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Sample records for quantitative spect assessment

  1. Quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M; Frey, E C; LaCroix, K J; Lalush, D S; McCartney, W H; King, M A; Gullberg, G T

    1998-01-01

    In recent years, there has been much interest in the clinical application of attenuation compensation to myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with the promise that accurate quantitative images can be obtained to improve clinical diagnoses. The different attenuation compensation methods that are available create confusion and some misconceptions. Also, attenuation-compensated images reveal other image-degrading effects including collimator-detector blurring and scatter that are not apparent in uncompensated images. This article presents basic concepts of the major factors that degrade the quality and quantitative accuracy of myocardial perfusion SPECT images, and includes a discussion of the various image reconstruction and compensation methods and misconceptions and pitfalls in implementation. The differences between the various compensation methods and their performance are demonstrated. Particular emphasis is directed to an approach that promises to provide quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT images by accurately compensating for the 3-dimensional (3-D) attenuation, collimator-detector response, and scatter effects. With advances in the computer hardware and optimized implementation techniques, quantitatively accurate and high-quality myocardial perfusion SPECT images can be obtained in clinically acceptable processing time. Examples from simulation, phantom, and patient studies are used to demonstrate the various aspects of the investigation. We conclude that quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT, which holds great promise to improve clinical diagnosis, is an achievable goal in the near future.

  2. Visual and semi-quantitative assessment of brain tumors using (201)Tl-SPECT.

    PubMed

    Nose, Ayumi; Otsuka, Hideki; Nose, Hayato; Otomi, Yoichi; Terazawa, Kaori; Harada, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of (201)Tl-SPECT in differentiating benign from malignant brain tumors. Eighty-eight patients (44 males and 44 females) with 58 high-grade (WHO grade III-IV) and 30 low-grade (WHO grade I-II) tumors were evaluated with (201)Tl-SPECT. (1) Visual assessment was performed by board-certificated radiologists using (201)Tl-SPECT. Tumors were classified in two groups (Tl-positive and Tl-negative) and scored using the five grade evaluation system. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed in the Tl-positive group. (2) Semi-quantitative assessment involved measurement of early and delayed (201)Tl uptake, and the retention index (RI) was applied as follows: RI=delayed uptake ratio/early uptake ratio. Three combinations of RI using mean and maximum values of the region of interest were calculated. (1) Seventy-four Tl-positive and 14 Tl-negative tumors. The area under the ROC curve (AUC) estimated by three radiologists exceeded a value of 0.7. The value was greater when estimated by the more experienced radiologist. (2) In all RIs, the difference of RI between high-grade tumors and low-grade tumors was statistically significant. A visual and semi-quantitative assessment using (201)Tl-SPECT was found to be useful for differentiating benign from malignant brain tumors.

  3. Relationship Between Coronary Contrast-Flow Quantitative Flow Ratio and Myocardial Ischemia Assessed by SPECT MPI.

    PubMed

    Smit, Jeff M; Koning, Gerhard; van Rosendael, Alexander R; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; Mertens, Bart J; Jukema, J Wouter; Delgado, Victoria; Reiber, Johan H C; Bax, Jeroen J; Scholte, Arthur J

    2017-07-06

    A new method has been developed to calculate fractional flow reserve (FFR) from invasive coronary angiography, the so-called "contrast-flow quantitative flow ratio (cQFR)". Recently, cQFR was compared to invasive FFR in intermediate coronary lesions showing an overall diagnostic accuracy of 85%. The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cQFR and myocardial ischemia assessed by single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging (SPECT MPI). Patients who underwent SPECT MPI and coronary angiography within 3 months were included. The cQFR computation was performed offline, using dedicated software. The cQFR computation was based on 3-dimensional quantitative coronary angiography (QCA) and computational fluid dynamics. The standard 17-segment model was used to determine the vascular territories. Myocardial ischemia was defined as a summed difference score ≥2 in a vascular territory. A cQFR of ≤0.80 was considered abnormal. Two hundred and twenty-four coronary arteries were analysed in 85 patients. Overall accuracy of cQFR to detect ischemia on SPECT MPI was 90%. In multivariable analysis, cQFR was independently associated with ischemia on SPECT MPI (OR per 0.01 decrease of cQFR: 1.10; 95% CI 1.04-1.18, p = 0.002), whereas clinical and QCA parameters were not. Furthermore, cQFR showed incremental value for the detection of ischemia compared to clinical and QCA parameters (global chi square 48.7 to 62.6; p <0.001). A good relationship between cQFR and SPECT MPI was found. cQFR was independently associated with ischemia on SPECT MPI and showed incremental value to detect ischemia compared to clinical and QCA parameters.

  4. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-05-01

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50% when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25% when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30%, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50%) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the use of resolution

  5. Assessment of the sources of error affecting the quantitative accuracy of SPECT imaging in small animals

    SciTech Connect

    Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, University of California, San Francisco and University of California, Berkeley; Department of Radiology, University of California; Gullberg, Grant T; Hwang, Andrew B.; Franc, Benjamin L.; Gullberg, Grant T.; Hasegawa, Bruce H.

    2008-02-15

    Small animal SPECT imaging systems have multiple potential applications in biomedical research. Whereas SPECT data are commonly interpreted qualitatively in a clinical setting, the ability to accurately quantify measurements will increase the utility of the SPECT data for laboratory measurements involving small animals. In this work, we assess the effect of photon attenuation, scatter and partial volume errors on the quantitative accuracy of small animal SPECT measurements, first with Monte Carlo simulation and then confirmed with experimental measurements. The simulations modeled the imaging geometry of a commercially available small animal SPECT system. We simulated the imaging of a radioactive source within a cylinder of water, and reconstructed the projection data using iterative reconstruction algorithms. The size of the source and the size of the surrounding cylinder were varied to evaluate the effects of photon attenuation and scatter on quantitative accuracy. We found that photon attenuation can reduce the measured concentration of radioactivity in a volume of interest in the center of a rat-sized cylinder of water by up to 50percent when imaging with iodine-125, and up to 25percent when imaging with technetium-99m. When imaging with iodine-125, the scatter-to-primary ratio can reach up to approximately 30percent, and can cause overestimation of the radioactivity concentration when reconstructing data with attenuation correction. We varied the size of the source to evaluate partial volume errors, which we found to be a strong function of the size of the volume of interest and the spatial resolution. These errors can result in large (>50percent) changes in the measured amount of radioactivity. The simulation results were compared with and found to agree with experimental measurements. The inclusion of attenuation correction in the reconstruction algorithm improved quantitative accuracy. We also found that an improvement of the spatial resolution through the

  6. Quantitative assessment of rest and acetazolamide CBF using quantitative SPECT reconstruction and sequential administration of (123)I-iodoamphetamine: comparison among data acquired at three institutions.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Miho; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Takahashi, Masaaki; Shimosegawa, Eku; Hatazawa, Jun; Suzuki, Michiyasu; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Kenji; Iihara, Koji; Iida, Hidehiro

    2014-11-01

    A recently developed technique which reconstructs quantitative images from original projection data acquired using existing single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) devices enabled quantitative assessment of cerebral blood flow (CBF) at rest and after acetazolamide challenge. This study was intended to generate a normal database and to investigate its inter-institutional consistency. The three institutions carried out a series of SPECT scanning on 32 healthy volunteers, following a recently proposed method that involved dual administration of (123)I-iodoamphetamine during a single SPECT scan. Intra-institute and inter-institutional variations of regional CBF values were evaluated both at rest and after acetazolamide challenge. Functional images were pooled for both rest and acetazolamide CBF, and inter-institutional difference was evaluated among these images using two independent software programs. Quantitative assessment of CBF images at rest and after acetazolamide was successfully achieved with the given protocol in all institutions. Intra-institutional variation of CBF values at rest and after acetazolamide was consistent with previously reported values. Quantitative CBF values showed no significant difference among institutions in all regions, except for a posterior cerebral artery region after acetazolamide challenge in one institution which employed SPECT device with lowest spatial resolution. Pooled CBF images at rest and after acetazolamide generated using two software programs showed no institutional differences after equalization of the spatial resolution. SPECT can provide reproducible images from projection data acquired using different SPECT devices. A common database acquired at different institutions may be shared among institutions, if images are reconstructed using a quantitative reconstruction program, and acquired by following a standardized protocol.

  7. Parametric Cerebrovascular Reserve Images Using Acetazolamide (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT: A Feasibility Study of Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hongyoon; Yoo, Min Young; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Kang, Keon Wook; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2013-09-01

    Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been widely used for evaluation of hemodynamics; however, qualitative and subjective visual assessment of cerebrovascular reserve (CVR) has been performed in clinical settings. The aim of this study was to generate parametric CVR images and evaluate its feasibility of quantification. Basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT data from 17 patients who underwent bypass surgery or percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were used. Spatial normalization was performed and parametric CVR images were generated using relative CVR (rCVR) of each voxel proportional to CVR of the whole brain. Binary parametric maps to show area of relatively reduced CVR were generated also using threshold of rCVR < 90 %. We calculated rCVR of internal carotid artery (ICA) using the parametric CVR images and probabilistic maps for ICA territory. Pre- and postprocedural parametric CVR images were obtained and quantitative rCVRs were compared. The rCVRs were evaluated according to visual grades for regional decreased CVR. Postprocedural rCVR obtained from parametric CVR images increased significantly from preprocedural rCVR. The rCVR was significantly correlated with visual grades of reduced CVR for each side of ICA territories. We generated parametric CVR images for basal/acetazolamide stress (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT. As a quantitative measurement, rCVR obtained from the parametric image was feasibly assessed hemodynamic abnormalities with preserved anatomical information.

  8. Combined visual and semi-quantitative assessment of (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT for the diagnosis of dopaminergic neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Jun; Yoshimura, Hajime; Shimizu, Keiji; Hino, Megumu; Kohara, Nobuo

    2017-07-01

    Visual and semi-quantitative assessments of (123)I-FP-CIT single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) are useful for the diagnosis of dopaminergic neurodegenerative diseases (dNDD), including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, progressive supranuclear palsy, multiple system atrophy, and corticobasal degeneration. However, the diagnostic value of combined visual and semi-quantitative assessment in dNDD remains unclear. Among 239 consecutive patients with a newly diagnosed possible parkinsonian syndrome who underwent (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT in our medical center, 114 patients with a disease duration less than 7 years were diagnosed as dNDD with the established criteria or as non-dNDD according to clinical judgment. We retrospectively examined their clinical characteristics and visual and semi-quantitative assessments of (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT. The striatal binding ratio (SBR) was used as a semi-quantitative measure of (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT. We calculated the sensitivity and specificity of visual assessment alone, semi-quantitative assessment alone, and combined visual and semi-quantitative assessment for the diagnosis of dNDD. SBR was correlated with visual assessment. Some dNDD patients with a normal visual assessment had an abnormal SBR, and vice versa. There was no statistically significant difference between sensitivity of the diagnosis with visual assessment alone and semi-quantitative assessment alone (91.2 vs. 86.8%, respectively, p = 0.29). Combined visual and semi-quantitative assessment demonstrated superior sensitivity (96.7%) to visual assessment (p = 0.03) or semi-quantitative assessment (p = 0.003) alone with equal specificity. Visual and semi-quantitative assessments of (123)I-FP-CIT SPECT are helpful for the diagnosis of dNDD, and combined visual and semi-quantitative assessment shows superior sensitivity with equal specificity.

  9. Brain SPECT quantitation in clinical diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.

    1991-12-31

    Methods to quantitate SPECT data for clinical diagnosis should be chosen so that they take advantage of the lessons learned from PET data. This is particularly important because current SPECT high-resolution brain imaging systems now produce images that are similar in resolution to those generated by the last generation PET equipment (9 mm FWHM). These high-resolution SPECT systems make quantitation of SPECT more problematic than earlier. Methodology validated on low-resolution SPECT systems may no longer be valid for data obtained with the newer SPECT systems. For example, in patients with dementia, the ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity often was studied. However, with new instruments, the cerebellum appears very different: discrete regions are more apparent. The large cerebellar regions usually used with older instrumentation are of an inappropriate size for the new equipment. The normal range for any method of quantitation determined using older equipment probably changes for data obtained with new equipment. It is not surprising that Kim et al. in their simulations demonstrated that because of the finite resolution of imaging systems, the ability to measure pure function is limited, with {open_quotes}anatomy{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}function{close_quotes} coupled in a {open_quotes}complex nonlinear way{close_quotes}. 11 refs.

  10. 3D quantitative analysis of brain SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Ceskovic, Ivan; Petrovic, Ratimir; Loncaric, Srecko

    2001-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a computer-based technique for quantitative analysis of 3-D brain images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In particular, the volume and location of ischemic lesion and penumbra is important for early diagnosis and treatment of infracted regions of the brain. SPECT imaging is typically used as diagnostic tool to assess the size and location of the ischemic lesion. The segmentation method presented in this paper utilizes a 3-D deformable model in order to determine size and location of the regions of interest. The evolution of the model is computed using a level-set implementation of the algorithm. In addition to 3-D deformable model the method utilizes edge detection and region growing for realization of a pre-processing. Initial experimental results have shown that the method is useful for SPECT image analysis.

  11. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L J; Nijsen, Johannes F W; Lam, Marnix G E H; Zonnenberg, Bernard A; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Viergever, Max A; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2013-11-01

    Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ((166)Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative (166)Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum. A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of (166)Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full (166)Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A(est)) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six (166)Ho RE patients. At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥ 17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96-106.21 ml were improved from 32%-63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%-80% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 76%-103% (SPECT-fMC). Furthermore

  12. Evaluation of quantitative accuracy in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for various isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, S.-J.; Yu, A. R.; Kim, Y.-s.; Kang, W.-S.; Jin, S. S.; Kim, J.-S.; Son, T. J.; Kim, H.-J.

    2015-05-01

    In vivo pre-clinical single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a valuable tool for functional small animal imaging, but several physical factors, such as scatter radiation, limit the quantitative accuracy of conventional scintillation crystal-based SPECT. Semiconductor detectors such as CZT overcome these deficiencies through superior energy resolution. To our knowledge, little scientific information exists regarding the accuracy of quantitative analysis in CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT systems for different isotopes. The aim of this study was to assess the quantitative accuracy of CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT for four isotopes: 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In. The quantitative accuracy of the CZT-based Triumph X-SPECT (Gamma-Medica Ideas, Northridge, CA, U.S.A.) was compared with that of a conventional SPECT using GATE simulation. Quantitative errors due to the attenuation and scatter effects were evaluated for all four isotopes with energy windows of 5%, 10%, and 20%. A spherical source containing the isotope was placed at the center of the air-or-water-filled mouse-sized cylinder phantom. The CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT was more accurate than the conventional SPECT. For example, in the conventional SPECT with an energy window of 10%, scatter effects degraded quantitative accuracy by up to 11.52%, 5.10%, 2.88%, and 1.84% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. However, with the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT, the degradations were only 9.67%, 5.45%, 2.36%, and 1.24% for 201Tl, 99mTc, 123I, and 111In, respectively. As the energy window was increased, the quantitative errors increased in both SPECT systems. Additionally, the isotopes with lower energy of photon emissions had greater quantitative error. Our results demonstrated that the CZT-based pre-clinical SPECT had lower overall quantitative errors due to reduced scatter and high detection efficiency. Furthermore, the results of this systematic assessment quantifying the accuracy of these SPECT

  13. Quantitative SPECT of uptake of monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, G.L.; Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J.; Zhang, C.G.; Custer, T.R.

    1989-01-01

    Absolute quantitation of the distribution of radiolabeled antibodies is important to the efficient conduct of research with these agents and their ultimate use for imaging and treatment, but is formidable because of the unrestricted nature of their distribution within the patient. Planar imaging methods have been developed and provide an adequate approximation of the distribution of radionuclide for many purposes, particularly when there is considerable specificity of targeting. This is not currently the case for antibodies and is unlikely in the future. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides potential for greater accuracy because it reduces problems caused by superimposition of tissues and non-target contributions to target counts. SPECT measurement of radionuclide content requires: (1) accurate determination of camera sensitivity; (2) accurate determination of the number of counts in a defined region of interest; (3) correction for attenuation; (4) correction for scatter and septal penetration; (5) accurate measurement of the administered dose; (6) adequate statistics; and (7) accurate definition of tissue mass or volume. The major impediment to each of these requirements is scatter of many types. The magnitude of this problem can be diminished by improvements in tomographic camera design, computer algorithms, and methodological approaches. 34 references.

  14. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Gils, C. A. J.; Beijst, C.; van Rooij, R.; de Jong, H. W. A. M.

    2016-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,-26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated CDR

  15. Impact of reconstruction parameters on quantitative I-131 SPECT.

    PubMed

    van Gils, C A J; Beijst, C; van Rooij, R; de Jong, H W A M

    2016-07-21

    Radioiodine therapy using I-131 is widely used for treatment of thyroid disease or neuroendocrine tumors. Monitoring treatment by accurate dosimetry requires quantitative imaging. The high energy photons however render quantitative SPECT reconstruction challenging, potentially requiring accurate correction for scatter and collimator effects. The goal of this work is to assess the effectiveness of various correction methods on these effects using phantom studies. A SPECT/CT acquisition of the NEMA IEC body phantom was performed. Images were reconstructed using the following parameters: (1) without scatter correction, (2) with triple energy window (TEW) scatter correction and (3) with Monte Carlo-based scatter correction. For modelling the collimator-detector response (CDR), both (a) geometric Gaussian CDRs as well as (b) Monte Carlo simulated CDRs were compared. Quantitative accuracy, contrast to noise ratios and recovery coefficients were calculated, as well as the background variability and the residual count error in the lung insert. The Monte Carlo scatter corrected reconstruction method was shown to be intrinsically quantitative, requiring no experimentally acquired calibration factor. It resulted in a more accurate quantification of the background compartment activity density compared with TEW or no scatter correction. The quantification error relative to a dose calibrator derived measurement was found to be  <1%,-26% and 33%, respectively. The adverse effects of partial volume were significantly smaller with the Monte Carlo simulated CDR correction compared with geometric Gaussian or no CDR modelling. Scatter correction showed a small effect on quantification of small volumes. When using a weighting factor, TEW correction was comparable to Monte Carlo reconstruction in all measured parameters, although this approach is clinically impractical since this factor may be patient dependent. Monte Carlo based scatter correction including accurately simulated CDR

  16. Quantitative Monte Carlo-based holmium-166 SPECT reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Elschot, Mattijs; Smits, Maarten L. J.; Nijsen, Johannes F. W.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Zonnenberg, Bernard A.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Jong, Hugo W. A. M. de; Viergever, Max A.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: Quantitative imaging of the radionuclide distribution is of increasing interest for microsphere radioembolization (RE) of liver malignancies, to aid treatment planning and dosimetry. For this purpose, holmium-166 ({sup 166}Ho) microspheres have been developed, which can be visualized with a gamma camera. The objective of this work is to develop and evaluate a new reconstruction method for quantitative {sup 166}Ho SPECT, including Monte Carlo-based modeling of photon contributions from the full energy spectrum.Methods: A fast Monte Carlo (MC) simulator was developed for simulation of {sup 166}Ho projection images and incorporated in a statistical reconstruction algorithm (SPECT-fMC). Photon scatter and attenuation for all photons sampled from the full {sup 166}Ho energy spectrum were modeled during reconstruction by Monte Carlo simulations. The energy- and distance-dependent collimator-detector response was modeled using precalculated convolution kernels. Phantom experiments were performed to quantitatively evaluate image contrast, image noise, count errors, and activity recovery coefficients (ARCs) of SPECT-fMC in comparison with those of an energy window-based method for correction of down-scattered high-energy photons (SPECT-DSW) and a previously presented hybrid method that combines MC simulation of photopeak scatter with energy window-based estimation of down-scattered high-energy contributions (SPECT-ppMC+DSW). Additionally, the impact of SPECT-fMC on whole-body recovered activities (A{sup est}) and estimated radiation absorbed doses was evaluated using clinical SPECT data of six {sup 166}Ho RE patients.Results: At the same noise level, SPECT-fMC images showed substantially higher contrast than SPECT-DSW and SPECT-ppMC+DSW in spheres ≥17 mm in diameter. The count error was reduced from 29% (SPECT-DSW) and 25% (SPECT-ppMC+DSW) to 12% (SPECT-fMC). ARCs in five spherical volumes of 1.96–106.21 ml were improved from 32%–63% (SPECT-DSW) and 50%–80

  17. Noninvasive quantitative assessment of pacing induced ischemia in coronary artery disease patients using SPECT imaging with thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Summerville, D.A.; Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Jaski, B.E.; Nesto, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the use of a quantification algorithm which measures total myocardial mass using thallium-201 and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Myocardial and lung uptake ratios were determined from the early and redistribution scintigrams of twelve coronary artery disease patients who had received intraventricular thallium-201 during pacing induced ischemia. The Iowa heart phantom placed in an Alderson chest phantom were imaged tomographically for the obtained range in target-to-background ratios. Tomographic acquisitions were made over 180/sup 0/. 30/sup 0/ RAO to 60/sup 0/ LPO for 64 projections. All reconstructions were made using attenuation compensation. Transverse tomographic slices were formulated into oblique data sets. The slices perpendicular to the left ventricular long axis (typically 16 to 19, .62 cm thick) were processed by a previously described algorithm which estimates volumes above certain threshold count values in contiguous slices and then sums according to Simpson's rule. Calibration curves for different target-to-background values and different threshold values were obtained. In the phantom, changes in the refillable chambers were accurately quantifiable. When applied to six patient studies, estimates of the change in myocardial mass correlated with the amount of ischemia (elevation in left ventricular EDP, r = .93). The authors conclude that SPECT can be used to make accurate estimates of myocardial mass using such algorithms if care is taken to adjust for individual variations in the uptake of thallium-201.

  18. Noninvasive quantitative assessment of pacing induced ischemia in coronary artery disease patients using spect imaging with thallium-201

    SciTech Connect

    Summerville, D.A.; Polak, J.F.; Holman, B.L.; Jaski, B.E.; Nesto, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    The authors have investigated the use of a quantification algorithm which measures total myocardial mass using thallium-201 and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Myocardial and lung uptake ratios were determined from the early and redistribution scintigrams of twelve coronary artery disease patients who had received intraventricular thallium-201 during pacing induced ischemia. The Iowa heart phantom placed in an Alderson chest phantom were imaged tomographically for the obtained range in target-to-background ratios. Tomographic acquisitions were made over 180/sup 0/: 30/sup 0/ RAO to 60/sup 0/ LPO for 64 projections. All reconstructions were made using attenuation compensation. Transverse tomographic slices were formatted into oblique data sets. The slices perpendicular to the left ventricular long axis (typically 16 to 19, .62 cm thick) were processed by a previously described algorithm which estimates volumes above certain threshold count values in contiguous slices and then sums according to Simpson's rule. Calibration curves for different target-to-background values and different threshold values were obtained. In the phantom, changes in the refillable chambers were accurately quantifiable. When applied to six patient studies, estimates of the change in myocardial mass correlated with the amount of ischemia (elevation in left ventricular EDP, r = .93). The authors conclude that SPECT can be used to make accurate estimates of myocardial mass using such algorithms if care is taken to adjust for individual variations in the uptake of tahallium-201.

  19. A combined static-dynamic single-dose imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT.

    PubMed

    Sciammarella, Maria; Shrestha, Uttam M; Seo, Youngho; Gullberg, Grant T; Botvinick, Elias H

    2017-08-03

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is a clinical mainstay that is typically performed with static imaging protocols and visually or semi-quantitatively assessed for perfusion defects based upon the relative intensity of myocardial regions. Dynamic cardiac SPECT presents a new imaging technique based on time-varying information of radiotracer distribution, which permits the evaluation of regional myocardial blood flow (MBF) and coronary flow reserve (CFR). In this work, a preliminary feasibility study was conducted in a small patient sample designed to implement a unique combined static-dynamic single-dose one-day visit imaging protocol to compare quantitative dynamic SPECT with static conventional SPECT for improving the diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). Fifteen patients (11 males, four females, mean age 71 ± 9 years) were enrolled for a combined dynamic and static SPECT (Infinia Hawkeye 4, GE Healthcare) imaging protocol with a single dose of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin administered at rest and a single dose administered at stress in a one-day visit. Out of 15 patients, eleven had selective coronary angiography (SCA), 8 within 6 months and the rest within 24 months of SPECT imaging, without intervening symptoms or interventions. The extent and severity of perfusion defects in each myocardial region was graded visually. Dynamically acquired data were also used to estimate the MBF and CFR. Both visually graded images and estimated CFR were tested against SCA as a reference to evaluate the validity of the methods. Overall, conventional static SPECT was normal in ten patients and abnormal in five patients, dynamic SPECT was normal in 12 patients and abnormal in three patients, and CFR from dynamic SPECT was normal in nine patients and abnormal in six patients. Among those 11 patients with SCA, conventional SPECT was normal in 5, 3 with documented CAD on SCA with an overall accuracy of 64%, sensitivity of 40% and specificity of 83%. Dynamic SPECT image

  20. Quantitative Comparison of PET and Bremsstrahlung SPECT for Imaging the In Vivo Yttrium-90 Microsphere Distribution after Liver Radioembolization

    PubMed Central

    Elschot, Mattijs; Vermolen, Bart J.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; de Keizer, Bart; van den Bosch, Maurice A. A. J.; de Jong, Hugo W. A. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background After yttrium-90 (90Y) microsphere radioembolization (RE), evaluation of extrahepatic activity and liver dosimetry is typically performed on 90Y Bremsstrahlung SPECT images. Since these images demonstrate a low quantitative accuracy, 90Y PET has been suggested as an alternative. The aim of this study is to quantitatively compare SPECT and state-of-the-art PET on the ability to detect small accumulations of 90Y and on the accuracy of liver dosimetry. Methodology/Principal Findings SPECT/CT and PET/CT phantom data were acquired using several acquisition and reconstruction protocols, including resolution recovery and Time-Of-Flight (TOF) PET. Image contrast and noise were compared using a torso-shaped phantom containing six hot spheres of various sizes. The ability to detect extra- and intrahepatic accumulations of activity was tested by quantitative evaluation of the visibility and unique detectability of the phantom hot spheres. Image-based dose estimates of the phantom were compared to the true dose. For clinical illustration, the SPECT and PET-based estimated liver dose distributions of five RE patients were compared. At equal noise level, PET showed higher contrast recovery coefficients than SPECT. The highest contrast recovery coefficients were obtained with TOF PET reconstruction including resolution recovery. All six spheres were consistently visible on SPECT and PET images, but PET was able to uniquely detect smaller spheres than SPECT. TOF PET-based estimates of the dose in the phantom spheres were more accurate than SPECT-based dose estimates, with underestimations ranging from 45% (10-mm sphere) to 11% (37-mm sphere) for PET, and 75% to 58% for SPECT, respectively. The differences between TOF PET and SPECT dose-estimates were supported by the patient data. Conclusions/Significance In this study we quantitatively demonstrated that the image quality of state-of-the-art PET is superior over Bremsstrahlung SPECT for the assessment of the 90Y

  1. Clinical Significance of Quantitative 123I-MIBG SPECT/CT Analysis of Pheochromocytoma and Paraganglioma.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Ryusuke; Nakamoto, Yuji; Ishimori, Takayoshi; Togashi, Kaori

    2016-11-01

    This retrospective study compared the diagnostic performances of quantitative versus visual analyses of I-MIBG scintigraphy in patients with suspected pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma (PPGL). SPECT images were obtained 6 and/or 24 h after MIBG injection from 68 patients with clinically suspected PPGL, with attenuation correction by low-dose unenhanced CT. Planar images were also obtained at each time point. SUVs of retroperitoneal tumors, including PPGLs, and physiological uptake by normal organs were measured using the SPECT images. The diagnostic performance of the quantitative assessment in differentiating PPGLs from other lesions or normal adrenal glands was assessed using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The planar scans and 6-h and 24-h SPECT/CT images were also assessed visually. PPGLs showed a significantly higher SUVmax (mean ± SD = 9.97 ± 3.86) than other retroperitoneal lesions (3.85 ± 1.51) or normal adrenal glands (3.91 ± 1.20). At an optimal cut-off of 6.57, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the quantitative assessment for 6-h SPECT/CT in differentiating PPGLs was 78.6%, 96.3%, and 92.6%, respectively; the area under the curve was 0.878. The diagnostic performance did not significantly differ between the quantitative and visual analyses, but the specificity of the former tended to be higher at 6 h (96.3% vs. 90.7%) and at 24 h (91.2% vs. 82.4%). The specificity, but not the sensitivity, of the quantitative approach was higher than that of visual assessment in differentiating PPGLs from other retroperitoneal pathologies and from physiological uptake in the normal adrenal gland.

  2. Design and assessment of cardiac SPECT systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chih-Jie

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a modality widely used to detect myocardial ischemia and myocardial infarction. Objectively assessing and comparing different SPECT systems is important so that the best detectability of cardiac defects can be achieved. Whitaker, Clarkson, and Barrett's study on the scanning linear observer (SLO) shows that the SLO can be used to estimate the location and size of signals. One major advantage of the SLO is that it can be used with projection data rather than reconstruction data. Thus, this observer model assesses overall hardware performance independent by any reconstruction algorithm. In addition, we will show that the run time of image-quality studies is significantly reduced. Several systems derived from the GE CZT-based dedicated cardiac SPECT camera Discovery 530c design, which is officially named the Alcyone Technology: Discovery NM 530c, were assessed using the performance of the SLO for the task of detecting cardiac defects and estimating the properties of the defects. Clinically, hearts can be virtually segmented into three coronary artery territories: left anterior descending artery (LAD), left circumflex artery (LCX), and right coronary artery (RCA). One of the most important functions of a cardiac SPECT system is to produce images from which a radiologist can correctly predict in which territory the defect exists. A good estimation of the defect extent from the images is also very helpful for determining the seriousness of the myocardial ischemia. In this dissertation, both locations and extent of defects were estimated by the SLO, and system performance was assessed using localization receiver operating characteristic (LROC) / estimation receiver operating characteristic (EROC) curves. Area under LROC curve (AULC) / area under EROC curve (AUEC) and true positive fraction (TPF) at specific false positive fraction (FPF) can be treated as the gures of merit (FOMs). As the results will show, a

  3. Accuracy of quantitative reconstructions in SPECT/CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Celler, A.; Belhocine, T.; van der Werf, R.; Driedger, A.

    2008-09-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the quantitative accuracy of our OSEM-APDI reconstruction method based on SPECT/CT imaging for Tc-99m, In-111, I-123, and I-131 isotopes. Phantom studies were performed on a SPECT/low-dose multislice CT system (Infinia-Hawkeye-4 slice, GE Healthcare) using clinical acquisition protocols. Two radioactive sources were centrally and peripherally placed inside an anthropometric Thorax phantom filled with non-radioactive water. Corrections for attenuation, scatter, collimator blurring and collimator septal penetration were applied and their contribution to the overall accuracy of the reconstruction was evaluated. Reconstruction with the most comprehensive set of corrections resulted in activity estimation with error levels of 3-5% for all the isotopes.

  4. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 05: Calibration of a SPECT/CT camera for quantitative SPECT with {sup 99m}Tc

    SciTech Connect

    Gaudin, Émilie; Montégiani, Jean-François; Després, Philippe; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu

    2014-08-15

    While quantitation is the norm in PET, it is not widely available yet in SPECT. This work's aim was to calibrate a commercially available SPECT/CT system to perform quantitative SPECT. Counting sensitivity, dead-time (DT) constant and partial volume effect (PVE) of the system were assessed. A dual-head Siemens SymbiaT6 SPECT/CT camera equipped with low energy high-resolution collimators was studied. {sup 99m}Tc was the radioisotope of interest because of its wide usage in nuclear medicine. First, point source acquisitions were performed (activity: 30–990MBq). Further acquisitions were then performed with a uniform Jaszczak phantom filled with water at high activity (25–5000MBq). PVE was studied using 6 hot spheres (diameters: 9.9–31.2 mm) filled with {sup 99m}Tc (2.8MBq/cc) in the Jaszczak phantom, which was: (1) empty, (2) water-filled and (3) water-filled with low activity (0.1MBq/cc). The data was reconstructed with the Siemens's Flash3D iterative algorithm with 4 subsets and 8 iterations, attenuation-correction (AC) and scatter-correction (SC). DT modelling was based on the total spectrum counting rate. Sensitivity was assessed using AC-SC reconstructed SPECT data. Sensitivity and DT for the sources were 99.51±1.46cps/MBq and 0.60±0.04µs. For the phantom, sensitivity and DT were 109.9±2.3cps/MBq and 0.62±0.13µs. The recovery-coefficient varied from 5% for the 9.9mm, to 80% for the 31.2mm spheres. With our calibration methods, both sensitivity and DT constant of the SPECT camera had little dependence on the object geometry and attenuation. For small objects of known size, recovery-coefficient can be applied to correct PVE. Clinical quantitative SPECT appears to be possible and has many potential applications.

  5. Automated quantitative coronary computed tomography correlates of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    de Graaf, Michiel A; El-Naggar, Heba M; Boogers, Mark J; Veltman, Caroline E; Broersen, Alexander; Kitslaar, Pieter H; Dijkstra, Jouke; Kroft, Lucia J; Al Younis, Imad; Reiber, Johan H; Bax, Jeroen J; Delgado, Victoria; Scholte, Arthur J

    2013-08-01

    Automated software tools have permitted more comprehensive, robust and reproducible quantification of coronary stenosis, plaque burden and plaque location of coronary computed tomography angiography (CTA) data. The association between these quantitative CTA (QCT) parameters and the presence of myocardial ischaemia has not been explored. The aim of the present investigation was to evaluate the association between QCT parameters of coronary artery lesions and the presence of myocardial ischaemia on gated myocardial perfusion single-photon emission CT (SPECT). Included in the study were 40 patients (mean age 58.2 ± 10.9 years, 27 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) who had undergone multidetector row CTA and gated myocardial perfusion SPECT within 6 months. From the CTA datasets, vessel-based and lesion-based visual analyses were performed. Consecutively, lesion-based QCT was performed to assess plaque length, plaque burden, percentage lumen area stenosis and remodelling index. Subsequently, the presence of myocardial ischaemia was assessed using the summed difference score (SDS ≥2) on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial ischaemia was seen in 25 patients (62.5%) in 37 vascular territories. Quantitatively assessed significant stenosis and quantitatively assessed lesion length were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia (OR 7.72, 95% CI 2.41-24.7, p < 0.001, and OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.00-1.45, p = 0.032, respectively) after correcting for clinical variables and visually assessed significant stenosis. The addition of quantitatively assessed significant stenosis (χ(2) = 20.7) and lesion length (χ(2) = 26.0) to the clinical variables and the visual assessment (χ(2) = 5.9) had incremental value in the association with myocardial ischaemia. Coronary lesion length and quantitatively assessed significant stenosis were independently associated with myocardial ischaemia. Both quantitative parameters have incremental value

  6. Noninvasive Nuclear SPECT Myocardial Blood Flow Quantitation to Guide Management for Coronary Artery Disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lung-Ching; Jong, Bor-Hsin; Lin, Sheng-Che; Ku, Chi-Tai; Chen, Ing-Jou; Chen, Yen-Kung; Hsu, Bailing

    2017-09-01

    Recently, myocardial blood flow quantitation with dynamic SPECT has been validated to enhance the detection of multivessel coronary artery disease (CAD) and conclude equivocal SPECT myocardial perfusion study. This advance opened an important clinical application to utilize the tool in guiding CAD management for area where myocardial perfusion tracers for PET are unavailable or unaffordable. We present a clinical patient with ongoing recursive angina who underwent multiple nuclear stress tests for a sequence of CAD evaluation in 26 months and demonstrated that SPECT myocardial blood flow quantitation properly guided CAD management to warrant patient outcome.

  7. Comparison between segmental wall motion and wall thickening in patients with coronary artery disease using quantitative gated SPECT software.

    PubMed

    Imran, M B; Morita, K; Adachi, I; Konno, M; Kubo, N; Mochizuki, T; Katoh, C; Kohya, T; Kitabatake, A; Tsukamoto, E; Tamaki, N

    2000-08-01

    This study was performed to evaluate regional wall motion (WM) and wall thickening (WT) using gated myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and to determine their similarity and disparity in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). A total of 44 patients underwent 1 day stress/rest (MIBI) gated SPECT. Commercially available quantitative analysis of gated SPECT (QGS) software was used to generate 3D surface display and cine-mode SPECT display. Left ventricle was divided into nine segments to score WM and WT from 0 (no abnormality) to 4 (severe abnormality) by six independent observers. Finally a mean score was calculated for each segment from the scores of six observers. There was fairly good correlation between WM and WT of individual segments (r = 0.62, p < 0.0001). Concordance rate (IWM - WTI < 1) was 85%. A large difference between WM and WT (WM - WT > or = 2) was observed in 15 segments, including 12 segments with greater WM abnormalities and 3 segments with greater WT abnormalities (lateral and inferior walls). Greater WM abnormalities were most commonly observed in anteroseptal segments especially in post coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) patients. In conclusion, WM and WT showed similarity on QGS studies. However, these two parameters may be determined separately in gated SPECT studies for comprehensive and robust evaluation of the functional status of myocardium. Analyses based on WM assessment alone may lead to erroneous results especially in septal regions.

  8. Quantitation of renal uptake of technetium-99m DMSA using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Groshar, D.; Frankel, A.; Iosilevsky, G.; Israel, O.; Moskovitz, B.; Levin, D.R.; Front, D.

    1989-02-01

    Quantitative single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) methodology based on calibration with kidney phantoms has been applied for the assessment of renal uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA in 25 normals; 16 patients with a single normal kidney; 30 patients with unilateral nephropathy; and 17 patients with bilateral nephropathy. An excellent correlation (r = 0.99, s.e.e. = 152) was found between SPECT measured concentration and actual concentration in kidney phantoms. Kidney uptake at 6 hr after injection in normals was 20.0% +/- 4.6% for the left and 20.8% +/- 4.4% for the right. Patients with unilateral nephropathy had a statistically significant (p less than 0.001) low uptake in the diseased kidney (7.0% +/- 4.7%), but the contralateral kidney uptake did not differ from the normal group (20.0% +/- 7.0%). The method was especially useful in patients with bilateral nephropathy. Significantly (p less than 0.001) decreased uptake was found in both kidneys (5.1% +/- 3.4% for the left and 6.7% +/- 4.2% for the right). The total kidney uptake (right and left) in this group showed to be inversely correlated (r = 0.83) with serum creatinine. The uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA in single normal kidney was higher (p less than 0.001) than in a normal kidney (34.7% +/- 11.9%), however, it was lower than the total absolute uptake (RT + LT = 41.5% +/- 8.8%) in the normal group. The results indicate that SPECT is a reliable and reproducible technique to quantitate absolute kidney uptake of (/sup 99m/Tc)DMSA.

  9. Combining SPECT and Quantitative EEG Analysis for the Automated Differential Diagnosis of Disorders with Amnestic Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Höller, Yvonne; Bathke, Arne C.; Uhl, Andreas; Strobl, Nicolas; Lang, Adelheid; Bergmann, Jürgen; Nardone, Raffaele; Rossini, Fabio; Zauner, Harald; Kirschner, Margarita; Jahanbekam, Amirhossein; Trinka, Eugen; Staffen, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and Electroencephalography (EEG) have become established tools in routine diagnostics of dementia. We aimed to increase the diagnostic power by combining quantitative markers from SPECT and EEG for differential diagnosis of disorders with amnestic symptoms. We hypothesize that the combination of SPECT with measures of interaction (connectivity) in the EEG yields higher diagnostic accuracy than the single modalities. We examined 39 patients with Alzheimer's dementia (AD), 69 patients with depressive cognitive impairment (DCI), 71 patients with amnestic mild cognitive impairment (aMCI), and 41 patients with amnestic subjective cognitive complaints (aSCC). We calculated 14 measures of interaction from a standard clinical EEG-recording and derived graph-theoretic network measures. From regional brain perfusion measured by 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO)-SPECT in 46 regions, we calculated relative cerebral perfusion in these patients. Patient groups were classified pairwise with a linear support vector machine. Classification was conducted separately for each biomarker, and then again for each EEG- biomarker combined with SPECT. Combination of SPECT with EEG-biomarkers outperformed single use of SPECT or EEG when classifying aSCC vs. AD (90%), aMCI vs. AD (70%), and AD vs. DCI (100%), while a selection of EEG measures performed best when classifying aSCC vs. aMCI (82%) and aMCI vs. DCI (90%). Only the contrast between aSCC and DCI did not result in above-chance classification accuracy (60%). In general, accuracies were higher when measures of interaction (i.e., connectivity measures) were applied directly than when graph-theoretical measures were derived. We suggest that quantitative analysis of EEG and machine-learning techniques can support differentiating AD, aMCI, aSCC, and DCC, especially when being combined with imaging methods such as SPECT. Quantitative analysis of EEG connectivity could become an

  10. [Quantitative evaluation of 123I-FP-CIT SPECT: validation of a semiautomated method].

    PubMed

    Lorenzo Bosquet, C; Cuberas Borrós, G; Miquel Rodríguez, F; Caresia, P; Aguadé Bruix, S; Castell Conesa, J

    2005-01-01

    To assess the utility of a quantification of the 123I-FP-CIT uptake by the definition of some reference values, normal range values and interobserver variation. Fifty patients with a 123I-FP-CIT SPECT: 25 patients had a pathological SPECT with the diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and the remaining had a qualitative normal SPET, with the diagnosis of 14 drug-induced Parkinsonism and 11 with psychogenic Parkinsonism. In the transversal slices, the best central slice that showed the nuclei of the base best was selected and standard ROIs (Region Of Interest) were applied. Specific (caudate and putamen) versus non specific (occipital) and laterality ratios were calculated. A normal statistical analysis for independent quantitative samples was used (mean, standard deviation and range) as well as variation coefficient and correlation coefficient of two observers and the 10th and 90th percentile. The variation coefficient interobserver was 3.24-5.61 and the correlation coefficient was 0.89-0.99. Cut-off values between both populations were established at 2.10 in the right putamen and at 2.05 in the left. Cut-off values definition in caudate were not assessable due to overlapping of ratios of both populations. This quantification method is highly reproducible. It makes it possible to obtain reference values and to define normal range.

  11. Practical reconstruction protocol for quantitative (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Siman, W; Mikell, J K; Kappadath, S C

    2016-09-01

    To develop a practical background compensation (BC) technique to improve quantitative (90)Y-bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) using a commercially available imaging system. All images were acquired using medium-energy collimation in six energy windows (EWs), ranging from 70 to 410 keV. The EWs were determined based on the signal-to-background ratio in planar images of an acrylic phantom of different thicknesses (2-16 cm) positioned below a (90)Y source and set at different distances (15-35 cm) from a gamma camera. The authors adapted the widely used EW-based scatter-correction technique by modeling the BC as scaled images. The BC EW was determined empirically in SPECT/CT studies using an IEC phantom based on the sphere activity recovery and residual activity in the cold lung insert. The scaling factor was calculated from 20 clinical planar (90)Y images. Reconstruction parameters were optimized in the same SPECT images for improved image quantification and contrast. A count-to-activity calibration factor was calculated from 30 clinical (90)Y images. The authors found that the most appropriate imaging EW range was 90-125 keV. BC was modeled as 0.53× images in the EW of 310-410 keV. The background-compensated clinical images had higher image contrast than uncompensated images. The maximum deviation of their SPECT calibration in clinical studies was lowest (<10%) for SPECT with attenuation correction (AC) and SPECT with AC + BC. Using the proposed SPECT-with-AC + BC reconstruction protocol, the authors found that the recovery coefficient of a 37-mm sphere (in a 10-mm volume of interest) increased from 39% to 90% and that the residual activity in the lung insert decreased from 44% to 14% over that of SPECT images with AC alone. The proposed EW-based BC model was developed for (90)Y bremsstrahlung imaging. SPECT with AC + BC gave improved lesion detectability and activity quantification compared to SPECT with AC

  12. MIRD pamphlet No. 24: Guidelines for quantitative 131I SPECT in dosimetry applications.

    PubMed

    Dewaraja, Yuni K; Ljungberg, Michael; Green, Alan J; Zanzonico, Pat B; Frey, Eric C; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Dunphy, Mark; Fisher, Darrell R; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Wessels, Barry W

    2013-12-01

    The reliability of radiation dose estimates in internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of activity estimates obtained at each imaging time point. The recently published MIRD pamphlet no. 23 provided a general overview of quantitative SPECT imaging for dosimetry. The present document is the first in a series of isotope-specific guidelines that will follow MIRD 23 and focuses on one of the most commonly used therapeutic radionuclides, (131)I. The purpose of this document is to provide guidance on the development of protocols for quantitative (131)I SPECT in radionuclide therapy applications that require regional (normal organs, lesions) and 3-dimensional dosimetry.

  13. Improved SPECT quantitation using fully three-dimensional iterative spatially variant scatter response compensation.

    PubMed

    Beekman, F J; Kamphuis, C; Viergever, M A

    1996-01-01

    The quality and quantitative accuracy of iteratively reconstructed SPECT images improves when better point spread function (PSF) models of the gamma camera are used during reconstruction. Here, inclusion in the PSF model of photon crosstalk between different slices caused by limited gamma camera resolution and scatter is examined. A three-dimensional (3-D) projector back-projector (proback) has been developed which models both the distance dependent detector point spread function and the object shape-dependent scatter point spread function of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). A table occupying only a few megabytes of memory is sufficient to represent this scatter model. The contents of this table are obtained by evaluating an analytical expression for object shape-dependent scatter. The proposed approach avoids the huge memory requirements of storing the full transition matrix needed for 3-D reconstruction including object shape-dependent scatter. In addition, the method avoids the need for lengthy Monte Carlo simulations to generate such a matrix. In order to assess the quantitative accuracy of the method, reconstructions of a water filled cylinder containing regions of different activity levels and of simulated 3-D brain projection data have been evaluated for technetium-99m. It is shown that fully 3-D reconstruction including complete detector response and object shape-dependent scatter modeling clearly outperforms simpler methods that lack a complete detector response and/or a complete scatter response model. Fully 3-D scatter correction yields the best quantitation of volumes of interest and the best contrast-to-noise curves.

  14. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Song, Shaoli; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring.

  15. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring. PMID:28251150

  16. SPECT quantitation of iodine-131 concentration in phantoms and human tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Israel, O.; Iosilevsky, G.; Front, D.; Bettman, L.; Frenkel, A.; Ish-Shalom, S.; Steiner, M.; Ben-Harush, M.; Kolodny, G.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The validity of SPECT measurement of iodine-131 ({sup 131}I) concentration was tested in vitro in phantoms and in vivo by measuring bladder urine concentrations. Phantom studies comparing known and SPECT measured concentrations showed a good correlation for {sup 131}I (r = 0.98, s.e.e. = 20.94 counts/voxel) for phantoms of 25 to 127 cc and concentrations of 0.13 to 9.5 microCi/cc. The in vivo, in vitro correlation of {sup 131}I concentrations in the urine was also good (r = 0.98, s.e.e. = 0.677 microCi/cc). Quantitative SPECT was used to calculate the effective half-life and dosimetry of radioiodine in 12 sites of thyroid carcinoma in seven patients. SPECT was also used to determine the dosimetry of ({sup 131}I)MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidine) in two patients with carcinoid, two with neuroblastoma, and one with pheochromocytoma. The radiation dose for thyroid carcinoma metastases varied between 6.3 and 276.9 rad/mCi. The dose from MIBG varied between 13.4 and 57.8 rad/mCi. These results indicate the validity of quantitative SPECT for in vivo measurement of {sup 131}I and the need to measure the concentration of {sup 131}I in individual human tumor sites.

