Yang, Zhu; Li, Mingzhe; Wong, Wai Shing; Guo, Guangyu; Liu, Shichang; Guo, Hongwei; Li, Ning

    2016-01-04

    Ethylene participates in the regulation of numerous cellular events and biological processes, including water loss, during leaf and flower petal wilting. The diverse ethylene responses may be regulated via dynamic interplays between protein phosphorylation/dephosphorylation and ubiquitin/26S proteasome-mediated protein degradation and protease cleavage. To address how ethylene alters protein phosphorylation through multi-furcated signaling pathways, we performed a (15)N stable isotope labelling-based, differential, and quantitative phosphoproteomics study on air- and ethylene-treated ethylene-insensitive Arabidopsis double loss-of-function mutant ein3-1/eil1-1. Among 535 non-redundant phosphopeptides identified, two and four phosphopeptides were up- and downregulated by ethylene, respectively. Ethylene-regulated phosphorylation of aquaporin PIP2;1 is positively correlated with the water flux rate and water loss in leaf. Genetic studies in combination with quantitative proteomics, immunoblot analysis, protoplast swelling/shrinking experiments, and leaf water loss assays on the transgenic plants expressing both the wild-type and S280A/S283A-mutated PIP2;1 in the both Col-0 and ein3eil1 genetic backgrounds suggest that ethylene increases water transport rate in Arabidopsis cells by enhancing S280/S283 phosphorylation at the C terminus of PIP2;1. Unknown kinase and/or phosphatase activities may participate in the initial up-regulation independent of the cellular functions of EIN3/EIL1. This finding contributes to our understanding of ethylene-regulated leaf wilting that is commonly observed during post-harvest storage of plant organs.

  17. Quantitative- and Phospho-Proteomic Analysis of the Yeast Response to the Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor Imatinib to Pharmacoproteomics-Guided Drug Line Extension

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Sandra C.; Mira, Nuno P.; Moreira, Ana S.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Imatinib mesylate (IM) is a potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor used as front-line therapy in chronic myeloid leukemia, a disease caused by the oncogenic kinase Bcr-Abl. Although the clinical success of IM set a new paradigm in molecular-targeted therapy, the emergence of IM resistance is a clinically significant problem. In an effort to obtain new insights into the mechanisms of adaptation and tolerance to IM, as well as the signaling pathways potentially affected by this drug, we performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis-based quantitative- and phospho-proteomic analysis in the eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We singled out proteins that were either differentially expressed or differentially phosphorylated in response to IM, using the phosphoselective dye Pro-Q® Diamond, and identified 18 proteins in total. Ten were altered only at the content level (mostly decreased), while the remaining 8 possessed IM-repressed phosphorylation. These 18 proteins are mainly involved in cellular carbohydrate processes (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis), translation, protein folding, ion homeostasis, and nucleotide and amino acid metabolism. Remarkably, all 18 proteins have human functional homologs. A role for HSP70 proteins in the response to IM, as well as decreased glycolysis as a metabolic marker of IM action are suggested, consistent with findings from studies in human cell lines. The previously-proposed effect of IM as an inhibitor of vacuolar H+-ATPase function was supported by the identification of an underexpressed protein subunit of this complex. Taken together, these findings reinforce the role of yeast as a valuable eukaryotic model for pharmacological studies and identification of new drug targets, with potential clinical implications in drug reassignment or line extension under a personalized medicine perspective. PMID:22775238

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics by mass spectrometry: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Nita-Lazar, Aleksandra; Saito-Benz, Hideshiro; White, Forest M.

    2009-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation-mediated signaling networks regulate much of the cellular response to external stimuli, and dysregulation in these networks has been linked to multiple disease states. Significant advancements have been made over the past decade to enable the analysis and quantification of cellular protein phosphorylation events, but comprehensive analysis of the phosphoproteome is still lacking, as is the ability to monitor signaling at the network level while comprehending the biological implications of each phosphorylation site. In this review we highlight many of the technological advances over the past decade and describe some of the latest applications of these tools to uncover signaling networks in a variety of biological settings. We finish with a concise discussion of the future of the field, including additional advances that are required to link protein phosphorylation analysis with biological insight. PMID:18846511

  19. Quantitative label-free phosphoproteomics strategy for multifaceted experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Soderblom, Erik J; Philipp, Melanie; Thompson, J Will; Caron, Marc G; Moseley, M Arthur

    2011-05-15

    Protein phosphorylation is a critical regulator of signaling in nearly all eukaryotic cellular pathways and dysregulated phosphorylation has been implicated in an array of diseases. The majority of MS-based quantitative phosphorylation studies are currently performed from transformed cell lines because of the ability to generate large amounts of starting material with incorporated isotopically labeled amino acids during cell culture. Here we describe a general label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic strategy capable of directly analyzing relatively small amounts of virtually any biological matrix, including human tissue and biological fluids. The strategy utilizes a TiO(2) enrichment protocol in which the selectivity and recovery of phosphopeptides were optimized by assessing a twenty-point condition matrix of binding modifier concentrations and peptide-to-resin capacity ratios. The quantitative reproducibility of the TiO(2) enrichment was determined to be 16% RSD through replicate enrichments of a wild-type Danio rerio (zebrafish) lysate. Measured phosphopeptide fold-changes from alpha-casein spiked into wild-type zebrafish lysate backgrounds were within 5% of the theoretical value. Application to a morpholino induced knock-down of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 (GRK5) in zebrafish embryos resulted in the quantitation of 719 phosphorylated peptides corresponding to 449 phosphorylated proteins from 200 μg of zebrafish embryo lysates.

  20. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Aurora Kinase Inhibition in Monopolar Cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Polat, Ayse Nur; Karayel, Özge; Giese, Sven H; Harmanda, Büşra; Sanal, Erdem; Hu, Chi-Kuo; Renard, Bernhard Y; Özlü, Nurhan

    2015-09-04

    Cytokinesis is the last step of the cell cycle that requires coordinated activities of the microtubule cytoskeleton, actin cytoskeleton, and membrane compartments. Aurora B kinase is one of the master regulatory kinases that orchestrate multiple events during cytokinesis. To reveal targets of the Aurora B kinase, we combined quantitative mass spectrometry with chemical genetics. Using the quantitative proteomic approach, SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture), we analyzed the phosphoproteome of monopolar cytokinesis upon VX680- or AZD1152-mediated aurora kinase inhibition. In total, our analysis quantified over 20 000 phosphopeptides in response to the Aurora-B kinase inhibition; 246 unique phosphopeptides were significantly down-regulated and 74 were up-regulated. Our data provide a broad analysis of downstream effectors of Aurora kinase and offer insights into how Aurora kinase regulates cytokinesis.

  1. Quantitative variations of the mitochondrial proteome and phosphoproteome during fermentative and respiratory growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Margaux; Bonhomme, Ludovic; Davanture, Marlène; Valot, Benoit; Zivy, Michel; Lemaire, Claire

    2014-06-25

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a facultative aerobe able to adapt its metabolism according to the carbon substrate. The mechanisms of these adaptations involve at least partly the mitochondria but are not yet well understood. To address the possible role of protein phosphorylation event in their regulation, it is necessary in a first instance to determine precisely the phosphorylation sites that show changes depending on the carbon source. In this aim we performed an overall quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic study of isolated mitochondria extracted from yeast grown on fermentative (glucose or galactose) and respiratory (lactate) media. Label free quantitative analysis of protein accumulation revealed significant variation of 176 mitochondrial proteins including 108 proteins less accumulated in glucose medium than in lactate and galactose media. We also showed that the responses to galactose and glucose are not similar. Stable isotope dimethyl labeling allowed the quantitative comparison of phosphorylation levels between the different growth conditions. This study enlarges significantly the map of yeast mitochondrial phosphosites as 670 phosphorylation sites were identified, of which 214 were new and quantified. Above all, we showed that 90 phosphosites displayed a significant variation according to the medium and that variation of phosphorylation level is site-dependent. This proteomic and phosphoproteomic study is the first extensive study providing quantitative data on phosphosites responses to different carbon substrates independent of the variations of protein quantities in the yeast S. cerevisiae mitochondria. The significant changes observed in the level of phosphorylation according to the carbon substrate open the way to the study of the regulation of mitochondrial proteins by phosphorylation in fermentative and respiratory media. In addition, the identification of a large number of new phosphorylation sites show that the characterization of

  2. The current state of the art of quantitative phosphoproteomics and its applications to diabetes research

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Chi Yuet X’avia; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Smith, Richard D.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2016-03-17

    Protein phosphorylation is a fundamental regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes and aberrant perturbation of phosphorylation has been revealed in various human diseases. Kinases and their cognate inhibitors have been hotspot for drug development. Therefore, the emerging tools, which enable a system-wide quantitative profiling of phosphoproteome, would offer a powerful impetus in unveiling novel signaling pathways, drug targets and/or biomarkers for the disease of interest. In this review, we will highlight recent advances in phosphoproteomics, the current state-of-the-art of the technologies, and the challenges and future perspectives of this research area. Finally, we will underscore some exemplary applications of phosphoproteomics in diabetes research.

  3. The current state of the art of quantitative phosphoproteomics and its applications to diabetes research.

    PubMed

    Chan, Chi Yuet X'avia; Gritsenko, Marina A; Smith, Richard D; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a fundamental regulatory mechanism in many cellular processes and aberrant perturbation of phosphorylation has been implicated in various human diseases. Kinases and their cognate inhibitors have been considered as hotspots for drug development. Therefore, the emerging tools, which enable a system-wide quantitative profiling of phosphoproteome, would offer a powerful impetus in unveiling novel signaling pathways, drug targets and/or biomarkers for diseases of interest. This review highlights recent advances in phosphoproteomics, the current state of the art of the technologies and the challenges and future perspectives of this research area. Finally, some exemplary applications of phosphoproteomics in diabetes research are underscored.

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis identifies activation of the RET and IGF-1R/IR signaling pathways in neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    DeNardo, Bradley D; Holloway, Michael P; Ji, Qinqin; Nguyen, Kevin T; Cheng, Yan; Valentine, Marcus B; Salomon, Arthur; Altura, Rachel A

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an embryonal tumor of childhood with a heterogenous clinical presentation that reflects differences in activation of complex biological signaling pathways. Protein phosphorylation is a key component of cellular signal transduction and plays a critical role in processes that control cancer cell growth and survival. We used shotgun LC/MS to compare phosphorylation between a human MYCN amplified neuroblastoma cell line (NB10), modeling a resistant tumor, and a human neural precursor cell line (NPC), modeling a normal baseline neural crest cell. 2181 unique phosphorylation sites representing 1171 proteins and 2598 phosphopeptides were found. Protein kinases accounted for 6% of the proteome, with a predominance of tyrosine kinases, supporting their prominent role in oncogenic signaling pathways. Highly abundant receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) phosphopeptides in the NB10 cell line relative to the NPC cell line included RET, insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor/insulin receptor (IGF-1R/IR), and fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1). Multiple phosphorylated peptides from downstream mediators of the PI3K/AKT/mTOR and RAS pathways were also highly abundant in NB10 relative to NPC. Our analysis highlights the importance of RET, IGF-1R/IR and FGFR1 as RTKs in neuroblastoma and suggests a methodology that can be used to identify potential novel biological therapeutic targets. Furthermore, application of this previously unexploited technology in the clinic opens the possibility of providing a new wide-scale molecular signature to assess disease progression and prognosis.

  5. Phosphoproteomics analysis of a clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis Beijing isolate: expanding the mycobacterial phosphoproteome catalog.

    PubMed

    Fortuin, Suereta; Tomazella, Gisele G; Nagaraj, Nagarjuna; Sampson, Samantha L; Gey van Pittius, Nicolaas C; Soares, Nelson C; Wiker, Harald G; de Souza, Gustavo A; Warren, Robin M

    2015-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation, regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases, mediates a switch between protein activity and cellular pathways that contribute to a large number of cellular processes. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 Serine/Threonine kinases (STPKs) which show close homology to eukaryotic kinases. This study aimed to elucidate the phosphoproteomic landscape of a clinical isolate of M. tuberculosis. We performed a high throughput mass spectrometric analysis of proteins extracted from an early-logarithmic phase culture. Whole cell lysate proteins were processed using the filter-aided sample preparation method, followed by phosphopeptide enrichment of tryptic peptides by strong cation exchange (SCX) and Titanium dioxide (TiO2) chromatography. The MaxQuant quantitative proteomics software package was used for protein identification. Our analysis identified 414 serine/threonine/tyrosine phosphorylated sites, with a distribution of S/T/Y sites; 38% on serine, 59% on threonine and 3% on tyrosine; present on 303 unique peptides mapping to 214 M. tuberculosis proteins. Only 45 of the S/T/Y phosphorylated proteins identified in our study had been previously described in the laboratory strain H37Rv, confirming previous reports. The remaining 169 phosphorylated proteins were newly identified in this clinical M. tuberculosis Beijing strain. We identified 5 novel tyrosine phosphorylated proteins. These findings not only expand upon our current understanding of the protein phosphorylation network in clinical M. tuberculosis but the data set also further extends and complements previous knowledge regarding phosphorylated peptides and phosphorylation sites in M. tuberculosis.

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling downstream of the prostaglandin e2/g-protein coupled receptor in human synovial fibroblasts: potential antifibrotic networks.

    PubMed

    Gerarduzzi, Casimiro; He, QingWen; Antoniou, John; Di Battista, John A

    2014-11-07

    The Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) signaling mechanism within fibroblasts is of growing interest as it has been shown to prevent numerous fibrotic features of fibroblast activation with limited evidence of downstream pathways. To understand the mechanisms of fibroblasts producing tremendous amounts of PGE2 with autocrine effects, we apply a strategy of combining a wide-screening of PGE2-induced kinases with quantitative phosphoproteomics. Our large-scale proteomic approach identified a PKA signal transmitted through phosphorylation of its substrates harboring the R(R/X)X(S*/T*) motif. We documented 115 substrates, of which 72 had 89 sites with a 2.5-fold phosphorylation difference in PGE2-treated cells than in untreated cells, where approximately half of such sites were defined as being novel. They were compiled by networking software to focus on highlighted activities and to associate them with a functional readout of fibroblasts. The substrates were associated with a variety of cellular functions including cytoskeletal structures (migration/motility), regulators of G-protein coupled receptor function, protein kinases, and transcriptional/translational regulators. For the first time, we extended the PGE2 pathway into an elaborate network of interconnecting phosphoproteins, providing vital information to a once restricted signalosome. These data provide new insights into eicosanoid-initiated cell signaling with regards to the regulation of fibroblast activation and the identification of new targets for evidenced-based pharmacotherapy against fibrosis.

  7. Biphasic Affinity Chromatographic Approach for Deep Tyrosine Phosphoproteome Analysis.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhenzhen; Dong, Mingming; Wang, Yan; Dong, Jing; Li, Shawn S-C; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang

    2017-02-21

    Tyrosine phosphorylation (pTyr) is important for normal physiology and implicated in many human diseases, particularly cancer. Identification of pTyr sites is critical to dissecting signaling pathways and understanding disease pathologies. However, compared with serine/threonine phosphorylation (pSer/pThr), the analysis of pTyr at the proteome level is more challenging due to its low abundance. Here, we developed a biphasic affinity chromatographic approach where Src SH2 superbinder was coupled with NeutrAvidin affinity chromatography, for tyrosine phosphoproteome analysis. With the use of competitive elution agent biotin-pYEEI, this strategy can distinguish high-affinity phosphotyrosyl peptides from low-affinity ones, while the excess competitive agent is readily removed by using NeutrAvidin agarose resin in an integrated tip system. The excellent performance of this system was demonstrated by analyzing tyrosine phosphoproteome of Jurkat cells from which 3,480 unique pTyr sites were identified. The biphasic affinity chromatography method for deep Tyr phosphoproteome analysis is rapid, sensitive, robust, and cost-effective. It is widely applicable to the global analysis of the tyrosine phosphoproteome associated with tyrosine kinase signal transduction.

  8. Stable Isotope Metabolic Labeling-based Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Arabidopsis Mutants Reveals Ethylene-regulated Time-dependent Phosphoproteins and Putative Substrates of Constitutive Triple Response 1 Kinase*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhu; Guo, Guangyu; Zhang, Manyu; Liu, Claire Y.; Hu, Qin; Lam, Henry; Cheng, Han; Xue, Yu; Li, Jiayang; Li, Ning

    2013-01-01

    Ethylene is an important plant hormone that regulates numerous cellular processes and stress responses. The mode of action of ethylene is both dose- and time-dependent. Protein phosphorylation plays a key role in ethylene signaling, which is mediated by the activities of ethylene receptors, constitutive triple response 1 (CTR1) kinase, and phosphatase. To address how ethylene alters the cellular protein phosphorylation profile in a time-dependent manner, differential and quantitative phosphoproteomics based on 15N stable isotope labeling in Arabidopsis was performed on both one-minute ethylene-treated Arabidopsis ethylene-overly-sensitive loss-of-function mutant rcn1-1, deficient in PP2A phosphatase activity, and a pair of long-term ethylene-treated wild-type and loss-of-function ethylene signaling ctr1-1 mutants, deficient in mitogen-activated kinase kinase kinase activity. In total, 1079 phosphopeptides were identified, among which 44 were novel. Several one-minute ethylene-regulated phosphoproteins were found from the rcn1-1. Bioinformatic analysis of the rcn1-1 phosphoproteome predicted nine phosphoproteins as the putative substrates for PP2A phosphatase. In addition, from CTR1 kinase-enhanced phosphosites, we also found putative CTR1 kinase substrates including plastid transcriptionally active protein and calcium-sensing receptor. These regulatory proteins are phosphorylated in the presence of ethylene. Analysis of ethylene-regulated phosphosites using the group-based prediction system with a protein–protein interaction filter revealed a total of 14 kinase–substrate relationships that may function in both CTR1 kinase- and PP2A phosphatase-mediated phosphor-relay pathways. Finally, several ethylene-regulated post-translational modification network models have been built using molecular systems biology tools. It is proposed that ethylene regulates the phosphorylation of arginine/serine-rich splicing factor 41, plasma membrane intrinsic protein 2A, light

  9. Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Analysis of Human Lens Fiber Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Han, Jun; David, Larry L.; Schey, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The human lens fiber cell insoluble membrane fraction contains important membrane proteins, cytoskeletal proteins, and cytosolic proteins that are strongly associated with the membrane. The purpose of this study was to characterize the lens fiber cell membrane proteome and phosphoproteome from human lenses. Methods. HPLC-mass spectrometry–based multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT), without or with phosphopeptide enrichment, was applied to study the proteome and phosphoproteome of lens fiber cell membranes, respectively. Results. In total, 951 proteins were identified, including 379 integral membrane and membrane-associated proteins. Enriched gene categories and pathways based on the proteomic analysis include carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, pentose phosphate pathway, pyruvate metabolism), proteasome, cell-cell signaling and communication (GTP binding, gap junction, focal adhesion), glutathione metabolism, and actin regulation. The combination of TiO2 phosphopeptide enrichment and MudPIT analysis revealed 855 phosphorylation sites on 271 proteins, including 455 phosphorylation sites that have not been previously identified. PKA, PKC, CKII, p38MAPK, and RSK are predicted as the major kinases for phosphorylation on the sites identified in the human lens membrane fraction. Conclusions. The results presented herein significantly expand the characterized proteome and phosphoproteome of the human lens fiber cell and provide a valuable reference for future research in studies of lens development and disease. PMID:23349431

  10. Cost-effective isobaric tagging for quantitative phosphoproteomics using DiART reagents.

    PubMed

    Ramsubramaniam, Nikhil; Tao, Feng; Li, Shuwei; Marten, Mark R

    2013-12-01

    We describe the use of an isobaric tagging reagent, Deuterium isobaric Amine Reactive Tag (DiART), for quantitative phosphoproteomic experiments. Using DiART tagged custom mixtures of two phosphorylated peptides from alpha casein and their non-phosphorylated counterparts, we demonstrate the compatibility of DiART with TiO2 affinity purification of phosphorylated peptides. Comparison of theoretical vs. experimental reporter ion ratios reveals accurate quantification of phosphorylated peptides over a dynamic range of more than 15-fold. Using DiART labelling and TiO2 enrichment (DiART-TiO2) with large quantities of proteins (8 mg) from the cell lysate of model fungus Aspergillus nidulans, we quantified 744 unique phosphopeptides. Overlap of median values of TiO2 enriched phosphopeptides with theoretical values indicates accurate trends. Altogether these findings confirm the feasibility of performing quantitative phosphoproteomic experiments in a cost-effective manner using isobaric tagging reagents, DiART.

  11. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals new roles for the protein phosphatase PP6 in mitotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Rusin, Scott F.; Schlosser, Kate A.; Adamo, Mark E.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.

    2017-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism controlling mitotic progression. Protein phosphatase 6 (PP6) is an essential enzyme with conserved roles in chromosome segregation and spindle assembly from yeast to humans. We applied a baculovirus-mediated gene silencing approach to deplete HeLa cells of the catalytic subunit of PP6 (PP6c) and analyzed changes in the phosphoproteome and proteome in mitotic cells by quantitative mass spectrometry–based proteomics. We identified 408 phosphopeptides on 272 proteins that increased and 298 phosphopeptides on 220 proteins that decreased in phosphorylation upon PP6c depletion in mitotic cells. Motif analysis of the phosphorylated sites combined with bioinformatics pathway analysis revealed previously unknown PP6c–dependent regulatory pathways. Biochemical assays demonstrated that PP6c opposed casein kinase 2–dependent phosphorylation of the condensin I subunit NCAP-G, and cellular analysis showed that depletion of PP6c resulted in defects in chromosome condensation and segregation in anaphase, consistent with dysregulation of condensin I function in the absence of PP6 activity. PMID:26462736

  12. Integration of conventional quantitative and phospho-proteomics reveals new elements in activated Jurkat T-cell receptor pathway maintenance.

    PubMed

    Jouy, Florent; Müller, Stephan A; Wagner, Juliane; Otto, Wolfgang; von Bergen, Martin; Tomm, Janina M

    2015-01-01

    Recent years have seen a constant development of tools for the global assessment of phosphoproteins. Here, we outline a concept for integrating approaches for quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics. The strategy was applied to the analysis of changes in signalling and protein synthesis occurring after activation of the T-cell receptor (TCR) pathway in a T-cell line (Jurkat cells). For this purpose, peptides were obtained from four biological replicates of activated and control Jurkat T-cells and phosphopeptides enriched via a TiO2-based chromatographic step. Both phosphopeptide-enriched and flow-through fractions were analyzed by LC-MS. We observed 1314 phosphopeptides in the enriched fraction whereas 19 were detected in the flow-through, enabling the quantification of 414 and eight phosphoproteins in the respective fractions. Pathway analysis revealed the differential regulation of many metabolic pathways. Among the quantified proteins, 11 kinases with known TCR-related function were detected. A kinase-substrate database search for the phosphosites identified also confirmed the activity of a further ten kinases. In total, these two approaches provided evidence of 19 unique TCR-related kinases. The combination of phosphoproteomics and conventional quantitative shotgun analysis leads to a more comprehensive assessment of the signalling networks needed for the maintenance of the activated status of Jurkat T-cells.

  13. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling of cellular response induced by an insect cytokine paralytic peptide.

    PubMed

    Song, Liang; Wang, Fei; Dong, Zhaoming; Hua, Xiaoting; Xia, Qingyou

    2017-02-10

    Paralytic peptide (PP) participates in diverse physiological processes as an insect cytokine, such as immunity control, paralysis induction, regulation of cell morphology and proliferation. To investigate the molecular mechanism underlying those physiological activities, we systematically investigated the global phosphorylation events in fat body of silkworm larvae induced by PP through label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics. 2534 phosphosites were finally identified, of which the phosphorylation level of 620 phosphosites on 244 proteins was significantly up-regulated and 67 phosphosites on 43 proteins was down-regulated. Among those proteins, 13 were protein kinases (PKs), 13 were transcription factors (TFs) across 10 families and 17 were metabolism related enzymes. Meanwhile, Motif-X analysis of the phosphorylation sites showed that 16 motifs are significantly enriched, including 8 novel phosphorylation motifs. In addition, KEGG and functional interacting network analysis revealed that phosphorylation cascades play the crucial regulation roles in PP-dependent signaling pathways, and highlighted the potential central position of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in them. These analyses provide direct insights into the molecule mechanisms of cellular response induced by PP.

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals the Role of Protein Arginine Phosphorylation in the Bacterial Stress Response*

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Andreas; Trentini, Débora Broch; Spiess, Silvia; Fuhrmann, Jakob; Ammerer, Gustav; Mechtler, Karl; Clausen, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Arginine phosphorylation is an emerging protein modification implicated in the general stress response of Gram-positive bacteria. The modification is mediated by the arginine kinase McsB, which phosphorylates and inactivates the heat shock repressor CtsR. In this study, we developed a mass spectrometric approach accounting for the peculiar chemical properties of phosphoarginine. The improved methodology was used to analyze the dynamic changes in the Bacillus subtilis arginine phosphoproteome in response to different stress situations. Quantitative analysis showed that a B. subtilis mutant lacking the YwlE arginine phosphatase accumulated a strikingly large number of arginine phosphorylations (217 sites in 134 proteins), however only a minor fraction of these sites was increasingly modified during heat shock or oxidative stress. The main targets of McsB-mediated arginine phosphorylation comprise central factors of the stress response system including the CtsR and HrcA heat shock repressors, as well as major components of the protein quality control system such as the ClpCP protease and the GroEL chaperonine. These findings highlight the impact of arginine phosphorylation in orchestrating the bacterial stress response. PMID:24263382

  15. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Approaches for Deciphering the Signaling Pathway for Tension Wood Formation in Poplar.

    PubMed

    Mauriat, Mélanie; Leplé, Jean-Charles; Claverol, Stéphane; Bartholomé, Jérôme; Negroni, Luc; Richet, Nicolas; Lalanne, Céline; Bonneu, Marc; Coutand, Catherine; Plomion, Christophe

    2015-08-07

    Trees adjust their growth following forced changes in orientation to re-establish a vertical position. In angiosperms, this adjustment involves the differential regulation of vascular cambial activity between the lower (opposite wood) and upper (tension wood) sides of the leaning stem. We investigated the molecular mechanisms leading to the formation of differential wood types through a quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis on poplar subjected to a gravitropic stimulus. We identified and quantified 675 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 468 phosphoproteins, and 3 763 nonphosphorylated peptides, corresponding to 1 155 proteins, in the differentiating xylem of straight-growing trees (control) and trees subjected to a gravitational stimulus during 8 weeks. About 1% of the peptides were specific to a wood type (straight, opposite, or tension wood). Proteins quantified in more than one type of wood were more numerous: a mixed linear model showed 389 phosphopeptides and 556 proteins to differ in abundance between tension wood and opposite wood. Twenty-one percent of the phosphoproteins identified here were described in their phosphorylated form for the first time. Our analyses revealed remarkable developmental molecular plasticity, with wood type-specific phosphorylation events, and highlighted the involvement of different proteins in the biosynthesis of cell wall components during the formation of the three types of wood.

  16. SPECHT – Single-stage phosphopeptide enrichment and stable-isotope chemical tagging: Quantitative phosphoproteomics of insulin action in muscle

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Sano, Hiroyuki; Keller, Susanna R.; Lienhard, Gustav E.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of cellular signaling remains a significant challenge for translational and clinical research. In particular, robust and accurate methods for quantitative phosphoproteomics in tissues and tumors represent significant hurdles for such efforts. In the present work, we design, implement and validate a method for single-stage phosphopeptide enrichment and stable isotope chemical tagging, or SPECHT, that enables the use of iTRAQ, TMT and/or reductive dimethyl-labeling strategies to be applied to phosphoproteomics experiments performed on primary tissue. We develop and validate our approach using reductive dimethyl-labeling and HeLa cells in culture, and find these results indistinguishable from data generated from more traditional SILAC-labeled HeLa cells mixed at the cell level. We apply the SPECHT approach to the quantitative analysis of insulin signaling in a murine myotube cell line and muscle tissue, identify known as well as new phosphorylation events, and validate these phosphorylation sites using phospho-specific antibodies. Taken together, our work validates chemical tagging post-single-stage phosphoenrichment as a general strategy for studying cellular signaling in primary tissues. PMID:25463755

  17. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Novel Phosphorylation Events in Insulin Signaling Regulated by Protein Phosphatase 1 Regulatory Subunit 12A

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangmin; Ma, Danjun; Caruso, Michael; Lewis, Monique; Qi, Yue; Yi, Zhengping

    2014-01-01

    Serine/threonine protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 12A (PPP1R12A) modulates the activity and specificity of the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1, regulating various cellular processes via dephosphorylation. Nonetheless, little is known about phosphorylation events controlled by PPP1R12A in skeletal muscle insulin signaling. Here, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to generate a global picture of phosphorylation events regulated by PPP1R12A in a L6 skeletal muscle cell line, which were engineered for inducible PPP1R12A knockdown. Phosphoproteomics revealed 3876 phosphorylation sites (620 were novel) in these cells. Furthermore, PPP1R12A knockdown resulted in increased overall phosphorylation in L6 cells at the basal condition, and changed phosphorylation levels for 698 sites (assigned to 295 phosphoproteins) at the basal and/or insulin-stimulated conditions. Pathway analysis on the 295 phosphoproteins revealed multiple significantly enriched pathways related to insulin signaling, such as mTOR signaling and RhoA signaling. Moreover, phosphorylation levels for numerous regulatory sites in these pathways were significantly changed due to PPP1R12A knockdown. These results indicate that PPP1R12A indeed plays a role in skeletal muscle insulin signaling, providing novel insights into the biology of insulin action. This new information may facilitate the design of experiments to better understand mechanisms underlying skeletal muscle insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:24972320

  18. Identification of Candidate Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) Substrates in Mitosis by Quantitative Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Adam; Adamo, Mark E; Cheng, Chao; Kettenbach, Arminja N

    2016-07-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) is an essential regulator of many mitotic processes including the reorganization of the cytoskeleton, chromosome segregation, and formation and separation of daughter cells. Deregulation of Cdk1 activity results in severe defects in these processes. Although the role of Cdk1 in mitosis is well established, only a limited number of Cdk1 substrates have been identified in mammalian cells. To increase our understanding of Cdk1-dependent phosphorylation pathways in mitosis, we conducted a quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis in mitotic HeLa cells using two small molecule inhibitors of Cdk1, Flavopiridol and RO-3306. In these analyses, we identified a total of 24,840 phosphopeptides on 4,273 proteins, of which 1,215 phosphopeptides on 551 proteins were significantly reduced by 2.5-fold or more upon Cdk1 inhibitor addition. Comparison of phosphopeptide quantification upon either inhibitor treatment revealed a high degree of correlation (R(2) value of 0.87) between the different datasets. Motif enrichment analysis of significantly regulated phosphopeptides revealed enrichment of canonical Cdk1 kinase motifs. Interestingly, the majority of proteins identified in this analysis contained two or more Cdk1 inhibitor-sensitive phosphorylation sites, were highly connected with other candidate Cdk1 substrates, were enriched at specific subcellular structures, or were part of protein complexes as identified by the CORUM database. Furthermore, candidate Cdk1 substrates were enriched in G2 and M phase-specific genes. Finally, we validated a subset of candidate Cdk1 substrates by in vitro kinase assays. Our findings provide a valuable resource for the cell signaling and mitosis research communities and greatly increase our knowledge of Cdk1 substrates and Cdk1-dependent signaling pathways. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the response of maize leaves to drought, heat and their combination stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiuli; Wu, Liuji; Zhao, Feiyun; Zhang, Dayong; Li, Nana; Zhu, Guohui; Li, Chaohao; Wang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Drought and heat stress, especially their combination, greatly affect crop production. Many studies have described transcriptome, proteome and phosphoproteome changes in response of plants to drought or heat stress. However, the study about the phosphoproteomic changes in response of crops to the combination stress is scare. To understand the mechanism of maize responses to the drought and heat combination stress, phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on maize leaves by using multiplex iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic and LC-MS/MS methods. Five-leaf-stage maize was subjected to drought, heat or their combination, and the leaves were collected. Globally, heat, drought and the combined stress significantly changed the phosphorylation levels of 172, 149, and 144 phosphopeptides, respectively. These phosphopeptides corresponded to 282 proteins. Among them, 23 only responded to the combined stress and could not be predicted from their responses to single stressors; 30 and 75 only responded to drought and heat, respectively. Notably, 19 proteins were phosphorylated on different sites in response to the single and combination stresses. Of the seven significantly enriched phosphorylation motifs identified, two were common for all stresses, two were common for heat and the combined stress, and one was specific to the combined stress. The signaling pathways in which the phosphoproteins were involved clearly differed among the three stresses. Functional characterization of the phosphoproteins and the pathways identified here could lead to new targets for the enhancement of crop stress tolerance, which will be particularly important in the face of climate change and the increasing prevalence of abiotic stressors.

  20. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals compensatory effects in the piriform cortex of VX nerve agent exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Wright, James D; Manda, Srikanth S; Zhong, Jun; Na, Chan Hyun; Meyerhoff, James; Benton, Bernard; Jabbour, Rabih; Willis, Kristen; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Sekowski, Jennifer W

    2015-01-01

    To gain insights into the toxicity induced by the nerve agent VX, an MS-based phosphoproteomic analysis was carried out on the piriform cortex region of brains from VX-treated rats. Using isobaric tag based TMT labeling followed by titanium dioxide enrichment strategy, we identified 9975 unique phosphosites derived from 3287 phosphoproteins. Temporal changes in the phosphorylation status of peptides were observed over a time period of 24 h in rats exposed to a 1× LD50, intravenous (i.v.) dose with the most notable changes occurring at the 1 h postexposure time point. Five major functional classes of proteins exhibited changes in their phosphorylation status: (i) ion channels/transporters, including ATPases, (ii) kinases/phosphatases, (iii) GTPases, (iv) structural proteins, and (v) transcriptional regulatory proteins. This study is the first quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of VX toxicity in the brain. Understanding the toxicity and compensatory signaling mechanisms will improve the understanding of the complex toxicity of VX in the brain and aid in the elucidation of novel molecular targets that would be important for development of improved countermeasures. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001184 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001184).

  1. Temporal proteomic analysis of HIV infection reveals remodelling of the host phosphoproteome by lentiviral Vif variants

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Edward JD; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; van den Boomen, Dick JH; Antrobus, Robin; Williamson, James C; Lehner, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Viruses manipulate host factors to enhance their replication and evade cellular restriction. We used multiplex tandem mass tag (TMT)-based whole cell proteomics to perform a comprehensive time course analysis of >6500 viral and cellular proteins during HIV infection. To enable specific functional predictions, we categorized cellular proteins regulated by HIV according to their patterns of temporal expression. We focussed on proteins depleted with similar kinetics to APOBEC3C, and found the viral accessory protein Vif to be necessary and sufficient for CUL5-dependent proteasomal degradation of all members of the B56 family of regulatory subunits of the key cellular phosphatase PP2A (PPP2R5A-E). Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of HIV-infected cells confirmed Vif-dependent hyperphosphorylation of >200 cellular proteins, particularly substrates of the aurora kinases. The ability of Vif to target PPP2R5 subunits is found in primate and non-primate lentiviral lineages, and remodeling of the cellular phosphoproteome is therefore a second ancient and conserved Vif function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18296.001 PMID:27690223

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomic study of pressure-overloaded mouse heart reveals dynamin-related protein 1 as a modulator of cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yu-Wang; Chang, Ya-Ting; Wang, Qinchuan; Lin, Jim Jung-Ching; Chen, Yu-Ju; Chen, Chien-Chang

    2013-11-01

    Pressure-overload stress to the heart causes pathological cardiac hypertrophy, which increases the risk of cardiac morbidity and mortality. However, the detailed signaling pathways induced by pressure overload remain unclear. Here we used phosphoproteomics to delineate signaling pathways in the myocardium responding to acute pressure overload and chronic hypertrophy in mice. Myocardial samples at 4 time points (10, 30, 60 min and 2 weeks) after transverse aortic banding (TAB) in mice underwent quantitative phosphoproteomics assay. Temporal phosphoproteomics profiles showed 360 phosphorylation sites with significant regulation after TAB. Multiple mechanical stress sensors were activated after acute pressure overload. Gene ontology analysis revealed differential phosphorylation between hearts with acute pressure overload and chronic hypertrophy. Most interestingly, analysis of the cardiac hypertrophy pathway revealed phosphorylation of the mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (DRP1) by prohypertrophic kinases. Phosphorylation of DRP1 S622 was confirmed in TAB-treated mouse hearts and phenylephrine (PE)-treated rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. TAB-treated mouse hearts showed phosphorylation-mediated mitochondrial translocation of DRP1. Inhibition of DRP1 with the small-molecule inhibitor mdivi-1 reduced the TAB-induced hypertrophic responses. Mdivi-1 also prevented PE-induced hypertrophic growth and oxygen consumption in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. We reveal the signaling responses of the heart to pressure stress in vivo and in vitro. DRP1 may be important in the development of cardiac hypertrophy.

  3. Phosphoproteomics in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harsha, H. C.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2010-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation serves as a basis for regulating a number of cellular processes. Aberrant activation of kinase signaling pathways is commonly associated with several cancers. Recent developments in phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment strategies and quantitative mass spectrometry have resulted in robust pipelines for high-throughput characterization of phosphorylation in a global fashion. Today, it is possible to profile site-specific phosphorylation events on thousands of proteins in a single experiment. The potential of this approach is already being realized to characterize signaling pathways that govern oncogenesis. In addition, chemical proteomic strategies have been used to unravel targets of kinase inhibitors, which are otherwise difficult to characterize. This review summarizes various approaches used for analysis of the phosphoproteome in general, and protein kinases in particular, highlighting key cancer phosphoproteomic studies. PMID:20937571

  4. Developmentally-Dynamic Murine Brain Proteomes and Phosphoproteomes Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Doubleday, Peter F.; Ballif, Bryan A.

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes are governed by a diverse suite of signaling pathways employing reversible phosphorylation. Recent advances in large-scale phosphoproteomic methodologies have made possible the identification and quantification of hundreds to thousands of phosphorylation sites from primary tissues. Towards a global characterization of proteomic changes across brain development, we present the results of a large-scale quantitative mass spectrometry study comparing embryonic, newborn and adult murine brain. Using anti-phosphotyrosine immuno-affinity chromatography and strong cation exchange (SCX) chromatography, coupled to immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC), we identified and quantified over 1,750 phosphorylation sites and over 1,300 proteins between three developmental states. Bioinformatic analyses highlight functions associated with the identified proteins and phosphoproteins and their enrichment at distinct developmental stages. These results serve as a primary reference resource and reveal dynamic developmental profiles of proteins and phosphoproteins from the developing murine brain. PMID:25177544

  5. Phosphoproteomic analysis of wild-type and antimony-resistant Leishmania braziliensis lines by 2D-DIGE technology.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Douglas de Souza; Pescher, Pascale; Laurent, Christine; Lenormand, Pascal; Späth, Gerald F; Murta, Silvane M F

    2015-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most studied post-translational modifications that is involved in different cellular events in Leishmania. In this study, we performed a comparative phosphoproteomics analysis of potassium antimonyl tartrate (SbIII)-resistant and -susceptible lines of Leishmania braziliensis using a 2D-DIGE approach followed by MS. In order to investigate the differential phosphoprotein abundance associated with the drug-induced stress response and SbIII-resistance mechanisms, we compared nontreated and SbIII-treated samples of each line. Pair wise comparisons revealed a total of 116 spots that showed a statistically significant difference in phosphoprotein abundance, including 11 and 34 spots specifically correlated with drug treatment and resistance, respectively. We identified 48 different proteins distributed into seven biological process categories. The category "protein folding/chaperones and stress response" is mainly implicated in response to SbIII treatment, while the categories "antioxidant/detoxification," "metabolic process," "RNA/DNA processing," and "protein biosynthesis" are modulated in the case of antimony resistance. Multiple sequence alignments were performed to validate the conservation of phosphorylated residues in nine proteins identified here. Western blot assays were carried out to validate the quantitative phosphoproteome analysis. The results revealed differential expression level of three phosphoproteins in the lines analyzed. This novel study allowed us to profile the L. braziliensis phosphoproteome, identifying several potential candidates for biochemical or signaling networks associated with antimony resistance phenotype in this parasite. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Her2/neu signaling and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bose, Ron; Molina, Henrik; Patterson, A. Scott; Bitok, John K.; Periaswamy, Balamurugan; Bader, Joel S.; Pandey, Akhilesh; Cole, Philip A.

    2006-01-01

    Her2/neu (Her2) is a tyrosine kinase belonging to the EGF receptor (EGFR)/ErbB family and is overexpressed in 20–30% of human breast cancers. We sought to characterize Her2 signal transduction pathways further by using MS-based quantitative proteomics. Stably transfected cell lines overexpressing Her2 or empty vector were generated, and the effect of an EGFR and Her2 selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor, PD168393, on these cells was characterized. Quantitative measurements were obtained on 462 proteins by using the SILAC (stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture) method to monitor three conditions simultaneously. Of these proteins, 198 showed a significant increase in tyrosine phosphorylation in Her2-overexpressing cells, and 81 showed a significant decrease in phosphorylation. Treatment of Her2-overexpressing cells with PD168393 showed rapid reversibility of the majority of the Her2-triggered phosphorylation events. Phosphoproteins that were identified included many known Her2 signaling molecules as well as known EGFR signaling proteins that had not been previously linked to Her2, such as Stat1, Dok1, and δ-catenin. Importantly, several previously uncharacterized Her2 signaling proteins were identified, including Axl tyrosine kinase, the adaptor protein Fyb, and the calcium-binding protein Pdcd-6/Alg-2. We also identified a phosphorylation site in Her2, Y877, which is located in the activation loop of the kinase domain, is distinct from the known C-terminal tail autophosphorylation sites, and may have important implications for regulation of Her2 signaling. Network modeling, which combined phosphoproteomic results with literature-curated protein–protein interaction data, was used to suggest roles for some of the previously unidentified Her2 signaling proteins. PMID:16785428

  7. Effects of MEK inhibitors GSK1120212 and PD0325901 in vivo using 10-plex quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Paulo, Joao A.; McAllister, Fiona E.; Everley, Robert A.; Beausoleil, Sean A.; Banks, Alexander S.; Gygi, Steven P.

    2015-01-01

    Multiplexed isobaric tag-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics strategies can comprehensively analyze drug treatments effects on biological systems. Given the role of MEK signaling in cancer and MAPK-dependent diseases, we sought to determine if this pathway could be inhibited safely by examining the downstream molecular consequences. We used a series of TMT10-plex experiments to analyze the effect of two MEK inhibitors (GSK1120212 and PD0325901) on three tissues (kidney, liver, and pancreas) from nine mice. We quantified ~6000 proteins in each tissue, but significant protein level alterations were minimal with inhibitor treatment. Of particular interest was kidney tissue, as edema is an adverse effect of these inhibitors. From kidney tissue, we enriched phosphopeptides using titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quantified 10,562 phosphorylation events. Further analysis by phosphotyrosine (pY) peptide immunoprecipitation quantified an additional 592 phosphorylation events. Phosphorylation motif analysis revealed that the inhibitors decreased phosphorylation levels of PxSP and SP sites, consistent with ERK inhibition. The MEK inhibitors had the greatest decrease on the phosphorylation of two proteins, Barttin and Slc12a3, which have roles in ion transport and fluid balance. Further studies will provide insight into the effect of these MEK inhibitors with respect to edema and other adverse events in mouse models and human patients. PMID:25195567

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Identifies Filaggrin and other Targets of Ionizing Radiation in a Human Skin Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Feng; Waters, Katrina M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Wirgau, Rachel M.; Gristenko, Marina A.; Zhao, Rui; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Stenoien, David L.

    2012-04-17

    Our objective here was to perform a quantitative phosphoproteomic study on a reconstituted human skin tissue to identify low and high dose ionizing radiation dependent signaling in a complex 3-dimensional setting. Application of an isobaric labeling strategy using sham and 3 radiation doses (3, 10, 200 cGy) resulted in the identification of 1113 unique phosphopeptides. Statistical analyses identified 151 phosphopeptides showing significant changes in response to radiation and radiation dose. Proteins responsible for maintaining skin structural integrity including keratins and desmosomal proteins (desmoglein, desmoplakin, plakophilin 1 and 2,) had altered phosphorylation levels following exposure to both low and high doses of radiation. A phosphorylation site present in multiple copies in the linker regions of human profilaggrin underwent the largest fold change. Increased phosphorylation of these sites coincided with altered profilaggrin processing suggesting a role for linker phosphorylation in human profilaggrin regulation. These studies demonstrate that the reconstituted human skin system undergoes a coordinated response to ionizing radiation involving multiple layers of the stratified epithelium that serve to maintain skin barrier functions and minimize the damaging consequences of radiation exposure.

  9. Integration of phosphoproteomic, chemical, and biological strategies for the functional analysis of targeted protein phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mingquan; Huang, Bill X

    2013-02-01

    Reversible phosphorylation, tightly controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, plays a central role in mediating biological processes, such as protein-protein interactions, subcellular translocation, and activation of cellular enzymes. MS-based phosphoproteomics has now allowed the detection and quantification of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites from a typical biological sample in a single experiment, which has posed new challenges in functional analysis of each and every phosphorylation site on specific signaling phosphoproteins of interest. In this article, we review recent advances in the functional analysis of targeted phosphorylation carried out by various chemical and biological approaches in combination with the MS-based phosphoproteomics. This review focuses on three types of strategies, including forward functional analysis, defined for the result-driven phosphoproteomics efforts in determining the substrates of a specific protein kinase; reverse functional analysis, defined for tracking the kinase(s) for specific phosphosite(s) derived from the discovery-driven phosphoproteomics efforts; and MS-based analysis on the structure-function relationship of phosphoproteins. It is expected that this review will provide a state-of-the-art overview of functional analysis of site-specific phosphorylation and explore new perspectives and outline future challenges.

  10. Identification of novel signaling components in N,N’-Dinitrosopiperazine-mediated metastasis of nasopharyngeal Carcinoma by quantitative phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a highly invasive and metastatic cancer. N,N’-dinitrosopiperazine (DNP), a carcinogen with specificity for nasopharyngeal epithelium, facilitates NPC metastasis. However, the underlying mechanism is not known. Methods Quantitative phosphoproteomics, using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell cultures, was employed to identify phosphoproteins associated with NPC metastasis mediated by DNP. NPC cell line 6-10B, which is relatively less metastatic, was used to investigate DNP-mediated metastasis. Boyden chamber invasion assay was used to measure DNP-induced motility and invasion, and nude mice were used to verify DNP-mediated metastasis in vivo. Several different phosphoproteins detected by proteomics analysis were verified by immunoblotting. DNP-mediated metastasis facilitated by lysine-rich CEACAM1 co-isolated protein (LYRIC) phosphorylation at serine 568 was confirmed using mutations targeting the phosphorylation site of LYRIC. DNP-mediated metastasis through LYRIC phosphorylation was confirmed in the NPC cell line CNE1. DNP-mediated LYRIC phosphorylation at serine 568 was also verified in metastatic tumors of BABL/c nude mice. Results Boyden chamber invasion assay indicated that DNP mediated cell motility and invasion of NPC cell 6-10B in vitro, and experiments with nude mice indicated that DNP increased 6-10B metastasis in vivo. In the phosphoproteomics analysis, we detected 216 phosphorylation sites on 130 proteins; among these, 48 phosphorylation sites on 30 unique phosphopeptides were modulated by DNP by at least 1.5-fold. DNP mediated the expression of phosphorylated GTPase, ferritin, LYRIC, and RNA polymerase, and it decreased the expression of phosphorylated torsin-1A protein 1. Furthermore, DNP induced LYRIC phosphorylation at serine 568 to facilitate cell motility and invasion, whereas DNP-mediated motility and invasion was decreased when serine 568 in LYRIC was mutated. In another NPC cell line

  11. Quantitative phospho-proteomics reveals the Plasmodium merozoite triggers pre-invasion host kinase modification of the red cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Zuccala, Elizabeth S; Satchwell, Timothy J; Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan Hong; Wilson, Marieangela C; Heesom, Kate J; Baum, Jake

    2016-02-02

    The invasive blood-stage malaria parasite - the merozoite - induces rapid morphological changes to the target erythrocyte during entry. However, evidence for active molecular changes in the host cell that accompany merozoite invasion is lacking. Here, we use invasion inhibition assays, erythrocyte resealing and high-definition imaging to explore red cell responses during invasion. We show that although merozoite entry does not involve erythrocyte actin reorganisation, it does require ATP to complete the process. Towards dissecting the ATP requirement, we present an in depth quantitative phospho-proteomic analysis of the erythrocyte during each stage of invasion. Specifically, we demonstrate extensive increased phosphorylation of erythrocyte proteins on merozoite attachment, including modification of the cytoskeletal proteins beta-spectrin and PIEZO1. The association with merozoite contact but not active entry demonstrates that parasite-dependent phosphorylation is mediated by host-cell kinase activity. This provides the first evidence that the erythrocyte is stimulated to respond to early invasion events through molecular changes in its membrane architecture.

  12. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Cell-Based Resistance to BRAF Inhibitor Therapy in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Robert; Vella, Laura J.; Xavier, Dylan; Amirkhani, Ardeshir; Parker, Jimmy; Cebon, Jonathan; Molloy, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    The treatment of melanoma by targeted inhibition of the mutated kinase BRAF with small molecules only temporarily suppresses metastatic disease. In the face of chemical inhibition tumor plasticity, both innate and adaptive, promotes survival through the biochemical and genetic reconfiguration of cellular pathways that can engage proliferative and migratory systems. To investigate this process, high-resolution mass spectrometry was used to characterize the phosphoproteome of this transition in vitro. A simple and accurate, label-free quantitative method was used to localize and quantitate thousands of phosphorylation events. We also correlated changes in the phosphoproteome with the proteome to more accurately determine changes in the activity of regulatory kinases determined by kinase landscape profiling. The abundance of phosphopeptides with sites that function in cytoskeletal regulation, GTP/GDP exchange, protein kinase C, IGF signaling, and melanosome maturation were highly divergent after transition to a drug resistant phenotype. PMID:26029660

  13. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals Wee1 kinase as a therapeutic target in a model of proneural glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lescarbeau, Rebecca S.; Lei, Liang; Bakken, Katrina K.; Sims, Peter A.; Sarkaria, Jann N.; Canoll, Peter; White, Forest M.

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain cancer. With a median survival of about a year, new approaches to treating this disease are necessary. To identify signaling molecules regulating GBM progression in a genetically engineered murine model of proneural GBM, we quantified phosphotyrosine mediated signaling using mass spectrometry. Oncogenic signals, including phosphorylated ERK MAPK, PI3K, and PDGFR, were found to be increased in the murine tumors relative to brain. Phosphorylation of CDK1 pY15, associated with the G2 arrest checkpoint, was identified as the most differentially phosphorylated site, with a 14-fold increase in phosphorylation in the tumors. To assess the role of this checkpoint as a potential therapeutic target, syngeneic primary cell lines derived from these tumors were treated with MK-1775, an inhibitor of Wee1, the kinase responsible for CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation. MK-1775 treatment led to mitotic catastrophe, as defined by increased DNA damage and cell death by apoptosis. To assess the extensibility of targeting Wee1/CDK1 in GBM, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cell lines were also treated with MK-1775. Although the response was more heterogeneous, on-target Wee1 inhibition led to decreased CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation and increased DNA damage and apoptosis in each line. These results were also validated in vivo, where single-agent MK-1775 demonstrated an anti-tumor effect on a flank PDX tumor model, increasing mouse survival by 1.74-fold. This study highlights the ability of unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomics to reveal therapeutic targets in tumor models, and the potential for Wee1 inhibition as a treatment approach in pre-clinical models of GBM. PMID:27196784

  14. Temporal quantitative phosphoproteomics of ADP stimulation reveals novel central nodes in platelet activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Geiger, Jörg; Gambaryan, Stepan; Solari, Fiorella A.; Dell’Aica, Margherita; Loroch, Stefan; Mattheij, Nadine J.; Mindukshev, Igor; Pötz, Oliver; Jurk, Kerstin; Burkhart, Julia M.; Fufezan, Christian; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) enhances platelet activation by virtually any other stimulant to complete aggregation. It binds specifically to the G-protein–coupled membrane receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12, stimulating intracellular signaling cascades, leading to integrin αIIbβ3 activation, a process antagonized by endothelial prostacyclin. P2Y12 inhibitors are among the most successful antiplatelet drugs, however, show remarkable variability in efficacy. We reasoned whether a more detailed molecular understanding of ADP-induced protein phosphorylation could identify (1) critical hubs in platelet signaling toward aggregation and (2) novel molecular targets for antiplatelet treatment strategies. We applied quantitative temporal phosphoproteomics to study ADP-mediated signaling at unprecedented molecular resolution. Furthermore, to mimic the antagonistic efficacy of endothelial-derived prostacyclin, we determined how Iloprost reverses ADP-mediated signaling events. We provide temporal profiles of 4797 phosphopeptides, 608 of which showed significant regulation. Regulated proteins are implicated in well-known activating functions such as degranulation and cytoskeletal reorganization, but also in less well-understood pathways, involving ubiquitin ligases and GTPase exchange factors/GTPase-activating proteins (GEF/GAP). Our data demonstrate that ADP-triggered phosphorylation occurs predominantly within the first 10 seconds, with many short rather than sustained changes. For a set of phosphorylation sites (eg, PDE3ASer312, CALDAG-GEFISer587, ENSASer109), we demonstrate an inverse regulation by ADP and Iloprost, suggesting that these are central modulators of platelet homeostasis. This study demonstrates an extensive spectrum of human platelet protein phosphorylation in response to ADP and Iloprost, which inversely overlap and represent major activating and inhibitory pathways. PMID:28060719

  15. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Wee1 Kinase as a Therapeutic Target in a Model of Proneural Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Lescarbeau, Rebecca S; Lei, Liang; Bakken, Katrina K; Sims, Peter A; Sarkaria, Jann N; Canoll, Peter; White, Forest M

    2016-06-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common malignant primary brain cancer. With a median survival of about a year, new approaches to treating this disease are necessary. To identify signaling molecules regulating GBM progression in a genetically engineered murine model of proneural GBM, we quantified phosphotyrosine-mediated signaling using mass spectrometry. Oncogenic signals, including phosphorylated ERK MAPK, PI3K, and PDGFR, were found to be increased in the murine tumors relative to brain. Phosphorylation of CDK1 pY15, associated with the G2 arrest checkpoint, was identified as the most differentially phosphorylated site, with a 14-fold increase in phosphorylation in the tumors. To assess the role of this checkpoint as a potential therapeutic target, syngeneic primary cell lines derived from these tumors were treated with MK-1775, an inhibitor of Wee1, the kinase responsible for CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation. MK-1775 treatment led to mitotic catastrophe, as defined by increased DNA damage and cell death by apoptosis. To assess the extensibility of targeting Wee1/CDK1 in GBM, patient-derived xenograft (PDX) cell lines were also treated with MK-1775. Although the response was more heterogeneous, on-target Wee1 inhibition led to decreased CDK1 Y15 phosphorylation and increased DNA damage and apoptosis in each line. These results were also validated in vivo, where single-agent MK-1775 demonstrated an antitumor effect on a flank PDX tumor model, increasing mouse survival by 1.74-fold. This study highlights the ability of unbiased quantitative phosphoproteomics to reveal therapeutic targets in tumor models, and the potential for Wee1 inhibition as a treatment approach in preclinical models of GBM. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1332-43. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Data set from a comprehensive phosphoproteomic analysis of rice variety IRBB5 in response to bacterial blight.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yuxuan; Tong, Xiaohong; Wang, Yifeng; Qiu, Jiehua; Li, Zhiyong; Zhang, Wen; Huang, Shiwen; Zhang, Jian

    2016-03-01

    Bacterial blight (BB) caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) has become one of the most devastating diseases for rice, a major food source for over half of the world populations. To investigate the roles of protein phosphorylation in rice bacterial blight resistance, a quantitative phosphoproteomic study was conducted in rice variety IRBB5 at 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection. 2367 and 2223 phosphosites on 1334 and 1297 representative proteins were identified in 0 h and 24 h after Xoo infection, respectively, out of which 762 proteins were found to be differentially phosphorylated. In associated with the published article "A comprehensive quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of rice in response to bacterial blight" in BMC Plant Biology (Hou et al., 2015) [1], this dataset article provided the detailed information of experimental designing, methods, features as well as the raw data of mass spectrometry (MS) identification. The MS proteomics data could be fully accessed from the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the dataset identifier PXD002222.