  17. Optimal energy window selection of a CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Su-Jin; Yu, A. Ram; Choi, Yun Young; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Hee-Joung

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT)-based small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has desirable characteristics such as superior energy resolution, but data acquisition for SPECT imaging has been widely performed with a conventional energy window. The aim of this study was to determine the optimal energy window settings for technetium-99 m (99mTc) and thallium-201 (201Tl), the most commonly used isotopes in SPECT imaging, using CZT-based small-animal SPECT for quantitative accuracy. We experimentally investigated quantitative measurements with respect to primary count rate, contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), and scatter fraction (SF) within various energy window settings using Triumph X-SPECT. The two ways of energy window settings were considered: an on-peak window and an off-peak window. In the on-peak window setting, energy centers were set on the photopeaks. In the off-peak window setting, the ratios of energy differences between the photopeak from the lower- and higher-threshold varied from 4:6 to 3:7. In addition, the energy-window width for 99mTc varied from 5% to 20%, and that for 201Tl varied from 10% to 30%. The results of this study enabled us to determine the optimal energy windows for each isotope in terms of primary count rate, CNR, and SF. We selected the optimal energy window that increases the primary count rate and CNR while decreasing SF. For 99mTc SPECT imaging, the energy window of 138-145 keV with a 5% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was determined to be the optimal energy window. For 201Tl SPECT imaging, the energy window of 64-85 keV with a 30% width and off-peak ratio of 3:7 was selected as the optimal energy window. Our results demonstrated that the proper energy window should be carefully chosen based on quantitative measurements in order to take advantage of desirable characteristics of CZT-based small-animal SPECT. These results provided valuable reference information for the establishment of new protocol for CZT

  18. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2015-04-13

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method provided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  19. Objective evaluation of reconstruction methods for quantitative SPECT imaging in the absence of ground truth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Song, Na; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is emerging as an important tool in clinical studies and biomedical research. There is thus a need for optimization and evaluation of systems and algorithms that are being developed for quantitative SPECT imaging. An appropriate objective method to evaluate these systems is by comparing their performance in the end task that is required in quantitative SPECT imaging, such as estimating the mean activity concentration in a volume of interest (VOI) in a patient image. This objective evaluation can be performed if the true value of the estimated parameter is known, i.e. we have a gold standard. However, very rarely is this gold standard known in human studies. Thus, no-gold-standard techniques to optimize and evaluate systems and algorithms in the absence of gold standard are required. In this work, we developed a no-gold-standard technique to objectively evaluate reconstruction methods used in quantitative SPECT when the parameter to be estimated is the mean activity concentration in a VOI. We studied the performance of the technique with realistic simulated image data generated from an object database consisting of five phantom anatomies with all possible combinations of five sets of organ uptakes, where each anatomy consisted of eight different organ VOIs. Results indicate that the method pro- vided accurate ranking of the reconstruction methods. We also demonstrated the application of consistency checks to test the no-gold-standard output.

  20. Quantitative analysis of L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Tasneem; Tahtali, Murat; Pickering, Mark R.

    2016-03-01

    This paper aims to investigate the performance of a newly proposed L-SPECT system for small animal brain imaging. The L-SPECT system consists of an array of 100 × 100 micro range diameter pinholes. The proposed detector module has a 48 mm by 48 mm active area and the system is based on a pixelated array of NaI crystals (10×10×10 mm elements) coupled with an array of position sensitive photomultiplier tubes (PSPMTs). The performance of this system was evaluated with pinhole radii of 50 μm, 60 μm and 100 μm. Monte Carlo simulation studies using the Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) software package validate the performance of this novel dual head L-SPECT system where a geometric mouse phantom is used to investigate its performance. All SPECT data were obtained using 120 projection views from 0° to 360° with a 3° step. Slices were reconstructed using conventional filtered back projection (FBP) algorithm. We have evaluated the quality of the images in terms of spatial resolution (FWHM) based on line spread function, the system sensitivity, the point source response function and the image quality. The sensitivity of our newly proposed L- SPECT system was about 4500 cps/μCi at 6 cm along with excellent full width at half-maximum (FWHM) using 50 μm pinhole aperture at several radii of rotation. The analysis results show the combination of excellent spatial resolution and high detection efficiency over an energy range between 20-160 keV. The results demonstrate that SPECT imaging using a pixelated L-SPECT detector module is applicable in a quantitative study of mouse brain imaging.

  1. Global scaling for semi-quantitative analysis in FP-CIT SPECT.

    PubMed

    Kupitz, D; Apostolova, I; Lange, C; Ulrich, G; Amthauer, H; Brenner, W; Buchert, R

    2014-01-01

    Semi-quantitative characterization of dopamine transporter availability from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 123I-ioflupane (FP-CIT) is based on uptake ratios relative to a reference region. The aim of this study was to evaluate the whole brain as reference region for semi-quantitative analysis of FP-CIT SPECT. The rationale was that this might reduce statistical noise associated with the estimation of non-displaceable FP-CIT uptake. 150 FP-CIT SPECTs were categorized as neurodegenerative or non-neurodegenerative by an expert. Semi-quantitative analysis of specific binding ratios (SBR) was performed with a custom-made tool based on the Statistical Parametric Mapping software package using predefined regions of interest (ROIs) in the anatomical space of the Montreal Neurological Institute. The following reference regions were compared: predefined ROIs for frontal and occipital lobe and whole brain (without striata, thalamus and brainstem). Tracer uptake in the reference region was characterized by the mean, median or 75th percentile of its voxel intensities. The area (AUC) under the receiver operating characteristic curve was used as performance measure. The highest AUC of 0.973 was achieved by the SBR of the putamen with the 75th percentile in the whole brain as reference. The lowest AUC for the putamen SBR of 0.937 was obtained with the mean in the frontal lobe as reference. We recommend the 75th percentile in the whole brain as reference for semi-quantitative analysis in FP-CIT SPECT. This combination provided the best agreement of the semi-quantitative analysis with visual evaluation of the SPECT images by an expert and, therefore, is appropriate to support less experienced physicians.

  2. Applicability of a set of tomographic reconstruction algorithms for quantitative SPECT on irradiated nuclear fuel assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsson Svärd, Staffan; Holcombe, Scott; Grape, Sophie

    2015-05-01

    A fuel assembly operated in a nuclear power plant typically contains 100-300 fuel rods, depending on fuel type, which become strongly radioactive during irradiation in the reactor core. For operational and security reasons, it is of interest to experimentally deduce rod-wise information from the fuel, preferably by means of non-destructive measurements. The tomographic SPECT technique offers such possibilities through its two-step application; (1) recording the gamma-ray flux distribution around the fuel assembly, and (2) reconstructing the assembly's internal source distribution, based on the recorded radiation field. In this paper, algorithms for performing the latter step and extracting quantitative relative rod-by-rod data are accounted for. As compared to application of SPECT in nuclear medicine, nuclear fuel assemblies present a much more heterogeneous distribution of internal attenuation to gamma radiation than the human body, typically with rods containing pellets of heavy uranium dioxide surrounded by cladding of a zirconium alloy placed in water or air. This inhomogeneity severely complicates the tomographic quantification of the rod-wise relative source content, and the deduction of conclusive data requires detailed modelling of the attenuation to be introduced in the reconstructions. However, as shown in this paper, simplified models may still produce valuable information about the fuel. Here, a set of reconstruction algorithms for SPECT on nuclear fuel assemblies are described and discussed in terms of their quantitative performance for two applications; verification of fuel assemblies' completeness in nuclear safeguards, and rod-wise fuel characterization. It is argued that a request not to base the former assessment on any a priori information brings constraints to which reconstruction methods that may be used in that case, whereas the use of a priori information on geometry and material content enables highly accurate quantitative assessment, which

  3. Quantitative simultaneous 111In∕99mTc SPECT-CT of osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Cervo, Morgan; Gerbaudo, Victor H; Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C

    2013-08-01

    A well-established approach for diagnostic imaging of osteomyelitis (OM), a bone infection, is simultaneous SPECT-CT of 99mTc sulfur colloid (SC) and 111In white blood cells (WBC). This method provides essentially perfect spatial registration of the tracers within anatomic sites of interest. Currently, diagnosis is based purely on a visual assessment-where relative discordance between 99mTc and 111In uptake in bone, i.e., high 111In and low 99mTc, suggests OM. To achieve more quantitative images, noise, scatter, and crosstalk between radionuclides must be addressed through reconstruction. Here the authors compare their Monte Carlo-based joint OSEM (MC-JOSEM) algorithm, which reconstructs both radionuclides simultaneously, to a more conventional triple-energy window-based reconstruction (TEW-OSEM), and to iterative reconstruction with no compensation for scatter (NC-OSEM). The authors created numerical phantoms of the foot and torso. Multiple bone-infection sites were modeled using high-count Monte Carlo simulation. Counts per voxel were then scaled to values appropriate for 111In WBC and 99mTc SC imaging. Ten independent noisy projection image sets were generated by drawing random Poisson deviates from these very low-noise images. Data were reconstructed using the two iterative scatter-compensation methods, TEW-OSEM and MC-JOSEM, as well as the uncorrected method (NC-OSEM). Mean counts in volumes of interest (VOIs) were used to evaluate the bias and precision of each method. Data were also acquired using a phantom, approximately the size of an adult ankle, consisting of regions representing infected and normal bone marrow, within a bone-like attenuator and surrounding soft tissue; each compartment contained a mixture of 111In and 99mTc. Low-noise data were acquired during multiple short scans over 29 h on a Siemens Symbia T6 SPECT-CT with medium-energy collimators. Pure 99mTc and 111In projection datasets were derived by fitting the acquired projections to the sum

  4. Dobutamine stress echocardiography versus quantitative technetium-99m sestamibi SPECT for detecting residual stenosis and multivessel disease after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Lancellotti, P; Benoit, T; Rigo, P; Pierard, L

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the relative accuracy of dobutamine stress echocardiography (DSE) and quantitative technetium-99m sestamibi single photon emission computed tomography (mibi SPECT) for detecting infarct related artery stenosis and multivessel disease early after acute myocardial infarction.
DESIGN—Prospective study.
SETTING—University hospital.
METHODS—75 patients underwent simultaneous DSE and mibi SPECT at (mean (SD)) 5 (2) days after a first acute myocardial infarct. Quantitative coronary angiography was performed in all patients after imaging studies.
RESULTS—Significant stenosis (> 50%) of the infarct related artery was detected in 69 patients. Residual ischaemia was identified by DSE in 55 patients and by quantitative mibi SPECT in 49. The sensitivity of DSE and mibi SPECT for detecting significant infarct related artery stenosis was 78% and 70%, respectively, with a specificity of 83% for both tests. The combination of DSE and mibi SPECT did not change the specificity (83%) but increased the sensitivity to 94%. Mibi SPECT was more sensitive than DSE for detecting mild stenosis (73% v 9%; p = 0.008). The sensitivity of DSE for detecting moderate or severe stenosis was greater than mibi SPECT (97% v 74%; p = 0.007). Wall motion abnormalities with DSE and transient perfusion defects with mibi SPECT outside the infarction zone were sensitive (80% v 67%; NS) and highly specific (95% v 93%; NS) for multivessel disease.
CONCLUSIONS—DSE and mibi SPECT have equivalent accuracy for detecting residual infarct related artery stenosis of ⩾ 50% and multivessel disease early after acute myocardial infarction. DSE is more predictive of moderate or severe infarct related artery stenosis. Combined imaging only improves the detection of mild stenosis.


Keywords: myocardial infarction; dobutamine echocardiography; single photon emission computed tomography; SPECT; myocardial ischaemia PMID:11602542

  5. Effectiveness of quantitative MAA SPECT/CT for the definition of vascularized hepatic volume and dosimetric approach: phantom validation and clinical preliminary results in patients with complex hepatic vascularization treated with yttrium-90-labeled microspheres.

    PubMed

    Garin, Etienne; Lenoir, Laurence; Rolland, Yan; Laffont, Sophie; Pracht, Marc; Mesbah, Habiba; Porée, Philippe; Ardisson, Valérie; Bourguet, Patrick; Clement, Bruno; Boucher, Eveline

    2011-12-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the use of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) analysis for vascularized volume measurements in the use of the yttrium-90-radiolabeled microspheres (TheraSphere). A phantom study was conducted for the validation of SPECT/CT volume measurement. SPECT/CT quantitative analysis was used for the measurement of the volume of distribution of the albumin macroaggregates (MAA; i.e., the vascularized volume) in the liver and the tumor, and the total activity contained in the liver and the tumor in four consecutive patients presenting with a complex liver vascularization referred for a treatment with TheraSphere. SPECT/CT volume measurement proved to be accurate (mean error <7%) and reproducible (interobserver concordance 0.99). For eight treatments, in cases of complex hepatic vascularization, the hepatic volumes based on angiography and CT led to a relative overestimation or underestimation of the vascularized hepatic volume by 43.2 ± 32.7% (5-87%) compared with SPECT/CT analyses. The vascularized liver volume taken into account calculated from SPECT/CT data, instead of angiography and CT data, results in modifying the activity injected for three treatments of eight. Moreover, quantitative analysis of SPECT/CT allows us to calculate the absorbed dose in the tumor and in the healthy liver, leading to doubling of the injected activity for one treatment of eight. MAA SPECT/CT is accurate for volume measurements. It provides a valuable contribution to the therapeutic planning of patients presenting with complex hepatic vascularization, in particular for calculating the vascularized liver volume, the activity to be injected and the absorbed doses. Studies should be conducted to assess the role of quantitative MAA/SPECT CT in therapeutic planning.

  6. Quantitative simultaneous 111In/99mTc SPECT-CT of osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cervo, Morgan; Gerbaudo, Victor H.; Park, Mi-Ae; Moore, Stephen C.

    2013-01-01

    projections to the sum of 99mTc and 111In contributions, using the known half-lives. Uncontaminated data were scaled and recombined into six datasets with different activity ratios; ten Poisson noise realizations were then generated for each ratio. VOIs in each of the compartments were used to evaluate the bias and precision of each method with respect to reconstructions of uncontaminated datasets. In addition to the simulated and acquired phantom images, the authors reconstructed patient images with MC-JOSEM and TEW-OSEM. Patient reconstructions were assessed qualitatively for lesion contrast, spatial definition, and scatter. Results: For all simulated and acquired infection phantoms, the root-mean squared-error of measured 99mTc activity was significantly improved with MC-JOSEM and TEW-OSEM in comparison to NC-OSEM reconstructions. While MC-JOSEM trended toward outperforming TEW-OSEM, the improvement was only found to be significant (p < 0.001) for the acquired bone phantom in which a wide range of 111In/99mTc concentration ratios were tested. In all cases, scatter correction did not significantly improve 111In quantitation. Conclusions: Compensation for scatter and crosstalk is useful for improving quality, bias, and precision of 99mTc activity estimates in simultaneous dual-radionuclide imaging of OM. The use of the more rigorous MC-based estimates provided marginal improvements over TEW. While the phantom results were encouraging, more subjects are needed to evaluate the usefulness of quantitative 111In/99mTc SPECT-CT in the clinic. PMID:23927346

  7. Role of auditory brain function assessment by SPECT in cochlear implant side selection.

    PubMed

    Di Nardo, W; Giannantonio, S; Di Giuda, D; De Corso, E; Schinaia, L; Paludetti, G

    2013-02-01

    Pre-surgery evaluation, indications for cochlear implantation and expectations in terms of post-operative functional results remain challenging topics in pre-lingually deaf adults. Our study has the purpose of determining the benefits of Single Photon Emission Tomography (SPECT) assessment in pre-surgical evaluation of pre-lingually deaf adults who are candidates for cochlear implantation. In 7 pre-lingually profoundly deaf patients, brain SPECT was performed at baseline conditions and in bilateral simultaneous multi-frequency acoustic stimulation. Six sagittal tomograms of both temporal cortices were used for semi-quantitative analysis in each patient. Percentage increases in cortical perfusion resulting from auditory stimulation were calculated. The results showed an inter-hemispherical asymmetry of the activation extension and intensity in the stimulated temporal areas. Consistent with the obtained brain activation data, patients were implanted preferring the side that showed higher activation after acoustic stimulus. Considering the increment in auditory perception performances, it was possible to point out a relationship between cortical brain activity shown by SPECT and hearing performances, and, even more significant, a correlation between post-operative functional performances and the activation of the most medial part of the sagittal temporal tomograms, corresponding to medium-high frequencies. In light of these findings, we believe that brain SPECT could be considered in the evaluation of deaf patients candidate for cochlear implantation, and that it plays a major role in functional assessment of the auditory cortex of pre-lingually deaf subjects, even if further studies are necessary to conclusively establish its utility. Further developments of this technique are possible by using trans-tympanic electrical stimulation of the cochlear promontory, which could give the opportunity to study completely deaf patients, whose evaluation is objectively difficult

  8. Three modality image registration of brain SPECT/CT and MR images for quantitative analysis of dopamine transporter imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yuzuho; Takeda, Yuta; Hara, Takeshi; Zhou, Xiangrong; Matsusako, Masaki; Tanaka, Yuki; Hosoya, Kazuhiko; Nihei, Tsutomu; Katafuchi, Tetsuro; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Important features in Parkinson's disease (PD) are degenerations and losses of dopamine neurons in corpus striatum. 123I-FP-CIT can visualize activities of the dopamine neurons. The activity radio of background to corpus striatum is used for diagnosis of PD and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB). The specific activity can be observed in the corpus striatum on SPECT images, but the location and the shape of the corpus striatum on SPECT images only are often lost because of the low uptake. In contrast, MR images can visualize the locations of the corpus striatum. The purpose of this study was to realize a quantitative image analysis for the SPECT images by using image registration technique with brain MR images that can determine the region of corpus striatum. In this study, the image fusion technique was used to fuse SPECT and MR images by intervening CT image taken by SPECT/CT. The mutual information (MI) for image registration between CT and MR images was used for the registration. Six SPECT/CT and four MR scans of phantom materials are taken by changing the direction. As the results of the image registrations, 16 of 24 combinations were registered within 1.3mm. By applying the approach to 32 clinical SPECT/CT and MR cases, all of the cases were registered within 0.86mm. In conclusions, our registration method has a potential in superimposing MR images on SPECT images.

  9. Quantitative cardiac SPECT in three dimensions: validation by experimental phantom studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Z.; Ye, J.; Cheng, J.; Li, J.; Harrington, D.

    1998-04-01

    A mathematical framework for quantitative SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) reconstruction of the heart is presented. An efficient simultaneous compensation approach to the reconstruction task is described. The implementation of the approach on a digital computer is delineated. The approach was validated by experimental data acquired from chest phantoms. The phantoms consisted of a cylindrical elliptical tank of Plexiglass, a cardiac insert made of Plexiglass, a spine insert of packed bone meal and lung inserts made of styrofoam beads alone. Water bags were added to simulate different body characteristics. Comparison between the quantitative reconstruction and the conventional FBP (filtered backprojection) method was performed. The FBP reconstruction had a poor quantitative accuracy and varied for different body configurations. Significant improvement in reconstruction accuracy by the quantitative approach was demonstrated with a moderate computing time on a currently available desktop computer. Furthermore, the quantitative reconstruction was robust for different body characteristics. Therefore, the quantitative approach has the potential for clinical use.

  10. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments

    PubMed Central

    Eter, Wael A.; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, 111In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of 111In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers. PMID:27080529

  11. SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging enables accurate evaluation of radiotracers for β-cell mass assessments.

    PubMed

    Eter, Wael A; Parween, Saba; Joosten, Lieke; Frielink, Cathelijne; Eriksson, Maria; Brom, Maarten; Ahlgren, Ulf; Gotthardt, Martin

    2016-04-15

    Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) has become a promising experimental approach to monitor changes in β-cell mass (BCM) during diabetes progression. SPECT imaging of pancreatic islets is most commonly cross-validated by stereological analysis of histological pancreatic sections after insulin staining. Typically, stereological methods do not accurately determine the total β-cell volume, which is inconvenient when correlating total pancreatic tracer uptake with BCM. Alternative methods are therefore warranted to cross-validate β-cell imaging using radiotracers. In this study, we introduce multimodal SPECT - optical projection tomography (OPT) imaging as an accurate approach to cross-validate radionuclide-based imaging of β-cells. Uptake of a promising radiotracer for β-cell imaging by SPECT, (111)In-exendin-3, was measured by ex vivo-SPECT and cross evaluated by 3D quantitative OPT imaging as well as with histology within healthy and alloxan-treated Brown Norway rat pancreata. SPECT signal was in excellent linear correlation with OPT data as compared to histology. While histological determination of islet spatial distribution was challenging, SPECT and OPT revealed similar distribution patterns of (111)In-exendin-3 and insulin positive β-cell volumes between different pancreatic lobes, both visually and quantitatively. We propose ex vivo SPECT-OPT multimodal imaging as a highly accurate strategy for validating the performance of β-cell radiotracers.

  12. Changes in quantitative SPECT thallium-201 results associated with the use of energy-weighted acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Floyd, J.L.; Mann, R.B.; Shaw, A. )

    1991-05-01

    The effect of utilizing energy-weighted acquisition on quantitative analysis of SPECT thallium-201 images was evaluated by simultaneously acquiring energy-weighted and windowed projection images in ten patients. The paired image sets were processed identically and evaluated by probability analysis of defect magnitude as indicated by a commercially available software analysis package. It was predicted that defect magnitude would increase as a result of improved image contrast. This was confirmed experimentally. One should be cautious in relying on strict quantitative criteria in cardiac studies with thallium-201, especially when major changes in the imaging system or technique are introduced.

  13. A SVD-based method to assess the uniqueness and accuracy of SPECT geometrical calibration.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tianyu; Yao, Rutao; Shao, Yiping; Zhou, Rong

    2009-12-01

    Geometrical calibration is critical to obtaining high resolution and artifact-free reconstructed image for SPECT and CT systems. Most published calibration methods use analytical approach to determine the uniqueness condition for a specific calibration problem, and the calibration accuracy is often evaluated through empirical studies. In this work, we present a general method to assess the characteristics of both the uniqueness and the quantitative accuracy of the calibration. The method uses a singular value decomposition (SVD) based approach to analyze the Jacobian matrix from a least-square cost function for the calibration. With this method, the uniqueness of the calibration can be identified by assessing the nonsingularity of the Jacobian matrix, and the estimation accuracy of the calibration parameters can be quantified by analyzing the SVD components. A direct application of this method is that the efficacy of a calibration configuration can be quantitatively evaluated by choosing a figure-of-merit, e.g., the minimum required number of projection samplings to achieve desired calibration accuracy. The proposed method was validated with a slit-slat SPECT system through numerical simulation studies and experimental measurements with point sources and an ultra-micro hot-rod phantom. The predicted calibration accuracy from the numerical studies was confirmed by the experimental point source calibrations at approximately 0.1 mm for both the center of rotation (COR) estimation of a rotation stage and the slit aperture position (SAP) estimation of a slit-slat collimator by an optimized system calibration protocol. The reconstructed images of a hot rod phantom showed satisfactory spatial resolution with a proper calibration and showed visible resolution degradation with artificially introduced 0.3 mm COR estimation error. The proposed method can be applied to other SPECT and CT imaging systems to analyze calibration method assessment and calibration protocol

  14. A collimator optimization method for quantitative imaging: application to Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xing; Frey, Eric C

    2013-08-01

    Post-therapy quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has shown great potential to provide reliable activity estimates, which are essential for dose verification. Typically 90Y imaging is performed with high- or medium-energy collimators. However, the energy spectrum of 90Y bremsstrahlung photons is substantially different than typical for these collimators. In addition, dosimetry requires quantitative images, and collimators are not typically optimized for such tasks. Optimizing a collimator for 90Y imaging is both novel and potentially important. Conventional optimization methods are not appropriate for 90Y bremsstrahlung photons, which have a continuous and broad energy distribution. In this work, the authors developed a parallel-hole collimator optimization method for quantitative tasks that is particularly applicable to radionuclides with complex emission energy spectra. The authors applied the proposed method to develop an optimal collimator for quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT in the context of microsphere radioembolization. To account for the effects of the collimator on both the bias and the variance of the activity estimates, the authors used the root mean squared error (RMSE) of the volume of interest activity estimates as the figure of merit (FOM). In the FOM, the bias due to the null space of the image formation process was taken in account. The RMSE was weighted by the inverse mass to reflect the application to dosimetry; for a different application, more relevant weighting could easily be adopted. The authors proposed a parameterization for the collimator that facilitates the incorporation of the important factors (geometric sensitivity, geometric resolution, and septal penetration fraction) determining collimator performance, while keeping the number of free parameters describing the collimator small (i.e., two parameters). To make the optimization results for quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT more

  15. Quantitative pulmonary single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with radiotherapy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarfone, Christopher

    1998-09-01

    The potential benefits of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) lung perfusion imaging for 3- dimensional radiation treatment planning and dose- response analysis, are currently being investigated. Accurate and precise SPECT quantification may facilitate the development of models to predict radiation-induced pulmonary dysfunction prior to treatment. The purpose of this research was to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy and precision of SPECT filtered backprojection (FBP) and maximum likelihood-expectation maximization (ML-EM) image reconstruction methods for measuring absolute and relative activity concentration estimates in the lungs. The investigation is conducted using Monte Carlo simulation and validation, experimental phantom studies and applications to patient data. The scatter response function and scatter fraction (SF) for the lung is measured using Monte Carlo simulation and experimental imaging of point and line sources surrounded by lung density media. The Monte Carlo (experimental) SF value for lung density material is determined to be 14.86% (14.01%) for the line source and 18.88% (20.32%) for the point source. Quantitative experimental evaluation of FBP and ML-EM reconstruction techniques is performed using an anthropomorphic torso phantom containing spherical defects (simulating areas of reduced perfusion) of inner diameters 1.4 cm, 3.4 cm, and 5.6 cm at sphere:background concentration ratios of 0:1, 0.38:1, 0.47:1, 0.51:1, 0.70:1. Quantification is examined as a function of attenuation, scatter constant (k, range = 0.45 to 2.00), total iteration number (5 → 500) and deconvolution (Metz) filter power (X, range = 2.0 to 10.0). Relative (to lung background) and absolute quantification is performed using region of interest (ROI) analysis. A dependence of quantitative accuracy on both defect diameter and density is observed. In general, percent bias increases as defect diameter and density decrease. Also, negative bias in the lung

  16. Quantitative I-123-IMP brain SPECT and neuropsychological testing in AIDS dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuni, C.C.; Rhame, F.S.; Meier, M.J.; Foehse, M.C.; Loewenson, R.B.; Lee, B.C.; Boudreau, R.J.; duCret, R.P. )

    1991-03-01

    We performed I-123-IMP SPECT brain imaging on seven mildly demented AIDS patients and seven normal subjects. In an attempt to detect and quantitate regions of decreased I-123-IMP uptake, pixel intensity histograms of normalized SPECT images at the basal ganglia level were analyzed for the fraction of pixels in the lowest quartile of the intensity range. This fraction (F) averaged 17.5% (S.D. = 4.6) in the AIDS group and 12.6% (S.D. = 5.1) in the normal group (p less than .05). Six of the AIDS patients underwent neuropsychological testing (NPT). NPT showed the patients to have a variety of mild abnormalities. Regression analysis of NPT scores versus F yielded a correlation coefficient of .80 (p less than .05). We conclude that analysis of I-123-IMP SPECT image pixel intensity distribution is potentially sensitive in detecting abnormalities associated with AIDS dementia and may correlate with the severity of dementia as measured by NPT.

  17. Implications of CT noise and artifacts for quantitative {sup 99m}Tc SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hulme, K. W.; Kappadath, S. C.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: This paper evaluates the effects of computed tomography (CT) image noise and artifacts on quantitative single-photon emission computed-tomography (SPECT) imaging, with the aim of establishing an appropriate range of CT acquisition parameters for low-dose protocols with respect to accurate SPECT attenuation correction (AC). Methods: SPECT images of two geometric and one anthropomorphic phantom were reconstructed iteratively using CT scans acquired at a range of dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 0.4 to 46 mGy). Resultant SPECT image quality was evaluated by comparing mean signal, background noise, and artifacts to SPECT images reconstructed using the highest dose CT for AC. Noise injection was performed on linear-attenuation (μ) maps to determine the CT noise threshold for accurate AC. Results: High levels of CT noise (σ ∼ 200–400 HU) resulted in low μ-maps noise (σ ∼ 1%–3%). Noise levels greater than ∼10% in 140 keV μ-maps were required to produce visibly perceptible increases of ∼15% in {sup 99m}Tc SPECT images. These noise levels would be achieved at low CT dose levels (CTDI{sub vol} = 4 μGy) that are over 2 orders of magnitude lower than the minimum dose for diagnostic CT scanners. CT noise could also lower (bias) the expected μ values. The relative error in reconstructed SPECT signal trended linearly with the relative shift in μ. SPECT signal was, on average, underestimated in regions corresponding with beam-hardening artifacts in CT images. Any process that has the potential to change the CT number of a region by ∼100 HU (e.g., misregistration between CT images and SPECT images due to motion, the presence of contrast in CT images) could introduce errors in μ{sub 140} {sub keV} on the order of 10%, that in turn, could introduce errors on the order of ∼10% into the reconstructed {sup 99m}Tc SPECT image. Conclusions: The impact of CT noise on SPECT noise was demonstrated to be negligible for clinically achievable CT parameters. Because

  18. Patient-specific dosimetry based on quantitative SPECT imaging and 3D-DFT convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to validate the use of a 3-D discrete Fourier Transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to carry out the dosimetry for I-131 for soft tissues in radioimmunotherapy procedures. To validate this convolution method, mathematical and physical phantoms were used as a basis of comparison with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations which were carried out using the EGS4 system code. The mathematical phantom consisted of a sphere containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. The physical phantom consisted of a cylinder containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the Circular Harmonic Transform (CHT) algorithm.

  19. Alzheimer disease: Quantitative analysis of I-123-iodoamphetamine SPECT brain imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Hellman, R.S.; Tikofsky, R.S.; Collier, B.D.; Hoffmann, R.G.; Palmer, D.W.; Glatt, S.L.; Antuono, P.G.; Isitman, A.T.; Papke, R.A.

    1989-07-01

    To enable a more quantitative diagnosis of senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (SDAT), the authors developed and tested a semiautomated method to define regions of interest (ROIs) to be used in quantitating results from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of regional cerebral blood flow performed with N-isopropyl iodine-123-iodoamphetamine. SPECT/IMP imaging was performed in ten patients with probable SDAT and seven healthy subjects. Multiple ROIs were manually and semiautomatically generated, and uptake was quantitated for each ROI. Mean cortical activity was estimated as the average of the mean activity in 24 semiautomatically generated ROIs; mean cerebellar activity was determined from the mean activity in separate ROIs. A ratio of parietal to cerebellar activity less than 0.60 and a ratio of parietal to mean cortical activity less than 0.90 allowed correct categorization of nine of ten and eight of ten patients, respectively, with SDAT and all control subjects. The degree of diminished mental status observed in patients with SDAT correlated with both global and regional changes in IMP uptake.

  20. Simulation of realistic abnormal SPECT brain perfusion images: application in semi-quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, T.; Fleming, J. S.; Hoffmann, S. M. A.; Kemp, P. M.

    2005-11-01

    Simulation is useful in the validation of functional image analysis methods, particularly when considering the number of analysis techniques currently available lacking thorough validation. Problems exist with current simulation methods due to long run times or unrealistic results making it problematic to generate complete datasets. A method is presented for simulating known abnormalities within normal brain SPECT images using a measured point spread function (PSF), and incorporating a stereotactic atlas of the brain for anatomical positioning. This allows for the simulation of realistic images through the use of prior information regarding disease progression. SPECT images of cerebral perfusion have been generated consisting of a control database and a group of simulated abnormal subjects that are to be used in a UK audit of analysis methods. The abnormality is defined in the stereotactic space, then transformed to the individual subject space, convolved with a measured PSF and removed from the normal subject image. The dataset was analysed using SPM99 (Wellcome Department of Imaging Neuroscience, University College, London) and the MarsBaR volume of interest (VOI) analysis toolbox. The results were evaluated by comparison with the known ground truth. The analysis showed improvement when using a smoothing kernel equal to system resolution over the slightly larger kernel used routinely. Significant correlation was found between effective volume of a simulated abnormality and the detected size using SPM99. Improvements in VOI analysis sensitivity were found when using the region median over the region mean. The method and dataset provide an efficient methodology for use in the comparison and cross validation of semi-quantitative analysis methods in brain SPECT, and allow the optimization of analysis parameters.

  1. Quantitative capabilities of four state-of-the-art SPECT-CT cameras

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Four state-of-the-art single-photon emission computed tomography-computed tomography (SPECT-CT) systems, namely Philips Brightview, General Electric Discovery NM/CT 670 and Infinia Hawkeye 4, and Siemens Symbia T6, were investigated in terms of accuracy of attenuation and scatter correction, contrast recovery for small hot and cold structures, and quantitative capabilities when using their dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction with attenuation and scatter corrections and resolution recovery. Methods The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) NU-2 1994 phantom with cold air, water, and Teflon inserts, and a homemade contrast phantom with hot and cold rods were filled with 99mTc and scanned. The acquisition parameters were chosen to provide adequate linear and angular sampling and high count statistics. The data were reconstructed using Philips Astonish, General Electric Evolution for Bone, or Siemens Flash3D, eight subsets, and a varying number of iterations. A procedure similar to the one used in positron emission tomography (PET) allowed us to obtain the factor to convert counts per pixel into activity per unit volume. Results Edge and oscillation artifacts were observed with all phantoms and all systems. At 30 iterations, the residual fraction in the inserts of the NEMA phantom fell below 3.5%. Contrast recovery increased with the number of iterations but became almost saturated at 24 iterations onwards. In the uniform part of the NEMA and contrast phantoms, a quantification error below 10% was achieved. Conclusions In objects whose dimensions exceeded the SPECT spatial resolution by several times, quantification seemed to be feasible within 10% error limits. A partial volume effect correction strategy remains necessary for the smallest structures. The reconstruction artifacts nevertheless remain a handicap on the road towards accurate quantification in SPECT and should be the focus of further works in reconstruction

  2. Quantitative multi-pinhole small-animal SPECT: uniform versus non-uniform Chang attenuation correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; de Jong, J. R.; Gratama van Andel, H. A.; van der Have, F.; Vastenhouw, B.; Laverman, P.; Boerman, O. C.; Dierckx, R. A. J. O.; Beekman, F. J.

    2011-09-01

    Attenuation of photon flux on trajectories between the source and pinhole apertures affects the quantitative accuracy of reconstructed single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. We propose a Chang-based non-uniform attenuation correction (NUA-CT) for small-animal SPECT/CT with focusing pinhole collimation, and compare the quantitative accuracy with uniform Chang correction based on (i) body outlines extracted from x-ray CT (UA-CT) and (ii) on hand drawn body contours on the images obtained with three integrated optical cameras (UA-BC). Measurements in phantoms and rats containing known activities of isotopes were conducted for evaluation. In 125I, 201Tl, 99mTc and 111In phantom experiments, average relative errors comparing to the gold standards measured in a dose calibrator were reduced to 5.5%, 6.8%, 4.9% and 2.8%, respectively, with NUA-CT. In animal studies, these errors were 2.1%, 3.3%, 2.0% and 2.0%, respectively. Differences in accuracy on average between results of NUA-CT, UA-CT and UA-BC were less than 2.3% in phantom studies and 3.1% in animal studies except for 125I (3.6% and 5.1%, respectively). All methods tested provide reasonable attenuation correction and result in high quantitative accuracy. NUA-CT shows superior accuracy except for 125I, where other factors may have more impact on the quantitative accuracy than the selected attenuation correction.

  3. Development and evaluation of an improved quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT method

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Xing; Du, Yong; Ljungberg, Michael; Rault, Erwann; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Frey, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Yttrium-90 (90Y) is one of the most commonly used radionuclides in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). Since it decays with essentially no gamma photon emissions, surrogate radionuclides (e.g., 111In) or imaging agents (e.g., 99mTc MAA) are typically used for treatment planning. It would, however, be useful to image 90Y directly in order to confirm that the distributions measured with these other radionuclides or agents are the same as for the 90Y labeled agents. As a result, there has been a great deal of interest in quantitative imaging of 90Y bremsstrahlung photons using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. The continuous and broad energy distribution of bremsstrahlung photons, however, imposes substantial challenges on accurate quantification of the activity distribution. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an improved quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT reconstruction method appropriate for these imaging applications. Methods: Accurate modeling of image degrading factors such as object attenuation and scatter and the collimator-detector response is essential to obtain quantitatively accurate images. All of the image degrading factors are energy dependent. Thus, the authors separated the modeling of the bremsstrahlung photons into multiple categories and energy ranges. To improve the accuracy, the authors used a bremsstrahlung energy spectrum previously estimated from experimental measurements and incorporated a model of the distance between 90Y decay location and bremsstrahlung emission location into the SIMIND code used to generate the response functions and kernels used in the model. This improved Monte Carlo bremsstrahlung simulation was validated by comparison to experimentally measured projection data of a 90Y line source. The authors validated the accuracy of the forward projection model for photons in the various categories and energy ranges using the validated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. The

  4. Development and evaluation of an improved quantitative (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT method.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xing; Du, Yong; Ljungberg, Michael; Rault, Erwann; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Frey, Eric C

    2012-05-01

    Yttrium-90 ((90)Y) is one of the most commonly used radionuclides in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). Since it decays with essentially no gamma photon emissions, surrogate radionuclides (e.g., (111)In) or imaging agents (e.g., (99m)Tc MAA) are typically used for treatment planning. It would, however, be useful to image (90)Y directly in order to confirm that the distributions measured with these other radionuclides or agents are the same as for the (90)Y labeled agents. As a result, there has been a great deal of interest in quantitative imaging of (90)Y bremsstrahlung photons using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. The continuous and broad energy distribution of bremsstrahlung photons, however, imposes substantial challenges on accurate quantification of the activity distribution. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an improved quantitative (90)Y bremsstrahlung SPECT reconstruction method appropriate for these imaging applications. Accurate modeling of image degrading factors such as object attenuation and scatter and the collimator-detector response is essential to obtain quantitatively accurate images. All of the image degrading factors are energy dependent. Thus, the authors separated the modeling of the bremsstrahlung photons into multiple categories and energy ranges. To improve the accuracy, the authors used a bremsstrahlung energy spectrum previously estimated from experimental measurements and incorporated a model of the distance between (90)Y decay location and bremsstrahlung emission location into the SIMIND code used to generate the response functions and kernels used in the model. This improved Monte Carlo bremsstrahlung simulation was validated by comparison to experimentally measured projection data of a (90)Y line source. The authors validated the accuracy of the forward projection model for photons in the various categories and energy ranges using the validated Monte Carlo (MC) simulation method. The

  5. Assessing the Reliability of Quantitative Imaging of Sm-153

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poh, Zijie; Dagan, Maáyan; Veldman, Jeanette; Trees, Brad

    2013-03-01

    Samarium-153 is used for palliation of and recently has been investigated for therapy for bone metastases. Patient specific dosing of Sm-153 is based on quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and knowing the accuracy and precision of image-based estimates of the in vivo activity distribution. Physical phantom studies are useful for estimating these in simple objects, but do not model realistic activity distributions. We are using realistic Monte Carlo simulations combined with a realistic digital phantom modeling human anatomy to assess the accuracy and precision of Sm-153 SPECT. Preliminary data indicates that we can simulate projection images and reconstruct them with compensation for various physical image degrading factors, such as attenuation and scatter in the body as well as non-idealities in the imaging system, to provide realistic SPECT images.

  6. A Monte Carlo and physical phantom evaluation of quantitative In-111 SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Du, Yong; Song, Xiyun; Segars, W. Paul; Frey, Eric C.

    2005-09-01

    Accurate estimation of the 3D in vivo activity distribution is important for dose estimation in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT). Although SPECT can potentially provide such estimates, SPECT without compensation for image degrading factors is not quantitatively accurate. In this work, we evaluated quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) reconstruction methods that include compensation for various physical effects. Experimental projection data were obtained using a GE VH/Hawkeye system and an RSD torso phantom. Known activities of In-111 chloride were placed in the lungs, liver, heart, background and two spherical compartments with inner diameters of 22 mm and 34 mm. The 3D NCAT phantom with organ activities based on clinically derived In-111 ibritumomab tiuxetan data was used for the Monte Carlo (MC) simulation studies. Low-noise projection data were simulated using previously validated MC simulation methods. Fifty sets of noisy projections with realistic count levels were generated. Reconstructions were performed using the OS-EM algorithm with various combinations of attenuation (A), scatter (S), geometric response (G), collimator-detector response (D) and partial volume compensation (PVC). The QSPECT images from the various combinations of compensations were evaluated in terms of the accuracy and precision of the estimates of the total activity in each organ. For experimental data, the errors in organ activities for ADS and PVC compensation were less than 6.5% except the smaller sphere (-11.9%). For the noisy simulated data, the errors in organ activity for ADS compensation were less than 5.5% except the lungs (20.9%) and blood vessels (15.2%). Errors for other combinations of compensations were significantly (A, AS) or somewhat (AGS) larger. With added PVC, the error in the organ activities improved slightly except for the lungs (11.5%) and blood vessels (3.6%) where the improvement was more substantial. The standard deviation/mean ratios were all less than 1.5%. We

  7. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    Artzi, Moran; Even-Sapir, Einat; Lerman Shacham, Hedva; Thaler, Avner; Urterger, Avi Orr; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir

    2017-01-01

    Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT) SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson’s disease (PD), are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC) of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC). All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001) was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4) compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5) and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6), and significantly (p = 0.05) lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of quantitative

  8. DaT-SPECT assessment depicts dopamine depletion among asymptomatic G2019S LRRK2 mutation carriers.

    PubMed

    Artzi, Moran; Even-Sapir, Einat; Lerman Shacham, Hedva; Thaler, Avner; Urterger, Avi Orr; Bressman, Susan; Marder, Karen; Hendler, Talma; Giladi, Nir; Ben Bashat, Dafna; Mirelman, Anat

    2017-01-01

    Identification of early changes in Dopamine-Transporter (DaT) SPECT imaging expected in the prodromal phase of Parkinson's disease (PD), are usually overlooked. Carriers of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation are known to be at high risk for developing PD, compared to non-carriers. In this work we aimed to study early changes in Dopamine uptake in non-manifesting PD carriers (NMC) of the G2019S LRRK2 mutation using quantitative DaT-SPECT analysis and to examine the potential for early prediction of PD. Eighty Ashkenazi-Jewish subjects were included in this study: eighteen patients with PD; thirty-one NMC and thirty-one non-manifesting non-carriers (NMNC). All subjects underwent a through clinical assessment including evaluation of motor, olfactory, affective and non-motor symptoms and DaT-SPECT imaging. A population based DaT-SPECT template was created based on the NMNC cohort, and data driven volumes-of-interest (VOIs) were defined. Comparisons between groups were performed based on VOIs and voxel-wise analysis. The striatum area of all three cohorts was segmented into four VOIs, corresponding to the right/left dorsal and ventral striatum. Significant differences in clinical measures were found between patients with PD and non-manifesting subjects with no differences between NMC and NMNC. Significantly lower uptake (p<0.001) was detected in the right and left dorsal striatum in the PD group (2.2±0.3, 2.3±0.4) compared to the NMC (4.2±0.6, 4.3±0.5) and NMNC (4.5±0.6, 4.6±0.6), and significantly (p = 0.05) lower uptake in the right dorsal striatum in the NMC group compared to NMNC. Converging results were obtained using voxel-wise analysis. Two NMC participants, who later phenoconverted into PD, demonstrated reduced uptake mainly in the dorsal striatum. No significant correlations were found between the DaT-SPECT uptake in the different VOIs and clinical and behavioral assessments in the non-manifesting groups. This study shows the clinical value of quantitative

  9. SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging for the assessment of left ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Garcia, Ernest V.; Bax, Jeroen J.; Iskandrian, Ami E.; Borges-Neto, Salvador; Soman, Prem

    2012-01-01

    Phase analysis of gated single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) is an evolving technique for measuring LV mechanical dyssynchrony. Since its inception in 2005, it has undergone considerable technical development and clinical evaluation. This article reviews the background, the technical and clinical characteristics, and evolving clinical applications of phase analysis of gated SPECT MPI in patients requiring cardiac resynchronization therapy or implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapy and in assessing LV diastolic dyssynchrony. PMID:21567281

  10. Improving quantitative dosimetry in (177)Lu-DOTATATE SPECT by energy window-based scatter corrections.

    PubMed

    de Nijs, Robin; Lagerburg, Vera; Klausen, Thomas L; Holm, Søren

    2014-05-01

    Patient-specific dosimetry of lutetium-177 ((177)Lu)-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumours is important, because uptake differs across patients. Single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT)-based dosimetry requires a conversion factor between the obtained counts and the activity, which depends on the collimator type, the utilized energy windows and the applied scatter correction techniques. In this study, energy window subtraction-based scatter correction methods are compared experimentally and quantitatively. (177)Lu SPECT images of a phantom with known activity concentration ratio between the uniform background and filled hollow spheres were acquired for three different collimators: low-energy high resolution (LEHR), low-energy general purpose (LEGP) and medium-energy general purpose (MEGP). Counts were collected in several energy windows, and scatter correction was performed by applying different methods such as effective scatter source estimation (ESSE), triple-energy and dual-energy window, double-photopeak window and downscatter correction. The intensity ratio between the spheres and the background was measured and corrected for the partial volume effect and used to compare the performance of the methods. Low-energy collimators combined with 208 keV energy windows give rise to artefacts. For the 113 keV energy window, large differences were observed in the ratios for the spheres. For MEGP collimators with the ESSE correction technique, the measured ratio was close to the real ratio, and the differences between spheres were small. For quantitative (177)Lu imaging MEGP collimators are advised. Both energy peaks can be utilized when the ESSE correction technique is applied. The difference between the calculated and the real ratio is less than 10% for both energy windows.

  11. Quantitative (177)Lu SPECT imaging using advanced correction algorithms in non-reference geometry.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cozzella, M L; Fazio, A; De Felice, P; Iaccarino, G; D'Andrea, M; Ungania, S; Cazzato, M; Schmidt, K; Kimiaei, S; Strigari, L

    2016-12-01

    Peptide receptor therapy with (177)Lu-labelled somatostatin analogues is a promising tool in the management of patients with inoperable or metastasized neuroendocrine tumours. The aim of this work was to perform accurate activity quantification of (177)Lu in complex anthropomorphic geometry using advanced correction algorithms. Acquisitions were performed on the higher (177)Lu photopeak (208keV) using a Philips IRIX gamma camera provided with medium-energy collimators. System calibration was performed using a 16mL Jaszczak sphere surrounded by non-radioactive water. Attenuation correction was performed using μ-maps derived from CT data, while scatter and septal penetration corrections were performed using the transmission-dependent convolution-subtraction method. SPECT acquisitions were finally corrected for dead time and partial volume effects. Image analysis was performed using the commercial QSPECT software. The quantitative SPECT approach was validated on an anthropomorphic phantom provided with a home-made insert simulating a hepatic lesion. Quantitative accuracy was studied using three tumour-to-background activity concentration ratios (6:1, 9:1, 14:1). For all acquisitions, the recovered total activity was within 12% of the calibrated activity both in the background region and in the tumour. Using a 6:1 tumour-to-background ratio the recovered total activity was within 2% in the tumour and within 5% in the background. Partial volume effects, if not properly accounted for, can lead to significant activity underestimations in clinical conditions. In conclusion, accurate activity quantification of (177)Lu can be obtained if activity measurements are performed with equipment traceable to primary standards, advanced correction algorithms are used and acquisitions are performed at the 208keV photopeak using medium-energy collimators. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Improving quantitative dosimetry in 177Lu-DOTATATE SPECT by energy window-based scatter corrections

    PubMed Central

    Lagerburg, Vera; Klausen, Thomas L.; Holm, Søren

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Patient-specific dosimetry of lutetium-177 (177Lu)-DOTATATE treatment in neuroendocrine tumours is important, because uptake differs across patients. Single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT)-based dosimetry requires a conversion factor between the obtained counts and the activity, which depends on the collimator type, the utilized energy windows and the applied scatter correction techniques. In this study, energy window subtraction-based scatter correction methods are compared experimentally and quantitatively. Materials and methods 177Lu SPECT images of a phantom with known activity concentration ratio between the uniform background and filled hollow spheres were acquired for three different collimators: low-energy high resolution (LEHR), low-energy general purpose (LEGP) and medium-energy general purpose (MEGP). Counts were collected in several energy windows, and scatter correction was performed by applying different methods such as effective scatter source estimation (ESSE), triple-energy and dual-energy window, double-photopeak window and downscatter correction. The intensity ratio between the spheres and the background was measured and corrected for the partial volume effect and used to compare the performance of the methods. Results Low-energy collimators combined with 208 keV energy windows give rise to artefacts. For the 113 keV energy window, large differences were observed in the ratios for the spheres. For MEGP collimators with the ESSE correction technique, the measured ratio was close to the real ratio, and the differences between spheres were small. Conclusion For quantitative 177Lu imaging MEGP collimators are advised. Both energy peaks can be utilized when the ESSE correction technique is applied. The difference between the calculated and the real ratio is less than 10% for both energy windows. PMID:24525900

  13. Three-minute SPECT/CT is sufficient for the assessment of bone metastasis as add-on to planar bone scintigraphy: prospective head-to-head comparison to 11-min SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Zacho, Helle D; Manresa, José A Biurrun; Aleksyniene, Ramune; Ejlersen, June A; Fledelius, Joan; Bertelsen, Henrik; Petersen, Lars J

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to assess whether ultra-fast acquisition SPECT/CT (UF-SPECT/CT) can replace standard SPECT/CT (std-SPECT/CT) as "add-on" to whole-body bone scintigraphy (WB-BS) for the investigation of bone metastases. Consecutive cancer patients referred for WB-BS who underwent SPECT/CT in addition to WB-BS were included. Std-SPECT, UF-SPECT, and low-dose CT were performed (std-SPECT: matrix 128 × 128, zoom factor 1, 20 s/view, 32 views; UF-SPECT: identical parameters except for 10 s/view and 16 views, reducing the acquisition time from 11 to 3 min). A consensus diagnosis was reached by two observers for each set of images (WB-BS + standard SPECT/CT or WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT) using a three-category evaluation scale: M0: no bone metastases; M1: bone metastases; and Me: equivocal findings. Among the 104 included patients, most presented with prostate cancer (n = 71) or breast cancer (n = 28). Using WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT, 71 (68%) patients were classified as M0, 19 (18%) as M1, and 14 (14%) as Me. Excellent agreement was observed between WB-BS + std-SPECT/CT and WB-BS + UF-SPECT/CT using the three-category scale: kappa = 0.91 (95% CI 0.84-0.97). No difference in observer agreement between cancer types was detected. SPECT/CT provided a definitive classification in 90 of 104 cases in which WB-BS was not entirely diagnostic. To investigate potential bone metastases, UF-SPECT/CT can be conducted as add-on to WB-BS to notably reduce the SPECT acquisition time without compromising diagnostic confidence.

  14. Quantitatively accurate activity measurements with a dedicated cardiac SPECT camera: Physical phantom experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir Wells, R. Glenn

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: Recently, there has been increased interest in dedicated cardiac single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scanners with pinhole collimation and improved detector technology due to their improved count sensitivity and resolution over traditional parallel-hole cameras. With traditional cameras, energy-based approaches are often used in the clinic for scatter compensation because they are fast and easily implemented. Some of the cardiac cameras use cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) detectors which can complicate the use of energy-based scatter correction (SC) due to the low-energy tail—an increased number of unscattered photons detected with reduced energy. Modified energy-based scatter correction methods can be implemented, but their level of accuracy is unclear. In this study, the authors validated by physical phantom experiments the quantitative accuracy and reproducibility of easily implemented correction techniques applied to {sup 99m}Tc myocardial imaging with a CZT-detector-based gamma camera with multiple heads, each with a single-pinhole collimator. Methods: Activity in the cardiac compartment of an Anthropomorphic Torso phantom (Data Spectrum Corporation) was measured through 15 {sup 99m}Tc-SPECT acquisitions. The ratio of activity concentrations in organ compartments resembled a clinical {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi scan and was kept consistent across all experiments (1.2:1 heart to liver and 1.5:1 heart to lung). Two background activity levels were considered: no activity (cold) and an activity concentration 1/10th of the heart (hot). A plastic “lesion” was placed inside of the septal wall of the myocardial insert to simulate the presence of a region without tracer uptake and contrast in this lesion was calculated for all images. The true net activity in each compartment was measured with a dose calibrator (CRC-25R, Capintec, Inc.). A 10 min SPECT image was acquired using a dedicated cardiac camera with CZT detectors (Discovery NM530c, GE

  15. Patient-specific dosimetry using quantitative SPECT imaging and three-dimensional discrete fourier transform convolution

    SciTech Connect

    Akabani, G.; Hawkins, W.G.; Eckblade, M.B.; Leichner, P.K.

    1997-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a three-dimensional discrete Fourier transform (3D-DFT) convolution method to perform the dosimetry for {sup 131}I-labeled antibodies in soft tissues. Mathematical and physical phantoms were used to compare 3D-DFT with Monte Carlo transport (MCT) calculations based on the EGS4 code. The mathematical and physical phantoms consisted of a sphere and cylinder, respectively, containing uniform and nonuniform activity distributions. Quantitative SPECT reconstruction was carried out using the circular harmonic transform (CHT) algorithm. The radial dose profile obtained from MCT calculations and the 3D-DFT convolution method for the mathematical phantom were in close agreement. The root mean square error (RMSE) for the two methods was <0.1%, with a maximum difference <21%. Results obtained for the physical phantom gave a RMSE <0.1% and a maximum difference of <13%; isodose contours were in good agreement. SPECT data for two patients who had undergone {sup 131}I radioimmunotherapy (RIT) were used to compare absorbed-dose rates and isodose rate contours with the two methods of calculations. This yielded a RMSE <0.02% and a maximum difference of <13%. Our results showed that the 3D-DFT convolution method compared well with MCT calculations. The 3D-DFT approach is computationally much more efficient and, hence, the method of choice. This method is patient-specific and applicable to the dosimetry of soft-tissue tumors and normal organs. It can be implemented on personal computers. 22 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Post-reconstruction non-local means filtering methods using CT side information for quantitative SPECT.

    PubMed

    Chun, Se Young; Fessler, Jeffrey A; Dewaraja, Yuni K

    2013-09-07

    Quantitative SPECT techniques are important for many applications including internal emitter therapy dosimetry where accurate estimation of total target activity and activity distribution within targets are both potentially important for dose–response evaluations. We investigated non-local means (NLM) post-reconstruction filtering for accurate I-131 SPECT estimation of both total target activity and the 3D activity distribution. We first investigated activity estimation versus number of ordered-subsets expectation–maximization (OSEM) iterations. We performed simulations using the XCAT phantom with tumors containing a uniform and a non-uniform activity distribution, and measured the recovery coefficient (RC) and the root mean squared error (RMSE) to quantify total target activity and activity distribution, respectively. We observed that using more OSEM iterations is essential for accurate estimation of RC, but may or may not improve RMSE. We then investigated various post-reconstruction filtering methods to suppress noise at high iteration while preserving image details so that both RC and RMSE can be improved. Recently, NLM filtering methods have shown promising results for noise reduction. Moreover, NLM methods using high-quality side information can improve image quality further. We investigated several NLM methods with and without CT side information for I-131 SPECT imaging and compared them to conventional Gaussian filtering and to unfiltered methods. We studied four different ways of incorporating CT information in the NLM methods: two known (NLM CT-B and NLM CT-M) and two newly considered (NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H). We also evaluated the robustness of NLM filtering using CT information to erroneous CT. NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H yielded comparable RC values to unfiltered images while substantially reducing RMSE. NLM CT-S achieved −2.7 to 2.6% increase of RC compared to no filtering and NLM CT-H yielded up to 6% decrease in RC while other methods yielded lower

  17. Post-reconstruction non-local means filtering methods using CT side information for quantitative SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chun, Se Young; Fessler, Jeffrey A.; Dewaraja, Yuni K.

    2013-09-01

    Quantitative SPECT techniques are important for many applications including internal emitter therapy dosimetry where accurate estimation of total target activity and activity distribution within targets are both potentially important for dose-response evaluations. We investigated non-local means (NLM) post-reconstruction filtering for accurate I-131 SPECT estimation of both total target activity and the 3D activity distribution. We first investigated activity estimation versus number of ordered-subsets expectation-maximization (OSEM) iterations. We performed simulations using the XCAT phantom with tumors containing a uniform and a non-uniform activity distribution, and measured the recovery coefficient (RC) and the root mean squared error (RMSE) to quantify total target activity and activity distribution, respectively. We observed that using more OSEM iterations is essential for accurate estimation of RC, but may or may not improve RMSE. We then investigated various post-reconstruction filtering methods to suppress noise at high iteration while preserving image details so that both RC and RMSE can be improved. Recently, NLM filtering methods have shown promising results for noise reduction. Moreover, NLM methods using high-quality side information can improve image quality further. We investigated several NLM methods with and without CT side information for I-131 SPECT imaging and compared them to conventional Gaussian filtering and to unfiltered methods. We studied four different ways of incorporating CT information in the NLM methods: two known (NLM CT-B and NLM CT-M) and two newly considered (NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H). We also evaluated the robustness of NLM filtering using CT information to erroneous CT. NLM CT-S and NLM CT-H yielded comparable RC values to unfiltered images while substantially reducing RMSE. NLM CT-S achieved -2.7 to 2.6% increase of RC compared to no filtering and NLM CT-H yielded up to 6% decrease in RC while other methods yielded lower RCs

  18. SPECT brain perfusion imaging with Tc-99m ECD: Semi-quantitative regional analysis and database mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Schiepers, C.; Hegge, J.; De Roo, M.

    1994-05-01

    Brain SPECT is a well accepted method for the assessment of brain perfusion in various disorders such as epilepsy, stroke, dementia. A program for handling the tomographic data was developed, using a commercial spreadsheet (Microsoft EXCEL) with a set of macro`s for analysis, graphic display and database management of the final results.

  19. Assessment of demented patients by dynamic SPECT of inhaled xenon-133

    SciTech Connect

    Komatani, A.; Yamaguchi, K.; Sugai, Y.; Takanashi, T.; Kera, M.; Shinohara, M.; Kawakatsu, S.

    1988-10-01

    We studied the potential for using dynamic single photon emission computed tomography of inhaled xenon-133 (/sup 133/Xe) gas in the assessment of demented patients. An advanced ring-type single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) HEADTOME with improved spatial resolution (15 mm in full width at half maximum (FWHM)) was used for tomographic measurement of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF). All 34 patients underwent a detailed psychiatric examination and x-ray computed tomography scan, and matched research criteria for Alzheimer's disease (n = 13), senile dementia of the Alzheimer type (n = 9), or multi-infarct dementia (n = 12). In comparison with a senile control group (n = 7), mean CBF of both the whole brain and the temporo-parietal region was significantly less in the Alzheimer's disease and senile dementia Alzheimer type groups, but no significant difference was seen between the senile control group and multi-infarct dementia group. The correlation was 0.72 (p less than 0.004) between the mean CBF of the whole brain and the score of Hasegawa's Dementia Scale, and 0.94 (p less than 0.0001) between rCBF of the temporo-parietal region and the scale in Alzheimer's disease. In the senile dementia Alzheimer type group, the correlations were 0.77 (p less than 0.01) and 0.83 (p less than 0.004) respectively. No significant correlations were found in the multi-infarct dementia group. A temporo-parietal reduction in the distribution of the rCBF characteristic in the Alzheimer's disease group and a patchy whole brain reduction characteristic in the multi-infarct dementia group was detected. The ability of our improved SPECT to provide both quantitative measurement of rCBF and characteristic rCBF distribution patterns, makes it a promising tool for research or routine examination of demented patients.

  20. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F.; Segars, Paul W.; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C.

    2013-06-01

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  1. Improved dose-volume histogram estimates for radiopharmaceutical therapy by optimizing quantitative SPECT reconstruction parameters.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Lishui; Hobbs, Robert F; Segars, Paul W; Sgouros, George; Frey, Eric C

    2013-06-07

    In radiopharmaceutical therapy, an understanding of the dose distribution in normal and target tissues is important for optimizing treatment. Three-dimensional (3D) dosimetry takes into account patient anatomy and the nonuniform uptake of radiopharmaceuticals in tissues. Dose-volume histograms (DVHs) provide a useful summary representation of the 3D dose distribution and have been widely used for external beam treatment planning. Reliable 3D dosimetry requires an accurate 3D radioactivity distribution as the input. However, activity distribution estimates from SPECT are corrupted by noise and partial volume effects (PVEs). In this work, we systematically investigated OS-EM based quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) image reconstruction in terms of its effect on DVHs estimates. A modified 3D NURBS-based Cardiac-Torso (NCAT) phantom that incorporated a non-uniform kidney model and clinically realistic organ activities and biokinetics was used. Projections were generated using a Monte Carlo (MC) simulation; noise effects were studied using 50 noise realizations with clinical count levels. Activity images were reconstructed using QSPECT with compensation for attenuation, scatter and collimator-detector response (CDR). Dose rate distributions were estimated by convolution of the activity image with a voxel S kernel. Cumulative DVHs were calculated from the phantom and QSPECT images and compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. We found that noise, PVEs, and ringing artifacts due to CDR compensation all degraded histogram estimates. Low-pass filtering and early termination of the iterative process were needed to reduce the effects of noise and ringing artifacts on DVHs, but resulted in increased degradations due to PVEs. Large objects with few features, such as the liver, had more accurate histogram estimates and required fewer iterations and more smoothing for optimal results. Smaller objects with fine details, such as the kidneys, required more iterations and less

  2. Validation of Cross-calibration Schemes for Quantitative Bone SPECT/CT Using Different Sources under Various Geometric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Miyaji, Noriaki; Miwa, Kenta; Motegi, Kazuki; Umeda, Takuro; Wagatsuma, Kei; Fukai, Shohei; Takiguchi, Tomohiro; Terauchi, Takashi; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    Several cross-calibration schemes have been proposed to produce quantitative values in bone SPECT imaging. Differences in the radionuclide sources and geometric conditions can decrease the accuracy of cross-calibration factor (CCF). The present study aimed to validate the effects of calibration schemes using different sources under various geometric conditions. Temporal variations as well as variations in acquisition counts and the shapes of (57)Co standard and (99m)Tc point sources and a (99m)Tc disk source were determined. The effects of the geometric conditions of the source-to-camera distance (SCD) and lateral distance on the CCF were investigated by moving the camera or source away from the origin. The system planar sensitivity of NEMA incorporated into a Symbia Intevo SPECT/CT device (Siemens®) was defined as reference values. The temporal variation in CCF using the (57)Co source was relatively stable within the range of 0.7% to 2.3%, whereas the (99m)Tc source ranged from 2.7% to 7.3%. In terms of source shape, the (57)Co standard point source was the most stable. Both SCD and lateral distance decreased as a function of distance from the origin. Errors in the geometric condition were higher for the (57)Co standard point source than the (99m)Tc disk source. Different calibration schemes influenced the reliability of quantitative values. The (57)Co standard point source was stable over a long period, and this helped to maintain the quality of quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data. The CCF accuracy of the (99m)Tc source decreased depending on the preparative method. The method of calibration for quantitative SPECT should be immediately standardized to eliminate uncertainty.

  3. An automated voxelized dosimetry tool for radionuclide therapy based on serial quantitative SPECT/CT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, Price A.; Kron, Tomas; Beauregard, Jean-Mathieu; Hofman, Michael S.; Hogg, Annette; Hicks, Rodney J.

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: To create an accurate map of the distribution of radiation dose deposition in healthy and target tissues during radionuclide therapy.Methods: Serial quantitative SPECT/CT images were acquired at 4, 24, and 72 h for 28 {sup 177}Lu-octreotate peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) administrations in 17 patients with advanced neuroendocrine tumors. Deformable image registration was combined with an in-house programming algorithm to interpolate pharmacokinetic uptake and clearance at a voxel level. The resultant cumulated activity image series are comprised of values representing the total number of decays within each voxel's volume. For PRRT, cumulated activity was translated to absorbed dose based on Monte Carlo-determined voxel S-values at a combination of long and short ranges. These dosimetric image sets were compared for mean radiation absorbed dose to at-risk organs using a conventional MIRD protocol (OLINDA 1.1).Results: Absorbed dose values to solid organs (liver, kidneys, and spleen) were within 10% using both techniques. Dose estimates to marrow were greater using the voxelized protocol, attributed to the software incorporating crossfire effect from nearby tumor volumes.Conclusions: The technique presented offers an efficient, automated tool for PRRT dosimetry based on serial post-therapy imaging. Following retrospective analysis, this method of high-resolution dosimetry may allow physicians to prescribe activity based on required dose to tumor volume or radiation limits to healthy tissue in individual patients.

  4. Quantitative SPECT/CT reconstruction for 177Lu and 177Lu/90Y targeted radionuclide therapies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Piwowarska-Bilska, H.; Celler, A.; Birkenfeld, B.

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the quantitative accuracy of SPECT/CT imaging studies as would be performed before and after targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) using phantom experiments with (i) 99mTc, (ii) 177Lu and (iii) 90Y/177Lu. While the experiment with 99mTc imitated a diagnostic scan, the experiments with 177Lu and 90Y/177Lu modeled post-therapy acquisitions. At the next stage, we reconstructed images from pre- and post-therapy patient studies. The data were first reconstructed using two methods with limited corrections for the physics effects. Then, to generate quantitatively accurate absolute activity distributions, we applied a hybrid (model-based and window-based) reconstruction strategy where some of the physics effects were accurately modeled while corrections for other effects were empirical and based on information obtained from the projection data. The accuracies of absolute activity recovered by the hybrid method from the six phantom experiments were very similar to each other and acceptable for potential use in TRT. When measured in identical regions of interest, the 99mTc activity was reconstructed with errors ranging between -3.3% and 2.9%, while the 177Lu activity was reconstructed from experiments with 177Lu and 90Y/177Lu with errors ranging between -1.6% and 1.6%. The reconstruction algorithms with limited corrections led to larger and case-specific errors as might have been expected. From a clinical prospective, our results showed that physics-based reconstructions improved resolution of images corresponding to both diagnostic scans with 99mTc and post-therapy scans with 177Lu. Our analysis of patient study demonstrated that lack of corrections led to overestimation of activities in organs and tumor by 29-39% for the diagnostic scan with 99mTc and by 105-218% for post-therapy scan with 177Lu.

  5. Design and assessment of a novel SPECT system for desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeraatkar, Navid; Farahani, Mohammad Hossein; Rahmim, Arman; Sarkar, Saeed; Ay, Mohammad Reza

    2016-05-15

    Purpose: Given increasing efforts in biomedical research utilizing molecular imaging methods, development of dedicated high-performance small-animal SPECT systems has been growing rapidly in the last decade. In the present work, we propose and assess an alternative concept for SPECT imaging enabling desktop open-gantry imaging of small animals. Methods: The system, PERSPECT, consists of an imaging desk, with a set of tilted detector and pinhole collimator placed beneath it. The object to be imaged is simply placed on the desk. Monte Carlo (MC) and analytical simulations were utilized to accurately model and evaluate the proposed concept and design. Furthermore, a dedicated image reconstruction algorithm, finite-aperture-based circular projections (FABCP), was developed and validated for the system, enabling more accurate modeling of the system and higher quality reconstructed images. Image quality was quantified as a function of different tilt angles in the acquisition and number of iterations in the reconstruction algorithm. Furthermore, more complex phantoms including Derenzo, Defrise, and mouse whole body were simulated and studied. Results: The sensitivity of the PERSPECT was 207 cps/MBq. It was quantitatively demonstrated that for a tilt angle of 30°, comparable image qualities were obtained in terms of normalized squared error, contrast, uniformity, noise, and spatial resolution measurements, the latter at ∼0.6 mm. Furthermore, quantitative analyses demonstrated that 3 iterations of FABCP image reconstruction (16 subsets/iteration) led to optimally reconstructed images. Conclusions: The PERSPECT, using a novel imaging protocol, can achieve comparable image quality performance in comparison with a conventional pinhole SPECT with the same configuration. The dedicated FABCP algorithm, which was developed for reconstruction of data from the PERSPECT system, can produce high quality images for small-animal imaging via accurate modeling of the system as

  6. Submaximal exercise thallium-201 SPECT for assessment of interventional therapy in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Kander, N.; Juni, J.E.; Ellis, S.G.; O'Neill, W.W.; Schork, M.A.; Topol, E.J.; Schwaiger, M. )

    1991-04-01

    Submaximal thallium-201 stress testing has been shown to provide important diagnostic and prognostic information in patients with acute myocardial infarction. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the diagnostic value of early submaximal stress testing and thallium-201 single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after interventional therapy. Scintigraphic results from 56 patients with infarctions, who underwent acute thrombolytic therapy, angioplasty, or both, were compared with late (6 weeks) functional outcome as assessed by radionuclide ventriculography and with results of discharge coronary angiography. A linear correlation was found between the extent of thallium-201 SPECT perfusion defect and late ventricular function (r = 0.74, p less than 0.01). Forty-two percent of patients with large SPECT perfusion defects had normal left ventricular ejection fractions, suggesting an overestimation of infarct size by early imaging. Sensitivity and specificity of thallium-201 SPECT for detection of coronary artery stenosis in noninfarct territories was 57% and 46%, respectively, indicating limited diagnostic definition of extent of underlying coronary artery disease. Results of follow-up coronary angiography showed a significant relationship between the size of the initial perfusion defect and early restenosis or reocclusion of the infarct artery. Thus the extent of early thallium-201 perfusion defects correlates with late functional outcome but appears to overestimate the degree of injury. Submaximal thallium-201 stress testing allows only limited characterization of underlying coronary artery disease. Early assessment of infarct size may identify a patient population at high risk for reocclusion of the infarct artery.

  7. Quantitative image reconstruction for dual-isotope parathyroid SPECT/CT: phantom experiments and sample patient studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Chamoiseau, S.; Celler, A.

    2012-08-01

    We investigated the quantitative accuracy of the model-based dual-isotope single-photon emission computed tomography (DI-SPECT) reconstructions that use Klein-Nishina expressions to estimate the scattered photon contributions to the projection data. Our objective was to examine the ability of the method to recover the absolute activities pertaining to both radiotracers: Tc-99m and I-123. We validated our method through a series of phantom experiments performed using a clinical hybrid SPECT/CT camera (Infinia Hawkeye, GE Healthcare). Different activity ratios and different attenuating media were used in these experiments to create cross-talk effects of varying severity, which can occur in clinical studies. Accurate model-based corrections for scatter and cross-talk with CT attenuation maps allowed for the recovery of the absolute activities from DI-SPECT/CT scans with errors that ranged 0-10% for both radiotracers. The unfavorable activity ratios increased the computational burden but practically did not affect the resulting accuracy. The visual analysis of parathyroid patient data demonstrated that our model-based processing improved adenoma/background contrast and enhanced localization of small or faint adenomas.

  8. Myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function indices assessed by gated myocardial perfusion SPECT in methamphetamine abusers.

    PubMed

    Dadpour, Bita; Dabbagh Kakhki, Vahid R; Afshari, Reza; Dorri-Giv, Masoumeh; Mohajeri, Seyed A R; Ghahremani, Somayeh

    2016-12-01

    Methamphetamine (MA) is associated with alterations of cardiac structure and function, although it is less known. In this study, we assessed possible abnormality in myocardial perfusion and left ventricular function using gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. Fifteen patients with MA abuse, on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV) MA dependency determined by Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV, underwent 2-day dipyridamole stress/rest Tc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT. An average daily dose of MA use was 0.91±1.1 (0.2-4) g. The duration of MA use was 3.4±2.1 (1-7) years. In visual and semiquantitative analyses, all patients had normal gated myocardial perfusion SPECT, with no perfusion defects. In all gated SPECT images, there was no abnormality in left ventricular wall motion and thickening. All summed stress scores and summed rest scores were below 3. Calculated left ventricular functional indices including the end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume, and left ventricular ejection fraction were normal. Many cardiac findings because of MA mentioned in previous reports are less likely because of significant epicardial coronary artery stenosis.

  9. Noninvasive Assessment of Myocardial Viability in a Small Animal Model: Comparison of MRI, SPECT, and PET

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Daniel; Bal, Harshali; Arkles, Jeffrey; Horowitz, James; Araujo, Luis; Acton, Paul D.; Ferrari, Victor A.

    2010-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) research relies increasingly on small animal models and noninvasive imaging methods such as MRI, single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), and positron emission tomography (PET). However, a direct comparison among these techniques for characterization of perfusion, viability, and infarct size is lacking. Rats were studied within 18–24 hr post AMI by MRI (4.7 T) and subsequently (40–48 hr post AMI) by SPECT (99Tc-MIBI) and micro-PET (18FDG). A necrosis-specific MRI contrast agent was used to detect AMI, and a fast low angle shot (FLASH) sequence was used to acquire late enhancement and functional images contemporaneously. Infarcted regions showed late enhancement, whereas corresponding radionuclide images had reduced tracer uptake. MRI most accurately depicted AMI, showing the closest correlation and agreement with triphenyl tetrazolium chloride (TTC), followed by SPECT and PET. In some animals a mismatch of reduced uptake in normal myocardium and relatively increased 18FDG uptake in the infarct border zone precluded conventional quantitative analysis. We performed the first quantitative comparison of MRI, PET, and SPECT for reperfused AMI imaging in a small animal model. MRI was superior to the other modalities, due to its greater spatial resolution and ability to detect necrotic myocardium directly. The observed 18FDG mismatch likely represents variable metabolic conditions between stunned myocardium in the infarct border zone and normal myocardium and supports the use of a standardized glucose load or glucose clamp technique for PET imaging of reperfused AMI in small animals. PMID:18228591

  10. MIRD Pamphlet No. 26: Joint EANM/MIRD Guidelines for Quantitative 177Lu SPECT Applied for Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ljungberg, Michael; Celler, Anna; Konijnenberg, Mark W; Eckerman, Keith F; Dewaraja, Yuni K; Sjögreen-Gleisner, Katarina; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fahey, Frederic; Fisher, Darrell R; Hobbs, Robert; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Zanzonico, Pat; Bacher, Klaus; Chiesa, Carlo; Flux, Glenn; Lassmann, Michael; Strigari, Lidia; Walrand, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy of absorbed dose calculations in personalized internal radionuclide therapy is directly related to the accuracy of the activity (or activity concentration) estimates obtained at each of the imaging time points. MIRD Pamphlet no. 23 presented a general overview of methods that are required for quantitative SPECT imaging. The present document is next in a series of isotope-specific guidelines and recommendations that follow the general information that was provided in MIRD 23. This paper focuses on (177)Lu (lutetium) and its application in radiopharmaceutical therapy. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  11. In vivo Tumor Grading of Prostate Cancer using Quantitative 111In-Capromab Pendetide SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Cooperberg, Matthew R.; Konety, Badrinath R.; Hawkins, Randall A.

    2010-01-01

    -based PVE correction could recover true tracer concentrations in volumes as small as 7.77 ml up to 90% in phantom measurements. From patient studies, there was a statistically significant correlation (ρ = 0.71, P = 0.033) between higher AUVs (from either left or right lobe) and higher components of pathologic Gleason scores. Conclusion Our results strongly indicate noninvasive prostate tumor grading potential using quantitative 111In-capromab pendetide SPECT/CT for prostate cancer evaluation. PMID:20008977

  12. Comparison of (99m)Tc-MDP SPECT qualitative vs quantitative results in patients with suspected condylar hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    López Buitrago, D F; Ruiz Botero, J; Corral, C M; Carmona, A R; Sabogal, A

    To compare qualitative vs quantitative results of Single Photon Emission Computerised Tomography (SPECT), calculated from percentage of (99m)Tc-MDP (methylene diphosphonate) uptake, in condyles of patients with a presumptive clinical diagnosis of condylar hyperplasia. A retrospective, descriptive study was conducted on the (99m)Tc-MDP SPECT bone scintigraphy reports from 51 patients, with clinical impression of facial asymmetry related to condylar hyperplasia referred by their specialist in orthodontics or maxillofacial surgery, to a nuclear medicine department in order to take this type of test. Quantitative data from (99m)Tc-MDP condylar uptake of each were obtained and compared with qualitative image interpretation reported by a nuclear medicine expert. The concordances between the 51 qualitative and quantitative reports results was established. The total sample included 32 women (63%) and 19 men (37%). The patient age range was 13-45 years (21±8 years). According to qualitative reports, 19 patients were positive for right side condylar hyperplasia, 12 for left side condylar hyperplasia, with 8 bilateral, and 12 negative. The quantitative reports diagnosed 16 positives for right side condylar hyperplasia, 10 for left side condylar hyperplasia, and 25 negatives. Nuclear medicine images are an important diagnostic tool, but the qualitative interpretation of the images is not as reliable as the quantitative calculation. The agreement between the two types of report is low (39.2%, Kappa=0.13; P>.2). The main limitation of quantitative reports is that they do not register bilateral condylar hyperplasia cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  13. Regional cerebral blood flow imaging: A quantitative comparison of technetium-99m-HMPAO SPECT with C15O2 PET

    SciTech Connect

    Gemmell, H.G.; Evans, N.T.; Besson, J.A.; Roeda, D.; Davidson, J.; Dodd, M.G.; Sharp, P.F.; Smith, F.W.; Crawford, J.R.; Newton, R.H. )

    1990-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare technetium-99m-hexamethylpropyleneamineoxime ({sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) imaging using positron emission tomography (PET). As investigation of dementia is likely to be one of the main uses of routine rCBF imaging, 18 demented patients were imaged with both techniques. The PET data were compared quantitatively with three versions of the SPECT data. These were, first, data normalized to the SPECT cerebellar uptake, second, data linearly corrected using the PET cerebellar value and, finally, data Lassen corrected for washout from the high flow areas. Both the linearly-corrected (r = 0.81) and the Lassen-corrected (r = 0.79) HMPAO SPECT data showed good correlation with the PET rCBF data. The relationship between the normalized HMPAO SPECT data and the PET data was nonlinear. It is not yet possible to obtain rCBF values in absolute units from HMPAO SPECT without knowledge of the true rCBF in one reference region for each patient.

  14. Validation of a short-scan-time imaging protocol for thallium-201 myocardial SPECT with a multifocal collimator.

    PubMed

    Horiguchi, Yoriko; Ueda, Tomohiro; Shiomori, Tomofumi; Kanna, Masahiko; Matsushita, Hirooki; Kawaminami, Tomoko; Sudo, Yuta; Kikuchi, Shinnosuke; Sasaki, Ryo; Hoshimiya, Jun; Morita, Yukiko

    2014-10-01

    IQ-SPECT (Siemens AG, Munich, Germany) is a highly sensitive single-photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) system that uses a multifocal collimator. We searched for a suitable protocol for short-time imaging by IQ-SPECT in thallium-201 (Tl-201) MPI by evaluating phantom images and also by comparing human IQ-SPECT images with conventional SPECT images as reference standards. We assessed the image quality using the normalized mean square error (NMSE) and drew up count profiles in Tl-201 SPECT images acquired with IQ-SPECT in a phantom study. We also performed Tl-201 stress myocardial SPECT/CT in 21 patients and compared delayed images acquired by using IQ-SPECT with 36 or 17 views per head with images obtained by using conventional SPECT. The NMSE of SPECT images from IQ-SPECT with 36 views was approximately one-fifth of that with 17 views. The myocardial count profile of images with 17 views was lower than those of images with 36 or 104 views in some regions. Defect scores were significantly lower, and image quality scores higher, in images from conventional SPECT than in those from IQ-SPECT with 17 views. Defect scores and image quality scores were equivalent in images from conventional SPECT and those from IQ-SPECT with 36 views. Agreement with the results of conventional SPECT in terms of coronary artery territory-based defect judgment was the best in IQ-SPECT with 36 views with computed tomography-derived attenuation correction (CTAC): the kappa values for IQ-SPECT with 36 views were 0.76 (without CTAC) and 0.83 (with CTAC), and those for IQ-SPECT with 17 views were 0.62 (without CTAC) and 0.59 (with CTAC). The difference in quantitative tracer uptake between conventional SPECT images and IQ-SPECT images was significantly greater for IQ-SPECT images with 17 views than for those with 36 views. Scanning with 36 views per head with CTAC may be appropriate for Tl-201 MPI using IQ-SPECT, because it provides images equivalent to

  15. The Effect of Electromagnetic Field Generated by a Mobile Phone on the Performance of a SPECT Scanner: A Quantitative Study.

    PubMed

    Pashazadeh, Ali Mahmoud; Dehkordi, Forough Jafarian; Tanha, Kaveh; Assadi, Majid

    2015-07-01

    The aim of the current attempt was quantitative investigation of the electromagnetic interference (EMI) of a mobile phone with the function of a SPECT gamma camera during data acquisition. We tested the effect of a mobile phone, in both ringing mode and standby mode, on one SPECT gamma camera during scanning a cylindrical phantom containing 5.4 mCi (99m)Tc. The experiment was performed for different distances of 10, 12, 14, 16, 18, 20, 25, and 30 cm between mobile phone and head of the scanner, and for different head angles of 0, 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, and 180 degrees. A RF-EMF meter measured strength of electromagnetic field throughout the study. Statistically significant decrease in count number was considered to be electromagnetic interference. There was significant reduction in the recorded counts during ringing of the mobile phone in all studied distances. For gamma camera, fixed at a distance, there was no uniform pattern of reduction of the counts at different angles between two operation modes of the mobile phone. A mobile phone, at close distance, can be a sensible source of electromagnetic field, disturbing the normal function of a gamma camera.

  16. Recent advances in SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Tsui, Benjamin M. W.

    1998-08-28

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a medical imaging modality that combines conventional nuclear medicine imaging technique and methods of computed tomography (CT). From images that represent the biodistribution of the injected radiopharmaceutical in the patient, SPECT provides functional information that is unique. The first SPECT system was developed in the sixties. However, early progress of SPECT was hampered by the lack of adequate image reconstruction methods. The development of x-ray CT and image reconstruction methods in the seventies spurred a renewed interest in SPECT. In 1981, the first commercial SPECT system based on a single rotating camera was available for clinical use. Today, most modern SPECT systems consist of multiple cameras that rotate around the patients. They have better spatial resolution and higher detection efficiency as compared to the earlier single camera systems. Recently, a new generation of dual camera systems allowing for coincidence imaging of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals has emerged in the commercial market. Additionally, new quantitative image reconstruction methods are under development. They compensate for image degrading factors including attenuation, collimator-detector blurring and scatter. Also, they result in SPECT images with improved image quality and more accurately represent the three-dimensional radioactivity distribution in the patient. Such advances in radiopharmaceuticals, instrumentation, image reconstruction, compensation methods, and clinical applications have fueled a steady growth of SPECT as an important diagnostic tool in patient management.

  17. Quantitative microbiological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Hoornstra, E; Notermans, S

    2001-05-21

    The production of safe food is being increasingly based on the use of risk analysis, and this process is now in use to establish national and international food safety objectives. It is also being used more frequently to guarantee that safety objectives are met and that such guarantees are achieved in a cost-effective manner. One part of the overall risk analysis procedure-risk assessment-is the scientific process in which the hazards and risk factors are identified, and the risk estimate or risk profile is determined. Risk assessment is an especially important tool for governments when food safety objectives have to be developed in the case of 'new' contaminants in known products or known contaminants causing trouble in 'new' products. Risk assessment is also an important approach for food companies (i) during product development, (ii) during (hygienic) process optimalization, and (iii) as an extension (validation) of the more qualitative HACCP-plan. This paper discusses these two different types of risk assessment, and uses probability distribution functions to assess the risks posed by Escherichia coli O157:H7 in each case. Such approaches are essential elements of risk management, as they draw on all available information to derive accurate and realistic estimations of the risk posed. The paper also discusses the potential of scenario-analysis in simulating the impact of different or modified risk factors during the consideration of new or improved control measures.

  18. SU-C-201-02: Quantitative Small-Animal SPECT Without Scatter Correction Using High-Purity Germanium Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Gearhart, A; Peterson, T; Johnson, L

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of the exceptional energy resolution of germanium detectors for preclinical SPECT in comparison to conventional detectors. Methods: A cylindrical water phantom was created in GATE with a spherical Tc-99m source in the center. Sixty-four projections over 360 degrees using a pinhole collimator were simulated. The same phantom was simulated using air instead of water to establish the true reconstructed voxel intensity without attenuation. Attenuation correction based on the Chang method was performed on MLEM reconstructed images from the water phantom to determine a quantitative measure of the effectiveness of the attenuation correction. Similarly, a NEMA phantom was simulated, and the effectiveness of the attenuation correction was evaluated. Both simulations were carried out using both NaI detectors with an energy resolution of 10% FWHM and Ge detectors with an energy resolution of 1%. Results: Analysis shows that attenuation correction without scatter correction using germanium detectors can reconstruct a small spherical source to within 3.5%. Scatter analysis showed that for standard sized objects in a preclinical scanner, a NaI detector has a scatter-to-primary ratio between 7% and 12.5% compared to between 0.8% and 1.5% for a Ge detector. Preliminary results from line profiles through the NEMA phantom suggest that applying attenuation correction without scatter correction provides acceptable results for the Ge detectors but overestimates the phantom activity using NaI detectors. Due to the decreased scatter, we believe that the spillover ratio for the air and water cylinders in the NEMA phantom will be lower using germanium detectors compared to NaI detectors. Conclusion: This work indicates that the superior energy resolution of germanium detectors allows for less scattered photons to be included within the energy window compared to traditional SPECT detectors. This may allow for quantitative SPECT without implementing scatter

  19. [Quantitation of cerebral blood flow and partition coefficient using 123I-IMP dynamic SPECT with single arterial blood sampling].

    PubMed

    Mizumura, S; Kumita, S; Kumazaki, T

    1996-03-01

    A method base on the two-compartment model was developed to measure quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) and partition coefficient (lambda) of IMP from dynamic SPECT and single arterial blood sampling. In this method, the linear differential equation of two-compartment model, Yokoi proposed, was employed and quantitative CBF and lambda values were measured with the standard input function calibrated by single arterial sampling. The input function was derived from the standard input function scaled by a factor determined by the single arterial blood sample. This new technique was applied to 5 normal volunteers (Ages ranged from 25 to 29 yr., average 26 yr.). The optimal time to calibrate the standard input function in the individual study and optimal the period of the upper limit time to which input function is integrated from IMP administration for analysis of the equation were determined to minimize the difference between integration of the calibrated standard input function and of the individual input function. Minimization of the difference yields an optimal calibration time (4 to 10 min after IMP administration) and the period of the upper limit time (8 to 60 min after acquisition start). Comparison of CBF and lambda values obtained by the graphical method using the calibrated standard data and individual input function were performed. It should be noted that CBF values were in good agreement between the two methods, respectively (r = 0.92, P<0.01; r = 0.72, p = 0.01). This method is easy to estimate CBF and lambda by only single arterial blood sampling and IMP dynamic SPECT, and useful for routine studies.

  20. Microbiological Quantitative Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Silvia; Schaffner, Donald W.

    The meat and poultry industry faces ongoing challenges due to the natural association of pathogens of concern (e.g., Salmonella, Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7) with a variety of domesticated food animals. In addition, pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes pose a significant cross-contamination risk during further meat and poultry processing, distribution, and storage. Furthermore, the meat and poultry industries are constantly changing with the addition of new products, use of new raw materials, and targeting of new consumer populations, each of which may give rise to potential new risks. National and international regulations are increasingly using a “risk-based” approach to food safety (where the regulatory focus is driven by the magnitude of the risk), so risk assessment is becoming a valuable tool to systematically organize and evaluate the potential public health risk posed by food processing operations.

  1. Perfusion SPECT, SISCOM and PET (18)F-FDG in the assessment of drug- refractory epilepsy patients candidates for epilepsy surgery.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Piñera, M; Mestre-Fusco, A; Ley, M; González, S; Medrano, S; Principe, A; Mojal, S; Conesa, G; Rocamora, R

    2015-01-01

    Brain perfusion SPECT (ictal-interictal), SPECT images and subtraction ictal SPECT coregistered to MRI (SISCOM) and (18)F-FDG-PET (interictal), play an important role in the pre-surgical diagnosis of patients with medically refractory epilepsy. This study aimed to establish: the reproducibility of visual ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM analysis altogether with the capacity of SPECT, SISCOM and PET to determine the epileptogenic zone. (99m)Tc-HMPAO SPECT ictal-interictal and SISCOM (Analyze 7.0) were performed on 47 refractory epilepsy patients (24 F, 19-60 yrs). In 13 patients, SISCOM was also performed using a new program (Focus DET). Ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM images were analysed independently by two nuclear medicine physicians (observer 1 and 2). Kappa concordance coefficient was used to evaluate the reproducibility. In sixteen patients, SPECT, SISCOM and PET findings were compared with the resected area during the surgery, and surgical outcome using Engel scale or with the stereo EEG-(SEEG). The ictal-interictal SPECT interobserver agreement was 91%, Kappa index 0.86, SISCOM (Analyze 7.0) interobserver agreement percentage was 82%, Kappa index 0.80, Analyze 7.0 showed a higher inconclusive results than visual SPECT analysis. SISCOM FocusDET interobserver agreement was 92%, Kappa index 0.87, with lower inconclusive results than Analyze 7.0. SPECT, SISCOM and PET combined findings identified 87% seizure onset zone: 79% temporal, 26% parieto-temporal and 7% frontal. Ictal-interictal SPECT and SISCOM showed a high reproducibility in this sample of patients with drug-refractory epilepsy. SPECT,SISCOM and PET combined findings improved detection of epileptogenic zone in comparison with the individual assessment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema with breath-hold SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Kawakami, Yasuhiko; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Noriko; Seto, Akiko; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2008-06-01

    Anatomic relation between pulmonary perfusion and morphology in pulmonary emphysema was assessed on deep-inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Subjects were 38 patients with pulmonary emphysema and 11 non-smoker controls, who successfully underwent DIBrH and non-BrH perfusion SPECT using a dual-headed SPECT system during the period between January 2004 and June 2006. DIBrH SPECT was three-dimensionally co-registered with DIBrH CT to comprehend the relationship between lung perfusion defects and CT low attenuation areas (LAA). By comparing the appearance of lung perfusion on DIBrH with non-BrH SPECT, the correlation with the rate constant for the alveolar-capillary transfer of carbon monoxide (DLCO/VA) was compared between perfusion abnormalities on these SPECTs and LAA on CT. DIBrH SPECT provided fairly uniform perfusion in controls, but significantly enhanced perfusion heterogeneity when compared with non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema patients (P < 0.001). The reliable DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images confirmed more extended perfusion defects than LAA on CT in majority (73%) of patients. Perfusion abnormalities on DIBrH SPECT were more closely correlated with DLCO/VA than LAA on CT (P < 0.05). DIBrH SPECT identifies affected lungs with perfusion abnormality better than does non-BrH SPECT in pulmonary emphysema. DIBrH SPECT-CT fusion images are useful for more accurately localizing affected lungs than morphologic CT alone in this disease.

  3. Three-Dimensional Dosimetric Analysis and Quantitative Bremsstrahlung Spect Imaging for Treatment of Non-Resectable Pancreatic Cancer Using Colloidal PHOSPHORUS-32.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsai, E. Ishmael

    1995-01-01

    Current methods of calculating absorbed dose in tissue from beta emitting radiopharmaceuticals yield only estimates of the average dose and cannot be used for dose mapping of bremsstrahlung SPECT images. The present work describes a clinically applicable methodology that can be used to determine the 3-D absorbed dose distribution from bremsstrahlung SPECT images for patients undergoing infusional brachytherapy. The radiopharmaceutical used in this study was colloidal P-32; however, other beta emitters can be used with this method. Calibration curves were generated from phantom studies to determine the activity per voxel from the attenuation corrected measured counts per voxel. The cumulative activity at each voxel position was converted to dose (Gy) using a Monte Carlo based P -32 point dose kernel calculation in water. Two-dimensional isodose distributions then were generated and projected on the reconstructed SPECT slices. This technique was further extended to calculate the quantitative dose for the entire volume and iso-surface dose distributions were generated in 3-D from bremsstrahlung SPECT data. In addition, to calculate the dose rate or accumulated dose at any depth from a given activity, a computer program based on the modified Loevinger point function was developed. This program calculates the dose in two ways: (1) through a closed solution for the spherical geometry by integration of the function over small spherical volumes, or (2) by applying the revised parameters of the modified Loevinger function. A practical and clinically feasible technique was developed for 3-D image co-registration between CT and SPECT for direct anatomic confirmation of the correlation between the region of the P-32 activity distribution and the anatomic site of injection. The method provides the correlation of the body contours obtained from bremsstrahlung SPECT data with corresponding contours from CT. A 3-D surface was first generated by mapping the iso-counts in the SPECT

  4. Gamma camera calibration and validation for quantitative SPECT imaging with (177)Lu.

    PubMed

    D'Arienzo, M; Cazzato, M; Cozzella, M L; Cox, M; D'Andrea, M; Fazio, A; Fenwick, A; Iaccarino, G; Johansson, L; Strigari, L; Ungania, S; De Felice, P

    2016-06-01

    Over the last years (177)Lu has received considerable attention from the clinical nuclear medicine community thanks to its wide range of applications in molecular radiotherapy, especially in peptide-receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). In addition to short-range beta particles, (177)Lu emits low energy gamma radiation of 113keV and 208keV that allows gamma camera quantitative imaging. Despite quantitative cancer imaging in molecular radiotherapy having been proven to be a key instrument for the assessment of therapeutic response, at present no general clinically accepted quantitative imaging protocol exists and absolute quantification studies are usually based on individual initiatives. The aim of this work was to develop and evaluate an approach to gamma camera calibration for absolute quantification in tomographic imaging with (177)Lu. We assessed the gamma camera calibration factors for a Philips IRIX and Philips AXIS gamma camera system using various reference geometries, both in air and in water. Images were corrected for the major effects that contribute to image degradation, i.e. attenuation, scatter and dead- time. We validated our method in non-reference geometry using an anthropomorphic torso phantom provided with the liver cavity uniformly filled with (177)LuCl3. Our results showed that calibration factors depend on the particular reference condition. In general, acquisitions performed with the IRIX gamma camera provided good results at 208keV, with agreement within 5% for all geometries. The use of a Jaszczak 16mL hollow sphere in water provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in anthropomorphic geometry within 1% for the 208keV peak, for both gamma cameras. The point source provided the poorest results, most likely because scatter and attenuation correction are not incorporated in the calibration factor. However, for both gamma cameras all geometries provided calibration factors capable of recovering the activity in

  5. CT-based SPECT attenuation correction and assessment of infarct size: results from a cardiac phantom study.

    PubMed

    Kroiss, Alexander Stephan; Nekolla, Stephan Gerhard; Dobrozemsky, Georg; Grubinger, Thomas; Shulkin, Barry Lynn; Schwaiger, Markus

    2017-09-21

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT is a commonly performed, well established, clinically useful procedure for the management of patients with coronary artery disease. However, the attenuation of photons from myocardium impacts the quantification of infarct sizes. CT-Attenuation Correction (AC) potentially resolves this problem. This contention was investigated by analyzing various parameters for infarct size delineation in a cardiac phantom model. A thorax phantom with a left ventricle (LV), fillable defects, lungs, spine and liver was used. The defects were combined to simulate 6 infarct sizes (5-20% LV). The LV walls were filled with 100120 kBq/ml (99m)Tc and the liver with 10-12 kBq/ml (99m)Tc. The defects were filled with water of 50% LV activity to simulate transmural and non-transmural infarction, respectively. Imaging of the phantom was repeated for each configuration in a SPECT/CT system. The defects were positioned in the anterior as well as in the inferior wall. Data were acquired in two modes: 32 views, 30 s/view, 180° and 64 views, 15 s/view, 360° orbit. Images were reconstructed iteratively with scatter correction and resolution recovery. Polar maps were generated and defect sizes were calculated with variable thresholds (40-60%, in 5% steps). The threshold yielding the best correlation and the lowest mean deviation from the true extents was considered optimal. AC data showed accurate estimation of transmural defect extents with an optimal threshold of 50% [non attenuation correction (NAC): 40%]. For the simulation of non-transmural defects, a threshold of 55% for AC was found to yield the best results (NAC: 45%). The variability in defect size due to the location (anterior versus inferior) of the defect was reduced by 50% when using AC data indicating the benefit from using AC. No difference in the optimal threshold was observed between the different orbits. Cardiac SPECT/CT shows an improved capability for quantitative defect size assessment in phantom

  6. Spatially resolved assessment of hepatic function using 99mTc-IDA SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hesheng; Cao, Yue

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: 99mTc-iminodiacetic acid (IDA) hepatobiliary imaging is usually quantified for hepatic function on the entire liver or regions of interest (ROIs) in the liver. The authors presented a method to estimate the hepatic extraction fraction (HEF) voxel-by-voxel from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT with a 99mTc-labeled IDA agent of mebrofenin and evaluated the spatially resolved HEF measurements with an independent physiological measurement.Methods: Fourteen patients with intrahepatic cancers were treated with radiation therapy (RT) and imaged by 99mTc-mebrofenin SPECT before and 1 month after RT. The dynamic SPECT volumes were with a resolution of 3.9 × 3.9 × 2.5 mm{sup 3}. Throughout the whole liver with approximate 50 000 voxels, voxelwise HEF quantifications were estimated and compared between using arterial input function (AIF) from the heart and using vascular input function (VIF) from the spleen. The correlation between mean of the HEFs over the nontumor liver tissue and the overall liver function measured by Indocyanine green clearance half-time (T1/2) was assessed. Variation of the voxelwise estimation was evaluated in ROIs drawn in relatively homogeneous regions of the livers. The authors also examined effects of the time range parameter on the voxelwise HEF quantification.Results: Mean of the HEFs over the liver estimated using AIF significantly correlated with the physiological measurement T1/2 (r= 0.52, p= 0.0004), and the correlation was greatly improved by using VIF (r= 0.79, p < 0.0001). The parameter of time range for the retention phase did not lead to a significant difference in the means of the HEFs in the ROIs. Using VIF and a retention phase time range of 7–30 min, the relative variation of the voxelwise HEF in the ROIs was 10%± 6% of respective mean HEF.Conclusions: The voxelwise HEF derived from 99mTc-IDA SPECT by the deconvolution analysis is feasible to assess the spatial distribution of hepatic function in the

  7. Systolic and diastolic assessment by 3D-ASM segmentation of gated-SPECT Studies: a comparison with MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobon-Gomez, C.; Bijnens, B. H.; Huguet, M.; Sukno, F.; Moragas, G.; Frangi, A. F.