  17. Sample preparation for phosphoproteomic analysis of circadian time series in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Krahmer, Johanna; Hindle, Matthew M; Martin, Sarah F; Le Bihan, Thierry; Millar, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Systems biological approaches to study the Arabidopsis thaliana circadian clock have mainly focused on transcriptomics while little is known about the proteome, and even less about posttranslational modifications. Evidence has emerged that posttranslational protein modifications, in particular phosphorylation, play an important role for the clock and its output. Phosphoproteomics is the method of choice for a large-scale approach to gain more knowledge about rhythmic protein phosphorylation. Recent plant phosphoproteomics publications have identified several thousand phosphopeptides. However, the methods used in these studies are very labor-intensive and therefore not suitable to apply to a well-replicated circadian time series. To address this issue, we present and compare different strategies for sample preparation for phosphoproteomics that are compatible with large numbers of samples. Methods are compared regarding number of identifications, variability of quantitation, and functional categorization. We focus on the type of detergent used for protein extraction as well as methods for its removal. We also test a simple two-fraction separation of the protein extract. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative phosphoproteomics unravels biased phosphorylation of serotonin 2A receptor at Ser280 by hallucinogenic versus nonhallucinogenic agonists.

    PubMed

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-05-01

    The serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT(2A) receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT(2A) receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT(2A) agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser(280)) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT(2A) receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser(280) by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT(2A) receptors at Ser(280) in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser(280) to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased

  19. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Unravels Biased Phosphorylation of Serotonin 2A Receptor at Ser280 by Hallucinogenic versus Nonhallucinogenic Agonists*

    PubMed Central

    Karaki, Samah; Becamel, Carine; Murat, Samy; Mannoury la Cour, Clotilde; Millan, Mark J.; Prézeau, Laurent; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe; Vandermoere, Franck

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin 5-HT2A receptor is a primary target of psychedelic hallucinogens such as lysergic acid diethylamine, mescaline, and psilocybin, which reproduce some of the core symptoms of schizophrenia. An incompletely resolved paradox is that only some 5-HT2A receptor agonists exhibit hallucinogenic activity, whereas structurally related agonists with comparable affinity and activity lack such a psychoactive activity. Using a strategy combining stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture with enrichment in phosphorylated peptides by means of hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography followed by immobilized metal affinity chromatography, we compared the phosphoproteome in HEK-293 cells transiently expressing the 5-HT2A receptor and exposed to either vehicle or the synthetic hallucinogen 1-[2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl]-2-aminopropane (DOI) or the nonhallucinogenic 5-HT2A agonist lisuride. Among the 5995 identified phosphorylated peptides, 16 sites were differentially phosphorylated upon exposure of cells to DOI versus lisuride. These include a serine (Ser280) located in the third intracellular loop of the 5-HT2A receptor, a region important for its desensitization. The specific phosphorylation of Ser280 by hallucinogens was further validated by quantitative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified receptor digests and by Western blotting using a phosphosite specific antibody. The administration of DOI, but not of lisuride, to mice, enhanced the phosphorylation of 5-HT2A receptors at Ser280 in the prefrontal cortex. Moreover, hallucinogens induced a less pronounced desensitization of receptor-operated signaling in HEK-293 cells and neurons than did nonhallucinogenic agonists. The mutation of Ser280 to aspartic acid (to mimic phosphorylation) reduced receptor desensitization by nonhallucinogenic agonists, whereas its mutation to alanine increased the ability of hallucinogens to desensitize the receptor. This study reveals a biased phosphorylation of

  20. Phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation networks in Tetrahymena thermophila, a model single-celled organism.

    PubMed

    Tian, Miao; Chen, Xiulan; Xiong, Qian; Xiong, Jie; Xiao, Chuanle; Ge, Feng; Yang, Fuquan; Miao, Wei

    2014-02-01

    Tetrahymena thermophila is a widely used unicellular eukaryotic model organism in biological research and contains more than 1000 protein kinases and phosphatases with specificity for Ser/Thr/Tyr residues. However, only a few dozen phosphorylation sites in T. thermophila are known, presenting a major obstacle to further understanding of the regulatory roles of reversible phosphorylation in this organism. In this study, we used high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to conduct global and site-specific phosphoproteome profiling of T. thermophila. In total, 1384 phosphopeptides and 2238 phosphorylation sites from 1008 T. thermophila proteins were identified through the combined use of peptide prefractionation, TiO2 enrichment, and two-dimensional LC-MS/MS analysis. The identified phosphoproteins are implicated in the regulation of various biological processes such as transport, gene expression, and mRNA metabolic process. Moreover, integrated analysis of the T. thermophila phosphoproteome and gene network revealed the potential biological functions of many previously unannotated proteins and predicted some putative kinase-substrate pairs. Our data provide the first global survey of phosphorylation in T. thermophila using a phosphoproteomic approach and suggest a wide-ranging regulatory scope of this modification. The provided dataset is a valuable resource for the future understanding of signaling pathways in this important model organism.

  1. Phosphoproteome Analysis Links Protein Phosphorylation to Cellular Remodeling and Metabolic Adaptation during Magnaporthe oryzae Appressorium Development.

    PubMed

    Franck, William L; Gokce, Emine; Randall, Shan M; Oh, Yeonyee; Eyre, Alex; Muddiman, David C; Dean, Ralph A

    2015-06-05

    The rice pathogen, Magnaporthe oryzae, undergoes a complex developmental process leading to formation of an appressorium prior to plant infection. In an effort to better understand phosphoregulation during appressorium development, a mass spectrometry based phosphoproteomics study was undertaken. A total of 2924 class I phosphosites were identified from 1514 phosphoproteins from mycelia, conidia, germlings, and appressoria of the wild type and a protein kinase A (PKA) mutant. Phosphoregulation during appressorium development was observed for 448 phosphosites on 320 phosphoproteins. In addition, a set of candidate PKA targets was identified encompassing 253 phosphosites on 227 phosphoproteins. Network analysis incorporating regulation from transcriptomic, proteomic, and phosphoproteomic data revealed new insights into the regulation of the metabolism of conidial storage reserves and phospholipids, autophagy, actin dynamics, and cell wall metabolism during appressorium formation. In particular, protein phosphorylation appears to play a central role in the regulation of autophagic recycling and actin dynamics during appressorium formation. Changes in phosphorylation were observed in multiple components of the cell wall integrity pathway providing evidence that this pathway is highly active during appressorium development. Several transcription factors were phosphoregulated during appressorium formation including the bHLH domain transcription factor MGG_05709. Functional analysis of MGG_05709 provided further evidence for the role of protein phosphorylation in regulation of glycerol metabolism and the metabolic reprogramming characteristic of appressorium formation. The data presented here represent a comprehensive investigation of the M. oryzae phosphoproteome and provide key insights on the role of protein phosphorylation during infection-related development.

  2. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Platelets Activated by Pro-Thrombotic Oxidized Phospholipids and Thrombin

    PubMed Central

    Zimman, Alejandro; Titz, Bjoern; Komisopoulou, Evangelia; Biswas, Sudipta; Graeber, Thomas G.; Podrez, Eugene A.

    2014-01-01

    Specific oxidized phospholipids (oxPCCD36) promote platelet hyper-reactivity and thrombosis in hyperlipidemia via the scavenger receptor CD36, however the signaling pathway(s) induced in platelets by oxPCCD36 are not well defined. We have employed mass spectrometry-based tyrosine, serine, and threonine phosphoproteomics for the unbiased analysis of platelet signaling pathways induced by oxPCCD36 as well as by the strong physiological agonist thrombin. oxPCCD36 and thrombin induced differential phosphorylation of 115 proteins (162 phosphorylation sites) and 181 proteins (334 phosphorylation sites) respectively. Most of the phosphoproteome changes induced by either agonist have never been reported in platelets; thus they provide candidates in the study of platelet signaling. Bioinformatic analyses of protein phosphorylation dependent responses were used to categorize preferential motifs for (de)phosphorylation, predict pathways and kinase activity, and construct a phosphoproteome network regulating integrin activation. A putative signaling pathway involving Src-family kinases, SYK, and PLCγ2 was identified in platelets activated by oxPCCD36. Subsequent ex vivo studies in human platelets demonstrated that this pathway is downstream of the scavenger receptor CD36 and is critical for platelet activation by oxPCCD36. Our results provide multiple insights into the mechanism of platelet activation and specifically in platelet regulation by oxPCCD36. PMID:24400094

  3. Radiosensitization of Human Leukemic HL-60 Cells by ATR Kinase Inhibitor (VE-821): Phosphoproteomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Šalovská, Barbora; Fabrik, Ivo; Ďurišová, Kamila; Link, Marek; Vávrová, Jiřina; Řezáčová, Martina; Tichý, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation or chemotherapy are frequently used in oncology. DNA damage response (DDR)—triggered by radiation-induced double strand breaks—is orchestrated mainly by three Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related kinases (PIKKs): Ataxia teleangiectasia mutated (ATM), DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and ATM and Rad3-related kinase (ATR). Their activation promotes cell-cycle arrest and facilitates DNA damage repair, resulting in radioresistance. Recently developed specific ATR inhibitor, VE-821 (3-amino-6-(4-(methylsulfonyl)phenyl)-N-phenylpyrazine-2-carboxamide), has been reported to have a significant radio- and chemo-sensitizing effect delimited to cancer cells (largely p53-deficient) without affecting normal cells. In this study, we employed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to describe the mechanism of the radiosensitizing effect of VE-821 in human promyelocytic leukemic cells HL-60 (p53-negative). Hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC)-prefractionation with TiO2-enrichment and nano-liquid chromatography—tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis revealed 9834 phosphorylation sites. Proteins with differentially up-/down-regulated phosphorylation were mostly localized in the nucleus and were involved in cellular processes such as DDR, all phases of the cell cycle, and cell division. Moreover, sequence motif analysis revealed significant changes in the activities of kinases involved in these processes. Taken together, our data indicates that ATR kinase has multiple roles in response to DNA damage throughout the cell cycle and that its inhibitor VE-821 is a potent radiosensitizing agent for p53-negative HL-60 cells. PMID:25003641

  4. Label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics with novel pairwise abundance normalization reveals synergistic RAS and CIP2A signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kauko, Otto; Laajala, Teemu Daniel; Jumppanen, Mikael; Hintsanen, Petteri; Suni, Veronika; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Corthals, Garry; Aittokallio, Tero; Westermarck, Jukka; Imanishi, Susumu Y.

    2015-01-01

    Hyperactivated RAS drives progression of many human malignancies. However, oncogenic activity of RAS is dependent on simultaneous inactivation of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activity. Although PP2A is known to regulate some of the RAS effector pathways, it has not been systematically assessed how these proteins functionally interact. Here we have analyzed phosphoproteomes regulated by either RAS or PP2A, by phosphopeptide enrichment followed by mass-spectrometry-based label-free quantification. To allow data normalization in situations where depletion of RAS or PP2A inhibitor CIP2A causes a large uni-directional change in the phosphopeptide abundance, we developed a novel normalization strategy, named pairwise normalization. This normalization is based on adjusting phosphopeptide abundances measured before and after the enrichment. The superior performance of the pairwise normalization was verified by various independent methods. Additionally, we demonstrate how the selected normalization method influences the downstream analyses and interpretation of pathway activities. Consequently, bioinformatics analysis of RAS and CIP2A regulated phosphoproteomes revealed a significant overlap in their functional pathways. This is most likely biologically meaningful as we observed a synergistic survival effect between CIP2A and RAS expression as well as KRAS activating mutations in TCGA pan-cancer data set, and synergistic relationship between CIP2A and KRAS depletion in colony growth assays. PMID:26278961

  5. Discovery of Mouse Spleen Signaling Responses to Anthrax using Label-Free Quantitative Phosphoproteomics via Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Manes, Nathan P.; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C.; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Liotta, Lance A.; Popov, Serguei G.

    2011-01-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24–48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48–72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  6. Discovery of mouse spleen signaling responses to anthrax using label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Manes, Nathan P; Dong, Li; Zhou, Weidong; Du, Xiuxia; Reghu, Nikitha; Kool, Arjan C; Choi, Dahan; Bailey, Charles L; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A; Popov, Serguei G

    2011-03-01

    Inhalational anthrax is caused by spores of the bacterium Bacillus anthracis (B. anthracis), and is an extremely dangerous disease that can kill unvaccinated victims within 2 weeks. Modern antibiotic-based therapy can increase the survival rate to ∼50%, but only if administered presymptomatically (within 24-48 h of exposure). To discover host signaling responses to presymptomatic anthrax, label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics via liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry was used to compare spleens from uninfected and spore-challenged mice over a 72 h time-course. Spleen proteins were denatured using urea, reduced using dithiothreitol, alkylated using iodoacetamide, and digested into peptides using trypsin, and the resulting phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide solid-phase extraction and analyzed by nano-liquid chromatography-Linear Trap Quadrupole-Orbitrap-MS(/MS). The fragment ion spectra were processed using DeconMSn and searched using both Mascot and SEQUEST resulting in 252,626 confident identifications of 6248 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 5782 phosphorylation sites). The precursor ion spectra were deisotoped using Decon2LS and aligned using MultiAlign resulting in the confident quantitation of 3265 of the identified phosphopeptides. ANOVAs were used to produce a q-value ranked list of host signaling responses. Late-stage (48-72 h postchallenge) Sterne strain (lethal) infections resulted in global alterations to the spleen phosphoproteome. In contrast, ΔSterne strain (asymptomatic; missing the anthrax toxin) infections resulted in 188 (5.8%) significantly altered (q<0.05) phosphopeptides. Twenty-six highly tentative phosphorylation responses to early-stage (24 h postchallenge) anthrax were discovered (q<0.5), and ten of these originated from eight proteins that have known roles in the host immune response. These tentative early-anthrax host response signaling events within mouse spleens may translate into presymptomatic

  7. Identification of Putative Mek1 Substrates during Meiosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Quantitative Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Suhandynata, Raymond T.; Wan, Lihong; Zhou, Huilin; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2016-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a key role in sexual reproduction as it generates crossovers that, in combination with sister chromatid cohesion, physically connect homologous chromosomes, thereby promoting their proper segregation at the first meiotic division. Meiotic recombination is initiated by programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) catalyzed by the evolutionarily conserved, topoisomerase-like protein Spo11. Repair of these DSBs is highly regulated to create crossovers between homologs that are distributed throughout the genome. This repair requires the presence of the mitotic recombinase, Rad51, as well as the strand exchange activity of the meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1. A key regulator of meiotic DSB repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1, which promotes interhomolog strand invasion and is required for the meiotic recombination checkpoint and the crossover/noncrossover decision. Understanding how Mek1 regulates meiotic recombination requires the identification of its substrates. Towards that end, an unbiased phosphoproteomic approach utilizing Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cells (SILAC) was utilized to generate a list of potential Mek1 substrates, as well as proteins containing consensus phosphorylation sites for cyclin-dependent kinase, the checkpoint kinases, Mec1/Tel1, and the polo-like kinase, Cdc5. These experiments represent the first global phosphoproteomic dataset for proteins in meiotic budding yeast. PMID:27214570

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Signaling Mechanisms Associated with Rapid Cold Hardening in a Chill-Tolerant Fly.

    PubMed

    Teets, Nicholas M; Denlinger, David L

    2016-08-05

    Rapid cold hardening (RCH) is a physiological adaptation in which brief chilling (minutes to hours) significantly enhances the cold tolerance of insects. RCH allows insects to cope with sudden cold snaps and diurnal variation in temperature, but the mechanistic basis of this rapid stress response is poorly understood. Here, we used phosphoproteomics to identify phosphorylation-mediated signaling events that are regulated by chilling that induces RCH. Phosphoproteomic changes were measured in both brain and fat bodies, two tissues that are essential for sensing cold and coordinating RCH at the organismal level. Tissues were chilled ex vivo, and changes in phosphoprotein abundance were measured using 2D electrophoresis coupled with Pro-Q diamond labeling of phosphoproteins followed by protein identification via LC-MS/MS. In both tissues, we observed an abundance of protein phosphorylation events in response to chilling. Some of the proteins regulated by RCH-inducing chilling include proteins involved in cytoskeletal reorganization, heat shock proteins, and proteins involved in the degradation of damaged cellular components via the proteasome and autophagosome. Our results suggest that phosphorylation-mediated signaling cascades are major drivers of RCH and enhance our mechanistic understanding of this complex phenotype.

  9. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the Chlamydia caviae elementary body and reticulate body forms.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Derek J; Adams, Nancy E; Maurelli, Anthony T

    2015-08-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for significant diseases in humans and economically important domestic animals. These pathogens undergo a unique biphasic developmental cycle transitioning between the environmentally stable elementary body (EB) and the replicative intracellular reticulate body (RB), a conversion that appears to require extensive regulation of protein synthesis and function. However, Chlamydia possess a limited number of canonical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation of proteins in bacteria has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of post-translational control of protein function. We utilized 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with phosphoprotein staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis to map the phosphoproteome of the EB and RB forms of Chlamydia caviae. Forty-two non-redundant phosphorylated proteins were identified (some proteins were present in multiple locations within the gels). Thirty-four phosphorylated proteins were identified in EBs, including proteins found in central metabolism and protein synthesis, Chlamydia-specific hypothetical proteins and virulence-related proteins. Eleven phosphorylated proteins were identified in RBs, mostly involved in protein synthesis and folding and a single virulence-related protein. Only three phosphoproteins were found in both EB and RB phosphoproteomes. Collectively, 41 of 42 C. caviae phosphoproteins were present across Chlamydia species, consistent with the existence of a conserved chlamydial phosphoproteome. The abundance of stage-specific phosphoproteins suggests that protein phosphorylation may play a role in regulating the function of developmental-stage-specific proteins and/or may function in concert with other factors in directing EB-RB transitions.

  10. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the Chlamydia caviae elementary body and reticulate body forms

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Nancy E.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia are Gram-negative, obligate intracellular bacteria responsible for significant diseases in humans and economically important domestic animals. These pathogens undergo a unique biphasic developmental cycle transitioning between the environmentally stable elementary body (EB) and the replicative intracellular reticulate body (RB), a conversion that appears to require extensive regulation of protein synthesis and function. However, Chlamydia possess a limited number of canonical mechanisms of transcriptional regulation. Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation of proteins in bacteria has been increasingly recognized as an important mechanism of post-translational control of protein function. We utilized 2D gel electrophoresis coupled with phosphoprotein staining and MALDI-TOF/TOF analysis to map the phosphoproteome of the EB and RB forms of Chlamydia caviae. Forty-two non-redundant phosphorylated proteins were identified (some proteins were present in multiple locations within the gels). Thirty-four phosphorylated proteins were identified in EBs, including proteins found in central metabolism and protein synthesis, Chlamydia-specific hypothetical proteins and virulence-related proteins. Eleven phosphorylated proteins were identified in RBs, mostly involved in protein synthesis and folding and a single virulence-related protein. Only three phosphoproteins were found in both EB and RB phosphoproteomes. Collectively, 41 of 42 C. caviae phosphoproteins were present across Chlamydia species, consistent with the existence of a conserved chlamydial phosphoproteome. The abundance of stage-specific phosphoproteins suggests that protein phosphorylation may play a role in regulating the function of developmental-stage-specific proteins and/or may function in concert with other factors in directing EB–RB transitions. PMID:25998263

  11. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analyses of the inferior parietal lobule from three different pathological stages of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Swomley, Aaron M; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Butterfield, D Allan

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder, is clinically characterized by progressive neuronal loss resulting in loss of memory and dementia. AD is histopathologically characterized by the extensive distribution of senile plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, and synapse loss. Amnestic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is generally accepted to be an early stage of AD. MCI subjects have pathology and symptoms that fall on the scale intermediately between 'normal' cognition with little or no pathology and AD. A rare number of individuals, who exhibit normal cognition on psychometric tests but whose brains show widespread postmortem AD pathology, are classified as 'asymptomatic' or 'preclinical' AD (PCAD). In this study, we evaluated changes in protein phosphorylation states in the inferior parietal lobule of subjects with AD, MCI, PCAD, and control brain using a 2-D PAGE proteomics approach in conjunction with Pro-Q Diamond phosphoprotein staining. Statistically significant changes in phosphorylation levels were found in 19 proteins involved in energy metabolism, neuronal plasticity, signal transduction, and oxidative stress response. Changes in the disease state phosphoproteome may provide insights into underlying mechanisms for the preservation of memory with expansive AD pathology in PCAD and the progressive memory loss in amnestic MCI that escalates to the dementia and the characteristic pathology of AD brain.

  12. Comprehensive Analysis of the Membrane Phosphoproteome Regulated by Oligogalacturonides in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Mattei, Benedetta; Spinelli, Francesco; Pontiggia, Daniela; De Lorenzo, Giulia

    2016-01-01

    Early changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana membrane phosphoproteome in response to oligogalacturonides (OGs), a class of plant damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), were analyzed by two complementary proteomic approaches. Differentially phosphorylated sites were determined through phosphopeptide enrichment followed by LC-MS/MS using label-free quantification; differentially phosphorylated proteins were identified by 2D-DIGE combined with phospho-specific fluorescent staining (phospho-DIGE). This large-scale phosphoproteome analysis of early OG-signaling enabled us to determine 100 regulated phosphosites using LC-MS/MS and 46 differential spots corresponding to 34 pdhosphoproteins using phospho-DIGE. Functional classification showed that the OG-responsive phosphoproteins include kinases, phosphatases and receptor-like kinases, heat shock proteins (HSPs), reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging enzymes, proteins related to cellular trafficking, transport, defense and signaling as well as novel candidates for a role in immunity, for which elicitor-induced phosphorylation changes have not been shown before. A comparison with previously identified elicitor-regulated phosphosites shows only a very limited overlap, uncovering the immune-related regulation of 70 phosphorylation sites and revealing novel potential players in the regulation of elicitor-dependent immunity. PMID:27532006

  13. Regulation of Platelet Derived Growth Factor Signaling by Leukocyte Common Antigen-related (LAR) Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase: A Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Study*

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, Michael G.; Hellberg, Carina; Hotchin, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular signaling pathways are reliant on protein phosphorylation events that are controlled by a balance of kinase and phosphatase activity. Although kinases have been extensively studied, the role of phosphatases in controlling specific cell signaling pathways has been less so. Leukocyte common antigen-related protein (LAR) is a member of the LAR subfamily of receptor-like protein tyrosine phosphatases (RPTPs). LAR is known to regulate the activity of a number of receptor tyrosine kinases, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR). To gain insight into the signaling pathways regulated by LAR, including those that are PDGF-dependent, we have carried out the first systematic analysis of LAR-regulated signal transduction using SILAC-based quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic techniques. We haveanalyzed differential phosphorylation between wild-type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) and MEFs in which the LAR cytoplasmic phosphatase domains had been deleted (LARΔP), and found a significant change in abundance of phosphorylation on 270 phosphosites from 205 proteins because of the absence of the phosphatase domains of LAR. Further investigation of specific LAR-dependent phosphorylation sites and enriched biological processes reveal that LAR phosphatase activity impacts on a variety of cellular processes, most notably regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Analysis of putative upstream kinases that may play an intermediary role between LAR and the identified LAR-dependent phosphorylation events has revealed a role for LAR in regulating mTOR and JNK signaling. PMID:27074791

  14. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of murine Fmr1-KO cell lines provides new insights into FMRP-dependent signal transduction mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Matic, Katarina; Eninger, Timo; Bardoni, Barbara; Davidovic, Laetitia; Macek, Boris

    2014-10-03

    Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) is an RNA-binding protein that has a major effect on neuronal protein synthesis. Transcriptional silencing of the FMR1 gene leads to loss of FMRP and development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common known hereditary cause of intellectual impairment and autism. Here we utilize SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomics to analyze murine FMR1(-) and FMR1(+) fibroblastic cell lines derived from FMR1-KO embryos to identify proteins and phosphorylation sites dysregulated as a consequence of FMRP loss. We quantify FMRP-related changes in the levels of 5,023 proteins and 6,133 phosphorylation events and map them onto major signal transduction pathways. Our study confirms global downregulation of the MAPK/ERK pathway and decrease in phosphorylation level of ERK1/2 in the absence of FMRP, which is connected to attenuation of long-term potentiation. We detect differential expression of several key proteins from the p53 pathway, pointing to the involvement of p53 signaling in dysregulated cell cycle control in FXS. Finally, we detect differential expression and phosphorylation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing and nuclear transport, as well as Wnt and calcium signaling, such as PLC, PKC, NFAT, and cPLA2. We postulate that calcium homeostasis is likely affected in molecular pathogenesis of FXS.

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomics revealed interplay between Syk and Lyn in the resistance to nilotinib in chronic myeloid leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Gioia, Romain; Leroy, Cédric; Drullion, Claire; Lagarde, Valérie; Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Lippert, Eric; Roche, Serge; Mahon, François-Xavier; Pasquet, Jean-Max

    2011-08-25

    In this study, we have addressed how Lyn kinase signaling mediates nilotinib-resistance by quantitative phospho-proteomics using Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acid in Cell culture. We have found an increased tyrosine phosphorylation of 2 additional tyrosine kinases in nilotinib-resistant cells: the spleen tyrosine kinase Syk and the UFO family receptor tyrosine kinase Axl. This increased tyrosine phosphorylation involved an interaction of these tyrosine kinases with Lyn. Inhibition of Syk by the inhibitors R406 or BAY 61-3606 or by RNA interference restored the capacity of nilotinib to inhibit cell proliferation. Conversely, coexpression of Lyn and Syk were required to fully induce resistance to nilotinib in drug-sensitive cells. Surprisingly, the knockdown of Syk also strongly decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of Lyn and Axl, thus uncovering interplay between Syk and Lyn. We have shown the involvement of the adaptor protein CDCP-1 in resistance to nilotinib. Interestingly, the expression of Axl and CDCP1 were found increased both in a nilotinib-resistant cell line and in nilotinib-resistant CML patients. We conclude that an oncogenic signaling mediated by Lyn and Syk can bypass the need of Bcr-Abl in CML cells. Thus, targeting these kinases may be of therapeutic value to override imatinib or nilotinib resistance in CML.

  16. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals genistein as a modulator of cell cycle and DNA damage response pathways in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    FANG, YI; ZHANG, QIAN; WANG, XIN; YANG, XUE; WANG, XIANGYU; HUANG, ZHEN; JIAO, YUCHEN; WANG, JING

    2016-01-01

    Around one sixth of breast cancer cases are classified as triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), named after the absence of the expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2); however, patients with TNBC suffer from poor clinical outcome and shortage of targeted therapy. Genistein, an estrogenic soy isoflavone, shows anticancer effects in TNBC cells such as inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. However, the underlying mechanism of its anticancer effects is poorly understood and its elucidation can help the development of novel therapeutic strategies for TNBC. In this study, by combining isobaric tag-based TMT labeling with titanium dioxide-based phosphopeptide enrichment, we quantitated 5,445 phosphorylation sites on 2,008 phosphoproteins in the TNBC cell line MDA-MB-231, upon genistein treatment. Our analysis revealed 332 genistein-regulated phosphorylation sites on 226 proteins. Our data show that genistein can regulate several biological processes during the cell cycle, including DNA replication, cohesin complex cleavage, and kinetochore formation. Furthermore, genistein can also activate DNA damage response, including activation of ATR and BRCA1 complex. Overall, our study presents evidence at a phosphoproteomic level that genistein is able to inhibit TNBC cell growth by regulating the cell cycle and DNA damage response in a more complex manner. Our findings help elucidate the mechanisms through which genistein exerts its anticancer effects in TNBC cells. PMID:26783066

  17. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of the Highly-Metastatic Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line, MHCC97-H

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Miaomiao; Cheng, Han; Wang, Zhiqiang; Su, Na; Liu, Zexian; Sun, Changqing; Zhen, Bei; Hong, Xuechuan; Xue, Yu; Xu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Invasion and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a major cause for lethal liver cancer. Signaling pathways associated with cancer progression are frequently reconfigured by aberrant phosphorylation of key proteins. To capture the key phosphorylation events in HCC metastasis, we established a methodology by an off-line high-pH HPLC separation strategy combined with multi-step IMAC and LC–MS/MS to study the phosphoproteome of a metastatic HCC cell line, MHCC97-H (high metastasis). In total, 6593 phosphopeptides with 6420 phosphorylation sites (p-sites) of 2930 phosphoproteins were identified. Statistical analysis of gene ontology (GO) categories for the identified phosphoproteins showed that several of the biological processes, such as transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and RNA splicing, were over-represented. Further analysis of Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) annotations demonstrated that phosphoproteins in multiple pathways, such as spliceosome, the insulin signaling pathway and the cell cycle, were significantly enriched. In particular, we compared our dataset with a previously published phosphoproteome in a normal liver sample, and the results revealed that a number of proteins in the spliceosome pathway, such as U2 small nuclear RNA Auxiliary Factor 2 (U2AF2), Eukaryotic Initiation Factor 4A-III (EIF4A3), Cell Division Cycle 5-Like (CDC5L) and Survival Motor Neuron Domain Containing 1 (SMNDC1), were exclusively identified as phosphoproteins only in the MHCC97-H cell line. These results indicated that the phosphorylation of spliceosome proteins may participate in the metastasis of HCC by regulating mRNA processing and RNA splicing. PMID:25690035

  18. Phosphoproteomic analysis of interacting tumor and endothelial cells identifies regulatory mechanisms of transendothelial migration.

    PubMed

    Locard-Paulet, Marie; Lim, Lindsay; Veluscek, Giulia; McMahon, Kelly; Sinclair, John; van Weverwijk, Antoinette; Worboys, Jonathan D; Yuan, Yinyin; Isacke, Clare M; Jørgensen, Claus

    2016-02-09

    The exit of metastasizing tumor cells from the vasculature, extravasation, is regulated by their dynamic interactions with the endothelial cells that line the internal surface of vessels. To elucidate signals controlling tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium and subsequent transendothelial migration, we performed phosphoproteomic analysis to map cell-specific changes in protein phosphorylation that were triggered by contact between metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells and endothelial cells. From the 2669 unique phosphorylation sites identified, 77 and 43 were differentially phosphorylated in the tumor cells and endothelial cells, respectively. The receptor tyrosine kinase ephrin type A receptor 2 (EPHA2) exhibited decreased Tyr(772) phosphorylation in the cancer cells upon endothelial contact. Knockdown of EPHA2 increased adhesion of the breast cancer cells to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) and their transendothelial migration in coculture cell assays, as well as early-stage lung colonization in vivo. EPHA2-mediated inhibition of transendothelial migration of breast cancer cells depended on interaction with the ligand ephrinA1 on HUVECs and phosphorylation of EPHA2-Tyr(772). When EPHA2 phosphorylation dynamics were compared between cell lines of different metastatic ability, EPHA2-Tyr(772) was rapidly dephosphorylated after ephrinA1 stimulation specifically in cells targeting the lung. Knockdown of the phosphatase LMW-PTP reduced adhesion and transendothelial migration of the breast cancer cells. Overall, cell-specific phosphoproteomic analysis provides a bidirectional map of contact-initiated signaling between tumor and endothelial cells that can be further investigated to identify mechanisms controlling the transendothelial cell migration of cancer cells.

  19. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xinyan; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Renuse, Santosh; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S; Stearns, Vered; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-11-01

    Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor-α (ER) antagonist, is an important agent for the treatment of breast cancer. However, this therapy is complicated by the fact that a substantial number of patients exhibit either de novo or acquired resistance. To characterize the signaling mechanisms underlying this resistance, we treated the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with tamoxifen for over six months and showed that this cell line acquired resistance to tamoxifen in vitro and in vivo. We performed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling on the tamoxifen resistant and vehicle-treated sensitive cell lines to quantify the phosphorylation alterations associated with tamoxifen resistance. From >5600 unique phosphopeptides identified, 1529 peptides exhibited hyperphosphorylation and 409 peptides showed hypophosphorylation in the tamoxifen resistant cells. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that focal adhesion pathway was one of the most enriched signaling pathways activated in tamoxifen resistant cells. Significantly, we showed that the focal adhesion kinase FAK2 was not only hyperphosphorylated but also transcriptionally up-regulated in tamoxifen resistant cells. FAK2 suppression by specific siRNA knockdown or a small molecule inhibitor repressed cellular proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. More importantly, our survival analysis revealed that high expression of FAK2 is significantly associated with shorter metastasis-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Our studies suggest that FAK2 is a potential therapeutic target for the management of hormone-refractory breast cancers.

  20. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Focal Adhesion Kinase 2 (FAK2) as a Potential Therapeutic Target for Tamoxifen Resistance in Breast Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinyan; Zahari, Muhammad Saddiq; Renuse, Santosh; Nirujogi, Raja Sekhar; Kim, Min-Sik; Manda, Srikanth S.; Stearns, Vered; Gabrielson, Edward; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2015-01-01

    Tamoxifen, an estrogen receptor-α (ER) antagonist, is an important agent for the treatment of breast cancer. However, this therapy is complicated by the fact that a substantial number of patients exhibit either de novo or acquired resistance. To characterize the signaling mechanisms underlying this resistance, we treated the MCF7 breast cancer cell line with tamoxifen for over six months and showed that this cell line acquired resistance to tamoxifen in vitro and in vivo. We performed SILAC-based quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling on the tamoxifen resistant and vehicle-treated sensitive cell lines to quantify the phosphorylation alterations associated with tamoxifen resistance. From >5600 unique phosphopeptides identified, 1529 peptides exhibited hyperphosphorylation and 409 peptides showed hypophosphorylation in the tamoxifen resistant cells. Gene set enrichment analysis revealed that focal adhesion pathway was one of the most enriched signaling pathways activated in tamoxifen resistant cells. Significantly, we showed that the focal adhesion kinase FAK2 was not only hyperphosphorylated but also transcriptionally up-regulated in tamoxifen resistant cells. FAK2 suppression by specific siRNA knockdown or a small molecule inhibitor repressed cellular proliferation in vitro and tumor formation in vivo. More importantly, our survival analysis revealed that high expression of FAK2 is significantly associated with shorter metastasis-free survival in estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer patients treated with tamoxifen. Our studies suggest that FAK2 is a potential therapeutic target for the management of hormone-refractory breast cancers. PMID:26330541

  1. Quantitative Site-Specific Phosphoproteomics of Trichoderma reesei Signaling Pathways upon Induction of Hydrolytic Enzyme Production.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Elizabeth V; Imanishi, Susumu Y; Haapaniemi, Pekka; Yadav, Avinash; Saloheimo, Markku; Corthals, Garry L; Pakula, Tiina M

    2016-02-05

    The filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei is used for industrial production of secreted enzymes including carbohydrate active enzymes, such as cellulases and hemicellulases. The production of many of these enzymes by T. reesei is influenced by the carbon source it grows on, where the regulation system controlling hydrolase genes involves various signaling pathways. T. reesei was cultivated in the presence of sorbitol, a carbon source that does not induce the production of cellulases and hemicellulases, and then exposed to either sophorose or spent-grain extract, which are efficient inducers of the enzyme production. Specific changes at phosphorylation sites were investigated in relation to the production of cellulases and hemicellulases using an MS-based framework. Proteome-wide phosphorylation following carbon source exchange was investigated in the early stages of induction: 0, 2, 5, and 10 min. The workflow involved sequential trypsin digestion, TiO2 enrichment, and MS analysis using a Q Exactive mass spectrometer. We report on the identification and quantitation of 1721 phosphorylation sites. Investigation of the data revealed a complex signaling network activated upon induction involving components related to light-mediated cellulase induction, osmoregulation, and carbon sensing. Changes in protein phosphorylation were detected in the glycolytic pathway, suggesting an inhibition of glucose catabolism at 10 min after the addition of sophorose and as early as 2 min after the addition of spent-grain extract. Differential phosphorylation of factors related to carbon storage, intracellular trafficking, cytoskeleton, and cellulase gene regulation were also observed.

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics identifies SnRK2 protein kinase substrates and reveals the effectors of abscisic acid action

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pengcheng; Xue, Liang; Batelli, Giorgia; Lee, Shinyoung; Hou, Yueh-Ju; Van Oosten, Michael J.; Zhang, Huiming; Tao, W. Andy; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2013-01-01

    Sucrose nonfermenting 1 (SNF1)-related protein kinase 2s (SnRK2s) are central components of abscisic acid (ABA) signaling pathways. The snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple-mutant plants are nearly completely insensitive to ABA, suggesting that most of the molecular actions of ABA are triggered by the SnRK2s-mediated phosphorylation of substrate proteins. Only a few substrate proteins of the SnRK2s are known. To identify additional substrate proteins of the SnRK2s and provide insight into the molecular actions of ABA, we used quantitative phosphoproteomics to compare the global changes in phosphopeptides in WT and snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant seedlings in response to ABA treatment. Among the 5,386 unique phosphorylated peptides identified in this study, we found that ABA can increase the phosphorylation of 166 peptides and decrease the phosphorylation of 117 peptides in WT seedlings. In the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant, 84 of the 166 peptides, representing 58 proteins, could not be phosphorylated, or phosphorylation was not increased under ABA treatment. In vitro kinase assays suggest that most of the 58 proteins can serve as substrates of the SnRK2s. The SnRK2 substrates include proteins involved in flowering time regulation, RNA and DNA binding, miRNA and epigenetic regulation, signal transduction, chloroplast function, and many other cellular processes. Consistent with the SnRK2 phosphorylation of flowering time regulators, the snrk2.2/2.3/2.6 triple mutant flowered significantly earlier than WT. These results shed new light on the role of the SnRK2 protein kinases and on the downstream effectors of ABA action, and improve our understanding of plant responses to adverse environments. PMID:23776212

  3. Phosphoproteome Analysis Reveals the Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Deoxynivalenol-Induced Intestinal Toxicity in IPEC-J2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Qi; Wang, Song-Bo; Wang, Rui-Guo; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Pei-Long; Su, Xiao-Ou

    2016-01-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is a widespread trichothecene mycotoxin that commonly contaminates cereal crops and has various toxic effects in animals and humans. DON primarily targets the gastrointestinal tract, the first barrier against ingested food contaminants. In this study, an isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based phosphoproteomic approach was employed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-mediated intestinal toxicity in porcine epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) exposed to 20 μM DON for 60 min. There were 4153 unique phosphopeptides, representing 389 phosphorylation sites, detected in 1821 phosphoproteins. We found that 289 phosphopeptides corresponding to 255 phosphoproteins were differentially phosphorylated in response to DON. Comprehensive Gene Ontology (GO) analysis combined with Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment revealed that, in addition to previously well-characterized mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, DON exposure altered phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt (PI3K/Akt) and Janus kinase/signal transducer, and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways. These pathways are involved in a wide range of biological processes, including apoptosis, the intestinal barrier, intestinal inflammation, and the intestinal absorption of glucose. DON-induced changes are likely to contribute to the intestinal dysfunction. Overall, identification of relevant signaling pathways yielded new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying DON-induced intestinal toxicity, and might help in the development of improved mechanism-based risk assessments in animals and humans. PMID:27669298

  4. Quantitative phosphoproteome analysis of embryonic stem cell differentiation toward blood

    PubMed Central

    Piazzi, Manuela; Williamson, Andrew; Lee, Chia-Fang; Pearson, Stella; Lacaud, Georges; Kouskoff, Valerie; McCubrey, James A.; Cocco, Lucio; Whetton, Anthony D.

    2015-01-01

    Murine embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate in vitro into three germ layers (endodermic, mesodermic, ectodermic). Studies on the differentiation of these cells to specific early differentiation stages has been aided by an ES cell line carrying the Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) targeted to the Brachyury (Bry) locus which marks mesoderm commitment. Furthermore, expression of the Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor receptor 2 (Flk1) along with Bry defines hemangioblast commitment. Isobaric-tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQTM) and phosphopeptide enrichment coupled to liquid chromatography separation and mass spectrometry allow the study of phosphorylation changes occurring at different stages of ES cell development using Bry and Flk1 expression respectively. We identified and relatively quantified 37 phosphoentities which are modulated during mesoderm-induced ES cells differentiation, comparing epiblast-like, early mesoderm and hemangioblast-enriched cells. Among the proteins differentially phosphorylated toward mesoderm differentiation were: the epigenetic regulator Dnmt3b, the protein kinase GSK3b, the chromatin remodeling factor Smarcc1, the transcription factor Utf1; as well as protein specifically related to stem cell differentiation, as Eomes, Hmga2, Ints1 and Rif1. As most key factors regulating early hematopoietic development have also been implicated in various types of leukemia, understanding the post-translational modifications driving their regulation during normal development could result in a better comprehension of their roles during abnormal hematopoiesis in leukemia. PMID:25890499

  5. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of polyethylene glycol-induced osmotic stress in root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    PubMed Central

    Horst, Walter Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress (OS) reduces cell-wall (CW) porosity and limits aluminium (Al) uptake by root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A subsequent transcriptomic study suggested that genes related to CW processes are involved in adjustment to OS. In this study, a proteomic and phosphoproteomic approach was applied to identify OS-induced protein regulation to further improve our understanding of how OS affects Al accumulation. Analysis of total soluble proteins in root tips indicated that, in total, 22 proteins were differentially regulated by OS; these proteins were functionally categorized. Seventy-seven per- cent of the total expressed proteins were involved in metabolic pathways, particularly of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. An analysis of the apoplastic proteome revealed that OS reduced the level of five proteins and increased that of seven proteins. Investigation of the total soluble phosphoproteome suggested that dehydrin responded to OS with an enhanced phosphorylation state without a change in abundance. A cellular immunolocalization analysis indicated that dehydrin was localized mainly in the CW. This suggests that dehydrin may play a major protective role in the OS-induced physical breakdown of the CW structure and thus maintenance of the reversibility of CW extensibility during recovery from OS. The proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses provided novel insights into the complex mechanisms of OS-induced reduction of Al accumulation in the root tips of common bean and highlight a key role for modification of CW structure. PMID:24123251

  6. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S.; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-01-01

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility. PMID:28248234

  7. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of polyethylene glycol-induced osmotic stress in root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Bao; Eticha, Dejene; Führs, Hendrik; Heintz, Dimitri; Ayoub, Daniel; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schlingmann, Barbara; Rao, Idupulapati Madhusudana; Braun, Hans-Peter; Horst, Walter Johannes

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced osmotic stress (OS) reduces cell-wall (CW) porosity and limits aluminium (Al) uptake by root tips of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). A subsequent transcriptomic study suggested that genes related to CW processes are involved in adjustment to OS. In this study, a proteomic and phosphoproteomic approach was applied to identify OS-induced protein regulation to further improve our understanding of how OS affects Al accumulation. Analysis of total soluble proteins in root tips indicated that, in total, 22 proteins were differentially regulated by OS; these proteins were functionally categorized. Seventy-seven per- cent of the total expressed proteins were involved in metabolic pathways, particularly of carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism. An analysis of the apoplastic proteome revealed that OS reduced the level of five proteins and increased that of seven proteins. Investigation of the total soluble phosphoproteome suggested that dehydrin responded to OS with an enhanced phosphorylation state without a change in abundance. A cellular immunolocalization analysis indicated that dehydrin was localized mainly in the CW. This suggests that dehydrin may play a major protective role in the OS-induced physical breakdown of the CW structure and thus maintenance of the reversibility of CW extensibility during recovery from OS. The proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses provided novel insights into the complex mechanisms of OS-induced reduction of Al accumulation in the root tips of common bean and highlight a key role for modification of CW structure.

  8. Selecting Sample Preparation Workflows for Mass Spectrometry-Based Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Patient Samples with Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Valladares, Maria; Aasebø, Elise; Selheim, Frode; Berven, Frode S; Bruserud, Øystein

    2016-08-22

    Global mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic and phosphoproteomic studies of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) biomarkers represent a powerful strategy to identify and confirm proteins and their phosphorylated modifications that could be applied in diagnosis and prognosis, as a support for individual treatment regimens and selection of patients for bone marrow transplant. MS-based studies require optimal and reproducible workflows that allow a satisfactory coverage of the proteome and its modifications. Preparation of samples for global MS analysis is a crucial step and it usually requires method testing, tuning and optimization. Different proteomic workflows that have been used to prepare AML patient samples for global MS analysis usually include a standard protein in-solution digestion procedure with a urea-based lysis buffer. The enrichment of phosphopeptides from AML patient samples has previously been carried out either with immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) or metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC). We have recently tested several methods of sample preparation for MS analysis of the AML proteome and phosphoproteome and introduced filter-aided sample preparation (FASP) as a superior methodology for the sensitive and reproducible generation of peptides from patient samples. FASP-prepared peptides can be further fractionated or IMAC-enriched for proteome or phosphoproteome analyses. Herein, we will review both in-solution and FASP-based sample preparation workflows and encourage the use of the latter for the highest protein and phosphorylation coverage and reproducibility.

  9. In-depth phosphoproteomic analysis of royal jelly derived from western and eastern honeybee species.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Lu, Xiaoshan; Huo, Xinmei; Meng, Lifeng; Wu, Bin; Li, Jianke

    2014-12-05

    The proteins in royal jelly (RJ) play a pivotal role in the nutrition, immune defense, and cast determination of honeybee larvae and have a wide range of pharmacological and health-promoting functions for humans as well. Although the importance of post-translational modifications (PTMs) in protein function is known, investigation of protein phosphorylation of RJ proteins is still very limited. To this end, two complementary phosphopeptide enrichment materials (Ti(4+)-IMAC and TiO2) and high-sensitivity mass spectrometry were applied to establish a detailed phosphoproteome map and to qualitatively and quantitatively compare the phosphoproteomes of RJ produced by Apis mellifera ligustica (Aml) and Apis cerana cerana (Acc). In total, 16 phosphoproteins carrying 67 phosphorylation sites were identified in RJ derived from western bees, and nine proteins phosphorylated on 71 sites were found in RJ produced by eastern honeybees. Of which, eight phosphorylated proteins were common to both RJ samples, and the same motif ([S-x-E]) was extracted, suggesting that the function of major RJ proteins as nutrients and immune agents is evolutionary preserved in both of these honeybee species. All eight overlapping phosphoproteins showed significantly higher abundance in Acc-RJ than in Aml-RJ, and the phosphorylation of Jelleine-II (an antimicrobial peptide, TPFKLSLHL) at S(6) in Acc-RJ had stronger antimicrobial properties than that at T(1) in Aml-RJ even though the overall antimicrobial activity of Jelleine-II was found to decrease after phosphorylation. The differences in phosphosites, peptide abundance, and antimicrobial activity of the phosphorylated RJ proteins indicate that the two major honeybee species employ distinct phosphorylation strategies that align with their different biological characteristics shaped by evolution. The phosphorylation of RJ proteins are potentially driven by the activity of extracellular serine/threonine protein kinase FAM20C-like protein (FAM20C

  10. Phosphoproteomics in cereals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingfang

    2015-01-01

    Cereals are the most important crop plant supplying staple food throughout the world. The economic importance and continued breeding of crop plants such as rice, maize, wheat, or barley require a detailed scientific understanding of adaptive and developmental processes. Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important regulatory posttranslational modifications and its analysis allows deriving functional and regulatory principles in plants. This minireview summarizes the current knowledge of phosphoproteomic studies in cereals.

  11. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals interconnected system-wide responses to perturbations of kinases and phosphatases in yeast.

    PubMed

    Bodenmiller, Bernd; Wanka, Stefanie; Kraft, Claudine; Urban, Jörg; Campbell, David; Pedrioli, Patrick G; Gerrits, Bertran; Picotti, Paola; Lam, Henry; Vitek, Olga; Brusniak, Mi-Youn; Roschitzki, Bernd; Zhang, Chao; Shokat, Kevan M; Schlapbach, Ralph; Colman-Lerner, Alejandro; Nolan, Garry P; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Peter, Matthias; Loewith, Robbie; von Mering, Christian; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2010-12-21

    The phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of proteins by kinases and phosphatases constitute an essential regulatory network in eukaryotic cells. This network supports the flow of information from sensors through signaling systems to effector molecules and ultimately drives the phenotype and function of cells, tissues, and organisms. Dysregulation of this process has severe consequences and is one of the main factors in the emergence and progression of diseases, including cancer. Thus, major efforts have been invested in developing specific inhibitors that modulate the activity of individual kinases or phosphatases; however, it has been difficult to assess how such pharmacological interventions would affect the cellular signaling network as a whole. Here, we used label-free, quantitative phosphoproteomics in a systematically perturbed model organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to determine the relationships between 97 kinases, 27 phosphatases, and more than 1000 phosphoproteins. We identified 8814 regulated phosphorylation events, describing the first system-wide protein phosphorylation network in vivo. Our results show that, at steady state, inactivation of most kinases and phosphatases affected large parts of the phosphorylation-modulated signal transduction machinery-and not only the immediate downstream targets. The observed cellular growth phenotype was often well maintained despite the perturbations, arguing for considerable robustness in the system. Our results serve to constrain future models of cellular signaling and reinforce the idea that simple linear representations of signaling pathways might be insufficient for drug development and for describing organismal homeostasis.

  12. Comparative Phosphoproteomic Analysis under High-Nitrogen Fertilizer Reveals Central Phosphoproteins Promoting Wheat Grain Starch and Protein Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, Shoumin; Deng, Xiong; Zhang, Ming; Zhu, Gengrui; Lv, Dongwen; Wang, Yaping; Zhu, Dong; Yan, Yueming

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is a macronutrient important for plant growth and development. It also strongly influences starch and protein synthesis, closely related to grain yield and quality. We performed the first comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of developing wheat grains in response to high-N fertilizer. Physiological and biochemical analyses showed that application of high-N fertilizer resulted in significant increases in leaf length and area, chlorophyll content, the activity of key enzymes in leaves such as nitrate reductase (NR), and in grains such as sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS), sucrose synthase (SuSy), and ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). This enhanced enzyme activity led to significant improvements in starch content, grain yield, and ultimately, bread making quality. Comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of developing grains under the application of high-N fertilizer performed 15 and 25 days post-anthesis identified 2470 phosphosites among 1372 phosphoproteins, of which 411 unique proteins displayed significant changes in phosphorylation level (>2-fold or <0.5-fold). These phosphoproteins are involved mainly in signaling transduction, starch synthesis, energy metabolism. Pro-Q diamond staining and Western blotting confirmed our phosphoproteomic results. We propose a putative pathway to elucidate the important roles of the central phosphoproteins regulating grain starch and protein synthesis. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of protein phosphorylation modifications involved in grain development, yield and quality formation. PMID:28194157

  13. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Paper Mulberry Reveals Phosphorylation Functions in Chilling Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Pi, Zhi; Zhao, Mei-Ling; Peng, Xian-Jun; Shen, Shi-Hua

    2017-04-13

    Paper mulberry is a valuable woody species with a good chilling tolerance. In this study, phosphoproteomic analysis, physiological measurement, and mRNA quantification were employed to explore the molecular mechanism of chilling (4 °C) tolerance in paper mulberry. After chilling for 6 h, 427 significantly changed phosphoproteins were detected in paper mulberry seedlings without obvious physiological injury. When obvious physiological injury occurred after chilling for 48 h, a total of 611 phosphoproteins were found to be significantly changed at the phosphorylation level. Several protein kinases, especially CKII, were possibly responsible for these changes according to conserved sequence analysis. The results of Gene Ontology analysis showed that phosphoproteins were mainly responsible for signal transduction, protein modification, and translation during chilling. Additionally, transport and cellular component organization were enriched after chilling for 6 and 48 h, respectively. On the basis of the protein-protein interaction network analysis, a protein kinase and phosphatases hub protein (P1959) were found to be involved in cross-talk between Ca(2+), BR, ABA, and ethylene-mediated signaling pathways. We also highlighted the phosphorylation of BpSIZ1 and BpICE1 possibly impacted on the CBF/DREB-responsive pathway. From these results, we developed a schematic for the chilling tolerance mechanism at phosphorylation level.

  14. A solid phase extraction-based platform for rapid phosphoproteomic analysis

    PubMed Central

    Dephoure, Noah; Gygi, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is among the most common and intensely studied post-translational protein modification. It plays crucial roles in virtually all cellular processes and has been implicated in numerous human diseases, including cancer. Traditional biochemical and genetic methods for identifying and monitoring sites of phosphorylation are laborious and slow and in recent years have largely been replaced by mass spectrometric analysis. Improved methods for phosphopeptide enrichment coupled with faster and more sensitive mass spectrometers have led to an explosion in the size of phosphoproteomic datasets. However, wider application of these methods is limited by equipment costs and the resultant high demand for instrument time as well as by a technology gap between biologists and mass spectrometrists. Here we describe a modified two-step enrichment strategy that employs lysC digestion and step elution from self-packed strong cation exchange (SCX) solid phase extraction (SPE) columns followed by immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) and LC-MS/MS analysis using a hybrid LTQ Orbitrap Velos mass spectrometer. The SCX procedure does not require an HPLC system, demands little expertise, and because multiple samples can be processed in parallel, can provide a large savings of time and labor. We demonstrate this method in conjunction with stable isotope labeling to quantify peptides harboring >8,000 unique phosphorylation sites in yeast in 12 hours of instrument analysis time and examine the impact of enzyme choice and instrument platform. PMID:21440633

  15. Phosphoproteomic profiling of the myocyte.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Alistair V G; Cordwell, Stuart J; White, Melanie Y

    2011-10-01

    Protein phosphorylation underpins major cellular processes including energy metabolism, signal transduction, excitation-contraction coupling, apoptosis, and cell survival mechanisms and is thus critical to the myocyte. Targeted approaches, whereby a handful of phosphoproteins are investigated, can suffer from a relatively narrow view of cellular phosphorylation. In contrast, recent technical advances have allowed for the comprehensive documentation of phosphorylation events in complex biological environments, providing a deeper view of the "phosphoproteome." A global, high-throughput characterization of the myocardial phosphoproteome, however, has not yet been achieved. Efficient analysis of phosphorylated proteins and their roles in a dynamic cellular environment requires high-resolution strategies that can identify, localize, and quantify many thousands of phosphorylation sites in a single experiment. Such an approach requires specific enrichment and purification techniques, developed to align with high-end instrumentation for analysis. Cutting-edge phosphoproteomics is no longer restricted to gel-based technology, instead focusing on affinity enrichment prior to liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. We will describe the best current methods and how they can be applied, as well as the challenges associated with them. We also present current phosphoproteomic investigations in the myocyte and its subcompartments. Although the techniques and instrumentation required to achieve the goal of a myocardial phosphoprotein catalog in physiological and diseased states are highly specialized, the potential biological insight provided by such an approach makes phosphoproteomics an important new avenue of investigation for the cardiovascular researcher.

  16. iTRAQ labeling is superior to mTRAQ for quantitative global proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Mertins, Philipp; Udeshi, Namrata D; Clauser, Karl R; Mani, D R; Patel, Jinal; Ong, Shao-en; Jaffe, Jacob D; Carr, Steven A

    2012-06-01

    Labeling of primary amines on peptides with reagents containing stable isotopes is a commonly used technique in quantitative mass spectrometry. Isobaric labeling techniques such as iTRAQ™ or TMT™ allow for relative quantification of peptides based on ratios of reporter ions in the low m/z region of spectra produced by precursor ion fragmentation. In contrast, nonisobaric labeling with mTRAQ™ yields precursors with different masses that can be directly quantified in MS1 spectra. In this study, we compare iTRAQ- and mTRAQ-based quantification of peptides and phosphopeptides derived from EGF-stimulated HeLa cells. Both labels have identical chemical structures, therefore precursor ion- and fragment ion-based quantification can be directly compared. Our results indicate that iTRAQ labeling has an additive effect on precursor intensities, whereas mTRAQ labeling leads to more redundant MS2 scanning events caused by triggering on the same peptide with different mTRAQ labels. We found that iTRAQ labeling quantified nearly threefold more phosphopeptides (12,129 versus 4,448) and nearly twofold more proteins (2,699 versus 1,597) than mTRAQ labeling. Although most key proteins in the EGFR signaling network were quantified with both techniques, iTRAQ labeling allowed quantification of twice as many kinases. Accuracy of reporter ion quantification by iTRAQ is adversely affected by peptides that are cofragmented in the same precursor isolation window, dampening observed ratios toward unity. However, because of tighter overall iTRAQ ratio distributions, the percentage of statistically significantly regulated phosphopeptides and proteins detected by iTRAQ and mTRAQ was similar. We observed a linear correlation of logarithmic iTRAQ to mTRAQ ratios over two orders of magnitude, indicating a possibility to correct iTRAQ ratios by an average compression factor. Spike-in experiments using peptides of defined ratios in a background of nonregulated peptides show that i

  17. Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals the importance of kinase regulation during orbivirus infection.

    PubMed

    Mohl, Bjorn-Patrick; Emmott, Edward; Roy, Polly

    2017-08-29

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes infections in wild and domesticated ruminants with high morbidity and mortality and is responsible for significant economic losses in both developing and developed countries. BTV serves as a model for the study of other members of the Orbivirus genus. Previously, the importance of casein kinase 2 for BTV replication was demonstrated. To identify intracellular signalling pathways and novel host-cell kinases involved during BTV infection, the phosphoproteome of BTV infected cells was analysed. Over 1000 phosphosites were identified using mass spectrometry, which were then used to determine the corresponding kinases involved during BTV infection. This analysis yielded protein kinase A (PKA) as a novel kinase activated during BTV infection. Subsequently, the importance of PKA for BTV infection was validated using a PKA inhibitor and activator. Our data confirmed that PKA was essential for efficient viral growth. Further, we showed that PKA is also required for infection of equid cells by African horse sickness virus, another member of the Orbivirus genus. Thus, despite their preference in specific host species, orbiviruses may utilize the same host signaling pathways during their replication. Copyright © 2017, The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  18. Quantitative label-free phosphoproteomics of six different life stages of the late blight pathogen Phytophthora infestans reveals abundant phosphorylation of members of the CRN effector family.

    PubMed

    Resjö, Svante; Ali, Ashfaq; Meijer, Harold J G; Seidl, Michael F; Snel, Berend; Sandin, Marianne; Levander, Fredrik; Govers, Francine; Andreasson, Erik

    2014-04-04

    The oomycete Phytophthora infestans is the causal agent of late blight in potato and tomato. Since the underlying processes that govern pathogenicity and development in P. infestans are largely unknown, we have performed a large-scale phosphoproteomics study of six different P. infestans life stages. We have obtained quantitative data for 2922 phosphopeptides and compared their abundance. Life-stage-specific phosphopeptides include ATP-binding cassette transporters and a kinase that only occurs in appressoria. In an extended data set, we identified 2179 phosphorylation sites and deduced 22 phosphomotifs. Several of the phosphomotifs matched consensus sequences of kinases that occur in P. infestans but not Arabidopsis. In addition, we detected tyrosine phosphopeptides that are potential targets of kinases resembling mammalian tyrosine kinases. Among the phosphorylated proteins are members of the RXLR and Crinkler effector families. The latter are phosphorylated in several life stages and at multiple positions, in sites that are conserved between different members of the Crinkler family. This indicates that proteins in the Crinkler family have functions beyond their putative role as (necrosis-inducing) effectors. This phosphoproteomics data will be instrumental for studies on oomycetes and host-oomycete interactions. The data sets have been deposited to ProteomeXchange (identifier PXD000433).

  19. Quantitative Measurement of Phosphoproteome Response to Osmotic Stress in Arabidopsis Based on Library-Assisted eXtracted Ion Chromatogram (LAXIC)*

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Liang; Wang, Pengcheng; Wang, Lianshui; Renzi, Emily; Radivojac, Predrag; Tang, Haixu; Arnold, Randy; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Tao, W. Andy

    2013-01-01

    Global phosphorylation changes in plants in response to environmental stress have been relatively poorly characterized to date. Here we introduce a novel mass spectrometry-based label-free quantitation method that facilitates systematic profiling plant phosphoproteome changes with high efficiency and accuracy. This method employs synthetic peptide libraries tailored specifically as internal standards for complex phosphopeptide samples and accordingly, a local normalization algorithm, LAXIC, which calculates phosphopeptide abundance normalized locally with co-eluting library peptides. Normalization was achieved in a small time frame centered to each phosphopeptide to compensate for the diverse ion suppression effect across retention time. The label-free LAXIC method was further treated with a linear regression function to accurately measure phosphoproteome responses to osmotic stress in Arabidopsis. Among 2027 unique phosphopeptides identified and 1850 quantified phosphopeptides in Arabidopsis samples, 468 regulated phosphopeptides representing 497 phosphosites have shown significant changes. Several known and novel components in the abiotic stress pathway were identified, illustrating the capability of this method to identify critical signaling events among dynamic and complex phosphorylation. Further assessment of those regulated proteins may help shed light on phosphorylation response to osmotic stress in plants. PMID:23660473

  20. Triple quad ICPMS (ICPQQQ) as a new tool for absolute quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Diez Fernández, Silvia; Sugishama, Naoki; Ruiz Encinar, Jorge; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo

    2012-07-17

    It is clear that sensitive and interference-free quantification of ICP-detectable elements naturally present in proteins will boost the role of ICPMS in proteomics. In this study, a completely new way of polyatomic interference removal in ICPMS for detection of sulfur (present in the majority of proteins as methionine or cysteine) and phosphorus (present in phosphorylated proteins) is presented. It is based on the concept of tandem mass spectrometry (QQQ) typically used in molecular MS. Briefly, the first quadrupole can be operated as 1 amu window band-pass mass filter to select target analyte ions ((31)P, (32)S, and their on-mass polyatomic interferences). In this way, only selected ions enter the cell and react with O(2), reducing the interferences produced by matrix ions as well as background noise. After optimization of the cell conditions, product ions formed for the targets, (47)PO(+) and (48)SO(+), could be detected with enhanced sensitivity and selectivity. The coupling to capillary HPLC allowed analysis of S- and P-containing species with the lowest detection limits ever published (11 and 6.6 fmol, respectively). The potential of the approach for proteomics studies was demonstrated for the highly sensitive simultaneous absolute quantification of different S-containing peptides and phosphopeptides.

  1. Phosphoproteomics and molecular cardiology: techniques, applications and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zeyu; Hamilton, Karyn L; Reardon, Kenneth F

    2012-09-01

    Protein phosphorylation has been widely documented as a key regulatory and signaling mechanism associated with many cardiac diseases. Recent advances in phosphoproteomic technologies such as phosphopeptide enrichment, novel mass spectrometry applications, and bioinformatic tools have resulted in high-throughput identification and quantitation of protein phosphorylation in a global manner. This review summarizes mainstream phosphoproteomic workflows and highlights the most recent applications of phosphoproteomics used in a range of molecular cardiology research.

  2. Phosphoproteomic analysis of the non-seed vascular plant model Selaginella moellendorffii

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Selaginella (Selaginella moellendorffii) is a lycophyte which diverged from other vascular plants approximately 410 million years ago. As the first reported non-seed vascular plant genome, Selaginella genome data allow comparative analysis of genetic changes that may be associated with land plant evolution. Proteomics investigations on this lycophyte model have not been extensively reported. Phosphorylation represents the most common post-translational modifications and it is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism controlling the functional expression of proteins inside living organisms. Results In this study, polyethylene glycol fractionation and immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography were employed to isolate phosphopeptides from wild-growing Selaginella. Using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry analysis, 1593 unique phosphopeptides spanning 1104 non-redundant phosphosites with confirmed localization on 716 phosphoproteins were identified. Analysis of the Selaginella dataset revealed features that are consistent with other plant phosphoproteomes, such as the relative proportions of phosphorylated Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues, the highest occurrence of phosphosites in the C-terminal regions of proteins, and the localization of phosphorylation events outside protein domains. In addition, a total of 97 highly conserved phosphosites in evolutionary conserved proteins were identified, indicating the conservation of phosphorylation-dependent regulatory mechanisms in phylogenetically distinct plant species. On the other hand, close examination of proteins involved in photosynthesis revealed phosphorylation events which may be unique to Selaginella evolution. Furthermore, phosphorylation motif analyses identified Pro-directed, acidic, and basic signatures which are recognized by typical protein kinases in plants. A group of Selaginella-specific phosphoproteins were found to be enriched in the Pro-directed motif class. Conclusions Our work provides

  3. Global dynamics of the Escherichia coli proteome and phosphoproteome during growth in minimal medium.

    PubMed

    Soares, Nelson C; Spät, Philipp; Krug, Karsten; Macek, Boris

    2013-06-07

    Recent phosphoproteomics studies have generated relatively large data sets of bacterial proteins phosphorylated on serine, threonine, and tyrosine, implicating this type of phosphorylation in the regulation of vital processes of a bacterial cell; however, most phosphoproteomics studies in bacteria were so far qualitative. Here we applied stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) to perform a quantitative analysis of proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics of Escherichia coli during five distinct phases of growth in the minimal medium. Combining two triple-SILAC experiments, we detected a total of 2118 proteins and quantified relative dynamics of 1984 proteins in all measured phases of growth, including 570 proteins associated with cell wall and membrane. In the phosphoproteomic experiment, we detected 150 Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events, of which 108 were localized to a specific amino acid residue and 76 were quantified in all phases of growth. Clustering analysis of SILAC ratios revealed distinct sets of coregulated proteins for each analyzed phase of growth and overrepresentation of membrane proteins in transition between exponential and stationary phases. The proteomics data indicated that proteins related to stress response typically associated with the stationary phase, including RpoS-dependent proteins, had increasing levels already during earlier phases of growth. Application of SILAC enabled us to measure median occupancies of phosphorylation sites, which were generally low (<12%). Interestingly, the phosphoproteome analysis showed a global increase of protein phosphorylation levels in the late stationary phase, pointing to a likely role of this modification in later phases of growth.

  4. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Protein Kinase C Signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Reveals Slt2 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK)-dependent Phosphorylation of Eisosome Core Components*

    PubMed Central

    Mascaraque, Victoria; Hernáez, María Luisa; Jiménez-Sánchez, María; Hansen, Rasmus; Gil, Concha; Martín, Humberto; Cid, Víctor J.; Molina, María

    2013-01-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been thoroughly studied as a paradigm of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. It consists of a classic MAPK module comprising the Bck1 MAPK kinase kinase, two redundant MAPK kinases (Mkk1 and Mkk2), and the Slt2 MAPK. This module is activated under a variety of stimuli related to cell wall homeostasis by Pkc1, the only member of the protein kinase C family in budding yeast. Quantitative phosphoproteomics based on stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture is a powerful tool for globally studying protein phosphorylation. Here we report an analysis of the yeast phosphoproteome upon overexpression of a PKC1 hyperactive allele that specifically activates CWI MAPK signaling in the absence of external stimuli. We found 82 phosphopeptides originating from 43 proteins that showed enhanced phosphorylation in these conditions. The MAPK S/T-P target motif was significantly overrepresented in these phosphopeptides. Hyperphosphorylated proteins provide putative novel targets of the Pkc1–cell wall integrity pathway involved in diverse functions such as the control of gene expression, protein synthesis, cytoskeleton maintenance, DNA repair, and metabolism. Remarkably, five components of the plasma-membrane-associated protein complex known as eisosomes were found among the up-regulated proteins. We show here that Pkc1-induced phosphorylation of the eisosome core components Pil1 and Lsp1 was not exerted directly by Pkc1, but involved signaling through the Slt2 MAPK module. PMID:23221999

  5. Meta-Analysis of Arabidopsis thaliana Phospho-Proteomics Data Reveals Compartmentalization of Phosphorylation Motifs[C][W

    PubMed Central

    van Wijk, Klaas J.; Friso, Giulia; Walther, Dirk; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Protein (de)phosphorylation plays an important role in plants. To provide a robust foundation for subcellular phosphorylation signaling network analysis and kinase-substrate relationships, we performed a meta-analysis of 27 published and unpublished in-house mass spectrometry–based phospho-proteome data sets for Arabidopsis thaliana covering a range of processes, (non)photosynthetic tissue types, and cell cultures. This resulted in an assembly of 60,366 phospho-peptides matching to 8141 nonredundant proteins. Filtering the data for quality and consistency generated a set of medium and a set of high confidence phospho-proteins and their assigned phospho-sites. The relation between single and multiphosphorylated peptides is discussed. The distribution of p-proteins across cellular functions and subcellular compartments was determined and showed overrepresentation of protein kinases. Extensive differences in frequency of pY were found between individual studies due to proteomics and mass spectrometry workflows. Interestingly, pY was underrepresented in peroxisomes but overrepresented in mitochondria. Using motif-finding algorithms motif-x and MMFPh at high stringency, we identified compartmentalization of phosphorylation motifs likely reflecting localized kinase activity. The filtering of the data assembly improved signal/noise ratio for such motifs. Identified motifs were linked to kinases through (bioinformatic) enrichment analysis. This study also provides insight into the challenges/pitfalls of using large-scale phospho-proteomic data sets to nonexperts. PMID:24894044

  6. Quantitative expression proteomics and phosphoproteomics profile of brain from PINK1 knockout mice: insights into mechanisms of familial Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Triplett, Judy C; Zhang, Zhaoshu; Sultana, Rukhsana; Cai, Jian; Klein, Jon B; Büeler, Hansruedi; Butterfield, David Allan

    2015-06-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-related, neurodegenerative motor disorder characterized by progressive degeneration of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta and presence of α-synuclein-containing protein aggregates. Mutations in the mitochondrial Ser/Thr kinase PTEN-induced kinase 1 (PINK1) are associated with an autosomal recessive familial form of early-onset PD. Recent studies have suggested that PINK1 plays important neuroprotective roles against mitochondrial dysfunction by phosphorylating and recruiting Parkin, a cytosolic E3 ubiquitin ligase, to facilitate elimination of damaged mitochondria via autophagy-lysosomal pathways. Loss of PINK1 in cells and animals leads to various mitochondrial impairments and oxidative stress, culminating in dopaminergic neuronal death in humans. Using a 2-D polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis proteomics approach, the differences in expressed brain proteome and phosphoproteome between 6-month-old PINK1-deficient mice and wild-type mice were identified. The observed changes in the brain proteome and phosphoproteome of mice lacking PINK1 suggest that defects in signaling networks, energy metabolism, cellular proteostasis, and neuronal structure and plasticity are involved in the pathogenesis of familial PD. Mutations in PINK1 are associated with an early-onset form of Parkinson's disease (PD). This study examines changes in the proteome and phosphoproteome of the PINK1 knockout mouse brain. Alterations were noted in several key proteins associated with: increased oxidative stress, aberrant cellular signaling, altered neuronal structure, decreased synaptic plasticity, reduced neurotransmission, diminished proteostasis networks, and altered metabolism. 14-3-3ε, 14-3-3 protein epsilon; 3-PGDH, phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase; ALDOA, aldolase A; APT1, acyl-protein thioesterase 1; CaM, calmodulin; CBR3, carbonyl reductase [NADPH] 3; ENO2, gamma-enolase; HPRT, hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase; HSP70

  7. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics of the Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated (ATM) and Ataxia Telangiectasia-Mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) Dependent DNA Damage Response in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Roitinger, Elisabeth; Hofer, Manuel; Köcher, Thomas; Pichler, Peter; Novatchkova, Maria; Yang, Jianhua; Schlögelhofer, Peter; Mechtler, Karl

    2015-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins on serine, threonine, and tyrosine residues is an important biological regulatory mechanism. In the context of genome integrity, signaling cascades driven by phosphorylation are crucial for the coordination and regulation of DNA repair. The two serine/threonine protein kinases ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related (ATR) are key factors in this process, each specific for different kinds of DNA lesions. They are conserved across eukaryotes, mediating the activation of cell-cycle checkpoints, chromatin modifications, and regulation of DNA repair proteins. We designed a novel mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics approach to study DNA damage repair in Arabidopsis thaliana. The protocol combines filter aided sample preparation, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, metal oxide affinity chromatography, and strong cation exchange chromatography for phosphopeptide generation, enrichment, and separation. Isobaric labeling employing iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) was used for profiling the phosphoproteome of atm atr double mutants and wild type plants under either regular growth conditions or challenged by irradiation. A total of 10,831 proteins were identified and 15,445 unique phosphopeptides were quantified, containing 134 up- and 38 down-regulated ATM/ATR dependent phosphopeptides. We identified known and novel ATM/ATR targets such as LIG4 and MRE11 (needed for resistance against ionizing radiation), PIE1 and SDG26 (implicated in chromatin remodeling), PCNA1, WAPL, and PDS5 (implicated in DNA replication), and ASK1 and HTA10 (involved in meiosis). PMID:25561503

  8. SILAC-based temporal phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Francavilla, Chiara; Hekmat, Omid; Blagoev, Blagoy; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, thanks to advances in Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based quantitative proteomics, studies on signaling pathways have moved from a detailed description of individual components to system-wide analysis of entire signaling cascades, also providing spatio-temporal views of intracellular pathways. Quantitative proteomics that combines stable isotope labeling by amino acid in cell culture (SILAC) with enrichment strategies for post-translational modification-bearing peptides and high-performance tandem mass spectrometry represents a powerful and unbiased approach to monitor dynamic signaling events. Here we provide an optimized SILAC-based proteomic workflow to analyze temporal changes in phosphoproteomes, which involve a generic three step enrichment protocol for phosphopeptides. SILAC-labeled peptides from digested whole cell lysates are as a first step enriched for phosphorylated tyrosines by immunoaffinity and then further enriched for phosphorylated serine/threonine peptides by strong cation exchange in combination with titanium dioxide-beads chromatography. Analysis of enriched peptides on Orbitrap-based MS results in comprehensive and accurate reconstruction of temporal changes of signaling networks.

  9. Tandem metal-oxide affinity chromatography for enhanced depth of phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Beckers, Gerold J M; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Röhrig, Horst; Conrath, Uwe; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2014-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells many diverse cellular functions are regulated by reversible protein phosphorylation. In recent years, phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool to study protein phosphorylation because it allows unbiased localization, and site-specific quantification, of in vivo phosphorylation of hundreds of proteins in a single experiment. A common strategy to identify phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation sites from complex biological samples is the enrichment of phosphopeptides from digested cellular lysates followed by mass spectrometry. However, despite the high sensitivity of modern mass spectrometers the large dynamic range of protein abundance and the transient nature of protein phosphorylation remained major pitfalls in MS-based phosphoproteomics. Tandem metal-oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) represents a robust and highly selective approach for the identification and site-specific quantification of low abundant phosphoproteins that is based on the successive enrichment of phosphoproteins and -peptides. This strategy combines protein extraction under denaturing conditions, phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)3-based MOAC, tryptic digestion of enriched phosphoproteins followed by TiO2-based MOAC of phosphopeptides. Thus, tandem MOAC effectively targets the phosphate moiety of phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides and, thus, allows probing of the phosphoproteome to unprecedented depth.

  10. Refined phosphopeptide enrichment by phosphate additive and the analysis of human brain phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Wu, Zhiping; Wang, Hong; Bai, Bing; Li, Yuxin; Wang, Xusheng; Zhai, Bo; Beach, Thomas G; Peng, Junmin

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia, characterized by progressive loss of cognitive function. One of the pathological hallmarks of AD is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles composed of abnormally hyperphosphorylated tau protein, but global deregulation of protein phosphorylation in AD is not well analyzed. Here, we report a pilot investigation of AD phosphoproteome by titanium dioxide enrichment coupled with high resolution LC-MS/MS. During the optimization of the enrichment method, we found that phosphate ion at a low concentration (e.g. 1 mM) worked efficiently as a nonphosphopeptide competitor to reduce background. The procedure was further tuned with respect to peptide-to-bead ratio, phosphopeptide recovery, and purity. Using this refined method and 9 h LC-MS/MS, we analyzed phosphoproteome in one milligram of digested AD brain lysate, identifying 5243 phosphopeptides containing 3715 nonredundant phosphosites on 1455 proteins, including 31 phosphosites on the tau protein. This modified enrichment method is simple and highly efficient. The AD case study demonstrates its feasibility of dissecting phosphoproteome in a limited amount of postmortem human brain. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001180 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001180).

  11. Proteome and phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-associated proteins from normal maize and mutants affected in starch biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Grimaud, Florent; Rogniaux, Hélène; James, Martha G; Myers, Alan M; Planchot, Véronique

    2008-01-01

    In addition to the exclusively granule-bound starch synthase GBSSI, starch granules also bind significant proportions of other starch biosynthetic enzymes, particularly starch synthases (SS) SSI and SSIIa, and starch branching enzyme (BE) BEIIb. Whether this association is a functional aspect of starch biosynthesis, or results from non-specific entrapment during amylopectin crystallization, is not known. This study utilized genetic, immunological, and proteomic approaches to investigate comprehensively the proteome and phosphoproteome of Zea mays endosperm starch granules. SSIII, BEI, BEIIa, and starch phosphorylase were identified as internal granule-associated proteins in maize endosperm, along with the previously identified proteins GBSS, SSI, SSIIa, and BEIIb. Genetic analyses revealed three instances in which granule association of one protein is affected by the absence of another biosynthetic enzyme. First, eliminating SSIIa caused reduced granule association of SSI and BEIIb, without affecting GBSS abundance. Second, eliminating SSIII caused the appearance of two distinct electrophoretic mobility forms of BEIIb, whereas only a single migration form of BEIIb was observed in wild type or any other mutant granules examined. Third, eliminating BEIIb caused significant increases in the abundance of BEI, BEIIa, SSIII, and starch phosphorylase in the granule, without affecting SSI or SSIIa. Analysis of the granule phosphoproteome with a phosphorylation-specific dye indicated that GBSS, BEIIb, and starch phosphorylase are all phosphorylated as they occur in the granule. These results suggest the possibility that starch metabolic enzymes located in granules are regulated by post-translational modification and/or protein-protein interactions.

  12. Phosphoproteome analysis of B. cinerea in response to different plant-based elicitors.

    PubMed

    Liñeiro, Eva; Chiva, Cristina; Cantoral, Jesús M; Sabido, Eduard; Fernández-Acero, Francisco Javier

    2016-04-29

    The phytopathogen Botrytis cinerea is a ubiquitous fungus with a high capacity to adapt its metabolism to different hosts and environmental conditions in order to deploy a variety of virulence and pathogenicity factors and develop a successful plant infection. Here we report the first comparative phosphoproteomic study of B. cinerea, aimed to analyze the phosphoprotein composition of the fungus and its changes under different phenotypical conditions induced by two different carbon sources as plant based elicitors: glucose and deproteinized tomato cell wall (TCW). A total of 2854 and 2269 different phosphosites (2883 and 1137 phosphopeptides) were identified in glucose and TCW respectively, which map to 1338 phosphoproteins in glucose and 733 in TCW. Out of the identified phosphoproteins, 173 were exclusively found when glucose was the only carbon source and 11 when the carbon source was TCW. Differences in the pattern of phosphorylation-sites were also detected according to the carbon source. Gene ontology classification of the identified phosphoproteins showed that most of the characteristic proteins of the different carbon sources were related to signalling and transmembrane transport, thus highlighting the importance of these processes in the fungal adaptation to the surrounding conditions. The characterization of the B. cinerea phosphoproteome under different induction conditions reported here is the first comparative phosphoproteomic approach in this model phytopathogenic fungus. The identified phosphopeptides contribute to expand the map of known phosphoproteins in this pathogen and the observed changes according to the used carbon source contribute to understand the adaptation of the fungus to the environment changes. This knowledge improves the understanding of the adaptation mechanism, defines the role of the phosphoproteins involved in this process, and enables the advance in the design of novel strategies against the fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B

  13. Salinity-Induced Palmella Formation Mechanism in Halotolerant Algae Dunaliella salina Revealed by Quantitative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Sijia; Bian, Yangyang; Zhao, Qi; Chen, Sixue; Mao, Jiawei; Song, Chunxia; Cheng, Kai; Xiao, Zhen; Zhang, Chuanfang; Ma, Weimin; Zou, Hanfa; Ye, Mingliang; Dai, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    Palmella stage is critical for some unicellular algae to survive in extreme environments. The halotolerant algae Dunaliella salina is a good single-cell model for studying plant adaptation to high salinity. To investigate the molecular adaptation mechanism in salinity shock-induced palmella formation, we performed a comprehensive physiological, proteomics and phosphoproteomics study upon palmella formation of D. salina using dimethyl labeling and Ti4+-immobilized metal ion affinity chromatography (IMAC) proteomic approaches. We found that 151 salinity-responsive proteins and 35 salinity-responsive phosphoproteins were involved in multiple signaling and metabolic pathways upon palmella formation. Taken together with photosynthetic parameters and enzyme activity analyses, the patterns of protein accumulation and phosphorylation level exhibited the mechanisms upon palmella formation, including dynamics of cytoskeleton and cell membrane curvature, accumulation and transport of exopolysaccharides, photosynthesis and energy supplying (i.e., photosystem II stability and activity, cyclic electron transport, and C4 pathway), nuclear/chloroplastic gene expression regulation and protein processing, reactive oxygen species homeostasis, and salt signaling transduction. The salinity-responsive protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks implied that signaling and protein synthesis and fate are crucial for modulation of these processes. Importantly, the 3D structure of phosphoprotein clearly indicated that the phosphorylation sites of eight proteins were localized in the region of function domain. PMID:28588593

  14. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Reveals Pathways for Coordination of Cell Growth and Division by the Conserved Fission Yeast Kinase Pom1*

    PubMed Central

    Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Deng, Lin; Wu, Youjun; Baldissard, Suzanne; Adamo, Mark E.; Gerber, Scott A.; Moseley, James B.

    2015-01-01

    Complex phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks underlie the coordination of cellular growth and division. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Dual specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase (DYRK) family protein kinase Pom1 regulates cell cycle progression through the mitotic inducer Cdr2 and controls cell polarity through unknown targets. Here, we sought to determine the phosphorylation targets of Pom1 kinase activity by SILAC-based phosphoproteomics. We defined a set of high-confidence Pom1 targets that were enriched for cytoskeletal and cell growth functions. Cdr2 was the only cell cycle target of Pom1 kinase activity that we identified in cells. Mutation of Pom1-dependent phosphorylation sites in the C terminus of Cdr2 inhibited mitotic entry but did not impair Cdr2 localization. In addition, we found that Pom1 phosphorylated multiple substrates that function in polarized cell growth, including Tea4, Mod5, Pal1, the Rho GAP Rga7, and the Arf GEF Syt22. Purified Pom1 phosphorylated these cell polarity targets in vitro, confirming that they are direct substrates of Pom1 kinase activity and likely contribute to regulation of polarized growth by Pom1. Our study demonstrates that Pom1 acts in a linear pathway to control cell cycle progression while regulating a complex network of cell growth targets. PMID:25720772

  15. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals pathways for coordination of cell growth and division by the conserved fission yeast kinase pom1.

    PubMed

    Kettenbach, Arminja N; Deng, Lin; Wu, Youjun; Baldissard, Suzanne; Adamo, Mark E; Gerber, Scott A; Moseley, James B

    2015-05-01

    Complex phosphorylation-dependent signaling networks underlie the coordination of cellular growth and division. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the Dual specificity tyrosine-(Y)-phosphorylation regulated kinase (DYRK) family protein kinase Pom1 regulates cell cycle progression through the mitotic inducer Cdr2 and controls cell polarity through unknown targets. Here, we sought to determine the phosphorylation targets of Pom1 kinase activity by SILAC-based phosphoproteomics. We defined a set of high-confidence Pom1 targets that were enriched for cytoskeletal and cell growth functions. Cdr2 was the only cell cycle target of Pom1 kinase activity that we identified in cells. Mutation of Pom1-dependent phosphorylation sites in the C terminus of Cdr2 inhibited mitotic entry but did not impair Cdr2 localization. In addition, we found that Pom1 phosphorylated multiple substrates that function in polarized cell growth, including Tea4, Mod5, Pal1, the Rho GAP Rga7, and the Arf GEF Syt22. Purified Pom1 phosphorylated these cell polarity targets in vitro, confirming that they are direct substrates of Pom1 kinase activity and likely contribute to regulation of polarized growth by Pom1. Our study demonstrates that Pom1 acts in a linear pathway to control cell cycle progression while regulating a complex network of cell growth targets. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Protein Phosphorylation Networks in the Hypopharyngeal Gland of Honeybee Workers (Apis mellifera ligustica).

    PubMed

    Qi, Yuping; Fan, Pei; Hao, Yue; Han, Bin; Fang, Yu; Feng, Mao; Cui, Ziyou; Li, Jianke

    2015-11-06

    The hypopharyngeal gland (HG) in honeybee workers changes functions according to physiological age in the bee colony from producing royal jelly (RJ) in nurse bees to digestive enzymes in foragers. The same set of secretory cells expresses different genes or proteins to create these age-dependent changes; however, it is unknown precisely how the phosphorylation network regulates physiological differences across the development of the adult worker HG. We employed high-accuracy mass-spectrometry-based proteomics to survey phosphoproteome changes in the newly emerged, nurse, and forager bees. Overall, 941, 1322, and 1196 phosphorylation sites matching 1007, 1353, and 1199 phosphopeptides from 549, 720, and 698 phosphoproteins were identified in the three ages of the HG, respectively. Specialized, interconnected phosphorylation networks within each age were found by comparing protein abundance and phosphorylation levels. This illustrates that many proteins are regulated by phosphorylation independent of their expression levels. Furthermore, proteins in key biological processes and pathways were dynamically phosphorylated with age development, including the centrosome cycle, mitotic spindle elongation, macromolecular complex disassembly, and ribosome, indicating that phosphorylation tunes protein activity to optimize cellular behavior of the HG over time. Moreover, complementary protein and phosphoprotein expression is required to support the unique physiology of secretory activity in the HG. This reported data set of the honeybee phosphoproteome significantly improves our understanding of a range of regulatory mechanisms controlling a variety of cellular processes and will serve as a valuable resource for those studying the honeybee and other insects.

  17. Fast and easy phosphopeptide fractionation by combinatorial ERLIC-SCX solid-phase extraction for in-depth phosphoproteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Mostafa; Sprenger, Adrian; Rackiewicz, Michal; Dengjel, Joern

    2016-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic analysis is a powerful method for gaining a global, unbiased understanding of cellular signaling. Its accuracy and comprehensiveness stands or falls with the quality and choice of the applied phosphopeptide prefractionation strategy. This protocol covers a powerful but simple and rapid strategy for phosphopeptide prefractionation. The combinatorial use of two distinct chromatographic techniques that address the inverse physicochemical properties of peptides allows for superior fractionation efficiency of multiple phosphorylated peptides. In the first step, multiphosphorylated peptides are separated according to the number of negatively charged phosphosites by electrostatic repulsion-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC). A subsequent strong cation exchange (SCX) step separates mostly singly phosphorylated peptides in the ERLIC flow-through according to their positive charge. The presented strategy is inexpensive and adaptable to large and small amounts of starting material, and it allows highly multiplexed sample preparation. Because of its implementation as solid-phase extraction, the entire workflow takes only 2 h to complete.

  18. Mitochondrial tyrosine phosphoproteome: new insights from an up-to-date analysis.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Luca; Salvi, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is a newcomer in the mitochondrial signaling and is currently emerging as an important mechanism for regulating mitochondrial processes. But to what extent? By analyzing an updated draft of the mitochondrial tyrosine phosphoproteome, the following observations can be drawn: more than a hundred mitochondrial proteins undergo tyrosine phosphorylation, phosphotyrosine proteins are distributed in each of the submitochondrial compartments, and mitochondrial tyrosine phosphorylated proteins are involved in a variety of functions as metabolism (electron transport chain, Krebs cycle, fatty acid and amino acid metabolism), solute and protein transport, mitochondrial translation machinery, quality protein assessment, oxidative stress, apoptosis, fission, and other. This large and varied collection suggests that tyrosine phosphorylation could be a widespread mechanism in modulating mitochondrial functions. Moreover the in silico model is here used to explore potential effects of tyrosine phosphorylation on selected mitochondrial proteins pointing out some future perspectives in this field.

  19. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Identifies Signaling Pathways Regulated by Curcumin in Human Colon Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tatsuhiro; Higuchi, Yutaka; Shibagaki, Yoshio; Hattori, Seisuke

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin, a major polyphenol of the spice turmeric, acts as a potent chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent in several cancer types, including colon cancer. Although various proteins have been shown to be affected by curcumin, how curcumin exerts its anticancer activity is not fully understood. Phosphoproteomic analyses were performed using SW480 and SW620 human colon cancer cells to identify curcumin-affected signaling pathways. Curcumin inhibited the growth of the two cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Thirty-nine curcumin-regulated phosphoproteins were identified, five of which are involved in cancer signaling pathways. Detailed analyses revealed that the mTORC1 and p53 signaling pathways are main targets of curcumin. Our results provide insight into the molecular mechanisms of the anticancer activities of curcumin and future molecular targets for its clinical application. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of the Rana catesbeiana tadpole tail fin proteome and phosphoproteome during T3-induced apoptosis: identification of a novel type I keratin

    PubMed Central

    Domanski, Dominik; Helbing, Caren C

    2007-01-01

    Background Thyroid hormones (THs) are vital in the maintenance of homeostasis and in the control of development. One postembryonic developmental process that is principally regulated by THs is amphibian metamorphosis. This process has been intensively studied at the genomic level yet very little information at the proteomic level exists. In addition, there is increasing evidence that changes in the phosphoproteome influence TH action. Results Here we identify components of the proteome and phosphoproteome in the tail fin that changed within 48 h of exposure of premetamorphic Rana catesbeiana tadpoles to 10 nM 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T3). To this end, we developed a cell and protein fractionation method combined with two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and phosphoprotein-specific staining. Altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS). We identified and cloned a novel Rana larval type I keratin, RLK I, which may be a target for caspase-mediated proteolysis upon exposure to T3. In addition, the RLK I transcript is reduced during T3-induced and natural metamorphosis which is consistent with a larval keratin. Furthermore, GILT, a protein involved in the immune system, is changed in phosphorylation state which is linked to its activation. Using a complementary MS technique for the analysis of differentially-expressed proteins, isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) revealed 15 additional proteins whose levels were altered upon T3 treatment. The success of identifying proteins whose levels changed upon T3 treatment with iTRAQ was enhanced through de novo sequencing of MS data and homology database searching. These proteins are involved in apoptosis, extracellular matrix structure, immune system, metabolism, mechanical function, and oxygen transport. Conclusion We have demonstrated the ability to derive proteomics-based information from a model species for postembryonic development for which no genome information is currently

  1. Systematic Analysis of the Phosphoproteome and Kinase-substrate Networks in the Mouse Testis*

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Lin; Liu, Zexian; Wang, Jing; Cui, Yiqiang; Guo, Yueshuai; Zhou, Tao; Zhou, Zuomin; Guo, Xuejiang; Xue, Yu; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-01-01

    Spermatogenesis is a complex process closely associated with the phosphorylation-orchestrated cell cycle. Elucidating the phosphorylation-based regulations should advance our understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms. Here we present an integrative study of phosphorylation events in the testis. Large-scale phosphoproteome profiling in the adult mouse testis identified 17,829 phosphorylation sites in 3955 phosphoproteins. Although only approximately half of the phosphorylation sites enriched by IMAC were also captured by TiO2, both the phosphoprotein data sets identified by the two methods significantly enriched the functional annotation of spermatogenesis. Thus, the phosphoproteome profiled in this study is a highly useful snapshot of the phosphorylation events in spermatogenesis. To further understand phosphoregulation in the testis, the site-specific kinase-substrate relations were computationally predicted for reconstructing kinase-substrate phosphorylation networks. A core sub-kinase-substrate phosphorylation networks among the spermatogenesis-related proteins was retrieved and analyzed to explore the phosphoregulation during spermatogenesis. Moreover, network-based analyses demonstrated that a number of protein kinases such as MAPKs, CDK2, and CDC2 with statistically more site-specific kinase-substrate relations might have significantly higher activities and play an essential role in spermatogenesis, and the predictions were consistent with previous studies on the regulatory roles of these kinases. In particular, the analyses proposed that the activities of POLO-like kinases (PLKs) might be dramatically higher, while the prediction was experimentally validated by detecting and comparing the phosphorylation levels of pT210, an indicator of PLK1 activation, in testis and other tissues. Further experiments showed that the inhibition of POLO-like kinases decreases cell proliferation by inducing G2/M cell cycle arrest. Taken together, this systematic

  2. Quantitative phosphoproteomics after auxin-stimulated lateral root induction identifies an SNX1 protein phosphorylation site required for growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongtao; Zhou, Houjiang; Berke, Lidija; Heck, Albert J R; Mohammed, Shabaz; Scheres, Ben; Menke, Frank L H

    2013-05-01

    Protein phosphorylation is instrumental to early signaling events. Studying system-wide phosphorylation in relation to processes under investigation requires a quantitative proteomics approach. In Arabidopsis, auxin application can induce pericycle cell divisions and lateral root formation. Initiation of lateral root formation requires transcriptional reprogramming following auxin-mediated degradation of transcriptional repressors. The immediate early signaling events prior to this derepression are virtually uncharacterized. To identify the signal molecules responding to auxin application, we used a lateral root-inducible system that was previously developed to trigger synchronous division of pericycle cells. To identify and quantify the early signaling events following this induction, we combined (15)N-based metabolic labeling and phosphopeptide enrichment and applied a mass spectrometry-based approach. In total, 3068 phosphopeptides were identified from auxin-treated root tissue. This root proteome dataset contains largely phosphopeptides not previously reported and represents one of the largest quantitative phosphoprotein datasets from Arabidopsis to date. Key proteins responding to auxin treatment included the multidrug resistance-like and PIN2 auxin carriers, auxin response factor2 (ARF2), suppressor of auxin resistance 3 (SAR3), and sorting nexin1 (SNX1). Mutational analysis of serine 16 of SNX1 showed that overexpression of the mutated forms of SNX1 led to retarded growth and reduction of lateral root formation due to the reduced outgrowth of the primordium, showing proof of principle for our approach.

  3. Quantitative phosphoproteomics of tomato mounting a hypersensitive response reveals a swift suppression of photosynthetic activity and a differential role for hsp90 isoforms.

    PubMed

    Stulemeijer, Iris J E; Joosten, Matthieu H A J; Jensen, Ole N

    2009-03-01

    An important mechanism by which plants defend themselves against pathogens is the rapid execution of a hypersensitive response (HR). Tomato plants containing the Cf-4 resistance gene mount an HR that relies on the activation of phosphorylation cascades, when challenged with the Avr4 elicitor secreted by the pathogenic fungus Cladosporium fulvum. Phosphopeptides were isolated from tomato seedlings expressing both Cf-4 and Avr4 using titanium dioxide columns and LC-MS/MS analysis led to the identification of 50 phosphoproteins, most of which have not been described in tomato before. Phosphopeptides were quantified using a label-free approach based on the MS peak areas. We identified 12 phosphopeptides for which the abundance changed upon HR initiation, as compared to control seedlings. Our results suggest that photosynthetic activity is specifically suppressed in a phosphorylation-dependent way during the very early stages of HR development. In addition, phosphopeptides originating from four Hsp90 isoforms exhibited altered abundances in Cf-4/Avr4 seedlings compared to control seedlings, suggesting that the isoforms of this chaperone protein have a different function in defense signaling. We show that label-free relative quantification of the phosphoproteome of complex samples is feasible, allowing extension of our knowledge on the general physiology and defense signaling of plants mounting the HR.

  4. Dynamic Phosphoproteome Analysis of Seedling Leaves in Brachypodium distachyon L. Reveals Central Phosphorylated Proteins Involved in the Drought Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Ming; Yan, Xing; Bian, Yan-Wei; Zhen, Shou-Min; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Drought stress is a major abiotic stress affecting plant growth and development. In this study, we performed the first dynamic phosphoproteome analysis of Brachypodium distachyon L. seedling leaves under drought stress for different times. A total of 4924 phosphopeptides, contained 6362 phosphosites belonging to 2748 phosphoproteins. Rigorous standards were imposed to screen 484 phosphorylation sites, representing 442 unique phosphoproteins. Comparative analyses revealed significant changes in phosphorylation levels at 0, 6, and 24 h under drought stress. The most phosphorylated proteins and the highest phosphorylation level occurred at 6 h. Venn analysis showed that the up-regulated phosphopeptides at 6 h were almost two-fold those at 24 h. Motif-X analysis identified the six motifs: [sP], [Rxxs], [LxRxxs], [sxD], [sF], and [TP], among which [LxRxxs] was also previously identified in B. distachyon. Results from molecular function and protein-protein interaction analyses suggested that phosphoproteins mainly participate in signal transduction, gene expression, drought response and defense, photosynthesis and energy metabolism, and material transmembrane transport. These phosphoproteins, which showed significant changes in phosphorylation levels, play important roles in signal transduction and material transmembrane transport in response to drought conditions. Our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism of this plant’s abiotic stress response through phosphorylation modification. PMID:27748408

  5. Global Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals the Involvement of Phosphorylation in Aflatoxins Biosynthesis in the Pathogenic Fungus Aspergillus flavus

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Silin; Yang, Mingkun; Li, Yu; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Zhuo; Zhang, Jia; Yang, Guang; Yue, Yuewei; Li, Siting; Ge, Feng; Wang, Shihua

    2016-01-01

    Aspergillus flavus is a pathogenic fungus that produces toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins and is the causative agent of aflatoxicosis. A growing body of evidence indicates that reversible phosphorylation plays important roles in regulating diverse functions in this pathogen. However, only a few phosphoproteins of this fungus have been identified, which hampers our understanding of the roles of phosphorylation in A. flavus. So we performed a global and site-specific phosphoproteomic analysis of A. flavus. A total of 598 high-confidence phosphorylation sites were identified in 283 phosphoproteins. The identified phosphoproteins were involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction and aflatoxins biosynthesis. Five identified phosphoproteins associated with MAPK signal transduction and aflatoxins biosynthesis were validated by immunoblotting using phospho-specific antibodies. Further functional studies revealed that phosphorylation of the MAP kinase kinase kinase Ste11 affected aflatoxins biosynthesis in A. flavus. Our data represent the results of the first global survey of protein phosphorylation in A. flavus and reveal previously unappreciated roles for phosphorylation in the regulation of aflatoxins production. The generated dataset can serve as an important resource for the functional analysis of protein phosphorylation in A. flavus and facilitate the elucidation of phosphorylated signaling networks in this pathogen. PMID:27667718

  6. Comparative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of VEGF and Angiopoietin-1 Signaling Reveals ZO-1 as a Critical Regulator of Endothelial Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Chidiac, Rony; Zhang, Ying; Tessier, Sylvain; Faubert, Denis; Delisle, Chantal; Gratton, Jean-Philippe

    2016-05-01

    VEGF and angiopoietin-1 (Ang-1) are essential factors to promote angiogenesis through regulation of a plethora of signaling events in endothelial cells (ECs). Although pathways activated by VEGF and Ang-1 are being established, the unique signaling nodes conferring specific responses to each factor remain poorly defined. Thus, we conducted a large-scale comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of signaling pathways activated by VEGF and Ang-1 in ECs using mass spectrometry. Analysis of VEGF and Ang-1 networks of regulated phosphoproteins revealed that the junctional proteins ZO-1, ZO-2, JUP and p120-catenin are part of a cluster of proteins phosphorylated following VEGF stimulation that are linked to MAPK1 activation. Down-regulation of these junctional proteins led to MAPK1 activation and accordingly, increased proliferation of ECs stimulated specifically by VEGF, but not by Ang-1. We identified ZO-1 as the central regulator of this effect and showed that modulation of cellular ZO-1 levels is necessary for EC proliferation during vascular development of the mouse postnatal retina. In conclusion, we uncovered ZO-1 as part of a signaling node activated by VEGF, but not Ang-1, that specifically modulates EC proliferation during angiogenesis.

  7. Phosphoproteomic analysis of Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T identified the role of protein phosphorylation in methanogenesis and osmoregulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wan-Ling; Lai, Shu-Jung; Yang, Jhih-Tian; Chern, Jeffy; Liang, Suh-Yuen; Chou, Chi-Chi; Kuo, Chih-Horng; Lai, Mei-Chin; Wu, Shih-Hsiung

    2016-01-01

    Methanogens have gained much attention for their metabolic product, methane, which could be an energy substitute but also contributes to the greenhouse effect. One factor that controls methane emission, reversible protein phosphorylation, is a crucial signaling switch, and phosphoproteomics has become a powerful tool for large-scale surveying. Here, we conducted the first phosphorylation-mediated regulation study in halophilic Methanohalophilus portucalensis FDF1T, a model strain for studying stress response mechanisms in osmoadaptation. A shotgun approach and MS-based analysis identified 149 unique phosphoproteins. Among them, 26% participated in methanogenesis and osmolytes biosynthesis pathways. Of note, we uncovered that protein phosphorylation might be a crucial factor to modulate the pyrrolysine (Pyl) incorporation and Pyl-mediated methylotrophic methanogenesis. Furthermore, heterologous expression of glycine sarcosine N-methyltransferase (GSMT) mutant derivatives in the osmosensitive Escherichia coli MKH13 revealed that the nonphosphorylated T68A mutant resulted in increased salt tolerance. In contrast, mimic phosphorylated mutant T68D proved defective in both enzymatic activity and salinity tolerance for growth. Our study provides new insights into phosphorylation modification as a crucial role of both methanogenesis and osmoadaptation in methanoarchaea, promoting biogas production or reducing future methane emission in response to global warming and climate change. PMID:27357474

  8. PAPE (Prefractionation-Assisted Phosphoprotein Enrichment): A Novel Approach for Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Green Tissues from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lassowskat, Ines; Naumann, Kai; Lee, Justin; Scheel, Dierk

    2013-01-01

    Phosphorylation is an important post-translational protein modification with regulatory roles in diverse cellular signaling pathways. Despite recent advances in mass spectrometry, the detection of phosphoproteins involved in signaling is still challenging, as protein phosphorylation is typically transient and/or occurs at low levels. In green plant tissues, the presence of highly abundant proteins, such as the subunits of the RuBisCO complex, further complicates phosphoprotein analysis. Here, we describe a simple, but powerful, method, which we named prefractionation-assisted phosphoprotein enrichment (PAPE), to increase the yield of phosphoproteins from Arabidopsis thaliana leaf material. The first step, a prefractionation via ammonium sulfate precipitation, not only depleted RuBisCO almost completely, but, serendipitously, also served as an efficient phosphoprotein enrichment step. When coupled with a subsequent metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) step, the phosphoprotein content was highly enriched. The reproducibility and efficiency of phosphoprotein enrichment was verified by phospho-specific staining and, further, by mass spectrometry, where it could be shown that the final PAPE fraction contained a significant number of known and additionally novel (potential) phosphoproteins. Hence, this facile two-step procedure is a good prerequisite to probe the phosphoproteome and gain deeper insight into plant phosphorylation-based signaling events. PMID:28250405

  9. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of renal cortex in a salt-load rat model of advanced kidney damage

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shaoling; He, Hanchang; Tan, Lishan; Wang, Liangliang; Su, Zhengxiu; Liu, Yufeng; Zhu, Hongguo; Zhang, Menghuan; Hou, Fan Fan; Li, Aiqing

    2016-01-01

    Salt plays an essential role in the progression of chronic kidney disease and hypertension. However, the mechanisms underlying pathogenesis of salt-induced kidney damage remain largely unknown. Here, Sprague-Dawley rats, that underwent 5/6 nephrectomy (5/6Nx, a model of advanced kidney damage) or sham operation, were treated for 2 weeks with a normal or high-salt diet. We employed aTiO2 enrichment, iTRAQ labeling and liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry strategy for proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling of the renal cortex. We found 318 proteins differentially expressed in 5/6Nx group relative to sham group, and 310 proteins significantly changed in response to salt load in 5/6Nx animals. Totally, 1810 unique phosphopeptides corresponding to 550 phosphoproteins were identified. We identified 113 upregulated and 84 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx animals relative to sham animals. Salt load induced 78 upregulated and 91 downregulated phosphopeptides in 5/6Nx rats. The differentially expressed phospholproteins are important transporters, structural molecules, and receptors. Protein-protein interaction analysis revealed that the differentially phosphorylated proteins in 5/6Nx group, Polr2a, Srrm1, Gsta2 and Pxn were the most linked. Salt-induced differential phosphoproteins, Myh6, Lmna and Des were the most linked. Altered phosphorylation levels of lamin A and phospholamban were validated. This study will provide new insight into pathogenetic mechanisms of chronic kidney disease and salt sensitivity. PMID:27775022

  10. Nuclear phosphoproteome analysis of 3T3-L1 preadipocyte differentiation reveals system-wide phosphorylation of transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Rabiee, Atefeh; Schwämmle, Veit; Sidoli, Simone; Dai, Jie; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina; Mandrup, Susanne; Jensen, Ole N

    2017-03-01

    Adipocytes (fat cells) are important endocrine and metabolic cells critical for systemic insulin sensitivity. Both adipose excess and insufficiency are associated with adverse metabolic function. Adipogenesis is the process whereby preadipocyte precursor cells differentiate into lipid-laden mature adipocytes. This process is driven by a network of transcriptional regulators (TRs). We hypothesized that protein PTMs, in particular phosphorylation, play a major role in activating and propagating signals within TR networks upon induction of adipogenesis by extracellular stimulus. We applied MS-based quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics to monitor the alteration of nuclear proteins during the early stages (4 h) of preadipocyte differentiation. We identified a total of 4072 proteins including 2434 phosphorylated proteins, a majority of which were assigned as regulators of gene expression. Our results demonstrate that adipogenic stimuli increase the nuclear abundance and/or the phosphorylation levels of proteins involved in gene expression, cell organization, and oxidation-reduction pathways. Furthermore, proteins acting as negative modulators involved in negative regulation of gene expression, insulin stimulated glucose uptake, and cytoskeletal organization showed a decrease in their nuclear abundance and/or phosphorylation levels during the first 4 h of adipogenesis. Among 288 identified TRs, 49 were regulated within 4 h of adipogenic stimulation including several known and many novel potential adipogenic regulators. We created a kinase-substrate database for 3T3-L1 preadipocytes by investigating the relationship between protein kinases and protein phosphorylation sites identified in our dataset. A majority of the putative protein kinases belong to the cyclin-dependent kinase family and the mitogen-activated protein kinase family including P38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinases, suggesting that these kinases act as orchestrators of early adipogenesis.

  11. Databases for plant phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Waltraud X; Yao, Qiuming; Xu, Dong

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation is the most studied posttranslational modification involved in signal transduction in stress responses, development, and growth. In the recent years large-scale phosphoproteomic studies were carried out using various model plants and several growth and stress conditions. Here we present an overview of online resources for plant phosphoproteomic databases: PhosPhAt as a resource for Arabidopsis phosphoproteins, P3DB as a resource expanding to crop plants, and Medicago PhosphoProtein Database as a resource for the model plant Medicago trunculata.

  12. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis reveals the response and defense mechanism in leaves of diploid wheat T. monococcum under salt stress and recovery.

    PubMed

    Lv, Dong-Wen; Zhu, Geng-Rui; Zhu, Dong; Bian, Yan-Wei; Liang, Xiao-Na; Cheng, Zhi-Wei; Deng, Xiong; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-06-30

    Salinity is a major abiotic stress factor affecting crops production and productivity. Triticum monococcum is closely related to Triticum urartu (A(U)A(U)), which is used as a model plant of wheat A genome study. Here, salt stress induced dynamic proteome and phosphoproteome profiling was focused. The T. monococcum seedlings were initially treated with different concentrations of NaCl ranging from 80 to 320mM for 48h followed by a recovery process for 48h prior to proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis. As a result, a total of 81 spots corresponding to salt stress and recovery were identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS from 2-DE gels. These proteins were mainly involved in regulatory, stress defense, protein folding/assembly/degradation, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production and transportation, protein metabolism, and cell structure. Pro-Q Diamond staining was used to detect the phosphoproteins. Finally, 20 spots with different phosphorylation levels during salt treatment or recovery compared with controls were identified. A set of potential salt stress response and defense biomarkers was identified, such as cp31BHv, betaine-aldehyde dehydrogenase, leucine aminopeptidase 2, Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, and 2-Cys peroxiredoxin BAS1, which could lead to a better understanding of the molecular basis of salt response and defense in food crops. Soil salinity reduces the yield of the major crops, which is one of the severest problems in irrigated agriculture worldwide. However, how crops response and defense during different levels of salt treatment and recovery processes is still unclear, especially at the post-translational modification level. T. monococcum is a useful model for common wheat. Thus, proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of T. monococcum leaves were performed in our study, which provided novel insights into the underlying salt response and defense mechanisms in wheat and other crops. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Technical phosphoproteomic and bioinformatic tools useful in cancer research

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is one of the most important forms of cellular regulation. Thus, phosphoproteomic analysis of protein phosphorylation in cells is a powerful tool to evaluate cell functional status. The importance of protein kinase-regulated signal transduction pathways in human cancer has led to the development of drugs that inhibit protein kinases at the apex or intermediary levels of these pathways. Phosphoproteomic analysis of these signalling pathways will provide important insights for operation and connectivity of these pathways to facilitate identification of the best targets for cancer therapies. Enrichment of phosphorylated proteins or peptides from tissue or bodily fluid samples is required. The application of technologies such as phosphoenrichments, mass spectrometry (MS) coupled to bioinformatics tools is crucial for the identification and quantification of protein phosphorylation sites for advancing in such relevant clinical research. A combination of different phosphopeptide enrichments, quantitative techniques and bioinformatic tools is necessary to achieve good phospho-regulation data and good structural analysis of protein studies. The current and most useful proteomics and bioinformatics techniques will be explained with research examples. Our aim in this article is to be helpful for cancer research via detailing proteomics and bioinformatic tools. PMID:21967744

  14. Mass spectrometric phosphoproteome analysis of HIV-infected brain reveals novel phosphorylation sites and differential phosphorylation patterns

    PubMed Central

    Uzasci, Lerna; Auh, Sungyoung; Cotter, Robert J.; Nath, Avindra

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To map the phosphoproteome and identify changes in the phosphorylation patterns in the HIV-infected and uninfected brain using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Experimental Design Parietal cortex from brain of individuals with and without HIV infection were lysed and trypsinized. The peptides were labeled with iTRAQ reagents, combined, phospho-enriched by titanium dioxide chromatography, and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with high-resolution. Results Our phosphoproteomic workflow resulted in the identification of 112 phosphorylated proteins and 17 novel phosphorylation sites in all the samples that were analyzed. The phosphopeptide sequences were searched for kinase substrate motifs which revealed potential kinases involved in important signaling pathways. The site-specific phosphopeptide quantification showed that peptides from neurofilament medium polypeptide, myelin basic protein, and 2′–3′-cyclic nucleotide-3′ phosphodiesterase have relatively higher phosphorylation levels during HIV infection. Clinical Relevance This study has enriched the global phosphoproteome knowledge of the human brain by detecting novel phosphorylation sites on neuronal proteins and identifying differentially phosphorylated brain proteins during HIV infection. Kinases that lead to unusual phosphorylations could be therapeutic targets for the treatment of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). PMID:26033855

  15. Multivariate Quantitative Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Capezza, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Technique of multivariate quantitative chemical analysis devised for use in determining relative proportions of two components mixed and sprayed together onto object to form thermally insulating foam. Potentially adaptable to other materials, especially in process-monitoring applications in which necessary to know and control critical properties of products via quantitative chemical analyses of products. In addition to chemical composition, also used to determine such physical properties as densities and strengths.