    2009-02-01

    Gated single photon emission tomography (gSPECT) is a well-established technique used routinely in clinical practice. It can be employed to evaluate global left ventricular (LV) function of a patient. The purpose of this study is to assess LV systolic and diastolic function from gSPECT datasets in comparison with cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (CMR) measurements. This is achieved by applying our recently implemented 3D active shape model (3D-ASM) segmentation approach for gSPECT studies. This methodology allows for generation of 3D LV meshes for all cardiac phases, providing volume time curves and filling rate curves. Both systolic and diastolic functional parameters can be derived from these curves for an assessment of patient condition even at early stages of LV dysfunction. Agreement of functional parameters, with respect to CMR measurements, were analyzed by means of Bland-Altman plots. The analysis included subjects presenting either LV hypertrophy, dilation or myocardial infarction.

  8. Dopamine D2 receptor status assessed by IBZM SPECT - A sensitive indicator for cerebral hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Tatsch, K.; Schwarz, J.; Welz, A.

    1995-05-01

    The striatum is highly sensitive to tissue hypoxia. Thus, it may be suggested that cerebral hypoxia could affect the integrity of the striatal receptor system. Purpose of the current SPECT investigations with IBZM was to evaluate whether hypoxic conditions cause detectable changes in the D2 receptor status. 25 controls and 30 pts with history of cerebral hypoxia (resuscitation after cardiac arrest: n=19, CABG surgery under cardiopulmonary bypass: n=11) were investigated with SPECT 2h p.i. of 185 MBq I-123 IBZM. For semiquant, evaluation transverse slices corrected for attenuation were used to calculate striatal to frontal cortex (S/FC) ratios. In 13/19 pts with cerebral hypoxia due to cardiac arrest IBZM binding was severely reduced after successful resuscitation. 7 died, 5 were in a vegetative state, 1 remained severely disabled. In 6/19 S/FC ratios were normal/mildly reduced, 2 of them had a good outcome, 4 were moderatley disabled. In pts with CABG IBZM binding was preoperatively normal. After hypoxia due to cardiac surgery striatal S/FC ratios decreased slightly, persisting on this level even 6 months after surgery. Neuropsychological/psychiatric testing showed only minor or transient changes in this group of patients. The striatal D2 receptor status seems to be a sensitive indicator for cerebral hypoxia. After hypoxia due to cardiac arrest IBZM results well correlate (in contrast to morphological or SEP findings) with the clinical outcome and thus may serve as early predictor of the individual prognosis. The moderate decline in IBZM binding following CABG surgery suggests mild cerebral hypoxia despite of protective hypothermia. Sensitively indicating cerebral hypoxia changes in the D2 receptor status assessed by IBZM SPECT may serve as a valuable diagnostic tool for testing neuroprotective drugs or modified surgical techniques.

  9. Comparison of quantitative Y-90 SPECT and non-time-of-flight PET imaging in post-therapy radioembolization of liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Yue, Jianting; Mauxion, Thibault; Reyes, Diane K; Lodge, Martin A; Hobbs, Robert F; Rong, Xing; Dong, Yinfeng; Herman, Joseph M; Wahl, Richard L; Geschwind, Jean-François H; Frey, Eric C

    2016-10-01

    Radioembolization with yttrium-90 microspheres may be optimized with patient-specific pretherapy treatment planning. Dose verification and validation of treatment planning methods require quantitative imaging of the post-therapy distribution of yttrium-90 (Y-90). Methods for quantitative imaging of Y-90 using both bremsstrahlung SPECT and PET have previously been described. The purpose of this study was to compare the two modalities quantitatively in humans. Calibration correction factors for both quantitative Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT and a non-time-of-flight PET system without compensation for prompt coincidences were developed by imaging three phantoms. The consistency of these calibration correction factors for the different phantoms was evaluated. Post-therapy images from both modalities were obtained from 15 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma who underwent hepatic radioembolization using Y-90 glass microspheres. Quantitative SPECT and PET images were rigidly registered and the total liver activities and activity distributions estimated for each modality were compared. The activity distributions were compared using profiles, voxel-by-voxel correlation and Bland-Altman analyses, and activity-volume histograms. The mean ± standard deviation of difference in the total activity in the liver between the two modalities was 0% ± 9% (range -21%-18%). Voxel-by-voxel comparisons showed a good agreement in regions corresponding roughly to treated tumor and treated normal liver; the agreement was poorer in regions with low or no expected activity, where PET appeared to overestimate the activity. The correlation coefficients between intrahepatic voxel pairs for the two modalities ranged from 0.86 to 0.94. Cumulative activity volume histograms were in good agreement. These data indicate that, with appropriate reconstruction methods and measured calibration correction factors, either Y-90 SPECT/CT or Y-90 PET/CT can be used for quantitative post-therapy monitoring of Y

  10. Evaluation of two conjugate gradient based algorithms for quantitation in cardiac SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sire, P.; Grangeat, P.; Iovleff, S.; Mallon, L.A.

    1996-12-31

    Correction attenuation in SPECT is a very important issue in cardiac imaging. In this paper we evaluate two conjugate gradient (CG) based algorithms to reconstruct an attenuation compensated emission map. The first algorithm is a classic preconditioned CG approach, the second one uses the minimal residual (MR) algorithm. We discuss the emission reconstruction problem and the difficulty to get a good uniformity within the reconstructed cardiac wall. An evaluation on numerical and real phantoms shows that the point spread function (PSF) of the system strongly affects the uniformity. Thus, two essential improvements are made. First, the response of the reconstruction procedure is made isotropic by replacing the classic 1D apodized ramp reconstruction filter with a 2D filter. Second, to improve the spatial resolution, we apply a PSF deconvolution to the projections. A threshold parameter is used to prevent the deconvolution from amplifying high-frequency noise. Stabilization is also achieved by incorporating into the reconstruction algorithms a regularization, which is made spatially adaptive to preserve high contrast within the heart while smoothing the rest of the image. Results obtained on numerical and anatomic phantoms show that the proposed algorithms lead to fast, stabilized and more accurate attenuation compensation.

  11. Towards quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deserno, Thomas M.; Sárándi, István.; Jose, Abin; Haak, Daniel; Jonas, Stephan; Specht, Paula; Brandenburg, Vincent

    2014-03-01

    Calciphylaxis is a rare disease that has devastating conditions associated with high morbidity and mortality. Calciphylaxis is characterized by systemic medial calcification of the arteries yielding necrotic skin ulcerations. In this paper, we aim at supporting the installation of multi-center registries for calciphylaxis, which includes a photographic documentation of skin necrosis. However, photographs acquired in different centers under different conditions using different equipment and photographers cannot be compared quantitatively. For normalization, we use a simple color pad that is placed into the field of view, segmented from the image, and its color fields are analyzed. In total, 24 colors are printed on that scale. A least-squares approach is used to determine the affine color transform. Furthermore, the card allows scale normalization. We provide a case study for qualitative assessment. In addition, the method is evaluated quantitatively using 10 images of two sets of different captures of the same necrosis. The variability of quantitative measurements based on free hand photography is assessed regarding geometric and color distortions before and after our simple calibration procedure. Using automated image processing, the standard deviation of measurements is significantly reduced. The coefficients of variations yield 5-20% and 2-10% for geometry and color, respectively. Hence, quantitative assessment of calciphylaxis becomes practicable and will impact a better understanding of this rare but fatal disease.

  12. MIRD pamphlet No. 23: quantitative SPECT for patient-specific 3-dimensional dosimetry in internal radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Dewaraja, Yuni K; Frey, Eric C; Sgouros, George; Brill, A Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-08-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification-based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry.

  13. Quantitative Tc-99m myocardial perfusion SPECT with 180[degree] acquisition

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, J.

    1992-01-01

    Myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images using 180[degrees] acquisition are degraded by the effects of scatter, nonuniform attenuation and system geometric resolution variation with source depth. Using a 180[degrees] scan orbit which is closer to the heart may provide higher image resolution, signal-to-noise ratio and defect-to-normal contrast than using a 360[degrees] orbit, however, significant object shape distortion has been observed in the 180[degrees] reconstructed images. A method has been developed that combines filtered back-projection (FBP) with iterative attenuation and three-dimensional (3-D) resolution compensation for Tc-99m myocardial perfusion imaging, data. The non-uniform attenuation coefficient distribution is obtained by a quick transmission scan using a flood source and segmentation of the reconstructed transmission image to define areas of significantly different attenuation. A priori attenuation coefficients are assigned to the areas to form the attenuation distribution map. The 3-D correction is accomplished by including both the non-uniform attenuation and depth-dependent resolution variation in the reprojection procedure of an iterative correction algorithm. The method was evaluated with both simulated and experimental data using clinical protocols with a cardiac phantom. A significant improvement in image resolution was observed with line source images was reduced from approximately 10 mm to 7.l5 mm after 7 iterations of the 3-D correction. The contrast of two perfusion defects to the surrounding normally perfused regions was significantly improved with the correction. Significant improvement in uniformity at different positions in the 100% perfused areas in the myocardium was also observed. The normalized root squared error (NRSE) of one transaxial image from the original source distribution in the simulation study was reduced from 0.8 to 0.2 after 5 iterations of the 3-D correction.

  14. SU-C-201-06: Utility of Quantitative 3D SPECT/CT Imaging in Patient Specific Internal Dosimetry of 153-Samarium with GATE Monte Carlo Package

    SciTech Connect

    Fallahpoor, M; Abbasi, M; Sen, A; Parach, A; Kalantari, F

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Patient-specific 3-dimensional (3D) internal dosimetry in targeted radionuclide therapy is essential for efficient treatment. Two major steps to achieve reliable results are: 1) generating quantitative 3D images of radionuclide distribution and attenuation coefficients and 2) using a reliable method for dose calculation based on activity and attenuation map. In this research, internal dosimetry for 153-Samarium (153-Sm) was done by SPECT-CT images coupled GATE Monte Carlo package for internal dosimetry. Methods: A 50 years old woman with bone metastases from breast cancer was prescribed 153-Sm treatment (Gamma: 103keV and beta: 0.81MeV). A SPECT/CT scan was performed with the Siemens Simbia-T scanner. SPECT and CT images were registered using default registration software. SPECT quantification was achieved by compensating for all image degrading factors including body attenuation, Compton scattering and collimator-detector response (CDR). Triple energy window method was used to estimate and eliminate the scattered photons. Iterative ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) with correction for attenuation and distance-dependent CDR was used for image reconstruction. Bilinear energy mapping is used to convert Hounsfield units in CT image to attenuation map. Organ borders were defined by the itk-SNAP toolkit segmentation on CT image. GATE was then used for internal dose calculation. The Specific Absorbed Fractions (SAFs) and S-values were reported as MIRD schema. Results: The results showed that the largest SAFs and S-values are in osseous organs as expected. S-value for lung is the highest after spine that can be important in 153-Sm therapy. Conclusion: We presented the utility of SPECT-CT images and Monte Carlo for patient-specific dosimetry as a reliable and accurate method. It has several advantages over template-based methods or simplified dose estimation methods. With advent of high speed computers, Monte Carlo can be used for treatment planning

  15. Perfusion brain SPECT in assessing motor improvement after deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Paschali, Anna; Constantoyannis, Constantinos; Angelatou, Fevronia; Vassilakos, Pavlos

    2013-03-01

    High-frequency deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) has become an established therapeutic approach for the management of patients with late-stage idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). The aim of the present study was to assess regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes related to motor improvement. Twenty-one PD patients underwent two rCBF SPECT studies at rest, once preoperatively in the off-meds state and the other postoperatively (at 6 ± 2 months) in the off medication/on stimulation state. Patients were classified according to the UPDRS and H&Y scale. NeuroGam software was used to register, quantify, and compare two sequential brain SPECT studies of the same patient in order to investigate rCBF changes during STN stimulation in comparison with preoperative rCBF. The relationship between rCBF and UPDRS scores was used as a covariate of interest. Twenty patients showed clinical improvement during the first months after surgery, resulting in a 44 % reduction of the UPDRS motor score. The administered mean daily levodopa dose significantly decreased from 850 ± 108 mg before surgery to 446 ± 188 mg during the off-meds state (p < 0.001, paired t test). At the 6-month postoperative assessment, we noticed rCBF increases in the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the premotor cortex (PMC) (mean rCBF increase = 10.2 %, p < 0.05), the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and in associative and limbic territories of the frontal cortex (mean rCBF increase = 8.2 %, p > 0.05). A correlation was detected between the improvement in motor scores and the rCBF increase in the pre-SMA and PMC (r = 0.89, p < 0.001). Our study suggests that STN stimulation leads to improvement in neural activity and rCBF increase in higher-order motor cortical areas.

  16. Simplifying volumes-of-interest (VOIs) definition in quantitative SPECT: Beyond manual definition of 3D whole-organ VOIs.

    PubMed

    Vicente, Esther M; Lodge, Martin A; Rowe, Steven P; Wahl, Richard L; Frey, Eric C

    2017-05-01

    We investigated the feasibility of using simpler methods than manual whole-organ volume-of-interest (VOI) definition to estimate the organ activity concentration in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in cases where the activity in the organ can be assumed to be uniformly distributed on the scale of the voxel size. In particular, we investigated an anatomic region-of-interest (ROI) defined in a single transaxial slice, and a single sphere placed inside the organ boundaries. The evaluation was carried out using Monte Carlo simulations based on patient indium (111) In pentetreotide SPECT and computed tomography (CT) images. We modeled constant activity concentrations in each organ, validating this assumption by comparing the distribution of voxel values inside the organ VOIs of the simulated data with the patient data. We simulated projection data corresponding to 100, 50, and 25% of the clinical count level to study the effects of noise level due to shortened acquisition time. Images were reconstructed using a previously validated quantitative SPECT reconstruction method. The evaluation was performed in terms of the accuracy and precision of the activity concentration estimates. The results demonstrated that the non-uniform image intensity observed in the reconstructed images in the organs with normal uptake was consistent with uniform activity concentration in the organs on the scale of the voxel size; observed non-uniformities in image intensity were due to a combination of partial-volume effects at the boundaries of the organ, artifacts in the reconstructed image due to collimator-detector response compensation, and noise. Using an ROI defined in a single transaxial slice produced similar biases compared to the three-dimensional (3D) whole-organ VOIs, provided that the transaxial slice was near the central plane of the organ and that the pixels from the organ boundaries were not included in the ROI. Although this slice method was sensitive to noise

  17. Environmental probabilistic quantitative assessment methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crovelli, Robert A.

    1995-10-01

    Probabilistic methodologies developed originally for one area of application may be applicable in another area. Therefore, it is extremely important to communicate across disciplines. Of course, a physical reinterpretation is necessary and perhaps some modification of the methodology. This seems to be the situation in applying resource assessment methodologies as environmental assessment methodologies. In this paper, four petroleum resource assessment methodologies are presented as possible pollution assessment methodologies, even though petroleum as a resource is desirable, whereas pollution is undesirable. It is ironic that oil as a precious resource in the ground can become a serious pollutant as a spill in the ocean. There are similarities in both situations where the quantity of undiscovered crude oil and natural gas resources, and the quantity of a pollutant or contaminant are to be estimated. Obviously, we are interested in making a quantitative assessment in order to answer the question, "How much material is there?" For situations in which there are a lack of statistical data, risk analysis is used rather than classical statistical analysis. That is, a relatively subjective evaluation is made rather than an evaluation based on random sampling which may be impossible. Hence, probabilistic quantitative assessment methodologies are needed for the risk analysis. A methodology is defined in this paper to consist of a probability model and a probabilistic method, where the method is used to solve the model. The following four basic types of probability models are considered: (1) direct assessment, (2) accumulation size, (3) volumetric yield, and (4) reservoir engineering. Three of the four petroleum resource assessment methodologies were written as microcomputer systems, viz., TRIAGG for direct assessment, APRAS for accumulation size, and FASPU for reservoir engineering. A fourth microcomputer system termed PROBDIST supports the three assessment systems. TRIAGG

  18. Functional evaluation of myocardial viability by 99mTc tetrofosmin gated SPECT--a quantitative comparison with 18F fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission CT (18F FDG PET).

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Y; Watanabe, S; Nakaya, J; Fujiwara, M; Hasegawa, R; Matsuno, K; Kuroda, T; Mikami, Y; Fujii, K; Himi, T; Masuda, Y

    1999-06-01

    To validate functional analysis of gated SPECT in detecting myocardial viability, seventeen patients (male 15, female 2, mean age 58) with angiographically proven chronic ischemic heart disease (RCA 6, LAD 10, LCX 1) and eight normal volunteers (all male) were studied. All patients underwent 18F FDG PET and 99mTc tetrofosmin (TF) gated SPECT within a week. After being displayed in a polar map, myocardial perfusion was regionally determined by the mean count in 9 segments at end diastole (ED) and end systole (ES) in gated SPECT. Systolic function was determined by the count increase ratio from ED to ES (WTI: ES - ED/ED). Glucose metabolism was assessed by 18F FDG PET in the segments correspondent to those defined for SPECT. TF %uptake of < 60% was defined as hypoperfusion, and FDG %uptake of < 50% was defined as reduced glucose metabolism. The myocardial segments were classified into 3 categories: "normal" perfusion (n = 85), "mismatch" (reduced perfusion with reserved FDG uptake, n = 25) and "matched" reduced perfusion and metabolic reduction (n = 26). Mean WTI in "mismatch" segment was 0.38 +/- 0.21, and was significantly greater than that in "matched reduced" segments, 0.15 +/- 0.20 (p < 0.001). It was also greater than that in "normal" segments, 0.27 +/- 0.16. Regression analysis showed that association between WTI and FDG %uptake was significant (r = 0.57, p < 0.0005) for the ischemic segments ("mismatch" + "matched", n = 51), but the association was weak for the entire segments although it was statistically significant (r = 0.26, p = 0.02, n = 136). For the segments determined as infarct by perfusion image, systolic functional analysis by gated SPECT is helpful in differentiation of a viable myocardial region or artifact from a scar. Nevertheless, further clinical and technical assessment is required for ECG gating to eliminate overestimation of viability and to warrant clinical use.

  19. Quantitative simultaneous 99mTc/123I cardiac SPECT using MC-JOSEM.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Jinsong; Zhu, Xuping; Trott, Cathryn M; El Fakhri, Georges

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous rest 99mTc-Sestamibi/ 123I-BMIPP cardiac SPECT imaging has the potential to replace current clinical 99mTc-Sestamibi rest/stress imaging and therefore has great potential in the case of patients with chest pain presenting to the emergency department. Separation of images of these two radionuclides is difficult, however, because their emission energies are close. The authors previously developed a fast Monte Carlo (MC)-based joint ordered-subset expectation maximization (JOSEM) iterative reconstruction algorithm (MC-JOSEM), which simultaneously compensates for scatter and cross talk as well as detector response within the reconstruction algorithm. In this work, the authors evaluated the performance of MC-JOSEM in a realistic population of 99mTc/123I studies using cardiac phantom data on a Siemens e.cam system using a standard cardiac protocol. The authors also compared the performance of MC-JOSEM for estimation tasks to that of two other methods: standard OSEM using photopeak energy windows without scatter correction (NSC-OSEM) and standard OSEM using a Compton-scatter energy window for scatter correction (SC-OSEM). For each radionuclide the authors separately acquired high-count projections of radioactivity in the myocardium wall, liver, and soft tissue background compartments of a water-filled torso phantom, and they generated synthetic projections of various dual-radionuclide activity distributions. Images of different combinations of myocardium wall/background activity concentration ratios for each radionuclide were reconstructed by NSC-OSEM, SC-OSEM, and MC-JOSEM. For activity estimation in the myocardium wall, MC-JOSEM always produced the best relative bias and relative standard deviation compared with NSC-OSEM and SC-OSEM for all the activity combinations. On average, the relative biases after 100 iterations were 8.1% for 99mTc and 3.7% for 123I with MC-JOSEM, 39.4% for 99mTc and 23.7% for 123I with NSC-OSEM, and 20.9% for 99mTc with SC-OSEM. The

  20. Standardization of techniques for using single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for aerosol deposition assessment of orally inhaled products.

    PubMed

    Fleming, John; Bailey, Dale L; Chan, Hak-Kim; Conway, Joy; Kuehl, Philip J; Laube, Beth L; Newman, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be used to measure the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of inhaled aerosol deposition in the lungs. This is of value in evaluating and optimizing drug delivery by inhalation. 3D imaging has the advantage over planar scintigraphy of giving better data on the distribution of deposition within the lung. There are a variety of different methods of acquisition and analysis of the data, which makes interpretation of results difficult to compare between centers. This article describes a standardized protocol that aims to overcome this problem. Although not being completely prescriptive, it presents the key recommendations that are necessary to ensure consistency. In addition to radiolabel validation, these are (i) having some form of accountability of the activity measurements as quality control, (ii) producing quantitative images by performing attenuation and preferably scatter correction, (iii) defining volumes of interest and calculating parameters in the manner described, and (iv) describing in any report the details of technique used. When carefully used, SPECT imaging is able to produce high-quality quantitative data of the 3D distribution of drug deposition within the lungs. By establishing a standardized protocol, results of 3D imaging of the deposition of orally inhaled aerosols using SPECT should be more comparable, which should enhance collaborations between centers and insure that this form of imaging becomes acceptable to the regulatory authorities.

  1. Quantitative assessment of increasing complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csernai, L. P.; Spinnangr, S. F.; Velle, S.

    2017-05-01

    We study the build up of complexity on the example of 1 kg matter in different forms. We start with the simplest example of ideal gases, and then continue with more complex chemical, biological, life, social and technical structures. We assess the complexity of these systems quantitatively, based on their entropy. We present a method to attribute the same entropy to known physical systems and to complex organic molecules, up to a DNA molecule. The important steps in this program and the basic obstacles are discussed.

  2. Quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstock, Robert M (Inventor); Smidts, Carol S (Inventor); Mosleh, Ali (Inventor); Chang, Yung-Hsien (Inventor); Swaminathan, Sankaran (Inventor); Groen, Francisco J (Inventor); Tan, Zhibin (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A quantitative risk assessment system (QRAS) builds a risk model of a system for which risk of failure is being assessed, then analyzes the risk of the system corresponding to the risk model. The QRAS performs sensitivity analysis of the risk model by altering fundamental components and quantifications built into the risk model, then re-analyzes the risk of the system using the modifications. More particularly, the risk model is built by building a hierarchy, creating a mission timeline, quantifying failure modes, and building/editing event sequence diagrams. Multiplicities, dependencies, and redundancies of the system are included in the risk model. For analysis runs, a fixed baseline is first constructed and stored. This baseline contains the lowest level scenarios, preserved in event tree structure. The analysis runs, at any level of the hierarchy and below, access this baseline for risk quantitative computation as well as ranking of particular risks. A standalone Tool Box capability exists, allowing the user to store application programs within QRAS.

  3. Assessment of an intermediate reprojection technique transitioning from planar to SPECT radionuclide ventriculography.

    PubMed

    O'Doherty, Jim; Rojas Fisher, Bruno; Price, Jonathan Mark; Wechalekar, Kshama

    2014-10-01

    The technique of SPECT-RNV (radionuclide ventriculography) offers a greater amount of clinically usable data than its planar counterpart (P-RNV). In transitioning from planar to SPECT-only acquisition methodologies, reprojection of the SPECT data can provide a planar dataset which can be used as an interim technique. The aim of this study was to test if reprojected planar images could be used as a surrogate for true planar images in SPECT-only setting. We performed SPECT-RNV and P-RNV on 47 patients on traditional sodium iodide (NaI) cameras, determining left ventricular ejection fractions (LVEF) for planar (EFP) and SPECT (EFS) techniques. We reprojected the SPECT-RNV data along the best septal separation angle determined from planar scanning. This creates a further planar dataset denoted 'reprojected P-RNV' (rP-RNV) giving a reprojected ejection fraction (EFR) which can be used as a validation variable in transitioning to SPECT-only acquisition. Performing t tests showed no statistical difference between EFP and EFR (P > .017) but bias was observed in EFS results compared to EFP and EFS compared to EFR results. An unblinded, comparison of parametric data between the three datasets for a subset of ten patients showed good clinical concordance. False negative and false positive rates were low for rP-RNV compared to P-RNV. The reprojected planar LVEF correlates well to P-RNV EF values. The rP-RNV dataset can aid clinicians in transitioning from planar RNV to SPECT-only acquisition.

  4. Examining a hypothetical quantitative model for better approximation of culprit coronary artery and site of stenosis on 99mTc-sestamibi gated myocardial perfusion SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sushanta; Sen, Srabani; Das, Debasis; Basu, Sandip

    2016-10-01

    A hypothetical quantitative model of analyzing gated myocardial perfusion SPECT is proposed and examined for the feasibility of its use as a predictor of diseased coronary artery and approximating the site of stenosis to determine whether it could serve as a useful noninvasive complement for coronary angiography. The extent and severity of perfusion defects on rest gated myocardial perfusion imaging SPECT-images were assessed on a five-point scale in a standard 17-segment model and total perfusion deficit was quantified by automated software. The first step was to locate the diseased coronary artery using a quantitative method: for this, the score of each segment belonging to a particular coronary artery was determined using a systematic presumptive approach. After determination of specific coronary artery segments, the scores of the contiguous segments in three short axis slices (apical, middle, and basal) were summed for six subdivisions (anterior, anterolateral, inferolateral, inferior, anteroseptal, and inferoseptal). The site of stenosis was determined from (a) the initial approximation of the involved segments with a defect score of 2-4 and (b) subsequent calculation of the defect score of each of the six subdivisions and allocating the site through a preassigned number for each coronary artery. For each coronary artery, only the subdivision with the highest defect score was considered. Proximal, middle, and distal segments of left anterior descending artery (LAD) were considered to be represented when the summed value of a subdivision within a particular arterial territory was more than or equal to 7, between 5 and 7, 5 and 3, respectively. For the left circumflex and right coronary artery, summed scores (of respective subdivisions) of more than or equal to 5 and between 3 and 5 were preassigned to proximal and distal stenosis, respectively. The results were then correlated with the coronary angiographic data. On coronary angiography, proximal LAD occlusion

  5. Abdominal SPECT imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Van Heertum, R.L.; Brunetti, J.C.; Yudd, A.P.

    1987-07-01

    Over the past several years, abdominal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has evolved from a research tool to an important clinical imaging modality that is helpful in the diagnostic assessment of a wide variety of disorders involving the abdominal viscera. Although liver-spleen imaging is the most popular of the abdominal SPECT procedures, blood pool imaging is becoming much more widely utilized for the evaluation of cavernous hemangiomas of the liver as well as other vascular abnormalities in the abdomen. Adjunctive indium leukocyte and gallium SPECT studies are also proving to be of value in the assessment of a variety of infectious and neoplastic diseases. As more experience is acquired in this area, SPECT should become the primary imaging modality for both gallium and indium white blood cells in many institutions. Renal SPECT, on the other hand, has only recently been used as a clinical imaging modality for the assessment of such parameters as renal depth and volume. The exact role of renal SPECT as a clinical tool is, therefore, yet to be determined. 79 references.

  6. MIRD Pamphlet No. 23: Quantitative SPECT for Patient-Specific 3-Dimensional Dosimetry in Internal Radionuclide Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dewaraja, Yuni K.; Frey, Eric C.; Sgouros, George; Brill, A. Bertrand; Roberson, Peter; Zanzonico, Pat B.; Ljungberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In internal radionuclide therapy, a growing interest in voxel-level estimates of tissue-absorbed dose has been driven by the desire to report radiobiologic quantities that account for the biologic consequences of both spatial and temporal nonuniformities in these dose estimates. This report presents an overview of 3-dimensional SPECT methods and requirements for internal dosimetry at both regional and voxel levels. Combined SPECT/CT image-based methods are emphasized, because the CT-derived anatomic information allows one to address multiple technical factors that affect SPECT quantification while facilitating the patient-specific voxel-level dosimetry calculation itself. SPECT imaging and reconstruction techniques for quantification in radionuclide therapy are not necessarily the same as those designed to optimize diagnostic imaging quality. The current overview is intended as an introduction to an upcoming series of MIRD pamphlets with detailed radionuclide-specific recommendations intended to provide best-practice SPECT quantification–based guidance for radionuclide dosimetry. PMID:22743252

  7. Does percutaneous nephrolithotomy and its outcomes have an impact on renal function? Quantitative analysis using SPECT-CT DMSA.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Fentes, Daniel; Cortés, Julia; Gude, Francisco; García, Camilo; Ruibal, Alvaro; Aguiar, Pablo

    2014-10-01

    To assess the functional effects of percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PCNL) and its outcomes in the operated kidney, we prospectively studied 30 consecutive cases undergoing PCNL. Kidney function was evaluated preoperatively and 3 months after surgery with serum creatinine, glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and with (99m)Tc-DMSA SPECT-CT scans to determine the differential renal function (DRF). PCNL effects in the operated kidney DRF were considered globally (DRFPLANAR, DRFSPECT) and in the region of percutaneous access (DRFACCESS). PCNL functional impact was also assessed depending on its outcomes, namely success (stone-free status) and the development of perioperative complications. PCNL has rendered 73 % of the cases completely stone free with a 33 % complication rate. After PCNL, serum creatinine and GFR did not change significantly, whereas DRFPLANAR and DRFSPECT dropped 1.2 % (p = 0.014) and 1.0 % (p = 0.041), respectively. The highest decrease was observed in DRFACCESS (1.8 %, p = 0.012). Stone-free status after PCNL did not show any impact on kidney function. Conversely, cases that suffered from a complication showed impairment in serum creatinine (0.1 mg/dL, p = 0.028), in GFR (11.1 mL/min, p = 0.036) as well as in DRFPLANAR (2.7 %, p = 0.018), DRFSPECT (2.2 %, p = 0.023) and DRFACCESS (2.7 %, p = 0.049). We conclude that PCNL has a minimal impact on global kidney function, which is mainly located in the region of percutaneous access. The advent of perioperative complications increased PCNL functional damage, whereas the stone-free status did not show any meaningful effect.

  8. Steal phenomenon-induced lung perfusion defects in pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas: assessment with automated perfusion SPECT-CT fusion images.

    PubMed

    Suga, Kazuyoshi; Iwanaga, Hideyuki; Tokuda, Osamu; Okada, Munemasa; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Matsunaga, Naofumi

    2010-09-01

    Lung perfusion impairment in patients with pulmonary arteriovenous fistula (AVF) was evaluated by automated deep inspiratory breath-hold (DIBrH) perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)-CT fusion images. Participants were 14 patients with a single (N=6) or multiple nodular AVFs (N=8) diagnosed by contrast-enhanced CT scan and/or pulmonary angiography. After the injection of 185MBq Tc-99m-macroaggregated albumin, a whole-body scan was obtained to quantify an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt. Subsequently, DIBrH SPECT was obtained using the continuous rotating acquisition mode of a dual-headed SPECT system, which was automatically coregistered with DIBrH CT. The anatomic relationship between AVF and perfusion defects was assessed on the fusion images. The whole-body scan depicted systemic organs indicating the presence of an intrapulmonary right-to-left shunt in all the patients. DIBrH SPECT showed 34 perfusion defects in these patients, which were located at the AVF and in the surrounding lungs of the AVF on the fusion images, regardless of the absence of morphologic abnormality on CT in all the patients. These defects were considered to be caused by the 'steal phenomenon' associated with the high and fast pulmonary arterial flow to each AVF, which were more extensive and severe in the multiple AVFs compared with a single AVF (P=0.0012), occasionally extending to the entire lobe with AVF or even to the adjacent lobe. In five patients, the fusion images detected a total of six tiny AVFs with unexpectedly extensive 'steal phenomenon'-induced defects, which had been missed by other radiological imaging techniques. The summed value of the shunt index estimated by the whole-body scan and the lung perfusion defect extent estimated by DIBrH SPECT was significantly correlated with PaO2 in all the patients (P < 0.0001), with a better correlation compared with the shunt index alone. In addition to the right-to-left shunt, 'steal phenomenon

  9. Assessment of poststress left ventricular ejection fraction by gated SPECT: comparison with equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.

    PubMed

    Acampa, Wanda; Caprio, Maria Grazia; Nicolai, Emanuele; Liuzzi, Raffaele; De Luca, Serena; Capasso, Enza; Luongo, Luca; Petretta, Mario; Cuocolo, Alberto

    2010-02-01

    We compared left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction obtained by gated SPECT with that obtained by equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography in a large cohort of patients. Within 1 week, 514 subjects with suspected or known coronary artery disease underwent same-day stress-rest (99m)Tc-sestamibi gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. For both studies, data were acquired 30 min after completion of exercise and after 3 h rest. In the overall study population, a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.82, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.83, p<0.0001). In Bland-Altman analysis, the mean differences in ejection fraction (radionuclide angiocardiography minus gated SPECT) were -0.6% at rest and 1.7% after stress. In subjects with normal perfusion (n=362), a good correlation between ejection fraction measured by gated SPECT and by radionuclide angiocardiography was observed at rest (r=0.72, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.70, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were -0.9% at rest and 1.4% after stress. Also in patients with abnormal perfusion (n=152), a good correlation between the two techniques was observed both at rest (r=0.89, p<0.0001) and after stress (r=0.90, p<0.0001) and the mean differences in ejection fraction were 0.1% at rest and 2.5% after stress. In a large study population, a good agreement was observed in the evaluation of LV ejection fraction between gated SPECT and radionuclide angiocardiography. However, in patients with perfusion abnormalities, a slight underestimation in poststress LV ejection fraction was observed using gated SPECT as compared to equilibrium radionuclide angiocardiography.

  10. The Impact of 3D Volume-of-Interest Definition on Accuracy and Precision of Activity Estimation in Quantitative SPECT and Planar Processing Methods

    PubMed Central

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise, and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT), and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important effect impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimations. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in the same transaxial plane in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g., in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from −1 to 1 voxels in increments of 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ

  11. The impact of 3D volume of interest definition on accuracy and precision of activity estimation in quantitative SPECT and planar processing methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Bin; Frey, Eric C.

    2010-06-01

    Accurate and precise estimation of organ activities is essential for treatment planning in targeted radionuclide therapy. We have previously evaluated the impact of processing methodology, statistical noise and variability in activity distribution and anatomy on the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates obtained with quantitative SPECT (QSPECT) and planar (QPlanar) processing. Another important factor impacting the accuracy and precision of organ activity estimates is accuracy of and variability in the definition of organ regions of interest (ROI) or volumes of interest (VOI). The goal of this work was thus to systematically study the effects of VOI definition on the reliability of activity estimates. To this end, we performed Monte Carlo simulation studies using randomly perturbed and shifted VOIs to assess the impact on organ activity estimates. The 3D NCAT phantom was used with activities that modeled clinically observed 111In ibritumomab tiuxetan distributions. In order to study the errors resulting from misdefinitions due to manual segmentation errors, VOIs of the liver and left kidney were first manually defined. Each control point was then randomly perturbed to one of the nearest or next-nearest voxels in three ways: with no, inward or outward directional bias, resulting in random perturbation, erosion or dilation, respectively, of the VOIs. In order to study the errors resulting from the misregistration of VOIs, as would happen, e.g. in the case where the VOIs were defined using a misregistered anatomical image, the reconstructed SPECT images or projections were shifted by amounts ranging from -1 to 1 voxels in increments of with 0.1 voxels in both the transaxial and axial directions. The activity estimates from the shifted reconstructions or projections were compared to those from the originals, and average errors were computed for the QSPECT and QPlanar methods, respectively. For misregistration, errors in organ activity estimations were

  12. Optimal left ventricular lead position assessed with phase analysis on gated myocardial perfusion SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Boogers, Mark J.; Chen, Ji; van Bommel, Rutger J.; Borleffs, C. Jan Willem; Dibbets-Schneider, Petra; van der Hiel, Bernies; Al Younis, Imad; Schalij, Martin J.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose The aim of the current study was to evaluate the relationship between the site of latest mechanical activation as assessed with gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS), left ventricular (LV) lead position and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Methods The patient population consisted of consecutive patients with advanced heart failure in whom CRT was currently indicated. Before implantation, 2-D echocardiography and GMPS were performed. The echocardiography was performed to assess LV end-systolic volume (LVESV), LV end-diastolic volume (LVEDV) and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). The site of latest mechanical activation was assessed by phase analysis of GMPS studies and related to LV lead position on fluoroscopy. Echocardiography was repeated after 6 months of CRT. CRT response was defined as a decrease of ≥15% in LVESV. Results Enrolled in the study were 90 patients (72% men, 67±10 years) with advanced heart failure. In 52 patients (58%), the LV lead was positioned at the site of latest mechanical activation (concordant), and in 38 patients (42%) the LV lead was positioned outside the site of latest mechanical activation (discordant). CRT response was significantly more often documented in patients with a concordant LV lead position than in patients with a discordant LV lead position (79% vs. 26%, p<0.01). After 6 months, patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LVEF, LVESV and LVEDV (p<0.05), whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvement in these variables. Conclusion Patients with a concordant LV lead position showed significant improvement in LV volumes and LV systolic function, whereas patients with a discordant LV lead position showed no significant improvements. PMID:20953608

  13. ASSESSMENT OF EFFECTIVE DOSE FROM CONE BEAM CT IMAGING IN SPECT/CT EXAMINATION IN COMPARISON WITH OTHER MODALITIES.

    PubMed

    Tonkopi, Elena; Ross, Andrew A

    2016-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess radiation dose from the cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) component of single photon emission tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) examinations and to compare it with the radiopharmaceutical related dose as well as dose from multidetector computed tomography (MDCT). Effective dose (ED) from computed tomography (CT) was estimated using dose-length product values and anatomy-specific conversion factors. The contribution from the SPECT component was evaluated using ED per unit administered activity for the radiopharmaceuticals listed in the International Commission on Radiological Protection Publications 80 and 106. With the exception of cardiac studies (0.11 mSv), the CBCT dose (3.96-6.04 mSv) was similar to that from the radiopharmaceutical accounting for 29-56 % of the total ED from the examination. In comparison with MDCT examinations, the CBCT dose was 48 and 42 % lower for abdomen/pelvis and chest/abdomen/pelvis scans, respectively, while in the chest the CBCT scan resulted in higher dose (23 %). Radiation dose from the CT component should be taken into consideration when evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grova, C.; Jannin, P.; Biraben, A.; Buvat, I.; Benali, H.; Bernard, A. M.; Scarabin, J. M.; Gibaud, B.

    2003-12-01

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  15. A methodology for generating normal and pathological brain perfusion SPECT images for evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods: application in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Grova, C; Jannin, P; Biraben, A; Buvat, I; Benali, H; Bernard, A M; Scarabin, J M; Gibaud, B

    2003-12-21

    Quantitative evaluation of brain MRI/SPECT fusion methods for normal and in particular pathological datasets is difficult, due to the frequent lack of relevant ground truth. We propose a methodology to generate MRI and SPECT datasets dedicated to the evaluation of MRI/SPECT fusion methods and illustrate the method when dealing with ictal SPECT. The method consists in generating normal or pathological SPECT data perfectly aligned with a high-resolution 3D T1-weighted MRI using realistic Monte Carlo simulations that closely reproduce the response of a SPECT imaging system. Anatomical input data for the SPECT simulations are obtained from this 3D T1-weighted MRI, while functional input data result from an inter-individual analysis of anatomically standardized SPECT data. The method makes it possible to control the 'brain perfusion' function by proposing a theoretical model of brain perfusion from measurements performed on real SPECT images. Our method provides an absolute gold standard for assessing MRI/SPECT registration method accuracy since, by construction, the SPECT data are perfectly registered with the MRI data. The proposed methodology has been applied to create a theoretical model of normal brain perfusion and ictal brain perfusion characteristic of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. To approach realistic and unbiased perfusion models, real SPECT data were corrected for uniform attenuation, scatter and partial volume effect. An anatomic standardization was used to account for anatomic variability between subjects. Realistic simulations of normal and ictal SPECT deduced from these perfusion models are presented. The comparison of real and simulated SPECT images showed relative differences in regional activity concentration of less than 20% in most anatomical structures, for both normal and ictal data, suggesting realistic models of perfusion distributions for evaluation purposes. Inter-hemispheric asymmetry coefficients measured on simulated data were found within

  16. Three-dimensional personalized dosimetry for 188Re liver selective internal radiation therapy based on quantitative post-treatment SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbinin, S.; Grimes, J.; Bator, A.; Cwikla, J. B.; Celler, A.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that accurate patient-specific distributions of microspheres labeled with 188Re and resulting absorbed doses can be obtained from single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) studies performed after 188Re selective internal radiation therapy when accurate correction methods are employed in image reconstruction. Our quantitative image reconstruction algorithm includes corrections for attenuation, resolution degradations and scatter as well as a window-based compensation for contamination. The procedure has been validated using four phantom experiments containing an 18 ml cylindrical source (82-93 MBq of 188Re activity) simulating a liver tumor. In addition, we applied our approach to post-therapy SPECT studies of ten patients with progressive primary or metastatic liver carcinomas. Our quantitative algorithm accurately (within 9%) recovered 188Re activity from four phantom experiments. In addition, for two patients that received three scans, deviations remained consistent between the measured and the reconstructed activities that were determined from studies with differing severity of the dead-time effect. The analysis of absorbed doses for patient studies allowed us to hypothesize that D90 (the minimum dose received by 90% of the tumor volume) may be a reliable metric relating therapy outcomes to the calculated doses. Among several considered metrics, only D90 showed statistically significant correlation with the overall survival.

  17. Computational tools and methods for objective assessment of image quality in x-ray CT and SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palit, Robin

    Computational tools of use in the objective assessment of image quality for tomography systems were developed for computer processing units (CPU) and graphics processing units (GPU) in the image quality lab at the University of Arizona. Fast analytic x-ray projection code called IQCT was created to compute the mean projection image for cone beam multi-slice helical computed tomography (CT) scanners. IQCT was optimized to take advantage of the massively parallel architecture of GPUs. CPU code for computing single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) projection images was written calling upon previous research in the image quality lab. IQCT and the SPECT modeling code were used to simulate data for multi-modality SPECT/CT observer studies. The purpose of these observer studies was to assess the benefit in image quality of using attenuation information from a CT measurement in myocardial SPECT imaging. The observer chosen for these studies was the scanning linear observer. The tasks for the observer were localization of a signal and estimation of the signal radius. For the localization study, area under the localization receiver operating characteristic curve (A LROC) was computed as AMeasLROC = 0.89332 ± 0.00474 and ANoLROC = 0.89408 ± 0.00475, where "Meas" implies the use of attenuation information from the CT measurement, and "No" indicates the absence of attenuation information. For the estimation study, area under the estimation receiver operating characteristic curve (AEROC) was quantified as AMeasEROC = 0.55926 ± 0.00731 and ANoEROC = 0.56167 ± 0.00731. Based on these results, it was concluded that the use of CT information did not improve the scanning linear observer's ability to perform the stated myocardial SPECT tasks. The risk to the patient of the CT measurement was quantified in terms of excess effective dose as 2.37 mSv for males and 3.38 mSv for females. Another image quality tool generated within this body of work was a singular value

  18. Quantitation of left ventricular ejection fraction reserve from early gated regadenoson stress Tc-99m high efficiency SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Brodov, Yafim; Fish, Mathews; Rubeaux, Mathieu; Otaki, Yuka; Gransar, Heidi; Lemley, Mark; Gerlach, Jim; Berman, Daniel; Germano, Guido; Slomka, Piotr

    2016-01-01

    Background Ejection fraction (EF) reserve has been found to be a useful adjunct for identifying high risk coronary artery disease in cardiac positron emission tomography (PET). We aimed to evaluate EF reserve obtained from technetium-99m sestamibi (Tc-99m) high-efficiency (HE) SPECT. Methods Fifty patients (mean age 69 y) undergoing regadenoson same-day rest (8–11 mCi)/stress (32–42mCi) Tc-99m gated HE SPECT were enrolled. Stress imaging was started one min after sequential intravenous regadenoson 0.4mg and Tc-99m injection, and was composed of five 2 min supine gated acquisitions followed by two 4 min supine and upright images. Ischemic total perfusion deficit (ITPD) ≥ 5 % was considered as significant ischemia. Results Significantly lower mean EF reserve was obtained in the 5th and 9th min after regadenoson bolus in patients with significant ischemia versus patients without (5th min: −4.2 ± 4.6% vs. 1.3 ± 6.6%, p = 0.006; 9th min: −2.7 ± 4.8% vs. 2.0 ± 6.6%, p = 0.03). Conclusions Negative EF reserve obtained between 5th and 9th min of regadenoson stress demonstrated best concordance with significant ischemia and may be a promising tool for detection of myocardial stunning with Tc-99m HE-SPECT. PMID:27387521

  19. Integrated Environmental Modeling: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the need for microbial assessments and presents a road map associated with quantitative microbial risk assessments, through an integrated environmental modeling approach. A brief introduction and the strengths of the current knowledge are illustrated. W...

  20. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial - Primer

    EPA Science Inventory

    This document provides a Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) primer that organizes QMRA tutorials. The tutorials describe functionality of a QMRA infrastructure, guide the user through software use and assessment options, provide step-by-step instructions for implementi...

  1. Integrated Environmental Modeling: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the need for microbial assessments and presents a road map associated with quantitative microbial risk assessments, through an integrated environmental modeling approach. A brief introduction and the strengths of the current knowledge are illustrated. W...

  2. Longitudinal Assessment of Lung Cancer Progression in Mice Using the Sodium Iodide Symporter Reporter Gene and SPECT/CT Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Anton, Martina; Kusewitt, Donna F.; Norenberg, Jeffrey P.; MacKenzie, Debra A.; Thompson, Todd A.; Muttil, Pavan

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate of any tissue-specific cancer in both men and women. Research continues to investigate novel drugs and therapies to mitigate poor treatment efficacy, but the lack of a good descriptive lung cancer animal model for preclinical drug evaluation remains an obstacle. Here we describe the development of an orthotopic lung cancer animal model which utilizes the human sodium iodide symporter gene (hNIS; SLC5A5) as an imaging reporter gene for the purpose of non-invasive, longitudinal tumor quantification. hNIS is a glycoprotein that naturally transports iodide (I-) into thyroid cells and has the ability to symport the radiotracer 99mTc-pertechnetate (99mTcO4-). A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells were genetically modified with plasmid or lentiviral vectors to express hNIS. Modified cells were implanted into athymic nude mice to develop two tumor models: a subcutaneous and an orthotopic xenograft tumor model. Tumor progression was longitudinally imaged using SPECT/CT and quantified by SPECT voxel analysis. hNIS expression in lung tumors was analyzed by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, hematoxylin and eosin staining and visual inspection of pulmonary tumors was performed. We observed that lentiviral transduction provided enhanced and stable hNIS expression in A549 cells. Furthermore, 99mTcO4- uptake and accumulation was observed within lung tumors allowing for imaging and quantification of tumor mass at two-time points. This study illustrates the development of an orthotopic lung cancer model that can be longitudinally imaged throughout the experimental timeline thus avoiding inter-animal variability and leading to a reduction in total animal numbers. Furthermore, our orthotopic lung cancer animal model is clinically relevant and the genetic modification of cells for SPECT/CT imaging can be translated to other tissue-specific tumor animal models. PMID:28036366

  3. Quantitative assessment of scientific quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinzl, Harald; Bloching, Philipp

    2012-09-01

    Scientific publications, authors, and journals are commonly evaluated with quantitative bibliometric measures. Frequently-used measures will be reviewed and their strengths and weaknesses will be highlighted. Reflections about conditions for a new, research paper-specific measure will be presented.

  4. Environmental probabilistic quantitative assessment methodologies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crovelli, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, four petroleum resource assessment methodologies are presented as possible pollution assessment methodologies, even though petroleum as a resource is desirable, whereas pollution is undesirable. A methodology is defined in this paper to consist of a probability model and a probabilistic method, where the method is used to solve the model. The following four basic types of probability models are considered: 1) direct assessment, 2) accumulation size, 3) volumetric yield, and 4) reservoir engineering. Three of the four petroleum resource assessment methodologies were written as microcomputer systems, viz. TRIAGG for direct assessment, APRAS for accumulation size, and FASPU for reservoir engineering. A fourth microcomputer system termed PROBDIST supports the three assessment systems. The three assessment systems have different probability models but the same type of probabilistic method. The type of advantages of the analytic method are in computational speed and flexibility, making it ideal for a microcomputer. -from Author

  5. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: an evaluation by reference to symptoms, spirometric lung function and emphysema, as assessed with HRCT.

    PubMed

    Jögi, Jonas; Ekberg, Marie; Jonson, Björn; Bozovic, Gracijela; Bajc, Marika

    2011-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow limitation which is not fully reversible. Despite the heterogeneity of COPD, its diagnosis and staging is currently based solely on forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)). FEV(1) does not explain the underlying pathophysiology of airflow limitation. The relationship between FEV(1), symptoms and emphysema extent is weak. Better diagnostic tools are needed to define COPD. Tomographic lung scintigraphy [ventilation/perfusion single photon emission tomography (V/P SPECT)] visualizes regional V and P. In COPD, relations between V/P SPECT, spirometry, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) and symptoms have been insufficiently studied. The aim of this study was to investigate how lung function imaging and obstructive disease grading undertaken using V/P SPECT correlate with symptoms, spirometric lung function and degree of emphysema assessed with HRCT in patients with COPD. Thirty patients with stable COPD were evaluated with the Medical Research Council dyspnoea questionnaire (MRC) and the clinical COPD questionnaire (CCQ). Spirometry was performed. The extent of emphysema was assessed using HRCT. V/P SPECT was used to assess V/P patterns, total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease. The total reduction in lung function and degree of obstructive disease, assessed with V/P SPECT, significantly correlated with emphysema extent (r = 0.66-0.69, p < 0.0001) and spirometric lung function (r = 0.62-0.74, p < 0.0005). The correlation between emphysema extent and spirometric lung function was weaker. No correlation between MRC, CCQ and objective measurements was found. V/P SPECT is sensitive to early changes in COPD. V/P SPECT also has the possibility to identify comorbid disease. V/P SPECT findings show a significant correlation with emphysema extent and spirometric lung function. We therefore recommend that scintigraphic signs of COPD, whenever found, should be reported. V

  6. Quantitative measurement of blood flow volume in the major intracranial arteries by using 123i-iodoamphetamine SPECT.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Masaharu; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Miyake, Hidenori; Oshima, Marie

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the novel automatic method to quantify blood flow volumes of the major intracranial arteries by using SPECT. We created the vascular templates to cover the territory supplied by the major intracranial arteries. Each blood flow volume was calculated as the regional cerebral blood flow on SPECT using this template × volume size of the template. In this study, we evaluated the volume flows in 22 cerebral hemispheres with normal perfusion and 28 hemispheres with severe stenosis in the internal cerebral artery (ICA) or middle cerebral artery (MCA) and that at acetazolamide test in 16 normal hemispheres and 20 hemispheres with stenosis. The mean blood flow volumes of the ICA and MCA in the normal hemispheres increased to more than 40% after acetazolamide test (161-228 mL/min for ICA and 111-157 mL/min for MCA), although those in the hemispheres with stenosis increased to less than 35% (158-192 mL/min for ICA and 107-127 mL/min for MCA). The receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed that the simple difference between the blood flow volume at acetazolamide test and that at rest using the new MCA template was superior to detecting reduction of cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), compared with the conventional percent CVR using the original template. Blood flow volumes of the intracranial arteries had been able to be quantified automatically on SPECT, and difference of CVR was available for predicting the blood demand-supply balance.

  7. A method for energy window optimization for quantitative tasks that includes the effects of model-mismatch on bias: application to Y-90 bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong, Xing; Du, Yong; Frey, Eric C.

    2012-06-01

    Quantitative Yttrium-90 (90Y) bremsstrahlung single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging has shown great potential to provide reliable estimates of 90Y activity distribution for targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry applications. One factor that potentially affects the reliability of the activity estimates is the choice of the acquisition energy window. In contrast to imaging conventional gamma photon emitters where the acquisition energy windows are usually placed around photopeaks, there has been great variation in the choice of the acquisition energy window for 90Y imaging due to the continuous and broad energy distribution of the bremsstrahlung photons. In quantitative imaging of conventional gamma photon emitters, previous methods for optimizing the acquisition energy window assumed unbiased estimators and used the variance in the estimates as a figure of merit (FOM). However, for situations, such as 90Y imaging, where there are errors in the modeling of the image formation process used in the reconstruction there will be bias in the activity estimates. In 90Y bremsstrahlung imaging this will be especially important due to the high levels of scatter, multiple scatter, and collimator septal penetration and scatter. Thus variance will not be a complete measure of reliability of the estimates and thus is not a complete FOM. To address this, we first aimed to develop a new method to optimize the energy window that accounts for both the bias due to model-mismatch and the variance of the activity estimates. We applied this method to optimize the acquisition energy window for quantitative 90Y bremsstrahlung SPECT imaging in microsphere brachytherapy. Since absorbed dose is defined as the absorbed energy from the radiation per unit mass of tissues in this new method we proposed a mass-weighted root mean squared error of the volume of interest (VOI) activity estimates as the FOM. To calculate this FOM, two analytical expressions were derived for

  8. SPECT/CT localization of oral radioiodine activity: a retrospective study and in-vitro assessment

    PubMed Central

    Burlison, Jared S.; Hartshorne, Michael F.; Voda, Alan M.; Cocks, Franklin H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose We sought to further localize radioiodine activity in the mouth on post-thyroid cancer therapy imaging using single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). Materials and methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients (58) who underwent thyroid cancer therapy with iodine-131 (131I) at our institution from August 2009 to March 2011 whose post-therapy radioiodine imaging included neck SPECT/CT. A small group (six) of diagnostic 123I scans including SPECT/CT was also reviewed. Separately, we performed in-vitro 131I (sodium iodide) binding assays with amalgam and Argenco HP 77 (77% dental gold alloy) as proof of principle for these interactions. Results Of the 58 post-therapy patients, 45 (78%) had undergone metallic dental restorations, and of them 41 (91%) demonstrated oral 131I activity localizing preferentially to those restorations. It was observed that radioiodine also localized to other dental restorations and to orthodontic hardware. Gum-line activity in edentulous patients suggests radioiodine interaction with denture adhesive. In vitro, dental amalgam and Argenco HP 77 bound 131I in a time-dependent manner over 1–16 days of exposure. Despite subsequent washings with normal saline, significant 131I activity (maximally 12% for amalgam and 68% for Argenco HP 77) was retained by these metals. Subsequent soaking in a saturated solution of potassium iodide partially displaced 131I from amalgam, with near-total displacement of 131I from Argenco HP 77. Conclusion SPECT/CT shows that radioiodine in the oral cavity localizes to metallic dental restorations. Furthermore, in-vitro studies demonstrate partially reversible binding of 131I to common dental metals. PMID:24128897

  9. Natural history of the spontaneous reperfusion of human cerebral infarcts as assessed by 99mTc HMPAO SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Bowler, J; Wade, J; Jones, B; Nijran, K; Steiner, T

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—Little is known about the effect of spontaneous reperfusion of human cerebral infarcts. Single photon emission computerised tomography (SPECT) data were analysed from a study using 99Tcm HMPAO (99Tcm hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime) in human cerebral infarction for the frequency of reperfusion and to see if it affected infarct size, oedema, haemorrhagic transformation, or functional outcome.
METHODS—Fifty sequential cases of ischaemic stroke were studied with 124 99Tcm HMPAO SPECT at around one day, one week, and three months after stroke along with detailed clinical and functional assessments.
RESULTS—Visually apparent reperfusion occurred in 14 of 50 patients (28%) with a mean delay of 5.8 days and reperfusion was seen in seven others in whom it was identified on the basis of changes in perfusion deficit volume. It occurred in 13 of 23 embolic events but only in three of 23 other events. In only two cases did spontaneous reperfusion occur early enough to preserve tissue or function. Reperfusion did not otherwise reduce infarct size, or improve clinical or functional outcome, and was not associated with oedema but an association with haemorrhagic transformation was suggested. Reperfusion significantly decreased the apparent perfusion defect as measured by SPECT one week from the ictus, but was mostly non-nutritional and transient. The mean volume of tissue preserved by nutritional reperfusion was 10 cm3, but this was unequally distributed between cases. Late washout of 99Tcm HMPAO from areas of hyperaemic reperfusion may be a good prognostic marker but is a rare phenomenon and too insensitive to be of general applicability.
CONCLUSIONS—Spontaneous reperfusion after cerebral infarction occurs in 42% of cases within the first week but is associated with clinical improvement in only 2%. It has few adverse consequences although it may be associated with haemorrhagic transformation.

 PMID:9436735

  10. Risk Assessment: A Quantitative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baert, K.; Francois, K.; de Meulenaer, B.; Devlieghere, F.

    A risk can be defined as a function of the probability of an adverse health effect and the severity of that effect, consequential to a hazard in food (Codex Alimentarius, 1999) . During a risk assessment, an estimate of the risk is obtained. The goal is to estimate the likelihood and the extent of adverse effects occurring to humans due to possible exposure(s) to hazards. Risk assessment is a scientifically based process consisting of the following steps: (1) hazard identification, (2) hazard characterization, (3) exposure assessment and (4) and risk characterization (Codex Alimentarius, 1999).

  11. QUANTITATIVE PROCEDURES FOR NEUROTOXICOLOGY RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this project, previously published information on biologically based dose-response model for brain development was used to quantitatively evaluate critical neurodevelopmental processes, and to assess potential chemical impacts on early brain development. This model has been ex...

  12. QUANTITATIVE PROCEDURES FOR NEUROTOXICOLOGY RISK ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this project, previously published information on biologically based dose-response model for brain development was used to quantitatively evaluate critical neurodevelopmental processes, and to assess potential chemical impacts on early brain development. This model has been ex...

  13. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  14. Quantitative Assessment of Fluorescent Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Cranfill, Paula J.; Sell, Brittney R.; Baird, Michelle A.; Allen, John R.; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W.; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W.

    2016-01-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FP) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning the blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has its own unique photophysical properties. Thus, there is no single “best” fluorescent protein for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for any given application, we have characterized quantitatively over 40 different FPs for their brightness, photostability, pH stability, and monomeric properties, which permits easy apples-to-apples comparisons between these FPs. We report the values for all of the FPs measured, but focus the discussion on the more popular and/or best performing FPs in each spectral region. PMID:27240257

  15. Quantitative assessment of fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Cranfill, Paula J; Sell, Brittney R; Baird, Michelle A; Allen, John R; Lavagnino, Zeno; de Gruiter, H Martijn; Kremers, Gert-Jan; Davidson, Michael W; Ustione, Alessandro; Piston, David W

    2016-07-01

    The advent of fluorescent proteins (FPs) for genetic labeling of molecules and cells has revolutionized fluorescence microscopy. Genetic manipulations have created a vast array of bright and stable FPs spanning blue to red spectral regions. Common to autofluorescent FPs is their tight β-barrel structure, which provides the rigidity and chemical environment needed for effectual fluorescence. Despite the common structure, each FP has unique properties. Thus, there is no single 'best' FP for every circumstance, and each FP has advantages and disadvantages. To guide decisions about which FP is right for a given application, we have quantitatively characterized the brightness, photostability, pH stability and monomeric properties of more than 40 FPs to enable straightforward and direct comparison between them. We focus on popular and/or top-performing FPs in each spectral region.

  16. Validation of semi-quantitative methods for DAT SPECT: influence of anatomical variability and partial volume effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallego, J.; Niñerola-Baizán, A.; Cot, A.; Aguiar, P.; Crespo, C.; Falcón, C.; Lomeña, F.; Sempau, J.; Pavía, J.; Ros, D.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the influence of anatomical variability between subjects and of the partial volume effect (PVE) on the standardized Specific Uptake Ratio (SUR) in [123I]FP-bib SPECT studies. To this end, magnetic resonance (MR) images of 23 subjects with differences in the striatal volume of up to 44% were segmented and used to generate a database of 138 Monte Carlo simulated SPECT studies. Data included normal uptakes and pathological cases. Studies were reconstructed by filtered back projection (FBP) and the ordered-subset expectation-maximization algorithm. Quantification was carried out by applying a reference method based on regions of interest (ROIs) derived from the MR images and ROIs derived from the Automated Anatomical Labelling map. Our results showed that, regardless of anatomical variability, the relationship between calculated and true SUR values for caudate and putamen could be described by a multiple linear model which took into account the spill-over phenomenon caused by PVE ({{R}2}≥slant 0.963 for caudate and ≥0.980 for putamen) and also by a simple linear model (R2 ≥ 0.952 for caudate and ≥0.973 for putamen). Calculated values were standardized by inverting both linear systems. Differences between standardized and true values showed that, although the multiple linear model was the best approach in terms of variability ({χ2}  ≥ 11.79 for caudate and  ≤7.36 for putamen), standardization based on a simple linear model was also suitable ({χ2}  ≥ 12.44 for caudate and  ≤12.57 for putamen).

  17. SPECT-CT Assessment of Pseudarthrosis after Spinal Fusion: Diagnostic Pitfall due to a Broken Screw

    PubMed Central

    Rager, Olivier; Amzalag, Gaël; Varoquaux, Arthur; Schaller, Karl; Ratib, Osman; Tessitore, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    A 43-year-old drug addicted female was referred for a L5-S1 posterolateral in situ fixation with autologous graft because of an L5/S1 severe discopathy with listhesis. After six months, low back pain recurred. A Tc-99m HDP SPECT-CT diagnosed a pseudarthrosis with intense uptake of the L5-S1 endplates and a fracture of the right S1 screw just outside the metal-bone interface without any uptake or bone resorption around the screw. The absence of uptake around a broken screw is a pitfall that the physician should be aware of. PMID:24159394

  18. Superior diagnostic performance of perfusion-cardiovascular magnetic resonance versus SPECT to detect coronary artery disease: The secondary endpoints of the multicenter multivendor MR-IMPACT II (Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Myocardial Perfusion Assessment in Coronary Artery Disease Trial)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Perfusion-cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is generally accepted as an alternative to SPECT to assess myocardial ischemia non-invasively. However its performance vs gated-SPECT and in sub-populations is not fully established. The goal was to compare in a multicenter setting the diagnostic performance of perfusion-CMR and gated-SPECT for the detection of CAD in various populations using conventional x-ray coronary angiography (CXA) as the standard of reference. Methods In 33 centers (in US and Europe) 533 patients, eligible for CXA or SPECT, were enrolled in this multivendor trial. SPECT and CXA were performed within 4 weeks before or after CMR in all patients. Prevalence of CAD in the sample was 49% and 515 patients received MR contrast medium. Drop-out rates for CMR and SPECT were 5.6% and 3.7%, respectively (ns). The study was powered for the primary endpoint of non-inferiority of CMR vs SPECT for both, sensitivity and specificity for the detection of CAD (using a single-threshold reading), the results for the primary endpoint were reported elsewhere. In this article secondary endpoints are presented, i.e. the diagnostic performance of CMR versus SPECT in subpopulations such as multi-vessel disease (MVD), in men, in women, and in patients without prior myocardial infarction (MI). For diagnostic performance assessment the area under the receiver-operator-characteristics-curve (AUC) was calculated. Readers were blinded versus clinical data, CXA, and imaging results. Results The diagnostic performance (= area under ROC = AUC) of CMR was superior to SPECT (p = 0.0004, n = 425) and to gated-SPECT (p = 0.018, n = 253). CMR performed better than SPECT in MVD (p = 0.003 vs all SPECT, p = 0.04 vs gated-SPECT), in men (p = 0.004, n = 313) and in women (p = 0.03, n = 112) as well as in the non-infarct patients (p = 0.005, n = 186 in 1–3 vessel disease and p = 0.015, n = 140 in MVD). Conclusion

  19. Intravenous adenosine (adenoscan) versus exercise in the noninvasive assessment of coronary artery disease by SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    LaManna, M.M.; Mohama, R.; Slavich, I.L. 3d.; Lumia, F.J.; Cha, S.D.; Rambaran, N.; Maranhao, V. )

    1990-11-01

    Fifteen patients at a mean age of 58 underwent adenosine and maximal exercise thallium SPECT imaging. All scans were performed 1 week apart and within 4 weeks of cardiac catheterization. SPECT imaging was performed after the infusion of 140 micrograms/kg/min of adenosine for 6 minutes. Mean heart rate increment during adenosine administration was 67 +/- 3.7 to 77 +/- 4.1. Mean blood pressure was 136 +/- 7.2 to 135 +/- 6.2 systolic and 78 +/- 1.8 to 68 +/- 2.6 diastolic. No adverse hemodynamic effects were observed. There were no changes in PR or QRS in intervals. Five stress ECGs were ischemic. No ST changes were observed with adenosine. Although 68% of the patients had symptoms of flushing, light-headedness, and dizziness during adenosine infusion, symptoms resolved within 1 minute of dosage adjustment or termination of the infusion in all but one patient, who required theophylline. Sensitivity for coronary artery detection was 77% and specificity 100%. Concordance between adenoscans and exercise thallium scintigraphy was high (13/15 = 87%). In two patients, there were minor scintigraphic differences. The authors conclude that adenosine is a sensitive, specific, and safe alternative to exercise testing in patients referred for thallium imaging and may be preferable to dipyridamole.

  20. Accuracy of quantitative visual soil assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, Maricke; Heuvelink, Gerard; Stoorvogel, Jetse; Wallinga, Jakob; de Boer, Imke; van Dam, Jos; van Essen, Everhard; Moolenaar, Simon; Verhoeven, Frank; Stoof, Cathelijne

    2016-04-01

    Visual soil assessment (VSA) is a method to assess soil quality visually, when standing in the field. VSA is increasingly used by farmers, farm organisations and companies, because it is rapid and cost-effective, and because looking at soil provides understanding about soil functioning. Often VSA is regarded as subjective, so there is a need to verify VSA. Also, many VSAs have not been fine-tuned for contrasting soil types. This could lead to wrong interpretation of soil quality and soil functioning when contrasting sites are compared to each other. We wanted to assess accuracy of VSA, while taking into account soil type. The first objective was to test whether quantitative visual field observations, which form the basis in many VSAs, could be validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The second objective was to assess whether quantitative visual field observations are reproducible, when used by observers with contrasting backgrounds. For the validation study, we made quantitative visual observations at 26 cattle farms. Farms were located at sand, clay and peat soils in the North Friesian Woodlands, the Netherlands. Quantitative visual observations evaluated were grass cover, number of biopores, number of roots, soil colour, soil structure, number of earthworms, number of gley mottles and soil compaction. Linear regression analysis showed that four out of eight quantitative visual observations could be well validated with standardized field or laboratory measurements. The following quantitative visual observations correlated well with standardized field or laboratory measurements: grass cover with classified images of surface cover; number of roots with root dry weight; amount of large structure elements with mean weight diameter; and soil colour with soil organic matter content. Correlation coefficients were greater than 0.3, from which half of the correlations were significant. For the reproducibility study, a group of 9 soil scientists and 7

  1. SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, George; Giamouzis, Gregory; Karagiannis, Georgios; Butler, Javed; Tsougos, Ioannis; Valotassiou, Varvara; Giannakoulas, George; Dimakopoulos, Nikolaos; Xanthopoulos, Andrew; Skoularigis, John; Triposkiadis, Filippos; Georgoulias, Panagiotis

    2017-02-02

    Heart failure is a common clinical syndrome associated with significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. Ischemic heart disease is the leading cause of heart failure, at least in the industrialized countries. Proper diagnosis of the syndrome and management of patients with heart failure require anatomical and functional information obtained through various imaging modalities. Nuclear cardiology techniques play a main role in the evaluation of heart failure. Myocardial single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with thallium-201 or technetium-99 m labelled tracers offer valuable data regarding ventricular function, myocardial perfusion, viability, and intraventricular synchronism. Moreover, positron emission tomography (PET) permits accurate evaluation of myocardial perfusion, metabolism, and viability, providing high-quality images and the ability of quantitative analysis. As these imaging techniques assess different parameters of cardiac structure and function, variations of sensitivity and specificity have been reported among them. In addition, the role of SPECT and PET guided therapy remains controversial. In this comprehensive review, we address these controversies and report the advances in patient's investigation with SPECT and PET in ischemic heart failure. Furthermore, we present the innovations in technology that are expected to strengthen the role of nuclear cardiology modalities in the investigation of heart failure.

  2. Implementation and assessment of an animal management system for small-animal micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holdsworth, David W.; Detombe, Sarah A.; Chiodo, Chris; Fricke, Stanley T.; Drangova, Maria

    2011-03-01

    Advances in laboratory imaging systems for CT, SPECT, MRI, and PET facilitate routine micro-imaging during pre-clinical investigations. Challenges still arise when dealing with immune-compromised animals, biohazardous agents, and multi-modality imaging. These challenges can be overcome with an appropriate animal management system (AMS), with the capability for supporting and monitoring a rat or mouse during micro-imaging. We report the implementation and assessment of a new AMS system for mice (PRA-3000 / AHS-2750, ASI Instruments, Warren MI), designed to be compatible with a commercial micro-CT / micro-SPECT imaging system (eXplore speCZT, GE Healthcare, London ON). The AMS was assessed under the following criteria: 1) compatibility with the imaging system (i.e. artifact generation, geometric dimensions); 2) compatibility with live animals (i.e. positioning, temperature regulation, anesthetic supply); 3) monitoring capabilities (i.e. rectal temperature, respiratory and cardiac monitoring); 4) stability of co-registration; and 5) containment. Micro-CT scans performed using a standardized live-animal protocol (90 kVp, 40 mA, 900 views, 16 ms per view) exhibited low noise (+/-19 HU) and acceptable artifact from high-density components within the AMS (e.g. ECG pad contacts). Live mice were imaged repeatedly (with removal and replacement of the AMS) and spatial registration was found to be stable to within +/-0.07 mm. All animals tolerated enclosure within the AMS for extended periods (i.e. > one hour) without distress, based on continuous recordings of rectal temperature, ECG waveform and respiratory rate. A sealed AMS system extends the capability of a conventional micro-imaging system to include immune-compromised and biosafety level 2 mouse-imaging protocols.

  3. Thallium-201 SPECT in prognostic assessment of malignant gliomas treated with postoperative radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Semba, Takatoshi; Sugawara, Yoshifumi; Ochi, Takashi; Fujii, Takashi; Mochizuki, Teruhito; Ohnishi, Takanori

    2006-05-01

    This study was designed to investigate the value of preoperative thallium-201 (201Tl) SPECT as a predictor of outcome in malignant glioma. From January 1990 to September 2003, 109 patients with glioma were treated with postoperative radiotherapy. Of these, 36 patients with malignant gliomas who underwent preoperative 201Tl-SPECT were included in this study (grade 3: n=14, grade 4: n=22). On early (10 minutes) and delayed (2 hours) images after 111 MBq 201TlCl injection, we calculated radioactivity ratios of tumors to contralateral normal brain (T/N ratios) and retention indices (RIs). For early and delayed images, we compared outcome between a high T/N ratio group (T/N ratio equal or greater than the average) and a low T/N ratio group (T/N ratio less than the average). We also divided the patients into two groups on the basis of RI; a high RI group (RI equal or greater than the average) and a low RI group (RI less than the average), and similarly compared outcome between the two groups. Median survival time was 12 months for both grade 3 and grade 4 tumors; however, two-year survival was 53% for grade 3 and 15% for grade 4. In both early and delayed images, outcome was significantly better for patients with low T/N ratios (early < 4.71, delayed < 3.96) than those with high T/N ratios (early: p = 0.030, delayed: p = 0.049). However, no significant survival difference was apparent between the low- (< -12.25) and high RI groups. In grade 3 glioma, patients with high T/N ratios demonstrated a tendency toward poorer outcome, although this trend was not significant (early: p = 0.079, delayed: p = 0.099). Overall outcome was poor for grade 4 glioma, and the difference in survival between low and high T/N ratio groups was not significant (early: p = 0.51, delayed: p = 0.53). However, long survival was seen only in patients with lower T/N ratios. Differences of 201Tl uptake in malignant gliomas could predict outcome. 201Tl-SPECT is potentially useful in the management of

  4. Integrated regional assessment: qualitative and quantitative issues

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Elizabeth L.

    2009-11-19

    Qualitative and quantitative issues are particularly significant in integrated regional assessment. This chapter examines the terms “qualitative” and “quantitative” separately and in relation to one another, along with a discussion of the degree of interdependence or overlap between the two. Strategies for integrating the two general approaches often produce uneasy compromises. However, integrated regional assessment provides opportunities for strong collaborations in addressing specific problems in specific places.

  5. Sites of Latest Mechanical Activation as Assessed by SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Ischemic and Dilated Cardiomyopathy Patients with LBBB

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xianhe; Xu, Huiqin; Zhao, Xuefeng; Chen, Ji

    2014-01-01

    Objective Sites of latest mechanical activation (SOLA) have been recognized as optimal left-ventricular (LV) lead positions for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). This study was aimed to investigate SOLA in ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM) and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Methods Sixty-four consecutive LBBB patients (47 DCM, 17 ICM), who met the standard indications for CRT and underwent resting SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI), were selected. Phase analysis was used to assess LV dyssynchrony and SOLA. The Emory Cardiac Toolbox was used to measure perfusion defects. LV dyssynchrony and SOLA were compared between the DCM patients with wide (≥150 ms) and moderate (120–150 ms) QRS durations (QRSd). The relationship between SOLA and perfusion defects was analyzed in the ICM patients. Results The DCM patients with wide QRSd had significantly more LV dyssynchrony than those with moderate QRSd. Lateral SOLA were significantly more frequent in the DCM patients with wide QRSd than those with moderate QRSd (96% vs. 62%, p=0.010). In the ICM patients, SOLA were either in the scar segments (82%) or in the segments immediately adjacent to the scar segments (18%), regardless of QRSd. Conclusion Lateral SOLA were more frequent in the DCM patients with wide QRSd than those with moderate QRSd. Such relationship was not observed in the ICM patients, where SOLA were associated with scar location rather than QRSd. These findings support the use of SPECT MPI to aid the selection of potential CRT responders and guide LV lead placement. PMID:24577952

  6. Radiological interpretation 2020: Toward quantitative image assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Boone, John M.

    2007-11-15

    The interpretation of medical images by radiologists is primarily and fundamentally a subjective activity, but there are a number of clinical applications such as tumor imaging where quantitative imaging (QI) metrics (such as tumor growth rate) would be valuable to the patient’s care. It is predicted that the subjective interpretive environment of the past will, over the next decade, evolve toward the increased use of quantitative metrics for evaluating patient health from images. The increasing sophistication and resolution of modern tomographic scanners promote the development of meaningful quantitative end points, determined from images which are in turn produced using well-controlled imaging protocols. For the QI environment to expand, medical physicists, physicians, other researchers and equipment vendors need to work collaboratively to develop the quantitative protocols for imaging, scanner calibrations, and robust analytical software that will lead to the routine inclusion of quantitative parameters in the diagnosis and therapeutic assessment of human health. Most importantly, quantitative metrics need to be developed which have genuine impact on patient diagnosis and welfare, and only then will QI techniques become integrated into the clinical environment.

  7. Multi-centre evaluation of accuracy and reproducibility of planar and SPECT image quantification: An IAEA phantom study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Brian E; Grošev, Darko; Buvat, Irène; Coca Pérez, Marco A; Frey, Eric C; Green, Alan; Krisanachinda, Anchali; Lassmann, Michael; Ljungberg, Michael; Pozzo, Lorena; Quadir, Kamila Afroj; Terán Gretter, Mariella A; Van Staden, Johann; Poli, Gian Luca

    2016-04-19

    Accurate quantitation of activity provides the basis for internal dosimetry of targeted radionuclide therapies. This study investigated quantitative imaging capabilities at sites with a variety of experience and equipment and assessed levels of errors in activity quantitation in Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and planar imaging. Participants from 9 countries took part in a comparison in which planar, SPECT and SPECT with X ray computed tomography (SPECT-CT) imaging were used to quantify activities of four epoxy-filled cylinders containing (133)Ba, which was chosen as a surrogate for (131)I. The sources, with nominal volumes of 2, 4, 6 and 23mL, were calibrated for (133)Ba activity by the National Institute of Standards and Technology, but the activity was initially unknown to the participants. Imaging was performed in a cylindrical phantom filled with water. Two trials were carried out in which the participants first estimated the activities using their local standard protocols, and then repeated the measurements using a standardized acquisition and analysis protocol. Finally, processing of the imaging data from the second trial was repeated by a single centre using a fixed protocol. In the first trial, the activities were underestimated by about 15% with planar imaging. SPECT with Chang's first order attenuation correction (Chang-AC) and SPECT-CT overestimated the activity by about 10%. The second trial showed moderate improvements in accuracy and variability. Planar imaging was subject to methodological errors, e.g., in the use of a transmission scan for attenuation correction. The use of Chang-AC was subject to variability from the definition of phantom contours. The project demonstrated the need for training and standardized protocols to achieve good levels of quantitative accuracy and precision in a multicentre setting. Absolute quantification of simple objects with no background was possible with the strictest protocol to about 6% with

  8. Physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment.

    PubMed

    Cheuvront, Samuel N; Kenefick, Robert W; Charkoudian, Nisha; Sawka, Michael N

    2013-03-01

    Dehydration (body water deficit) is a physiologic state that can have profound implications for human health and performance. Unfortunately, dehydration can be difficult to assess, and there is no single, universal gold standard for decision making. In this article, we review the physiologic basis for understanding quantitative dehydration assessment. We highlight how phenomenologic interpretations of dehydration depend critically on the type (dehydration compared with volume depletion) and magnitude (moderate compared with severe) of dehydration, which in turn influence the osmotic (plasma osmolality) and blood volume-dependent compensatory thresholds for antidiuretic and thirst responses. In particular, we review new findings regarding the biological variation in osmotic responses to dehydration and discuss how this variation can help provide a quantitative and clinically relevant link between the physiology and phenomenology of dehydration. Practical measures with empirical thresholds are provided as a starting point for improving the practice of dehydration assessment.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  11. Quantitative methods in assessment of neurologic function.

    PubMed

    Potvin, A R; Tourtellotte, W W; Syndulko, K; Potvin, J

    1981-01-01

    Traditionally, neurologists have emphasized qualitative techniques for assessing results of clinical trials. However, in recent years qualitative evaluations have been increasingly augmented by quantitative tests for measuring neurologic functions pertaining to mental state, strength, steadiness, reactions, speed, coordination, sensation, fatigue, gait, station, and simulated activities of daily living. Quantitative tests have long been used by psychologists for evaluating asymptomatic function, assessing human information processing, and predicting proficiency in skilled tasks; however, their methodology has never been directly assessed for validity in a clinical environment. In this report, relevant contributions from the literature on asymptomatic human performance and that on clinical quantitative neurologic function are reviewed and assessed. While emphasis is focused on tests appropriate for evaluating clinical neurologic trials, evaluations of tests for reproducibility, reliability, validity, and examiner training procedures, and for effects of motivation, learning, handedness, age, and sex are also reported and interpreted. Examples of statistical strategies for data analysis, scoring systems, data reduction methods, and data display concepts are presented. Although investigative work still remains to be done, it appears that carefully selected and evaluated tests of sensory and motor function should be an essential factor for evaluating clinical trials in an objective manner.

  12. A multiresolution restoration method for cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquiz, Juan Manuel

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is affected by photon attenuation and image blurring due to Compton scatter and geometric detector response. Attenuation correction is important to increase diagnostic accuracy of cardiac SPECT. However, in attenuation-corrected scans, scattered photons from radioactivity in the liver could produce a spillover of counts into the inferior myocardial wall. In the clinical setting, blurring effects could be compensated by restoration with Wiener and Metz filters. Inconveniences of these procedures are that the Wiener filter depends upon the power spectra of the object image and noise, which are unknown, while Metz parameters have to be optimized by trial and error. This research develops an alternative restoration procedure based on a multiresolution denoising and regularization algorithm. It was hypothesized that this representation leads to a more straightforward and automatic restoration than conventional filters. The main objective of the research was the development and assessment of the multiresolution algorithm for compensating the liver spillover artifact. The multiresolution algorithm decomposes original SPECT projections into a set of sub-band frequency images. This allows a simple denoising and regularization procedure by discarding high frequency channels and performing inversion only in low and intermediate frequencies. The method was assessed in bull's eye polar maps and short- axis attenuation-corrected reconstructions of a realistic cardiac-chest phantom with a custom-made liver insert and different 99mTc liver-to-heart activity ratios. Inferior myocardial defects were simulated in some experiments. The cardiac phantom in free air was considered as the gold standard reference. Quantitative analysis was performed by calculating contrast of short- axis slices and the normalized chi-square measure, defect size and mean and standard deviation of polar map counts. The performance of the multiresolution

  13. Sensitivity analysis in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zwieterin, M H; van Gerwen, S J

    2000-07-15

    The occurrence of foodborne disease remains a widespread problem in both the developing and the developed world. A systematic and quantitative evaluation of food safety is important to control the risk of foodborne diseases. World-wide, many initiatives are being taken to develop quantitative risk analysis. However, the quantitative evaluation of food safety in all its aspects is very complex, especially since in many cases specific parameter values are not available. Often many variables have large statistical variability while the quantitative effect of various phenomena is unknown. Therefore, sensitivity analysis can be a useful tool to determine the main risk-determining phenomena, as well as the aspects that mainly determine the inaccuracy in the risk estimate. This paper presents three stages of sensitivity analysis. First, deterministic analysis selects the most relevant determinants for risk. Overlooking of exceptional, but relevant cases is prevented by a second, worst-case analysis. This analysis finds relevant process steps in worst-case situations, and shows the relevance of variations of factors for risk. The third, stochastic analysis, studies the effects of variations of factors for the variability of risk estimates. Care must be taken that the assumptions made as well as the results are clearly communicated. Stochastic risk estimates are, like deterministic ones, just as good (or bad) as the available data, and the stochastic analysis must not be used to mask lack of information. Sensitivity analysis is a valuable tool in quantitative risk assessment by determining critical aspects and effects of variations.

  14. PET and SPECT Radiotracers to Assess Function and Expression of ABC Transporters in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mairinger, Severin; Erker, Thomas; Müller, Markus; Langer, Oliver

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, such as P-glycoprotein (Pgp, ABCB1), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP, ABCG2) and multidrug resistance-associated proteins (MRPs) are expressed in high concentrations at various physiological barriers (e.g. blood-brain barrier, blood-testis barrier, blood-tumor barrier), where they impede the tissue accumulation of various drugs by active efflux transport. Changes in ABC transporter expression and function are thought to be implicated in various diseases, such as cancer, epilepsy, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. The availability of a non-invasive imaging method which allows for measuring ABC transporter function or expression in vivo would be of great clinical use in that it could facilitate the identification of those patients that would benefit from treatment with ABC transporter modulating drugs. To date three different kinds of imaging probes have been described to measure ABC transporters in vivo: i) radiolabelled transporter substrates ii) radiolabelled transporter inhibitors and iii) radiolabelled prodrugs which are enzymatically converted into transporter substrates in the organ of interest (e.g. brain). The design of new imaging probes to visualize efflux transporters is inter alia complicated by the overlapping substrate recognition pattern of different ABC transporter types. The present article will describe currently available ABC transporter radiotracers for positron emission tomography (PET) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and critically discuss strengths and limitations of individual probes and their potential clinical applications. PMID:21434859

  15. Comparison of 8-frame and 16-frame thallium-201 gated myocardial perfusion SPECT for determining left ventricular systolic and diastolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Kurisu, Satoshi; Sumimoto, Yoji; Ikenaga, Hiroki; Watanabe, Noriaki; Ishibashi, Ken; Dohi, Yoshihiro; Fukuda, Yukihiro; Kihara, Yasuki

    2017-07-01

    The myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography synchronized with the electrocardiogram (gated SPECT) has been widely used for the assessment of left ventricular (LV) systolic and diastolic functions using Quantitative gated SPECT. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of 8-frame and 16-frame thallium-201 (Tl-201) gated SPECT for determining LV systolic and diastolic parameters. The study population included 42 patients with suspected coronary artery disease who underwent gated SPECT by clinical indication. LV systolic and diastolic parameters were assessed on 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. There were good correlations in end-diastolic volume (r = 0.99, p < 0.001), end-systolic volume (ESV) (r = 0.97, p < 0.001) and ejection fraction (EF) (r = 0.95, p < 0.001) between 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. Bland-Altman plot showed a significant negative slope of -0.08 in EDV indicating a larger difference for larger EDV. Eight-frame gated SPECT overestimated ESV by 2.3 ml, and underestimated EF by -4.2% than 16-frame gated SPECT. There were good correlations in peak filling rate (PFR) (r = 0.87, p < 0.001), one third mean filling rate (r = 0.87, p < 0.001) and time to PFR (r = 0.61, p < 0.001) between 8-frame and 16-frame gated SPECT. Eight-frame gated SPECT underestimated PFR by -0.22 than 16-frame gated SPECT. Eight-frame gated SPECT estimated as much MFR/3 and TPFR as 16-frame gated SPECT. According to the data, the study suggested that 8-frame Tl-201 gated SPECT could underestimate systolic and/or diastolic parameter when compared with 16-frame gated SPECT.

  16. LROC assessment of non-linear filtering methods in Ga-67 SPECT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Clercq, Stijn; Staelens, Steven; De Beenhouwer, Jan; D'Asseler, Yves; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2006-03-01

    In emission tomography, iterative reconstruction is usually followed by a linear smoothing filter to make such images more appropriate for visual inspection and diagnosis by a physician. This will result in a global blurring of the images, smoothing across edges and possibly discarding valuable image information for detection tasks. The purpose of this study is to investigate which possible advantages a non-linear, edge-preserving postfilter could have on lesion detection in Ga-67 SPECT imaging. Image quality can be defined based on the task that has to be performed on the image. This study used LROC observer studies based on a dataset created by CPU-intensive Gate Monte Carlo simulations of a voxelized digital phantom. The filters considered in this study were a linear Gaussian filter, a bilateral filter, the Perona-Malik anisotropic diffusion filter and the Catte filtering scheme. The 3D MCAT software phantom was used to simulate the distribution of Ga-67 citrate in the abdomen. Tumor-present cases had a 1-cm diameter tumor randomly placed near the edges of the anatomical boundaries of the kidneys, bone, liver and spleen. Our data set was generated out of a single noisy background simulation using the bootstrap method, to significantly reduce the simulation time and to allow for a larger observer data set. Lesions were simulated separately and added to the background afterwards. These were then reconstructed with an iterative approach, using a sufficiently large number of MLEM iterations to establish convergence. The output of a numerical observer was used in a simplex optimization method to estimate an optimal set of parameters for each postfilter. No significant improvement was found for using edge-preserving filtering techniques over standard linear Gaussian filtering.

  17. Free craniotomy versus osteoplastic craniotomy, assessment of flap viability using 99mTC MDP SPECT.

    PubMed

    Shelef, Ilan; Golan, Haim; Merkin, Vladimir; Melamed, Israel; Benifla, Mony

    2016-09-01

    There are currently two accepted neurosurgical methods to perform a bony flap. In an osteoplastic flap, the flap is attached to surrounding muscle. In a free flap, the flap is not attached to adjacent tissues. The former is less common due to its complexity and the extensive time required for the surgery; yet the rate of infection is significantly lower, a clear explanation for which is unknown. The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that the osteoplastic flap acts as a live implant that resumes its blood flow and metabolic activity; contrasting with the free flap, which does not have sufficient blood flow, and therefore acts as a foreign body. Seven patients who underwent craniotomy with osteoplastic flaps and five with free flaps had planar bone and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) scans of the skull at 3-7days postoperative, after injection of the radioisotope, 99m-technetium-methylene diphosphonate (99m-Tc-MDP). We compared radioactive uptake as a measure of metabolic activity between osteoplastic and free flaps. Mean normalized radioactive uptakes in the centers of the flaps, calculated as the ratios of uptakes in the flap centers to uptakes in normal contralateral bone, were [mean: 1.7 (SD: 0.8)] and [0.6 (0.1)] for the osteoplastic and free flap groups respectively and were [2.4 (0.8)] and [1.3 (0.4)] in the borders of the flaps. Our analyses suggest that in craniotomy, the use of an osteoplastic flap, in contrast to free flap, retains bone viability.

  18. Quantitative Upright–Supine High-Speed SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging for Detection of Coronary Artery Disease: Correlation with Invasive Coronary Angiography

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Ryo; Tamarappoo, Balaji K.; Kang, Xingping; Wolak, Arik; Kite, Faith; Hayes, Sean W.; Thomson, Louise E.J.; Friedman, John D.; Berman, Daniel S.; Slomka, Piotr J.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed camera system for high-speed SPECT (HS-SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging shows excellent correlation with conventional SPECT. Our goal was to test the diagnostic accuracy of an automated quantification of combined upright and supine myocardial SPECT for detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) (≥70% luminal diameter stenosis or, in left main coronary artery, ≥50% luminal diameter stenosis) in comparison to invasive coronary angiography (ICA). Methods We studied 142 patients undergoing upright and supine HS-SPECT, including 56 consecutive patients (63% men; mean age 6 ± SD, 64 ± 13 y; 45% exercise stress) without known CAD who underwent diagnostic ICA within 6 mo of HS-SPECT and 86 consecutive patients with a low likelihood of CAD. Reference limits for upright and supine HS-SPECT were created from studies of patients with a low likelihood of CAD. Automated software adopted from supine–prone analysis was used to quantify the severity and extent of perfusion abnormality and was expressed as total perfusion deficit (TPD). TPD was obtained for upright (U-TPD), supine (S-TPD), and combined upright–supine acquisitions (C-TPD). Stress U-TPD ≥ 5%, S-TPD ≥ 5%, and C-TPD ≥ 3% myocardium were considered abnormal for per-patient analysis, and U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD ≥ 2% in each coronary artery territory were considered abnormal for per-vessel analysis. Results On a per-patient basis, the sensitivity was 91%, 88%, and 94% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively, and specificity was 59%, 73%, and 86% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively. C-TPD had a larger area under the receiver-operating-characteristic curve than U-TPD or S-TPD for identification of stenosis ≥ 70% (0.94 vs. 0.88 and 0.89, P < 0.05 and not significant, respectively). On a per-vessel basis, the sensitivity was 67%, 66%, and 69% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively, and specificity was 91%, 94%, and 97% for U-TPD, S-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively (P = 0

  19. Segmental and global left ventricular function assessment using gated SPECT with a semiconductor Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) camera: phantom study and clinical validation vs cardiac magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Bailliez, Alban; Blaire, Tanguy; Mouquet, Frédéric; Legghe, R; Etienne, B; Legallois, Damien; Agostini, Denis; Manrique, Alain

    2014-08-01

    We evaluated gated-SPECT using a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) camera for assessing global and regional left ventricular (LV) function. A phantom study evaluated the accuracy of wall thickening assessment using systolic count increase on both Anger and CZT (Discovery 530NMc) cameras. The refillable phantom simulated variable myocardial wall thicknesses. The apparent count increase (%CI) was compared to the thickness increase (%Th). CZT gated-SPECT was compared to cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in 27 patients. Global and regional LV function (wall thickening and motion) were quantified and compared between SPECT and CMR data. In the phantom study using a 5-mm object, the regression between %CI and %Th was significantly closer to the line of identity (y = x) with the CZT (R (2) = 0.9955) than the Anger (R (2) = 0.9995, P = .03). There was a weaker correlation for larger objects (P = .003). In patients, there was a high concordance between CZT and CMR for ESV, EDV, and LVEF (all CCC >0.80, P < .001). CZT underestimated %CI and wall motion (WM) compared to CMR (P < .001). The agreement to CMR was better for WM than wall thickening. The Discovery 530NMc provided accurate measurements of global LV function but underestimated regional wall thickening, especially in patients with increased wall thickness.

  20. Blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI: A novel technique for the assessment of myocardial ischemia as identified by nuclear imaging SPECT.

    PubMed

    Egred, M; Waiter, G D; Redpath, T W; Semple, S K I; Al-Mohammad, A; Walton, S

    2007-12-01

    The different levels of deoxyhemoglobin in the ischemic myocardium, induced by stressors such as dipyridamole, can be detected by blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) MRI and may be used to diagnose myocardial ischemia. The aim of this study was to assess the signal change in the myocardium on BOLD MRI as well as wall thickening between rest and dipyridamole stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardium as identified on SPECT imaging. Twelve patients with stress-induced myocardial ischemia on SPECT underwent rest and dipyridamole stress MRI using a double breath-hold, T2()-weighted, ECG-gated sequence to produce BOLD contrast images as well as cine-MRI for wall thickening assessment in 10 of the 12 patients. Signal change on BOLD MRI and wall thickening were compared between rest and stress images in ischemic and non-ischemic myocardial segments as identified on SPECT. In each patient, two MRI slices containing 16 segments per slice were analysed. In total, there were 384 segments for BOLD analysis and 320 for wall thickening. For BOLD signal 137 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia on SPECT and 247 to normal segments, while for wall thickening 112 segments correlated to segments with reversible ischemia and 208 to normal segments. The average BOLD MRI signal intensity change was -13.8 (+/-16.3)% in the ischemic segments compared to -10.3 (+/-14.7)% in the non-ischemic segments (p=0.05). The average wall thickening was 6.4 (+/-3.4) mm in the ischemic segments compared to 8.7 (+/-3.8) mm in the non-ischemic segments (p<0.0001). Stress-induced ischemic myocardium has a different signal change and wall thickening than non-ischemic myocardium and may be differentiated on BOLD MRI. Larger studies are needed to define a threshold for detection and to determine the sensitivity and specificity of this technique.