  16. Increasing phosphoproteomic coverage through sequential digestion by complementary proteases

    PubMed Central

    Gilmore, Jason M.; Kettenbach, Arminja N.; Gerber, Scott A.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a reversible post-translational modification known to regulate protein function, subcellular localization, complex formation, and protein degradation. Detailed phosphoproteomic information is critical to kinomic studies of signal transduction and for elucidation of cancer biomarkers, such as in non-small cell lung adenocarcinoma, where phosphorylation is commonly dysregulated. However, the collection and analysis of phosphorylation data remains a difficult problem. The low concentrations of phosphopeptides in complex biological mixtures as well as challenges inherent in their chemical nature have limited phosphoproteomic characterization and some phosphorylation sites are inaccessible by traditional workflows. We developed a sequential digestion method using complementary proteases, Glu-C and trypsin, to increase phosphoproteomic coverage and supplement traditional approaches. The sequential digestion method is more productive than workflows utilizing only Glu-C and we evaluated the orthogonality of the sequential digestion method relative to replicate trypsin-based analyses. Finally, we demonstrate the ability of the sequential digestion method to access new regions of the phosphoproteome by comparison to existing public phosphoproteomic databases. Our approach increases coverage of the human lung cancer phosphoproteome by accessing both new phosphoproteins and novel phosphorylation site information. PMID:22002561

  17. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  18. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  19. TiSH--a robust and sensitive global phosphoproteomics strategy employing a combination of TiO2, SIMAC, and HILIC.

    PubMed

    Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Birck, Pernille; Størling, Joachim; Pociot, Flemming; Mandrup-Poulsen, Thomas; Larsen, Martin R

    2012-10-22

    Large scale quantitative phosphoproteomics depends upon multidimensional strategies for peptide fractionation, phosphopeptide enrichment, and mass spectrometric analysis. Previously, most robust comprehensive large-scale phosphoproteomics strategies have relied on milligram amounts of protein. We have set up a multi-dimensional phosphoproteomics strategy combining a number of well-established enrichment and fraction methods: An initial TiO(2) phosphopeptide pre-enrichment step is followed by post-fractionation using sequential elution from IMAC (SIMAC) to separate multi- and mono-phosphorylated peptides, and hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) of the mono-phosphorylated peptides (collectively abbreviated "TiSH"). The advantages of the strategy include a high specificity and sample preparation workload reduction due to the TiO(2) pre-enrichment step, as well as low adsorptive losses. We demonstrate the capability of this strategy by quantitative investigation of early interferon-γ signaling in low quantities of insulinoma cells. We identified ~6600 unique phosphopeptides from 300 μg of peptides/condition (22 unique phosphopeptides/μg) in a duplex dimethyl labeling experiment, with an enrichment specificity>94%. When doing network analysis of putative phosphorylation changes it could be noted that the identified protein interaction network centered upon proteins known to be affected by the interferon-γ pathway, thereby supporting the utility of this global phosphoproteomics strategy. This strategy thus shows great potential for interrogating signaling networks from low amounts of sample with high sensitivity and specificity.

  20. Nuclear phosphoproteomics analysis reveals that CDK1/2 are involved in EGF-regulated constitutive pre-mRNA splicing in MDA-MB-468 cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianwei; Guo, Dan; Zhu, Yinghui; Xian, Feng; Liu, Siqi; Wu, Lin; Lou, Xiaomin

    2016-06-01

    The epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor (EGFR) pathway is one of the most dysregulated and extensively investigated signaling pathways in human cancers and plays important roles in the regulation of nuclear functions through both cytoplasmic and nuclear EGFR pathways. However, the current understanding of the nuclear phosphorylation responses to activated EGFR pathways remains limited. In the present study, phosphoproteomics analysis revealed the increased phosphorylation of 90 nuclear proteins, primarily involved in RNA processing, pre-mRNA splicing and cell cycle regulation, upon EGF stimulation in MDA-MB-468 cells. Cellular splicing assays of the β-globin (HBB) minigene confirmed that EGF induced constitutive pre-mRNA splicing. Further analysis of phosphoproteomics data identified multiple CDK1/2 substrates in pre-mRNA splicing-related proteins, and both CDK1/2 inhibitors and CDK1/2 knockdowns reduced EGF-regulated pre-mRNA splicing. In conclusion, the results of the present study provide evidence that CDK1/2 participate in the regulation of constitutive pre-mRNA splicing by EGF stimulation in MDA-MB-468 cells. In this study, we successfully carried out a survey of nuclear phosphorylation changes in response to EGF stimulation. The results from the functional category analysis and pre-mRNA splicing assay strongly indicated that EGFR activation increased constitutive pre-mRNA splicing in MDA-MB-468 cells, revealing additional role of EGFR on regulation of mRNA maturation beyond alternative pre-mRNA splicing reported by previous studies. Furthermore, we found that CDK1/2 participated in constitutive pre-mRNA splicing regulation by EGF in MDA-MB-468 cells. Our study provides new knowledge for understanding the regulation of constitutive pre-mRNA splicing by EGF stimulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. TSLP Signaling Network Revealed by SILAC-Based Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chaerkady, Raghothama; Wu, Xinyan; Huang, Tai-Chung; Getnet, Derese; Mitchell, Christopher J.; Palapetta, Shyam M.; Sharma, Jyoti; O'Meally, Robert N.; Cole, Robert N.; Yoda, Akinori; Moritz, Albrecht; Loriaux, Marc M.; Rush, John; Weinstock, David M.; Tyner, Jeffrey W.; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2012-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) is a cytokine that plays diverse roles in the regulation of immune responses. TSLP requires a heterodimeric receptor complex consisting of IL-7 receptor α subunit and its unique TSLP receptor (gene symbol CRLF2) to transmit signals in cells. Abnormal TSLP signaling (e.g. overexpression of TSLP or its unique receptor TSLPR) contributes to the development of a number of diseases including asthma and leukemia. However, a detailed understanding of the signaling pathways activated by TSLP remains elusive. In this study, we performed a global quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling network using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture. By employing titanium dioxide in addition to antiphosphotyrosine antibodies as enrichment methods, we identified 4164 phosphopeptides on 1670 phosphoproteins. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture-based quantitation, we determined that the phosphorylation status of 226 proteins was modulated by TSLP stimulation. Our analysis identified activation of several members of the Src and Tec families of kinases including Btk, Lyn, and Tec by TSLP for the first time. In addition, we report TSLP-induced phosphorylation of protein phosphatases such as Ptpn6 (SHP-1) and Ptpn11 (Shp2), which has also not been reported previously. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that Shp2 binds to the adapter protein Gab2 in a TSLP-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of an inducible protein complex in TSLP signaling. A kinase inhibitor screen revealed that pharmacological inhibition of PI-3 kinase, Jak family kinases, Src family kinases or Btk suppressed TSLP-dependent cellular proliferation making them candidate therapeutic targets in diseases resulting from aberrant TSLP signaling. Our study is the first phosphoproteomic analysis of the TSLP signaling pathway that greatly expands our understanding of TSLP signaling and provides novel therapeutic targets

  2. Global Proteome and Phospho-proteome Analysis of Merlin-deficient Meningioma and Schwannoma Identifies PDLIM2 as a Novel Therapeutic Target.

    PubMed

    Bassiri, Kayleigh; Ferluga, Sara; Sharma, Vikram; Syed, Nelofer; Adams, Claire L; Lasonder, Edwin; Hanemann, C Oliver

    2017-02-01

    Loss or mutation of the tumour suppressor Merlin predisposes individuals to develop multiple nervous system tumours, including schwannomas and meningiomas, sporadically or as part of the autosomal dominant inherited condition Neurofibromatosis 2 (NF2). These tumours display largely low grade features but their presence can lead to significant morbidity. Surgery and radiotherapy remain the only treatment options despite years of research, therefore an effective therapeutic is required. Unbiased omics studies have become pivotal in the identification of differentially expressed genes and proteins that may act as drug targets or biomarkers. Here we analysed the proteome and phospho-proteome of these genetically defined tumours using primary human tumour cells to identify upregulated/activated proteins and/or pathways. We identified over 2000 proteins in comparative experiments between Merlin-deficient schwannoma and meningioma compared to human Schwann and meningeal cells respectively. Using functional enrichment analysis we highlighted several dysregulated pathways and Gene Ontology terms. We identified several proteins and phospho-proteins that are more highly expressed in tumours compared to controls. Among proteins jointly dysregulated in both tumours we focused in particular on PDZ and LIM domain protein 2 (PDLIM2) and validated its overexpression in several tumour samples, while not detecting it in normal cells. We showed that shRNA mediated knockdown of PDLIM2 in both primary meningioma and schwannoma leads to significant reductions in cellular proliferation. To our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive assessment of the NF2-related meningioma and schwannoma proteome and phospho-proteome. Taken together, our data highlight several commonly deregulated factors, and indicate that PDLIM2 may represent a novel, common target for meningioma and schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Characterization of the Phosphoproteome in SLE Patients

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianrong; Dai, Yong

    2012-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a complex regulatory event that is involved in the signaling networks that affect virtually every cellular process. The protein phosphorylation may be a novel source for discovering biomarkers and drug targets. However, a systematic analysis of the phosphoproteome in patients with SLE has not been performed. To clarify the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we compared phosphoprotein expression in PBMCs from SLE patients and normal subjects using proteomics analyses. Phosphopeptides were enriched using TiO2 from PBMCs isolated from 15 SLE patients and 15 healthy subjects and then analyzed by automated LC-MS/MS analysis. Phosphorylation sites were identified and quantitated by MASCOT and MaxQuant. A total of 1035 phosphorylation sites corresponding to 618 NCBI-annotated genes were identified in SLE patients compared with normal subjects. Differentially expressed proteins, peptides and phosphorylation sites were then subjected to bioinformatics analyses. Gene ontology(GO) and pathway analyses showed that nucleic acid metabolism, cellular component organization, transport and multicellular organismal development pathways made up the largest proportions of the differentially expressed genes. Pathway analyses showed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway and actin cytoskeleton regulators made up the largest proportions of the metabolic pathways. Network analysis showed that rous sarcoma oncogene (SRC), v-rel reticuloendotheliosis viral oncogene homolog A (RELA), histone deacetylase (HDA1C) and protein kinase C, delta (PRKCD) play important roles in the stability of the network. These data suggest that aberrant protein phosphorylation may contribute to SLE pathogenesis. PMID:23285258

  4. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  5. Comparative genetic, proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of C. elegans embryos with a focus on ham-1/STOX and pig-1/MELK in dopaminergic neuron development.

    PubMed

    Offenburger, Sarah-Lena; Bensaddek, Dalila; Murillo, Alejandro Brenes; Lamond, Angus I; Gartner, Anton

    2017-06-28

    Asymmetric cell divisions are required for cellular diversity and defects can lead to altered daughter cell fates and numbers. In a genetic screen for C. elegans mutants with defects in dopaminergic head neuron specification or differentiation, we isolated a new allele of the transcription factor HAM-1 [HSN (Hermaphrodite-Specific Neurons) Abnormal Migration]. Loss of both HAM-1 and its target, the kinase PIG-1 [PAR-1(I)-like Gene], leads to abnormal dopaminergic head neuron numbers. We identified discrete genetic relationships between ham-1, pig-1 and apoptosis pathway genes in dopaminergic head neurons. We used an unbiased, quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics approach to characterise direct and indirect protein targets and pathways that mediate the effects of PIG-1 kinase loss in C. elegans embryos. Proteins showing changes in either abundance, or phosphorylation levels, between wild-type and pig-1 mutant embryos are predominantly connected with processes including cell cycle, asymmetric cell division, apoptosis and actomyosin-regulation. Several of these proteins play important roles in C. elegans development. Our data provide an in-depth characterisation of the C. elegans wild-type embryo proteome and phosphoproteome and can be explored via the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (EPD) - an open access, searchable online database.

  6. Quantitative phosphoproteomics reveals the role of the AMPK plant ortholog SnRK1 as a metabolic master regulator under energy deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Nukarinen, Ella; Nägele, Thomas; Pedrotti, Lorenzo; Wurzinger, Bernhard; Mair, Andrea; Landgraf, Ramona; Börnke, Frederik; Hanson, Johannes; Teige, Markus; Baena-Gonzalez, Elena; Dröge-Laser, Wolfgang; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-01-01

    Since years, research on SnRK1, the major cellular energy sensor in plants, has tried to define its role in energy signalling. However, these attempts were notoriously hampered by the lethality of a complete knockout of SnRK1. Therefore, we generated an inducible amiRNA::SnRK1α2 in a snrk1α1 knock out background (snrk1α1/α2) to abolish SnRK1 activity to understand major systemic functions of SnRK1 signalling under energy deprivation triggered by extended night treatment. We analysed the in vivo phosphoproteome, proteome and metabolome and found that activation of SnRK1 is essential for repression of high energy demanding cell processes such as protein synthesis. The most abundant effect was the constitutively high phosphorylation of ribosomal protein S6 (RPS6) in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant. RPS6 is a major target of TOR signalling and its phosphorylation correlates with translation. Further evidence for an antagonistic SnRK1 and TOR crosstalk comparable to the animal system was demonstrated by the in vivo interaction of SnRK1α1 and RAPTOR1B in the cytosol and by phosphorylation of RAPTOR1B by SnRK1α1 in kinase assays. Moreover, changed levels of phosphorylation states of several chloroplastic proteins in the snrk1α1/α2 mutant indicated an unexpected link to regulation of photosynthesis, the main energy source in plants. PMID:27545962

  7. Temporal Dynamics of the Saccharopolyspora erythraea Phosphoproteome*

    PubMed Central

    Licona-Cassani, Cuauhtemoc; Lim, SooA; Marcellin, Esteban; Nielsen, Lars K.

    2014-01-01

    Actinomycetes undergo a dramatic reorganization of metabolic and cellular machinery during a brief period of growth arrest (“metabolic switch”) preceding mycelia differentiation and the onset of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. This study explores the role of phosphorylation in coordinating the metabolic switch in the industrial actinomycete Saccharopolyspora erythraea. A total of 109 phosphopeptides from 88 proteins were detected across a 150-h fermentation using open-profile two-dimensional LC-MS proteomics and TiO2 enrichment. Quantitative analysis of the phosphopeptides and their unphosphorylated cognates was possible for 20 pairs that also displayed constant total protein expression. Enzymes from central carbon metabolism such as putative acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, isocitrate lyase, and 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase changed dramatically in the degree of phosphorylation during the stationary phase, suggesting metabolic rearrangement for the reutilization of substrates and the production of polyketide precursors. In addition, an enzyme involved in cellular response to environmental stress, trypsin-like serine protease (SACE_6340/NC_009142_6216), decreased in phosphorylation during the growth arrest stage. More important, enzymes related to the regulation of protein synthesis underwent rapid phosphorylation changes during this stage. Whereas the degree of phosphorylation of ribonuclease Rne/Rng (SACE_1406/NC_009142_1388) increased during the metabolic switch, that of two ribosomal proteins, S6 (SACE_7351/NC_009142_7233) and S32 (SACE_6101/NC_009142_5981), dramatically decreased during this stage of the fermentation, supporting the hypothesis that ribosome subpopulations differentially regulate translation before and after the metabolic switch. Overall, we show the great potential of phosphoproteomic studies to explain microbial physiology and specifically provide evidence of dynamic protein phosphorylation events across the developmental cycle of

  8. Shotguns in the front line: phosphoproteomics in plants.

    PubMed

    Nakagami, Hirofumi; Sugiyama, Naoyuki; Ishihama, Yasushi; Shirasu, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of 'shotgun proteomics' has paved the way for high-throughput proteome analysis, by which thousands of proteins can be identified simultaneously from complex samples. Although the shotgun approach has the potential to monitor many different post-translational modifications, further technological development is needed to enrich each post-translational 'modificome'. Large-scale in vivo phosphorylation site mapping, so-called shotgun phosphoproteomics, has become feasible in various organisms, including plants, owing to recent technological breakthroughs. Shotgun phosphoproteomics is not a mature technology, but progress has been rapid. In this review, we highlight the scope and limitations of current methods, and some key technological issues in this field.

  9. Comparative muscle proteomics/phosphoproteomics analysis provides new insight for the biosafety evaluation of fat-1 transgenic cattle.

    PubMed

    Xin, Xiangbo; Liu, Xinfeng; Li, Xin; Ding, Xiangbin; Yang, Shuping; Jin, Congfei; Li, Guangpeng; Guo, Hong

    2017-07-14

    The biosafety of fat-1 transgenic cattle has been a focus of our studies since the first fat-1 transgenic cow was born. In this study, we used tandem mass tag labeling, TiO2 enrichment, and nanoscale liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (nanol LC-MS/MS) to compare proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiling analyses of muscle between fat-1 transgenic cows and wild-type cows. A total of 1555 proteins and 900 phosphorylation sites in 159 phosphoproteins were identified in the profiling assessments, but only four differentially expressed proteins and nine differentially expressed phosphopeptides were detected in fat-1 transgenic cows relative to wild-type cows. Bioinformatics analyses showed that all of the identified proteins and phosphoproteins were mainly related to the metabolic processes of three major nutrients: carbohydrates, lipids, and proteins. All of these differentially expressed proteins might take part in DNA recombination, repair, and regulation of the immune system. In conclusion, most of the identified proteins and phosphoproteins exhibited few changes. Our results provide new insights into the biosafety of fat-1 transgenic cattle.

  10. Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, John; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.

    1996-12-01

    Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis is a visual library of techniques used in making volumetric measurements. This 40-minute VHS videotape is designed as a resource for introducing students to proper volumetric methods and procedures. The entire tape, or relevant segments of the tape, can also be used to review procedures used in subsequent experiments that rely on the traditional art of quantitative analysis laboratory practice. The techniques included are: Quantitative transfer of a solid with a weighing spoon Quantitative transfer of a solid with a finger held weighing bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a paper strap held bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a spatula Examples of common quantitative weighing errors Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to beaker to volumetric flask Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to volumetric flask Volumetric transfer pipet A complete acid-base titration Hand technique variations The conventional view of contemporary quantitative chemical measurement tends to focus on instrumental systems, computers, and robotics. In this view, the analyst is relegated to placing standards and samples on a tray. A robotic arm delivers a sample to the analysis center, while a computer controls the analysis conditions and records the results. In spite of this, it is rare to find an analysis process that does not rely on some aspect of more traditional quantitative analysis techniques, such as careful dilution to the mark of a volumetric flask. Figure 2. Transfer of a solid with a spatula. Clearly, errors in a classical step will affect the quality of the final analysis. Because of this, it is still important for students to master the key elements of the traditional art of quantitative chemical analysis laboratory practice. Some aspects of chemical analysis, like careful rinsing to insure quantitative transfer, are often an automated part of an instrumental process that must be understood by the

  11. Multiplex staining of 2-DE gels for an initial phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds and early grown seedlings from a non-orthodox specie: Quercus ilex L. subsp. ballota [Desf.] Samp.

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Rodríguez, M. Cristina; Abril, Nieves; Sánchez-Lucas, Rosa; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V.

    2015-01-01

    As a preliminary step in the phosphoproteome analysis of germinating seeds (0 and 24 h after seed imbibition) and early grown seedlings (216 h after seed imbibition) from a non-orthodox sp. Quercus ilex, a multiplex (SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q DPS) staining of high-resolution 2-DE gels was used. By using this protocol it was possible to detect changes in protein-abundance and/or phosphorylation status. This simple approach could be a good complementary alternative to the enrichment protocols used in the search for phosphoprotein candidates. While 482 spots were visualized with SYPRO-Ruby, 222 were with Pro-Q DPS. Statistically significant differences in spot intensity were observed among samples, these corresponding to 85 SYPRO-Ruby-, 20 Pro-Q-DPS-, and 35 SYPRO-Ruby and Pro-Q-DPS-stained spots. Fifty-five phosphoprotein candidates showing qualitative or quantitative differences between samples were subjected to MALDI-TOF-TOF MS analysis, with 20 of them being identified. Identified proteins belonged to five different functional categories, namely: carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism, defense, protein folding, and oxidation-reduction processes. With the exception of a putative cyclase, the other 19 proteins had at least one orthologous phosphoprotein in Arabidopsis thaliana, Medicago truncatula, N. tabacum, and Glycine max. Out of the 20 identified, seven showed differences in intensity in Pro-Q-DPS but not in SYPRO-Ruby-stained gels, including enzymes of the glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. This bears out that theory the regulation of these enzymes occurs at the post-translational level by phosphorylation with no changes at the transcriptional or translational level. This is different from the mechanism reported in orthodox seeds, in which concomitant changes in abundance and phosphorylation status have been observed for these enzymes. PMID:26322061

  12. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals a Novel Mechanism of CaMKIIα Regulation Inversely Induced by Cocaine Memory Extinction versus Reconsolidation

    PubMed Central

    Rich, Matthew T.; Abbott, Thomas B.; Chung, Lisa; Gulcicek, Erol E.; Stone, Kathryn L.; Colangelo, Christopher M.; Lam, TuKiet T.; Nairn, Angus C.; Taylor, Jane R.

    2016-01-01

    Successful addiction treatment depends on maintaining long-term abstinence, making relapse prevention an essential therapeutic goal. However, exposure to environmental cues associated with drug use often thwarts abstinence efforts by triggering drug using memories that drive craving and relapse. We sought to develop a dual approach for weakening cocaine memories through phosphoproteomic identification of targets regulated in opposite directions by memory extinction compared with reconsolidation in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been trained to self-administer cocaine paired with an audiovisual cue. We discovered a novel, inversely regulated, memory-dependent phosphorylation event on calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα) at serine (S)331. Correspondingly, extinction-associated S331 phosphorylation inhibited CaMKIIα activity. Intra-basolateral amygdala inhibition of CaMKII promoted memory extinction and disrupted reconsolidation, leading to a reduction in subsequent cue-induced reinstatement. CaMKII inhibition had no effect if the memory was neither retrieved nor extinguished. Therefore, inhibition of CaMKII represents a novel mechanism for memory-based addiction treatment that leverages both extinction enhancement and reconsolidation disruption to reduce relapse-like behavior. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Preventing relapse to drug use is an important goal for the successful treatment of addictive disorders. Relapse-prevention therapies attempt to interfere with drug-associated memories, but are often hindered by unintentional memory strengthening. In this study, we identify phosphorylation events that are bidirectionally regulated by the reconsolidation versus extinction of a cocaine-associated memory, including a novel site on CaMKIIα. Additionally, using a rodent model of addiction, we show that CaMKII inhibition in the amygdala can reduce relapse-like behavior. Together, our data supports the existence of mechanisms that can be used to enhance

  13. Phosphoproteomic Analysis of KSHV-Infected Cells Reveals Roles of ORF45-Activated RSK during Lytic Replication

    PubMed Central

    Avey, Denis; Tepper, Sarah; Li, Wenwei; Turpin, Zachary; Zhu, Fanxiu

    2015-01-01

    Kaposi’s Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus (KSHV) is an oncogenic virus which has adapted unique mechanisms to modulate the cellular microenvironment of its human host. The pathogenesis of KSHV is intimately linked to its manipulation of cellular signaling pathways, including the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. We have previously shown that KSHV ORF45 contributes to the sustained activation of both ERK and p90 ribosomal S6 kinase (RSK, a major functional mediator of ERK/MAPK signaling) during KSHV lytic replication. ORF45-activated RSK is required for optimal KSHV lytic gene expression and progeny virion production, though the underlying mechanisms downstream of this activation are still unclear. We hypothesized that the activation of RSK by ORF45 causes differential phosphorylation of cellular and viral substrates, affecting biological processes essential for efficient KSHV lytic replication. Accordingly, we observed widespread and significant differences in protein phosphorylation upon induction of lytic replication. Mass-spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic screening identified putative substrates of ORF45-activated RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Bioinformatic analyses revealed that nuclear proteins, including several transcriptional regulators, were overrepresented among these candidates. We validated the ORF45/RSK-dependent phosphorylation of several putative substrates by employing KSHV BAC mutagenesis, kinase inhibitor treatments, and/or CRISPR-mediated knockout of RSK in KSHV-infected cells. Furthermore, we assessed the consequences of knocking out these substrates on ORF45/RSK-dependent regulation of gene expression and KSHV progeny virion production. Finally, we show data to support that ORF45 regulates the translational efficiency of a subset of viral/cellular genes with complex secondary structure in their 5’ UTR. Altogether, these data shed light on the mechanisms by which KSHV ORF45 manipulates

  14. Proteome and phosphoproteome analysis of honeybee (Apis mellifera) venom collected from electrical stimulation and manual extraction of the venom gland

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Honeybee venom is a complicated defensive toxin that has a wide range of pharmacologically active compounds. Some of these compounds are useful for human therapeutics. There are two major forms of honeybee venom used in pharmacological applications: manually (or reservoir disrupting) extracted glandular venom (GV), and venom extracted through the use of electrical stimulation (ESV). A proteome comparison of these two venom forms and an understanding of the phosphorylation status of ESV, are still very limited. Here, the proteomes of GV and ESV were compared using both gel-based and gel-free proteomics approaches and the phosphoproteome of ESV was determined through the use of TiO2 enrichment. Results Of the 43 proteins identified in GV, < 40% were venom toxins, and > 60% of the proteins were non-toxic proteins resulting from contamination by gland tissue damage during extraction and bee death. Of the 17 proteins identified in ESV, 14 proteins (>80%) were venom toxic proteins and most of them were found in higher abundance than in GV. Moreover, two novel proteins (dehydrogenase/reductase SDR family member 11-like and histone H2B.3-like) and three novel phosphorylation sites (icarapin (S43), phospholipase A-2 (T145), and apamin (T23)) were identified. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that venom extracted manually is different from venom extracted using ESV, and these differences may be important in their use as pharmacological agents. ESV may be more efficient than GV as a potential pharmacological source because of its higher venom protein content, production efficiency, and without the need to kill honeybee. The three newly identified phosphorylated venom proteins in ESV may elicit a different immune response through the specific recognition of antigenic determinants. The two novel venom proteins extend our proteome coverage of honeybee venom. PMID:24199871

  15. Phosphoproteomic Analysis Reveals a Novel Mechanism of CaMKIIα Regulation Inversely Induced by Cocaine Memory Extinction versus Reconsolidation.

    PubMed

    Rich, Matthew T; Abbott, Thomas B; Chung, Lisa; Gulcicek, Erol E; Stone, Kathryn L; Colangelo, Christopher M; Lam, TuKiet T; Nairn, Angus C; Taylor, Jane R; Torregrossa, Mary M

    2016-07-20

    Successful addiction treatment depends on maintaining long-term abstinence, making relapse prevention an essential therapeutic goal. However, exposure to environmental cues associated with drug use often thwarts abstinence efforts by triggering drug using memories that drive craving and relapse. We sought to develop a dual approach for weakening cocaine memories through phosphoproteomic identification of targets regulated in opposite directions by memory extinction compared with reconsolidation in male Sprague-Dawley rats that had been trained to self-administer cocaine paired with an audiovisual cue. We discovered a novel, inversely regulated, memory-dependent phosphorylation event on calcium-calmodulin-dependent kinase II α (CaMKIIα) at serine (S)331. Correspondingly, extinction-associated S331 phosphorylation inhibited CaMKIIα activity. Intra-basolateral amygdala inhibition of CaMKII promoted memory extinction and disrupted reconsolidation, leading to a reduction in subsequent cue-induced reinstatement. CaMKII inhibition had no effect if the memory was neither retrieved nor extinguished. Therefore, inhibition of CaMKII represents a novel mechanism for memory-based addiction treatment that leverages both extinction enhancement and reconsolidation disruption to reduce relapse-like behavior. Preventing relapse to drug use is an important goal for the successful treatment of addictive disorders. Relapse-prevention therapies attempt to interfere with drug-associated memories, but are often hindered by unintentional memory strengthening. In this study, we identify phosphorylation events that are bidirectionally regulated by the reconsolidation versus extinction of a cocaine-associated memory, including a novel site on CaMKIIα. Additionally, using a rodent model of addiction, we show that CaMKII inhibition in the amygdala can reduce relapse-like behavior. Together, our data supports the existence of mechanisms that can be used to enhance current strategies for

  16. Phosphoproteomics reveals ALK promote cell progress via RAS/JNK pathway in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guofeng; Zhang, Min; Wu, Yeming; Wu, Zhixiang

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests receptor tyrosine kinase ALK as a promising therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. However, clinical trials reveal that a limited proportion of ALK-positive neuroblastoma patients experience clinical benefits from Crizotinib, a clinically approved specific inhibitor of ALK. The precise molecular mechanisms of aberrant ALK activity in neuroblastoma remain elusive, limiting the clinical application of ALK as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. Here, we describe a deep quantitative phosphoproteomic approach in which Crizotinib-treated neuroblastoma cell lines bearing aberrant ALK are used to investigate downstream regulated phosphoproteins. We identified more than 19,500—and quantitatively analyzed approximately 10,000—phosphorylation sites from each cell line, ultimately detecting 450–790 significantly-regulated phosphorylation sites. Multiple layers of bioinformatic analysis of the significantly-regulated phosphoproteins identified RAS/JNK as a downstream signaling pathway of ALK, independent of the ALK variant present. Further experiments demonstrated that ALK/JNK signaling could be inactivated by either ALK- or JNK-specific inhibitors, resulting in cell growth inhibition by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis. Our study broadly defines the phosphoproteome in response to ALK inhibition and provides a resource for further clinical investigation of ALK as therapeutic target for the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:27732954

  17. Quantitative analysis of PET studies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative analysis can be included relatively easily in clinical PET-imaging protocols, but in order to obtain meaningful quantitative results one needs to follow a standardized protocol for image acquisition and data analysis. Important factors to consider are the calibration of the PET scanner, the radiotracer uptake time and the approach for definition of regions of interests. Using such standardized acquisition protocols quantitative parameters of tumor metabolism or receptor status can be derived from tracer kinetic analysis and simplified approaches such as calculation of standardized uptake values (SUVs).

  18. Quantitative analysis in megageomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, L.

    1985-01-01

    Megageomorphology is the study of regional topographic features and their relations to independent geomorphic variables that operate at the regional scale. These independent variables can be classified as either tectonic or climatic in nature. Quantitative megageomorphology stresses the causal relations between plate tectonic factors and landscape features or correlations between climatic factors and geomorphic processes. In addition, the cumulative effects of tectonics and climate on landscape evolution that simultaneously operate in a complex system of energy transfer is of interst. Regional topographic differentiation, say between continents and ocean floors, is largely the result of the different densities and density contrasts within the oceanic and continental lithosphere and their isostatic consequences. Regional tectonic processes that alter these lithospheric characteristics include rifting, collision, subduction, transpression and transtension.

  19. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/).

  20. Phosphoproteomic profiling of mouse primary HSPCs reveals new regulators of HSPC mobilization

    PubMed Central

    Ficarro, Scott B.; Hutchinson, John N.; Csepanyi-Komi, Roland; Nguyen, Phi T.; Wisniewski, Eva; Sullivan, Jessica; Hofmann, Oliver; Ligeti, Erzsebet; Marto, Jarrod A.; Wagers, Amy J.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a central mechanism of signal transduction that both positively and negatively regulates protein function. Large-scale studies of the dynamic phosphorylation states of cell signaling systems have been applied extensively in cell lines and whole tissues to reveal critical regulatory networks, and candidate-based evaluations of phosphorylation in rare cell populations have also been informative. However, application of comprehensive profiling technologies to adult stem cell and progenitor populations has been challenging, due in large part to the scarcity of such cells in adult tissues. Here, we combine multicolor flow cytometry with highly efficient 3-dimensional high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to enable quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis from 200 000 highly purified primary mouse hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). Using this platform, we identify ARHGAP25 as a novel regulator of HSPC mobilization and demonstrate that ARHGAP25 phosphorylation at serine 363 is an important modulator of its function. Our approach provides a robust platform for large-scale phosphoproteomic analyses performed with limited numbers of rare progenitor cells. Data from our study comprises a new resource for understanding the molecular signaling networks that underlie hematopoietic stem cell mobilization. PMID:27365422

  1. Functional phosphoproteomic mass spectrometry-based approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Mass Spectrometry (MS)-based phosphoproteomics tools are crucial for understanding the structure and dynamics of signaling networks. Approaches such as affinity purification followed by MS have also been used to elucidate relevant biological questions in health and disease. The study of proteomes and phosphoproteomes as linked systems, rather than research studies of individual proteins, are necessary to understand the functions of phosphorylated and un-phosphorylated proteins under spatial and temporal conditions. Phosphoproteome studies also facilitate drug target protein identification which may be clinically useful in the near future. Here, we provide an overview of general principles of signaling pathways versus phosphorylation. Likewise, we detail chemical phosphoproteomic tools, including pros and cons with examples where these methods have been applied. In addition, basic clues of electrospray ionization and collision induced dissociation fragmentation are detailed in a simple manner for successful phosphoproteomic clinical studies. PMID:23369623

  2. Improvement of phosphoproteome analyses using FAIMS and decision tree fragmentation. application to the insulin signaling pathway in Drosophila melanogaster S2 cells.

    PubMed

    Bridon, Gaëlle; Bonneil, Eric; Muratore-Schroeder, Tara; Caron-Lizotte, Olivier; Thibault, Pierre

    2012-02-03

    This report examines the analytical benefits of high-field asymmetric waveform ion mobility spectrometry (FAIMS) coupled to liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) for phosphoproteomics analyses. The ability of FAIMS to separate multiply charged peptide ions from chemical interferences confers a unique advantage in phosphoproteomics by enhancing the detection of low abundance phosphopeptides. LC-FAIMS-MS experiments performed on TiO(2)-enriched tryptic digests from Drosophila melanogaster provided a 50% increase in phosphopeptide identification compared to conventional LC-MS analysis. Also, FAIMS can be used to select different population of multiply charged phosphopeptide ions prior to their activation with either collision activated dissociation (CAD) or electron transfer dissociation (ETD). Importantly, FAIMS enabled the resolution of coeluting phosphoisomers of different abundances to facilitate their unambiguous identification using conventional database search engines. The benefits of FAIMS in large-scale phosphoproteomics of D. melanogaster are further investigated using label-free quantitation to identify differentially regulated phosphoproteins in response to insulin stimulation.

  3. Software for quantitative trait analysis.

    PubMed

    Almasy, Laura; Warren, Diane M

    2005-09-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed.

  4. Software for quantitative trait analysis

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed. PMID:16197737

  5. Evaluating Multiplexed Quantitative Phosphopeptide Analysis on a Hybrid Quadrupole Mass Filter/Linear Ion Trap/Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    As a driver for many biological processes, phosphorylation remains an area of intense research interest. Advances in multiplexed quantitation utilizing isobaric tags (e.g., TMT and iTRAQ) have the potential to create a new paradigm in quantitative proteomics. New instrumentation and software are propelling these multiplexed workflows forward, which results in more accurate, sensitive, and reproducible quantitation across tens of thousands of phosphopeptides. This study assesses the performance of multiplexed quantitative phosphoproteomics on the Orbitrap Fusion mass spectrometer. Utilizing a two-phosphoproteome model of precursor ion interference, we assessed the accuracy of phosphopeptide quantitation across a variety of experimental approaches. These methods included the use of synchronous precursor selection (SPS) to enhance TMT reporter ion intensity and accuracy. We found that (i) ratio distortion remained a problem for phosphopeptide analysis in multiplexed quantitative workflows, (ii) ratio distortion can be overcome by the use of an SPS-MS3 scan, (iii) interfering ions generally possessed a different charge state than the target precursor, and (iv) selecting only the phosphate neutral loss peak (single notch) for the MS3 scan still provided accurate ratio measurements. Remarkably, these data suggest that the underlying cause of interference may not be due to coeluting and cofragmented peptides but instead from consistent, low level background fragmentation. Finally, as a proof-of-concept 10-plex experiment, we compared phosphopeptide levels from five murine brains to five livers. In total, the SPS-MS3 method quantified 38 247 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 11 000 phosphorylation sites. With 10 measurements recorded for each phosphopeptide, this equates to more than 628 000 binary comparisons collected in less than 48 h. PMID:25521595

  6. Phosphoproteomics for the masses

    PubMed Central

    Grimsrud, Paul A.; Swaney, Danielle L.; Wenger, Craig D.; Beauchene, Nicole A.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2010-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation serves as a primary mechanism of signal transduction in the cells of biological organisms. Technical advancements over the last several years in mass spectrometry now allow for the large-scale identification and quantitation of in vivo phosphorylation at unprecedented levels. These developments have occurred in the areas of sample preparation, instrumentation, quantitative methodology, and informatics so that today, ten to twenty thousand phosphorylation sites can be identified and quantified within a few weeks. With the rapid development and widespread availability of such data, its translation into biological insight and knowledge is a current obstacle. Here we present an overview of how this technology came to be and is currently applied, as well as future challenges for the field. PMID:20047291

  7. Glucose-regulated and drug-perturbed phosphoproteome reveals molecular mechanisms controlling insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sacco, Francesca; Humphrey, Sean J.; Cox, Jürgen; Mischnik, Marcel; Schulte, Anke; Klabunde, Thomas; Schäfer, Matthias; Mann, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Insulin-secreting beta cells play an essential role in maintaining physiological blood glucose levels, and their dysfunction leads to the development of diabetes. To elucidate the signalling events regulating insulin secretion, we applied a recently developed phosphoproteomics workflow. We quantified the time-resolved phosphoproteome of murine pancreatic cells following their exposure to glucose and in combination with small molecule compounds that promote insulin secretion. The quantitative phosphoproteome of 30,000 sites clustered into three main groups in concordance with the modulation of the three key kinases: PKA, PKC and CK2A. A high-resolution time course revealed key novel regulatory sites, revealing the importance of methyltransferase DNMT3A phosphorylation in the glucose response. Remarkably a significant proportion of these novel regulatory sites is significantly downregulated in diabetic islets. Control of insulin secretion is embedded in an unexpectedly broad and complex range of cellular functions, which are perturbed by drugs in multiple ways. PMID:27841257

  8. Spatial proteomic and phospho-proteomic organization in three prototypical cell migration modes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Tight spatio-temporal signaling of cytoskeletal and adhesion dynamics is required for localized membrane protrusion that drives directed cell migration. Different ensembles of proteins are therefore likely to get recruited and phosphorylated in membrane protrusions in response to specific cues. Results Here, we use an assay that allows to biochemically purify extending protrusions of cells migrating in response to three prototypical receptors: integrins, recepor tyrosine kinases and G-coupled protein receptors. Using quantitative proteomics and phospho-proteomics approaches, we provide evidence for the existence of cue-specific, spatially distinct protein networks in the different cell migration modes. Conclusions The integrated analysis of the large-scale experimental data with protein information from databases allows us to understand some emergent properties of spatial regulation of signaling during cell migration. This provides the cell migration community with a large-scale view of the distribution of proteins and phospho-proteins regulating directed cell migration. PMID:24987309

  9. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y L; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription-translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  10. Phosphoproteome Profiling Reveals Circadian Clock Regulation of Posttranslational Modifications in the Murine Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Cheng-Kang; Xu, Bo; Mehta, Neel; Mayne, Janice; Sun, Warren Y. L.; Cheng, Kai; Ning, Zhibin; Dong, Jing; Zou, Hanfa; Cheng, Hai-Ying Mary; Figeys, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    The circadian clock is an endogenous oscillator that drives daily rhythms in physiology, behavior, and gene expression. The underlying mechanisms of circadian timekeeping are cell-autonomous and involve oscillatory expression of core clock genes that is driven by interconnecting transcription–translation feedback loops (TTFLs). Circadian clock TTFLs are further regulated by posttranslational modifications, in particular, phosphorylation. The hippocampus plays an important role in spatial memory and the conversion of short- to long-term memory. Several studies have reported the presence of a peripheral oscillator in the hippocampus and have highlighted the importance of circadian regulation in memory formation. Given the general importance of phosphorylation in circadian clock regulation, we performed global quantitative proteome and phosphoproteome analyses of the murine hippocampus across the circadian cycle, applying spiked-in labeled reference and high accuracy mass spectrometry (MS). Of the 3,052 proteins and 2,868 phosphosites on 1,368 proteins that were accurately quantified, 1.7% of proteins and 5.2% of phosphorylation events exhibited time-of-day-dependent expression profiles. The majority of circadian phosphopeptides displayed abrupt fluctuations at mid-to-late day without underlying rhythms of protein abundance. Bioinformatic analysis of cyclic phosphorylation events revealed their diverse distribution in different biological pathways, most notably, cytoskeletal organization and neuronal morphogenesis. This study provides the first large-scale, quantitative MS analysis of the circadian phosphoproteome and proteome of the murine hippocampus and highlights the significance of rhythmic regulation at the posttranslational level in this peripheral oscillator. In addition to providing molecular insights into the hippocampal circadian clock, our results will assist in the understanding of genetic factors that underlie rhythms-associated pathological states of

  11. Phosphoproteome Discovery in Human Biological Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating protein function and thus influences a vast spectrum of cellular processes. With the advent of modern bioanalytical technologies, examination of protein phosphorylation on a global scale has become one of the major research areas. Phosphoproteins are found in biological fluids and interrogation of the phosphoproteome in biological fluids presents an exciting opportunity for discoveries that hold great potential for novel mechanistic insights into protein function in health and disease, and for translation to improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical setting. This review focuses on phosphoproteome discovery in selected human biological fluids: serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bioanalytical workflows pertinent to phosphoproteomics of biological fluids are discussed with emphasis on mass spectrometry-based approaches, and summaries of studies on phosphoproteome discovery in major fluids are presented. PMID:28248247

  12. Phosphoproteome Discovery in Human Biological Fluids.

    PubMed

    Giorgianni, Francesco; Beranova-Giorgianni, Sarka

    2016-12-01

    Phosphorylation plays a critical role in regulating protein function and thus influences a vast spectrum of cellular processes. With the advent of modern bioanalytical technologies, examination of protein phosphorylation on a global scale has become one of the major research areas. Phosphoproteins are found in biological fluids and interrogation of the phosphoproteome in biological fluids presents an exciting opportunity for discoveries that hold great potential for novel mechanistic insights into protein function in health and disease, and for translation to improved diagnostic and therapeutic approaches for the clinical setting. This review focuses on phosphoproteome discovery in selected human biological fluids: serum/plasma, urine, cerebrospinal fluid, saliva, and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Bioanalytical workflows pertinent to phosphoproteomics of biological fluids are discussed with emphasis on mass spectrometry-based approaches, and summaries of studies on phosphoproteome discovery in major fluids are presented.

  13. Quantitative analysis of glycated proteins.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Ramírez-Boo, María; Finamore, Francesco; Gluck, Florent; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2014-02-07

    The proposed protocol presents a comprehensive approach for large-scale qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycated proteins (GP) in complex biological samples including biological fluids and cell lysates such as plasma and red blood cells. The method, named glycation isotopic labeling (GIL), is based on the differential labeling of proteins with isotopic [(13)C6]-glucose, which supports quantitation of the resulting glycated peptides after enzymatic digestion with endoproteinase Glu-C. The key principle of the GIL approach is the detection of doublet signals for each glycated peptide in MS precursor scanning (glycated peptide with in vivo [(12)C6]- and in vitro [(13)C6]-glucose). The mass shift of the doublet signals is +6, +3 or +2 Da depending on the peptide charge state and the number of glycation sites. The intensity ratio between doublet signals generates quantitative information of glycated proteins that can be related to the glycemic state of the studied samples. Tandem mass spectrometry with high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD-MS2) and data-dependent methods with collision-induced dissociation (CID-MS3 neutral loss scan) are used for qualitative analysis.

  14. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  15. Battle through Signaling between Wheat and the Fungal Pathogen Septoria tritici Revealed by Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Fen; Melo-Braga, Marcella N.; Larsen, Martin R.; Jørgensen, Hans J. L.; Palmisano, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The fungus Septoria tritici causes the disease septoria tritici blotch in wheat, one of the most economically devastating foliar diseases in this crop. To investigate signaling events and defense responses in the wheat–S. tritici interaction, we performed a time-course study of S. tritici infection in resistant and susceptible wheat using quantitative proteomics and phosphoproteomics, with special emphasis on the initial biotrophic phase of interactions. Our study revealed an accumulation of defense and stress-related proteins, suppression of photosynthesis, and changes in sugar metabolism during compatible and incompatible interactions. However, differential regulation of the phosphorylation status of signaling proteins, transcription and translation regulators, and membrane-associated proteins was observed between two interactions. The proteomic data were correlated with a more rapid or stronger accumulation of signal molecules, including calcium, H2O2, NO, and sugars, in the resistant than in the susceptible cultivar in response to the infection. Additionally, 31 proteins and 5 phosphoproteins from the pathogen were identified, including metabolic proteins and signaling proteins such as GTP-binding proteins, 14–3-3 proteins, and calcium-binding proteins. Quantitative PCR analysis showed the expression of fungal signaling genes and genes encoding a superoxide dismutase and cell-wall degrading enzymes. These results indicate roles of signaling, antioxidative stress mechanisms, and nutrient acquisition in facilitating the initial symptomless growth. Taken in its entirety, our dataset suggests interplay between the plant and S. tritici through complex signaling networks and downstream molecular events. Resistance is likely related to several rapidly and intensively triggered signal transduction cascades resulting in a multiple-level activation of transcription and translation processes of defense responses. Our sensitive approaches and model provide a

  16. Comparative phosphoproteomic analysis of mammalian glomeruli reveals conserved podocin C-terminal phosphorylation as a determinant of slit diaphragm complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Rinschen, Markus M; Pahmeyer, Caroline; Pisitkun, Trairak; Schnell, Nicole; Wu, Xiongwu; Maaß, Martina; Bartram, Malte P; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2015-04-01

    Glomerular biology is dependent on tightly controlled signal transduction networks that control phosphorylation of signaling proteins such as cytoskeletal regulators or slit diaphragm proteins of kidney podocytes. Cross-species comparison of phosphorylation events is a powerful mean to functionally prioritize and identify physiologically meaningful phosphorylation sites. Here, we present the result of phosphoproteomic analyses of cow and rat glomeruli to allow cross-species comparisons. We discovered several phosphorylation sites with potentially high biological relevance, e.g. tyrosine phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal regulator synaptopodin and the slit diaphragm protein neph-1 (Kirrel). Moreover, cross-species comparisons revealed conserved phosphorylation of the slit diaphragm protein nephrin on an acidic cluster at the intracellular terminus and conserved podocin phosphorylation on the very carboxyl terminus of the protein. We studied a highly conserved podocin phosphorylation site in greater detail and show that phosphorylation regulates affinity of the interaction with nephrin and CD2AP. Taken together, these results suggest that species comparisons of phosphoproteomic data may reveal regulatory principles in glomerular biology. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001005 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001005). © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Characterization and phosphoproteomic analysis of a human immortalized podocyte model of Fabry disease generated using CRISPR/Cas9 technology.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ester M; Labilloy, Anatália; Eshbach, Megan L; Roy, Ankita; Subramanya, Arohan R; Monte, Semiramis; Labilloy, Guillaume; Weisz, Ora A

    2016-11-01

    Fabry nephropathy is a major cause of morbidity and premature death in patients with Fabry disease (FD), a rare X-linked lysosomal storage disorder. Gb3, the main substrate of α-galactosidase A (α-Gal A), progressively accumulates within cells in a variety of tissues. Establishment of cell models has been useful as a tool for testing hypotheses of disease pathogenesis. We applied CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing technology to the GLA gene to develop human kidney cell models of FD in human immortalized podocytes, which are the main affected renal cell type. Our podocytes lack detectable α-Gal A activity and have increased levels of Gb3. To explore different pathways that could have distinct patterns of activation under conditions of α-gal A deficiency, we used a high-throughput antibody array to perform phosphorylation profiling of CRISPR/Cas9-edited and control podocytes. Changes in both total protein levels and in phosphorylation status per site were observed. Analysis of our candidate proteins suggests that multiple signaling pathways are impaired in FD. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  18. Reverse-phase phosphoproteome analysis of signaling pathways induced by Rift valley fever virus in human small airway epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Popova, Taissia G; Turell, Michael J; Espina, Virginia; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kidd, Jessica; Narayanan, Aarthi; Liotta, Lance; Petricoin, Emanuel F; Kashanchi, Fatah; Bailey, Charles; Popov, Serguei G

    2010-11-03

    Rift valley fever virus (RVFV) infection is an emerging zoonotic disease endemic in many countries of sub-Saharan Africa and in Egypt. In this study we show that human small airway epithelial cells are highly susceptible to RVFV virulent strain ZH-501 and the attenuated strain MP-12. We used the reverse-phase protein arrays technology to identify phosphoprotein signaling pathways modulated during infection of cultured airway epithelium. ZH-501 infection induced activation of MAP kinases (p38, JNK and ERK) and downstream transcriptional factors [STAT1 (Y701), ATF2 (T69/71), MSK1 (S360) and CREB (S133)]. NF-κB phosphorylation was also increased. Activation of p53 (S15, S46) correlated with the increased levels of cleaved effector caspase-3, -6 and -7, indicating activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. RVFV infection downregulated phosphorylation of a major anti-apoptotic regulator of survival pathways, AKT (S473), along with phosphorylation of FOX 01/03 (T24/31) which controls cell cycle arrest downstream from AKT. Consistent with this, the level of apoptosis inhibitor XIAP was decreased. However, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway marker, caspase-9, demonstrated only a marginal activation accompanied by an increased level of the inhibitor of apoptosome formation, HSP27. Concentration of the autophagy marker, LC3B, which often accompanies the pro-survival signaling, was decreased. Cumulatively, our analysis of RVFV infection in lung epithelium indicated a viral strategy directed toward the control of cell apoptosis through a number of transcriptional factors. Analyses of MP-12 titers in challenged cells in the presence of MAPK inhibitors indicated that activation of p38 represents a protective cell response while ERK activation controls viral replication.

  19. Recent advances in enrichment and separation strategies for mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chenxi; Zhong, Xuefei; Li, Lingjun

    2016-01-01

    Due to the significance of protein phosphorylation in various biological processes and signaling events, new analytical techniques for enhanced phosphoproteomics have been rapidly introduced in recent years. The combinatorial use of the phospho-specific enrichment techniques and prefractionation methods prior to MS analysis enables comprehensive profiling of the phosphoproteome and facilitates deciphering the critical roles that phosphorylation plays in signaling pathways in various biological systems. This review places special emphasis on the recent five-year (2009–2013) advances for enrichment and separation techniques that have been utilized for phosphopeptides prior to MS analysis. PMID:24687451

  20. Kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP) quantifies the contribution of protein kinases to the regulation of cell viability.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Edmund H; Casado, Pedro; Rajeeve, Vinothini; Cutillas, Pedro R

    2017-09-01

    Cell survival is regulated by a signaling network driven by the activity of protein kinases; however, determining the contribution that each kinase in the network makes to such regulation remains challenging. Here, we report a computational approach that uses mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomics data to rank protein kinases based on their contribution to cell regulation. We found that the scores returned by this algorithm, which we have termed kinase activity ranking using phosphoproteomics data (KARP), were a quantitative measure of the contribution that individual kinases make to the signaling output. Application of KARP to the analysis of eight hematological cell lines revealed that cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 1/2, casein kinase (CK) 2, extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK), and p21-activated kinase (PAK) were the most frequently highly ranked kinases in these cell models. The patterns of kinase activation were cell-line specific yet showed a significant association with cell viability as a function of kinase inhibitor treatment. Thus, our study exemplifies KARP as an untargeted approach to empirically and systematically identify regulatory kinases within signaling networks. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Comparative phosphoproteomics of zebrafish Fyn/Yes morpholino knockdown embryos.

    PubMed

    Lemeer, Simone; Jopling, Chris; Gouw, Joost; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R; Slijper, Monique; den Hertog, Jeroen

    2008-11-01

    The coordinated movement of cells is indispensable for normal vertebrate gastrulation. Several important players and signaling pathways have been identified in convergence and extension (CE) cell movements during gastrulation, including non-canonical Wnt signaling. Fyn and Yes, members of the Src family of kinases, are key regulators of CE movements as well. Here we investigated signaling pathways in early development by comparison of the phosphoproteome of wild type zebrafish embryos with Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos that display specific CE cell movement defects. For quantitation we used differential stable isotope labeling by reductive amination of peptides. Equal amounts of labeled peptides from wild type and Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos were mixed and analyzed by on-line reversed phase TiO(2)-reversed phase LC-MS/MS. Phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated peptides were quantified, and significant changes in protein expression and/or phosphorylation were detected. We identified 348 phosphoproteins of which 69 showed a decrease in phosphorylation in Fyn/Yes knockdown embryos and 72 showed an increase in phosphorylation. Among these phosphoproteins were known regulators of cell movements, including Adducin and PDLIM5. Our results indicate that quantitative phosphoproteomics combined with morpholino-mediated knockdowns can be used to identify novel signaling pathways that act in zebrafish development in vivo.

  2. Integrative Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics Profiling Reveals Dynamic Signaling Networks and Bioenergetics Pathways Underlying T Cell Activation.

    PubMed

    Tan, Haiyan; Yang, Kai; Li, Yuxin; Shaw, Timothy I; Wang, Yanyan; Blanco, Daniel Bastardo; Wang, Xusheng; Cho, Ji-Hoon; Wang, Hong; Rankin, Sherri; Guy, Cliff; Peng, Junmin; Chi, Hongbo

    2017-03-21

    The molecular circuits by which antigens activate quiescent T cells remain poorly understood. We combined temporal profiling of the whole proteome and phosphoproteome via multiplexed isobaric labeling proteomics technology, computational pipelines for integrating multi-omics datasets, and functional perturbation to systemically reconstruct regulatory networks underlying T cell activation. T cell receptors activated the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome with discrete kinetics, marked by early dynamics of phosphorylation and delayed ribosome biogenesis and mitochondrial activation. Systems biology analyses identified multiple functional modules, active kinases, transcription factors and connectivity between them, and mitochondrial pathways including mitoribosomes and complex IV. Genetic perturbation revealed physiological roles for mitochondrial enzyme COX10-mediated oxidative phosphorylation in T cell quiescence exit. Our multi-layer proteomics profiling, integrative network analysis, and functional studies define landscapes of the T cell proteome and phosphoproteome and reveal signaling and bioenergetics pathways that mediate lymphocyte exit from quiescence.