  1. Activity concentration measurements using a conjugate gradient (Siemens xSPECT) reconstruction algorithm in SPECT/CT.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Ian S; Hoffmann, Sandra A

    2016-11-01

    The interest in quantitative single photon emission computer tomography (SPECT) shows potential in a number of clinical applications and now several vendors are providing software and hardware solutions to allow 'SUV-SPECT' to mirror metrics used in PET imaging. This brief technical report assesses the accuracy of activity concentration measurements using a new algorithm 'xSPECT' from Siemens Healthcare. SPECT/CT data were acquired from a uniform cylinder with 5, 10, 15 and 20 s/projection and NEMA image quality phantom with 25 s/projection. The NEMA phantom had hot spheres filled with an 8 : 1 activity concentration relative to the background compartment. Reconstructions were performed using parameters defined by manufacturer presets available with the algorithm. The accuracy of activity concentration measurements was assessed. A dose calibrator-camera cross-calibration factor (CCF) was derived from the uniform phantom data. In uniform phantom images, a positive bias was observed, ranging from ∼6% in the lower count images to ∼4% in the higher-count images. On the basis of the higher-count data, a CCF of 0.96 was derived. As expected, considerable negative bias was measured in the NEMA spheres using region mean values whereas positive bias was measured in the four largest NEMA spheres. Nonmonotonically increasing recovery curves for the hot spheres suggested the presence of Gibbs edge enhancement from resolution modelling. Sufficiently accurate activity concentration measurements can easily be measured on images reconstructed with the xSPECT algorithm without a CCF. However, the use of a CCF is likely to improve accuracy further. A manual conversion of voxel values into SUV should be possible, provided that the patient weight, injected activity and time between injection and imaging are all known accurately.

  2. Novel Quantitative Assessment of Metamorphopsia in Maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Wiecek, Emily; Lashkari, Kameran; Dakin, Steven C.; Bex, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Patients with macular disease often report experiencing metamorphopsia (visual distortion). Although typically measured with Amsler charts, more quantitative assessments of perceived distortion are desirable to effectively monitor the presence, progression, and remediation of visual impairment. Methods. Participants with binocular (n = 33) and monocular (n = 50) maculopathy across seven disease groups, and control participants (n = 10) with no identifiable retinal disease completed a modified Amsler grid assessment (presented on a computer screen with eye tracking to ensure fixation compliance) and two novel assessments to measure metamorphopsia in the central 5° of visual field. A total of 81% (67/83) of participants completed a hyperacuity task where they aligned eight dots in the shape of a square, and 64% (32/50) of participants with monocular distortion completed a spatial alignment task using dichoptic stimuli. Ten controls completed all tasks. Results. Horizontal and vertical distortion magnitudes were calculated for each of the three assessments. Distortion magnitudes were significantly higher in patients than controls in all assessments. There was no significant difference in magnitude of distortion across different macular diseases. There were no significant correlations between overall magnitude of distortion among any of the three measures and no significant correlations in localized measures of distortion. Conclusions. Three alternative quantifications of monocular spatial distortion in the central visual field generated uncorrelated estimates of visual distortion. It is therefore unlikely that metamorphopsia is caused solely by retinal displacement, but instead involves additional top-down information, knowledge about the scene, and perhaps, cortical reorganization. PMID:25406293

  3. Quantitative assessment of growth plate activity

    SciTech Connect

    Harcke, H.T.; Macy, N.J.; Mandell, G.A.; MacEwen, G.D.

    1984-01-01

    In the immature skeleton the physis or growth plate is the area of bone least able to withstand external forces and is therefore prone to trauma. Such trauma often leads to premature closure of the plate and results in limb shortening and/or angular deformity (varus or valgus). Active localization of bone seeking tracers in the physis makes bone scintigraphy an excellent method for assessing growth plate physiology. To be most effective, however, physeal activity should be quantified so that serial evaluations are accurate and comparable. The authors have developed a quantitative method for assessing physeal activity and have applied it ot the hip and knee. Using computer acquired pinhole images of the abnormal and contralateral normal joints, ten regions of interest are placed at key locations around each joint and comparative ratios are generated to form a growth plate profile. The ratios compare segmental physeal activity to total growth plate activity on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides and to adjacent bone. In 25 patients, ages 2 to 15 years, with angular deformities of the legs secondary to trauma, Blount's disease, and Perthes disease, this technique is able to differentiate abnormal segmental physeal activity. This is important since plate closure does not usually occur uniformly across the physis. The technique may permit the use of scintigraphy in the prediction of early closure through the quantitative analysis of serial studies.

  4. The Use of Quantitative SPECT/CT Imaging to Assess Residual Limb Health

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-01

    is very confident that we can get the project back on track in short order and drive towards a successful end point – which will greatly benefit our...study team has taken significant actions towards remedying these issues and is very confident that we can get the project back on track in short order...and drive towards a successful end point – which will greatly benefit our patients. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Prosthetics, residual limb health, imaging

  5. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images.

    PubMed

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-07

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT 'D.SPECT' camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of (99m)Tc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a (99m)Tc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  6. Comparison of SPECT using technetium-99m agents and thallium-201 and PET for the assessment of myocardial perfusion and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, D.S.; Kiat, H.; Van Train, K.F.; Friedman, J.; Garcia, E.V.; Maddahi, J. )

    1990-10-16

    This report reviews the applications of tomographic imaging with current and new tracers in assessing myocardial perfusion and viability. Multiple studies with thallium-201 (TI-201) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD) have demonstrated high sensitivity, high rates of normalcy and high reproducibility. In assessing viability, fixed defects are frequently detected in viable zones in 4-hour studies with TI-201 imaging. Redistribution imaging performed 18 to 72 hours after injection or reinjection of TI-201 before 4-hour redistribution imaging has been shown to improve accuracy of viability assessment. TI-201 SPECT studies are limited by the suboptimal physical properties of TI-201, which result in variable image quality. The 2 new technetium-99m (Tc-99m) - labeled myocardial perfusion tracers offer the ability to inject much higher amounts of radioactivity, making it possible to assess ventricular function as well as myocardial perfusion from the same injection of radiotracer. Tc-99m sestamibi has very slow myocardial clearance, which allows for prolonged imaging time and results in image quality superior to that obtained with TI-201 and Tc-99m teboroxime. The combination of minimal redistribution of Tc-99m sestamibi and high count rates makes gated SPECT imaging feasible, and also permits assessment of patients with acute ischemic syndromes by uncoupling the time of injection from the time of imaging. The combination of high image quality and first-pass exercise capabilities may lead to a choice of this agent over TI-201 for assessment of chronic CAD.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Assessment of patient exposure to X-radiation from SPECT/CT scanners.

    PubMed

    Hara, Narihiro; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Takenaka, Kenichi; Matsubara, Kousuke; Ujita, Hiroyuki; Kenko, Youichi

    2010-09-01

    In the operation of any SPECT/CT system, in addition to internal radiation exposure (gamma-ray) resulting from administration of radiopharmaceuticals, external radiation exposure (x-ray) from the CT device has to be taken into consideration in the light of recommendations from the International Commission on Radiological Protection. These recommendations include justification of practices (the use of radiation produces sufficient benefit to offset any risks caused by the use of radiation), optimization (the incurred exposure by the use of radiation should be kept as low as reasonably achievable), and dose limitation. The internal radiation exposures of each organ after administration of radiopharmaceuticals are calculated by the MIRD Committee method. For example, the internal radiation exposure index for brain perfusion scintigraphy is 0.8 mGy/37 MBq for N-isopropyl-4-iodoamphetamine((123)I) hydrochloride or 0.19 mGy/37 MBq for ethyl cysteinate dimer. On the other hand, the external radiation exposure from a CT device is calculated using the CT dose index volume (CTDIvol)--a measured and calculated value unique to the CT scanner and scan parameters used--and a dose-length product, which is obtained from CT conditions and generally used as a reference value for CT radiation exposure. However, CTDIvol and dose-length product are calculated values unique to each device, not the value of external radiation exposures of each organ. Therefore, we believe that it is necessary to measure the total (internal plus external) radiation exposure dose from CT. In the present study, using an anthropomorphic phantom for deep-body total absorbed dose measurement, we evaluated the radiation exposure doses (organ-absorbed doses) of each organ under various CT conditions. The radiation exposure doses of each organ were measured by inserting thermoluminescent dosimeter elements into the phantom under various CT conditions. The following were brain radiation exposure doses in the head

  8. [Studies of biologic activation associated with molecular receptor increase and tumor response in ChL6/L6 protocol patients; Studies in phantoms; Quantitative SPECT; Preclinical studies; and Clinical studies]. DOE annual report, 1994--95

    SciTech Connect

    DeNardo, S.J.

    1995-12-31

    The authors describe results which have not yet been published from their associated studies listed in the title. For the first, they discuss Lym-1 single chain genetically engineered molecules, analysis of molecular genetic coded messages to enhance tumor response, and human dosimetry and therapeutic human use radiopharmaceuticals. Studies in phantoms includes a discussion of planar image quantitation, counts coincidence correction, organ studies, tumor studies, and {sup 90}Y quantitation with Bremsstrahlung imaging. The study on SPECT discusses attenuation correction and scatter correction. Preclinical studies investigated uptake of {sup 90}Y-BrE-3 in mice using autoradiography. Clinical studies discuss image quantitation verses counts from biopsy samples, S factors for radiation dose calculation, {sup 67}Cu imaging studies for lymphoma cancer, and {sup 111}In MoAb imaging studies for breast cancer to predict {sup 90}Y MoAb therapy.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Chernov, V. I. Medvedeva, A. A. Zelchan, R. V. Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-02

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99}mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal {sup 199}Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of {sup 199}Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased {sup 199}Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI was 95%. The {sup 199}Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with {sup 199}Tl and {sup 99m}Tc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  10. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  11. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, S.

    2015-06-15

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant.

  12. Combined supine and prone quantitative myocardial perfusion SPECT: method development and clinical validation in patients with no known coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Nishina, Hidetaka; Slomka, Piotr J; Abidov, Aiden; Yoda, Shunichi; Akincioglu, Cigdem; Kang, Xingping; Cohen, Ishac; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Germano, Guido; Berman, Daniel S

    2006-01-01

    Acquisition in the prone position has been demonstrated to improve the specificity of visually analyzed myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) for detecting coronary artery disease (CAD). However, the diagnostic value of prone imaging alone or combined acquisition has not been previously described using quantitative analysis. A total of 649 patients referred for MPS comprised the study population. Separate supine and prone normal limits were derived from 40 males and 40 females with a low likelihood (LLk) of CAD using a 3 average-deviation cutoff for all pixels on the polar map. These limits were applied to the test population of 369 consecutive patients (65% males; age, 65 +/- 13 y; 49% exercise stress) without known CAD who had diagnostic coronary angiography within 3 mo of MPS. Total perfusion deficit (TPD), defined as a product of defect extent and severity scores, was obtained for supine (S-TPD), prone (P-TPD), and combined supine-prone datasets (C-TPD). The angiographic group was randomly divided into 2 groups for deriving and validating optimal diagnostic cutoffs. Normalcy rates were validated in 2 additional groups of consecutive LLk patients: unselected patients (n = 100) and patients with body mass index >30 (n = 100). C-TPD had a larger area under the receiver-operating-characteristic (ROC) curve than S-TPD or P-TPD for identification of stenosis >or=70% (0.86, 0.88, and 0.90 for S-TPD, P-TPD, and C-TPD, respectively; P < 0.05). In the validation group, sensitivity for P-TPD was lower than for S- or C-TPD (P < 0.05). C-TPD yielded higher specificity than S-TPD and a trend toward higher specificity than P-TPD (65%, 83%, and 86% for S-, P-, and C-TPD, respectively, P < 0.001; vs. S-TPD and P = 0.06 vs. P-TPD). Normalcy rates for C-TPD were higher than for S-TPD in obese LLk patients (78% vs. 95%, P < 0.001). Combined supine-prone quantification significantly improves the area under the ROC curve and specificity of MPS in the identification of obstructive CAD

  13. Integrated assessment of coronary anatomy and myocardial perfusion using a retractable SPECT camera combined with 64-slice CT: initial experience.

    PubMed

    Thilo, Christian; Schoepf, U Joseph; Gordon, Leonie; Chiaramida, Salvatore; Serguson, Jill; Costello, Philip

    2009-04-01

    We evaluated a prototype SPECT system integrated with multidetector row CT (MDCT) for obtaining complementary information on coronary anatomy and hemodynamic lesion significance. Twenty-five consecutive patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease (CAD) underwent routine SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). All patients also underwent repeat MPI with a mobile SPECT unit which could be attached to a 64-slice MDCT system. Coronary CT angiography (cCTA) was performed without repositioning the patient. Investigational MPI was compared with routine MPI for detection of myocardial perfusion defects (PD). Two observers diagnosed presence or absence of CAD based on MPI alone, cCTA alone, and based on combined MPI and cCTA with fused image display. In 22/24 patients investigative MPI corresponded with routine MPI (r = 0.80). Stenosis >or= 50% at cCTA was detected in 6/24 patients. Six out of 24 patients had PD at regular MPI. Three of these six patients had no significant stenosis at cCTA. Three out of 19 patients with normal MPI studies had significant stenosis at cCTA. Our initial experience indicates that the integration of SPECT MPI with cCTA is technically feasible and enables the comprehensive evaluation of coronary artery anatomy and myocardial perfusion with a single instrumental setup.

  14. Hydrogen quantitative risk assessment workshop proceedings.

    SciTech Connect

    Groth, Katrina M.; Harris, Aaron P.

    2013-09-01

    The Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Toolkit Introduction Workshop was held at Energetics on June 11-12. The workshop was co-hosted by Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and HySafe, the International Association for Hydrogen Safety. The objective of the workshop was twofold: (1) Present a hydrogen-specific methodology and toolkit (currently under development) for conducting QRA to support the development of codes and standards and safety assessments of hydrogen-fueled vehicles and fueling stations, and (2) Obtain feedback on the needs of early-stage users (hydrogen as well as potential leveraging for Compressed Natural Gas [CNG], and Liquefied Natural Gas [LNG]) and set priorities for %E2%80%9CVersion 1%E2%80%9D of the toolkit in the context of the commercial evolution of hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEV). The workshop consisted of an introduction and three technical sessions: Risk Informed Development and Approach; CNG/LNG Applications; and Introduction of a Hydrogen Specific QRA Toolkit.

  15. An automatic MRI/SPECT registration algorithm using image intensity and anatomical feature as matching characters: application on the evaluation of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jiann-Der; Huang, Chung-Hsien; Weng, Yi-Hsin; Lin, Kun-Ju; Chen, Chin-Tu

    2007-05-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of dopamine transporters with (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 has recently been proposed to offer valuable information in assessing the functionality of dopaminergic systems. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and SPECT imaging are important in the noninvasive examination of dopamine concentration in vivo. Therefore, this investigation presents an automated MRI/SPECT image registration algorithm based on a new similarity metric. This similarity metric combines anatomical features that are characterized by specific binding, the mean count per voxel in putamens and caudate nuclei, and the distribution of image intensity that is characterized by normalized mutual information (NMI). A preprocess, a novel two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm, is also presented for MRI/SPECT registration. Clinical MRI/SPECT data from 18 healthy subjects and 13 Parkinson's disease (PD) patients are involved to validate the performance of the proposed algorithms. An appropriate color map, such as "rainbow," for image display enables the two-cluster SPECT normalization algorithm to provide clinically meaningful visual contrast. The proposed registration scheme reduces target registration error from >7 mm for conventional registration algorithm based on NMI to approximately 4 mm. The error in the specific/nonspecific (99m)Tc-TRODAT-1 binding ratio, which is employed as a quantitative measure of TRODAT receptor binding, is also reduced from 0.45+/-0.22 to 0.08+/-0.06 among healthy subjects and from 0.28+/-0.18 to 0.12+/-0.09 among PD patients.

  16. A toolbox for rockfall Quantitative Risk Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agliardi, F.; Mavrouli, O.; Schubert, M.; Corominas, J.; Crosta, G. B.; Faber, M. H.; Frattini, P.; Narasimhan, H.

    2012-04-01

    Rockfall Quantitative Risk Analysis for mitigation design and implementation requires evaluating the probability of rockfall events, the probability and intensity of impacts on structures (elements at risk and countermeasures), their vulnerability, and the related expected costs for different scenarios. A sound theoretical framework has been developed during the last years both for spatially-distributed and local (i.e. single element at risk) analyses. Nevertheless, the practical application of existing methodologies remains challenging, due to difficulties in the collection of required data and to the lack of simple, dedicated analysis tools. In order to fill this gap, specific tools have been developed in the form of Excel spreadsheets, in the framework of Safeland EU project. These tools can be used by stakeholders, practitioners and other interested parties for the quantitative calculation of rock fall risk through its key components (probabilities, vulnerability, loss), using combinations of deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Three tools have been developed, namely: QuRAR (by UNIMIB), VulBlock (by UPC), and RiskNow-Falling Rocks (by ETH Zurich). QuRAR implements a spatially distributed, quantitative assessment methodology of rockfall risk for individual buildings or structures in a multi-building context (urban area). Risk is calculated in terms of expected annual cost, through the evaluation of rockfall event probability, propagation and impact probability (by 3D numerical modelling of rockfall trajectories), and empirical vulnerability for different risk protection scenarios. Vulblock allows a detailed, analytical calculation of the vulnerability of reinforced concrete frame buildings to rockfalls and related fragility curves, both as functions of block velocity and the size. The calculated vulnerability can be integrated in other methodologies/procedures based on the risk equation, by incorporating the uncertainty of the impact location of the rock

  17. Comparison of image quality, myocardial perfusion, and left ventricular function between standard imaging and single-injection ultra-low-dose imaging using a high-efficiency SPECT camera: the MILLISIEVERT study.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Andrew J; Blankstein, Ron; Andrews, Howard; Fish, Mathews; Padgett, Richard; Hayes, Sean W; Friedman, John D; Qureshi, Mehreen; Rakotoarivelo, Harivony; Slomka, Piotr; Nakazato, Ryo; Bokhari, Sabahat; Di Carli, Marcello; Berman, Daniel S

    2014-09-01

    SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging plays a central role in coronary artery disease diagnosis, but concerns exist regarding its radiation burden. Compared with standard Anger SPECT (A-SPECT) cameras, new high-efficiency (HE) cameras with specialized collimators and solid-state cadmium-zinc-telluride detectors offer potential to maintain image quality (IQ), while reducing administered activity and thus radiation dose to patients. No previous study has compared IQ, interpretation, total perfusion deficit (TPD), or ejection fraction (EF) in patients receiving both ultra-low-dose (ULD) imaging on an HE SPECT camera and standard low-dose (SLD) A-SPECT imaging. We compared ULD HE SPECT with SLD A-SPECT imaging by dividing the rest dose in 101 patients at 3 sites scheduled to undergo clinical A-SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging using a same day rest-stress (99m)Tc protocol. Patients underwent HE SPECT imaging after an initial approximately 130-MBq (3.5 mCi) dose and SLD-A-SPECT imaging after the remainder of the planned dose. Images were scored visually by 2 masked readers for IQ and summed rest score. TPD and EF were assessed quantitatively. Mean activity was 134 MBq (3.62 mCi) for ULD HE SPECT (effective dose, 1.15 mSv) and 278 MBq (7.50 mCi, 2.39 mSv) for SLD A-SPECT. Overall IQ was superior for ULD HE SPECT (P < 0.0001), with twice as many studies graded excellent quality. Extracardiac activity and overall perfusion assessment were similar. Between-method correlations were high for summed rest score (r = 0.87), TPD (r = 0.91), and EF (r = 0.88). ULD HE SPECT rest imaging correlates highly with SLD A-SPECT. It has improved image quality, comparable extracardiac activity, and achieves radiation dose reduction to 1 mSv for a single injection. © 2014 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  18. Wiener filtering improves quantification of regional myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Links, J.M.; Jeremy, R.W.; Dyer, S.M.; Frank, T.L.; Becker, L.C. )

    1990-07-01

    Quantitation of myocardial perfusion with thallium-201 (201Tl) SPECT is limited by finite resolution and image noise. This study examined whether Wiener filtering could improve quantitation of the severity of myocardial perfusion deficits. In 19 anesthetized dogs, adjustable stenoses were placed on the left anterior descending (LAD, n = 12) or circumflex (LCx, n = 7) arteries. Thallium-201 SPECT images were acquired during maximal coronary vasodilation with dipyridamole, and simultaneous measurements of myocardial blood flow were made with microspheres. The relationship between SPECT and microsphere flow deficits in the LAD region was significantly better (p less than 0.05) with Wiener filtering (Y = 0.90X + 0.03, r = 0.78) than with conventional Hanning filtering (Y = 0.66X + 0.34, r = 0.61). Similarly, in the LCx region the relationship between SPECT and microsphere perfusion deficits was better (p less than 0.01) with the Wiener filter (Y = 0.91X + 0.07, r = 0.66) than with the Hanning filter (Y = 0.36X + 0.50, r = 0.40). Wiener filtering improves quantitation of the severity of regional myocardial perfusion deficits, allowing better assessment of the functional significance of coronary artery stenoses.

  19. Technological Development and Advances in SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Youngho; Aparici, Carina Mari; Hasegawa, Bruce H

    2010-01-01

    SPECT/CT has emerged over the past decade as a means of correlating anatomical information from CT with functional information from SPECT. The integration of SPECT and CT in a single imaging device facilitates anatomical localization of the radiopharmaceutical to differentiate physiological uptake from that associated with disease and patient-specific attenuation correction to improve the visual quality and quantitative accuracy of the SPECT image. The first clinically available SPECT/CT systems performed emission-transmission imaging using a dual-headed SPECT camera and a low-power x-ray CT sub-system. Newer SPECT/CT systems are available with high-power CT sub-systems suitable for detailed anatomical diagnosis, including CT coronary angiography and coronary calcification that can be correlated with myocardial perfusion measurements. The high-performance CT capabilities also offer the potential to improve compensation of partial volume errors for more accurate quantitation of radionuclide measurement of myocardial blood flow and other physiological processes and for radiation dosimetry for radionuclide therapy. In addition, new SPECT technologies are being developed that significantly improve the detection efficiency and spatial resolution for radionuclide imaging of small organs including the heart, brain, and breast, and therefore may provide new capabilities for SPECT/CT imaging in these important clinical applications. PMID:18396178

  20. SPECT in the diagnosis of hepatic hemangioma

    SciTech Connect

    Brunetti, J.C.; Van Heertum, R.L.; Yudd, A.P.

    1985-05-01

    Tc99m labeled red blood cell blood flow and delayed static blood pool imaging is widely accepted as a reliable, accurate method for the diagnosis of hepatic hemangiomata. The purpose of this study is to assess the relative value of SPECT blood pool imaging in the evaluation of hepatic hemangionata. A total of 68 patients, including 21 patients with proven hepatic cavernous hemangiomas, were studied using both planar and SPECT imaging techniques. All patients underwent multi-phase evaluation which included a hepatic flow study, immediate planar images of the liver, followed by a 360/sup 0/ tomographic (SPECT) study and subsequent 60 minute delayed static planar hepatic blood pool images. All 21 patients with proven hepatic hemangiomas had a positive SPECT exam and 17 of the 21 (81%) patients had a positive planar exam. In the 21 patients, there were a total of 36 hemangiomas ranging in size from .7 cm to 13 cm. The SPECT imaging technique correctly identified all 36 lesions (100%) where as planar imaging detected 25 of the 36 lesions (69.4%). In all the remaining patients (10-normal, 17-metastatic disease, 12-hepatocellular disease, 6-hepatoma, 2-liver cysts), both the planar and SPECT imaging techniques were interpreted as showing no evidence of focal sequestration of red blood cells. SPECT hepatic blood pool imaging represents an improvement in the evaluation of hepatic hemangioma as a result of a reduction in imaging time (less than thirty minutes), improved spatial resolution and greater overall accuracy.

  1. [Quantitative assessment of quality of vision].

    PubMed

    Oshika, Tetsuro

    2004-12-01

    The importance of quality of vision (QOV) along with quality of life (QOL) in medicine has been recently widely recognized. We have conducted studies to quantitatively analyze factors related to QOV. Irregular astigmatism can be a significant obstacle for achieving satisfactory QOV. Videokeratography data were broken down using Fourier harmonic series analysis into spherical power, regular astigmatism (second harmonic component, n = 2), asymmetry (n = 1), and higher order irregularity (n > or = 3). The irregular astigmatism component calculated by the Fourier analysis significantly correlated with best spectacle-corrected visual acuity. Software was developed to display color-coded maps for the four Fourier indices. The normal range was defined for each Fourier index, and eyes with pathologic and postsurgical conditions were evaluated using the normal range. Progression of keratoconus over time was quantitatively described by Fourier analysis of the videokeratography data. Using the Fourier method, changes in corneal topography following suture removal after penetrating keratoplasty were evaluated. Fourier analysis of videokeratography data significantly facilitated determination of refraction and measurement of best spectacle-corrected visual acuity in eyes with corneal irregular astigmatism such as post-penetrating keratoplasty eyes. Higher-order wavefront aberrations of the cornea were calculated by expanding videokeratography elevation data into Zernike polynomials, and coma and spherical aberrations were computed. For ocular aberrations, the data obtained with the Hartmann-Shack sensor were decomposed into Zernike polynomials. Coma aberrations of the cornea significantly correlated with age, while corneal spherical aberrations showed no age-related changes. The time-course of changes in corneal higher-order aberrations was reported for photorefractive keratectomy and laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK). For ocular aberrations, the degree of tilting of the

  2. Poster — Thur Eve — 06: Dose assessment of cone beam CT imaging protocols as part of SPECT/CT examinations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonkopi, E; Ross, AA

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To assess radiation dose from the cone beam CT (CBCT) component of SPECT/CT studies and to compare with other CT examinations performed in our institution. Methods: We used an anthropomorphic chest phantom and the 6 cc ion chamber to measure entrance breast dose for several CBCT and diagnostic CT acquisition protocols. The CBCT effective dose was calculated with ImPACT software; the CT effective dose was evaluated from the DLP value and conversion factor, dependent on the anatomic region. The RADAR medical procedure radiation dose calculator was used to assess the nuclear medicine component of exam dose. Results: The entrance dose to the breast measured with the anthropomorphic phantom was 0.48 mGy and 9.41 mGy for cardiac and chest CBCT scans; and 4.59 mGy for diagnostic thoracic CT. The effective doses were 0.2 mSv, 3.2 mSv and 2.8 mSv respectively. For a small patient represented by the anthropomorphic phantom, the dose from the diagnostic CT was lower than from the CBCT scan, as a result of the exposure reduction options available on modern CT scanners. The CBCT protocols used the same fixed scanning techniques. The diagnostic CT dose based on the patient data was 35% higher than the phantom dose. For most SPECT/CT studies the dose from the CBCT component was comparable with the dose from the radiopharmaceutical. Conclusions: The patient radiation dose from the cone beam CT scan can be higher than that from a diagnostic CT and should be taken into consideration in evaluating total SPECT/CT patient dose.

  3. Assessment of a Monte-Carlo simulation of SPECT recordings from a new-generation heart-centric semiconductor camera: from point sources to human images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbert, Laetitia; Galbrun, Ernest; Odille, Freddy; Poussier, Sylvain; Noel, Alain; Wolf, Didier; Karcher, Gilles; Marie, Pierre-Yves

    2015-02-01

    Geant4 application for tomographic emission (GATE), a Monte-Carlo simulation platform, has previously been used for optimizing tomoscintigraphic images recorded with scintillation Anger cameras but not with the new-generation heart-centric cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras. Using the GATE platform, this study aimed at simulating the SPECT recordings from one of these new CZT cameras and to assess this simulation by direct comparison between simulated and actual recorded data, ranging from point sources to human images. Geometry and movement of detectors, as well as their respective energy responses, were modeled for the CZT ‘D.SPECT’ camera in the GATE platform. Both simulated and actual recorded data were obtained from: (1) point and linear sources of 99mTc for compared assessments of detection sensitivity and spatial resolution, (2) a cardiac insert filled with a 99mTc solution for compared assessments of contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness of myocardial borders and (3) in a patient with myocardial infarction using segmented cardiac magnetic resonance imaging images. Most of the data from the simulated images exhibited high concordance with the results of actual images with relative differences of only: (1) 0.5% for detection sensitivity, (2) 6.7% for spatial resolution, (3) 2.6% for contrast-to-noise ratio and 5.0% for sharpness index on the cardiac insert placed in a diffusing environment. There was also good concordance between actual and simulated gated-SPECT patient images for the delineation of the myocardial infarction area, although the quality of the simulated images was clearly superior with increases around 50% for both contrast-to-noise ratio and sharpness index. SPECT recordings from a new heart-centric CZT camera can be simulated with the GATE software with high concordance relative to the actual physical properties of this camera. These simulations may be conducted up to the stage of human SPECT-images even if further refinement is needed

  4. Assessing Cardiac Injury in Mice With Dual Energy-MicroCT, 4D-MicroCT, and MicroSPECT Imaging After Partial Heart Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chang-Lung; Min, Hooney; Befera, Nicholas; Clark, Darin; Qi, Yi; Das, Shiva; Johnson, G. Allan; Badea, Cristian T.; Kirsch, David G.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To develop a mouse model of cardiac injury after partial heart irradiation (PHI) and to test whether dual energy (DE)-microCT and 4-dimensional (4D)-microCT can be used to assess cardiac injury after PHI to complement myocardial perfusion imaging using micro-single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods and Materials: To study cardiac injury from tangent field irradiation in mice, we used a small-field biological irradiator to deliver a single dose of 12 Gy x-rays to approximately one-third of the left ventricle (LV) of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} and Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, where 1 or both alleles of p53 are deleted in endothelial cells. Four and 8 weeks after irradiation, mice were injected with gold and iodinated nanoparticle-based contrast agents, and imaged with DE-microCT and 4D-microCT to evaluate myocardial vascular permeability and cardiac function, respectively. Additionally, the same mice were imaged with microSPECT to assess myocardial perfusion. Results: After PHI with tangent fields, DE-microCT scans showed a time-dependent increase in accumulation of gold nanoparticles (AuNp) in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice. In Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, extravasation of AuNp was observed within the irradiated LV, whereas in the myocardium of Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/+} mice, AuNp were restricted to blood vessels. In addition, data from DE-microCT and microSPECT showed a linear correlation (R{sup 2} = 0.97) between the fraction of the LV that accumulated AuNp and the fraction of LV with a perfusion defect. Furthermore, 4D-microCT scans demonstrated that PHI caused a markedly decreased ejection fraction, and higher end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes, to develop in Tie2Cre; p53{sup FL/−} mice, which were associated with compensatory cardiac hypertrophy of the heart that was not irradiated. Conclusions: Our results show that DE-microCT and 4D-microCT with nanoparticle-based contrast agents are novel imaging approaches

  5. The quantitative assessment of body iron.

    PubMed

    Cook, James D; Flowers, Carol H; Skikne, Barry S

    2003-05-01

    Current initiatives to reduce the high prevalence of nutritional iron deficiency have highlighted the need for reliable epidemiologic methods to assess iron status. The present report describes a method for estimating body iron based on the ratio of the serum transferrin receptor to serum ferritin. Analysis showed a single normal distribution of body iron stores in US men aged 20 to 65 years (mean +/- 1 SD, 9.82 +/- 2.82 mg/kg). A single normal distribution was also observed in pregnant Jamaican women (mean +/- 1 SD, 0.09 +/- 4.48 mg/kg). Distribution analysis in US women aged 20 to 45 years indicated 2 populations; 93% of women had body iron stores averaging 5.5 +/- 3.35 mg/kg (mean +/- 1 SD), whereas the remaining 7% of women had a mean tissue iron deficit of 3.87 +/- 3.23 mg/kg. Calculations of body iron in trials of iron supplementation in Jamaica and iron fortification in Vietnam demonstrated that the method can be used to calculate absorption of the added iron. Quantitative estimates of body iron greatly enhance the evaluation of iron status and the sensitivity of iron intervention trials in populations in which inflammation is uncommon or has been excluded by laboratory screening. The method is useful clinically for monitoring iron status in those who are highly susceptible to iron deficiency.

  6. Quantitative Risk Assessment for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowry, T. S.; McKenna, S. A.; Hadgu, T.; Kalinina, E.

    2011-12-01

    This study uses a quantitative risk-assessment approach to place the uncertainty associated with enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) development into meaningful context and to identify points of attack that can reduce risk the most. Using the integrated geothermal assessment tool, GT-Mod, we calculate the complimentary cumulative distribution function of the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) that results from uncertainty in a variety of geologic and economic input parameter values. EGS is a developing technology that taps deep (2-10km) geologic heat sources for energy production by "enhancing" non-permeable hot rock through hydraulic stimulation. Despite the promise of EGS, uncertainties in predicting the physical end economic performance of a site has hindered its development. To address this, we apply a quantitative risk-assessment approach that calculates risk as the sum of the consequence, C, multiplied by the range of the probability, ΔP, over all estimations of a given exceedance probability, n, over time, t. The consequence here is defined as the deviation from the best estimate LCOE, which is calculated using the 'best-guess' input parameter values. The analysis assumes a realistic but fictitious EGS site with uncertainties in the exploration success rate, the sub-surface thermal gradient, the reservoir fracture pattern, and the power plant performance. Uncertainty in the exploration, construction, O&M, and drilling costs are also included. The depth to the resource is calculated from the thermal gradient and a target resource temperature of 225 °C. Thermal performance is simulated using the Gringarten analytical solution. The mass flow rate is set to produce 30 MWe of power for the given conditions and is adjusted over time to maintain that rate over the plant lifetime of 30 years. Simulations are conducted using GT-Mod, which dynamically links the physical systems of a geothermal site to simulate, as an integrated, multi-system component, the

  7. Evaluation by quantitative 99m-technetium MIBI SPECT and echocardiography of myocardial perfusion and wall motion abnormalities in patients with dobutamine-induced ST-segment elevation.

    PubMed

    Elhendy, A; Geleijnse, M L; Roelandt, J R; van Domburg, R T; Cornel, J H; TenCate, F J; Postma-Tjoa, J; Reijs, A E; el-Said, G M; Fioretti, P M

    1995-09-01

    ST-segment elevation during exercise testing has been attributed to myocardial ischemia and wall motion abnormalities (WMA). However, the functional significance of ST-segment elevation during dobutamine stress testing (DST) has not been evaluated in patients referred for diagnostic evaluation of myocardial ischemia. DST (up to 40 micrograms/kg/min) with simultaneous echocardiography and technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) was performed in 229 consecutive patients with suspected myocardial ischemia who were unable to perform an adequate exercise test; 127 (55%) had a previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI). ST elevation was defined as > or = 1 mm new or additional J point elevations with a horizontal or upsloping ST segment lasting 80 ms. Reversible perfusion defects on SPECT and new or worsening WMA during stress on echocardiography were considered diagnostic of ischemia. ST elevation occurred in 40 patients (17%) during the test; 34 of them (85%) had previous AMI. All patients with ST-segment elevation had abnormal scintigrams (fixed or reversible defects, or both) and abnormal wall motion (fixed or transient defect, or both) at peak stress. In patients who had ST elevation and no previous AMI (n = 6), ischemia was detected in all by echocardiography and in 5 (83%) by SPECT. In patients with previous AMI, the prevalence of ischemia was not different with or without ST elevation (53% vs 43% by echocardiography and 53% vs 48% by SPECT, respectively). Baseline regional wall motion score in the infarct zone was higher in patients with ST elevation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Perfusion patterns in postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT after coregistration with MRI in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hogan, R; Cook, M.; Binns, D.; Desmond, P.; Kilpatrick, C.; Murrie, V.; Morris, K.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To assess patterns of postictal cerebral blood flow in the mesial temporal lobe by coregistration of postictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT with MRI in patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy.
METHODS—Ten postictal and interictal 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT scans were coregistered with MRI in 10 patients with confirmed mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Volumetric tracings of the hippocampus and amygdala from the MRI were superimposed on the postictal and interictal SPECT. Asymmetries in hippocampal and amygdala SPECT signal were then calculated using the equation:
 % Asymmetry =100 × (right − left) / (right + left)/2.
RESULTS—In the postictal studies, quantitative measurements of amygdala SPECT intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in all cases, with an average % asymmetry of 11.1, range 5.2-21.9.Hippocampal intensities were greatest on the side of seizure onset in six studies, with an average % asymmetry of 9.6, range 4.7-12.0.In four scans the hippocampal intensities were less on the side of seizure onset, with an average % asymmetry of 10.2, range 5.7-15.5.There was no localising quantitative pattern in interictal studies.
CONCLUSIONS—Postictal SPECT shows distinctive perfusion patterns when coregistered with MRI, which assist in lateralisation of temporal lobe seizures. Hyperperfusion in the region of the amygdala is more consistently lateralising than hyperperfusion in the region of the hippocampus in postictal studies.

 PMID:9285464

  9. Quantitative Assessment of Autistic Symptomatology in Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pine, Elyse; Luby, Joan; Abbacchi, Anna; Constantino, John N.

    2006-01-01

    Given a growing emphasis on early intervention for children with autism, valid quantitative tools for measuring treatment response are needed. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a brief (15-20 minute) quantitative measure of autistic traits in 4-to 18-year-olds, for which a version for 3-year-olds was recently developed. We obtained serial…

  10. Monte Carlo simulations to assess differentiation between defects in cardiac SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrysanthou-Baustert, I.; Parpottas, Y.; Demetriadou, O.; Christofides, S.; Yiannakkaras, Ch; Kaolis, D.; Wasilewska-Radwanska, M.

    2011-09-01

    Differentiating between various types of lesions in nuclear cardiology is a challenge. This work assesses the level of differentiation achievable between various low contrast lesions, as encountered in nuclear cardiology. The parameters investigated are defect extend, defect thickness and perfusion reduction of the defect. The images have been obtained through Monte Carlo Simulations with the program SIMIND. Results show that acceptable size resolution is obtained for defects with an extend over 25×25mm. When thickness and perfusion reduction are both unknown, the imaging results are confounding. In this work, thickness and perfusion reduction cannot be differentiated. If one of the variables is known (thickness or perfusion reduction), imaging results can differentiate between the other unknown variable.

  11. Altered myocardial perfusion in patients with angina pectoris or silent ischemia during exercise as assessed by quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmarian, J.J.; Pratt, C.M.; Cocanougher, M.K.; Verani, M.S. )

    1990-10-01

    The extent of abnormally perfused myocardium was compared in patients with and without chest pain during treadmill exercise from a large, relatively low-risk consecutive patient population (n = 356) referred for quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). All patients had concurrent coronary angiography. Patients were excluded if they had prior coronary angioplasty or bypass surgery. Tomographic images were assessed visually and from computer-generated polar maps. Chest pain during exercise was as frequent in patients with normal coronary arteries (12%) as in those with significant (greater than 50% stenosis) coronary artery disease (CAD) (14%). In the 219 patients with significant CAD, silent ischemia was fivefold more common than symptomatic ischemia (83% versus 17%, p = 0.0001). However, there were no differences in the extent, severity, or distribution of coronary stenoses in patients with silent or symptomatic ischemia. Our major observation was that the extent of quantified SPECT perfusion defects was nearly identical in patients with (20.9 +/- 15.9%) and without (20.5 +/- 15.6%) exertional chest pain. The sensitivity for detecting the presence of CAD was significantly improved with quantitative SPECT compared with stress electrocardiography (87% versus 65%, p = 0.0001). Although scintigraphic and electrocardiographic evidence of exercise-induced ischemia were comparable in patients with chest pain (67% versus 73%, respectively; p = NS), SPECT was superior to stress electrocardiography for detecting silent myocardial ischemia. The majority of patients in this study with CAD who developed ischemia during exercise testing were asymptomatic, although they exhibited an angiographic profile and extent of abnormally perfused myocardium similar to those of patients with symptomatic ischemia.

  12. 99mTc-Nanocolloid SPECT/MRI Fusion for the Selective Assessment of Nonenlarged Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Patients with Early-Stage Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hoogendam, Jacob P; Zweemer, Ronald P; Hobbelink, Monique G G; van den Bosch, Maurice A A J; Verheijen, René H M; Veldhuis, Wouter B

    2016-04-01

    We aimed to explore the accuracy of (99m)Tc SPECT/MRI fusion for the selective assessment of nonenlarged sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) for diagnosing metastases in early-stage cervical cancer patients. We consecutively included stage IA1-IIB1 cervical cancer patients who presented to our tertiary referral center between March 2011 and February 2015. Patients with enlarged lymph nodes (short axis ≥ 10 mm) on MRI were excluded. Patients underwent an SLN procedure with preoperative (99m)Tc-nanocolloid SPECT/CT-based SLN mapping. When fused datasets of the SPECT and MR images were created, SLNs could be identified on the MR image with accurate correlation to the histologic result of each individual SLN. An experienced radiologist, masked to histology, retrospectively reviewed all fused SPECT/MR images and scored morphologic SLN parameters on a standardized case report form. Logistic regression and receiver-operating curves were used to model the parameters against the SLN status. In 75 cases, 136 SLNs were eligible for analysis, of which 13 (9.6%) contained metastases (8 cases). Three parameters-short-axis diameter, long-axis diameter, and absence of sharp demarcation-significantly predicted metastatic invasion of nonenlarged SLNs, with quality-adjusted odds ratios of 1.42 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.99), 1.28 (95% CI, 1.03-1.57), and 7.55 (95% CI, 1.09-52.28), respectively. The area under the curve of the receiver-operating curves combining these parameters was 0.749 (95% CI, 0.569-0.930). Heterogeneous gadolinium enhancement, cortical thickness, round shape, or SLN size, compared with the nearest non-SLN, showed no association with metastases (P= 0.055-0.795). In cervical cancer patients without enlarged lymph nodes, selective evaluation of only the SLNs-for size and absence of sharp demarcation-can be used to noninvasively assess the presence of metastases. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  13. Comparison of rubidium-82 positron emission tomography and thallium-201 SPECT imaging for detection of coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, R.E.; Schwaiger, M.; Molina, E.; Popma, J.; Gacioch, G.M.; Kalus, M.; Squicciarini, S.; al-Aouar, Z.R.; Schork, A.; Kuhl, D.E. )

    1991-06-15

    The diagnostic performance of rubidium-82 (Rb-82) positron emission tomography (PET) and thallium-201 (Tl-201) single-photon emission-computed tomography (SPECT) for detecting coronary artery disease was investigated in 81 patients (52 men, 29 women). PET studies using 60 mCi of Rb-82 were performed at baseline and after intravenous infusion of 0.56 mg/kg dipyridamole in conjunction with handgrip stress. Tl-201 SPECT was performed after dipyridamole-handgrip stress and, in a subset of patients, after treadmill exercise. Sensitivity, specificity and overall diagnostic accuracy were assessed using both visually and quantitatively interpreted coronary angiograms. The overall sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of PET for detection of coronary artery disease (greater than 50% diameter stenosis) were 84, 88 and 85%, respectively. In comparison, the performance of SPECT revealed a sensitivity of 84%, specificity of 53% (p less than 0.05 vs PET) and accuracy of 79%. Similar results were obtained using either visual or quantitative angiographic criteria for severity of coronary artery disease. In 43 patients without prior myocardial infarction, the sensitivity for detection of disease was 71 and 73%, respectively, similar for both PET and SPECT. There was no significant difference in diagnostic performance between imaging modalities when 2 different modes of stress (exercise treadmill vs intravenous dipyridamole plus handgrip) were used with SPECT imaging. Thus, Rb-82 PET provides improved specificity compared with Tl-201 SPECT for identifying coronary artery disease, most likely due to the higher photon energy of Rb-82 and attenuation correction provided by PET. However, post-test referral cannot be entirely excluded as a potential explanation for the lower specificity of Tl-201 SPECT.

  14. Evaluation of Fisher Information Matrix-Based Methods for Fast Assessment of Image Quality in Pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Pato, Lara R V; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Vandeghinste, Bert; Van Holen, Roel

    2015-09-01

    The accurate determination of the local impulse response and the covariance in voxels from penalized maximum likelihood reconstructed images requires performing reconstructions from many noise realizations of the projection data. As this is usually a very time-consuming process, efficient analytical approximations based on the Fisher information matrix (FIM) have been extensively used in PET and SPECT to estimate these quantities. For 3D imaging, however, additional approximations need to be made to the FIM in order to speed up the calculations. The most common approach is to use the local shift-invariant (LSI) approximation of the FIM, but this assumes specific conditions which are not always necessarily valid. In this paper we take a single-pinhole SPECT system and compare the accuracy of the LSI approximation against two other methods that have been more recently put forward: the non-uniform object-space pixelation (NUOP) and the subsampled FIM. These methods do not assume such restrictive conditions while still increasing the speed of the calculations considerably. Our results indicate that in pinhole SPECT the NUOP and subsampled FIM approaches could be more reliable than the LSI approximation, especially when a high accuracy is required.

  15. Physics process level discrimination of detections for GATE: Assessment of contamination in SPECT and spurious activity in PET

    SciTech Connect

    De Beenhouwer, Jan; Staelens, Steven; Vandenberghe, Stefaan; Verhaeghe, Jeroen; Van Holen, Roel; Rault, Erwann; Lemahieu, Ignace

    2009-04-15

    The GEANT4 application for tomographic emission (GATE) is one of the most detailed Monte Carlo simulation tools for SPECT and PET. It allows for realistic phantoms, complex decay schemes, and a large variety of detector geometries. However, only a fraction of the information in each particle history is available for postprocessing. In order to extend the analysis capabilities of GATE, a flexible framework was developed. This framework allows all detected events to be subdivided according to their type: In PET, true coincidences from others, and in SPECT, geometrically collimated photons from others. The framework of the authors can be applied to any isotope, phantom, and detector geometry available in GATE. It is designed to enhance the usability of GATE for the study of contamination and for the investigation of the properties of current and future prototype detectors. The authors apply the framework to a case study of Bexxar, first assuming labeling with {sup 124}I, then with {sup 131}I. It is shown that with {sup 124}I PET, results with an optimized window improve upon those with the standard window but achieve less than half of the ideal improvement. Nevertheless, {sup 124}I PET shows improved resolution compared to {sup 131}I SPECT with triple-energy-window scatter correction.

  16. Assessment of olfactory nerve by SPECT-MRI image with nasal thallium-201 administration in patients with olfactory impairments in comparison to healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Shiga, Hideaki; Taki, Junichi; Washiyama, Kohshin; Yamamoto, Junpei; Kinase, Sakae; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo; Watanabe, Naoto; Tonami, Hisao; Koshida, Kichiro; Amano, Ryohei; Furukawa, Mitsuru; Miwa, Takaki

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether migration of thallium-201 ((201)Tl) to the olfactory bulb were reduced in patients with olfactory impairments in comparison to healthy volunteers after nasal administration of (201)Tl. 10 healthy volunteers and 21 patients enrolled in the study (19 males and 12 females; 26-71 years old). The causes of olfactory dysfunction in the patients were head trauma (n = 7), upper respiratory tract infection (n = 7), and chronic rhinosinusitis (n = 7). (201)TlCl was administered unilaterally to the olfactory cleft, and SPECT-CT was conducted 24 h later. Separate MRI images were merged with the SPECT images. (201)Tl olfactory migration was also correlated with the volume of the olfactory bulb determined from MRI images, as well as with odor recognition thresholds measured by using T&T olfactometry. Nasal (201)Tl migration to the olfactory bulb was significantly lower in the olfactory-impaired patients than in healthy volunteers. The migration of (201)Tl to the olfactory bulb was significantly correlated with odor recognition thresholds obtained with T&T olfactometry and correlated with the volume of the olfactory bulb determined from MRI images when all subjects were included. Assessment of the (201)Tl migration to the olfactory bulb was the new method for the evaluation of the olfactory nerve connectivity in patients with impaired olfaction.

  17. A Quantitative Approach to Assessing System Evolvability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, John A., III

    2004-01-01

    When selecting a system from multiple candidates, the customer seeks the one that best meets his or her needs. Recently the desire for evolvable systems has become more important and engineers are striving to develop systems that accommodate this need. In response to this search for evolvability, we present a historical perspective on evolvability, propose a refined definition of evolvability, and develop a quantitative method for measuring this property. We address this quantitative methodology from both a theoretical and practical perspective. This quantitative model is then applied to the problem of evolving a lunar mission to a Mars mission as a case study.