  3. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  4. Machine learning of global phosphoproteomic profiles enables discrimination of direct versus indirect kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Kanshin, Evgeny; Giguere, Sebastien; Cheng, Jing; Tyers, Michael D; Thibault, Pierre

    2017-03-06

    Mass spectrometry allows quantification of tens of thousands of phosphorylation sites from minute amounts of cellular material. Despite this wealth of information, our understanding of phosphorylation-based signaling is limited, in part because it is not possible to deconvolute substrate phosphorylation that is directly mediated by a particular kinase versus phosphorylation that is mediated by downstream kinases. Here, we describe a framework for assignment of direct in-vivo kinase substrates using a combination of selective chemical inhibition, quantitative phosphoproteomics, and machine learning techniques. Our workflow allows classification of phosphorylation events following inhibition of an analog-sensitive kinase into kinase-independent effects of the inhibitor, direct effects on cognate substrates and indirect effects mediated by downstream kinases or phosphatases. We applied this method to identify many direct targets of Cdc28 and Snf1 kinases in the budding yeast S. cerevisiae. Global phosphoproteome analysis of acute time-series demonstrated that dephosphorylation of direct kinase substrates occurs more rapidly compared to indirect substrates, both after inhibitor treatment and under a physiological nutrient shift in wild-type cells. Mutagenesis experiments revealed a high proportion of functionally relevant phosphorylation sites on Snf1 targets. For example, Snf1 itself was inhibited through autophosphorylation on S391 and new phosphosites were discovered that modulate the activity of the Reg1 regulatory subunit of the Glc7 phosphatase and the Gal83 β-subunit of SNF1 complex. This methodology applies to any kinase for which a functional analog sensitive version can be constructed to facilitate the dissection of the global phosphorylation network.

  5. Global quantitative analysis of phosphorylation underlying phencyclidine signaling and sensorimotor gating in the prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    McClatchy, Daniel B.; Savas, Jeffrey N.; Martínez-Bartolomé, Salvador; Park, Sung Kyu; Maher, Pamela; Powell, Susan B.; Yates, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is an example of sensorimotor gating and deficits in PPI have been demonstrated in schizophrenia patients. Phencyclidine (PCP) suppression of PPI in animals has been studied to elucidate the pathological elements of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCP treatment or PPI in the brain are still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on the prefrontal cortex from rats that were subjected to PPI after being systemically injected with PCP or saline. PCP down-regulated phosphorylation events were significantly enriched in proteins associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, this dataset identifies functionally novel phosphorylation sites on known LTP-associated signaling molecules. In addition, mutagenesis of a significantly altered phosphorylation site on xCT (SLC7A11), the light chain of system xc-, the cystine/glutamate antiporter, suggests that PCP also regulates the activity of this protein. Finally, new insights were also derived on PPI signaling independent of PCP treatment. This is the first quantitative phosphorylation proteomic analysis providing new molecular insights into sensorimotor gating. PMID:25869802

  6. Global quantitative analysis of phosphorylation underlying phencyclidine signaling and sensorimotor gating in the prefrontal cortex.

    PubMed

    McClatchy, D B; Savas, J N; Martínez-Bartolomé, S; Park, S K; Maher, P; Powell, S B; Yates, J R

    2016-02-01

    Prepulse inhibition (PPI) is an example of sensorimotor gating and deficits in PPI have been demonstrated in schizophrenia patients. Phencyclidine (PCP) suppression of PPI in animals has been studied to elucidate the pathological elements of schizophrenia. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying PCP treatment or PPI in the brain are still poorly understood. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis was performed on the prefrontal cortex from rats that were subjected to PPI after being systemically injected with PCP or saline. PCP downregulated phosphorylation events were significantly enriched in proteins associated with long-term potentiation (LTP). Importantly, this data set identifies functionally novel phosphorylation sites on known LTP-associated signaling molecules. In addition, mutagenesis of a significantly altered phosphorylation site on xCT (SLC7A11), the light chain of system xc-, the cystine/glutamate antiporter, suggests that PCP also regulates the activity of this protein. Finally, new insights were also derived on PPI signaling independent of PCP treatment. This is the first quantitative phosphorylation proteomic analysis providing new molecular insights into sensorimotor gating.

  7. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-05

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses.

  8. Versatile nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics: a review.

    PubMed

    Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Jabeen, Fahmida; Hussain, Dilshad; Saeed, Adeela; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Huck, Christian W; Bonn, Günther K

    2012-10-17

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important post-translational modifications. Phosphorylated peptides are present in low abundance in blood serum but play a vital role in regulatory mechanisms and may serve as casual factors in diseases. The enrichment and analysis of phosphorylated peptides directly from human serum and mapping the phosphorylation sites is a challenging task. Versatile nanocomposites of different materials have been synthesized using simple but efficient methodologies for their enrichment. The nanocomposites include magnetic, coated, embedded as well as chemically derivatized materials. Different base materials such as polymers, carbon based and metal oxides are used. The comparison of nanocomposites with respective nanoparticles provides sufficient facts about their efficiency in terms of loading capacity and capture efficiency. The cost for preparing them is low and they hold great promise to be used as chromatographic materials for phosphopeptide enrichment. This review gives an overview of different nanocomposites in phosphoproteomics, discussing the improved efficiency than the individual counterparts and highlighting their significance in phosphopeptide enrichment.

  9. Phosphoproteomics by mass spectrometry and classical protein chemistry approaches.

    PubMed

    Salih, Erdjan

    2005-01-01

    The general fields of biological sciences have seen phenomenal transformations in the past two decades at the level of data acquisition, understanding biological processes, and technological developments. Those advances have been made partly because of the advent of molecular biology techniques (which led to genomics) coupled to the advances made in mass spectrometry (MS) to provide the current capabilities and developments in proteomics. However, our current knowledge that approximately 30,000 human genes may code for up to 1 million or more proteins disengage the interface between the genome sequence database algorithms and MS to generate a major interest in independent de novo MS/MS sequence determination. Significant progress has been made in this area through procedures to covalently modify peptide N- and C-terminal amino-acids by sulfonation and guanidination to permit rapid de novo sequence determination by MS/MS analysis. A number of strategies that have been developed to perform qualitative and quantitative proteomics range from 2D-gel electrophoresis, affinity tag reagents, and stable-isotope labeling. Those procedures, combined with MS/MS peptide sequence analysis at the subpicomole level, permit the rapid and effective identification and quantification of a large number of proteins within a given biological sample. The identification of proteins per se, however, is not always sufficient to interpret biological function because many of the naturally occurring proteins are post-translationally modified. One such modification is protein phosphorylation, which regulates a large array of cellular biochemical pathways of the biological system. Traditionally, the study of phosphoprotein structure-function relationships involved classical protein chemistry approaches that required protein purification, peptide mapping, and the identification of the phosphorylated peptide regions and sites by N-terminal sequence analysis. Recent advances made in mass

  10. Identifying differentially regulated subnetworks from phosphoproteomic data

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Various high throughput methods are available for detecting regulations at the level of transcription, translation or posttranslation (e.g. phosphorylation). Integrating these data with protein networks should make it possible to identify subnetworks that are significantly regulated. Furthermore, such integration can support identification of regulated entities from often noisy high throughput data. In particular, processing mass spectrometry-based phosphoproteomic data in this manner may expose signal transduction pathways and, in the case of experiments with drug-treated cells, reveal the drug's mode of action. Results Here, we introduce SubExtractor, an algorithm that combines phosphoproteomic data with protein network information from STRING to identify differentially regulated subnetworks and individual proteins. The method is based on a Bayesian probabilistic model combined with a genetic algorithm and rigorous significance testing. The Bayesian model accounts for information about both differential regulation and network topology. The method was tested with artificial data and subsequently applied to a comprehensive phosphoproteomics study investigating the mode of action of sorafenib, a small molecule kinase inhibitor. Conclusions SubExtractor reliably identifies differentially regulated subnetworks from phosphoproteomic data by integrating protein networks. The method can also be applied to gene or protein expression data. PMID:20584295

  11. Phosphoproteome Dynamics Upon Changes in Plant Water Status Reveal Early Events Associated With Rapid Growth Adjustment in Maize Leaves*

    PubMed Central

    Bonhomme, Ludovic; Valot, Benoît; Tardieu, François; Zivy, Michel

    2012-01-01

    Plant growth adjustment during water deficit is a crucial adaptive response. The rapid fine-tuned control achieved at the post-translational level is believed to be of considerable importance for regulating early changes in plant growth reprogramming. Aiming at a better understanding of early responses to contrasting plant water statuses, we carried out a survey of the protein phosphorylation events in the growing zone of maize leaves upon a range of water regimes. In this study, the impact of mild and severe water deficits were evaluated in comparison with constant optimal watering and with recovery periods lasting 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min. Using four biological replicates per treatment and a robust quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology based on stable-isotope labeling, we identified 3664 unique phosphorylation sites on 2496 proteins. The abundance of nearly 1250 phosphorylated peptides was reproducibly quantified and profiled with high confidence among treatments. A total of 138 phosphopeptides displayed highly significant changes according to water regimes and enabled to identify specific patterns of response to changing plant water statuses. Further quantification of protein amounts emphasized that most phosphorylation changes did not reflect protein abundance variation. During water deficit and recovery, extensive changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators directly or indirectly involved in plant growth and development. These included proteins influencing epigenetic control, gene expression, cell cycle-dependent processes and phytohormone-mediated responses. Some of the changes depended on stress intensity whereas others depended on rehydration duration, including rapid recoveries that occurred as early as 5 or 10 mins after rewatering. By combining a physiological approach and a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis, this work provides new insights into the in vivo early phosphorylation events triggered by rapid changes in

  12. Phosphoproteome dynamics upon changes in plant water status reveal early events associated with rapid growth adjustment in maize leaves.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Ludovic; Valot, Benoît; Tardieu, François; Zivy, Michel

    2012-10-01

    Plant growth adjustment during water deficit is a crucial adaptive response. The rapid fine-tuned control achieved at the post-translational level is believed to be of considerable importance for regulating early changes in plant growth reprogramming. Aiming at a better understanding of early responses to contrasting plant water statuses, we carried out a survey of the protein phosphorylation events in the growing zone of maize leaves upon a range of water regimes. In this study, the impact of mild and severe water deficits were evaluated in comparison with constant optimal watering and with recovery periods lasting 5, 10, 20, 30, 45, and 60 min. Using four biological replicates per treatment and a robust quantitative phosphoproteomic methodology based on stable-isotope labeling, we identified 3664 unique phosphorylation sites on 2496 proteins. The abundance of nearly 1250 phosphorylated peptides was reproducibly quantified and profiled with high confidence among treatments. A total of 138 phosphopeptides displayed highly significant changes according to water regimes and enabled to identify specific patterns of response to changing plant water statuses. Further quantification of protein amounts emphasized that most phosphorylation changes did not reflect protein abundance variation. During water deficit and recovery, extensive changes in phosphorylation status occurred in critical regulators directly or indirectly involved in plant growth and development. These included proteins influencing epigenetic control, gene expression, cell cycle-dependent processes and phytohormone-mediated responses. Some of the changes depended on stress intensity whereas others depended on rehydration duration, including rapid recoveries that occurred as early as 5 or 10 mins after rewatering. By combining a physiological approach and a quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis, this work provides new insights into the in vivo early phosphorylation events triggered by rapid changes in

  13. Quantitative analysis of glycoprotein glycans.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The ability to quantitatively determine changes in the N- and O-linked glycans is an essential component of comparative glycomics. Multiple strategies are available to by which this can be accomplished, including; both label free approaches and isotopic labeling strategies. The focus of this chapter is to describe each of these approaches while providing insight into their strengths and weaknesses, so that glycomic investigators can make an educated choice of the strategy that is best suited for their particular application.

  14. Search Databases and Statistics: Pitfalls and Best Practices in Phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Refsgaard, Jan C; Munk, Stephanie; Jensen, Lars J

    2016-01-01

    Advances in mass spectrometric instrumentation in the past 15 years have resulted in an explosion in the raw data yield from typical phosphoproteomics workflows. This poses the challenge of confidently identifying peptide sequences, localizing phosphosites to proteins and quantifying these from the vast amounts of raw data. This task is tackled by computational tools implementing algorithms that match the experimental data to databases, providing the user with lists for downstream analysis. Several platforms for such automated interpretation of mass spectrometric data have been developed, each having strengths and weaknesses that must be considered for the individual needs. These are reviewed in this chapter. Equally critical for generating highly confident output datasets is the application of sound statistical criteria to limit the inclusion of incorrect peptide identifications from database searches. Additionally, careful filtering and use of appropriate statistical tests on the output datasets affects the quality of all downstream analyses and interpretation of the data. Our considerations and general practices on these aspects of phosphoproteomics data processing are presented here.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Face Symmetry.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2015-06-01

    The major objective of this article was to report quantitatively the degree of human face symmetry for reported images taken from the Internet. From the original image of a certain person that appears in the center of each triplet, 2 symmetric combinations were constructed that are based on the left part of the image and its mirror image (left-left) and on the right part of the image and its mirror image (right-right). By applying a computer software that enables to determine length, surface area, and perimeter of any geometric shape, the following measurements were obtained for each triplet: face perimeter and area; distance between the pupils; mouth length; its perimeter and area; nose length and face length, usually below the ears; as well as the area and perimeter of the pupils. Then, for each of the above measurements, the value C, which characterizes the degree of symmetry of the real image with respect to the combinations right-right and left-left, was calculated. C appears on the right-hand side below each image. A high value of C indicates a low symmetry, and as the value is decreasing, the symmetry is increasing. The magnitude on the left relates to the pupils and compares the difference between the area and perimeter of the 2 pupils. The major conclusion arrived at here is that the human face is asymmetric to some degree; the degree of asymmetry is reported quantitatively under each portrait.

  16. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  17. Sensitivity analysis in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zwieterin, M H; van Gerwen, S J

    2000-07-15

    The occurrence of foodborne disease remains a widespread problem in both the developing and the developed world. A systematic and quantitative evaluation of food safety is important to control the risk of foodborne diseases. World-wide, many initiatives are being taken to develop quantitative risk analysis. However, the quantitative evaluation of food safety in all its aspects is very complex, especially since in many cases specific parameter values are not available. Often many variables have large statistical variability while the quantitative effect of various phenomena is unknown. Therefore, sensitivity analysis can be a useful tool to determine the main risk-determining phenomena, as well as the aspects that mainly determine the inaccuracy in the risk estimate. This paper presents three stages of sensitivity analysis. First, deterministic analysis selects the most relevant determinants for risk. Overlooking of exceptional, but relevant cases is prevented by a second, worst-case analysis. This analysis finds relevant process steps in worst-case situations, and shows the relevance of variations of factors for risk. The third, stochastic analysis, studies the effects of variations of factors for the variability of risk estimates. Care must be taken that the assumptions made as well as the results are clearly communicated. Stochastic risk estimates are, like deterministic ones, just as good (or bad) as the available data, and the stochastic analysis must not be used to mask lack of information. Sensitivity analysis is a valuable tool in quantitative risk assessment by determining critical aspects and effects of variations.

  18. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Brassinosteroid-induced Protein Phosphorylation in Rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yuxuan; Qiu, Jiehua; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Juan; Tong, Xiaohong; Lin, Haiyan; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The group of polyhydroxysteroid phytohormones referred to as the brassinosteroids (BRs) is known to act on plant development and the stress response. BR signal transduction relies largely on protein phosphorylation. By employing a label-free, MS (Mass Spectrometry)-based phosphoproteomic approach, we report here the largest profiling of 4,034 phosphosites on 1,900 phosphoproteins from rice young seedlings and their dynamic response to BR. 1,821 proteins, including kinases, transcription factors and core components of BR and other hormone signaling pathways, were found to be differentially phosphorylated during the BR treatment. A Western blot analysis verified the differential phosphorylation of five of these proteins, implying that the MS-based phosphoproteomic data were robust. It is proposed that the dephosphorylation of gibberellin (GA) signaling components could represent an important mechanism for the BR-regulated antagonism to GA, and that BR influences the plant architecture of rice by regulating cellulose synthesis via phosphorylation. PMID:28439285

  19. Phosphoproteomics by Mass Spectrometry: insights, implications, applications, and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Mayya, Viveka; Han, David K.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Phosphorylation of proteins is a predominant reversible post-translational modification. It is central to a wide variety of physiological responses and signaling mechanisms. Recent advances have allowed the global scope of phosphorylation to be addressed by mass spectrometry using phosphoproteomic approaches. In this perspective we discuss four aspects of phosphoproteomics; namely insights and implications from recently published phosphoproteomic studies, and applications and limitations of current phosphoproteomic strategies. As about 50,000 known phosphorylation sites do not yet have any ascribed function, we present our perspectives on a major function of protein phosphorylation that may be of predictive value in hypothesis based investigations. Finally we discuss strategies to measure stoichiometry of phosphorylation in a proteome-wide manner which is not provided by current phosphoproteomic approaches. PMID:19929607

  20. Identification of the PLK2-Dependent Phosphopeptidome by Quantitative Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Franchin, Cinzia; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A.; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Salvi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) has been recently recognized as the major enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of α-synuclein at S129 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this kinase may play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. Moreover PLK2 seems to be implicated in cell division, oncogenesis, and synaptic regulation of the brain. However little is known about the phosphoproteome generated by PLK2 and, consequently the overall impact of PLK2 on cellular signaling. To fill this gap we exploited an approach based on in vitro kinase assay and quantitative phosphoproteomics. A proteome-derived peptide library obtained by digestion of undifferentiated human neuroblastoma cell line was exhaustively dephosphorylated by lambda phosphatase followed by incubation with or without PLK2 recombinant kinase. Stable isotope labeling based quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to identify the phosphosites generated by PLK2. A total of 98 unique PLK2-dependent phosphosites from 89 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the primary structure of the identified phosphosites allowed the detailed definition of the kinase specificity and the compilation of a list of potential PLK2 targets among those retrieved in PhosphositePlus, a curated database of in cell/vivo phosphorylation sites. PMID:25338102

  1. Mechanisms of Soybean Roots' Tolerances to Salinity Revealed by Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Comparisons Between Two Cultivars*

    PubMed Central

    Pi, Erxu; Qu, Liqun; Hu, Jianwen; Huang, Yingying; Qiu, Lijuan; Lu, Hongfei; Jiang, Bo; Liu, Cong; Peng, Tingting; Zhao, Ying; Wang, Huizhong; Tsai, Sau-Na; Ngai, Saiming; Du, Liqun

    2016-01-01

    Understanding molecular mechanisms underlying plant salinity tolerance provides valuable knowledgebase for effective crop improvement through genetic engineering. Current proteomic technologies, which support reliable and high-throughput analyses, have been broadly used for exploring sophisticated molecular networks in plants. In the current study, we compared phosphoproteomic and proteomic changes in roots of different soybean seedlings of a salt-tolerant cultivar (Wenfeng07) and a salt-sensitive cultivar (Union85140) induced by salt stress. The root samples of Wenfeng07 and Union85140 at three-trifoliate stage were collected at 0 h, 0.5 h, 1 h, 4 h, 12 h, 24 h, and 48 h after been treated with 150 mm NaCl. LC-MS/MS based phosphoproteomic analysis of these samples identified a total of 2692 phosphoproteins and 5509 phosphorylation sites. Of these, 2344 phosphoproteins containing 3744 phosphorylation sites were quantitatively analyzed. Our results showed that 1163 phosphorylation sites were differentially phosphorylated in the two compared cultivars. Among them, 10 MYB/MYB transcription factor like proteins were identified with fluctuating phosphorylation modifications at different time points, indicating that their crucial roles in regulating flavonol accumulation might be mediated by phosphorylated modifications. In addition, the protein expression profiles of these two cultivars were compared using LC MS/MS based shotgun proteomic analysis, and expression pattern of all the 89 differentially expressed proteins were independently confirmed by qRT-PCR. Interestingly, the enzymes involved in chalcone metabolic pathway exhibited positive correlations with salt tolerance. We confirmed the functional relevance of chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, and cytochrome P450 monooxygenase genes using soybean composites and Arabidopsis thaliana mutants, and found that their salt tolerance were positively regulated by chalcone synthase, but was negatively regulated by

  2. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  3. Phosphorylation of proteins during human myometrial contractions: A phosphoproteomic approach.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Claire A; López Bernal, Andrés

    2017-01-22

    Phasic myometrial contractility is a key component of human parturition and the contractions are driven by reversible phosphorylation of myosin light chains catalyzed by the calcium (Ca(2+))-dependent enzyme myosin light chain kinase (MYLK). Other yet unknown phosphorylation or de-phosphorylation events may contribute to myometrial contraction and relaxation. In this study we have performed a global phosphoproteomic analysis of human myometrial tissue using tandem mass tagging to detect changes in the phosphorylation status of individual myometrial proteins during spontaneous and oxytocin-driven phasic contractions. We were able to detect 22 individual phosphopeptides whose relative ratio changed (fold > 2 or < 0.5) in response to spontaneous or oxytocin-stimulated contraction. The most significant changes in phosphorylation were to MYLK on serine 1760, a site associated with reductions in calmodulin binding and subsequent kinase activity. Phosphorylated MYLK (ser1760) increased significantly during spontaneous (9.83 ± 3.27 fold, P < 0.05) and oxytocin -induced (18.56 ± 8.18 fold, P < 0.01) contractions and we were able to validate these data using immunoblotting. Pathway analysis suggested additional proteins involved in calcium signalling, cGMP-PRKG signalling, adrenergic signalling and oxytocin signalling were also phosphorylated during contractions. This study demonstrates that a global phosphoproteomic analysis of myometrial tissue is a sensitive approach to detect changes in the phosphorylation of proteins during myometrial contractions, and provides a platform for further validation of these changes and for identification of their functional significance.

  4. Dataset of the Botrytis cinerea phosphoproteome induced by different plant-based elicitors.

    PubMed

    Liñeiro, Eva; Chiva, Cristina; Cantoral, Jesús M; Sabido, Eduard; Fernández-Acero, Francisco Javier

    2016-06-01

    Phosphorylation is one of the main post-translational modification (PTM) involved in signaling network in the ascomycete Botrytis cinerea, one of the most relevant phytopathogenic fungus. The data presented in this article provided a differential mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome of B. cinerea under two different phenotypical conditions induced by the use of two different elicitors: glucose and deproteinized Tomate Cell Walls (TCW). A total 1138 and 733 phosphoproteins were identified for glucose and TCW culture conditions respectively. Raw data are deposited at the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the data set identifier (PRIDE: http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride/archive/projects/PXD003099). Further interpretation and discussion of these data are provided in our research article entitled "Phosphoproteome analysis of B.cinerea in response to different plant-based elicitors" (Liñeiro et al., 2016) [1].

  5. Mobile app-based quantitative scanometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessica X H; Liu, Frank S F; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-16

    The feasibility of using smartphones and other mobile devices as the detection platform for quantitative scanometric assays is demonstrated. The different scanning modes (color, grayscale, black/white) and grayscale converting protocols (average, weighted average/luminosity, and software specific) have been compared in determining the optical darkness ratio (ODR) values, a conventional quantitation measure for scanometric assays. A mobile app was developed to image and analyze scanometric assays, as demonstrated by paper-printed tests and a biotin-streptavidin assay on a plastic substrate. Primarily for ODR analysis, the app has been shown to perform as well as a traditional desktop scanner, augmenting that smartphones (and other mobile devices) promise to be a practical platform for accurate, quantitative chemical analysis and medical diagnostics.

  6. SELPHI: correlation-based identification of kinase-associated networks from global phospho-proteomics data sets

    PubMed Central

    Petsalaki, Evangelia; Helbig, Andreas O.; Gopal, Anjali; Pasculescu, Adrian; Roth, Frederick P.; Pawson, Tony

    2015-01-01

    While phospho-proteomics studies have shed light on the dynamics of cellular signaling, they mainly describe global effects and rarely explore mechanistic details, such as kinase/substrate relationships. Tools and databases, such as NetworKIN and PhosphoSitePlus, provide valuable regulatory details on signaling networks but rely on prior knowledge. They therefore provide limited information on less studied kinases and fewer unexpected relationships given that better studied signaling events can mask condition- or cell-specific ‘network wiring’. SELPHI is a web-based tool providing in-depth analysis of phospho-proteomics data that is intuitive and accessible to non-bioinformatics experts. It uses correlation analysis of phospho-sites to extract kinase/phosphatase and phospho-peptide associations, and highlights the potential flow of signaling in the system under study. We illustrate SELPHI via analysis of phospho-proteomics data acquired in the presence of erlotinib—a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)—in cancer cells expressing TKI-resistant and -sensitive variants of the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor. In this data set, SELPHI revealed information overlooked by the reporting study, including the known role of MET and EPHA2 kinases in conferring resistance to erlotinib in TKI sensitive strains. SELPHI can significantly enhance the analysis of phospho-proteomics data contributing to improved understanding of sample-specific signaling networks. SELPHI is freely available via http://llama.mshri.on.ca/SELPHI. PMID:25948583

  7. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M.; Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I.; Al-Jaroudi, Said S.; Abbas, Nureddin M.

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  8. Seniors' Online Communities: A Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimrod, Galit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the contents and characteristics of seniors' online communities and to explore their potential benefits to older adults. Design and Methods: Quantitative content analysis of a full year's data from 14 leading online communities using a novel computerized system. The overall database included 686,283 messages. Results: There was…

  9. Seniors' Online Communities: A Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimrod, Galit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the contents and characteristics of seniors' online communities and to explore their potential benefits to older adults. Design and Methods: Quantitative content analysis of a full year's data from 14 leading online communities using a novel computerized system. The overall database included 686,283 messages. Results: There was…

  10. Quantitative analysis of arm movement smoothness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczesna, Agnieszka; Błaszczyszyn, Monika

    2017-07-01

    The paper deals with the problem of motion data quantitative smoothness analysis. We investigated values of movement unit, fluidity and jerk for healthy and paralyzed arm of patients with hemiparesis after stroke. Patients were performing drinking task. To validate the approach, movement of 24 patients were captured using optical motion capture system.

  11. A quantitative approach to scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology.

  12. A Quantitative Approach to Scar Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology. PMID:21281794

  13. Phosphoproteomics technologies and applications in plant biology research

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinna; Silva-Sanchez, Cecilia; Zhang, Tong; Chen, Sixue; Li, Haiying

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation has long been recognized as an essential mechanism to regulate many important processes of plant life. However, studies on phosphorylation mediated signaling events in plants are challenged with low stoichiometry and dynamic nature of phosphorylated proteins. Significant advances in mass spectrometry based phosphoproteomics have taken place in recent decade, including phosphoprotein/phosphopeptide enrichment, detection and quantification, and phosphorylation site localization. This review describes a variety of separation and enrichment methods for phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides, the applications of technological innovations in plant phosphoproteomics, and highlights significant achievement of phosphoproteomics in the areas of plant signal transduction, growth and development. PMID:26136758

  14. Method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Gjerde, Douglas T.; Schmuckler, Gabriella

    1981-06-09

    An improved apparatus and method for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single eluent and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  15. Quantitative ADF STEM: acquisition, analysis and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative annular dark-field in the scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF STEM), where image intensities are used to provide composition and thickness measurements, has enjoyed a renaissance during the last decade. Now in a post aberration-correction era many aspects of the technique are being revisited. Here the recent progress and emerging best-practice for such aberration corrected quantitative ADF STEM is discussed including issues relating to proper acquisition of experimental data and its calibration, approaches for data analysis, the utility of such data, its interpretation and limitations.

  16. Quantitative analysis of blood vessel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Michael G.; Abdul-Karim, Othman; Shah, Sujal; Gilbert, Steven G.; Van Bibber, Richard

    2001-07-01

    Re-narrowing or restenosis of a human coronary artery occurs within six months in one third of balloon angioplasty procedures. Accurate and repeatable quantitative analysis of vessel shape is important to characterize the progression and type of restenosis, and to evaluate effects new therapies might have. A combination of complicated geometry and image variability, and the need for high resolution and large image size makes visual/manual analysis slow, difficult, and prone to error. The image processing and analysis described here was developed to automate feature extraction of the lumen, internal elastic lamina, neointima, external elastic lamina, and tunica adventitia and to enable an objective, quantitative definition of blood vessel geometry. The quantitative geometrical analysis enables the measurement of several features including perimeter, area, and other metrics of vessel damage. Automation of feature extraction creates a high throughput capability that enables analysis of serial sections for more accurate measurement of restenosis dimensions. Measurement results are input into a relational database where they can be statistically analyzed compared across studies. As part of the integrated process, results are also imprinted on the images themselves to facilitate auditing of the results. The analysis is fast, repeatable and accurate while allowing the pathologist to control the measurement process.

  17. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  18. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects.

  19. High-energy PIXE: quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, A.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Campbell, J. L.; Maxwell, J. A.; Hopman, T.

    2004-06-01

    In recent years, high-energy PIXE was applied successfully for qualitative analysis on art and archaeological objects, e.g. coins, bronzes, sculptures, brooches. However, in the absence of software for quantitative analysis the full benefit inherent in the PIXE technique was not obtained. For example, a bronze could easily be distinguished from a brass, but the concentrations could not be rigorously compared within a set of bronzes. In this paper, the first quantitative analysis by high-energy PIXE is presented. The Guelph PIXE Software Package GUPIX has been extended to proton energies up to 100 MeV, so that high-energy PIXE spectra can be evaluated and concentrations derived. Measurements on metal and alloy standards at two different proton energies have been performed and the obtained compositions were compared to the certified values. The results will be presented and deviations discussed.

  20. Quantitative analysis of colony morphology in yeast.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Lin, Jake; Scott, Adrian C; Tan, Zhihao; Sorsa, Saija; Kallio, Aleksi; Nykter, Matti; Yli-Harja, Olli; Shmulevich, Ilya; Dudley, Aimée M

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms often form multicellular structures such as biofilms and structured colonies that can influence the organism's virulence, drug resistance, and adherence to medical devices. Phenotypic classification of these structures has traditionally relied on qualitative scoring systems that limit detailed phenotypic comparisons between strains. Automated imaging and quantitative analysis have the potential to improve the speed and accuracy of experiments designed to study the genetic and molecular networks underlying different morphological traits. For this reason, we have developed a platform that uses automated image analysis and pattern recognition to quantify phenotypic signatures of yeast colonies. Our strategy enables quantitative analysis of individual colonies, measured at a single time point or over a series of time-lapse images, as well as the classification of distinct colony shapes based on image-derived features. Phenotypic changes in colony morphology can be expressed as changes in feature space trajectories over time, thereby enabling the visualization and quantitative analysis of morphological development. To facilitate data exploration, results are plotted dynamically through an interactive Yeast Image Analysis web application (YIMAA; http://yimaa.cs.tut.fi) that integrates the raw and processed images across all time points, allowing exploration of the image-based features and principal components associated with morphological development.

  1. The proteome and phosphoproteome of maize pollen uncovers fertility candidate proteins.

    PubMed

    Chao, Qing; Gao, Zhi-Fang; Wang, Yue-Feng; Li, Zhe; Huang, Xia-He; Wang, Ying-Chun; Mei, Ying-Chang; Zhao, Biligen-Gaowa; Li, Liang; Jiang, Yu-Bo; Wang, Bai-Chen

    2016-06-01

    Maize is unique since it is both monoecious and diclinous (separate male and female flowers on the same plant). We investigated the proteome and phosphoproteome of maize pollen containing modified proteins and here we provide a comprehensive pollen proteome and phosphoproteome which contain 100,990 peptides from 6750 proteins and 5292 phosphorylated sites corresponding to 2257 maize phosphoproteins, respectively. Interestingly, among the total 27 overrepresented phosphosite motifs we identified here, 11 were novel motifs, which suggested different modification mechanisms in plants compared to those of animals. Enrichment analysis of pollen phosphoproteins showed that pathways including DNA synthesis/chromatin structure, regulation of RNA transcription, protein modification, cell organization, signal transduction, cell cycle, vesicle transport, transport of ions and metabolisms, which were involved in pollen development, the following germination and pollen tube growth, were regulated by phosphorylation. In this study, we also found 430 kinases and 105 phosphatases in the maize pollen phosphoproteome, among which calcium dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), leucine rich repeat kinase, SNF1 related protein kinases and MAPK family proteins were heavily enriched and further analyzed. From our research, we also uncovered hundreds of male sterility-associated proteins and phosphoproteins that might influence maize productivity and serve as targets for hybrid maize seed production. At last, a putative complex signaling pathway involving CDPKs, MAPKs, ubiquitin ligases and multiple fertility proteins was constructed. Overall, our data provides new insight for further investigation of protein phosphorylation status in mature maize pollen and construction of maize male sterile mutants in the future.

  2. Good practices for quantitative bias analysis.

    PubMed

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; MacLehose, Richard F; Maldonado, George; McCandless, Lawrence C; Greenland, Sander

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative bias analysis serves several objectives in epidemiological research. First, it provides a quantitative estimate of the direction, magnitude and uncertainty arising from systematic errors. Second, the acts of identifying sources of systematic error, writing down models to quantify them, assigning values to the bias parameters and interpreting the results combat the human tendency towards overconfidence in research results, syntheses and critiques and the inferences that rest upon them. Finally, by suggesting aspects that dominate uncertainty in a particular research result or topic area, bias analysis can guide efficient allocation of sparse research resources. The fundamental methods of bias analyses have been known for decades, and there have been calls for more widespread use for nearly as long. There was a time when some believed that bias analyses were rarely undertaken because the methods were not widely known and because automated computing tools were not readily available to implement the methods. These shortcomings have been largely resolved. We must, therefore, contemplate other barriers to implementation. One possibility is that practitioners avoid the analyses because they lack confidence in the practice of bias analysis. The purpose of this paper is therefore to describe what we view as good practices for applying quantitative bias analysis to epidemiological data, directed towards those familiar with the methods. We focus on answering questions often posed to those of us who advocate incorporation of bias analysis methods into teaching and research. These include the following. When is bias analysis practical and productive? How does one select the biases that ought to be addressed? How does one select a method to model biases? How does one assign values to the parameters of a bias model? How does one present and interpret a bias analysis?. We hope that our guide to good practices for conducting and presenting bias analyses will encourage

  3. Quantitative analysis to guide orphan drug development.

    PubMed

    Lesko, L J

    2012-08-01

    The development of orphan drugs for rare diseases has made impressive strides in the past 10 years. There has been a surge in orphan drug designations, but new drug approvals have not kept up. This article presents a three-pronged hierarchical strategy for quantitative analysis of data at the descriptive, mechanistic, and systems levels of the biological system that could represent a standardized and rational approach to orphan drug development. Examples are provided to illustrate the concept.

  4. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  5. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  6. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods—the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics. PMID:24740424

  7. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection.

    PubMed

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods-the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics. © 2014 The Author. Biometrical Journal published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Cross-Species PTM Mapping from Phosphoproteomic Data.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Rima; Yang, Jean Yee Hwa

    2017-01-01

    Protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) are crucial for signal transduction in cells. In order to understand key cell signaling events, identification of functionally important PTMs, which are more likely to be evolutionarily conserved, is necessary. In recent times, high-throughput mass spectrometry (MS) has made quantitative datasets in diverse species readily available, which has led to a growing need for tools to facilitate cross-species comparison of PTM data. Cross-species comparison of PTM sites is difficult since they often lie in structurally disordered protein domains. Current tools that address this can only map known PTMs between species based on previously annotated orthologous phosphosites and do not enable cross-species mapping of newly identified modification sites. Here, we describe an automated web-based tool, PhosphOrtholog, that accurately maps annotated and novel orthologous PTM sites from high-throughput MS-based experimental data obtained from different species without relying on existing PTM databases. Identification of conserved PTMs across species from large-scale experimental data increases our knowledgebase of evolutionarily conserved and functional PTM sites that influence most biological processes. In this Chapter, we illustrate with examples how to use PhosphOrtholog to map novel PTM sites from cross-species MS-based phosphoproteomics data.

  9. Quantitative resilience analysis through control design.

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Camphouse, Russell Chris

    2009-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. Few quantitative resilience methods exist, and those existing approaches tend to be rather simplistic and, hence, not capable of sufficiently assessing all aspects of critical infrastructure resilience. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the development of quantitative resilience through application of control design methods. Specifically, we conducted a survey of infrastructure models to assess what types of control design might be applicable for critical infrastructure resilience assessment. As a result of this survey, we developed a decision process that directs the resilience analyst to the control method that is most likely applicable to the system under consideration. Furthermore, we developed optimal control strategies for two sets of representative infrastructure systems to demonstrate how control methods could be used to assess the resilience of the systems to catastrophic disruptions. We present recommendations for future work to continue the development of quantitative resilience analysis methods.

  10. Identification of the PLK2-dependent phosphopeptidome by quantitative proteomics [corrected].

    PubMed

    Franchin, Cinzia; Cesaro, Luca; Pinna, Lorenzo A; Arrigoni, Giorgio; Salvi, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 2 (PLK2) has been recently recognized as the major enzyme responsible for phosphorylation of α-synuclein at S129 in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that this kinase may play a key role in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease and other synucleinopathies. Moreover PLK2 seems to be implicated in cell division, oncogenesis, and synaptic regulation of the brain. However little is known about the phosphoproteome generated by PLK2 and, consequently the overall impact of PLK2 on cellular signaling. To fill this gap we exploited an approach based on in vitro kinase assay and quantitative phosphoproteomics. A proteome-derived peptide library obtained by digestion of undifferentiated human neuroblastoma cell line was exhaustively dephosphorylated by lambda phosphatase followed by incubation with or without PLK2 recombinant kinase. Stable isotope labeling based quantitative phosphoproteomics was applied to identify the phosphosites generated by PLK2. A total of 98 unique PLK2-dependent phosphosites from 89 proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS. Analysis of the primary structure of the identified phosphosites allowed the detailed definition of the kinase specificity and the compilation of a list of potential PLK2 targets among those retrieved in PhosphositePlus, a curated database of in cell/vivo phosphorylation sites.

  11. Quantitative petrostructure analysis. Technical summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Warren, N.

    1980-09-01

    The establishment of quantitative techniques would lead to the development of predictive tools which would be of obvious importance in applied geophysics and engineering. In rock physics, it would help establish laws for averaging the effects of finite densities of real cracks and pores. It would also help in elucidating the relation between observed complex crack structures and various models for the mechanical properties of single cracks. The petrostructure study is addressed to this problem. The purpose of the effort is to quantitatively characterize the mineral and crack texture of granitic rock samples. The rock structures are to be characterized in such a way that the results can be used (1) to constrain the modelling of the effect of cracks on the physical properties of rocks, and (2) to test the possibility of establishing quantitative and predictive relations between petrographic observables and whole rock properties. Statistical techniques are being developed and being applied to the problem of parameterizing complex texture and crack patterns of rock, and of measuring correlation of these parameters to other measurable variables. The study is an application in factor analysis.

  12. Quantitative textural analysis of phenocryst zoning patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niespolo, E.; Andrews, B. J.

    2011-12-01

    The textural complexity of phenocrysts has made quantitative analysis of large populations of crystals a challenging study. Because each phenocryst expresses a unique localized event in the volcanic interior, no single crystal necessarily records the complete pre-eruptive history of the magmatic system as a whole. Synthesizing the textural and compositional records of many crystals, however, should provide a more complete understanding of conditions prior to eruption. In this research, we present new techniques for quantitative analysis of individual crystals and across populations of crystals. We apply those techniques to back-scattered electron images of complexly zoned plagioclase from El Chichón volcano, Mexico. Analysis begins with Gaussian filtering to remove noise from the images and create more qualitatively distinct zoning patterns. Because pixel intensity is directly correlated with Anorthite content, compositional anisotropy is then calculated throughout each image by determining the distance from a grid point at which variation in pixel intensity exceeds a pre-determined standard deviation; both regular and adaptive grid spacings are used, and length scales are calculated in 8 directions. The resulting textural maps are analogous to a vector field and quantify 2-dimensional variation in texture. With both types of grid spacing, changes in magnitude and orientation of textural anisotropy and length scale indicate different crystal zones. The adaptive grid spacing, however, describes non-uniform textural variation more completely and has a higher measurement density in regions of high-frequency variation. In general, textural regions commonly described as clean or smooth show longer length scales and aligned anisotropies, whereas shorter length scales with variable anisotropies identify areas commonly described as patchy, dusty, or rough. The comparison and correlation of textural and compositional zoning help determine how different crystals record the

  13. Large-Scale Proteomics and Phosphoproteomics of Urinary Exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Patricia A.; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D.; Tchapyjnikov, Dmitry; Star, Robert A.; Kleta, Robert; Wang, Nam Sun; Knepper, Mark A.

    2009-01-01

    Normal human urine contains large numbers of exosomes, which are 40- to 100-nm vesicles that originate as the internal vesicles in multivesicular bodies from every renal epithelial cell type facing the urinary space. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to profile the proteome of human urinary exosomes. Overall, the analysis identified 1132 proteins unambiguously, including 177 that are represented on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database of disease-related genes, suggesting that exosome analysis is a potential approach to discover urinary biomarkers. We extended the proteomic analysis to phosphoproteomic profiling using neutral loss scanning, and this yielded multiple novel phosphorylation sites, including serine-811 in the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl co-transporter, NCC. To demonstrate the potential use of exosome analysis to identify a genetic renal disease, we carried out immunoblotting of exosomes from urine samples of patients with a clinical diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type I, showing an absence of the sodium-potassium-chloride co-transporter 2, NKCC2. The proteomic data are publicly accessible at http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/papers/lkem/exosome/. PMID:19056867

  14. Large-scale proteomics and phosphoproteomics of urinary exosomes.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Patricia A; Pisitkun, Trairak; Hoffert, Jason D; Tchapyjnikov, Dmitry; Star, Robert A; Kleta, Robert; Wang, Nam Sun; Knepper, Mark A

    2009-02-01

    Normal human urine contains large numbers of exosomes, which are 40- to 100-nm vesicles that originate as the internal vesicles in multivesicular bodies from every renal epithelial cell type facing the urinary space. Here, we used LC-MS/MS to profile the proteome of human urinary exosomes. Overall, the analysis identified 1132 proteins unambiguously, including 177 that are represented on the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man database of disease-related genes, suggesting that exosome analysis is a potential approach to discover urinary biomarkers. We extended the proteomic analysis to phosphoproteomic profiling using neutral loss scanning, and this yielded multiple novel phosphorylation sites, including serine-811 in the thiazide-sensitive Na-Cl co-transporter, NCC. To demonstrate the potential use of exosome analysis to identify a genetic renal disease, we carried out immunoblotting of exosomes from urine samples of patients with a clinical diagnosis of Bartter syndrome type I, showing an absence of the sodium-potassium-chloride co-transporter 2, NKCC2. The proteomic data are publicly accessible at http://dir.nhlbi.nih.gov/papers/lkem/exosome/.

  15. Quantitative NIR Raman analysis in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sato-Berrú, R Ysacc; Medina-Valtierra, Jorge; Medina-Gutiérrez, Cirilo; Frausto-Reyes, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    The capability to obtain quantitative information of a simple way from Raman spectra is a subject of considerable interest. In this work, this is demonstrated for mixtures of ethanol with water and rhodamine-6G (R-6G) with methanol, which were analyzed directly in glass vessel. The Raman intensities and a simple mathematical model have been used and applied for the analysis of liquid samples. It is starting point to generate a general expression, from the experimental spectra, as the sum of the particular expression for each pure compound allow us to obtain an expression for the mixtures which can be used for determining concentrations, from the Raman spectrum, of the mixture.

  16. Quantitative analysis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, C R; Blewitt, R W; Bird, C C

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary attempt has been made to characterise a small series of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) by morphometric means using the Quantimet 720 Kontron MOP/AMO3 image analysis systems. In most cases it was found that the distribution of nuclear area and correlation between mean nuclear area and frequency per unit field, corresponded closely with tumour classification determined by light microscopy. These results suggest that it may be possible to devise an objective and reproducible grading system for NHL using quantitative morphometric techniques. PMID:7040479

  17. Quantitative analysis of retinal changes in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giansanti, Roberto; Boemi, Massimo; Fumelli, Paolo; Passerini, Giorgio; Zingaretti, Primo

    1995-05-01

    Arterial hypertension is a high prevalence disease in Western countries and it is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular accidents. Retinal vessel changes are common findings in patients suffering from long-standing hypertensive disease. Morphological evaluations of the fundus oculi represent a fundamental tool for the clinical approach to the patient with hypertension. A qualitative analysis of the retinal lesions is usually performed and this implies severe limitations both in the classification of the different degrees of the pathology and in the follow-up of the disease. A diagnostic system based on a quantitative analysis of the retinal changes could overcome these problems. Our computerized approach was intended for this scope. The paper concentrates on the results and the implications of a computerized approach to the automatic extraction of numerical indexes describing morphological details of the fundus oculi. A previously developed image processing and recognition system, documented elsewhere and briefly described here, was successfully tested in pre-clinical experiments and applied in the evaluation of normal as well as of pathological fundus. The software system was developed to extract indexes such as caliber and path of vessels, local tortuosity of arteries and arterioles, positions and angles of crossings between two vessels. The reliability of the results, justified by their low variability, makes feasible the standardization of quantitative parameters to be used both in the diagnosis and in the prognosis of hypertension, and also allows prospective studies based upon them.

  18. Quantitative architectural analysis of bronchial intraepithelial neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillaud, Martial; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Korbelik, Jagoda; Lam, Stephen

    2000-04-01

    Considerable variation exists among pathologist in the interpretation of intraepithelial neoplasia making it difficult to determine the natural history of these lesion and to establish management guidelines for chemoprevention. The aim of the study is to evaluate architectural features of pre-neoplastic progression in lung cancer, and to search for a correlation between architectural index and conventional pathology. Quantitative architectural analysis was performed on a series of normal lung biopsies and Carcinoma In Situ (CIS). Centers of gravity of the nuclei within a pre-defined region of interest were used as seeds to generate a Voronoi Diagram. About 30 features derived from the Voronoi diagram, its dual the Delaunay tessellation, and the Minimum Spanning Tree were extracted. A discriminant analysis was performed to separate between the two groups. The architectural Index was calculated for each of the bronchial biopsies that were interpreted as hyperplasia, metaplasia, mild, moderate or severe dysplasia by conventional histopathology criteria. As a group, lesions classified as CIS by conventional histopathology criteria could be distinguished from dysplasia using the architectural Index. Metaplasia was distinct from hyperplasia and hyperplasia from normal. There was overlap between severe and moderate dysplasia but mild dysplasia could be distinguished form moderate dysplasia. Bronchial intraepithelial neoplastic lesions can be degraded objectively by architectural features. Combination of architectural features and nuclear morphometric features may improve the quantitation of the changes occurring during the intra-epithelial neoplastic process.

  19. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  20. The method of quantitative automatic metallographic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyushev, N. V.; Skeeba, V. Yu

    2017-01-01

    A brief analysis of the existing softwares for computer processing of microstructure photographs is presented. The descriptions of the the software package developed by the author are demonstrated. This software product is intended for quantitative metallographic analysis of digital photographs of the microstructure of materials. It allows calculating the volume fraction and the average size of particles of the structure by several hundred secants (depending on the photographs resolution) in one vision field. Besides, a special module is built in the software allowing assessing the degree of deviation of the shape of different particles and impurities from the spherical one. The article presents the main algorithms, used during the creation of the software product, and formulae according to which the software calculates the parameters of the microstructure. It is shown that the reliability of calculations depends on the quality of preparation of the microstructure.

  1. Sperm phosphoproteome profiling by ultra performance liquid chromatography followed by data independent analysis (LC-MS(E)) reveals altered proteomic signatures in asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Parte, Priyanka P; Rao, Parimala; Redij, Shweta; Lobo, Vivian; D'Souza, Serena J; Gajbhiye, Rahul; Kulkarni, Vijay

    2012-10-22

    Sperm motility is an important prerequisite for successful fertilization and is regulated by cyclic AMP activated protein kinase A which phosphorylates flagella proteins like axonemal dynein and initiates motility. Increase in calcium influx reverses this process by dephosphorylation that is mediated by calcineurin. Analyzing the phosphoenriched fractions of spermatozoa lysates from eight normozoospermic-, and asthenozoospermic-samples, respectively, by Nano UPLC-MS(E), the present study investigates the phosphoproteins involved in sperm motility in an attempt to identify the key pathways regulating sperm motility and likely to be altered in spermatozoa of asthenozoospermic individuals. 66 phosphoproteins were differentially regulated in asthenozoospermia. The deregulated proteins comprised predominantly the HSPs, cytoskeletal proteins, proteins associated with the fibrous sheath, and those associated with energy metabolism. EM analysis of these spermatozoa demonstrated significant defects in mitochondria, and fibrous sheath and these defects could be correlated with the altered proteome. Pathway analysis revealed that carbohydrate and energy metabolism, cAMP mediated PKA signaling, PI3K/AKT signaling and pathway regulating actin based motility by Rho were significantly altered indicating that motility in spermatozoa is regulated through the concerted effort of these pathways. The data identified signature molecules that have the potential as biomarkers for diagnosing etiology of asthenozoospermia.

  2. Quantitative laryngeal electromyography: turns and amplitude analysis.

    PubMed

    Statham, Melissa McCarty; Rosen, Clark A; Nandedkar, Sanjeev D; Munin, Michael C

    2010-10-01

    Laryngeal electromyography (LEMG) is primarily a qualitative examination, with no standardized approach to interpretation. The objectives of our study were to establish quantitative norms for motor unit recruitment in controls and to compare with interference pattern analysis in patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis (VFP). Retrospective case-control study We performed LEMG of the thyroarytenoid-lateral cricoarytenoid muscle complex (TA-LCA) in 21 controls and 16 patients with unilateral VFP. Our standardized protocol used a concentric needle electrode with subjects performing variable force TA-LCA contraction. To quantify the interference pattern density, we measured turns and mean amplitude per turn for ≥10 epochs (each 500 milliseconds). Logarithmic regression analysis between amplitude and turns was used to calculate slope and intercept. Standard deviation was calculated to further define the confidence interval, enabling generation of a linear-scale graphical "cloud" of activity containing ≥90% of data points for controls and patients. Median age of controls and patients was similar (50.7 vs. 48.5 years). In controls, TA-LCA amplitude with variable contraction ranged from 145-1112 μV, and regression analysis comparing mean amplitude per turn to root-mean-square amplitude demonstrated high correlation (R = 0.82). In controls performing variable contraction, median turns per second was significantly higher compared to patients (450 vs. 290, P = .002). We first present interference pattern analysis in the TA-LCA in healthy adults and patients with unilateral VFP. Our findings indicate that motor unit recruitment can be quantitatively measured within the TA-LCA. Additionally, patients with unilateral VFP had significantly reduced turns when compared with controls.

  3. Phosphoproteome-based kinase activity profiling reveals the critical role of MAP2K2 and PLK1 in neuronal autophagy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lei-Lei; Wang, Yong-Bo; Song, Ju-Xian; Deng, Wan-Kun; Lu, Jia-Hong; Ma, Li-Li; Yang, Chuan-Bin; Li, Min; Xue, Yu

    2017-09-21

    Recent studies have demonstrated that dysregulation of macroautophagy/autophagy may play a central role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders, and the induction of autophagy protects against the toxic insults of aggregate-prone proteins by enhancing their clearance. Thus, autophagy has become a promising therapeutic target against neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, quantitative phosphoproteomic profiling together with a computational analysis was performed to delineate the phosphorylation signaling networks regulated by 2 natural neuroprotective autophagy enhancers, corynoxine (Cory) and corynoxine B (Cory B). To identify key regulators, namely, protein kinases, we developed a novel network-based algorithm of in silico Kinome Activity Profiling (iKAP) to computationally infer potentially important protein kinases from phosphorylation networks. Using this algorithm, we observed that Cory or Cory B potentially regulated several kinases. We predicted and validated that Cory, but not Cory B, downregulated a well-documented autophagy kinase, RPS6KB1/p70S6K (ribosomal protein S6 kinase, polypeptide 1). We also discovered 2 kinases, MAP2K2/MEK2 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 2) and PLK1 (polo-like kinase 1), to be potentially upregulated by Cory, whereas the siRNA-mediated knockdown of Map2k2 and Plk1 significantly inhibited Cory-induced autophagy. Furthermore, Cory promoted the clearance of Alzheimer disease-associated APP (amyloid β [A4] precursor protein) and Parkinson disease-associated SNCA/α-synuclein (synuclein, α) by enhancing autophagy, and these effects were dramatically diminished by the inhibition of the kinase activities of MAP2K2 and PLK1. As a whole, our study not only developed a powerful method for the identification of important regulators from the phosphoproteomic data but also identified the important role of MAP2K2 and PLK1 in neuronal autophagy.

  4. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  5. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  6. Near Real Time Quantitative Gas Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herget, William F.; Tromp, Marianne L.; Anderson, Charles R.

    1985-12-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) - based system has been developed and is undergoing evaluation for near real time multicomponent quantitative analysis of undiluted gaseous automotive exhaust emissions. The total system includes: (1) a gas conditioning system (GCS) for tracer gas injection, gas mixing, and temperature stabilization; and (2) an exhaust gas analyzer (EGA) consisting of a sample cell, an FT-IR system, and a computerized data processing system. Tests have shown that the system can monitor about 20 individual species (concentrations down to the 1-20 ppm range) with a time resolution of one second. Tests have been conducted on a chassis dynamometer system utilizing different autos, different fuels, and different driving cycles. Results were compared with those obtained using a standard constant volume sampling (CVS) system.

  7. Quantitative Analysis of Tremors in Welders

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Ramos, Juan; Reimer, Dacy; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Sullivan, Kelly; Nausieda, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Workers chronically exposed to manganese in welding fumes may develop an extra-pyramidal syndrome with postural and action tremors. Objectives: To determine the utility of tremor analysis in distinguishing tremors among workers exposed to welding fumes, patients with Idiopathic Parkinson’s Disease (IPD) and Essential Tremor (ET). Methods: Retrospective study of recorded tremor in subjects from academic Movement Disorders Clinics and Welders. Quantitative tremor analysis was performed and associated with clinical status. Results: Postural tremor intensity was increased in Welders and ET and was associated with visibly greater amplitude of tremor with arms extended. Mean center frequencies (Cf) of welders and patients with ET were significantly higher than the mean Cf of PD subjects. Although both the welders and the ET group exhibited a higher Cf with arms extended, welders could be distinguished from the ET subjects by a significantly lower Cf of the rest tremor than that measured in ET subjects. Conclusions: In the context of an appropriate exposure history and neurological examination, tremor analysis may be useful in the diagnosis of manganese-related extra-pyramidal manifestations. PMID:21655131

  8. Nonlinear dynamics and quantitative EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, B H

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative, computerized electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis appears to be based on a phenomenological approach to EEG interpretation, and is primarily rooted in linear systems theory. A fundamentally different approach to computerized EEG analysis, however, is making its way into the laboratories. The basic idea, inspired by recent advances in the area of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, is to view an EEG as the output of a deterministic system of relatively simple complexity, but containing nonlinearities. This suggests that studying the geometrical dynamics of EEGs, and the development of neurophysiologically realistic models of EEG generation may produce more successful automated EEG analysis techniques than the classical, stochastic methods. A review of the fundamentals of chaos theory is provided. Evidence supporting the nonlinear dynamics paradigm to EEG interpretation is presented, and the kind of new information that can be extracted from the EEG is discussed. A case is made that a nonlinear dynamic systems viewpoint to EEG generation will profoundly affect the way EEG interpretation is currently done.

  9. Phosphoproteome Analysis of Drosophila melanogaster Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Bo; Villén, Judit; Beausoleil, Sean A.; Mintseris, Julian; Gygi, Steven P.

    2011-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a key regulatory event in most cellular processes and development. Mass spectrometry-based proteomics provides a framework for the large-scale identification and characterization of phosphorylation sites. Here, we used a well-established phosphopeptide enrichment and identification strategy including the combination of strong cation exchange chromatography, immobilized metal affinity chromatography, and high-accuracy mass spectrometry instrumentation to study phosphorylation in developing Drosophila embryos. In total, 13 720 different phosphorylation sites were discovered from 2702 proteins with an estimated false-discovery rate (FDR) of 0.63% at the peptide level. Because of the large size of the data set, both novel and known phosphorylation motifs were extracted using the Motif-X algorithm, including those representative of potential ordered phosphorylation events. PMID:18327897

  10. Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-Activated ATM-Dependent Phosphorylation of Cytoplasmic Substrates Identified by Large-Scale Phosphoproteomics Screen.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Sergei V; Waardenberg, Ashley J; Engholm-Keller, Kasper; Arthur, Jonathan W; Graham, Mark E; Lavin, Martin

    2016-03-01

    Ataxia-telangiectasia, mutated (ATM) protein plays a central role in phosphorylating a network of proteins in response to DNA damage. These proteins function in signaling pathways designed to maintain the stability of the genome and minimize the risk of disease by controlling cell cycle checkpoints, initiating DNA repair, and regulating gene expression. ATM kinase can be activated by a variety of stimuli, including oxidative stress. Here, we confirmed activation of cytoplasmic ATM by autophosphorylation at multiple sites. Then we employed a global quantitative phosphoproteomics approach to identify cytoplasmic proteins altered in their phosphorylation state in control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) cells in response to oxidative damage. We demonstrated that ATM was activated by oxidative damage in the cytoplasm as well as in the nucleus and identified a total of 9,833 phosphorylation sites, including 6,686 high-confidence sites mapping to 2,536 unique proteins. A total of 62 differentially phosphorylated peptides were identified; of these, 43 were phosphorylated in control but not in A-T cells, and 19 varied in their level of phosphorylation. Motif enrichment analysis of phosphopeptides revealed that consensus ATM serine glutamine sites were overrepresented. When considering phosphorylation events, only observed in control cells (not observed in A-T cells), with predicted ATM sites phosphoSerine/phosphoThreonine glutamine, we narrowed this list to 11 candidate ATM-dependent cytoplasmic proteins. Two of these 11 were previously described as ATM substrates (HMGA1 and UIMCI/RAP80), another five were identified in a whole cell extract phosphoproteomic screens, and the remaining four proteins had not been identified previously in DNA damage response screens. We validated the phosphorylation of three of these proteins (oxidative stress responsive 1 (OSR1), HDGF, and ccdc82) as ATM dependent after H2O2 exposure, and another protein (S100A11) demonstrated ATM

  11. An Initial Characterization of the Serum Phosphoproteome

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Weidong; Ross, Mark M.; Tessitore, Alessandra; Ornstein, David; VanMeter, Amy; Liotta, Lance A.; Petricoin, Emanuel F.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation is a dynamic post-translational protein modification that is the basis of a general mechanism for maintaining and regulating protein structure and function, and of course underpins key cellular processes through signal transduction. In the last several years, many studies of large-scale profiling of phosphoproteins and mapping phosphorylation sites from cultured human cells or tissues by mass spectrometry technique have been published; however, there is little information on general (or global) phosphoproteomic characterization and description of the content of phosphoprotein analytes within the circulation. Circulating phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides could represent important disease biomarkers because of their well-known importance in cellular function, and these analytes frequently are mutated and activated in human diseases such as cancer. Here we report an initial attempt to characterize the phosphoprotein content of serum. To accomplish this, we developed a method in which phosphopeptides are enriched from digested serum proteins and analyzed by LC-MS/MS using LTQ-Orbitrap (CID) and LTQ-ETD mass spectrometers. Using this approach we identified ~100 unique phosphopeptides with stringent filtering criteria and a lower than 1% false discovery rate. PMID:19824718

  12. Deep Phosphoproteomic Measurements Pinpointing Drug Induced Protective Mechanisms in Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Chengli; Gao, Jing; Zhou, Yanting; Chen, Xiangling; Xiao, Ruoxuan; Zheng, Jing; Liu, Yansheng; Zhou, Hu

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and irreversible neurological disorder that impairs the living quality of old population and even life spans. New compounds have shown potential inneuroprotective effects in AD, such as GFKP-19, a 2-pyrrolidone derivative which has been proved to enhance the memory of dysmnesia mouse. The molecular mechanisms remain to be established for these drug candidates. Large-scale phosphoproteomic approach has been evolved rapidly in the last several years, which holds the potential to provide a useful toolkit to understand cellular signaling underlying drug effects. To establish and test such a method, we accurately analyzed the deep quantitative phosphoproteome of the neuro-2a cells treated with and without GFKP-19 using triple SILAC labeling. A total of 14,761 Class I phosphosites were quantified between controls, damaged, and protected conditions using the high resolution mass spectrometry, with a decent inter-mass spectrometer reproducibility for even subtle regulatory events. Our data suggests that GFKP-19 can reverse Aβ25−35 induced phosphorylation change in neuro-2a cells, and might protect the neuron system in two ways: firstly, it may decrease oxidative damage and inflammation induced by NO via down regulating the phosphorylation of nitric oxide synthase NOS1 at S847; Secondly, it may decrease tau protein phosphorylation through down-regulating the phosphorylation level of MAPK14 at T180. All mass spectrometry data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD005312. PMID:28066266

  13. Dynamic Adipocyte Phosphoproteome Reveals that Akt Directly Regulates mTORC2

    PubMed Central

    Humphrey, Sean J.; Yang, Guang; Yang, Pengyi; Fazakerley, Daniel J.; Stöckli, Jacqueline; Yang, Jean Y.; James, David E.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A major challenge of the post-genomics era is to define the connectivity of protein phosphorylation networks. Here, we quantitatively delineate the insulin signaling network in adipocytes by high-resolution mass spectrometry-based proteomics. These data reveal the complexity of intracellular protein phosphorylation. We identified 37,248 phosphorylation sites on 5,705 proteins in this single-cell type, with approximately 15% responding to insulin. We integrated these large-scale phosphoproteomics data using a machine learning approach to predict physiological substrates of several diverse insulin-regulated kinases. This led to the identification of an Akt substrate, SIN1, a core component of the mTORC2 complex. The phosphorylation of SIN1 by Akt was found to regulate mTORC2 activity in response to growth factors, revealing topological insights into the Akt/mTOR signaling network. The dynamic phosphoproteome described here contains numerous phosphorylation sites on proteins involved in diverse molecular functions and should serve as a useful functional resource for cell biologists. PMID:23684622

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  15. Seniors' online communities: a quantitative content analysis.

    PubMed

    Nimrod, Galit

    2010-06-01

    To examine the contents and characteristics of seniors' online communities and to explore their potential benefits to older adults. Quantitative content analysis of a full year's data from 14 leading online communities using a novel computerized system. The overall database included 686,283 messages. There was a constant increase in the daily activity level during the research period. Content analysis identified 13 main subjects discussed in the communities, including (in descending order) "Fun on line," "Retirement," "Family," "Health," "Work and Study," "Recreation" "Finance," "Religion and Spirituality," "Technology," "Aging," "Civic and Social," "Shopping," and "Travels." The overall tone was somewhat more positive than negative. The findings suggest that the utilities of Information and Communications Technologies for older adults that were identified in previous research are valid for seniors' online communities as well. However, the findings suggest several other possible benefits, which may be available only to online communities. The communities may provide social support, contribute to self-preservation, and serve as an opportunity for self-discovery and growth. Because they offer both leisure activity and an expanded social network, it is suggested that active participation in the communities may contribute to the well-being of older adults. Directions for future research and applied implications are further discussed.

  16. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Applying Knowledge of Quantitative Design and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared and contrasted two quantitative scholarly articles in relation to their research designs. Their designs were analyzed by the comparison of research references and research specific vocabulary to describe how various research methods were used. When researching and analyzing quantitative scholarly articles, it is imperative to…

  18. Quantitative color analysis for capillaroscopy image segmentation.

    PubMed

    Goffredo, Michela; Schmid, Maurizio; Conforto, Silvia; Amorosi, Beatrice; D'Alessio, Tommaso; Palma, Claudio

    2012-06-01

    This communication introduces a novel approach for quantitatively evaluating the role of color space decomposition in digital nailfold capillaroscopy analysis. It is clinically recognized that any alterations of the capillary pattern, at the periungual skin region, are directly related to dermatologic and rheumatic diseases. The proposed algorithm for the segmentation of digital capillaroscopy images is optimized with respect to the choice of the color space and the contrast variation. Since the color space is a critical factor for segmenting low-contrast images, an exhaustive comparison between different color channels is conducted and a novel color channel combination is presented. Results from images of 15 healthy subjects are compared with annotated data, i.e. selected images approved by clinicians. By comparison, a set of figures of merit, which highlights the algorithm capability to correctly segment capillaries, their shape and their number, is extracted. Experimental tests depict that the optimized procedure for capillaries segmentation, based on a novel color channel combination, presents values of average accuracy higher than 0.8, and extracts capillaries whose shape and granularity are acceptable. The obtained results are particularly encouraging for future developments on the classification of capillary patterns with respect to dermatologic and rheumatic diseases.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Hypoperfusion in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nael, Kambiz; Meshksar, Arash; Liebeskind, David S.; Coull, Bruce M.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Villablanca, J. Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study compares the concordance between arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) for the identification of regional hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch tissue classification using a quantitative method. Methods The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were as follows: patients with acute ischemic syndrome with symptom onset <24 hours and acquisition of both ASL and DSC MR perfusion. The volumes of infarction and hypoperfused lesions were calculated on ASL and DSC multi-parametric maps. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups using time to maximum >6 sec as the reference. In a subset of patients who were successfully recanalized, the identical analysis was performed and the infarction and hypoperfused lesion volumes were used for paired pre- and posttreatment comparisons. Results Forty-one patients met our inclusion criteria. Twenty patients underwent successful endovascular revascularization (TICI>2a), resulting in a total of 61 ASL-DSC data pairs for comparison. The hypoperfusion volume on ASL-cerebral blood flow best approximated the DSC-time to peak volume (r=0.83) in pretreatment group and time to maximum (r=0.46) after recanalization. Both ASL-cerebral blood flow and DSC-TTP overestimated the hypoperfusion volume compared with time to maximum volume in pretreatment (F=27.41, P<0.0001) and recanalized patients (F=8.78, P<0.0001). Conclusions ASL-cerebral blood flow overestimates the DSC time to maximum hypoperfusion volume and mismatch classification in patients with acute ischemic syndrome. Continued overestimation of hypoperfused volume after recanalization suggests flow pattern and velocity changes in addition to arterial transit delay can affects the performance of ASL. PMID:23988646

  20. Hippocampal phosphoproteomics of F344 rats exposed to 1-bromopropane

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Zhenlie; Ichihara, Sahoko; Oikawa, Shinji; Chang, Jie; Zhang, Lingyi; Hu, Shijie; Huang, Hanlin; Ichihara, Gaku

    2015-01-15

    1-Bromopropane (1-BP) is neurotoxic in both experimental animals and human. To identify phosphorylated modification on the unrecognized post-translational modifications of proteins and investigate their role in 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity, changes in hippocampal phosphoprotein expression levels were analyzed quantitatively in male F344 rats exposed to 1-BP inhalation at 0, 400, or 1000 ppm for 8 h/day for 1 or 4 weeks. Hippocampal protein extracts were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively by Pro-Q Diamond gel staining and SYPRO Ruby staining coupled with two-dimensional difference in gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively, as well as by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) to identify phosphoproteins. Changes in selected proteins were further confirmed by Manganese II (Mn{sup 2+})-Phos-tag SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Bax and cytochrome c protein levels were determined by western blotting. Pro-Q Diamond gel staining combined with 2D-DIGE identified 26 phosphoprotein spots (p < 0.05), and MALDI-TOF/MS identified 18 up-regulated proteins and 8 down-regulated proteins. These proteins are involved in the biological process of response to stimuli, metabolic processes, and apoptosis signaling. Changes in the expression of phosphorylated 14-3-3 θ were further confirmed by Mn{sup 2+}-Phos-tag SDS-PAGE. Western blotting showed overexpression of Bax protein in the mitochondria with down-regulation in the cytoplasm, whereas cytochrome c expression was high in the cytoplasm but low in the mitochondria after 1-BP exposure. Our results suggest that the pathogenesis of 1-BP-induced hippocampal damage involves inhibition of antiapoptosis process. Phosphoproteins identified in this study can potentially serve as biomarkers for 1-BP-induced neurotoxicity. - Highlights: • 1-BP modified hippocampal phosphoproteome in rat and 23 altered proteins were identified. • 1-BP changed phosphorylation

  1. Skeleton-based cerebrovascular quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xingce; Liu, Enhui; Wu, Zhongke; Zhai, Feifei; Zhu, Yi-Cheng; Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan

    2016-12-20

    Cerebrovascular disease is the most common cause of death worldwide, with millions of deaths annually. Interest is increasing toward understanding the geometric factors that influence cerebrovascular diseases, such as stroke. Cerebrovascular shape analyses are essential for the diagnosis and pathological identification of these conditions. The current study aimed to provide a stable and consistent methodology for quantitative Circle of Willis (CoW) analysis and to identify geometric changes in this structure. An entire pipeline was designed with emphasis on automating each step. The stochastic segmentation was improved and volumetric data were obtained. The L1 medial axis method was applied to vessel volumetric data, which yielded a discrete skeleton dataset. A B-spline curve was used to fit the skeleton, and geometric values were proposed for a one-dimensional skeleton and radius. The calculations used to derive these values were illustrated in detail. In one example(No. 47 in the open dataset) all values for different branches of CoW were calculated. The anterior communicating artery(ACo) was the shortest vessel, with a length of 2.6mm. The range of the curvature of all vessels was (0.3, 0.9) ± (0.1, 1.4). The range of the torsion was (-12.4,0.8) ± (0, 48.7). The mean radius value range was (3.1, 1.5) ± (0.1, 0.7) mm, and the mean angle value range was (2.2, 2.9) ± (0, 0.2) mm. In addition to the torsion variance values in a few vessels, the variance values of all vessel characteristics remained near 1. The distribution of the radii of symmetrical posterior cerebral artery(PCA) and angle values of the symmetrical posterior communicating arteries(PCo) demonstrated a certain correlation between the corresponding values of symmetrical vessels on the CoW. The data verified the stability of our methodology. Our method was appropriate for the analysis of large medical image datasets derived from the automated pipeline for populations. This method was applicable to

  2. Coupling functionalized cobalt ferrite nanoparticle enrichment with online LC/MS/MS for top-down phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bifan; Hwang, Leekyoung; Ochowicz, William; Lin, Ziqing; Guardado-Alvarez, Tania M; Cai, Wenxuan; Xiu, Lichen; Dani, Kunal; Colah, Cyrus; Jin, Song; Ge, Ying

    2017-06-01

    Phosphorylation plays pivotal roles in cellular processes and dysregulated phosphorylation is considered as an underlying mechanism in many human diseases. Top-down mass spectrometry (MS) analyzes intact proteins and provides a comprehensive analysis of protein phosphorylation. However, top-down MS-based phosphoproteomics is challenging due to the difficulty in enriching low abundance intact phosphoproteins as well as separating and detecting the enriched phosphoproteins from complex mixtures. Herein, we have designed and synthesized the next generation functionalized superparamagnetic cobalt ferrite (CoFe2O4) nanoparticles (NPs), and have further developed a top-down phosphoproteomics strategy coupling phosphoprotein enrichment enabled by the functionalized CoFe2O4 NPs with online liquid chromatography (LC)/MS/MS for comprehensive characterization of phosphoproteins. We have demonstrated the highly specific enrichment of a minimal amount of spike-in β-casein from a complex tissue lysate as well as effective separation and quantification of its phosphorylated genetic variants. More importantly, this integrated top-down phosphoproteomics strategy allows for enrichment, identification, quantification, and comprehensive characterization of low abundance endogenous phosphoproteins from complex tissue extracts on a chromatographic time scale.

  3. Off-line high-pH reversed-phase fractionation for in-depth phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Batth, Tanveer S; Francavilla, Chiara; Olsen, Jesper V

    2014-12-05

    Protein phosphorylation is an important post-translational modification (PTM) involved in embryonic development, adult homeostasis, and disease. Over the past decade, several advances have been made in liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)-based technologies to identify thousands of phosphorylation sites. However, in-depth phosphoproteomics often require off-line enrichment and fractionation techniques. In this study, we provide a detailed analysis of the physicochemical characteristics of phosphopeptides, which have been fractionated by off-line high-pH chromatography (HpH) before subsequent titanium dioxide (TiO2) enrichment and LC-MS/MS analysis. Our results demonstrate that HpH is superior to standard strong-cation exchange (SCX) fractionation in the total number of phosphopeptides detected when analyzing the same number of fractions by identical LC-MS/MS gradients. From 14 HpH fractions, we routinely identified over 30,000 unique phosphopeptide variants, which is more than twice the number of that obtained from SCX fractionation. HpH chromatography displayed an exceptional ability to fractionate singly phosphorylated peptides, with minor benefits for doubly phosphorylated peptides over that with SCX. Further optimizations in the pooling and concatenation strategy increased the total number of multiphosphorylated peptides detected after HpH fractionation. In conclusion, we provide a basic framework and resource for performing in-depth phosphoproteome studies utilizing off-line basic reversed-phased fractionation. Raw data is available at ProteomeXchange (PXD001404).

  4. The phosphoproteome of Fusarium graminearum at the onset of nitrogen starvation.

    PubMed

    Rampitsch, Christof; Subramaniam, Rajagopal; Djuric-Ciganovic, Slavica; Bykova, Natalia V

    2010-01-01

    Fusarium graminearum grown under stress, such as nutrient deprivation, activates, among others, the trichothecene pathway that produces the mycotoxin deoxynivalenol and its derivatives. The kinase inhibitor staurosporine reduced the production of trichothecenes by 39% compared with control in vitro. On the other hand, phosphatase inhibitor okadaic acid increased the amount by 72% compared with the control in vitro. This suggests that phosphorylation events are involved in the signalling pathway, leading to the activation of the trichothecene pathway. Three approaches were used to study the phosphoproteome of F. graminearum under nitrogen-limiting conditions: 2-DE (2-DE: IEFxSDS-PAGE) in combination with MS protein identification; SDS-PAGE in combination with off-line IMAC and TiO(2) enrichment and gel electrophoresis LC-MS analysis; and a gel-free approach using strong anion exchange chromatography, IMAC and LC-MS. A total of 348 phosphorylation sites localized in 301 peptides from 241 proteins were identified. By 2-DE, 20 phosphoproteins were identified, nine of which underwent changes during the time course examined. Using gel electrophoresis LC-MS 231 phosphopeptides were identified from three samples (ten gel slices each) at time points of nitrogen starvation t=0, 6, and 12 h. The gel-free analysis added 70 peptides from 65 proteins to the total. Proteins of unknown function and enzymes of known function comprised the largest groups overall. Ten protein kinases and seven transcription factors were identified. This is the first reported phosphoproteome of F. graminearum.

  5. Hydrophilic interaction chromatography reduces the complexity of the phosphoproteome and improves global phosphopeptide isolation and detection.

    PubMed

    McNulty, Dean E; Annan, Roland S

    2008-05-01

    The diversity and complexity of proteins and peptides in biological systems requires powerful liquid chromatography-based separations to optimize resolution and detection of components. Proteomics strategies often combine two orthogonal separation modes to meet this challenge. In nearly all cases, the second dimension is a reverse phase separation interfaced directly to a mass spectrometer. Here we report on the use of hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC) as part of a multidimensional chromatography strategy for proteomics. Tryptic peptides are separated on TSKgel Amide-80 columns using a shallow inverse organic gradient. Under these conditions, peptide retention is based on overall hydrophilicity, and a separation truly orthogonal to reverse phase is produced. Analysis of tryptic digests from HeLa cells yielded numbers of protein identifications comparable to that obtained using strong cation exchange. We also demonstrate that HILIC represents a significant advance in phosphoproteomics analysis. We exploited the strong hydrophilicity of the phosphate group to selectively enrich and fractionate phosphopeptides based on their increased retention under HILIC conditions. Subsequent IMAC enrichment of phosphopeptides from HILIC fractions showed better than 99% selectivity. This was achieved without the use of derivatization or chemical modifiers. In a 300-microg equivalent of HeLa cell lysate we identified over 1000 unique phosphorylation sites. More than 700 novel sites were added to the HeLa phosphoproteome.

  6. Searching for novel Cdk5 substrates in brain by comparative phosphoproteomics of wild type and Cdk5-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C; Kulkarni, Ashok B; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5-/- embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5-/- brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate.

  7. Quantitative Data Analysis--In the Graduate Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albers, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative research study collects numerical data that must be analyzed to help draw the study's conclusions. Teaching quantitative data analysis is not teaching number crunching, but teaching a way of critical thinking for how to analyze the data. The goal of data analysis is to reveal the underlying patterns, trends, and relationships of a…

  8. Quantitative Auger analysis of Nb-Ge superconducting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using Auger electron analysis for quantitative analysis was investigated by studying Nb/sub 3/Ge thin-film Auger data with different approaches. A method base on elemental standards gave consistent quantitative values with reported Nb-Ge data. Alloy sputter yields were also calculated and results were consistent with those for pure elements.

  9. Wrangling Phosphoproteomic Data to Elucidate Cancer Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Grimes, Mark L.; Lee, Wan-Jui; van der Maaten, Laurens; Shannon, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The interpretation of biological data sets is essential for generating hypotheses that guide research, yet modern methods of global analysis challenge our ability to discern meaningful patterns and then convey results in a way that can be easily appreciated. Proteomic data is especially challenging because mass spectrometry detectors often miss peptides in complex samples, resulting in sparsely populated data sets. Using the R programming language and techniques from the field of pattern recognition, we have devised methods to resolve and evaluate clusters of proteins related by their pattern of expression in different samples in proteomic data sets. We examined tyrosine phosphoproteomic data from lung cancer samples. We calculated dissimilarities between the proteins based on Pearson or Spearman correlations and on Euclidean distances, whilst dealing with large amounts of missing data. The dissimilarities were then used as feature vectors in clustering and visualization algorithms. The quality of the clusterings and visualizations were evaluated internally based on the primary data and externally based on gene ontology and protein interaction networks. The results show that t-distributed stochastic neighbor embedding (t-SNE) followed by minimum spanning tree methods groups sparse proteomic data into meaningful clusters more effectively than other methods such as k-means and classical multidimensional scaling. Furthermore, our results show that using a combination of Spearman correlation and Euclidean distance as a dissimilarity representation increases the resolution of clusters. Our analyses show that many clusters contain one or more tyrosine kinases and include known effectors as well as proteins with no known interactions. Visualizing these clusters as networks elucidated previously unknown tyrosine kinase signal transduction pathways that drive cancer. Our approach can be applied to other data types, and can be easily adopted because open source software

  10. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Selenate-Treated Alzheimer's Disease Model Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yong; Li, Shuiming; Shen, Liming; Liu, Qiong; Ni, Jiazuan

    2014-01-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins regulates most biological processes, while abnormal phosphorylation is a cause or consequence of many diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). One of the hallmarks of AD is the formation of neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs), which is composed of hyperphosphorylated tau proteins. Sodium selenate has been recently found to reduce tau hyperphosphorylation and NFTs formation, and to improve spatial learning and motor performance in AD mice. In the current study, the phosphoproteomics of N2aSW cells treated with selenate were investigated. To avoid missing low-abundance phosphoproteins, both the total proteins of cells and the phosphor-enriched proteins were extracted and subjected to the two-dimensional gel electrophoresis with Pro-Q diamond staining and then LC-MS/MS analysis. A total of 65 proteins were altered in phosphorylation level, of which 39 were up-regulated and 26 were down-regulated. All identified phosphoproteins were bioinformatically annotated according to their physiochemical features, subcellular location, and biological function. Most of these significantly changed phosphoproteins are involved in crucial neural processes such as protesome activity, oxidative stress, cysteine and methionine metabolism, and energy metabolism. Furthermore, decreases were found in homocysteine, phosphor-tau and amyloid β upon selenate treatment. Our results suggest that selenate may intervene in the pathological process of AD by altering the phosphorylation of some key proteins involved in oxidative stress, energy metabolism and protein degradation, thus play important roles in maintaining redox homeostasis, generating ATP, and clearing misfolded proteins and aggregates. The present paper provides some new clues to the mechanism of selenate in AD prevention. PMID:25485856

  11. Rapid Phosphoproteomic and Transcriptomic Changes in the Rhizobia-legume Symbiosis*

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christopher M.; Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Volkening, Jeremy D.; Grimsrud, Paul A.; Maeda, Junko; Bailey, Derek J.; Park, Kwanghyun; Howes-Podoll, Maegen; den Os, Désirée; Yeun, Li Huey; Westphall, Michael S.; Sussman, Michael R.; Ané, Jean-Michel; Coon, Joshua J.

    2012-01-01

    Symbiotic associations between legumes and rhizobia usually commence with the perception of bacterial lipochitooligosaccharides, known as Nod factors (NF), which triggers rapid cellular and molecular responses in host plants. We report here deep untargeted tandem mass spectrometry-based measurements of rapid NF-induced changes in the phosphorylation status of 13,506 phosphosites in 7739 proteins from the model legume Medicago truncatula. To place these phosphorylation changes within a biological context, quantitative phosphoproteomic and RNA measurements in wild-type plants were compared with those observed in mutants, one defective in NF perception (nfp) and one defective in downstream signal transduction events (dmi3). Our study quantified the early phosphorylation and transcription dynamics that are specifically associated with NF-signaling, confirmed a dmi3-mediated feedback loop in the pathway, and suggested “cryptic” NF-signaling pathways, some of them being also involved in the response to symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. PMID:22683509

  12. Quantitative Analysis of Radar Returns from Insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    When a number of flying insects is low enough to permit their resolution as individual radar targets, quantitative estimates of their aerial density are developed. Accurate measurements of heading distribution using a rotating polarization radar to enhance the wingbeat frequency method of identification are presented.

  13. Some Epistemological Considerations Concerning Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrescu, Emilian

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the author's address at the 2007 "Journal of Applied Quantitative Methods" ("JAQM") prize awarding festivity. The festivity was included in the opening of the 4th International Conference on Applied Statistics, November 22, 2008, Bucharest, Romania. In the address, the author reflects on three theses that…

  14. Phosphoproteomic differences in major depressive disorder postmortem brains indicate effects on synaptic function.

    PubMed

    Martins-de-Souza, Daniel; Guest, Paul C; Vanattou-Saifoudine, Natacha; Rahmoune, Hassan; Bahn, Sabine

    2012-12-01

    There is still a lack in the molecular comprehension of major depressive disorder (MDD) although this condition affects approximately 10% of the world population. Protein phosphorylation is a posttranslational modification that regulates approximately one-third of the human proteins involved in a range of cellular and biological processes such as cellular signaling. Whereas phosphoproteome studies have been carried out extensively in cancer research, few such investigations have been carried out in studies of psychiatric disorders. Here, we present a comparative phosphoproteome analysis of postmortem dorsolateral prefrontal cortex tissues from 24 MDD patients and 12 control donors. Tissue extracts were analyzed using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry in a data-independent manner (LC-MS(E)). Our analyses resulted in the identification of 5,195 phosphopeptides, corresponding to 802 non-redundant proteins. Ninety of these proteins showed differential levels of phosphorylation in tissues from MDD subjects compared to controls, being 20 differentially phosphorylated in at least 2 peptides. The majority of these phosphorylated proteins were associated with synaptic transmission and cellular architecture not only pointing out potential biomarker candidates but mainly shedding light to the comprehension of MDD pathobiology.

  15. Quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra with principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. E.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra as mixtures of particles on microscopic and macroscopic scales using principal components analysis. This technique allows for determination of the endmembers being mixed, their abundance, and the scale of mixing, as well as other physical parameters. Eighteen lunar telescopic reflectance spectra of the Copernicus crater region, from 600 nm to 1800 nm in wavelength, are modeled in terms of five likely endmembers: mare basalt, mature mare soil, anorthosite, mature highland soil, and clinopyroxene. These endmembers were chosen from a similar analysis of 92 lunar soil and rock samples. The models fit the data to within 2 percent rms. It is found that the goodness of fit is marginally better for intimate mixing over macroscopic mixing.

  16. Quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra with principal components analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, P. E.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1985-02-01

    A technique is presented for quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra as mixtures of particles on microscopic and macroscopic scales using principal components analysis. This technique allows for determination of the endmembers being mixed, their abundance, and the scale of mixing, as well as other physical parameters. Eighteen lunar telescopic reflectance spectra of the Copernicus crater region, from 600 nm to 1800 nm in wavelength, are modeled in terms of five likely endmembers: mare basalt, mature mare soil, anorthosite, mature highland soil, and clinopyroxene. These endmembers were chosen from a similar analysis of 92 lunar soil and rock samples. The models fit the data to within 2 percent rms. It is found that the goodness of fit is marginally better for intimate mixing over macroscopic mixing.

  17. Analysis of Two Quantitative Ultrasound Approaches.

    PubMed

    Muleki-Seya, Pauline; Han, Aiguo; Andre, Michael P; Erdman, John W; O'Brien, William D

    2017-09-01

    There are two well-known ultrasonic approaches to extract sets of quantitative parameters: Lizzi-Feleppa (LF) parameters: slope, intercept, and midband; and quantitative ultrasound (QUS)-derived parameters: effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC). In this study, the relation between the LF and QUS-derived parameters is studied theoretically and experimentally on ex vivo mouse livers. As expected from the theory, LF slope is correlated to ESD ([Formula: see text]), and from experimental data, LF midband is correlated to EAC ([Formula: see text]). However, LF intercept is not correlated to ESD ([Formula: see text]) nor EAC ([Formula: see text]). The unexpected correlation observed between LF slope and EAC ([Formula: see text]) results likely from the high correlation between ESD and EAC due to the inversion process. For a liver fat percentage estimation, an important potential medical application, the parameters presenting the better correlation are EAC ([Formula: see text]) and LF midband ([Formula: see text]).

  18. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  19. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  20. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  1. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Reineke, James B; Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, which encompasses the internalization and sorting of plasma membrane (PM) lipids and proteins to distinct membrane-bound intracellular compartments, is a highly regulated and fundamental cellular process by which eukaryotic cells dynamically regulate their PM composition. Indeed, endocytosis is implicated in crucial cellular processes that include proliferation, migration, and cell division as well as maintenance of tissue homeostasis such as apical-basal polarity. Once PM constituents have been taken up into the cell, either via clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE) or clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE), they typically have two fates: degradation through the late-endosomal/lysosomal pathway or returning to the PM via endocytic recycling pathways. In this review, we will detail experimental procedures that allow for both qualitative and quantitative assessment of endocytic recycling of transmembrane proteins internalized by CDE and CIE, using the HeLa cervical cancer cell line as a model system.

  2. Joint association analysis of bivariate quantitative and qualitative traits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mengdie; Diao, Guoqing

    2011-11-29

    Univariate genome-wide association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits has been investigated extensively in the literature. In the presence of correlated phenotypes, it is more intuitive to analyze all phenotypes simultaneously. We describe an efficient likelihood-based approach for the joint association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in unrelated individuals. We assume a probit model for the qualitative trait, under which an unobserved latent variable and a prespecified threshold determine the value of the qualitative trait. To jointly model the quantitative and qualitative traits, we assume that the quantitative trait and the latent variable follow a bivariate normal distribution. The latent variable is allowed to be correlated with the quantitative phenotype. Simultaneous modeling of the quantitative and qualitative traits allows us to make more precise inference on the pleiotropic genetic effects. We derive likelihood ratio tests for the testing of genetic effects. An application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data is provided. The new method yields reasonable power and meaningful results for the joint association analysis of the quantitative trait Q1 and the qualitative trait disease status at SNPs with not too small MAF.

  3. Impact of TGF-b on breast cancer from a quantitative proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jaegyoon; Yoon, Youngmi; Yeu, Yunku; Lee, Hookuen; Park, Sanghyun

    2013-12-01

    There has been much active research in bioinformatics to support our understanding of oncogenesis and tumor progression. Most research relies on mRNA gene expression data to identify marker genes or cancer specific gene networks. However, considering that proteins are functional molecules that carry out the biological tasks of genes, they can be direct markers of biological functions. Protein abundance data on a genome scale have not been investigated in depth due to the limited availability of high throughput protein assays. This hindrance is chiefly caused by a lack of robust techniques such as RT-PCR (real-time polymerase chain reaction). In this study, we quantified phospho-proteomes of breast cancer cell lines treated with TGF-beta (transforming growth factor beta). To discover biomarkers and observe changes in the signaling pathways related to breast cancer, we applied a protein network-based approach to generate a classifier of subnet markers. The accuracy of that classifier outperformed other network-based classification algorithms, and current feature selection and classification algorithms. Moreover, many cancer-related proteins were identified in those sub-networks. Each sub-network provides functional insights and can serve as a potential marker for TGF-beta treatments. After interpreting the roles of proteins in sub-networks with various signaling pathways, we found strong candidate proteins and various related interactions that are expected to affect breast cancer outcomes. These results demonstrate the high quality of the quantified phospho-proteomes data and show that our network construction and classification method is appropriate for an analysis of this type of data.

  4. Recent findings and technological advances in phosphoproteomics for cells and tissues

    PubMed Central

    von Stechow, Louise; Francavilla, Chiara; Olsen, Jesper V

    2015-01-01

    Site-specific phosphorylation is a fast and reversible covalent post-translational modification that is tightly regulated in cells. The cellular machinery of enzymes that write, erase and read these modifications (kinases, phosphatases and phospho-binding proteins) is frequently deregulated in different diseases, including cancer. Large-scale studies of phosphoproteins – termed phosphoproteomics – strongly rely on the use of high-performance mass spectrometric instrumentation. This powerful technology has been applied to study a great number of phosphorylation-based phenotypes. Nevertheless, many technical and biological challenges have to be overcome to identify biologically relevant phosphorylation sites in cells and tissues. This review describes different technological strategies to identify and quantify phosphorylation sites with high accuracy, without significant loss of analysis speed and reproducibility in tissues and cells. Moreover, computational tools for analysis, integration and biological interpretation of phosphorylation events are discussed. PMID:26400465

  5. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of HIV-1 Preintegration Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Oztop, Ilker; Vandegraaff, Nick; Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the formation of a provirus, an integrated DNA copy of the viral RNA genome. The linear cDNA product of reverse transcription is the integration substrate and two different integrase activities, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer, are required for provirus formation. Integrase nicks the cDNA ends adjacent to phylogenetically-conserved CA dinucleotides during 3′ processing. After nuclear entry and locating a suitable chromatin acceptor site, integrase joins the recessed 3′-OHs to the 5′-phosphates of a double-stranded staggered cut in the DNA target. Integrase functions in the context of a large nucleoprotein complex, called the preintegration complex (PIC), and PICs are analyzed to determine levels of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities that occur during acute virus infection. Denatured cDNA end regions are monitored by indirect end-labeling to measure the extent of 3′ processing. Native PICs can efficiently integrate their viral cDNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro, and Southern blotting or nested PCR assays are used to quantify the resultant DNA strand transfer activity. This study details HIV-1 infection, PIC extraction, partial purification, and quantitative analyses of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities. PMID:19233280

  7. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2014-02-18

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity.

  8. The quantitative failure of human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-07-01

    This philosophical treatise argues the merits of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in the context of the nuclear power industry. Actually, the author attacks historic and current HRA as having failed in informing policy makers who make decisions based on risk that humans contribute to systems performance. He argues for an HRA based on Bayesian (fact-based) inferential statistics, which advocates a systems analysis process that employs cogent heuristics when using opinion, and tempers itself with a rational debate over the weight given subjective and empirical probabilities.

  9. Quantitative analysis of myocardial tissue with digital autofluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Thomas; Holten-Rossing, Henrik; Svendsen, Ida M H; Jacobsen, Christina; Vainer, Ben

    2016-01-01

    The opportunity offered by whole slide scanners of automated histological analysis implies an ever increasing importance of digital pathology. To go beyond the importance of conventional pathology, however, digital pathology may need a basic histological starting point similar to that of hematoxylin and eosin staining in conventional pathology. This study presents an automated fluorescence-based microscopy approach providing highly detailed morphological data from unstained microsections. This data may provide a basic histological starting point from which further digital analysis including staining may benefit. This study explores the inherent tissue fluorescence, also known as autofluorescence, as a mean to quantitate cardiac tissue components in histological microsections. Data acquisition using a commercially available whole slide scanner and an image-based quantitation algorithm are presented. It is shown that the autofluorescence intensity of unstained microsections at two different wavelengths is a suitable starting point for automated digital analysis of myocytes, fibrous tissue, lipofuscin, and the extracellular compartment. The output of the method is absolute quantitation along with accurate outlines of above-mentioned components. The digital quantitations are verified by comparison to point grid quantitations performed on the microsections after Van Gieson staining. The presented method is amply described as a prestain multicomponent quantitation and outlining tool for histological sections of cardiac tissue. The main perspective is the opportunity for combination with digital analysis of stained microsections, for which the method may provide an accurate digital framework.

  10. Quantitive and Sociological Analysis of Blog Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnik, W.; Szymczyk, S.; Leszczynski, S.; Podsiadlo, R.; Rymszewicz, E.; Kurylo, L.; Makowiec, D.; Bykowska, B.

    2005-10-01

    This paper examines the emerging phenomenon of blogging, using three different Polish blogging services as the base of the research. Authors show that blog networks are sharing their characteristics with complex networks (gamma coefficients, small worlds, cliques, etc.). Elements of sociometric analysis were used to prove existence of some social structures in the blog networks.

  11. Phosphoproteomics Reveals HMGA1, a CK2 Substrate, as a Drug-Resistant Target in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yi-Ting; Pan, Szu-Hua; Tsai, Chia-Feng; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Hsu, Yuan-Ling; Yen, Hsin-Yung; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Liao, Yen-Chen; Hong, Tse-Ming; Sung, Ting-Yi; Yang, Pan-Chyr; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Although EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) have demonstrated good efficacy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients harboring EGFR mutations, most patients develop intrinsic and acquired resistance. We quantitatively profiled the phosphoproteome and proteome of drug-sensitive and drug-resistant NSCLC cells under gefitinib treatment. The construction of a dose-dependent responsive kinase-substrate network of 1548 phosphoproteins and 3834 proteins revealed CK2-centric modules as the dominant core network for the potential gefitinib resistance-associated proteins. CK2 knockdown decreased cell survival in gefitinib-resistant NSCLCs. Using motif analysis to identify the CK2 core sub-network, we verified that elevated phosphorylation level of a CK2 substrate, HMGA1 was a critical node contributing to EGFR-TKI resistance in NSCLC cell. Both HMGA1 knockdown or mutation of the CK2 phosphorylation site, S102, of HMGA1 reinforced the efficacy of gefitinib in resistant NSCLC cells through reactivation of the downstream signaling of EGFR. Our results delineate the TKI resistance-associated kinase-substrate network, suggesting a potential therapeutic strategy for overcoming TKI-induced resistance in NSCLC. PMID:28290473

  12. Quantitative analysis of Li by PIGE technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca, M.; Mateus, R.; Santos, C.; Cruz, J.; Silva, H.; Luis, H.; Martins, L.; Jesus, A. P.

    2017-09-01

    In this work, the cross section of the reactions 7Li(p,pγ)7Li (γ - 478 keV) at the proton energy range 2.0-4.2 MeV was measured. The measurements were carried out at the 3 MV Tandem Accelerator at the CTN/IST Laboratory in Lisbon. To validate the obtained results, calculated gamma-ray yields were compared, at several proton energy values, with experimental yields for thick samples made of inorganic compounds containing lithium. In order to quantify the light elements present in the samples, we used a standard free method for PIGE in thick samples, based on a code - Emitted Radiation Yield Analysis (ERYA), which integrates the nuclear reaction excitation function along the depth of the sample. We also demonstrated the capacity of the technique for analysis of Li ores, as Spodumene, Lithium Muscovite and Holmquistite, and Li-alloys for plasma facing materials showing that this is a reliable and accurate method for PIGE analysis of Li in thick samples.

  13. Unraveling the phosphoproteome dynamics in mammal mitochondria from a network perspective.

    PubMed

    Padrão, Ana Isabel; Vitorino, Rui; Duarte, José Alberto; Ferreira, Rita; Amado, Francisco

    2013-10-04

    With mitochondrion garnering more attention for its inextricable involvement in pathophysiological conditions, it seems imperative to understand the means by which the molecular pathways harbored in this organelle are regulated. Protein phosphorylation has been considered a central event in cellular signaling and, more recently, in the modulation of mitochondrial activity. Efforts have been made to understand the molecular mechanisms by which protein phosphorylation regulates mitochondrial signaling. With the advances in mass-spectrometry-based proteomics, there is a substantial hope and expectation in the increased knowledge of protein phosphorylation profile and its mode of regulation. On the basis of phosphorylation profiles, attempts have been made to disclose the kinases involved and how they control the molecular processes in mitochondria and, consequently, the cellular outcomes. Still, few studies have focused on mitochondrial phosphoproteome profiling, particularly in diseases. The present study reviews current data on protein phosphorylation profiling in mitochondria, the potential kinases involved and how pathophysiological conditions modulate the mitochondrial phosphoproteome. To integrate data from distinct research papers, we performed network analysis, with bioinformatic tools like Cytoscape, String, and PANTHER taking into consideration variables such as tissue specificity, biological processes, molecular functions, and pathophysiological conditions. For instance, data retrieved from these analyses evidence some homology in the mitochondrial phosphoproteome among liver and heart, with proteins from transport and oxidative phosphorylation clusters particularly susceptible to phosphorylation. A distinct profile was noticed for adipocytes, with proteins form metabolic processes, namely, triglycerides metabolism, as the main targets of phosphorylation. Regarding disease conditions, more phosphorylated proteins were observed in diabetics with some

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Immunohistochemistry in Melanoma Tumors.

    PubMed

    Lilyquist, Jenna; White, Kirsten Anne Meyer; Lee, Rebecca J; Philips, Genevieve K; Hughes, Christopher R; Torres, Salina M

    2017-04-01

    Identification of positive staining is often qualitative and subjective. This is particularly troublesome in pigmented melanoma lesions, because melanin is difficult to distinguish from the brown stain resulting from immunohistochemistry (IHC) using horse radish peroxidase developed with 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine (HRP-DAB). We sought to identify and quantify positive staining, particularly in melanoma lesions. We visualized G-protein coupled estrogen receptor (GPER) expression developed with HRP-DAB and counterstained with Azure B (stains melanin) in melanoma tissue sections (n = 3). Matched sections (n = 3), along with 22 unmatched sections, were stained only with Azure B as a control. Breast tissue (n = 1) was used as a positive HRP-DAB control. Images of the stained tissues were generated using a Nuance Spectral Imaging Camera. Analysis of the images was performed using the Nuance Spectral Imaging software and SlideBook. Data was analyzed using a Kruskal-Wallis one way analysis of variance (ANOVA). We showed that a pigmented melanoma tissue doubly stained with anti-GPER HRP-DAB and Azure B can be unmixed using spectra derived from a matched, Azure B-only section, and an anti-GPER HRP-DAB control. We unmixed each of the melanoma lesions using each of the Azure B spectra, evaluated the mean intensity of positive staining, and examined the distribution of the mean intensities (P = .73; Kruskal-Wallis). These results suggest that this method does not require a matched Azure B-only stained control tissue for every melanoma lesion, allowing precious tissues to be conserved for other studies. Importantly, this quantification method reduces the subjectivity of protein expression analysis, and provides a valuable tool for accurate evaluation, particularly for pigmented tissues.

  15. Chromatic Image Analysis For Quantitative Thermal Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buck, Gregory M.

    1995-01-01

    Chromatic image analysis system (CIAS) developed for use in noncontact measurements of temperatures on aerothermodynamic models in hypersonic wind tunnels. Based on concept of temperature coupled to shift in color spectrum for optical measurement. Video camera images fluorescence emitted by phosphor-coated model at two wavelengths. Temperature map of model then computed from relative brightnesses in video images of model at those wavelengths. Eliminates need for intrusive, time-consuming, contact temperature measurements by gauges, making it possible to map temperatures on complex surfaces in timely manner and at reduced cost.

  16. Influence of corrosion layers on quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, A.; Bohne, W.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Rauschenberg, J.; Röhrich, J.; Strub, E.

    2005-09-01

    Art historians and restorers in charge of ancient metal objects are often reluctant to remove the corrosion layer evolved over time, as this would change the appearance of the artefact dramatically. Therefore, when an elemental analysis of the objects is required, this has to be done by penetrating the corrosion layer. In this work the influence of corrosion was studied on Chinese and Roman coins, where removal of oxidized material was possible. Measurements on spots with and without corrosion are presented and the results discussed.

  17. Quantitative Analysis in Nuclear Medicine Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaidi, Habib

    This book provides a review of image analysis techniques as they are applied in the field of diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine. Driven in part by the remarkable increase in computing power and its ready and inexpensive availability, this is a relatively new yet rapidly expanding field. Likewise, although the use of radionuclides for diagnosis and therapy has origins dating back almost to the discovery of natural radioactivity itself, radionuclide therapy and, in particular, targeted radionuclide therapy has only recently emerged as a promising approach for therapy of cancer and, to a lesser extent, other diseases.

  18. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Epithelial Tissues.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoit; Umetsu, Daiki; Eaton, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are tissues that regulate exchanges with the environment. They are very dynamic and can acquire virtually any shape; at the cellular level, they are composed of cells tightly connected by junctions. Most often epithelia are amenable to live imaging; however, the large number of cells composing an epithelium and the absence of informatics tools dedicated to epithelial analysis largely prevented tissue scale studies. Here we present Tissue Analyzer, a free tool that can be used to segment and analyze epithelial cells and monitor tissue dynamics.

  19. Automated Immobilized Metal Affinity Chromatography System for Enrichment of Escherichia coli Phosphoproteome

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Yi; Wu, Si; Zhao, Rui; Zink, Erika M.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Meng, Da; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Lipton, Mary S.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana

    2013-06-05

    Enrichment of bacterial phosphopeptides is an essential step prior to bottom-up mass spectrometry-based analysis of the phosphoproteome, which is fundamental to understanding the role of phosphoproteins in cell signaling and regulation of protein activity. We developed an automated IMAC system to enrich strong cation exchange-fractionated phosphopeptides from the soluble proteome of Escherichia coli MG1655 grown on minimal medium. Initial demonstration of the system resulted in identification of 75 phosphopeptides covering 52 phosphoproteins. Consistent with previous studies, many of these phosphoproteins are involved in the carbohydrate portion of central metabolism. The automated system utilizes a large capacity IMAC column that can effectively enrich phosphopeptides from a bacterial sample by increasing peptide loading and reducing the wash time. An additional benefit of the automated IMAC system is reduced labor and associated costs.

  20. Characterization of the human plasma phosphoproteome using linear ion trap mass spectrometry and multiple search engines.

    PubMed

    Carrascal, Montserrat; Gay, Marina; Ovelleiro, David; Casas, Vanessa; Gelpí, Emilio; Abian, Joaquin

    2010-02-05

    Major plasma protein families play different roles in blood physiology and hemostasis and in immunodefense. Other proteins in plasma can be involved in signaling as chemical messengers or constitute biological markers of the status of distant tissues. In this respect, the plasma phosphoproteome holds potentially relevant information on the mechanisms modulating these processes through the regulation of protein activity. In this work we describe for the first time a collection of phosphopeptides identified in human plasma using immunoaffinity separation of the seven major serum protein families from other plasma proteins, SCX fractionation, and TiO(2) purification prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. One-hundred and twenty-seven phosphosites in 138 phosphopeptides mapping 70 phosphoproteins were identified with FDR < 1%. A high-confidence collection of phosphosites was obtained using a combined search with the OMSSA, SEQUEST, and Phenyx search engines.

  1. A Comparative Assessment of Greek Universities' Efficiency Using Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2010-01-01

    In part due to the increased demand for higher education, typical evaluation frameworks for universities often address the key issue of available resource utilisation. This study seeks to estimate the efficiency of 20 public universities in Greece through quantitative analysis (including performance indicators, data envelopment analysis (DEA) and…

  2. A Comparative Assessment of Greek Universities' Efficiency Using Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2010-01-01

    In part due to the increased demand for higher education, typical evaluation frameworks for universities often address the key issue of available resource utilisation. This study seeks to estimate the efficiency of 20 public universities in Greece through quantitative analysis (including performance indicators, data envelopment analysis (DEA) and…

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2016-12-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  5. Quantitative analysis of heart rate variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurths, J.; Voss, A.; Saparin, P.; Witt, A.; Kleiner, H. J.; Wessel, N.

    1995-03-01

    In the modern industrialized countries every year several hundred thousands of people die due to sudden cardiac death. The individual risk for this sudden cardiac death cannot be defined precisely by common available, noninvasive diagnostic tools like Holter monitoring, highly amplified ECG and traditional linear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV). Therefore, we apply some rather unconventional methods of nonlinear dynamics to analyze the HRV. Especially, some complexity measures that are based on symbolic dynamics as well as a new measure, the renormalized entropy, detect some abnormalities in the HRV of several patients who have been classified in the low risk group by traditional methods. A combination of these complexity measures with the parameters in the frequency domain seems to be a promising way to get a more precise definition of the individual risk. These findings have to be validated by a representative number of patients.

  6. Uncertainty of quantitative microbiological methods of pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gunar, O V; Sakhno, N G

    2015-12-30

    The total uncertainty of quantitative microbiological methods, used in pharmaceutical analysis, consists of several components. The analysis of the most important sources of the quantitative microbiological methods variability demonstrated no effect of culture media and plate-count techniques in the estimation of microbial count while the highly significant effect of other factors (type of microorganism, pharmaceutical product and individual reading and interpreting errors) was established. The most appropriate method of statistical analysis of such data was ANOVA which enabled not only the effect of individual factors to be estimated but also their interactions. Considering all the elements of uncertainty and combining them mathematically the combined relative uncertainty of the test results was estimated both for method of quantitative examination of non-sterile pharmaceuticals and microbial count technique without any product. These data did not exceed 35%, appropriated for a traditional plate count methods.

  7. Quantiprot - a Python package for quantitative analysis of protein sequences.

    PubMed

    Konopka, Bogumił M; Marciniak, Marta; Dyrka, Witold

    2017-07-17

    The field of protein sequence analysis is dominated by tools rooted in substitution matrices and alignments. A complementary approach is provided by methods of quantitative characterization. A major advantage of the approach is that quantitative properties defines a multidimensional solution space, where sequences can be related to each other and differences can be meaningfully interpreted. Quantiprot is a software package in Python, which provides a simple and consistent interface to multiple methods for quantitative characterization of protein sequences. The package can be used to calculate dozens of characteristics directly from sequences or using physico-chemical properties of amino acids. Besides basic measures, Quantiprot performs quantitative analysis of recurrence and determinism in the sequence, calculates distribution of n-grams and computes the Zipf's law coefficient. We propose three main fields of application of the Quantiprot package. First, quantitative characteristics can be used in alignment-free similarity searches, and in clustering of large and/or divergent sequence sets. Second, a feature space defined by quantitative properties can be used in comparative studies of protein families and organisms. Third, the feature space can be used for evaluating generative models, where large number of sequences generated by the model can be compared to actually observed sequences.

  8. iPhos: a toolkit to streamline the alkaline phosphatase-assisted comprehensive LC-MS phosphoproteome investigation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comprehensive characterization of the phosphoproteome in living cells is critical in signal transduction research. But the low abundance of phosphopeptides among the total proteome in cells remains an obstacle in mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis. To provide a solution, an alternative analytic strategy to confidently identify phosphorylated peptides by using the alkaline phosphatase (AP) treatment combined with high-resolution mass spectrometry was provided. While the process is applicable, the key integration along the pipeline was mostly done by tedious manual work. Results We developed a software toolkit, iPhos, to facilitate and streamline the work-flow of AP-assisted phosphoproteome characterization. The iPhos tookit includes one assister and three modules. The iPhos Peak Extraction Assister automates the batch mode peak extraction for multiple liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS) runs. iPhos Module-1 can process the peak lists extracted from the LC-MS analyses derived from the original and dephosphorylated samples to mine out potential phosphorylated peptide signals based on mass shift caused by the loss of some multiples of phosphate groups. And iPhos Module-2 provides customized inclusion lists with peak retention time windows for subsequent targeted LC-MS/MS experiments. Finally, iPhos Module-3 facilitates to link the peptide identifications from protein search engines to the quantification results from pattern-based label-free quantification tools. We further demonstrated the utility of the iPhos toolkit on the data of human metastatic lung cancer cells (CL1-5). Conclusions In the comparison study of the control group of CL1-5 cell lysates and the treatment group of dasatinib-treated CL1-5 cell lysates, we demonstrated the applicability of the iPhos toolkit and reported the experimental results based on the iPhos-facilitated phosphoproteome investigation. And further, we also compared the strategy with pure DDA-based LC

  9. Control of separation and quantitative analysis by GC-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmoud, A.; Huvenne, Jean P.; Legrand, P.

    1992-03-01

    Software for 3-D representations of the 'Absorbance-Wavenumber-Retention time' is used to control the quality of the GC separation. Spectral information given by the FTIR detection allows the user to be sure that a chromatographic peak is 'pure.' The analysis of peppermint essential oil is presented as an example. This assurance is absolutely required for quantitative applications. In these conditions, we have worked out a quantitative analysis of caffeine. Correlation coefficients between integrated absorbance measurements and concentration of caffeine are discussed at two steps of the data treatment.

  10. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  11. Phosphoproteomic Profiling of Human Myocardial Tissues Distinguishes Ischemic from Non-Ischemic End Stage Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Njoroge, Linda W.; Thompson, J. Will; Soderblom, Erik J.; Feger, Bryan J.; Troupes, Constantine D.; Hershberger, Kathleen A.; Ilkayeva, Olga R.; Nagel, Whitney L.; Landinez, Gina P.; Shah, Kishan M.; Burns, Virginia A.; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Foster, Matthew W.; Milano, Carmelo A.; Moseley, M. Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure. PMID:25117565

  12. Celiac Anti-Type 2 Transglutaminase Antibodies Induce Phosphoproteome Modification in Intestinal Epithelial Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marabotti, Anna; Lepretti, Marilena; Salzano, Anna Maria; Scaloni, Andrea; Vitale, Monica; Zambrano, Nicola; Sblattero, Daniele; Esposito, Carla

    2013-01-01

    Background Celiac disease is an inflammatory condition of the small intestine that affects genetically predisposed individuals after dietary wheat gliadin ingestion. Type 2-transglutaminase (TG2) activity seems to be responsible for a strong autoimmune response in celiac disease, TG2 being the main autoantigen. Several studies support the concept that celiac anti-TG2 antibodies may contribute to disease pathogenesis. Our recent findings on the ability of anti-TG2 antibodies to induce a rapid intracellular mobilization of calcium ions, as well as extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation, suggest that they potentially act as signaling molecules. In line with this concept, we have investigated whether anti-TG2 antibodies can induce phosphoproteome modification in an intestinal epithelial cell line. Methods and Principal Findings We studied phosphoproteome modification in Caco-2 cells treated with recombinant celiac anti-TG2 antibodies. We performed a two-dimensional electrophoresis followed by specific staining of phosphoproteins and mass spectrometry analysis of differentially phosphorylated proteins. Of 14 identified proteins (excluding two uncharacterized proteins), three were hypophosphorylated and nine were hyperphosphorylated. Bioinformatics analyses confirmed the presence of phosphorylation sites in all the identified proteins and highlighted their involvement in several fundamental biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, cell stress response, cytoskeletal organization and apoptosis. Conclusions Identification of differentially phosphorylated proteins downstream of TG2-antibody stimulation suggests that in Caco-2 cells these antibodies perturb cell homeostasis by behaving as signaling molecules. We hypothesize that anti-TG2 autoantibodies may destabilize the integrity of the intestinal mucosa in celiac individuals, thus contributing to celiac disease establishment and progression. Since several proteins here identified in this study

  13. Phosphoproteomic profiling of human myocardial tissues distinguishes ischemic from non-ischemic end stage heart failure.