  18. Quantitative risk assessment of Listeria monocytogenes in French cold-smoked salmon: I. Quantitative exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Pouillot, Régis; Miconnet, Nicolas; Afchain, Anne-Laure; Delignette-Muller, Marie Laure; Beaufort, Annie; Rosso, Laurent; Denis, Jean-Baptiste; Cornu, Marie

    2007-06-01

    A quantitative assessment of the exposure to Listeria monocytogenes from cold-smoked salmon (CSS) consumption in France is developed. The general framework is a second-order (or two-dimensional) Monte Carlo simulation, which characterizes the uncertainty and variability of the exposure estimate. The model takes into account the competitive bacterial growth between L. monocytogenes and the background competitive flora from the end of the production line to the consumer phase. An original algorithm is proposed to integrate this growth in conditions of varying temperature. As part of a more general project led by the French Food Safety Agency (Afssa), specific data were acquired and modeled for this quantitative exposure assessment model, particularly time-temperature profiles, prevalence data, and contamination-level data. The sensitivity analysis points out the main influence of the mean temperature in household refrigerators and the prevalence of contaminated CSS on the exposure level. The outputs of this model can be used as inputs for further risk assessment.

  19. Combining FDG-PET and 99mTc-SPECT to predict functional outcome after coronary artery bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Lehtinen, Miia; Schildt, Jukka; Ahonen, Aapo; Nikkinen, Päivi; Lauerma, Kirsi; Sinisalo, Juha; Kankuri, Esko; Vento, Antti; Pätilä, Tommi; Harjula, Ari

    2015-09-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) are suggested to improve clinical decision-making in ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Here, we present a unique cohort of patients who underwent nuclear medicine studies and cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) both before and 1 year after coronary artery bypass (CABG) surgery to assess benefit from surgery. Before CABG, we applied three quantitative techniques using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET and (99m)technetium-tetrofosmin-SPECT with a software tool to measure defects with hypoperfused but viable and non-viable myocardium in 15 patients. One method used solely PET, two others combined PET and SPECT at different thresholds. As a reference, we used change in left-ventricular (LV) function and volume by MRI. Preoperatively, ischaemic but viable areas detected by the method with a 10% threshold combining PET-SPECT and the PET-only method correlated significantly with preoperative regional wall thickening (WT; P = 0.03 and P = 0.005, respectively). When compared with global functional outcome (change in LV ejection fraction) and LV remodelling (change in end-diastolic volume) 1 year postoperatively, no correlation appeared with preoperative PET- or PET-SPECT-derived viable or non-viable tissue. Neither was any correlation observable between local change in WT and local preoperative defect size evaluated by any of these three methods. Preoperatively, PET and PET-SPECT with 10% threshold detected dysfunctional myocardium, but all analysis methods failed to predict 1-year functional outcome assessed by MRI. In patients with three-vessel disease and heart failure, SPECT perfusion and PET viability study results show substantial heterogeneity; this should be considered when selecting patients for revascularization. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Assessment of fatty acid metabolism in taxan-induced myocardial damage with iodine-123 BMIPP SPECT: comparative study with myocardial perfusion, left ventricular function, and histopathological findings.

    PubMed

    Saito, Kimimasa; Takeda, Kan; Imanaka-Yoshida, Kyoko; Imai, Hiroshi; Sekine, Takao; Kamikura, Yuko

    2003-09-01

    We investigated myocardial fatty acid metabolism in taxan-induced myocardial damage in patients with advanced lung cancer. Twenty-five patients with non-small-cell lung cancer were treated with taxan combined with carboplatin intravenously for three cycles. Myocardial SPECT imaging using 99mTc-methoxyisobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) and 123I-15-(p-iodophenyl)-3-(R,S)-methylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) was performed successively before and after chemotherapy. Regional uptake scores of BMIPP and MIBI were visually assessed and total uptake scores and the number of abnormal segments were calculated. Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was obtained by first-pass radionuclide angiocardiography using MIBI. Postmortem pathological examination was performed in 5 patients. Total BMIPP uptake scores after chemotherapy were significantly lower than those before chemotherapy (23.4 +/- 3.4 vs. 26.6 +/- 0.8; p < 0.001). Mean LVEF showed a significant decrease after chemotherapy. Of the 25 patients, 4 exhibited a decrease in LVEF of more than 10%, 1 had a decrease in LVEF to below 50%, and 1 developed congestive heart failure. These 6 patients had significant decreases in total BMIPP uptake scores and increases in the number of abnormal segments as compared with the other 19 patients. Histopathological examination of myocardial tissue showed interstitial edema and disarrayed myocardial cells. Taxan impairs myocardial fatty acid metabolism. 123I-BMIPP myocardial SPECT is useful for evaluating the cardiotoxicity induced by taxan.

  1. Organ volume estimation using SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Zaidi, H.

    1996-06-01

    Knowledge of in vivo thyroid volume has both diagnostic and therapeutic importance and could lead to a more precise quantification of absolute activity contained in the thyroid gland. In order to improve single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantitation, attenuation correction was performed according to Chang`s algorithm. The dual window method was used for scatter subtraction. The author used a Monte Carlo simulation of the SPECT system to accurately determine the scatter multiplier factor k. Volume estimation using SPECT was performed by summing up the volume elements (voxels) lying within the contour of the object, determined by a fixed threshold and the gray level histogram (GLH) method. Thyroid phantom and patient studies were performed and the influence of (1) fixed thresholding, (2) automatic thresholding, (3) attenuation, (4) scatter, and (5) reconstruction filter were investigated. This study shows that accurate volume estimation of the thyroid gland is feasible when accurate corrections are performed. The relative error is within 7% for the GLH method combined with attenuation and scatter corrections.

  2. A Quantitative Model for Assessing Faculty Promotion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tekian, Ara; And Others

    This paper describes a quantitative model that can be used to evaluate faculty performance for promotion decisions. Through the use of an evaluation form, the system (1) informs faculty members how they will be evaluated at the end of each academic year; (2) allows faculty growth to be documented in teaching, research, and other activities which…

  3. Assessing Quantitative Reasoning in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunes, Terezinha; Bryant, Peter; Evans, Deborah; Barros, Rossana

    2015-01-01

    Before starting school, many children reason logically about concepts that are basic to their later mathematical learning. We describe a measure of quantitative reasoning that was administered to children at school entry (mean age 5.8 years) and accounted for more variance in a mathematical attainment test than general cognitive ability 16 months…

  4. Evaluation of MR perfusion abnormalities in organophosphorus poisoning and its correlation with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Bhanu, K Uday; Khandelwal, Niranjan; Vyas, Sameer; Singh, Paramjeet; Prabhakar, Anuj; Mittal, B R; Bhalla, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Acute organophosphate (OP) pesticide poisoning causes substantial morbidity and mortality worldwide. Many imaging modalities, such as computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) of the brain, have been used for quantitative assessment of the acute brain insult caused by acute OP poisoning. Perfusion defects on SPECT in acutely poisoned patients with OPs have been described, however, MR perfusion abnormalities have not been described in the literature. MR perfusion Imaging has the advantage of having higher spatial resolution, no radiation, and better availability. In this prospective study, 20 patients who ingested OP compounds were included. All the patients underwent brain SPECT on a dual head SPECT gamma camera and MRI brain on a 1.5T MR system. Neurocognitive tests were performed for all patients. SPECT showed perfusion defects in 7 patients and total number of perfusion defects were 29. On MR perfusion, based on the cut-off values of normalized cerebral blood volume (nCBV) ratios and normalized cerebral blood flow (nCBF) ratios, the total number of patients showing perfusion defects were 6 and 8; and the total number of perfusion defects were 29 and 45, respectively. There was significant difference of the nCBV ratios and nCBF ratios between the control group (n = 20) and positive patients group (n = 6 and n = 8, respectively) (P > 0.05). All the defects seen on SPECT were well appreciated on nCBF maps (MRI perfusion) suggestive of 100% correlation. MR perfusion imaging can be used as an effective modality for evaluation in acute OP poisoning.

  5. SPECT radiopharmaceuticals for dementia.

    PubMed

    Guidotti, Claudio; Farioli, Daniela; Gaeta, Maria Chiara; Giovannini, Elisabetta; Lazzeri, Patrizia; Meniconi, Martina; Ciarmiello, Andrea

    2013-12-01

    Over the last decade the interest towards functional neuroimaging has gradually increased, especially in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. At present, diagnosis of dementia is mostly clinical. Numerous modalities of neuroimaging are today available, each of them allowing a different aspect of neurodegeneration to be investigated. Although during the last period many have predicted a forthcoming disappearance of SPECT imaging in favour of the PET imaging, many new radiotracers SPECT, dual-SPECT tracers techniques and receptor targeting designed radiopharmaceuticals are currently at study. Besides, last decade has also assisted to the development of new SPECT imaging systems, most of them integrated with other imaging modalities (MRI, CT, ultrasound techniques), granting improved imaging capabilities. All these improved conditions, especially appealing for the neuroimaging, together with the new radiopharmaceuticals in development may renovate the interest for SPECT clinical applications.

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Robot-Generated Maps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrapper, C.; Madhavan, R.; Lakaemper, R.; Censi, A.; Godil, A.; Wagan, A.; Jacoff, A.

    Mobile robotic mapping is now considered to be a sufficiently mature field with demonstrated successes in various domains. While much progress has been made in the development of computationally efficient and consistent mapping schemes, it is still murky, at best, on how these maps can be evaluated. We are motivated by the absence of an accepted standard for quantitatively measuring the performance of robotic mapping systems against user-defined requirements. It is our belief that the development of standardized methods for quantitatively evaluating existing robotic technologies will improve the utility of mobile robots in already established application areas, such as vacuum cleaning, robot surveillance, and bomb disposal. This approach will also enable the proliferation and acceptance of such technologies in emerging markets. This chapter summarizes our preliminary efforts by bringing together the research community towards addressing this important problem which has ramifications not only from researchers' perspective but also from consumers', robot manufacturers', and developers' viewpoints.

  7. Reproducibility of area at risk assessment in acute myocardial infarction by T1- and T2-mapping sequences in cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in comparison to Tc99m-sestamibi SPECT.

    PubMed

    Langhans, Birgit; Nadjiri, Jonathan; Jähnichen, Christin; Kastrati, Adnan; Martinoff, Stefan; Hadamitzky, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Area at risk (AAR) is an important parameter for the assessment of the salvage area after revascularization in acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By combining AAR assessment by T2-weighted imaging and scar quantification by late gadolinium enhancement imaging cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) offers a promising alternative to the "classical" modality of Tc99m-sestamibi single photon emission tomography (SPECT). Current T2 weighted sequences for edema imaging in CMR are limited by low contrast to noise ratios and motion artifacts. During the last years novel CMR imaging techniques for quantification of acute myocardial injury, particularly the T1-mapping and T2-mapping, have attracted rising attention. But no direct comparison between the different sequences in the setting of AMI or a validation against SPECT has been reported so far. We analyzed 14 patients undergoing primary coronary revascularization in AMI in whom both a pre-intervention Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT and CMR imaging at a median of 3.4 (interquartile range 3.3-3.6) days after the acute event were performed. Size of AAR was measured by three different non-contrast CMR techniques on corresponding short axis slices: T2-weighted, fat-suppressed turbospin echo sequence (TSE), T2-mapping from T2-prepared balanced steady state free precession sequences (T2-MAP) and T1-mapping from modified look locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) sequences. For each CMR sequence, the AAR was quantified by appropriate methods (absolute values for mapping sequences, comparison with remote myocardium for other sequences) and correlated with Tc99m-sestamibi-SPECT. All measurements were performed on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. The size of the AAR assessed by CMR was 28.7 ± 20.9 % of left ventricular myocardial volume (%LV) for TSE, 45.8 ± 16.6 %LV for T2-MAP, and 40.1 ± 14.4 %LV for MOLLI. AAR assessed by SPECT measured 41.6 ± 20.7 %LV. Correlation analysis revealed best correlation with SPECT for T2-MAP at a T2-threshold of 60 ms

  8. Phantom Validation of Tc-99m Absolute Quantification in a SPECT/CT Commercial Device

    PubMed Central

    Leite Ferreira, Paulo; Malterre, Jerome; Laub, Priscille; Prior, John O.; Verdun, Francis R.

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Similar to PET, absolute quantitative imaging is becoming available in commercial SPECT/CT devices. This study's goal was to assess quantitative accuracy of activity recovery as a function of image reconstruction parameters and count statistics in a variety of phantoms. Materials and Methods. We performed quantitative 99mTc-SPECT/CT acquisitions (Siemens Symbia Intevo, Erlangen, Germany) of a uniform cylindrical, NEMA/IEC, and an anthropomorphic abdominal phantom. Background activity concentrations tested ranged: 2–80 kBq/mL. SPECT acquisitions used 120 projections (20 s/projection). Reconstructions were performed with the proprietary iterative conjugate gradient algorithm. NEMA phantom reconstructions were obtained as a function of the iteration number (range: 4–48). Recovery coefficients, hot contrast, relative lung error (NEMA phantom), and image noise were assessed. Results. In all cases, absolute activity and activity concentration were measured within 10% of the expected value. Recovery coefficients and hot contrast in hot inserts did not vary appreciably with count statistics. RC converged at 16 iterations for insert size > 22 mm. Relative lung errors were comparable to PET levels indicating the efficient integration of attenuation and scatter corrections with adequate detector modeling. Conclusions. The tested device provided accurate activity recovery within 10% of correct values; these performances are comparable to current generation PET/CT systems. PMID:28096891

  9. A Quantitative Software Risk Assessment Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Alice

    2002-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews a risk assessment model as applied to software development. the presentation uses graphs to demonstrate basic concepts of software reliability. It also discusses the application to the risk model to the software development life cycle.

  10. Effects of CT-based attenuation correction of rat microSPECT images on relative myocardial perfusion and quantitative tracer uptake

    SciTech Connect

    Strydhorst, Jared H. Ruddy, Terrence D.; Wells, R. Glenn

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Our goal in this work was to investigate the impact of CT-based attenuation correction on measurements of rat myocardial perfusion with {sup 99m}Tc and {sup 201}Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Eight male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected with {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin and scanned in a small animal pinhole SPECT/CT scanner. Scans were repeated weekly over a period of 5 weeks. Eight additional rats were injected with {sup 201}Tl and also scanned following a similar protocol. The images were reconstructed with and without attenuation correction, and the relative perfusion was analyzed with the commercial cardiac analysis software. The absolute uptake of {sup 99m}Tc in the heart was also quantified with and without attenuation correction. Results: For {sup 99m}Tc imaging, relative segmental perfusion changed by up to +2.1%/−1.8% as a result of attenuation correction. Relative changes of +3.6%/−1.0% were observed for the {sup 201}Tl images. Interscan and inter-rat reproducibilities of relative segmental perfusion were 2.7% and 3.9%, respectively, for the uncorrected {sup 99m}Tc scans, and 3.6% and 4.3%, respectively, for the {sup 201}Tl scans, and were not significantly affected by attenuation correction for either tracer. Attenuation correction also significantly increased the measured absolute uptake of tetrofosmin and significantly altered the relationship between the rat weight and tracer uptake. Conclusions: Our results show that attenuation correction has a small but statistically significant impact on the relative perfusion measurements in some segments of the heart and does not adversely affect reproducibility. Attenuation correction had a small but statistically significant impact on measured absolute tracer uptake.

  11. Neuroreceptor imaging with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Innis, R B

    1992-11-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging can provide useful measurements of brain receptors and endogenous neurotransmitters and may have significant experimental and clinical applications. This presentation reviews the use of SPECT for neuroreceptor imaging. Studies of receptors for benzodiazepines, dopamine D2 agents, and dopamine reuptake sites will be used to exemplify the capabilities of SPECT. Tracers labeled with the radioisotope 125I have high affinity, high brain uptake, and high ratios of specific to nonspecific binding. Imaging studies of human and nonhuman primate brain will be presented, and the potential clinical applicability of these agents will be discussed.

  12. Effect of long-term treatment with pramipexole or levodopa on presynaptic markers assessed by longitudinal [123I]FP-CIT SPECT and histochemistry.

    PubMed

    Depboylu, Candan; Maurer, Lukas; Matusch, Andreas; Hermanns, Guido; Windolph, Andrea; Béhé, Martin; Oertel, Wolfgang H; Höglinger, Günter U

    2013-10-01

    A previous clinical trial studied the effect of long-term treatment with levodopa (LD) or the dopamine agonist pramipexole (PPX) on disease progression in Parkinson disease using SPECT with the dopamine transporter (DAT)-radioligand [(123)I]β-CIT as surrogate marker. [(123)I]β-CIT binding declined to significantly lower levels in patients receiving LD compared to PPX. However, the interpretation of this difference as LD-induced neurotoxicity, PPX-induced neuroprotection/-regeneration, or only drug-induced regulatory changes of DAT-availability remained controversial. To address this question experimentally, we induced a subtotal lesion of the substantia nigra in mice by bilateral injection of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine. After 4 weeks, mice were treated for 20 weeks orally with LD (100mg/kg/day) or PPX (3mg/kg/day), or water (vehicle) only. The integrity of nigrostriatal projections was assessed by repeated [(123)I]FP-CIT SPECT in vivo and by immunostaining for DAT and the dopamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) after sacrifice. In sham-lesioned mice, we found that both LD and PPX treatment significantly decreased the striatal FP-CIT binding (LD: -21%; PPX: -14%) and TH-immunoreactivity (LD: -42%; PPX: -45%), but increased DAT-immunoreactivity (LD: +42%; PPX: +33%) compared to controls without dopaminergic treatment. In 6-hydroxydopamine-lesioned mice, however, neither LD nor PPX significantly influenced the stably reduced FP-CIT SPECT signal (LD: -66%; PPX: -66%; controls -66%), TH-immunoreactivity (LD: -70%; PPX: -72%; controls: -77%) and DAT-immunoreactivity (LD: -70%; PPX: -75%; controls: -75%) in the striatum or the number of TH-positive cells in the substantia nigra (LD: -88%; PPX: -88%; controls: -86%), compared to lesioned mice without dopaminergic treatment. In conclusion, chronic dopaminergic stimulation with LD or PPX induced similar adaptive presynaptic changes in healthy mice, but no discernible changes in severely lesioned mice

  13. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR QUANTITATIVE RESPONSE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Relative Potency Factor approach (RPF) is used to normalize and combine different toxic potencies among a group of chemicals selected for cumulative risk assessment. The RPF method assumes that the slopes of the dose-response functions are all equal; but this method depends o...

  14. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR QUANTITATIVE RESPONSE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Relative Potency Factor approach (RPF) is used to normalize and combine different toxic potencies among a group of chemicals selected for cumulative risk assessment. The RPF method assumes that the slopes of the dose-response functions are all equal; but this method depends o...

  15. QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR MICROBIAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compared to chemical risk assessment, the process for microbial agents and infectious disease is more complex because of host factors and the variety of settings in which disease transmission can occur. While the National Academy of Science has established a paradigm for performi...

  16. QUANTITATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT FOR MICROBIAL AGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Compared to chemical risk assessment, the process for microbial agents and infectious disease is more complex because of host factors and the variety of settings in which disease transmission can occur. While the National Academy of Science has established a paradigm for performi...

  17. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  18. Quantitative performance assessments for neuromagnetic imaging systems.

    PubMed

    Koga, Ryo; Hiyama, Ei; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sekihara, Kensuke

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a Monte-Carlo simulation method to assess the performance of neuromagnetic imaging systems using two kinds of performance metrics: A-prime metric and spatial resolution. We compute these performance metrics for virtual sensor systems having 80, 160, 320, and 640 sensors, and discuss how the system performance is improved, depending on the number of sensors. We also compute these metrics for existing whole-head MEG systems, MEGvision™ (Yokogawa Electric Corporation, Tokyo, Japan) that uses axial-gradiometer sensors, and TRIUX™ (Elekta Corporate, Stockholm, Sweden) that uses planar-gradiometer and magnetometer sensors. We discuss performance comparisons between these significantly different systems.

  19. Quantitative Assessment of Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Geometry

    PubMed Central

    Shum, Judy; Martufi, Giampaolo; Di Martino, Elena; Washington, Christopher B.; Grisafi, Joseph; Muluk, Satish C.; Finol, Ender A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the maximum transverse diameter of an abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and expansion rate are not entirely reliable indicators of rupture potential. We hypothesize that aneurysm morphology and wall thickness are more predictive of rupture risk and can be the deciding factors in the clinical management of the disease. A non-invasive, image-based evaluation of AAA shape was implemented on a retrospective study of 10 ruptured and 66 unruptured aneurysms. Three-dimensional models were generated from segmented, contrast-enhanced computed tomography images. Geometric indices and regional variations in wall thickness were estimated based on novel segmentation algorithms. A model was created using a J48 decision tree algorithm and its performance was assessed using ten-fold cross validation. Feature selection was performed using the χ2-test. The model correctly classified 65 datasets and had an average prediction accuracy of 86.6% (κ = 0.37). The highest ranked features were sac length, sac height, volume, surface area, maximum diameter, bulge height, and intra-luminal thrombus volume. Given that individual AAAs have complex shapes with local changes in surface curvature and wall thickness, the assessment of AAA rupture risk should be based on the accurate quantification of aneurysmal sac shape and size. PMID:20890661

  20. Quantitative estimation in Health Impact Assessment: Opportunities and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, Rajiv; Seto, Edmund

    2011-04-15

    Health Impact Assessment (HIA) considers multiple effects on health of policies, programs, plans and projects and thus requires the use of diverse analytic tools and sources of evidence. Quantitative estimation has desirable properties for the purpose of HIA but adequate tools for quantification exist currently for a limited number of health impacts and decision settings; furthermore, quantitative estimation generates thorny questions about the precision of estimates and the validity of methodological assumptions. In the United States, HIA has only recently emerged as an independent practice apart from integrated EIA, and this article aims to synthesize the experience with quantitative health effects estimation within that practice. We use examples identified through a scan of available identified instances of quantitative estimation in the U.S. practice experience to illustrate methods applied in different policy settings along with their strengths and limitations. We then discuss opportunity areas and practical considerations for the use of quantitative estimation in HIA.

  1. Individualized risk assessment in neuroblastoma: does the tumoral metabolic activity on (123)I-MIBG SPECT predict the outcome?

    PubMed

    Rogasch, Julian M M; Hundsdoerfer, Patrick; Furth, Christian; Wedel, Florian; Hofheinz, Frank; Krüger, Paul-Christian; Lode, Holger; Brenner, Winfried; Eggert, Angelika; Amthauer, Holger; Schatka, Imke

    2017-08-14

    Risk-adapted treatment in children with neuroblastoma (NB) is based on clinical and genetic factors. This study evaluated the metabolic tumour volume (MTV) and its asphericity (ASP) in pretherapeutic (123)I-MIBG SPECT for individualized image-based prediction of outcome. This retrospective study included 23 children (11 girls, 12 boys; median age 1.8 years, range 0.3-6.8 years) with newly diagnosed NB consecutively examined with pretherapeutic (123)I-MIBG SPECT. Primary tumour MTV and ASP were defined using semiautomatic thresholds. Cox regression analysis, receiver operating characteristic analysis (cut-off determination) and Kaplan-Meier analysis with the log-rank test for event-free survival (EFS) were performed for ASP, MTV, laboratory parameters (including urinary homovanillic acid-to-creatinine ratio, HVA/C), and clinical (age, stage) and genetic factors. Predictive accuracy of the optimal multifactorial model was determined in terms of Harrell's C and likelihood ratio χ (2). Median follow-up was 36 months (range 7-107 months; eight patients showed disease progression/relapse, four patients died). The only significant predictors of EFS in the univariate Cox regression analysis were ASP (p = 0.029; hazard ratio, HR, 1.032 for a one unit increase), MTV (p = 0.038; HR 1.012) and MYCN amplification status (p = 0.047; HR 4.67). The mean EFS in patients with high ASP (>32.0%) and low ASP were 21 and 88 months, respectively (p = 0.013), and in those with high MTV (>46.7 ml) and low MTV were 22 and 87 months, respectively (p = 0.023). A combined risk model of either high ASP and high HVA/C or high MTV and high HVA/C best predicted EFS. In this exploratory study, pretherapeutic image-derived and laboratory markers of tumoral metabolic activity in NB (ASP, MTV, urinary HVA/C) allowed the identification of children with a high and low risk of progression/relapse under current therapy.

  2. Quantitative Assessments of the Martian Hydrosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasue, Jeremie; Mangold, Nicolas; Hauber, Ernst; Clifford, Steve; Feldman, William; Gasnault, Olivier; Grima, Cyril; Maurice, Sylvestre; Mousis, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we review current estimates of the global water inventory of Mars, potential loss mechanisms, the thermophysical characteristics of the different reservoirs that water may be currently stored in, and assess how the planet's hydrosphere and cryosphere evolved with time. First, we summarize the water inventory quantified from geological analyses of surface features related to both liquid water erosion, and ice-related landscapes. They indicate that, throughout most of Martian geologic history (and possibly continuing through to the present day), water was present to substantial depths, with a total inventory ranging from several 100 to as much as 1000 m Global Equivalent Layer (GEL). We then review the most recent estimates of water content based on subsurface detection by orbital and landed instruments, including deep penetrating radars such as SHARAD and MARSIS. We show that the total amount of water measured so far is about 30 m GEL, although a far larger amount of water may be stored below the sounding depths of currently operational instruments. Finally, a global picture of the current state of the subsurface water reservoirs and their evolution is discussed.

  3. Sensitive Quantitative Assessment of Balance Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, Willilam H.

    2007-01-01

    Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) has become a standard technique for objectively quantifying balance control performance, diagnosing the nature of functional impairments underlying balance disorders, and monitoring clinical treatment outcomes. We have long used CDP protocols to assess recovery of sensory-motor function in astronauts following space flight. The most reliable indicators of post-flight crew performance are the sensory organization tests (SOTs), particularly SOTs 5 and 6, which are sensitive to changes in availability and/or utilization of vestibular cues. We have noted, however, that some astronauts exhibiting obvious signs of balance impairment after flight are able to score within clinical norms on these tests, perhaps as a result of adopting competitive strategies or by their natural skills at substituting alternate sensory information sources. This insensitivity of the CDP protocol could underestimate of the degree of impairment and, perhaps, lead to premature release of those crewmembers to normal duties. To improve the sensitivity of the CDP protocol we have introduced static and dynamic head tilt SOT trials into our protocol. The pattern of postflight recovery quantified by the enhanced CDP protocol appears to more aptly track the re-integration of sensory-motor function, with recovery time increasing as the complexity of sensory-motor/biomechanical task increases. The new CDP protocol therefore seems more suitable for monitoring post-flight sensory-motor recovery and for indicating to crewmembers and flight surgeons fitness for return to duty and/or activities of daily living. There may be classes of patients (e.g., athletes, pilots) having motivation and/or performance characteristics similar to astronauts whose sensory-motor treatment outcomes would also be more accurately monitored using the enhanced CDP protocol. Furthermore, the enhanced protocol may be useful in early detection of age-related balance disorders.

  4. Sensitive Quantitative Assessment of Balance Disorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paloski, Willilam H.

    2007-01-01

    Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) has become a standard technique for objectively quantifying balance control performance, diagnosing the nature of functional impairments underlying balance disorders, and monitoring clinical treatment outcomes. We have long used CDP protocols to assess recovery of sensory-motor function in astronauts following space flight. The most reliable indicators of post-flight crew performance are the sensory organization tests (SOTs), particularly SOTs 5 and 6, which are sensitive to changes in availability and/or utilization of vestibular cues. We have noted, however, that some astronauts exhibiting obvious signs of balance impairment after flight are able to score within clinical norms on these tests, perhaps as a result of adopting competitive strategies or by their natural skills at substituting alternate sensory information sources. This insensitivity of the CDP protocol could underestimate of the degree of impairment and, perhaps, lead to premature release of those crewmembers to normal duties. To improve the sensitivity of the CDP protocol we have introduced static and dynamic head tilt SOT trials into our protocol. The pattern of postflight recovery quantified by the enhanced CDP protocol appears to more aptly track the re-integration of sensory-motor function, with recovery time increasing as the complexity of sensory-motor/biomechanical task increases. The new CDP protocol therefore seems more suitable for monitoring post-flight sensory-motor recovery and for indicating to crewmembers and flight surgeons fitness for return to duty and/or activities of daily living. There may be classes of patients (e.g., athletes, pilots) having motivation and/or performance characteristics similar to astronauts whose sensory-motor treatment outcomes would also be more accurately monitored using the enhanced CDP protocol. Furthermore, the enhanced protocol may be useful in early detection of age-related balance disorders.

  5. Quantitative thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography during maximal pharmacologic coronary vasodilation with adenosine for assessing coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, S.; Mahmarian, J.J.; Boyce, T.M.; Verani, M.S. )

    1991-09-01

    The diagnostic value of maximal pharmacologic coronary vasodilation with intravenously administered adenosine in conjunction with thallium-201 single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for detection of coronary artery disease was investigated in 101 consecutive patients who had concomitant coronary arteriography. Tomographic images were assessed visually and from computer-quantified polar maps of the thallium-201 distribution. Significant coronary artery disease, defined as greater than 50% luminal diameter stenosis, was present in 70 patients. The sensitivity for detecting patients with coronary artery disease using quantitative analysis was 87% in the total group, 82% in patients without myocardial infarction and 96% in those with prior myocardial infarction; the specificity was 90%. The sensitivity for diagnosing coronary artery disease in patients without infarction with single-, double-and triple-vessel disease was 76%, 86% and 90%, respectively. All individual stenoses were identified in 68% of patients with double-vessel disease and in 65% of those with triple-vessel disease. The extent of the perfusion defects, as quantified by polar maps, was directly related to the extent of coronary artery disease. In conclusion, quantitative thallium-201 SPECT during adenosine infusion has high sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing the presence of coronary artery disease, localizing the anatomic site of coronary stenosis and identifying the majority of affected vascular regions in patients with multivessel involvement.

  6. A Multimodal Imaging Protocol, (123)I/(99)Tc-Sestamibi, SPECT, and SPECT/CT, in Primary Hyperparathyroidism Adds Limited Benefit for Preoperative Localization.

    PubMed

    Lee, Grace S; McKenzie, Travis J; Mullan, Brian P; Farley, David R; Thompson, Geoffrey B; Richards, Melanie L

    2016-03-01

    Focused parathyroidectomy in primary hyperparathyroidism (1°HPT) is possible with accurate preoperative localization and intraoperative PTH monitoring (IOPTH). The added benefit of multimodal imaging techniques for operative success is unknown. Patients with 1°HPT, who underwent parathyroidectomy in 2012-2014 at a single institution, were retrospectively reviewed. Only the patients who underwent the standardized multimodal imaging workup consisting of (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi subtraction scintigraphy, SPECT, and SPECT/CT were assessed. Of 360 patients who were identified, a curative operation was performed in 96%, using pre-operative imaging and IOPTH. Imaging analysis showed that (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi had a sensitivity of 86% (95% CI 82-90%), positive predictive value (PPV) 93%, and accuracy 81%, based on correct lateralization. SPECT had a sensitivity of 77% (95% CI 72-82%), PPV 92% and accuracy 72%. SPECT/CT had a sensitivity of 75% (95% CI 70-80%), PPV of 94%, and accuracy 71%. There were 3 of 45 (7%) patients with negative sestamibi imaging that had an accurate SPECT and SPECT/CT. Of 312 patients (87%) with positive uptake on sestamibi (93% true positive, 7% false positive), concordant findings were present in 86% SPECT and 84% SPECT/CT. In cases where imaging modalities were discordant, but at least one method was true-positive, (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi was significantly better than both SPECT and SPECT/CT (p < 0.001). The inclusion of SPECT and SPECT/CT in 1°HPT imaging protocol increases patient cost up to 2.4-fold. (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi subtraction imaging is highly sensitive for preoperative localization in 1°HPT. SPECT and SPECT/CT are commonly concordant with (123)I/(99)Tc-sestamibi and rarely increase the sensitivity. Routine inclusion of multimodality imaging technique adds minimal clinical benefit but increases cost to patient in high-volume setting.

  7. A comparison of risk assessment techniques from qualitative to quantitative

    SciTech Connect

    Altenbach, T.J.

    1995-02-13

    Risk assessment techniques vary from purely qualitative approaches, through a regime of semi-qualitative to the more traditional quantitative. Constraints such as time, money, manpower, skills, management perceptions, risk result communication to the public, and political pressures all affect the manner in which risk assessments are carried out. This paper surveys some risk matrix techniques, examining the uses and applicability for each. Limitations and problems for each technique are presented and compared to the others. Risk matrix approaches vary from purely qualitative axis descriptions of accident frequency vs consequences, to fully quantitative axis definitions using multi-attribute utility theory to equate different types of risk from the same operation.

  8. Registration of renal SPECT and 2.5D US images.

    PubMed

    Galdames, Francisco J; Perez, Claudio A; Estévez, Pablo A; Held, Claudio M; Jaillet, Fabrice; Lobo, Gabriel; Donoso, Gilda; Coll, Claudia

    2011-06-01

    Image registration is the process of transforming different image data sets of an object into the same coordinate system. This is a relevant task in the field of medical imaging; one of its objectives is to combine information from different imaging modalities. The main goal of this study is the registration of renal SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) images and a sparse set of ultrasound slices (2.5D US), combining functional and anatomical information. Registration is performed after kidney segmentation in both image types. The SPECT segmentation is achieved using a deformable model based on a simplex mesh. The 2.5D US image segmentation is carried out in each of the 2D slices employing a deformable contour and Gabor filters to capture multi-scale image features. Moreover, a renal medulla detection method was developed to improve the US segmentation. A nonlinear optimization algorithm is used for the registration. In this process, movements caused by patient breathing during US image acquisition are also corrected. Only a few reports describe registration between SPECT images and a sparse set of US slices of the kidney, and they usually employ an optical localizer, unlike our method, that performs movement correction using information only from the SPECT and US images. Moreover, it does not require simultaneous acquisition of both image types. The registration method and both segmentations were evaluated separately. The SPECT segmentation was evaluated qualitatively by medical experts, obtaining a score of 5 over a scale from 1 to 5, where 5 represents a perfect segmentation. The 2.5D US segmentation was evaluated quantitatively, by comparing our method with an expert manual segmentation, and obtaining an average error of 3.3mm. The registration was evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively. Quantitatively the distance between the manual segmentation of the US images and the model extracted from the SPECT image was measured, obtaining an

  9. Impact of injected dose and acquisition time on a normal database by use of 3D-SSP in SPECT images: quantitative simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideo; Hatazawa, Jun; Nakagawara, Jyoji; Ito, Kengo; Ha-Kawa, Sang Kil; Masuda, Yasuhiko; Sugibayashi, Keiichi; Takahashi, Masaaki; Kikuchi, Kei; Katsuta, Noboru

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to validate the accuracy of normal databases (NDBs) with respect to variable injected doses and acquisition times by use of three-dimensional stereotactic surface projections (3D-SSP) in N-isopropyl-p-[123I]-iodoamphetamine (I-123-IMP) brain perfusion images. We constructed NDBs based on brain SPECT images obtained from 29 healthy volunteers. Each NDB was rebuilt under simulated unique conditions by use of dynamic acquisition datasets and comprised injected doses (222, 167, and 111 MBq) and acquisition times (30, 20, and 15 min). We selected seven of 29 datasets derived from the volunteers to simulate patients' data (PD). The simulated PD were designed to include regions of hypoperfusion. The study comprised protocol A (same conditions for PD and NDB) and protocol B (mismatched conditions for PD and NDB). We used 3D-SSP to compare with the Z score and detection error. The average Z scores were decreased significantly in protocol A [PD (High)-NDB (High) vs. PD (Low)-NDB (Low); PD (30 m)-NDB (30 m) vs. PD (15 m)-NDB (15 m) and PD (20 m)-NDB (20 m)].The average Z scores of PD (High) and PD (Medium) with NDB (High) did not differ significantly in protocol B, whereas all others were decreased significantly. The error of detection increased 6.65 % (protocol A) and 32.05 % (protocol B). The Z scores were specific to the injected dose and acquisition time used in 3D-SSP studies, and the calculated Z scores were affected by mismatched injected doses and acquisition times between PD and selected NDBs.

  10. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-Koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-07-01

    Technetium pertechnetate (TcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of TcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of TcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent TcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal-Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other TcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring TcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake.

  11. Quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography for technetium pertechnetate thyroid uptake measurement

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyunjong; Kim, Ji Hyun; Kang, Yeon-koo; Moon, Jae Hoon; So, Young; Lee, Won Woo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: Technetium pertechnetate (99mTcO4) is a radioactive tracer used to assess thyroid function by thyroid uptake system (TUS). However, the TUS often fails to deliver accurate measurements of the percent of thyroid uptake (%thyroid uptake) of 99mTcO4. Here, we investigated the usefulness of quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) after injection of 99mTcO4 in detecting thyroid function abnormalities. Materials and methods: We retrospectively reviewed data from 50 patients (male:female = 15:35; age, 46.2 ± 16.3 years; 17 Graves disease, 13 thyroiditis, and 20 euthyroid). All patients underwent 99mTcO4 quantitative SPECT/CT (185 MBq = 5 mCi), which yielded %thyroid uptake and standardized uptake value (SUV). Twenty-one (10 Graves disease and 11 thyroiditis) of the 50 patients also underwent conventional %thyroid uptake measurements using a TUS. Results: Quantitative SPECT/CT parameters (%thyroid uptake, SUVmean, and SUVmax) were the highest in Graves disease, second highest in euthyroid, and lowest in thyroiditis (P < 0.0001, Kruskal–Wallis test). TUS significantly overestimated the %thyroid uptake compared with SPECT/CT (P < 0.0001, paired t test) because other 99mTcO4 sources in addition to thyroid, such as salivary glands and saliva, contributed to the %thyroid uptake result by TUS, whereas %thyroid uptake, SUVmean and SUVmax from the SPECT/CT were associated with the functional status of thyroid. Conclusions: Quantitative SPECT/CT is more accurate than conventional TUS for measuring 99mTcO4 %thyroid uptake. Quantitative measurements using SPECT/CT may facilitate more accurate assessment of thyroid tracer uptake. PMID:27399139

  12. Left ventricular dyssynchrony assessed by two three-dimensional imaging modalities: phase analysis of gated myocardial perfusion SPECT and tri-plane tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ajmone Marsan, Nina; Henneman, Maureen M.; Chen, Ji; Ypenburg, Claudia; Dibbets, Petra; Ghio, Stefano; Bleeker, Gabe B.; Stokkel, Marcel P.; van der Wall, Ernst E.; Tavazzi, Luigi; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To compare left ventricular (LV) dyssynchrony assessment by phase analysis from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT (GMPS) with LV dyssynchrony assessment by tri-plane tissue Doppler imaging (TDI). Baseline LV dyssynchrony assessed with standard deviation (SD) of time-to-peak systolic velocity of 12 LV segments (Ts-SD) with TDI has proven to be a powerful predictor of response to CRT. Information on LV dyssynchrony can also be provided by GMPS with phase analysis of regional LV maximal count changes throughout the cardiac cycle. Methods Forty heart failure patients, referred for evaluation of potential eligibility for CRT, underwent both 3D echocardiography, with tri-plane TDI, and resting GMPS. From tri-plane TDI, Ts-SD was used as a validated parameter of LV dyssynchrony and compared with different indices (histogram bandwidth, phase SD, histogram skewness and kurtosis) derived from phase analysis of GMPS. Results Histogram bandwidth and phase SD showed good correlation with Ts-SD (r=0.77 and r=0.74, p<0.0001, respectively). Patients with substantial LV dyssynchrony assessed with tri-plane TDI (Ts-SD ≥33 ms) had also significantly higher values of histogram bandwidth and phase SD. Conclusions The results of this study support the use of phase analysis by GMPS to evaluate LV dyssynchrony. Histogram bandwidth and phase SD showed the best correlation with Ts-SD assessed with tri-plane TDI and appeared the most optimal variables for assessment of LV dyssynchrony with GMPS. PMID:17874098

  13. Quantitative health impact assessment: current practice and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Veerman, J; Barendregt, J; Mackenbach, J

    2005-01-01

    Study objective: To assess what methods are used in quantitative health impact assessment (HIA), and to identify areas for future research and development. Design: HIA reports were assessed for (1) methods used to quantify effects of policy on determinants of health (exposure impact assessment) and (2) methods used to quantify health outcomes resulting from changes in exposure to determinants (outcome assessment). Main results: Of 98 prospective HIA studies, 17 reported quantitative estimates of change in exposure to determinants, and 16 gave quantified health outcomes. Eleven (categories of) determinants were quantified up to the level of health outcomes. Methods for exposure impact assessment were: estimation on the basis of routine data and measurements, and various kinds of modelling of traffic related and environmental factors, supplemented with experts' estimates and author's assumptions. Some studies used estimates from other documents pertaining to the policy. For the calculation of health outcomes, variants of epidemiological and toxicological risk assessment were used, in some cases in mathematical models. Conclusions: Quantification is comparatively rare in HIA. Methods are available in the areas of environmental health and, to a lesser extent, traffic accidents, infectious diseases, and behavioural factors. The methods are diverse and their reliability and validity are uncertain. Research and development in the following areas could benefit quantitative HIA: methods to quantify the effect of socioeconomic and behavioural determinants; user friendly simulation models; the use of summary measures of public health, expert opinion and scenario building; and empirical research into validity and reliability. PMID:15831683

  14. Quantitative wearable sensors for objective assessment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Maetzler, Walter; Domingos, Josefa; Srulijes, Karin; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Bloem, Bastiaan R

    2013-10-01

    There is a rapidly growing interest in the quantitative assessment of Parkinson's disease (PD)-associated signs and disability using wearable technology. Both persons with PD and their clinicians see advantages in such developments. Specifically, quantitative assessments using wearable technology may allow for continuous, unobtrusive, objective, and ecologically valid data collection. Also, this approach may improve patient-doctor interaction, influence therapeutic decisions, and ultimately ameliorate patients' global health status. In addition, such measures have the potential to be used as outcome parameters in clinical trials, allowing for frequent assessments; eg, in the home setting. This review discusses promising wearable technology, addresses which parameters should be prioritized in such assessment strategies, and reports about studies that have already investigated daily life issues in PD using this new technology.

  15. Review and current status of SPECT scatter correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Brian F.; Buvat, Irène; Beekman, Freek J.

    2011-07-01

    Detection of scattered gamma quanta degrades image contrast and quantitative accuracy of single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging. This paper reviews methods to characterize and model scatter in SPECT and correct for its image degrading effects, both for clinical and small animal SPECT. Traditionally scatter correction methods were limited in accuracy, noise properties and/or generality and were not very widely applied. For small animal SPECT, these approximate methods of correction are often sufficient since the fraction of detected scattered photons is small. This contrasts with patient imaging where better accuracy can lead to significant improvement of image quality. As a result, over the last two decades, several new and improved scatter correction methods have been developed, although often at the cost of increased complexity and computation time. In concert with (i) the increasing number of energy windows on modern SPECT systems and (ii) excellent attenuation maps provided in SPECT/CT, some of these methods give new opportunities to remove degrading effects of scatter in both standard and complex situations and therefore are a gateway to highly quantitative single- and multi-tracer molecular imaging with improved noise properties. Widespread implementation of such scatter correction methods, however, still requires significant effort.

  16. [The method of quantitative assessment of dentition aesthetic parameters].

    PubMed

    Ryakhovsky, A N; Kalacheva, Ya A

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the formula for calculating the aesthetic index of treatment outcome. The formula was derived on the basis of the obtained regression equations showing the dependence of visual assessment of the value of aesthetic violations. The formula can be used for objective quantitative evaluation of the aesthetics of the teeth when smiling before and after dental treatment.

  17. Qualitative and Quantitative Hippocampal MRI Assessments in Intractable Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Paramdeep; Kaur, Rupinderjeet; Saggar, Kavita; Singh, Gagandeep; Kaur, Amarpreet

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To acquire normative data of hippocampal volumes and T2 relaxation times, to evaluate and compare qualitative and quantitative assessments in evaluating hippocampi in patients with different durations of intractable epilepsy, and to propose an imaging protocol based on performance of these techniques. Methods. MRI analysis was done in 50 nonepileptic controls and 30 patients with intractable epilepsy on 1.5T scanner. Visual assessment and hippocampal volumetry were done on oblique coronal IR/T2W and T1W MP-RAGE images, respectively. T2 relaxation times were measured using 16-echo Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill sequence. Volumetric data was normalized for variation in head size between individuals. Patients were divided into temporal (n = 20) and extratemporal (n = 10) groups based on clinical and EEG localization. Results. In controls, right hippocampal volume was slightly more than the left with no effect of age or gender. In TLE patients, hippocampal volumetry provided maximum concordance with EEG. Visual assessment of unilateral pathology concurred well with measured quantitative values but poorly in cases with bilateral pathologies. There were no significant differences of mean values between extratemporal group and controls group. Quantitative techniques detected mild abnormalities, undetected on visual assessment. Conclusions. Quantitative techniques are more sensitive to diagnose bilateral and mild unilateral hippocampal abnormalities. PMID:23984369

  18. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Final performance report, March 1992--November 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1995-12-01

    Research is described in the following areas: development and evaluation quantitatively of reconstruction algorithms with improved compensations for attenuation, scatter, and geometric collimator response; evaluation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) quantification of iodine 123 and astatine 211; and the development and evaluation of SPECT pinhole imaging for low and medium energy photons.

  19. Assessment of and standardization for quantitative nondestructive test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuschaefer, R. W.; Beal, J. B.

    1972-01-01

    Present capabilities and limitations of nondestructive testing (NDT) as applied to aerospace structures during design, development, production, and operational phases are assessed. It will help determine what useful structural quantitative and qualitative data may be provided from raw materials to vehicle refurbishment. This assessment considers metal alloys systems and bonded composites presently applied in active NASA programs or strong contenders for future use. Quantitative and qualitative data has been summarized from recent literature, and in-house information, and presented along with a description of those structures or standards where the information was obtained. Examples, in tabular form, of NDT technique capabilities and limitations have been provided. NDT techniques discussed and assessed were radiography, ultrasonics, penetrants, thermal, acoustic, and electromagnetic. Quantitative data is sparse; therefore, obtaining statistically reliable flaw detection data must be strongly emphasized. The new requirements for reusable space vehicles have resulted in highly efficient design concepts operating in severe environments. This increases the need for quantitative NDT evaluation of selected structural components, the end item structure, and during refurbishment operations.

  20. [Quantitative method of representative contaminants in groundwater pollution risk assessment].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-Jie; He, Jiang-Tao; Lu, Yan; Liu, Li-Ya; Zhang, Xiao-Liang

    2012-03-01

    In the light of the problem that stress vulnerability assessment in groundwater pollution risk assessment is lack of an effective quantitative system, a new system was proposed based on representative contaminants and corresponding emission quantities through the analysis of groundwater pollution sources. And quantitative method of the representative contaminants in this system was established by analyzing the three properties of representative contaminants and determining the research emphasis using analytic hierarchy process. The method had been applied to the assessment of Beijing groundwater pollution risk. The results demonstrated that the representative contaminants hazards greatly depended on different research emphasizes. There were also differences between the sequence of three representative contaminants hazards and their corresponding properties. It suggested that subjective tendency of the research emphasis had a decisive impact on calculation results. In addition, by the means of sequence to normalize the three properties and to unify the quantified properties results would zoom in or out of the relative properties characteristic of different representative contaminants.

  1. Quantitative risk assessment methods for cancer and noncancer effects.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Ronald E

    2012-01-01

    Human health risk assessments have evolved from the more qualitative approaches to more quantitative approaches in the past decade. This has been facilitated by the improvement in computer hardware and software capability and novel computational approaches being slowly recognized by regulatory agencies. These events have helped reduce the reliance on experimental animals as well as better utilization of published animal toxicology data in deriving quantitative toxicity indices that may be useful for risk management purposes. This chapter briefly describes some of the approaches as described in the guidance documents from several of the regulatory agencies as it pertains to hazard identification and dose-response assessment of a chemical. These approaches are contrasted with more novel computational approaches that provide a better grasp of the uncertainty often associated with chemical risk assessments.