    PubMed

    Schechter, Matthew A; Hsieh, Michael K H; Njoroge, Linda W; Thompson, J Will; Soderblom, Erik J; Feger, Bryan J; Troupes, Constantine D; Hershberger, Kathleen A; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Nagel, Whitney L; Landinez, Gina P; Shah, Kishan M; Burns, Virginia A; Santacruz, Lucia; Hirschey, Matthew D; Foster, Matthew W; Milano, Carmelo A; Moseley, M Arthur; Piacentino, Valentino; Bowles, Dawn E

    2014-01-01

    The molecular differences between ischemic (IF) and non-ischemic (NIF) heart failure are poorly defined. A better understanding of the molecular differences between these two heart failure etiologies may lead to the development of more effective heart failure therapeutics. In this study extensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic profiles of myocardial tissue from patients diagnosed with IF or NIF were assembled and compared. Proteins extracted from left ventricular sections were proteolyzed and phosphopeptides were enriched using titanium dioxide resin. Gel- and label-free nanoscale capillary liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution accuracy mass tandem mass spectrometry allowed for the quantification of 4,436 peptides (corresponding to 450 proteins) and 823 phosphopeptides (corresponding to 400 proteins) from the unenriched and phospho-enriched fractions, respectively. Protein abundance did not distinguish NIF from IF. In contrast, 37 peptides (corresponding to 26 proteins) exhibited a ≥ 2-fold alteration in phosphorylation state (p<0.05) when comparing IF and NIF. The degree of protein phosphorylation at these 37 sites was specifically dependent upon the heart failure etiology examined. Proteins exhibiting phosphorylation alterations were grouped into functional categories: transcriptional activation/RNA processing; cytoskeleton structure/function; molecular chaperones; cell adhesion/signaling; apoptosis; and energetic/metabolism. Phosphoproteomic analysis demonstrated profound post-translational differences in proteins that are involved in multiple cellular processes between different heart failure phenotypes. Understanding the roles these phosphorylation alterations play in the development of NIF and IF has the potential to generate etiology-specific heart failure therapeutics, which could be more effective than current therapeutics in addressing the growing concern of heart failure.

  14. A quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Stacy A.; Dugan, Joanne B.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an informal quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system (FCS). The analysis technique combines a coverage model with a fault tree model. To demonstrate the method's extensive capabilities, we replace the fault tree with a digraph model of the F18 FCS, the only model available to us. The substitution shows that while digraphs have primarily been used for qualitative analysis, they can also be used for quantitative analysis. Based on our assumptions and the particular failure rates assigned to the F18 FCS components, we show that coverage does have a significant effect on the system's reliability and thus it is important to include coverage in the reliability analysis.

  15. A quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Stacy A.; Dugan, Joanne B.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an informal quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system (FCS). The analysis technique combines a coverage model with a fault tree model. To demonstrate the method's extensive capabilities, we replace the fault tree with a digraph model of the F18 FCS, the only model available to us. The substitution shows that while digraphs have primarily been used for qualitative analysis, they can also be used for quantitative analysis. Based on our assumptions and the particular failure rates assigned to the F18 FCS components, we show that coverage does have a significant effect on the system's reliability and thus it is important to include coverage in the reliability analysis.

  16. Issues in Quantitative Analysis of Ultraviolet Imager (UV) Data: Airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    The GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has proven to be especially valuable in correlative substorm, auroral morphology, and extended statistical studies of the auroral regions. Such studies are based on knowledge of the location, spatial, and temporal behavior of auroral emissions. More quantitative studies, based on absolute radiometric intensities from UVI images, require a more intimate knowledge of the instrument behavior and data processing requirements and are inherently more difficult than studies based on relative knowledge of the oval location. In this study, UVI airglow observations are analyzed and compared with model predictions to illustrate issues that arise in quantitative analysis of UVI images. These issues include instrument calibration, long term changes in sensitivity, and imager flat field response as well as proper background correction. Airglow emissions are chosen for this study because of their relatively straightforward modeling requirements and because of their implications for thermospheric compositional studies. The analysis issues discussed here, however, are identical to those faced in quantitative auroral studies.

  17. Issues in Quantitative Analysis of Ultraviolet Imager (UV) Data: Airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    The GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has proven to be especially valuable in correlative substorm, auroral morphology, and extended statistical studies of the auroral regions. Such studies are based on knowledge of the location, spatial, and temporal behavior of auroral emissions. More quantitative studies, based on absolute radiometric intensities from UVI images, require a more intimate knowledge of the instrument behavior and data processing requirements and are inherently more difficult than studies based on relative knowledge of the oval location. In this study, UVI airglow observations are analyzed and compared with model predictions to illustrate issues that arise in quantitative analysis of UVI images. These issues include instrument calibration, long term changes in sensitivity, and imager flat field response as well as proper background correction. Airglow emissions are chosen for this study because of their relatively straightforward modeling requirements and because of their implications for thermospheric compositional studies. The analysis issues discussed here, however, are identical to those faced in quantitative auroral studies.

  18. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    Hugh A. Barton1 and Carey N. Pope2
    1US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2Department of...

  19. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    Hugh A. Barton1 and Carey N. Pope2
    1US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2Department of...

  20. Quantitating the subtleties of microglial morphology with fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut; Jelinek, Herbert F.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that microglial form and function are inextricably linked. In recent years, the traditional view that microglial form ranges between “ramified resting” and “activated amoeboid” has been emphasized through advancing imaging techniques that point to microglial form being highly dynamic even within the currently accepted morphological categories. Moreover, microglia adopt meaningful intermediate forms between categories, with considerable crossover in function and varying morphologies as they cycle, migrate, wave, phagocytose, and extend and retract fine and gross processes. From a quantitative perspective, it is problematic to measure such variability using traditional methods, but one way of quantitating such detail is through fractal analysis. The techniques of fractal analysis have been used for quantitating microglial morphology, to categorize gross differences but also to differentiate subtle differences (e.g., amongst ramified cells). Multifractal analysis in particular is one technique of fractal analysis that may be useful for identifying intermediate forms. Here we review current trends and methods of fractal analysis, focusing on box counting analysis, including lacunarity and multifractal analysis, as applied to microglial morphology. PMID:23386810

  1. Quantitating the subtleties of microglial morphology with fractal analysis.

    PubMed

    Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut; Jelinek, Herbert F

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that microglial form and function are inextricably linked. In recent years, the traditional view that microglial form ranges between "ramified resting" and "activated amoeboid" has been emphasized through advancing imaging techniques that point to microglial form being highly dynamic even within the currently accepted morphological categories. Moreover, microglia adopt meaningful intermediate forms between categories, with considerable crossover in function and varying morphologies as they cycle, migrate, wave, phagocytose, and extend and retract fine and gross processes. From a quantitative perspective, it is problematic to measure such variability using traditional methods, but one way of quantitating such detail is through fractal analysis. The techniques of fractal analysis have been used for quantitating microglial morphology, to categorize gross differences but also to differentiate subtle differences (e.g., amongst ramified cells). Multifractal analysis in particular is one technique of fractal analysis that may be useful for identifying intermediate forms. Here we review current trends and methods of fractal analysis, focusing on box counting analysis, including lacunarity and multifractal analysis, as applied to microglial morphology.

  2. Quantitative analysis of regional myocardial performance in coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. K.; Dodge, H. T.; Frimer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Findings from a group of subjects with significant coronary artery stenosis are given. A group of controls determined by use of a quantitative method for the study of regional myocardial performance based on the frame-by-frame analysis of biplane left ventricular angiograms are presented. Particular emphasis was placed upon the analysis of wall motion in terms of normalized segment dimensions, timing and velocity of contraction. The results were compared with the method of subjective assessment used clinically.

  3. Quantitative analysis of regional myocardial performance in coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. K.; Dodge, H. T.; Frimer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Findings from a group of subjects with significant coronary artery stenosis are given. A group of controls determined by use of a quantitative method for the study of regional myocardial performance based on the frame-by-frame analysis of biplane left ventricular angiograms are presented. Particular emphasis was placed upon the analysis of wall motion in terms of normalized segment dimensions, timing and velocity of contraction. The results were compared with the method of subjective assessment used clinically.

  4. Quantitative transverse flow assessment using OCT speckle decorrelation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of inter-Ascan speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to assess fluid flow. This method allows quantitative measurement of fluid flow in a plane normal to the scanning beam. To validate this method, OCT images were obtained from a micro fluid channel with bovine milk flowing at different speeds. We also imaged a blood vessel from in vivo animal models and performed speckle analysis to asses blood flow.

  5. Improved method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, J.S.; Gjerde, D.T.; Schmuckler, G.

    An improved apparatus and method are described for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single element and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  6. Quantitative analysis of single-molecule superresolution images

    PubMed Central

    Coltharp, Carla; Yang, Xinxing; Xiao, Jie

    2014-01-01

    This review highlights the quantitative capabilities of single-molecule localization-based superresolution imaging methods. In addition to revealing fine structural details, the molecule coordinate lists generated by these methods provide the critical ability to quantify the number, clustering, and colocalization of molecules with 10 – 50 nm resolution. Here we describe typical workflows and precautions for quantitative analysis of single-molecule superresolution images. These guidelines include potential pitfalls and essential control experiments, allowing critical assessment and interpretation of superresolution images. PMID:25179006

  7. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books.

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K; Pickett, Joseph P; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-14

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of 'culturomics,' focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.

  8. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva P.; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K.; Pickett, Joseph P.; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-01

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics’, focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. ‘Culturomics’ extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities. PMID:21163965

  9. Quantitative numerical analysis of transient IR-experiments on buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Ch.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Brink, A.; Röllig, M.

    2004-12-01

    Impulse-thermography has been established as a fast and reliable tool in many areas of non-destructive testing. In recent years several investigations have been done to apply active thermography to civil engineering. For quantitative investigations in this area of application, finite difference calculations have been performed for systematic studies on the influence of environmental conditions, heating power and time, defect depth and size and thermal properties of the bulk material (concrete). The comparison of simulated and experimental data enables the quantitative analysis of defects.

  10. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis of complex quantitative phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, A; Reich, T

    2001-01-01

    We report a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the five simulated quantitative traits in Genetic Analysis Workshop 12 using the Loki software. Our objectives were to determine the efficacy of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method and to test a new scoring technique. Our initial blind analysis, on replicate 42 (the "best replicate") successfully detected four out of the five disease loci and found no false positives. A power analysis shows that the software could usually detect 4 of the 10 trait/gene combinations at an empirical point-wise p-value of 1.5 x 10(-4).

  11. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Leanne; Převorovský, Martin; Rallis, Charalampos; Jeffares, Daniel C; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-10-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license.

  12. Quantitative Rietveld analysis of CAC clinker phases using synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Guirado, F. . E-mail: francesc.guirado@urv.cat; Gali, S.

    2006-11-15

    The quantitative Rietveld analyses of twenty samples of CAC from four different manufacturers over the world, one synthetic mixture and a NIST standard were performed using synchrotron radiation. As compared with conventional XRD, synchrotron powder diffraction permitted to find new minor phases, improve the characterization of solid solutions of iron rich CAC phases and reduce preferential orientation and microabsorption effects. Diffraction data were complemented with XRF and TG/DT analyses. Synchrotron results were used as a reference test to improve the performance of conventional powder diffraction, by an accurate selection of refinable profile and structural parameters, and permitted to extract several recommendations for conventional quantitative Rietveld procedures. It is shown that with these recommendations in mind, conventional XRD based Rietveld analyses are comparable to those obtained from synchrotron data. In summary, quantitative XRD Rietveld analysis is confirmed as an excellent tool for the CAC cement industry.

  13. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license. PMID:27712582

  14. A strategy to apply quantitative epistasis analysis on developmental traits.

    PubMed

    Labocha, Marta K; Yuan, Wang; Aleman-Meza, Boanerges; Zhong, Weiwei

    2017-05-15

    Genetic interactions are keys to understand complex traits and evolution. Epistasis analysis is an effective method to map genetic interactions. Large-scale quantitative epistasis analysis has been well established for single cells. However, there is a substantial lack of such studies in multicellular organisms and their complex phenotypes such as development. Here we present a method to extend quantitative epistasis analysis to developmental traits. In the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we applied RNA interference on mutants to inactivate two genes, used an imaging system to quantitatively measure phenotypes, and developed a set of statistical methods to extract genetic interactions from phenotypic measurement. Using two different C. elegans developmental phenotypes, body length and sex ratio, as examples, we showed that this method could accommodate various metazoan phenotypes with performances comparable to those methods in single cell growth studies. Comparing with qualitative observations, this method of quantitative epistasis enabled detection of new interactions involving subtle phenotypes. For example, several sex-ratio genes were found to interact with brc-1 and brd-1, the orthologs of the human breast cancer genes BRCA1 and BARD1, respectively. We confirmed the brc-1 interactions with the following genes in DNA damage response: C34F6.1, him-3 (ortholog of HORMAD1, HORMAD2), sdc-1, and set-2 (ortholog of SETD1A, SETD1B, KMT2C, KMT2D), validating the effectiveness of our method in detecting genetic interactions. We developed a reliable, high-throughput method for quantitative epistasis analysis of developmental phenotypes.

  15. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  16. Searching for Novel Cdk5 Substrates in Brain by Comparative Phosphoproteomics of Wild Type and Cdk5−/− Mice

    PubMed Central

    Contreras-Vallejos, Erick; Utreras, Elías; Bórquez, Daniel A.; Prochazkova, Michaela; Terse, Anita; Jaffe, Howard; Toledo, Andrea; Arruti, Cristina; Pant, Harish C.; Kulkarni, Ashok B.; González-Billault, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is the most common post-translational modification that regulates several pivotal functions in cells. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5) is a proline-directed serine/threonine kinase which is mostly active in the nervous system. It regulates several biological processes such as neuronal migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, axonal guidance and synaptic plasticity among others. In search for novel substrates of Cdk5 in the brain we performed quantitative phosphoproteomics analysis, isolating phosphoproteins from whole brain derived from E18.5 Cdk5+/+ and Cdk5−/− embryos, using an Immobilized Metal-Ion Affinity Chromatography (IMAC), which specifically binds to phosphorylated proteins. The isolated phosphoproteins were eluted and isotopically labeled for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry identification. We found 40 proteins that showed decreased phosphorylation at Cdk5−/− brains. In addition, out of these 40 hypophosphorylated proteins we characterized two proteins, :MARCKS (Myristoylated Alanine-Rich protein Kinase C substrate) and Grin1 (G protein regulated inducer of neurite outgrowth 1). MARCKS is known to be phosphorylated by Cdk5 in chick neural cells while Grin1 has not been reported to be phosphorylated by Cdk5. When these proteins were overexpressed in N2A neuroblastoma cell line along with p35, serine phosphorylation in their Cdk5 motifs was found to be increased. In contrast, treatments with roscovitine, the Cdk5 inhibitor, resulted in an opposite effect on serine phosphorylation in N2A cells and primary hippocampal neurons transfected with MARCKS. In summary, the results presented here identify Grin 1 as novel Cdk5 substrate and confirm previously identified MARCKS as a a bona fide Cdk5 substrate. PMID:24658276

  17. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  18. Quantitative risk analysis of oil storage facilities in seismic areas.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocino, Giovanni; Iervolino, Iunio; Orlando, Francesca; Salzano, Ernesto

    2005-08-31

    Quantitative risk analysis (QRA) of industrial facilities has to take into account multiple hazards threatening critical equipment. Nevertheless, engineering procedures able to evaluate quantitatively the effect of seismic action are not well established. Indeed, relevant industrial accidents may be triggered by loss of containment following ground shaking or other relevant natural hazards, either directly or through cascade effects ('domino effects'). The issue of integrating structural seismic risk into quantitative probabilistic seismic risk analysis (QpsRA) is addressed in this paper by a representative study case regarding an oil storage plant with a number of atmospheric steel tanks containing flammable substances. Empirical seismic fragility curves and probit functions, properly defined both for building-like and non building-like industrial components, have been crossed with outcomes of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for a test site located in south Italy. Once the seismic failure probabilities have been quantified, consequence analysis has been performed for those events which may be triggered by the loss of containment following seismic action. Results are combined by means of a specific developed code in terms of local risk contour plots, i.e. the contour line for the probability of fatal injures at any point (x, y) in the analysed area. Finally, a comparison with QRA obtained by considering only process-related top events is reported for reference.

  19. An improved quantitative analysis method for plant cortical microtubules.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Huang, Chenyang; Wang, Jia; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of plant cortical microtubules can reflect the physiological state of cells. However, little attention has been paid to the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules so far. In this paper, Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD) algorithm was applied in the image preprocessing of the original microtubule image. And then Intrinsic Mode Function 1 (IMF1) image obtained by decomposition was selected to do the texture analysis based on Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) algorithm. Meanwhile, in order to further verify its reliability, the proposed texture analysis method was utilized to distinguish different images of Arabidopsis microtubules. The results showed that the effect of BEMD algorithm on edge preserving accompanied with noise reduction was positive, and the geometrical characteristic of the texture was obvious. Four texture parameters extracted by GLCM perfectly reflected the different arrangements between the two images of cortical microtubules. In summary, the results indicate that this method is feasible and effective for the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules. It not only provides a new quantitative approach for the comprehensive study of the role played by microtubules in cell life activities but also supplies references for other similar studies.

  20. Quantitative analysis of synchrotron radiation intravenous angiographic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarnelli, Anna; Nemoz, Christian; Elleaume, Hélène; Estève, François; Bertrand, Bernard; Bravin, Alberto

    2005-02-01

    A medical research protocol on clinical intravenous coronary angiography has been completed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) biomedical beamline. The aim was to investigate the accuracy of intravenous coronary angiography based on the K-edge digital subtraction technique for the detection of in-stent restenosis. For each patient, diagnosis has been performed on the synchrotron radiation images and monitored with the conventional selective coronary angiography method taken as the golden standard. In this paper, the methods of image processing and the results of the quantitative analysis are described. Image processing includes beam harmonic contamination correction, spatial deconvolution and the extraction of a 'contrast' and a 'tissue' image from each couple of radiograms simultaneously acquired at energies bracketing the K-edge of iodine. Quantitative analysis includes the estimation of the vessel diameter, the calculation of the absolute iodine concentration profiles along the coronary arteries and the stenosis degree measurement.

  1. Biosynthesis and Regulation of Wheat Amylose and Amylopectin from Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Characterization of Granule-binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guan-Xing; Zhou, Jian-Wen; Liu, Yan-Lin; Lu, Xiao-Bing; Han, Cai-Xia; Zhang, Wen-Ying; Xu, Yan-Hao; Yan, Yue-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Waxy starch has an important influence on the qualities of breads. Generally, grain weight and yield in waxy wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) are significantly lower than in bread wheat. In this study, we performed the first proteomic and phosphoproteomic analyses of starch granule-binding proteins by comparing the waxy wheat cultivar Shannong 119 and the bread wheat cultivar Nongda 5181. These results indicate that reduced amylose content does not affect amylopectin synthesis, but it causes significant reduction of total starch biosynthesis, grain size, weight and grain yield. Two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis identified 40 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots in waxy and non-waxy wheats, which belonged mainly to starch synthase (SS) I, SS IIa and granule-bound SS I. Most DEPs involved in amylopectin synthesis showed a similar expression pattern during grain development, suggesting relatively independent amylose and amylopectin synthesis pathways. Phosphoproteome analysis of starch granule-binding proteins, using TiO2 microcolumns and LC-MS/MS, showed that the total number of phosphoproteins and their phosphorylation levels in ND5181 were significantly higher than in SN119, but proteins controlling amylopectin synthesis had similar phosphorylation levels. Our results revealed the lack of amylose did not affect the expression and phosphorylation of the starch granule-binding proteins involved in amylopectin biosynthesis. PMID:27604546

  2. Up-to-Date Workflow for Plant (Phospho)proteomics Identifies Differential Drought-Responsive Phosphorylation Events in Maize Leaves.

    PubMed

    Vu, Lam Dai; Stes, Elisabeth; Van Bel, Michiel; Nelissen, Hilde; Maddelein, Davy; Inzé, Dirk; Coppens, Frederik; Martens, Lennart; Gevaert, Kris; De Smet, Ive

    2016-12-02

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most common post-translational modifications (PTMs), which can regulate protein activity and localization as well as protein-protein interactions in numerous cellular processes. Phosphopeptide enrichment techniques enable plant researchers to acquire insight into phosphorylation-controlled signaling networks in various plant species. Most phosphoproteome analyses of plant samples still involve stable isotope labeling, peptide fractionation, and demand a lot of mass spectrometry (MS) time. Here, we present a simple workflow to probe, map, and catalogue plant phosphoproteomes, requiring relatively low amounts of starting material, no labeling, no fractionation, and no excessive analysis time. Following optimization of the different experimental steps on Arabidopsis thaliana samples, we transferred our workflow to maize, a major monocot crop, to study signaling upon drought stress. In addition, we included normalization to protein abundance to identify true phosphorylation changes. Overall, we identified a set of new phosphosites in both Arabidopsis thaliana and maize, some of which are differentially phosphorylated upon drought. All data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD003634, but to provide easy access to our model plant and crop data sets, we created an online database, Plant PTM Viewer ( bioinformatics.psb.ugent.be/webtools/ptm_viewer/ ), where all phosphosites identified in our study can be consulted.

  3. Implementing a Quantitative Analysis Design Tool for Future Generation Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    future MAC-enabled systems. A human-computer interaction ( HCI ) Index, originally applied to multi-function displays was applied to the prototype Vigilant...Spirit interface. A modified version of the HCI Index was successfully applied to perform a quantitative analysis of the baseline VSCS interface and...two modified interface designs. The modified HCI Index incorporates the Hick-Hyman decision time, Fitts’ Law time, and the physical actions

  4. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  5. Phosphoproteomics of collagen receptor networks reveals SHP-2 phosphorylation downstream of wild-type DDR2 and its lung cancer mutants.

    PubMed

    Iwai, Leo K; Payne, Leo S; Luczynski, Maciej T; Chang, Francis; Xu, Huifang; Clinton, Ryan W; Paul, Angela; Esposito, Edward A; Gridley, Scott; Leitinger, Birgit; Naegle, Kristen M; Huang, Paul H

    2013-09-15

    Collagen is an important extracellular matrix component that directs many fundamental cellular processes including differentiation, proliferation and motility. The signalling networks driving these processes are propagated by collagen receptors such as the β1 integrins and the DDRs (discoidin domain receptors). To gain an insight into the molecular mechanisms of collagen receptor signalling, we have performed a quantitative analysis of the phosphorylation networks downstream of collagen activation of integrins and DDR2. Temporal analysis over seven time points identified 424 phosphorylated proteins. Distinct DDR2 tyrosine phosphorylation sites displayed unique temporal activation profiles in agreement with in vitro kinase data. Multiple clustering analysis of the phosphoproteomic data revealed several DDR2 candidate downstream signalling nodes, including SHP-2 (Src homology 2 domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase 2), NCK1 (non-catalytic region of tyrosine kinase adaptor protein 1), LYN, SHIP-2 [SH2 (Src homology 2)-domain-containing inositol phosphatase 2], PIK3C2A (phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit type 2α) and PLCL2 (phospholipase C-like 2). Biochemical validation showed that SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation is dependent on DDR2 kinase activity. Targeted proteomic profiling of a panel of lung SCC (squamous cell carcinoma) DDR2 mutants demonstrated that SHP-2 is tyrosine-phosphorylated by the L63V and G505S mutants. In contrast, the I638F kinase domain mutant exhibited diminished DDR2 and SHP-2 tyrosine phosphorylation levels which have an inverse relationship with clonogenic potential. Taken together, the results of the present study indicate that SHP-2 is a key signalling node downstream of the DDR2 receptor which may have therapeutic implications in a subset of DDR2 mutations recently uncovered in genome-wide lung SCC sequencing screens.

  6. Phosphoproteomics Identifies CK2 as a Negative Regulator of Beige Adipocyte Thermogenesis and Energy Expenditure.

    PubMed

    Shinoda, Kosaku; Ohyama, Kana; Hasegawa, Yutaka; Chang, Hsin-Yi; Ogura, Mayu; Sato, Ayaka; Hong, Haemin; Hosono, Takashi; Sharp, Louis Z; Scheel, David W; Graham, Mark; Ishihama, Yasushi; Kajimura, Shingo

    2015-12-01

    Catecholamines promote lipolysis both in brown and white adipocytes, whereas the same stimuli preferentially activate thermogenesis in brown adipocytes. Molecular mechanisms for the adipose-selective activation of thermogenesis remain poorly understood. Here, we employed quantitative phosphoproteomics to map global and temporal phosphorylation profiles in brown, beige, and white adipocytes under β3-adrenenoceptor activation and identified kinases responsible for the adipose-selective phosphorylation profiles. We found that casein kinase2 (CK2) activity is preferentially higher in white adipocytes than brown/beige adipocytes. Genetic or pharmacological blockade of CK2 in white adipocytes activates the thermogenic program in response to cAMP stimuli. Such activation is largely through reduced CK2-mediated phosphorylation of class I HDACs. Notably, inhibition of CK2 promotes beige adipocyte biogenesis and leads to an increase in whole-body energy expenditure and ameliorates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. These results indicate that CK2 is a plausible target to rewire the β3-adrenenoceptor signaling cascade that promotes thermogenesis in adipocytes.

  7. Phosphoproteomics Reveals Distinct Modes of Mec1/ATR Signaling During DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Francisco Meirelles Bastos; Kim, Dongsung; Cussiol, Jose Renato; Das, Jishnu; Jeong, Min Cheol; Doerfler, Lillian; Schmidt, Kristina Hildegard; Yu, Haiyuan; Smolka, Marcus Bustamante

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The Mec1/Tel1 kinases (human ATR/ATM) play numerous roles in the DNA replication stress response. Despite the multi-functionality of these kinases, studies of their in vivo action have mostly relied on a few well-established substrates. Here we employed a combined genetic-phosphoproteomic approach to monitor Mec1/Tel1 signaling in a systematic, unbiased and quantitative manner. Unexpectedly, we find that Mec1 is highly active during normal DNA replication, at levels comparable or higher than Mec1’s activation state induced by replication stress. This “replication-correlated” mode of Mec1 action requires the 9-1-1 clamp and the Dna2 lagging-strand factor, and is distinguishable from Mec1’s action in activating the downstream kinase Rad53. We propose that Mec1/ATR performs key functions during ongoing DNA synthesis that are distinct from their canonical checkpoint role during replication stress. PMID:25752575

  8. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Tobacco Mature Pollen and Pollen Activated in vitro *

    PubMed Central

    Fíla, Jan; Radau, Sonja; Matros, Andrea; Hartmann, Anja; Scholz, Uwe; Feciková, Jana; Mock, Hans-Peter; Čapková, Věra; Zahedi, René Peiman; Honys, David

    2016-01-01

    Tobacco mature pollen has extremely desiccated cytoplasm, and is metabolically quiescent. Upon re-hydration it becomes metabolically active and that results in later emergence of rapidly growing pollen tube. These changes in cytoplasm hydration and metabolic activity are accompanied by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we subjected mature pollen, 5-min-activated pollen, and 30-min-activated pollen to TCA/acetone protein extraction, trypsin digestion and phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. The enriched fraction was subjected to nLC-MS/MS. We identified 471 phosphopeptides that carried 432 phosphorylation sites, position of which was exactly matched by mass spectrometry. These 471 phosphopeptides were assigned to 301 phosphoproteins, because some proteins carried more phosphorylation sites. Of the 13 functional groups, the majority of proteins were put into these categories: transcription, protein synthesis, protein destination and storage, and signal transduction. Many proteins were of unknown function, reflecting the fact that male gametophyte contains many specific proteins that have not been fully functionally annotated. The quantitative data highlighted the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during pollen activation; the identified phosphopeptides were divided into seven groups based on the regulatory trends. The major group comprised mature pollen-specific phosphopeptides that were dephosphorylated during pollen activation. Several phosphopeptides representing the same phosphoprotein had different regulation, which pinpointed the complexity of protein phosphorylation and its clear functional context. Collectively, we showed the first phosphoproteomics data on activated pollen where the position of phosphorylation sites was clearly demonstrated and regulatory kinetics was resolved. PMID:26792808

  9. Phosphoproteomics Profiling of Tobacco Mature Pollen and Pollen Activated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Fíla, Jan; Radau, Sonja; Matros, Andrea; Hartmann, Anja; Scholz, Uwe; Feciková, Jana; Mock, Hans-Peter; Čapková, Věra; Zahedi, René Peiman; Honys, David

    2016-04-01

    Tobacco mature pollen has extremely desiccated cytoplasm, and is metabolically quiescent. Upon re-hydration it becomes metabolically active and that results in later emergence of rapidly growing pollen tube. These changes in cytoplasm hydration and metabolic activity are accompanied by protein phosphorylation. In this study, we subjected mature pollen, 5-min-activated pollen, and 30-min-activated pollen to TCA/acetone protein extraction, trypsin digestion and phosphopeptide enrichment by titanium dioxide. The enriched fraction was subjected to nLC-MS/MS. We identified 471 phosphopeptides that carried 432 phosphorylation sites, position of which was exactly matched by mass spectrometry. These 471 phosphopeptides were assigned to 301 phosphoproteins, because some proteins carried more phosphorylation sites. Of the 13 functional groups, the majority of proteins were put into these categories: transcription, protein synthesis, protein destination and storage, and signal transduction. Many proteins were of unknown function, reflecting the fact that male gametophyte contains many specific proteins that have not been fully functionally annotated. The quantitative data highlighted the dynamics of protein phosphorylation during pollen activation; the identified phosphopeptides were divided into seven groups based on the regulatory trends. The major group comprised mature pollen-specific phosphopeptides that were dephosphorylated during pollen activation. Several phosphopeptides representing the same phosphoprotein had different regulation, which pinpointed the complexity of protein phosphorylation and its clear functional context. Collectively, we showed the first phosphoproteomics data on activated pollen where the position of phosphorylation sites was clearly demonstrated and regulatory kinetics was resolved.

  10. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of SQ Injection Using Multiple Chromatographic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Chau, Siu-Leung; Huang, Zhi-Bing; Song, Yan-Gang; Yue, Rui-Qi; Ho, Alan; Lin, Chao-Zhan; Huang, Wen-Hua; Han, Quan-Bin

    2016-08-19

    Quality control of Chinese medicine injections remains a challenge due to our poor knowledge of their complex chemical profile. This study aims to investigate the chemical composition of one of the best-selling injections, Shenqi Fuzheng (SQ) injection (SQI), via a full component quantitative analysis. A total of 15 representative small molecular components of SQI were simultaneously determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS); saccharide composition of SQI was also quantitatively determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) on an amino column before and after acid hydrolysis. The existence of polysaccharides was also examined on a gel permeation chromatography column. The method was well validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy and stability, and was successfully applied to analyze 13 SQI samples. The results demonstrate that up to 94.69% (w/w) of this injection product are quantitatively determined, in which small molecules and monosaccharide/sucrose account for 0.18%-0.21%, and 53.49%-58.2%, respectively. The quantitative information contributes to accumulating scientific evidence to better understand the therapy efficacy and safety of complex Chinese medicine injections.

  11. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-04

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the heterogeneous population of endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Kosheverova, Vera; Kamentseva, Rimma; Kharchenko, Marianna; Sokolkova, Alena; Kornilova, Elena; Samsonova, Maria

    2017-03-07

    The quantitative characterization of endocytic vesicles in images acquired with microscope is critically important for deciphering of endocytosis mechanisms. Image segmentation is the most important step of quantitative image analysis. In spite of availability of many segmentation methods, the accurate segmentation is challenging when the images are heterogeneous with respect to object shapes and signal intensities what is typical for images of endocytic vesicles. We present a Morphological reconstruction and Contrast mapping segmentation method (MrComas) for the segmentation of the endocytic vesicle population that copes with the heterogeneity in their shape and intensity. The method uses morphological opening and closing by reconstruction in the vicinity of local minima and maxima respectively thus creating the strong contrast between their basins of attraction. As a consequence, the intensity is flattened within the objects and their edges are enhanced. The method accurately recovered quantitative characteristics of synthetic images that preserve characteristic features of the endocytic vesicle population. In benchmarks and quantitative comparisons with two other popular segmentation methods, namely manual thresholding and Squash plugin, MrComas shows the best segmentation results on real biological images of EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) endocytosis. As a proof of feasibility, the method was applied to quantify the dynamical behavior of Early Endosomal Autoantigen 1 (EEA1)-positive endosome subpopulations during EGF-stimulated endocytosis.

  13. A Quantitative Method for Microtubule Analysis in Fluorescence Images.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaodong; Li, Lingfei; Hu, Jiongyu; Zhang, Qiong; Dang, Yongming; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-12-01

    Microtubule analysis is of significant value for a better understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Although immunofluorescence microscopic techniques have proven useful in the study of microtubules, comparative results commonly rely on a descriptive and subjective visual analysis. We developed an objective and quantitative method based on image processing and analysis of fluorescently labeled microtubular patterns in cultured cells. We used a multi-parameter approach by analyzing four quantifiable characteristics to compose our quantitative feature set. Then we interpreted specific changes in the parameters and revealed the contribution of each feature set using principal component analysis. In addition, we verified that different treatment groups could be clearly discriminated using principal components of the multi-parameter model. High predictive accuracy of four commonly used multi-classification methods confirmed our method. These results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of our method in the analysis of microtubules in fluorescence images. Application of the analytical methods presented here provides information concerning the organization and modification of microtubules, and could aid in the further understanding of structural and functional aspects of microtubules under normal and pathological conditions.

  14. What Really Happens in Quantitative Group Research? Results of a Content Analysis of Recent Quantitative Research in "JSGW"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyle, Lauren H.; Whittaker, Tiffany A.; Eyal, Maytal; McCarthy, Christopher J.

    2017-01-01

    The authors conducted a content analysis on quantitative studies published in "The Journal for Specialists in Group Work" ("JSGW") between 2012 and 2015. This brief report provides a general overview of the current practices of quantitative group research in counseling. The following study characteristics are reported and…

  15. Quantitative multivariate analysis of dynamic multicellular morphogenic trajectories.

    PubMed

    White, Douglas E; Sylvester, Jonathan B; Levario, Thomas J; Lu, Hang; Streelman, J Todd; McDevitt, Todd C; Kemp, Melissa L

    2015-07-01

    Interrogating fundamental cell biology principles that govern tissue morphogenesis is critical to better understanding of developmental biology and engineering novel multicellular systems. Recently, functional micro-tissues derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates have provided novel platforms for experimental investigation; however elucidating the factors directing emergent spatial phenotypic patterns remains a significant challenge. Computational modelling techniques offer a unique complementary approach to probe mechanisms regulating morphogenic processes and provide a wealth of spatio-temporal data, but quantitative analysis of simulations and comparison to experimental data is extremely difficult. Quantitative descriptions of spatial phenomena across multiple systems and scales would enable unprecedented comparisons of computational simulations with experimental systems, thereby leveraging the inherent power of computational methods to interrogate the mechanisms governing emergent properties of multicellular biology. To address these challenges, we developed a portable pattern recognition pipeline consisting of: the conversion of cellular images into networks, extraction of novel features via network analysis, and generation of morphogenic trajectories. This novel methodology enabled the quantitative description of morphogenic pattern trajectories that could be compared across diverse systems: computational modelling of multicellular structures, differentiation of stem cell aggregates, and gastrulation of cichlid fish. Moreover, this method identified novel spatio-temporal features associated with different stages of embryo gastrulation, and elucidated a complex paracrine mechanism capable of explaining spatiotemporal pattern kinetic differences in ESC aggregates of different sizes.

  16. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-04-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells.

  17. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed Central

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-01-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells. PMID:2720066

  18. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  19. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  20. Combining Metabolic ¹⁵N Labeling with Improved Tandem MOAC for Enhanced Probing of the Phosphoproteome.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Martin; Huck, Nicola; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Conrath, Uwe; Beckers, Gerold J M

    2015-01-01

    that is based on the successive enrichment of light and heavy nitrogen-labeled phosphoproteins and peptides. This improved strategy combines metabolic labeling of whole plants with the stable heavy nitrogen isotope ((15)N), protein extraction under denaturing conditions, phosphoprotein enrichment using Al(OH)3-based MOAC, and tryptic digest of enriched phosphoproteins followed by TiO2-based MOAC of phosphopeptides and quantitative phosphopeptide measurement by liquid chromatography (LC) and high-resolution accurate mass (HR/AM) mass spectrometry (MS). Thus, tandem MOAC effectively targets the phosphate moiety of phosphoproteins and phosphopeptides and allows probing of the phosphoproteome to unprecedented depth, while (15)N metabolic labeling enables accurate relative quantification of measured peptides and direct comparison between samples.

  1. Quantitative analysis of endocytosis with cytoplasmic pHluorin chimeras.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Derek C; Whitworth, Karen; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-09-01

    The pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant pHluorin is typically fused to the extracellular domain of transmembrane proteins to monitor endocytosis. Here, we have turned pHluorin inside-out, and show that cytoplasmic fusions of pHluorin are effective quantitative reporters for endocytosis and multivesicular body (MVB) sorting. In yeast in particular, fusion of GFP and its variants on the extracellular side of transmembrane proteins can result in perturbed trafficking. In contrast, cytoplasmic fusions are well tolerated, allowing for the quantitative assessment of trafficking of virtually any transmembrane protein. Quenching of degradation-resistant pHluorin in the acidic vacuole permits quantification of extravacuolar cargo proteins at steady-state levels and is compatible with kinetic analysis of endocytosis in live cells.

  2. Biomechanical cell analysis using quantitative phase imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, Adam; Park, Han Sang; Eldridge, William J.

    2016-03-01

    Quantitative phase imaging provides nanometer scale sensitivity and has been previously used to study spectral and temporal characteristics of individual cells in vitro, especially red blood cells. Here we extend this work to study the mechanical responses of individual cells due to the influence of external stimuli. Cell stiffness may be characterized by analyzing the inherent thermal fluctuations of cells but by applying external stimuli, additional information can be obtained. The time dependent response of cells due to external shear stress is examined with high speed quantitative phase imaging and found to exhibit characteristics that relate to their stiffness. However, analysis beyond the cellular scale also reveals internal organization of the cell and its modulation due to pathologic processes such as carcinogenesis. Further studies with microfluidic platforms point the way for using this approach in high throughput assays.

  3. [Simultaneous quantitative analysis of four lignanoids in Schisandra chinensis by quantitative analysis of multi-components by single marker].

    PubMed

    He, Feng-Cheng; Li, Shou-Xin; Zhao, Zhi-Quan; Dong, Jin-Ping; Liu, Wu-Zhan; Su, Rui-Qiang

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study is to establish a new method of quality evaluation and validate its feasibilities by the simultaneous quantitative assay of four lignanoids in Schisandra chinensis. A new quality evaluation method, quantitative analysis of multi-components by single marker (QAMS), was established and validated with Schisandra chinensis. Four main lignanoids, schisandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and gamma-schizandrin, were selected as analytes and schisandrin as internal reference substance to evaluate the quality. Their contents in 13 different batches of samples, collected from different bathes, were determined by both external standard method and QAMS. The method was evaluated by comparison of the quantitative results between external standard method and QAMS. No significant differences were found in the quantitative results of four lignanoids in 13 batches of S. chinensis determined by external standard method and QAMS. QAMS is feasible for determination of four lignanoids simultaneously when some authentic standard substances were unavailable, and the developed method can be used for quality control of S. chinensis.

  4. Quantitative 3D analysis of huge nanoparticle assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanaga, Daniele; Bleichrodt, Folkert; Altantzis, Thomas; Winckelmans, Naomi; Palenstijn, Willem Jan; Sijbers, Jan; de Nijs, Bart; van Huis, Marijn A.; Sánchez-Iglesias, Ana; Liz-Marzán, Luis M.; van Blaaderen, Alfons; Joost Batenburg, K.; Bals, Sara; van Tendeloo, Gustaaf

    2015-12-01

    Nanoparticle assemblies can be investigated in 3 dimensions using electron tomography. However, it is not straightforward to obtain quantitative information such as the number of particles or their relative position. This becomes particularly difficult when the number of particles increases. We propose a novel approach in which prior information on the shape of the individual particles is exploited. It improves the quality of the reconstruction of these complex assemblies significantly. Moreover, this quantitative Sparse Sphere Reconstruction approach yields directly the number of particles and their position as an output of the reconstruction technique, enabling a detailed 3D analysis of assemblies with as many as 10 000 particles. The approach can also be used to reconstruct objects based on a very limited number of projections, which opens up possibilities to investigate beam sensitive assemblies where previous reconstructions with the available electron tomography techniques failed.Nanoparticle assemblies can be investigated in 3 dimensions using electron tomography. However, it is not straightforward to obtain quantitative information such as the number of particles or their relative position. This becomes particularly difficult when the number of particles increases. We propose a novel approach in which prior information on the shape of the individual particles is exploited. It improves the quality of the reconstruction of these complex assemblies significantly. Moreover, this quantitative Sparse Sphere Reconstruction approach yields directly the number of particles and their position as an output of the reconstruction technique, enabling a detailed 3D analysis of assemblies with as many as 10 000 particles. The approach can also be used to reconstruct objects based on a very limited number of projections, which opens up possibilities to investigate beam sensitive assemblies where previous reconstructions with the available electron tomography techniques

  5. Quantitative MRI for analysis of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Warntjes, J. B. Marcel; Smedby, Örjan; Lundberg, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and purpose Damage to the blood-brain barrier with subsequent contrast enhancement is a hallmark of glioblastoma. Non-enhancing tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema is, however, not usually visible on conventional magnetic resonance imaging. New quantitative techniques using relaxometry offer additional information about tissue properties. The aim of this study was to evaluate longitudinal relaxation R1, transverse relaxation R2, and proton density in the peritumoral edema in a group of patients with malignant glioma before surgery to assess whether relaxometry can detect changes not visible on conventional images. Methods In a prospective study, 24 patients with suspected malignant glioma were examined before surgery. A standard MRI protocol was used with the addition of a quantitative MR method (MAGIC), which measured R1, R2, and proton density. The diagnosis of malignant glioma was confirmed after biopsy/surgery. In 19 patients synthetic MR images were then created from the MAGIC scan, and ROIs were placed in the peritumoral edema to obtain the quantitative values. Dynamic susceptibility contrast perfusion was used to obtain cerebral blood volume (rCBV) data of the peritumoral edema. Voxel-based statistical analysis was performed using a mixed linear model. Results R1, R2, and rCBV decrease with increasing distance from the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. There is a significant increase in R1 gradient after contrast agent injection (P < .0001). There is a heterogeneous pattern of relaxation values in the peritumoral edema adjacent to the contrast-enhancing part of the tumor. Conclusion Quantitative analysis with relaxometry of peritumoral edema in malignant gliomas detects tissue changes not visualized on conventional MR images. The finding of decreasing R1 and R2 means shorter relaxation times closer to the tumor, which could reflect tumor invasion into the peritumoral edema. However, these findings need to be validated in the future. PMID

  6. Quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal microscopy images: a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is a non-invasive method of examining the living human cornea. The recent trend towards quantitative studies using IVCM has led to the development of a variety of methods for quantifying image parameters. When selecting IVCM images for quantitative analysis, it is important to be consistent regarding the location, depth, and quality of images. All images should be de-identified, randomized, and calibrated prior to analysis. Numerous image analysis software are available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Criteria for analyzing corneal epithelium, sub-basal nerves, keratocytes, endothelium, and immune/inflammatory cells have been developed, although there is inconsistency among research groups regarding parameter definition. The quantification of stromal nerve parameters, however, remains a challenge. Most studies report lower inter-observer repeatability compared with intra-observer repeatability, and observer experience is known to be an important factor. Standardization of IVCM image analysis through the use of a reading center would be crucial for any future large, multi-centre clinical trials using IVCM.

  7. Quantitative Remote Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy by Multivariate Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clegg, S. M.; Sklute, E. C.; Dyar, M. D.; Barefield, J. E.; Wiens, R. C.

    2007-12-01

    The ChemCam instrument selected for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover includes a remote Laser- Induced Breakdown Spectrometer (LIBS) that will quantitatively probe samples up to 9m from the rover mast. LIBS is fundamentally an elemental analysis technique. LIBS involves focusing a Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm onto the surface of the sample. The laser ablates material from the surface, generating an expanding plasma containing electronically excited ions, atoms, and small molecules. As these electronically excited species relax back to the ground state, they emit light at wavelengths characteristic of the species present in the sample. Some of this emission is directed into one of three dispersive spectrometers. In this paper, we studied a suite of 18 igneous and highly-metamorphosed samples from a wide variety of parageneses for which chemical analyses by XRF were already available. Rocks were chosen to represent a range of chemical composition from basalt to rhyolite, thus providing significant variations in all of the major element contents (Si, Fe, Al, Ca, Na, K, O, Ti, Mg, and Mn). These samples were probed at a 9m standoff distance under experimental conditions that are similar to ChemCam. Extracting quantitative elemental concentrations from LIBS spectra is complicated by the chemical matrix effects. Conventional methods for obtaining quantitative chemical data from LIBS analyses are compared with new multivariate analysis (MVA) techniques that appear to compensate for these chemical matrix effects. The traditional analyses use specific elemental peak heights or areas, which compared with calibration curves for each element at one or more emission lines for a series of standard samples. Because of matrix effects, the calibration standards generally must have similar chemistries to the unknown samples, and thus this conventional approach imposes severe limitations on application of the technique to remote analyses. In this suite of samples, the use

  8. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  9. Binary imaging analysis for comprehensive quantitative histomorphometry of peripheral nerve.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Daniel A; Moradzadeh, Arash; Whitlock, Elizabeth L; Brenner, Michael J; Myckatyn, Terence M; Wei, Cindy H; Tung, Thomas H H; Mackinnon, Susan E

    2007-10-15

    Quantitative histomorphometry is the current gold standard for objective measurement of nerve architecture and its components. Many methods still in use rely heavily upon manual techniques that are prohibitively time consuming, predisposing to operator fatigue, sampling error, and overall limited reproducibility. More recently, investigators have attempted to combine the speed of automated morphometry with the accuracy of manual and semi-automated methods. Systematic refinements in binary imaging analysis techniques combined with an algorithmic approach allow for more exhaustive characterization of nerve parameters in the surgically relevant injury paradigms of regeneration following crush, transection, and nerve gap injuries. The binary imaging method introduced here uses multiple bitplanes to achieve reproducible, high throughput quantitative assessment of peripheral nerve. Number of myelinated axons, myelinated fiber diameter, myelin thickness, fiber distributions, myelinated fiber density, and neural debris can be quantitatively evaluated with stratification of raw data by nerve component. Results of this semi-automated method are validated by comparing values against those obtained with manual techniques. The use of this approach results in more rapid, accurate, and complete assessment of myelinated axons than manual techniques.

  10. Variability in quantitative cardiac magnetic resonance perfusion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bratis, K.

    2013-01-01

    By taking advantage of its high spatial resolution, noninvasive and nontoxic nature first-pass perfusion cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) has rendered an indispensable tool for the noninvasive detection of reversible myocardial ischemia. A potential advantage of perfusion CMR is its ability to quantitatively assess perfusion reserve within a myocardial segment, as expressed semi- quantitatively by myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) and fully- quantitatively by absolute myocardial blood flow (MBF). In contrast to the high accuracy and reliability of CMR in evaluating cardiac function and volumes, perfusion CMR is adversely affected by multiple potential reasons during data acquisition as well as post-processing. Various image acquisition techniques, various contrast agents and doses as well as variable blood flow at rest as well as variable reactions to stress all influence the acquired data. Mechanisms underlying the variability in perfusion CMR post processing, as well as their clinical significance, are yet to be fully elucidated. The development of a universal, reproducible, accurate and easily applicable tool in CMR perfusion analysis remains a challenge and will substantially enforce the role of perfusion CMR in improving clinical care. PMID:23825774

  11. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  12. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  13. Quantitative option analysis for implementation and management of landfills.

    PubMed

    Kerestecioğlu, Merih

    2016-09-01

    The selection of the most feasible strategy for implementation of landfills is a challenging step. Potential implementation options of landfills cover a wide range, from conventional construction contracts to the concessions. Montenegro, seeking to improve the efficiency of the public services while maintaining affordability, was considering privatisation as a way to reduce public spending on service provision. In this study, to determine the most feasible model for construction and operation of a regional landfill, a quantitative risk analysis was implemented with four steps: (i) development of a global risk matrix; (ii) assignment of qualitative probabilities of occurrences and magnitude of impacts; (iii) determination of the risks to be mitigated, monitored, controlled or ignored; (iv) reduction of the main risk elements; and (v) incorporation of quantitative estimates of probability of occurrence and expected impact for each risk element in the reduced risk matrix. The evaluated scenarios were: (i) construction and operation of the regional landfill by the public sector; (ii) construction and operation of the landfill by private sector and transfer of the ownership to the public sector after a pre-defined period; and (iii) operation of the landfill by the private sector, without ownership. The quantitative risk assessment concluded that introduction of a public private partnership is not the most feasible option, unlike the common belief in several public institutions in developing countries. A management contract for the first years of operation was advised to be implemented, after which, a long term operating contract may follow. © The Author(s) 2016.

  14. Lipid biomarker analysis for the quantitative analysis of airborne microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Macnaughton, S.J.; Jenkins, T.L.; Cormier, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    There is an ever increasing concern regarding the presence of airborne microbial contaminants within indoor air environments. Exposure to such biocontaminants can give rise to large numbers of different health effects including infectious diseases, allergenic responses and respiratory problems, Biocontaminants typically round in indoor air environments include bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and dust mites. Mycotoxins, endotoxins, pollens and residues of organisms are also known to cause adverse health effects. A quantitative detection/identification technique independent of culturability that assays both culturable and non culturable biomass including endotoxin is critical in defining risks from indoor air biocontamination. Traditionally, methods employed for the monitoring of microorganism numbers in indoor air environments involve classical culture based techniques and/or direct microscopic counting. It has been repeatedly documented that viable microorganism counts only account for between 0.1-10% of the total community detectable by direct counting. The classic viable microbiologic approach doe`s not provide accurate estimates of microbial fragments or other indoor air components that can act as antigens and induce or potentiate allergic responses. Although bioaerosol samplers are designed to damage the microbes as little as possible, microbial stress has been shown to result from air sampling, aerosolization and microbial collection. Higher collection efficiency results in greater cell damage while less cell damage often results in lower collection efficiency. Filtration can collect particulates at almost 100% efficiency, but captured microorganisms may become dehydrated and damaged resulting in non-culturability, however, the lipid biomarker assays described herein do not rely on cell culture. Lipids are components that are universally distributed throughout cells providing a means to assess independent of culturability.

  15. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. 3D visualization and quantitative analysis of human erythrocyte phagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Stachurska, Anna; Król, Teodora; Trybus, Wojciech; Szary, Karol; Fabijańska-Mitek, Jadwiga

    2016-11-01

    Since the erythrophagocytosis of opsonized erythrocytes is investigated mainly by calculating the phagocytic index using subjective light microscopy evaluation, we present methods for the quantitative and qualitative analysis of human cell erythrophagocytosis. Erythrocytes from two storage periods were used. Using Imaris software, we were able to create a three-dimensional model of erythrophagocytosis. The use of microscopy instead of cytometry revealed a significantly higher number of monocytes and erythrocytes that appeared active in phagocytosis. Spatial reconstruction allowed for detailed analysis of the process by precisely locating erythrocytes in phagocytes. Additionally, a technique of sequential image registration using Nis Elements software allowed for observation of the course of phagocytosis over a range of time intervals. This in vitro research may be helpful for understanding the cellular interactions between monocytes and erythrocytes. The cytometric method-being relatively rapid, sensitive, and specific-can serve as an alternative technique to microscopy in the quantitative analysis of erythrophagocytosis. This allows us to avoid counting the erythrocytes nonspecifically attached to monocytes and gives objective results. © 2016 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  17. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  18. Quantitative analysis of motion control in long term microgravity.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Anolli, A; Andreoni, G; Pedotti, A

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the 179-days EUROMIR '95 space mission, two in-flight experiments have foreseen quantitative three-dimensional human movement analysis in microgravity. For this aim, a space qualified opto-electronic motion analyser based on passive markers has been installed onboard the Russian Space Station MIR and 8 in flight sessions have been performed. Techhology and method for the collection of kinematics data are described, evaluating the accuracy in three-dimensional marker localisation. Results confirm the suitability of opto-electronic technology for quantitative human motion analysis on orbital modules and raise a set of "lessons learned", leading to the improvement of motion analyser performance with a contemporary swiftness of the on-board operations. Among the experimental program of T4, results of three voluntary posture perturbation protocols are described. The analysis suggests that a short term reinterpretation of proprioceptive information and re-calibration of sensorimotor mechanisms seem to end within the first weeks of flight, while a continuous long term adaptation process allows the refinement of motor performance, in the frame of never abandoned terrestrial strategies.

  19. Correlative SEM SERS for quantitative analysis of dimer nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, F J; Lenferink, A T M; van Wolferen, H A G M; Otto, C

    2016-11-14

    A Raman microscope integrated with a scanning electron microscope was used to investigate plasmonic structures by correlative SEM-SERS analysis. The integrated Raman-SEM microscope combines high-resolution electron microscopy information with SERS signal enhancement from selected nanostructures with adsorbed Raman reporter molecules. Correlative analysis is performed for dimers of two gold nanospheres. Dimers were selected on the basis of SEM images from multi aggregate samples. The effect of the orientation of the dimer with respect to the polarization state of the laser light and the effect of the particle gap size on the Raman signal intensity is observed. Additionally, calculations are performed to simulate the electric near field enhancement. These simulations are based on the morphologies observed by electron microscopy. In this way the experiments are compared with the enhancement factor calculated with near field simulations and are subsequently used to quantify the SERS enhancement factor. Large differences between experimentally observed and calculated enhancement factors are regularly detected, a phenomenon caused by nanoscale differences between the real and 'simplified' simulated structures. Quantitative SERS experiments reveal the structure induced enhancement factor, ranging from ∼200 to ∼20 000, averaged over the full nanostructure surface. The results demonstrate correlative Raman-SEM microscopy for the quantitative analysis of plasmonic particles and structures, thus enabling a new analytical method in the field of SERS and plasmonics.

  20. Computer compensation for NMR quantitative analysis of trace components

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-07-22

    A computer program has been written that determines trace components and separates overlapping components in multicomponent NMR spectra. This program uses the Lorentzian curve as a theoretical curve of NMR spectra. The coefficients of the Lorentzian are determined by the method of least squares. Systematic errors such as baseline/phase distortion are compensated and random errors are smoothed by taking moving averages, so that there processes contribute substantially to decreasing the accumulation time of spectral data. The accuracy of quantitative analysis of trace components has been improved by two significant figures. This program was applied to determining the abundance of 13C and the saponification degree of PVA.

  1. Quantitative analysis of sideband coupling in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, Bongsu; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the cantilever motions detected in photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM) using the sideband coupling detection scheme. In sideband coupling, the cantilever dynamics are probed at a combination frequency of a fundamental mechanical eigenmode and the modulation frequency of the laser beam. Using this detection mode, we develop a method for reconstructing the modulated photoinduced force gradient from experimental parameters in a quantitative manner. We show evidence, both theoretically and experimentally, that the sideband coupling detection mode provides PiFM images with superior contrast compared to images obtained when detecting the cantilever motions directly at the laser modulation frequency.

  2. Flow quantitation by radio frequency analysis of contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rovai, D; Lombardi, M; Mazzarisi, A; Landini, L; Taddei, L; Distante, A; Benassi, A; L'Abbate, A

    1993-03-01

    Contrast echocardiography has the potential for measuring cardiac output and regional blood flow. However, accurate quantitation is limited both by the use of non-standard contrast agents and by the electronic signal distortion inherent to the echocardiographic instruments. Thus, the aim of this study is to quantify flow by combining a stable contrast agent and a modified echo equipment, able to sample the radio frequency (RF) signal from a region of interest (ROI) in the echo image. The contrast agent SHU-454 (0.8 ml) was bolus injected into an in vitro calf vein, at 23 flow rates (ranging from 376 to 3620 ml/min) but constant volume and pressure. The ROI was placed in the centre of the vein, the RF signal was processed in real time and transferred to a personal computer to generate time-intensity curves. In the absence of recirculation, contrast washout slope and mean transit time (MTT) of curves (1.11-8.52 seconds) yielded excellent correlations with flow: r = 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. To compare the accuracy of RF analysis with that of conventional image processing as to flow quantitation, conventional images were collected in the same flow model by two different scanners: a) the mechanical sector scanner used for RF analysis, and b) a conventional electronic sector scanner. These images were digitized off-line, mean videodensity inside an identical ROI was measured and time-intensity curves were built. MTT by RF was shorter than by videodensitometric analysis of the images generated by the same scanner (p < 0.001). In contrast, MTT by RF was longer than by the conventional scanner (p < 0.001). Significant differences in MTT were also found with changes in the gain setting controls of the conventional scanner. To study the stability of the contrast effect, 6 contrast injections (20 ml) were performed at a constant flow rate during recirculation: the spontaneous decay in RF signal intensity (t1/2 = 64 +/- 8 seconds) was too long to affect MTT significantly

  3. Simulating the focal volume effect: a quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Timothy D.; Uiterwaal, Cornelis J. G. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present quantitative simulations of the focal volume effect. Intensity distributions in detection volumes with two- and three-dimensional spatial resolution are calculated. Results include an analysis of translations of these volumes in the focus along the direction of laser propagation as well as discussion of varying sizes of the spatially resolved volumes. We find that detection volumes less than half the 1/e full-width beam waist and less than half the Rayleigh length along the propagation direction offer an optimal compromise of maintaining intensity resolution without sacrificing peak intensity.

  4. Neutron diffractometer INES for quantitative phase analysis of archaeological objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imberti, S.; Kockelmann, W.; Celli, M.; Grazzi, F.; Zoppi, M.; Botti, A.; Sodo, A.; Imperiale, M. Leo; de Vries-Melein, M.; Visser, D.; Postma, H.

    2008-03-01

    With the Italian Neutron Experimental Station (INES) a new general purpose neutron powder diffractometer is available at ISIS, characterized by a high resolution at low d-spacings, and particularly suited for the quantitative phase analysis of a wide range of archaeological materials. Time-of-flight neutron diffraction is notable for being a non-destructive technique, allowing a reliable determination of the phase compositions of multiphase artefacts, with or without superficial corrosion layers. A selection of archaeometric studies carried out during the first year of the INES user programme is presented here to demonstrate the capabilities of the instrument.

  5. Identification of BCAP-{sub L} as a negative regulator of the TLR signaling-induced production of IL-6 and IL-10 in macrophages by tyrosine phosphoproteomics

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumura, Takayuki; Oyama, Masaaki; Kozuka-Hata, Hiroko; Ishikawa, Kosuke; Inoue, Takafumi; Muta, Tatsushi; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-ichiro

    2010-09-17

    Research highlights: {yields} Twenty five tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins in LPS-stimulated macrophages were determined. {yields} BCAP is a novel tyrosine-phosphorylated protein in LPS-stimulated macrophages. {yields} BCAP-{sub L} inhibits IL-6 and IL-10 production in LPS-stimulated macrophages. -- Abstract: Toll-like receptor (TLR) signaling in macrophages is essential for anti-pathogen responses such as cytokine production and antigen presentation. Although numerous reports suggest that protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) are involved in cytokine induction in response to lipopolysaccharides (LPS; TLR4 ligand) in macrophages, the PTK-mediated signal transduction pathway has yet to be analyzed in detail. Here, we carried out a comprehensive and quantitative dynamic tyrosine phosphoproteomic analysis on the TLR4-mediated host defense system in RAW264.7 macrophages using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC). We determined the temporal profiles of 25 proteins based on SILAC-encoded peptide(s). Of these, we focused on the tyrosine phosphorylation of B-cell adaptor for phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (BCAP) because the function of BCAP remains unknown in TLR signaling in macrophages. Furthermore, Bcap has two distinct transcripts, a full-length (Bcap-{sub L}) and an alternatively initiated or spliced (Bcap-{sub S}) mRNA, and little is known about the differential functions of the BCAP-{sub L} and BCAP-{sub S} proteins. Our study showed, for the first time, that RNAi-mediated selective depletion of BCAP-{sub L} enhanced IL-6 and IL-10 production but not TNF-{alpha} production in TLR ligand-stimulated macrophages. We propose that BCAP-{sub L} (but not BCAP-{sub S}) is a negative regulator of the TLR-mediated host defense system in macrophages.

  6. Functional Regression Models for Epistasis Analysis of Multiple Quantitative Traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Futao; Xie, Dan; Liang, Meimei; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, most genetic analyses of phenotypes have focused on analyzing single traits or analyzing each phenotype independently. However, joint epistasis analysis of multiple complementary traits will increase statistical power and improve our understanding of the complicated genetic structure of the complex diseases. Despite their importance in uncovering the genetic structure of complex traits, the statistical methods for identifying epistasis in multiple phenotypes remains fundamentally unexplored. To fill this gap, we formulate a test for interaction between two genes in multiple quantitative trait analysis as a multiple functional regression (MFRG) in which the genotype functions (genetic variant profiles) are defined as a function of the genomic position of the genetic variants. We use large-scale simulations to calculate Type I error rates for testing interaction between two genes with multiple phenotypes and to compare the power with multivariate pairwise interaction analysis and single trait interaction analysis by a single variate functional regression model. To further evaluate performance, the MFRG for epistasis analysis is applied to five phenotypes of exome sequence data from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) to detect pleiotropic epistasis. A total of 267 pairs of genes that formed a genetic interaction network showed significant evidence of epistasis influencing five traits. The results demonstrate that the joint interaction analysis of multiple phenotypes has a much higher power to detect interaction than the interaction analysis of a single trait and may open a new direction to fully uncovering the genetic structure of multiple phenotypes.

  7. Nuclear phosphoproteome of developing chickpea seedlings (Cicer arietinum L.) and protein-kinase interaction network.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajiv; Kumar, Amit; Subba, Pratigya; Gayali, Saurabh; Barua, Pragya; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2014-06-13

    Nucleus, the control centre of eukaryotic cell, houses most of the genetic machineries required for gene expression and their regulation. Post translational modifications of proteins, particularly phosphorylation control a wide variety of cellular processes but its functional connectivity, in plants, is still elusive. This study profiled the nuclear phosphoproteome of a grain legume, chickpea, to gain better understanding of such event. Intact nuclei were isolated from 3-week-old seedlings using two independent methods, and nuclear proteins were resolved by 2-DE. In a separate set of experiments, phosphoproteins were enriched using IMAC method and resolved by 1-DE. The separated proteins were stained with phosphospecific Pro-Q Diamond stain. Proteomic analyses led to the identification of 107 putative phosphoproteins, of which 86 were non-redundant. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were predicted on several key elements, which included both regulatory and functional proteins. The analysis revealed an array of phosphoproteins, presumably involved in a variety of cellular functions, viz., protein folding (24%), signalling and gene regulation (22%), DNA replication, repair and modification (16%), and metabolism (13%), among others. These results represent the first nucleus-specific phosphoproteome map of a non-model legume, which would provide insights into the possible function of protein phosphorylation in plants. Chickpea is grown over 10 million hectares of land worldwide, and global production hovers around 8.5 million metric tons annually. Despite its nutritional merits, it is often referred to as 'orphan' legume and has remained outside the realm of large-scale functional genomics studies. While current chickpea genome initiative has primarily focused on sequence information and functional annotation, proteomics analyses are limited. It is thus important to study the proteome of the cell organelle particularly the nucleus, which harbors most of the genetic

  8. Quantitative chemical analysis of ocular melanosomes in the TEM.

    PubMed

    Eibl, O; Schultheiss, S; Blitgen-Heinecke, P; Schraermeyer, U

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes in retinal tissues of a human, monkey and rat were analyzed by EDX in the TEM. Samples were prepared by ultramicrotomy at different thicknesses. The material was mounted on Al grids and samples were analyzed in a Zeiss 912 TEM equipped with an Omega filter and EDX detector with ultrathin window. Melanosomes consist of C and O as main components, mole fractions are about 90 and 3-10 at.%, respectively, and small mole fraction ratios, between 2 and 0.1 at.%, of Na, Mg, K, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca. All elements were measured quantitatively by standardless EDX with high precision. Mole fractions of transition metals Fe, Cu and Zn were also measured. For Fe a mole fraction ratio of less than 0.1at.% was found and gives the melanin its paramagnetic properties. Its mole fraction is however close to or below the minimum detectable mass fraction of the used equipment. Only in the human eye and only in the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) the mole fractions of Zn (0.1 at.% or 5000 microg/g) and Cu were clearly beyond the minimum detectable mass fraction. In the rat and monkey eye the mole fraction of Zn was at or below the minimum detectable mass fraction and could not be measured quantitatively. The obtained results yielded the chemical composition of the melanosomes in the choroidal tissue and the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) of the three different species. The results of the chemical analysis are discussed by mole fraction correlation diagrams. Similarities and differences between the different species are outlined. Correlation behavior was found to hold over species, e.g. the Ca-O correlation. It indicates that Ca is bound to oxygen rich sites in the melanin. These are the first quantitative analyses of melanosomes by EDX reported so far. The quantitative chemical analysis should open a deeper understanding of the metabolic processes in the eye that are of central importance for the understanding of a large number of eye-related diseases. The chemical analysis also

  9. Quantitative sonographic image analysis for hepatic nodules: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Naoki; Ogawa, Masahiro; Takayasu, Kentaro; Hirayama, Midori; Miura, Takao; Shiozawa, Katsuhiko; Abe, Masahisa; Nakagawara, Hiroshi; Moriyama, Mitsuhiko; Udagawa, Seiichi

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of quantitative image analysis to differentiate hepatic nodules on gray-scale sonographic images. We retrospectively evaluated 35 nodules from 31 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), 60 nodules from 58 patients with liver hemangioma, and 22 nodules from 22 patients with liver metastasis. Gray-scale sonographic images were evaluated with subjective judgment and image analysis using ImageJ software. Reviewers classified the shape of nodules as irregular or round, and the surface of nodules as rough or smooth. Circularity values were lower in the irregular group than in the round group (median 0.823, 0.892; range 0.641-0.915, 0.784-0.932, respectively; P = 3.21 × 10(-10)). Solidity values were lower in the rough group than in the smooth group (median 0.957, 0.968; range 0.894-0.986, 0.933-0.988, respectively; P = 1.53 × 10(-4)). The HCC group had higher circularity and solidity values than the hemangioma group. The HCC and liver metastasis groups had lower median, mean, modal, and minimum gray values than the hemangioma group. Multivariate analysis showed circularity [standardized odds ratio (OR), 2.077; 95 % confidential interval (CI) = 1.295-3.331; P = 0.002] and minimum gray value (OR 0.482; 95 % CI = 0.956-0.990; P = 0.001) as factors predictive of malignancy. The combination of subjective judgment and image analysis provided 58.3 % sensitivity and 89.5 % specificity with AUC = 0.739, representing an improvement over subjective judgment alone (68.4 % sensitivity, 75.0 % specificity, AUC = 0.701) (P = 0.008). Quantitative image analysis for ultrasonic images of hepatic nodules may correlate with subjective judgment in predicting malignancy.

  10. Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome of RA-Responsive and RA-Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Marilyn; Joint, Mathilde; Lutzing, Régis; Page, Adeline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active vitamin A metabolite, controls multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation through genomic programs and kinase cascades activation. Due to these properties, RA has proven anti-cancer capacity. Several breast cancer cells respond to the antiproliferative effects of RA, while others are RA-resistant. However, the overall signaling and transcriptional pathways that are altered in such cells have not been elucidated. Here, in a large-scale analysis of the phosphoproteins and in a genome-wide analysis of the RA-regulated genes, we compared two human breast cancer cell lines, a RA-responsive one, the MCF7 cell line, and a RA-resistant one, the BT474 cell line, which depicts several alterations of the "kinome". Using high-resolution nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry associated to phosphopeptide enrichment, we found that several proteins involved in signaling and in transcription, are differentially phosphorylated before and after RA addition. The paradigm of these proteins is the RA receptor α (RARα), which was phosphorylated in MCF7 cells but not in BT474 cells after RA addition. The panel of the RA-regulated genes was also different. Overall our results indicate that RA resistance might correlate with the deregulation of the phosphoproteome with consequences on gene expression.

  11. Phosphoproteome and Transcriptome of RA-Responsive and RA-Resistant Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Carrier, Marilyn; Joint, Mathilde; Lutzing, Régis; Page, Adeline; Rochette-Egly, Cécile

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid (RA), the main active vitamin A metabolite, controls multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation and differentiation through genomic programs and kinase cascades activation. Due to these properties, RA has proven anti-cancer capacity. Several breast cancer cells respond to the antiproliferative effects of RA, while others are RA-resistant. However, the overall signaling and transcriptional pathways that are altered in such cells have not been elucidated. Here, in a large-scale analysis of the phosphoproteins and in a genome-wide analysis of the RA-regulated genes, we compared two human breast cancer cell lines, a RA-responsive one, the MCF7 cell line, and a RA-resistant one, the BT474 cell line, which depicts several alterations of the “kinome”. Using high-resolution nano-LC-LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometry associated to phosphopeptide enrichment, we found that several proteins involved in signaling and in transcription, are differentially phosphorylated before and after RA addition. The paradigm of these proteins is the RA receptor α (RARα), which was phosphorylated in MCF7 cells but not in BT474 cells after RA addition. The panel of the RA-regulated genes was also different. Overall our results indicate that RA resistance might correlate with the deregulation of the phosphoproteome with consequences on gene expression. PMID:27362937

  12. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    PubMed Central

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-01-01

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ⋯Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations. PMID:26306198

  13. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Quantitative analysis of live cells using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tan Rongwei; Qu, Weijuan; Chee, Oi Choo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, Anand

    2010-03-01

    During the life time of a cell, it goes through changes to the plasma membrane as well as its internal structures especially distinctive during processes like cell division and death. Different types of microscope are used to fulfill the observation of the cell's variation. In our experiment, Vero cells have been investigated by using phase contrast microscopy and digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A comparison of the images obtained for cell division is presented here. The conventional phase contrast microscope provided a good imaging method in the real time analysis of cell division. The off-axis digital hologram recorded by the DHM system can be reconstructed to obtain both the intensity image and phase contrast image of the test object. These can be used for live cell imaging to provide multiple results from a single equipment setup. The DHM system, besides being a qualitative tool, is able to provide quantitative results and 3D images of the cell division process. The ability of DHM to provide quantitative analysis makes it an ideal tool for life science applications.

  15. Quantitative analysis of live cells using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tan Rongwei; Qu, Weijuan; Chee, Oi Choo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, Anand

    2009-12-01

    During the life time of a cell, it goes through changes to the plasma membrane as well as its internal structures especially distinctive during processes like cell division and death. Different types of microscope are used to fulfill the observation of the cell's variation. In our experiment, Vero cells have been investigated by using phase contrast microscopy and digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A comparison of the images obtained for cell division is presented here. The conventional phase contrast microscope provided a good imaging method in the real time analysis of cell division. The off-axis digital hologram recorded by the DHM system can be reconstructed to obtain both the intensity image and phase contrast image of the test object. These can be used for live cell imaging to provide multiple results from a single equipment setup. The DHM system, besides being a qualitative tool, is able to provide quantitative results and 3D images of the cell division process. The ability of DHM to provide quantitative analysis makes it an ideal tool for life science applications.

  16. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    DOE PAGES

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; ...

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically,more » the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.« less

  17. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    SciTech Connect

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  18. Quantitative analysis in outcome assessment of instrumented lumbosacral arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Champain, Sabina; Mazel, Christian; Mitulescu, Anca; Skalli, Wafa

    2007-08-01

    The outcome assessment in instrumented lumbosacral fusion mostly focuses on clinical criteria, complications and scores, with a high variability of imaging means, methods of fusion grading and parameters describing degenerative changes, making comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to evaluate the interest of quantified radiographic analysis of lumbar spine in global outcome assessment and to highlight the key biomechanical factors involved. Clinical data and Beaujon-Lassale scores were collected for 49 patients who underwent lumbosacral arthrodesis after prior lumbar discectomy (mean follow-up: 5 years). Sagittal standing and lumbar flexion-extension X-ray films allowed quantifying vertebral, lumbar, pelvic and kinematic parameters of the lumbar spine, which were compared to reference values. Statistics were performed to assess evolution for all variables. At long-term follow-up, 90% of patients presented satisfactory clinical outcomes, associated to normal sagittal alignment; vertebral parameters objectified adjacent level degeneration in four cases (8%). Clinical outcome was correlated (r = 0.8) with fusion that was confirmed in 80% of cases, doubtful in 16% and pseudarthrosis seemed to occur in 4% (2) of cases. In addition to clinical data (outcomes comparable to the literature), quantitative analysis accurately described lumbar spine geometry and kinematics, highlighting parameters related to adjacent level's degeneration and a significant correlation between clinical outcome and fusion. Furthermore, criteria proposed to quantitatively evaluate fusion from lumbar dynamic radiographs seem to be appropriate and in agreement with surgeon's qualitative grading in 87% of cases.

  19. Quantitative analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans chemotaxis using a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Ye, Jinjuan; Tan, Haowei; Ge, Anle; Tang, Lichun; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-08-05

    Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the widely studied model organisms, sense external chemical cues and perform relative chemotaxis behaviors through its simple chemosensory neuronal system. To study the mechanism underlying chemosensory behavior, a rapid and reliable method for quantitatively analyzing the worms' behaviors is essential. In this work, we demonstrated a microfluidic approach for investigating chemotaxis responses of worms to chemical gradients. The flow-based microfluidic chip was consisted of circular tree-like microchannels, which was able to generate eight flow streams containing stepwise chemical concentrations without the difference in flow velocity. Worms' upstream swimming into microchannels with various concentrations was monitored for quantitative analysis of the chemotaxis behavior. By using this microfluidic chip, the attractive and repellent responses of C. elegans to NaCl were successfully quantified within several minutes. The results demonstrated the wild type-like repellent responses and severely impaired attractive responses in grk-2 mutant animals with defects in calcium influx. In addition, the chemotaxis analysis of the third stage larvae revealed that its gustatory response was different from that in the adult stage. Thus, our microfluidic method provided a useful platform for studying the chemosensory behaviors of C. elegans and screening of chemosensation-related chemical drugs.

  20. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  1. 3D quantitative analysis of brain SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Ceskovic, Ivan; Petrovic, Ratimir; Loncaric, Srecko

    2001-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a computer-based technique for quantitative analysis of 3-D brain images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In particular, the volume and location of ischemic lesion and penumbra is important for early diagnosis and treatment of infracted regions of the brain. SPECT imaging is typically used as diagnostic tool to assess the size and location of the ischemic lesion. The segmentation method presented in this paper utilizes a 3-D deformable model in order to determine size and location of the regions of interest. The evolution of the model is computed using a level-set implementation of the algorithm. In addition to 3-D deformable model the method utilizes edge detection and region growing for realization of a pre-processing. Initial experimental results have shown that the method is useful for SPECT image analysis.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999–2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. PMID:26352604

  3. [Quantitative analysis of transformer oil dissolved gases using FTIR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-xin; Tang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Er-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-hua; Liu, Jun-hua

    2013-09-01

    For the defects of requiring carrier gas and regular calibration, and low safety using chromatography to on line monitor transformer dissolved gases, it was attempted to establish a dissolved gas analysis system based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Taking into account the small amount of characteristic gases, many components, detection limit and safety requirements and the difficulty of degasser to put an end to the presence of interference gas, the quantitative analysis model was established based on sparse partial least squares, piecewise section correction and feature variable extraction algorithm using improvement TR regularization. With the characteristic gas of CH4, C2H6, C2H6, and CO2, the results show that using FTIR meets DGA requirements with the spectrum wave number resolution of 1 cm(-1) and optical path of 10 cm.

  4. Quantitative Phase Analysis by the Rietveld Method for Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Lin, Xiaodong; He, Yonghong; Li, Shu; Zi, Run; Lai, Shijun

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative phase analysis (QPA) is helpful to determine the type attribute of the object because it could present the content of the constituents. QPA by Rietveld method requires neither measurement of calibration data nor the use of an internal standard; however, the approximate crystal structure of each phase in a mixture is necessary. In this study, 8 synthetic mixtures composed of potassium nitrate and sulfur were analyzed by Rietveld QPA method. The Rietveld refinement was accomplished with a material analysis using diffraction program and evaluated by three agreement indices. Results showed that Rietveld QPA yielded precise results, with errors generally less than 2.0% absolute. In addition, a criminal case which was broken successfully with the help of Rietveld QPA method was also introduced. This method will allow forensic investigators to acquire detailed information of the material evidence, which could point out the direction for case detection and court proceedings.

  5. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Duan, Xiaojun; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999-2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics.

  6. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  7. Quantitative morphometric analysis for the tectonic characterisation of northern Tunisia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camafort, Miquel; Pérez-Peña, José Vicente; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Ranero, César R.; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Azañón, José Miguel; Melki, Fetheddine; Ouadday, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Northern Tunisia is characterized by low deformation rates and low to moderate seismicity. Although instrumental seismicity reaches maximum magnitudes of Mw 5.5, some historical earthquakes have occurred with catastrophic consequences in this region. Aiming to improve our knowledge of active tectonics in Tunisia, we carried out both a quantitative morphometric analysis and field study in the north-western region. We applied different morphometric tools, like river profiles, knickpoint analysis, hypsometric curves and integrals and drainage pattern anomalies in order to differentiate between zones with high or low recent tectonic activity. This analysis helps identifying uplift and subsidence zones, which we relate to fault activity. Several active faults in a sparse distribution were identified. A selected sector was studied with a field campaign to test the results obtained with the quantitative analysis. During the fieldwork we identified geological evidence of recent activity and a considerable seismogenic potential along El Alia-Teboursouk (ETF) and Dkhila (DF) faults. The ETF fault could be responsible of one of the most devastating historical earthquakes in northern Tunisia that destroyed Utique in 412 A.D. Geological evidence include fluvial terraces folded by faults, striated and cracked pebbles, clastic dikes, sand volcanoes, coseismic cracks, etc. Although not reflected in the instrumental seismicity, our results support an important seismic hazard, evidenced by the several active tectonic structures identified and the two seismogenic faults described. After obtaining the current active tectonic framework of Tunisia we discuss our results within the western Mediterranean trying to contribute to the understanding of the western Mediterranean tectonic context. With our results, we suggest that the main reason explaining the sparse and scarce seismicity of the area in contrast with the adjacent parts of the Nubia-Eurasia boundary is due to its extended

  8. Quick 96FASP for high throughput quantitative proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yanbao; Bekele, Shiferaw; Pieper, Rembert

    2017-08-23

    Filter aided sample preparation (FASP) is becoming a central method for proteomic sample cleanup and peptide generation prior to LC-MS analysis. We previously adapted this method to a 96-well filter plate, and applied to prepare protein digests from cell lysate and body fluid samples in a high throughput quantitative manner. While the 96FASP approach is scalable and can handle multiple samples simultaneously, two key advantages compared to single FASP, it is also time-consuming. The centrifugation-based liquid transfer on the filter plate takes 3-5 times longer than single filter. To address this limitation, we now present a quick 96FASP (named q96FASP) approach that, relying on the use of filter membranes with a large MWCO size (~30kDa), significantly reduces centrifugal times. We show that q96FASP allows the generation of protein digests derived from whole cell lysates and body fluids in a quality similar to that of the single FASP method. Processing a sample in multiple wells in parallel, we observed excellent experimental repeatability by label-free quantitation approach. We conclude that the q96FASP approach promises to be a promising cost- and time-effective method for shotgun proteomics and will be particularly useful in large scale biomarker discovery studies. High throughput sample processing is of particular interests for quantitative proteomics. The previously developed 96FASP is high throughput and appealing, however it is time-consuming in the context of centrifugation-based liquid transfer (~1.5h per spin). This study presents a truly high throughput sample preparation method based on large cut-off 96-well filter plate, which shortens the spin time to ~20min. To our knowledge, this is the first multi-well method that is entirely comparable with conventional FASP. This study thoroughly examined two types of filter plates and performed side-by-side comparisons with single FASP. Two types of samples, whole cell lysate of a UTI (urinary tract infection

  9. Quantitative analysis of cyclic beta-turn models.

    PubMed Central

    Perczel, A.; Fasman, G. D.

    1992-01-01

    The beta-turn is a frequently found structural unit in the conformation of globular proteins. Although the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the alpha-helix and beta-pleated sheet are well defined, there remains some ambiguity concerning the pure component CD spectra of the different types of beta-turns. Recently, it has been reported (Hollósi, M., Kövér, K.E., Holly, S., Radics, L., & Fasman, G.D., 1987, Biopolymers 26, 1527-1572; Perczel, A., Hollósi, M., Foxman, B.M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991a, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 9772-9784) that some pseudohexapeptides (e.g., the cyclo[(delta)Ava-Gly-Pro-Aaa-Gly] where Aaa = Ser, Ser(OtBu), or Gly) in many solvents adopt a conformational mixture of type I and the type II beta-turns, although the X-ray-determined conformation was an ideal type I beta-turn. In addition to these pseudohexapeptides, conformational analysis was also carried out on three pseudotetrapeptides and three pseudooctapeptides. The target of the conformation analysis reported herein was to determine whether the ring stress of the above beta-turn models has an influence on their conformational properties. Quantitative nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements yielded interproton distances. The conformational average distances so obtained were interpreted utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to yield the conformational percentages. These conformational ratios were correlated with the conformational weights obtained by quantitative CD analysis of the same compounds. The pure component CD curves of type I and type II beta-turns were also obtained, using a recently developed algorithm (Perczel, A., Tusnády, G., Hollósi, M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991b, Protein Eng. 4(6), 669-679). For the first time the results of a CD deconvolution, based on the CD spectra of 14 beta-turn models, were assigned by quantitative NOE results. The NOE experiments confirmed the ratios of the component curves found for the two major beta-turns by CD analysis. These results

  10. Quantitative analysis of cyclic beta-turn models.

    PubMed

    Perczel, A; Fasman, G D

    1992-03-01

    The beta-turn is a frequently found structural unit in the conformation of globular proteins. Although the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the alpha-helix and beta-pleated sheet are well defined, there remains some ambiguity concerning the pure component CD spectra of the different types of beta-turns. Recently, it has been reported (Hollósi, M., Kövér, K.E., Holly, S., Radics, L., & Fasman, G.D., 1987, Biopolymers 26, 1527-1572; Perczel, A., Hollósi, M., Foxman, B.M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991a, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 9772-9784) that some pseudohexapeptides (e.g., the cyclo[(delta)Ava-Gly-Pro-Aaa-Gly] where Aaa = Ser, Ser(OtBu), or Gly) in many solvents adopt a conformational mixture of type I and the type II beta-turns, although the X-ray-determined conformation was an ideal type I beta-turn. In addition to these pseudohexapeptides, conformational analysis was also carried out on three pseudotetrapeptides and three pseudooctapeptides. The target of the conformation analysis reported herein was to determine whether the ring stress of the above beta-turn models has an influence on their conformational properties. Quantitative nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements yielded interproton distances. The conformational average distances so obtained were interpreted utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to yield the conformational percentages. These conformational ratios were correlated with the conformational weights obtained by quantitative CD analysis of the same compounds. The pure component CD curves of type I and type II beta-turns were also obtained, using a recently developed algorithm (Perczel, A., Tusnády, G., Hollósi, M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991b, Protein Eng. 4(6), 669-679). For the first time the results of a CD deconvolution, based on the CD spectra of 14 beta-turn models, were assigned by quantitative NOE results. The NOE experiments confirmed the ratios of the component curves found for the two major beta-turns by CD analysis. These results

  11. Quantitative image analysis in sonograms of the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, Skouroliakou; Maria, Lyra; Aristides, Antoniou; Lambros, Vlahos

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution, real-time ultrasound is a routine examination for assessing the disorders of the thyroid gland. However, the current diagnosis practice is based mainly on qualitative evaluation of the resulting sonograms, therefore depending on the physician's experience. Computerized texture analysis is widely employed in sonographic images of various organs (liver, breast), and it has been proven to increase the sensitivity of diagnosis by providing a better tissue characterization. The present study attempts to characterize thyroid tissue by automatic texture analysis. The texture features that are calculated are based on co-occurrence matrices as they have been proposed by Haralick. The sample consists of 40 patients. For each patient two sonographic images (one for each lobe) are recorded in DICOM format. The lobe is manually delineated in each sonogram, and the co-occurrence matrices for 52 separation vectors are calculated. The texture features extracted from each one of these matrices are: contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity. Primary component analysis is used to select the optimal set of features. The statistical analysis resulted in the extraction of 21 optimal descriptors. The optimal descriptors are all co-occurrence parameters as the first-order statistics did not prove to be representative of the images characteristics. The bigger number of components depends mainly on correlation for very close or very far distances. The results indicate that quantitative analysis of thyroid sonograms can provide an objective characterization of thyroid tissue.

  12. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants: quantitative analysis of root growth.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Peter

    2008-03-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe growth of plant roots is very easy to measure and is particularly straightforward in Arabidopsis thaliana, because the increase in organ size is essentially restricted to one dimension. The precise measurement of root apical growth can be used to accurately determine growth activity (the rate of growth at a given time) during development in mutants, transgenic backgrounds, or in response to experimental treatments. Root growth is measured in a number of ways, the simplest of which is to grow the seedlings in a Petri dish and record the position of the advancing root tip at appropriate time points. The increase in root length is measured with a ruler and the data are entered into Microsoft Excel for analysis. When dealing with large numbers of seedlings, however, this procedure can be tedious, as well as inaccurate. An alternative approach, described in this protocol, uses "snapshots" of the growing plants, which are taken using gel-documentation equipment (i.e., a video camera with a frame-grabber unit, now commonly used to capture images from ethidium-bromide-stained electrophoresis gels). The images are analyzed using publicly available software (NIH-Image), which allows the user simply to cut and paste data into Microsoft Excel.

  13. In vivo osteogenesis assay: a rapid method for quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis, J E; Konstantakos, E K; Arm, D; Caplan, A I

    1998-08-01

    A quantitative in vivo osteogenesis assay is a useful tool for the analysis of cells and bioactive factors that affect the amount or rate of bone formation. There are currently two assays in general use for the in vivo assessment of osteogenesis by isolated cells: diffusion chambers and porous calcium phosphate ceramics. Due to the relative ease of specimen preparation and reproducibility of results, the porous ceramic assay was chosen for the development of a rapid method for quantitating in vivo bone formation. The ceramic cube implantation technique consists of combining osteogenic cells with 27-mm3 porous calcium phosphate ceramics, implanting the cell-ceramic composites subcutaneously into an immuno-tolerant host, and, after 2-6 weeks, harvesting and preparing the ceramic implants for histologic analysis. A drawback to the analysis of bone formation within these porous ceramics is that the entire cube must be examined to find small foci of bone present in some samples; a single cross-sectional area is not representative. For this reason, image analysis of serial sections from ceramics is often prohibitively time-consuming. Two alternative scoring methodologies were tested and compared to bone volume measurements obtained by image analysis. The two subjective scoring methods were: (1) Bone Scale: the amount of bone within pores of the ceramic implant is estimated on a scale of 0-4 based on the degree of bone fill (0=no bone, 1=up to 25%, 2=25 to 75%, 4=75 to 100% fill); and (2) Percentage Bone: the amount of bone is estimated by determining the percentage of ceramic pores which contain bone. Every tenth section of serially sectioned cubes was scored by each of these methods under double-blind conditions, and the Bone Scale and Percentage Bone results were directly compared to image analysis measurements from identical samples. Correlation coefficients indicate that the Percentage Bone method was more accurate than the Bone Scale scoring method. The Bone Scale

  14. Functional linear models for association analysis of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Mills, James L; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Xiong, Momiao

    2013-11-01

    Functional linear models are developed in this paper for testing associations between quantitative traits and genetic variants, which can be rare variants or common variants or the combination of the two. By treating multiple genetic variants of an individual in a human population as a realization of a stochastic process, the genome of an individual in a chromosome region is a continuum of sequence data rather than discrete observations. The genome of an individual is viewed as a stochastic function that contains both linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) information of the genetic markers. By using techniques of functional data analysis, both fixed and mixed effect functional linear models are built to test the association between quantitative traits and genetic variants adjusting for covariates. After extensive simulation analysis, it is shown that the F-distributed tests of the proposed fixed effect functional linear models have higher power than that of sequence kernel association test (SKAT) and its optimal unified test (SKAT-O) for three scenarios in most cases: (1) the causal variants are all rare, (2) the causal variants are both rare and common, and (3) the causal variants are common. The superior performance of the fixed effect functional linear models is most likely due to its optimal utilization of both genetic linkage and LD information of multiple genetic variants in a genome and similarity among different individuals, while SKAT and SKAT-O only model the similarities and pairwise LD but do not model linkage and higher order LD information sufficiently. In addition, the proposed fixed effect models generate accurate type I error rates in simulation studies. We also show that the functional kernel score tests of the proposed mixed effect functional linear models are preferable in candidate gene analysis and small sample problems. The methods are applied to analyze three biochemical traits in data from the Trinity Students Study.

  15. From screening to quantitative sensitivity analysis. A unified approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campolongo, Francesca; Saltelli, Andrea; Cariboni, Jessica

    2011-04-01

    The present work is a sequel to a recent one published on this journal where the superiority of 'radial design' to compute the 'total sensitivity index' was ascertained. Both concepts belong to sensitivity analysis of model output. A radial design is the one whereby starting from a random point in the hyperspace of the input factors one step in turn is taken for each factor. The procedure is iterated a number of times with a different starting random point as to collect a sample of elementary shifts for each factor. The total sensitivity index is a powerful sensitivity measure which can be estimated based on such a sample. Given the similarity between the total sensitivity index and a screening test known as method of the elementary effects (or method of Morris), we test the radial design on this method. Both methods are best practices: the total sensitivity index in the class of the quantitative measures and the elementary effects in that of the screening methods. We find that the radial design is indeed superior even for the computation of the elementary effects method. This opens the door to a sensitivity analysis strategy whereby the analyst can start with a small number of points (screening-wise) and then - depending on the results - possibly increase the numeral of points up to compute a fully quantitative measure. Also of interest to practitioners is that a radial design is nothing else than an iterated 'One factor At a Time' (OAT) approach. OAT is a radial design of size one. While OAT is not a good practice, modelers in all domains keep using it for sensitivity analysis for reasons discussed elsewhere (Saltelli and Annoni, 2010) [23]. With the present approach modelers are offered a straightforward and economic upgrade of their OAT which maintain OAT's appeal of having just one factor moved at each step.

  16. Functional Linear Models for Association Analysis of Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Mills, James L.; Wilson, Alexander F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Xiong, Momiao

    2014-01-01

    Functional linear models are developed in this paper for testing associations between quantitative traits and genetic variants, which can be rare variants or common variants or the combination of the two. By treating multiple genetic variants of an individual in a human population as a realization of a stochastic process, the genome of an individual in a chromosome region is a continuum of sequence data rather than discrete observations. The genome of an individual is viewed as a stochastic function that contains both linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) information of the genetic markers. By using techniques of functional data analysis, both fixed and mixed effect functional linear models are built to test the association between quantitative traits and genetic variants adjusting for covariates. After extensive simulation analysis, it is shown that the F-distributed tests of the proposed fixed effect functional linear models have higher power than that of sequence kernel association test (SKAT) and its optimal unified test (SKAT-O) for three scenarios in most cases: (1) the causal variants are all rare, (2) the causal variants are both rare and common, and (3) the causal variants are common. The superior performance of the fixed effect functional linear models is most likely due to its optimal utilization of both genetic linkage and LD information of multiple genetic variants in a genome and similarity among different individuals, while SKAT and SKAT-O only model the similarities and pairwise LD but do not model linkage and higher order LD information sufficiently. In addition, the proposed fixed effect models generate accurate type I error rates in simulation studies. We also show that the functional kernel score tests of the proposed mixed effect functional linear models are preferable in candidate gene analysis and small sample problems. The methods are applied to analyze three biochemical traits in data from the Trinity Students Study. PMID:24130119

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Molecule RNA-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Schoening, Jan C.; Anselmetti, Dario; Staiger, Dorothee; Ros, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA-binding proteins impact gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by interacting with cognate cis elements within the transcripts. Here, we apply dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the interaction of the Arabidopsis glycine-rich RNA-binding protein AtGRP8 with its RNA target. A dwell-time-dependent analysis of the single-molecule data in combination with competition assays and site-directed mutagenesis of both the RNA target and the RNA-binding domain of the protein allowed us to distinguish and quantify two different binding modes. For dwell times <0.21 s an unspecific complex with a lifetime of 0.56 s is observed, whereas dwell times >0.33 s result in a specific interaction with a lifetime of 208 s. The corresponding reaction lengths are 0.28 nm for the unspecific and 0.55 nm for the specific AtGRP8-RNA interactions, indicating formation of a tighter complex with increasing dwell time. These two binding modes cannot be dissected in ensemble experiments. Quantitative titration in RNA bandshift experiments yields an ensemble-averaged equilibrium constant of dissociation of KD = 2 × 10−7 M. Assuming comparable on-rates for the specific and nonspecific binding modes allows us to estimate their free energies as ΔG0 = −42 kJ/mol and ΔG0 = −28 kJ/mol for the specific and nonspecific binding modes, respectively. Thus, we show that single-molecule force spectroscopy with a refined statistical analysis is a potent tool for the analysis of protein-RNA interactions without the drawback of ensemble averaging. This makes it possible to discriminate between different binding modes or sites and to analyze them quantitatively. We propose that this method could be applied to complex interactions of biomolecules in general, and be of particular interest for the investigation of multivalent binding reactions. PMID:19527663

  18. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Chris T; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A; Davis, Gordon O; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-04-15

    Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. QuASAR: quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, Chris T.; Moyerbrailean, Gregory A.; Davis, Gordon O.; Wen, Xiaoquan; Luca, Francesca; Pique-Regi, Roger

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) studies have discovered thousands of genetic variants that regulate gene expression, enabling a better understanding of the functional role of non-coding sequences. However, eQTL studies are costly, requiring large sample sizes and genome-wide genotyping of each sample. In contrast, analysis of allele-specific expression (ASE) is becoming a popular approach to detect the effect of genetic variation on gene expression, even within a single individual. This is typically achieved by counting the number of RNA-seq reads matching each allele at heterozygous sites and testing the null hypothesis of a 1:1 allelic ratio. In principle, when genotype information is not readily available, it could be inferred from the RNA-seq reads directly. However, there are currently no existing methods that jointly infer genotypes and conduct ASE inference, while considering uncertainty in the genotype calls. Results: We present QuASAR, quantitative allele-specific analysis of reads, a novel statistical learning method for jointly detecting heterozygous genotypes and inferring ASE. The proposed ASE inference step takes into consideration the uncertainty in the genotype calls, while including parameters that model base-call errors in sequencing and allelic over-dispersion. We validated our method with experimental data for which high-quality genotypes are available. Results for an additional dataset with multiple replicates at different sequencing depths demonstrate that QuASAR is a powerful tool for ASE analysis when genotypes are not available. Availability and implementation: http://github.com/piquelab/QuASAR. Contact: fluca@wayne.edu or rpique@wayne.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary Material is available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25480375

  20. The Quantitative Analysis of Chennai Automotive Industry Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Ethirajan

    2016-07-01

    Chennai, also called as Detroit of India due to presence of Automotive Industry producing over 40 % of the India's vehicle and components. During 2001-2002, the Automotive Component Industries (ACI) in Ambattur, Thirumalizai and Thirumudivakkam Industrial Estate, Chennai has faced problems on infrastructure, technology, procurement, production and marketing. The objective is to study the Quantitative Performance of Chennai Automotive Industry Cluster before (2001-2002) and after the CDA (2008-2009). The methodology adopted is collection of primary data from 100 ACI using quantitative questionnaire and analyzing using Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), Friedman Test (FMT), and Kruskall Wallis Test (KWT).The CA computed for the different set of variables reveals that there is high degree of relationship between the variables studied. The RA models constructed establish the strong relationship between the dependent variable and a host of independent variables. The models proposed here reveal the approximate relationship in a closer form. KWT proves, there is no significant difference between three locations clusters with respect to: Net Profit, Production Cost, Marketing Costs, Procurement Costs and Gross Output. This supports that each location has contributed for development of automobile component cluster uniformly. The FMT proves, there is no significant difference between industrial units in respect of cost like Production, Infrastructure, Technology, Marketing and Net Profit. To conclude, the Automotive Industries have fully utilized the Physical Infrastructure and Centralised Facilities by adopting CDA and now exporting their products to North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Africa and Asia. The value chain analysis models have been implemented in all the cluster units. This Cluster Development Approach (CDA) model can be implemented in industries of under developed and developing countries for cost reduction and productivity

  1. Phosphoproteomic dynamics of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) reveals shared and distinct components of dehydration response.

    PubMed

    Subba, Pratigya; Barua, Pragya; Kumar, Rajiv; Datta, Asis; Soni, Kamlesh Kumar; Chakraborty, Subhra; Chakraborty, Niranjan

    2013-11-01

    Reversible protein phosphorylation is a ubiquitous regulatory mechanism that plays critical roles in transducing stress signals to bring about coordinated intracellular responses. To gain better understanding of dehydration response in plants, we have developed a differential phosphoproteome in a food legume, chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.). Three-week-old chickpea seedlings were subjected to progressive dehydration by withdrawing water, and the changes in the phosphorylation status of a large repertoire of proteins were monitored. The proteins were resolved by 2-DE and stained with phosphospecific fluorescent Pro-Q Diamond dye. Mass spectrometric analysis led to the identification of 91 putative phosphoproteins, presumably involved in a variety of functions including cell defense and rescue, photosynthesis and photorespiration, molecular chaperones, and ion transport, among others. Multiple sites of phosphorylation were predicted on several key elements, which include both the regulatory as well as the functional proteins. A critical survey of the phosphorylome revealed a DREPP (developmentally regulated plasma membrane protein) plasma membrane polypeptide family protein, henceforth designated CaDREPP1. The transcripts of CaDREPP1 were found to be differentially regulated under dehydration stress, further corroborating the proteomic results. This work provides new insights into the possible phosphorylation events triggered by the conditions of progressive water-deficit in plants.

  2. Niobium(V) oxide (Nb2O5): application to phosphoproteomics.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott B; Parikh, Jignesh R; Blank, Nathaniel C; Marto, Jarrod A

    2008-06-15

    Proteomics-based analysis of signaling cascades relies on a growing suite of affinity resins and methods aimed at efficient enrichment of phosphorylated peptides from complex biological mixtures. Given the heterogeneity of phosphopeptides and the overlap in chemical properties between phospho- and unmodified peptides, it is likely that the use of multiple resins will provide the best combination of specificity, yield, and coverage for large-scale proteomics studies. Recently titanium and zirconium dioxides have been used successfully for enrichment of phosphopeptides. Here we report the first demonstration that niobium pentoxide (Nb 2O 5) provides for efficient enrichment and recovery ( approximately 50-100%) of phosphopeptides from simple mixtures and facilitates identification of several hundred putative sites of phosphorylation from cell lysate. Comparison of phosphorylated peptides identified from Nb 2O 5 and TiO 2 with sequences in the PhosphoELM database suggests a useful degree of divergence in the selectivity of these metal oxide resins. Collectively our data indicate that Nb 2O 5 provides efficient enrichment for phosphopeptides and offers a complementary approach for large-scale phosphoproteomics studies.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Peripheral Tissue Perfusion Using Spatiotemporal Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsul; Koh, Gou Young; Kwon, Kihwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion is challenging but necessary to diagnose peripheral vascular insufficiency. Because near infrared (NIR) radiation can penetrate relatively deep into tissue, significant attention has been given to intravital NIR fluorescence imaging. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new optical imaging-based strategy for quantitative measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion by time-series analysis of local pharmacokinetics of the NIR fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Time-series NIR fluorescence images were obtained after injecting ICG intravenously in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. Mathematical modeling and computational simulations were used for translating time-series ICG images into quantitative pixel perfusion rates and a perfusion map. We could successfully predict the prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs based on the perfusion profiles obtained immediately after surgery, which were dependent on the preexisting collaterals. This method also reflected increases in perfusion and improvements in prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs induced by treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor and COMP-angiopoietin-1. Conclusions/Significance We propose that this novel NIR-imaging-based strategy is a powerful tool for biomedical studies related to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions directed at stimulating angiogenesis. PMID:19169354

  4. Quantitative analysis of incipient mineral loss in hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Hellen, Adam; Jeon, Raymond; Abrams, Stephen; Amaechi, Bennett

    2009-02-01

    A coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model was developed to describe the biothermophotonic phenomena in multi-layered hard tissue structures. Photothermal Radiometry was applied as a safe, non-destructive, and highly sensitive tool for the detection of early tooth enamel demineralization to test the theory. Extracted human tooth was treated sequentially with an artificial demineralization gel to simulate controlled mineral loss in the enamel. The experimental setup included a semiconductor laser (659 nm, 120 mW) as the source of the photothermal signal. Modulated laser light generated infrared blackbody radiation from teeth upon absorption and nonradiative energy conversion. The infrared flux emitted by the treated region of the tooth surface and sub-surface was monitored with an infrared detector, both before and after treatment. Frequency scans with a laser beam size of 3 mm were performed in order to guarantee one-dimensionality of the photothermal field. TMR images showed clear differences between sound and demineralized enamel, however this technique is destructive. Dental radiographs did not indicate any changes. The photothermal signal showed clear change even after 1 min of gel treatment. As a result of the fittings, thermal and optical properties of sound and demineralized enamel were obtained, which allowed for quantitative differentiation of healthy and non-healthy regions. In conclusion, the developed model was shown to be a promising tool for non-invasive quantitative analysis of early demineralization of hard tissues.

  5. Quantitative analysis of tumor burden in mouse lung via MRI.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vanessa K; Garbow, Joel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Engelbach, John A; Nehorai, Arye

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Despite recent advances in screening protocols, the majority of patients still present with advanced or disseminated disease. Preclinical rodent models provide a unique opportunity to test novel therapeutic drugs for targeting lung cancer. Respiratory-gated MRI is a key tool for quantitatively measuring lung-tumor burden and monitoring the time-course progression of individual tumors in mouse models of primary and metastatic lung cancer. However, quantitative analysis of lung-tumor burden in mice by MRI presents significant challenges. Herein, a method for measuring tumor burden based upon average lung-image intensity is described and validated. The method requires accurate lung segmentation; its efficiency and throughput would be greatly aided by the ability to automatically segment the lungs. A technique for automated lung segmentation in the presence of varying tumor burden levels is presented. The method includes development of a new, two-dimensional parametric model of the mouse lungs and a multi-faceted cost function to optimally fit the model parameters to each image. Results demonstrate a strong correlation (0.93), comparable with that of fully manual expert segmentation, between the automated method's tumor-burden metric and the tumor burden measured by lung weight.

  6. Advance in orientation microscopy: quantitative analysis of nanocrystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Seyring, Martin; Song, Xiaoyan; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2011-04-26

    The special properties of nanocrystalline materials are generally accepted to be a consequence of the high density of planar defects (grain and twin boundaries) and their characteristics. However, until now, nanograin structures have not been characterized with similar detail and statistical relevance as coarse-grained materials, due to the lack of an appropriate method. In the present paper, a novel method based on quantitative nanobeam diffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented to determine the misorientation of adjacent nanograins and subgrains. Spatial resolution of <5 nm can be achieved. This method is applicable to characterize orientation relationships in wire, film, and bulk materials with nanocrystalline structures. As a model material, nanocrystalline Cu is used. Several important features of the nanograin structure are discovered utilizing quantitative analysis: the fraction of twin boundaries is substantially higher than that observed in bright-field images in the TEM; small angle grain boundaries are prominent; there is an obvious dependence of the grain boundary characteristics on grain size distribution and mean grain size.

  7. Quantitative analysis of multiple sclerosis: a feasibility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lihong; Li, Xiang; Wei, Xinzhou; Sturm, Deborah; Lu, Hongbing; Liang, Zhengrong

    2006-03-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory and demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system with a presumed immune-mediated etiology. For treatment of MS, the measurements of white matter (WM), gray matter (GM), and cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) are often used in conjunction with clinical evaluation to provide a more objective measure of MS burden. In this paper, we apply a new unifying automatic mixture-based algorithm for segmentation of brain tissues to quantitatively analyze MS. The method takes into account the following effects that commonly appear in MR imaging: 1) The MR data is modeled as a stochastic process with an inherent inhomogeneity effect of smoothly varying intensity; 2) A new partial volume (PV) model is built in establishing the maximum a posterior (MAP) segmentation scheme; 3) Noise artifacts are minimized by a priori Markov random field (MRF) penalty indicating neighborhood correlation from tissue mixture. The volumes of brain tissues (WM, GM) and CSF are extracted from the mixture-based segmentation. Experimental results of feasibility studies on quantitative analysis of MS are presented.

  8. Quantitative colorimetric-imaging analysis of nickel in iron meteorites.

    PubMed

    Zamora, L Lahuerta; López, P Alemán; Fos, G M Antón; Algarra, R Martín; Romero, A M Mellado; Calatayud, J Martínez

    2011-02-15

    A quantitative analytical imaging approach for determining the nickel content of metallic meteorites is proposed. The approach uses a digital image of a series of standard solutions of the nickel-dimethylglyoxime coloured chelate and a meteorite sample solution subjected to the same treatment as the nickel standards for quantitation. The image is processed with suitable software to assign a colour-dependent numerical value (analytical signal) to each standard. Such a value is directly proportional to the analyte concentration, which facilitates construction of a calibration graph where the value for the unknown sample can be interpolated to calculate the nickel content of the meteorite. The results thus obtained were validated by comparison with the official, ISO-endorsed spectrophotometric method for nickel. The proposed method is fairly simple and inexpensive; in fact, it uses a commercially available digital camera as measuring instrument and the images it provides are processed with highly user-friendly public domain software (specifically, ImageJ, developed by the National Institutes of Health and freely available for download on the Internet). In a scenario dominated by increasingly sophisticated and expensive equipment, the proposed method provides a cost-effective alternative based on simple, robust hardware that is affordable and can be readily accessed worldwide. This can be especially advantageous for countries were available resources for analytical equipment investments are scant. The proposed method is essentially an adaptation of classical chemical analysis to current, straightforward, robust, cost-effective instrumentation. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Quantitative three-dimensional holographic interferometry for flow field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, C. M. E.; Parker, S. C. J.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    Holographic interferometry offers the potential for quantitative, wholefield analysis of three-dimensional compressible flows. The technique is non-intrusive, does not require the introduction of seeding particles, and records the entire flow information within the pulse duration of a Q-switched ruby laser (~30ns). At present, however, holographic interferometry is mainly used qualitatively due to the practical restrictions of data recording, acquisition and processing. To address the potential of holographic flow analysis a prototype multi-channel interferometer has been designed and preliminary wind tunnel results have been obtained. The proposed configuration uses specular illumination which, unlike comparable diffuse systems, does not suffer from fringe localisation and speckle noise. Beam collimation and steering through the flow field is achieved in a single operation by the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs). The resulting design is compact, light efficient, has aberration compensation, and the recorded data are conducive to both tomographic analysis and direct comparison to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions. Holograms have been recorded of simple two-dimensional and axisymmetric compressible flows, to compare the accuracy of holographic density measurements with data from conventional pressure sensors and CFD codes. Data extraction from the holograms, and the elimination of rigid body motion, was achieved using digital Fourier transform fringe analysis. The introduction of phase errors by image processing has been investigated by analysing simulated fringe patterns generated from a combination of experimental amplitude information and computer generated phase data.

  10. Multipoint quantitative-trait linkage analysis in general pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Almasy, L; Blangero, J

    1998-01-01

    Multipoint linkage analysis of quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) has previously been restricted to sibships and small pedigrees. In this article, we show how variance-component linkage methods can be used in pedigrees of arbitrary size and complexity, and we develop a general framework for multipoint identity-by-descent (IBD) probability calculations. We extend the sib-pair multipoint mapping approach of Fulker et al. to general relative pairs. This multipoint IBD method uses the proportion of alleles shared identical by descent at genotyped loci to estimate IBD sharing at arbitrary points along a chromosome for each relative pair. We have derived correlations in IBD sharing as a function of chromosomal distance for relative pairs in general pedigrees and provide a simple framework whereby these correlations can be easily obtained for any relative pair related by a single line of descent or by multiple independent lines of descent. Once calculated, the multipoint relative-pair IBDs can be utilized in variance-component linkage analysis, which considers the likelihood of the entire pedigree jointly. Examples are given that use simulated data, demonstrating both the accuracy of QTL localization and the increase in power provided by multipoint analysis with 5-, 10-, and 20-cM marker maps. The general pedigree variance component and IBD estimation methods have been implemented in the SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) computer package. PMID:9545414

  11. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction performance of interpolants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.; Park, Stephen K.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis presented provides a quantitative measure of the reconstruction or interpolation performance of linear, shift-invariant interpolants. The performance criterion is the mean square error of the difference between the sampled and reconstructed functions. The analysis is applicable to reconstruction algorithms used in image processing and to many types of splines used in numerical analysis and computer graphics. When formulated in the frequency domain, the mean square error clearly separates the contribution of the interpolation method from the contribution of the sampled data. The equations provide a rational basis for selecting an optimal interpolant; that is, one which minimizes the mean square error. The analysis has been applied to a selection of frequently used data splines and reconstruction algorithms: parametric cubic and quintic Hermite splines, exponential and nu splines (including the special case of the cubic spline), parametric cubic convolution, Keys' fourth-order cubic, and a cubic with a discontinuous first derivative. The emphasis in this paper is on the image-dependent case in which no a priori knowledge of the frequency spectrum of the sampled function is assumed.

  13. Extracellular Matrix Proteome and Phosphoproteome of Potato Reveals Functionally Distinct and Diverse Canonical and Non-Canonical Proteoforms

    PubMed Central

    Elagamey, Eman; Narula, Kanika; Sinha, Arunima; Aggarwal, Pooja Rani; Ghosh, Sudip; Chakraborty, Niranjan; Chakraborty, Subhra

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) has a molecular machinery composed of diverse proteins and proteoforms that combine properties of tensile strength with extensibility exhibiting growth-regulatory functions and self- and non-self-recognition. The identification of ECM proteoforms is the prerequisite towards a comprehensive understanding of biological functions accomplished by the outermost layer of the cell. Regulatory mechanisms of protein functions rely on post-translational modifications, phosphorylation in particular, affecting enzymatic activity, interaction, localization and stability. To investigate the ECM proteoforms, we have isolated the cell wall proteome and phosphoproteome of a tuberous crop, potato (Solanum tuberosum). LC-MS/MS analysis led to the identification of 38 proteins and 35 phosphoproteins of known and unknown functions. The findings may provide a better understanding of biochemical machinery and the integrated protein and phosphoprotein network of ECM for future functional studies of different developmental pathways and gu