  2. Monte Carlo scatter correction for SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zemei

    The goal of this dissertation is to present a quantitatively accurate and computationally fast scatter correction method that is robust and easily accessible for routine applications in SPECT imaging. A Monte Carlo based scatter estimation method is investigated and developed further. The Monte Carlo simulation program SIMIND (Simulating Medical Imaging Nuclear Detectors), was specifically developed to simulate clinical SPECT systems. The SIMIND scatter estimation (SSE) method was developed further using a multithreading technique to distribute the scatter estimation task across multiple threads running concurrently on multi-core CPU's to accelerate the scatter estimation process. An analytical collimator that ensures less noise was used during SSE. The research includes the addition to SIMIND of charge transport modeling in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. Phenomena associated with radiation-induced charge transport including charge trapping, charge diffusion, charge sharing between neighboring detector pixels, as well as uncertainties in the detection process are addressed. Experimental measurements and simulation studies were designed for scintillation crystal based SPECT and CZT based SPECT systems to verify and evaluate the expanded SSE method. Jaszczak Deluxe and Anthropomorphic Torso Phantoms (Data Spectrum Corporation, Hillsborough, NC, USA) were used for experimental measurements and digital versions of the same phantoms employed during simulations to mimic experimental acquisitions. This study design enabled easy comparison of experimental and simulated data. The results have consistently shown that the SSE method performed similarly or better than the triple energy window (TEW) and effective scatter source estimation (ESSE) methods for experiments on all the clinical SPECT systems. The SSE method is proven to be a viable method for scatter estimation for routine clinical use.

  3. Some suggested future directions of quantitative resource assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, D.A.

    2001-01-01

    Future quantitative assessments will be expected to estimate quantities, values, and locations of undiscovered mineral resources in a form that conveys both economic viability and uncertainty associated with the resources. Historically, declining metal prices point to the need for larger deposits over time. Sensitivity analysis demonstrates that the greatest opportunity for reducing uncertainty in assessments lies in lowering uncertainty associated with tonnage estimates. Of all errors possible in assessments, those affecting tonnage estimates are by far the most important. Selecting the correct deposit model is the most important way of controlling errors because the dominance of tonnage-deposit models are the best known predictor of tonnage. Much of the surface is covered with apparently barren rocks and sediments in many large regions. Because many exposed mineral deposits are believed to have been found, a prime concern is the presence of possible mineralized rock under cover. Assessments of areas with resources under cover must rely on extrapolation from surrounding areas, new geologic maps of rocks under cover, or analogy with other well-explored areas that can be considered training tracts. Cover has a profound effect on uncertainty and on methods and procedures of assessments because geology is seldom known and geophysical methods typically have attenuated responses. Many earlier assessment methods were based on relationships of geochemical and geophysical variables to deposits learned from deposits exposed on the surface-these will need to be relearned based on covered deposits. Mineral-deposit models are important in quantitative resource assessments for two reasons: (1) grades and tonnages of most deposit types are significantly different, and (2) deposit types are present in different geologic settings that can be identified from geologic maps. Mineral-deposit models are the keystone in combining the diverse geoscience information on geology, mineral

  4. Status and future of Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment in China

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Q.L.; Barker, G.C.; Gorris, L.G.M.; Tian, M.S.; Song, X.Y.; Malakar, P.K.

    2015-01-01

    Since the implementation of the Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China in 2009 use of Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) has increased. QMRA is used to assess the risk posed to consumers by pathogenic bacteria which cause the majority of foodborne outbreaks in China. This review analyses the progress of QMRA research in China from 2000 to 2013 and discusses 3 possible improvements for the future. These improvements include planning and scoping to initiate QMRA, effectiveness of microbial risk assessment utility for risk management decision making, and application of QMRA to establish appropriate Food Safety Objectives. PMID:26089594

  5. Status and future of Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment in China.

    PubMed

    Dong, Q L; Barker, G C; Gorris, L G M; Tian, M S; Song, X Y; Malakar, P K

    2015-03-01

    Since the implementation of the Food Safety Law of the People's Republic of China in 2009 use of Quantitative Microbiological Risk Assessment (QMRA) has increased. QMRA is used to assess the risk posed to consumers by pathogenic bacteria which cause the majority of foodborne outbreaks in China. This review analyses the progress of QMRA research in China from 2000 to 2013 and discusses 3 possible improvements for the future. These improvements include planning and scoping to initiate QMRA, effectiveness of microbial risk assessment utility for risk management decision making, and application of QMRA to establish appropriate Food Safety Objectives.

  6. Generating Dynamic System Matrices for Dynamic SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the computer program is to generate system matrices that model data acquisition process in dynamic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The application is for the reconstruction of dynamic data from projection measurements that provide the time evolution of activity uptake and wash out in an organ of interest. The measurement of the time activity in the blood and organ tissue provide time-activity curves (TACs) that are used to estimate kinetic parameters. The program provides a correct model of the in vivo spatial and temporal distribution of radioactive in organs. The model accounts for the attenuation of the internal emitting radioactivity, it accounts for the vary point response of the collimators, and correctly models the time variation of the activity in the organs. One important application where the software is being used in a measuring the arterial input function (AIF) in a dynamic SPECT study where the data are acquired from a slow camera rotation. Measurement of the arterial input function (AIF) is essential to deriving quantitative estimates of regional myocardial blood flow using kinetic models. A study was performed to evaluate whether a slowly rotating SPECT system could provide accurate AIF's for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). Methods: Dynamic cardiac SPECT was first performed in human subjects at rest using a Phillips Precedence SPECT/CT scanner. Dynamic measurements of Tc-99m-tetrofosmin in the myocardium were obtained using an infusion time of 2 minutes. Blood input, myocardium tissue and liver TACs were estimated using spatiotemporal splines. These were fit to a one-compartment perfusion model to obtain wash-in rate parameters K1. Results: The spatiotemporal 4D ML-EM reconstructions gave more accurate reconstructions that did standard frame-by-frame 3D ML-EM reconstructions. From additional computer simulations and phantom studies, it was determined that a 1 minute infusion with a SPECT system rotation speed

  7. Radiotherapy of abdomen with precise renal assessment with SPECT/CT imaging (RAPRASI): design and methodology of a prospective trial to improve the understanding of kidney radiation dose response

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The kidneys are a principal dose-limiting organ in radiotherapy for upper abdominal cancers. The current understanding of kidney radiation dose response is rudimentary. More precise dose-volume response models that allow direct correlation of delivered radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function may improve radiotherapy treatment planning for upper-abdominal tumours. Our current understanding of kidney dose response and tolerance is limited and this is hindering efforts to introduce advanced radiotherapy techniques for upper-abdominal cancers, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). The aim of this study is to utilise radiotherapy and combined anatomical/functional imaging data to allow direct correlation of radiation dose with spatio-temporal changes in kidney function. The data can then be used to develop a more precise dose-volume response model which has the potential to optimise and individualise upper abdominal radiotherapy plans. Methods/design The Radiotherapy of Abdomen with Precise Renal Assessment with SPECT/CT Imaging (RAPRASI) is an observational clinical research study with participating sites at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital (SCGH) in Perth, Australia and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre (PMCC) in Melbourne, Australia. Eligible patients are those with upper gastrointestinal cancer, without metastatic disease, undergoing conformal radiotherapy that will involve incidental radiation to one or both kidneys. For each patient, total kidney function is being assessed before commencement of radiotherapy treatment and then at 4, 12, 26, 52 and 78 weeks after the first radiotherapy fraction, using two procedures: a Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR) measurement using the 51Cr-ethylenediamine tetra-acetic acid (EDTA) clearance; and a regional kidney perfusion measurement assessing renal uptake of 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA), imaged with a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography / Computed Tomography (SPECT

  8. Quantitative risk assessments as evidence in civil litigation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, V.R.

    1988-12-01

    Those who prepare quantitative risk assessments do not always appreciate that those assessments might be used as evidence in civil litigation. This paper suggests that litigation attorneys, judges, and juries be regarded as audiences to whom the information in the risk assessment must be communicated. The way that a risk assessment is prepared can affect significantly whether litigation is brought at all, the resolution of evidentiary motions involving the risk assessment, as well as the ultimate outcome of the litigation. This paper discusses certain procedural and evidentiary aspects of the civil litigation process in the hope that a better understanding of that process might lead to the preparation of risk assessments that are more adequately understood by juries, judges, and litigants.

  9. Simplified quantification method for in vivo SPECT/CT imaging of asialoglycoprotein receptor with 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI) to assess and stage hepatic fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Deliang; Guo, Zhide; Zhang, Pu; Li, Yesen; Su, Xinhui; You, Linyi; Gao, Mengna; Liu, Chang; Wu, Hua; Zhang, Xianzhong

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study is to develop a noninvasive method of SPECT imaging to quantify and stage liver fibrosis with an Asialoglycoprotein receptor (ASGP-R) targeting tracer—99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI). ASGP-Rs are well known to specifically express in the mammalian liver. Here, we demonstrated ASGP-R expression decreased in carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced mouse model. ASGP-R expression correlated with liver fibrosis progression. ASGP-R could be a useful marker in the stage of liver fibrosis. Liver uptake value (LUV) derived by SPECT imaging was used to assess liver fibrosis in the CCl4-induced mouse model. LUV = [radioactivity (liver uptake)/radioactivity (injected)] × 100/liver volume. The LUV decreased along with the disease progression. The relationships between LUV and liver hydroxyproline (i.e. collagen), as well as Sirius Red were established and verified. A strong negative linear correlation was found between LUV and hydroxyproline levels (r = −0.83) as well as LUV and Sirius Red quantification (r = −0.83). In conclusion, SPECT imaging with 99mTc-p(VLA-co-VNI) is useful in evaluating and staging liver fibrosis in vivo. PMID:27150943

  10. Ventilation/perfusion SPECT or SPECT/CT for lung function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema?

    PubMed

    Froeling, Vera; Heimann, Uwe; Huebner, Ralf-Harto; Kroencke, Thomas J; Maurer, Martin H; Doellinger, Felix; Geisel, Dominik; Hamm, Bernd; Brenner, Winfried; Schreiter, Nils F

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the utility of attenuation correction (AC) of V/P SPECT images for patients with pulmonary emphysema. Twenty-one patients (mean age 67.6 years) with pulmonary emphysema who underwent V/P SPECT/CT were included. AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images were compared visually and semiquantitatively. Visual comparison of AC/non-AC images was based on a 5-point likert scale. Semiquantitative comparison assessed absolute counts per lung (aCpLu) and lung lobe (aCpLo) for AC/non-AC images using software-based analysis; percentage counts (PC = (aCpLo/aCpLu) × 100) were calculated. Correlation between AC/non-AC V/P SPECT images was analyzed using Spearman's rho correlation coefficient; differences were tested for significance with the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Visual analysis revealed high conformity for AC and non-AC V/P SPECT images. Semiquantitative analysis of PC in AC/non-AC images had an excellent correlation and showed no significant differences in perfusion (ρ = 0.986) or ventilation (ρ = 0.979, p = 0.809) SPECT/CT images. AC of V/P SPECT images for lung lobe-based function imaging in patients with pulmonary emphysema do not improve visual or semiquantitative image analysis.

  11. Combined rest redistribution thallium-201 SPECT and low-dose dobutamine contractility assessment in a simple and practical new viability protocol.

    PubMed

    Heiba, Sherif I; Yee, Gennie; Abdel-Dayem, Hussein M; Youssef, Irini; Coppola, John

    2009-02-01

    Rest-redistribution (RR) thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging is commonly used for myocardial viability evaluation. Contractile reserve (CR) assessment with low-dose dobutamine (LDD) is another method that highly predicts functional recovery following revascularization. In this study, we investigate the feasibility of a new protocol that provides combined Tl-201 uptake, resting and CR functional regional myocardial information in a single examination. A total of 41 patients underwent RR-gated-SPECT Tl-201 myocardial perfusion imaging. The LDD infusion was maintained during delayed imaging. Segmental Tl-201 uptake was classified into normal, fixed decrease (mild to absent) and reversible, and sub-classified by wall motion (WM)/thickening (WT) changes between early resting and delayed LDD gated images into normal, fixed or improved dysfunctional (CR present) segments. Out of 820 examined segments, 33 showed no appreciable Tl-201 uptake to evaluate WM/WT. In a dysfunctional myocardium, CR was significantly higher (P < 0.001) in reversible and fixed than in normal Tl-201 segments. The CR in dysfunctional segments with fixed decrease Tl-201 uptake was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in mild and moderate than in severe fixed defects. Both fixed Tl-201 defects and lack of CR were observed more (P < 0.05) in akinetic/dyskinetic than in hypokinetic segments. Simultaneous assessment of myocardial viability by RR Tl-201 uptake, resting and CR functional regional information is feasible and can be easily attained using this new protocol. Moreover, this protocol requires no additional time or radioactivity when compared with the usual RR Tl-201 protocol. Validation of this protocol with patients' revascularization data is needed.

  12. Differences in resting state regional cerebral blood flow assessed with 99mTc-HMPAO SPECT and brain atlas matching between depressed patients with and without tinnitus.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A; Pagani, M; Jacobsson, H; Lindberg, G; Larsson, S A; Wägner, A; Hällstrom, T

    2002-05-01

    An increased occurrence of major depressive disorder has been reported in tinnitus patients, and of tinnitus in depressive patients. Involvement of several Brodmann areas (BAs) has been reported in tinnitus perception. The aim of this study was to assess the regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) changes in depressed patients with and without tinnitus. The rCBF distribution at rest was compared among 45 patients with a lifetime prevalence of major depressive disorder, of whom 27 had severe tinnitus, and 26 normal healthy subjects. 99mTc-hexamethylenepropylene amine oxime (99mTc-HMPAO) single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), using a three-headed gamma camera, was performed and the uptake in 34 functional sub-volumes of the brain bilaterally was assessed by a computerized brain atlas. Decreased rCBF in right frontal lobe BA 45 (P<0.05), the left parietal lobe BA 39 (P<0.00) and the left visual association cortex BA 18 (P<0.05) was found in tinnitus patients compared with non-tinnitus patients. The proportion of tinnitus patients with pronounced rCBF alterations in one or more of the temporal lobe BAs 41+21+22 was increased compared to gender matched controls (P<0.00) and patients without tinnitus (P<0.05). Positive correlations were found between trait anxiety scales from the Karolinska Scales of Personality and rCBF in tinnitus patients only in three limbic BAs (P<0.01), and inverse correlations in non-tinnitus patients only in five BAs subserving auditory perception and processing (P<0.05). rCBF differences between healthy controls and depressed patients with and without tinnitus were found in this study. The rCBF alterations were distributed in the cortex and were particularly specific in the auditory cortex. These findings suggest that taking audiological symptoms into account may yield more consistent results between rCBF studies of depression.

  13. Quantitative transverse flow assessment using OCT speckle decorrelation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuan; Huang, Yong; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C.; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the use of inter-Ascan speckle decorrelation analysis of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to assess fluid flow. This method allows quantitative measurement of fluid flow in a plane normal to the scanning beam. To validate this method, OCT images were obtained from a micro fluid channel with bovine milk flowing at different speeds. We also imaged a blood vessel from in vivo animal models and performed speckle analysis to asses blood flow.

  14. Predictors of high-risk coronary artery disease in subjects with normal SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Rine; Gransar, Heidi; Slomka, Piotr; Arsanjani, Reza; Shalev, Aryeh; Otaki, Yuka; Friedman, John D; Hayes, Sean W; Thomson, Louise E B; Fish, Mathews; Germano, Guido; Abidov, Aiden; Shaw, Leslee; Rozanski, Alan; Berman, Daniel S

    2016-06-01

    While uncommon, normal stress SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) can be seen in patients with high-risk coronary artery disease (CAD) by invasive coronary angiography (ICA).The predictors of high-risk CAD in patients with normal SPECT-MPI have not been described. We studied 580 patients (age 64 ± 12 years, 49% men) without known CAD who underwent stress-gated SPECT-MPI [exercise (41%) or vasodilator (59%)] <2 months before ICA and had summed stress score (SSS) <4. High-risk CAD was defined as 3 vessels with ≥70% stenosis, 2 vessels with ≥70% stenosis including proximal left anterior descending, or left main with ≥50% stenosis. Obstructive non-high-risk CAD was defined by the presence of a ≥70% stenosis but without having other high-risk criteria. Tenfold cross-validated receiver operating characteristic (ROC) estimates were obtained to assess the predictors of high-risk CAD. Forty-two subjects (7.2%) had high-risk CAD and 168 (29.0%) had obstructive non-high-risk CAD. Variables associated with high-risk CAD were pretest probability of CAD ≥66% (Odds ratio [OR] 3.63, 95% CI 1.6-8.3, P = .002), SSS > 0 (OR 7.46, 95% CI 2.6-21.1, P < 0.001), and abnormal TID (OR 2.16, 95% CI 1.0-4.5, P = 0.044). When substituted for TID, EF change was also predictive of high-risk CAD (OR 0.93, 95% CI 0.9-1.0, P = 0.023). The prevalence of high-risk CAD increased as the number of these predictors increased. In a sub-analysis of patients in whom quantitative total perfusion deficit (TPD) was available, TPD > 0 was also a predictor of high-risk CAD (OR 6.01, 95% CI 1.5-22.2, P = 0.011). Several clinical, stress, and SPECT-MPI findings are associated high-risk CAD among patients with normal SPECT-MPI. Consideration of these factors may improve the overall assessment of the likelihood of high-risk CAD in patients undergoing stress SPECT-MPI.

  15. Multiparametric Quantitative Ultrasound Imaging in Assessment of Chronic Kidney Disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jing; Perlman, Alan; Kalache, Safa; Berman, Nathaniel; Seshan, Surya; Salvatore, Steven; Smith, Lindsey; Wehrli, Natasha; Waldron, Levi; Kodali, Hanish; Chevalier, James

    2017-04-13

    To evaluate the value of multiparametric quantitative ultrasound imaging in assessing chronic kidney disease (CKD) using kidney biopsy pathologic findings as reference standards. We prospectively measured multiparametric quantitative ultrasound markers with grayscale, spectral Doppler, and acoustic radiation force impulse imaging in 25 patients with CKD before kidney biopsy and 10 healthy volunteers. Based on all pathologic (glomerulosclerosis, interstitial fibrosis/tubular atrophy, arteriosclerosis, and edema) scores, the patients with CKD were classified into mild (no grade 3 and <2 of grade 2) and moderate to severe (at least 2 of grade 2 or 1 of grade 3) CKD groups. Multiparametric quantitative ultrasound parameters included kidney length, cortical thickness, pixel intensity, parenchymal shear wave velocity, intrarenal artery peak systolic velocity (PSV), end-diastolic velocity (EDV), and resistive index. We tested the difference in quantitative ultrasound parameters among mild CKD, moderate to severe CKD, and healthy controls using analysis of variance, analyzed correlations of quantitative ultrasound parameters with pathologic scores and the estimated glomerular filtration rate (GFR) using Pearson correlation coefficients, and examined the diagnostic performance of quantitative ultrasound parameters in determining moderate CKD and an estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. There were significant differences in cortical thickness, pixel intensity, PSV, and EDV among the 3 groups (all P < .01). Among quantitative ultrasound parameters, the top areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves for PSV and EDV were 0.88 and 0.97, respectively, for determining pathologic moderate to severe CKD, and 0.76 and 0.86 for estimated GFR of less than 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) . Moderate to good correlations were found for PSV, EDV, and pixel intensity with pathologic scores and estimated GFR. The

  16. Application of Three-Class ROC Analysis to Task-Based Image Quality Assessment of Simultaneous Dual-Isotope Myocardial Perfusion SPECT (MPS)

    PubMed Central

    He, Xin; Song, Xiyun; Frey, Eric C.

    2009-01-01

    The diagnosis of cardiac disease using dual-isotope myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS) is based on the defect status in both stress and rest images, and can be modeled as a three-class task of classifying patients as having no, reversible, or fixed perfusion defects. Simultaneous acquisition protocols for dual-isotope MPS imaging have gained much interest due to their advantages including perfect registration of the 201Tl and 99mTc images in space and time, increased patient comfort, and higher clinical throughput. As a result of simultaneous acquisition, however, crosstalk contamination, where photons emitted by one isotope contribute to the image of the other isotope, degrades image quality. Minimizing the crosstalk is important in obtaining the best possible image quality. One way to minimize the crosstalk is to optimize the injected activity of the two isotopes by considering the three-class nature of the diagnostic problem. To effectively do so, we have previously developed a three-class receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis methodology that extends and unifies the decision theoretic, linear discriminant analysis, and psychophysical foundations of binary ROC analysis in a three-class paradigm. In this work, we applied the proposed three-class ROC methodology to the assessment of the image quality of simultaneous dual-isotope MPS imaging techniques and the determination of the optimal injected activity combination. In addition to this application, the rapid development of diagnostic imaging techniques has produced an increasing number of clinical diagnostic tasks that involve not only disease detection, but also disease characterization and are thus multiclass tasks. This paper provides a practical example of the application of the proposed three-class ROC analysis methodology to medical problems. PMID:18955172

  17. Quantitative-PCR assessment of Cryptosporidium parvum cell culture infection.

    PubMed

    Di Giovanni, George D; LeChevallier, Mark W

    2005-03-01

    A quantitative TaqMan PCR method was developed for assessing the Cryptosporidium parvum infection of in vitro cultivated human ileocecal adenocarcinoma (HCT-8) cell cultures. This method, termed cell culture quantitative sequence detection (CC-QSD), has numerous applications, several of which are presented. CC-QSD was used to investigate parasite infection in cell culture over time, the effects of oocyst treatment on infectivity and infectivity assessment of different C. parvum isolates. CC-QSD revealed that cell culture infection at 24 and 48 h postinoculation was approximately 20 and 60%, respectively, of the endpoint 72-h postinoculation infection. Evaluation of three different lots of C. parvum Iowa isolate oocysts revealed that the mean infection of 0.1 N HCl-treated oocysts was only 36% of the infection obtained with oocysts treated with acidified Hanks' balanced salt solution containing 1% trypsin. CC-QSD comparison of the C. parvum Iowa and TAMU isolates revealed significantly higher levels of infection for the TAMU isolate, which agrees with and supports previous human, animal, and cell culture studies. CC-QSD has the potential to aid in the optimization of Cryptosporidium cell culture methods and facilitate quantitative evaluation of cell culture infectivity experiments.

  18. Quantitative assessment of regional right ventricular function with color kinesis.

    PubMed

    Vignon, P; Weinert, L; Mor-Avi, V; Spencer, K T; Bednarz, J; Lang, R M

    1999-06-01

    We used color kinesis, a recent echocardiographic technique that provides regional information on the magnitude and timing of endocardial wall motion, to quantitatively assess regional right ventricular (RV) systolic and diastolic properties in 76 subjects who were divided into five groups, as follows: normal (n = 20), heart failure (n = 15), pressure/volume overload (n = 14), pressure overload (n = 12), and RV hypertrophy (n = 15). Quantitative segmental analysis of color kinesis images was used to obtain regional fractional area change (RFAC), which was displayed in the form of stacked histograms to determine patterns of endocardial wall motion. Time curves of integrated RFAC were used to objectively identify asynchrony of diastolic endocardial motion. When compared with normal subjects, patients with pressure overload or heart failure exhibited significantly decreased endocardial motion along the RV free wall. In the presence of mixed pressure/volume overload, the markedly increased ventricular septal motion compensated for decreased RV free wall motion. Diastolic endocardial wall motion was delayed in 17 of 72 segments (24%) in patients with RV pressure overload, and in 31 of 90 segments (34%) in patients with RV hypertrophy. Asynchrony of diastolic endocardial wall motion was greater in the latter group than in normal subjects (16% versus 10%: p < 0.01). Segmental analysis of color kinesis images allows quantitative assessment of regional RV systolic and diastolic properties.

  19. DREAM: a method for semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment.

    PubMed

    Van-Wendel-de-Joode, Berna; Brouwer, Derk H; Vermeulen, Roel; Van Hemmen, Joop J; Heederik, Dick; Kromhout, Hans

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a new method (DREAM) for structured, semi-quantitative dermal exposure assessment for chemical or biological agents that can be used in occupational hygiene or epidemiology. It is anticipated that DREAM could serve as an initial assessment of dermal exposure, amongst others, resulting in a ranking of tasks and subsequently jobs. DREAM consists of an inventory and evaluation part. Two examples of dermal exposure of workers of a car-construction company show that DREAM characterizes tasks and gives insight into exposure mechanisms, forming a basis for systematic exposure reduction. DREAM supplies estimates for exposure levels on the outside clothing layer as well as on skin, and provides insight into the distribution of dermal exposure over the body. Together with the ranking of tasks and people, this provides information for measurement strategies and helps to determine who, where and what to measure. In addition to dermal exposure assessment, the systematic description of dermal exposure pathways helps to prioritize and determine most adequate measurement strategies and methods. DREAM could be a promising approach for structured, semi-quantitative, dermal exposure assessment.

  20. Quantitative CT: technique dependency of volume assessment for pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Baiyu; Richard, Samuel; Barnhart, Huiman; Colsher, James; Amurao, Maxwell; Samei, Ehsan

    2010-04-01

    Current lung nodule size assessment methods typically rely on one-dimensional estimation of lesions. While new 3D volume assessment techniques using MSCT scan data have enabled improved estimation of lesion size, the effect of acquisition and reconstruction parameters on accuracy and precision of such estimation has not been adequately investigated. To characterize such dependencies, we scanned an anthropomorphic thoracic phantom containing synthetic nodules with different protocols, including various acquisition and reconstruction parameters. We also scanned the phantom repeatedly with the same protocol to investigate repeatability. The nodule's volume was estimated by a clinical lung analysis software package, LungVCAR. Accuracy (bias) and precision (variance) of the volume assessment were calculated across the nodules and compared between protocols via Generalized Estimating Equation analysis. Results suggest a strong dependence of accuracy and precision on dose level but little dependence on reconstruction thickness, thus providing possible guidelines for protocol optimization for quantitative tasks.

  1. Simulation evaluation of quantitative myocardial perfusion assessment from cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bindschadler, Michael; Modgil, Dimple; Branch, Kelley R.; La Riviere, Patrick J.; Alessio, Adam M.

    2014-03-01

    Contrast enhancement on cardiac CT provides valuable information about myocardial perfusion and methods have been proposed to assess perfusion with static and dynamic acquisitions. There is a lack of knowledge and consensus on the appropriate approach to ensure 1) sufficient diagnostic accuracy for clinical decisions and 2) low radiation doses for patient safety. This work developed a thorough dynamic CT simulation and several accepted blood flow estimation techniques to evaluate the performance of perfusion assessment across a range of acquisition and estimation scenarios. Cardiac CT acquisitions were simulated for a range of flow states (Flow = 0.5, 1, 2, 3 ml/g/min, cardiac output = 3,5,8 L/min). CT acquisitions were simulated with a validated CT simulator incorporating polyenergetic data acquisition and realistic x-ray flux levels for dynamic acquisitions with a range of scenarios including 1, 2, 3 sec sampling for 30 sec with 25, 70, 140 mAs. Images were generated using conventional image reconstruction with additional image-based beam hardening correction to account for iodine content. Time attenuation curves were extracted for multiple regions around the myocardium and used to estimate flow. In total, 2,700 independent realizations of dynamic sequences were generated and multiple MBF estimation methods were applied to each of these. Evaluation of quantitative kinetic modeling yielded blood flow estimates with an root mean square error (RMSE) of ~0.6 ml/g/min averaged across multiple scenarios. Semi-quantitative modeling and qualitative static imaging resulted in significantly more error (RMSE = ~1.2 and ~1.2 ml/min/g respectively). For quantitative methods, dose reduction through reduced temporal sampling or reduced tube current had comparable impact on the MBF estimate fidelity. On average, half dose acquisitions increased the RMSE of estimates by only 18% suggesting that substantial dose reductions can be employed in the context of quantitative myocardial

  2. Quantitative risk assessment in aerospace: Evolution from the nuclear industry

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1996-12-31

    In 1987, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the aerospace industry relied on failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) and hazards analysis as the primary tools for safety and reliability of their systems. The FMEAs were reviewed to provide critical items using a set of qualitative criteria. Hazards and critical items judged the worst, by a qualitative method, were to be either eliminated by a design change or controlled by the addition of a safeguard. However, it is frequently the case that limitations of space, weight, technical feasibility, and cost left critical items and hazards unable to be eliminated or controlled. In these situations, program management accepted the risk. How much risk was being accepted was unknown because quantitative risk assessment methods were not used. Perhaps the greatest contribution of the nuclear industry to NASA and the aerospace industry was the introduction of modern (i.e., post-WASH-1400) quantitative risk assessment concepts and techniques. The concepts of risk assessment that have been most useful in the aerospace industry are the following: 1. combination of accident sequence diagrams, event trees, and fault trees to model scenarios and their causative factors; 2. use of Bayesian analysis of system and component failure data; 3. evaluation and presentation of uncertainties in the risk estimates.

  3. Quantitative analysis in outcome assessment of instrumented lumbosacral arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Champain, Sabina; Mazel, Christian; Mitulescu, Anca; Skalli, Wafa

    2007-08-01

    The outcome assessment in instrumented lumbosacral fusion mostly focuses on clinical criteria, complications and scores, with a high variability of imaging means, methods of fusion grading and parameters describing degenerative changes, making comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to evaluate the interest of quantified radiographic analysis of lumbar spine in global outcome assessment and to highlight the key biomechanical factors involved. Clinical data and Beaujon-Lassale scores were collected for 49 patients who underwent lumbosacral arthrodesis after prior lumbar discectomy (mean follow-up: 5 years). Sagittal standing and lumbar flexion-extension X-ray films allowed quantifying vertebral, lumbar, pelvic and kinematic parameters of the lumbar spine, which were compared to reference values. Statistics were performed to assess evolution for all variables. At long-term follow-up, 90% of patients presented satisfactory clinical outcomes, associated to normal sagittal alignment; vertebral parameters objectified adjacent level degeneration in four cases (8%). Clinical outcome was correlated (r = 0.8) with fusion that was confirmed in 80% of cases, doubtful in 16% and pseudarthrosis seemed to occur in 4% (2) of cases. In addition to clinical data (outcomes comparable to the literature), quantitative analysis accurately described lumbar spine geometry and kinematics, highlighting parameters related to adjacent level's degeneration and a significant correlation between clinical outcome and fusion. Furthermore, criteria proposed to quantitatively evaluate fusion from lumbar dynamic radiographs seem to be appropriate and in agreement with surgeon's qualitative grading in 87% of cases.

  4. Quantitative Assessment of the Canine Pupillary Light Reflex

    PubMed Central

    Whiting, Rebecca E. H.; Yao, Gang; Narfström, Kristina; Pearce, Jacqueline W.; Coates, Joan R.; Dodam, John R.; Castaner, Leilani J.; Katz, Martin L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To develop instrumentation and methods for thorough quantitative assessment of the pupillary light reflex (PLR) in dogs under varying stimulus conditions. Methods. The PLR was recorded in normal Dachshunds using a custom system allowing full user control over stimulus intensity, color, and duration. Chemical restraint protocols were compared to determine which protocol provided for optimal baseline stability of pupil size and appropriate eye positioning. A series of white light stimuli of increasing intensity was used to elicit pupil constriction. Pupil images were concurrently recorded using continuous infrared illumination and an infrared-sensitive camera. The PLR was also recorded in response to blue and red stimuli. Results. With injectable chemical restraint alone, spontaneous fluctuations in pupil size occurred independent of light stimulation, and spontaneous eye movements made it difficult to fully visualize the pupil. Combined injectable chemical and inhalation restraint provided a steady baseline pupil size throughout PLR assessment and allowed for stable positioning of the eye using a conjunctival stay suture. Robust PLRs were elicited with all light colors. PLR constriction amplitude increased with increasing flash intensity and ranged from 5% to 70%. Conclusions. A recording system and protocol have been developed to reliably quantify the canine PLR. The techniques and instrumentation will be useful for objective quantitative assessment of the PLR in dogs and other species in research applications and may be useful in clinical veterinary ophthalmology and neurology if PLR abnormalities detected with these procedures can be associated with specific diseases. PMID:23847311

  5. Quantitative Cardiac Assessment in Fetal Tetralogy of Fallot.

    PubMed

    Jatavan, Phudit; Tongprasert, Fuanglada; Srisupundit, Kasemsri; Luewan, Suchaya; Traisrisilp, Kuntharee; Tongsong, Theera

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess cardiac function and biometric parameters in fetuses with a diagnosis of tetralogy of Fallot and compare them to those in healthy fetuses. Two hundred healthy fetuses and 20 fetuses with a diagnosis of classic tetralogy of Fallot were quantitatively assessed for 16 cardiac parameters, including morphologic characteristics and functions. All recruited fetuses were in the second trimester with correct gestational ages. The measured values that were out of normal reference ranges were considered abnormal. Rates of abnormalities of these parameters were compared between the groups. The significant parameters were further analyzed for their sensitivity, specificity, and likelihood ratio. Of the 16 parameters, rates of abnormalities in 7 parameters, including right ventricular wall thickness, peak systolic velocities (PSVs) in the pulmonary artery and aorta, time to peak velocity, or acceleration time, in the pulmonary artery, aortic valve diameter, pulmonary valve diameter, and aortic-to-pulmonary valve diameter ratio, were significantly higher in fetuses with tetralogy of Fallot (P < .001). The pulmonary artery PSV, pulmonary artery time to peak velocity, aortic valve diameter, pulmonary valve diameter, and aortic-to-pulmonary valve diameter ratio had high sensitivities (80.0%, 75.0%, 90.0%, 90.0%, and 100.0%, respectively) and specificities (95.5%, 97.0%, 94.5%, 96.0%, and 84.5%). In addition to a routine anatomic examination, quantitative assessment of fetal hemodynamics, especially an abnormally high PSV in the pulmonary artery, as well as a shortened acceleration time and abnormal valve size, might be very helpful for confirmation of the diagnosis in cases of suspected tetralogy of Fallot.

  6. Clubfoot: the treatment outcome using quantitative assessment of deformity.

    PubMed

    Rasit, Ah; Rasit, Ah; Azani, H; Zabidah, Pa; Merikan, A; Nur Alyana, Ba

    2012-06-01

    The recent trend in management of congenital idiopathic clubfoot tends towards conservative treatment. This study reviews the outcomes of treatment in our practice using the quantitative clubfoot assessment of the deformity (QCAD). Thirty patients (38 cases of clubfoot) with congenital idiopathic clubfoot treated at Sarawak General Hospital were followed-up for a mean of 3.6 years. The quantitative assessment consists of limb anthropometric measurement and the Pirani deformity severity score. There were 15 boys and 15 girls, with a mean age of 4.4 years (range, 13m - 8y). Most patients were of the Malay race (67%), followed by Chinese (23%) and others (10%). Eight patients suffered from bilateral congenital idiopathic clubfoot (33%), 12 were left unilateral (40%) and 10 were right unilateral (27%). Out of the total of 30 patients, 12 were treated conservatively with serial casting and 18 patients were treated surgically after resistance to serial casting at the age of nine months. At follow-up, there were significant differences between the surgical group (2.57 ± 1.45); (0.86 ± 0.36) and conservative group (0.7 ± 0.81); (0.34 ± 0.35) respectively (p < 0.05) regarding the mean difference in mid-leg circumference and foot length discrepancy in patients with unilateral clubfoot. There were no significant difference noted between groups with regards to results of the Pirani score, leg length discrepancy and mean difference of mid-foot circumference. There were significant differences in calf atrophy and foot length discrepancy when comparing surgically treated clubfoot patient compared to conservatively treated patients. Conservative treatment of clubfoot is the preferred method of treatment while surgical treatment may be necessary in more resistant cases. Clubfoot, outcome, treatment, quantitative assessment, deformity.

  7. Parametric quantification of myocardial ischaemia using real-time perfusion adenosine stress echocardiography images, with SPECT as reference method.

    PubMed

    Gudmundsson, P; Shahgaldi, K; Winter, R; Dencker, M; Kitlinski, M; Thorsson, O; Ljunggren, L; Willenheimer, R

    2010-01-01

    Real-time perfusion (RTP) adenosine stress echocardiography (ASE) can be used to visually evaluate myocardial ischaemia. The RTP power modulation technique, provides images for off-line parametric perfusion quantification using Qontrast software. From replenishment curves, this generates parametric images of peak signal intensity (A), myocardial blood flow velocity (beta) and myocardial blood flow (Axbeta) at rest and stress. This may be a tool for objective myocardial ischaemia evaluation. We assessed myocardial ischaemia by RTP-ASE Qontrast((R))-generated images, using 99mTc-tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as reference. Sixty-seven patients admitted to SPECT underwent RTP-ASE (SONOS 5500) during Sonovue infusion, before and throughout adenosine stress, also used for SPECT. Quantitative off-line analyses of myocardial perfusion by RTP-ASE Qontrast-generated A, beta and Axbeta images, at different time points during rest and stress, were blindly compared to SPECT. We analysed 201 coronary territories [corresponding to the left anterior descendent (LAD), left circumflex (LCx) and right coronary (RCA) arteries] from 67 patients. SPECT showed ischaemia in 18 patients. Receiver operator characteristics and kappa values showed that A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation significantly identified ischaemia in all territories (area under the curve 0.66-0.80, P = 0.001-0.05). Combined A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation gave the best results and the closest agreement was seen in the LAD territory: 89% accuracy; kappa 0.63; P<0.001. Myocardial isachemia can be evaluated in the LAD territory using RTP-ASE Qontrast-generated images, especially by combined A, beta and Axbeta image interpretation. However, the technique needs improvements regarding the LCx and RCA territories.

  8. Quantitative risk assessment for skin sensitization: Success or failure?

    PubMed

    Kimber, Ian; Gerberick, G Frank; Basketter, David A

    2017-02-01

    Skin sensitization is unique in the world of toxicology. There is a combination of reliable, validated predictive test methods for identification of skin sensitizing chemicals, a clearly documented and transparent approach to risk assessment, and effective feedback from dermatology clinics around the world delivering evidence of the success or failure of the hazard identification/risk assessment/management process. Recent epidemics of contact allergy, particularly to preservatives, have raised questions of whether the safety/risk assessment process is working in an optimal manner (or indeed is working at all!). This review has as its focus skin sensitization quantitative risk assessment (QRA). The core toxicological principles of QRA are reviewed, and evidence of use and misuse examined. What becomes clear is that skin sensitization QRA will only function adequately if two essential criteria are met. The first is that QRA is applied rigourously, and the second is that potential exposure to the sensitizing substance is assessed adequately. This conclusion will come as no surprise to any toxicologist who appreciates the basic premise that "risk = hazard x exposure". Accordingly, use of skin sensitization QRA is encouraged, not least because the essential feedback from dermatology clinics can be used as a tool to refine QRA in situations where this risk assessment tool has not been properly used. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Dual-energy micro-CT imaging of pulmonary airway obstruction: correlation with micro-SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, C. T.; Befera, N.; Clark, D.; Qi, Y.; Johnson, G. A.

    2014-03-01

    To match recent clinical dual energy (DE) CT studies focusing on the lung, similar developments for DE micro-CT of the rodent lung are required. Our group has been actively engaged in designing pulmonary gating techniques for micro- CT, and has also introduced the first DE micro-CT imaging method of the rodent lung. The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of DE micro-CT imaging for the evaluation of airway obstruction in mice, and to compare the method with micro single photon emission computed tomography (micro-SPECT) using technetium-99m labeled macroaggregated albumin (99mTc-MAA). The results suggest that the induced pulmonary airway obstruction causes either atelectasis, or air-trapping similar to asthma or chronic bronchitis. Atelectasis could only be detected at early time points in DE micro-CT images, and is associated with a large increase in blood fraction and decrease in air fraction. Air trapping had an opposite effect with larger air fraction and decreased blood fraction shown by DE micro-CT. The decrease in perfusion to the hypoventilated lung (hypoxic vasoconstriction) is also seen in micro-SPECT. The proposed DE micro-CT technique for imaging localized airway obstruction performed well in our evaluation, and provides a higher resolution compared to micro-SPECT. Both DE micro-CT and micro-SPECT provide critical, quantitative lung biomarkers for image-based anatomical and functional information in the small animal. The methods are readily linked to clinical methods allowing direct comparison of preclinical and clinical results.

  10. Short Course Introduction to Quantitative Mineral Resource Assessments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Singer, Donald A.

    2007-01-01

    This is an abbreviated text supplementing the content of three sets of slides used in a short course that has been presented by the author at several workshops. The slides should be viewed in the order of (1) Introduction and models, (2) Delineation and estimation, and (3) Combining estimates and summary. References cited in the slides are listed at the end of this text. The purpose of the three-part form of mineral resource assessments discussed in the accompanying slides is to make unbiased quantitative assessments in a format needed in decision-support systems so that consequences of alternative courses of action can be examined. The three-part form of mineral resource assessments was developed to assist policy makers evaluate the consequences of alternative courses of action with respect to land use and mineral-resource development. The audience for three-part assessments is a governmental or industrial policy maker, a manager of exploration, a planner of regional development, or similar decision-maker. Some of the tools and models presented here will be useful for selection of exploration sites, but that is a side benefit, not the goal. To provide unbiased information, we recommend the three-part form of mineral resource assessments where general locations of undiscovered deposits are delineated from a deposit type's geologic setting, frequency distributions of tonnages and grades of well-explored deposits serve as models of grades and tonnages of undiscovered deposits, and number of undiscovered deposits are estimated probabilistically by type. The internally consistent descriptive, grade and tonnage, deposit density, and economic models used in the design of the three-part form of assessments reduce the chances of biased estimates of the undiscovered resources. What and why quantitative resource assessments: The kind of assessment recommended here is founded in decision analysis in order to provide a framework for making decisions concerning mineral

  11. Liver function assessment using 99mTc-GSA single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging in hilar bile duct cancer: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Sumiyoshi, Tatsuaki; Shima, Yasuo; Okabayashi, Takehiro; Kozuki, Akihito; Hata, Yasuhiro; Noda, Yoshihiro; Kouno, Michihiko; Miyagawa, Kazuyuki; Tokorodani, Ryotaro; Saisaka, Yuichi; Tokumaru, Teppei; Nakamura, Toshio; Morita, Sojiro

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the utility of Tc-99m-diethylenetriamine-penta-acetic acid-galactosyl human serum albumin ((99m)Tc-GSA) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT fusion imaging for posthepatectomy remnant liver function assessment in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Thirty hilar bile duct cancer patients who underwent major hepatectomy with extrahepatic bile duct resection were retrospectively analyzed. Indocyanine green plasma clearance rate (KICG) value and estimated KICG by (99m)Tc-GSA scintigraphy (KGSA) and volumetric and functional rates of future remnant liver by (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging were used to evaluate preoperative whole liver function and posthepatectomy remnant liver function, respectively. Remnant (rem) KICG (= KICG × volumetric rate) and remKGSA (= KGSA × functional rate) were used to predict future remnant liver function; major hepatectomy was considered unsafe for values <0.05. The correlation of remKICG and remKGSA with posthepatectomy mortality and morbidity was determined. Although remKICG and remKGSA were not significantly different (median value: 0.071 vs 0.075), functional rates of future remnant liver were significantly higher than volumetric rates (median: 0.54 vs 0.46; P < .001). Hepatectomy was considered unsafe in 17% and 0% of patients using remKICG and remKGSA, respectively. Postoperative liver failure and mortality did not occur in the patients for whom hepatectomy was considered unsafe based on remKICG. remKGSA showed a stronger correlation with postoperative prothrombin time activity than remKICG. (99m)Tc-GSA SPECT/CT fusion imaging enables accurate assessment of future remnant liver function and suitability for hepatectomy in hilar bile duct cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Molecular SPECT Imaging: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Magdy M.; Tremoleda, Jordi L.; Bayomy, Tamer B.; Gsell, Willy

    2011-01-01

    Molecular imaging has witnessed a tremendous change over the last decade. Growing interest and emphasis are placed on this specialized technology represented by developing new scanners, pharmaceutical drugs, diagnostic agents, new therapeutic regimens, and ultimately, significant improvement of patient health care. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and positron emission tomography (PET) have their signature on paving the way to molecular diagnostics and personalized medicine. The former will be the topic of the current paper where the authors address the current position of the molecular SPECT imaging among other imaging techniques, describing strengths and weaknesses, differences between SPECT and PET, and focusing on different SPECT designs and detection systems. Radiopharmaceutical compounds of clinical as well-preclinical interest have also been reviewed. Moreover, the last section covers several application, of μSPECT imaging in many areas of disease detection and diagnosis. PMID:21603240

  13. Comparison of barium swallow, CT and thallium-201 SPECT in evaluating responses of patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nakahara, Tadaki; Togawa, Takashi; Nagata, Matsuo; Kikuchi, Kazunori; Hatano, Kazuo; Yui, Nobuharu; Kubo, Atsushi

    2003-10-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the results of thallium-201 (Tl-201) SPECT, barium swallow and CT in the assessment of the effect of preoperative chemoradiotherapy. This study consisted of 28 patients with advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (AESCC) who underwent the three imaging modalities before and after preoperative chemoradiotherapy. The results were quantified using the bidimensional method for barium swallow and contrast-enhanced CT and the tumor-to-lung ratio for SPECT. The percent decrease in these quantitative values after therapy was defined as %Dba, %Dct and %Dtl respectively. The histological effect of the chemoradiotherapy was determined from the resected surgical specimen of the esophagus: grade 0, 100% viable tumor cells; grade 1a, 99-67%; grade 1b, 66-34%; grade 2, 33-1%; grade 3, no viable cells. A statistically significant difference of %Dtl between the subgroups of each grade was evident (p = 0.0433), whereas no significant differences were evident for %Dba (p = 0.1778) or %Dct (p = 0.7377). However, the overlap of %Dtl between these groups was marked. Although thallium-201 SPECT cannot be used to evaluate the therapeutic effect with acceptable accuracy, SPECT may be of additional value to barium swallow and CT in assessing the response of AESCC to preoperative chemoradiotherapy.

  14. Assessment of cardiac function using myocardial perfusion imaging technique on SPECT with 99mTc sestamibi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gani, M. R. A.; Nazir, F.; Pawiro, S. A.; Soejoko, D. S.

    2016-03-01

    Suspicion on coronary heart disease can be confirmed by observing the function of left ventricle cardiac muscle with Myocardial Perfusion Imaging techniques. The function perfusion itself is indicated by the uptake of radiopharmaceutical tracer. The 31 patients were studied undergoing the MPI examination on Gatot Soebroto Hospital using 99mTc-sestamibi radiopharmaceutical with stress and rest conditions. Stress was stimulated by physical exercise or pharmacological agent. After two hours, the patient did rest condition on the same day. The difference of uptake percentage between stress and rest conditions will be used to determine the malfunction of perfusion due to ischemic or infarct. Degradation of cardiac function was determined based on the image-based assessment of five segments of left ventricle cardiac. As a result, 8 (25.8%) patients had normal myocardial perfusion and 11 (35.5%) patients suspected for having partial ischemia. Total ischemia occurred to 8 (25.8%) patients with reversible and irreversible ischemia and the remaining 4 (12.9%) patients for partial infarct with characteristic the percentage of perfusion ≤50%. It is concluded that MPI technique of image-based assessment on uptake percentage difference between stress and rest conditions can be employed to predict abnormal perfusion as complementary information to diagnose the cardiac function.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow assessed by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunt and hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Or, Matan; Peremans, Kathelijne; Martlé, Valentine; Vandermeulen, Eva; Bosmans, Tim; Devriendt, Nausikaa; de Rooster, Hilde

    2017-02-01

    Regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in eight dogs with congenital portosystemic shunt (PSS) and hepatic encephalopathy (HE) was compared with rCBF in eight healthy control dogs using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with a (99m)technetium-hexamethylpropylene amine oxime ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) tracer. SPECT scans were abnormal in all PSS dogs. Compared to the control group, rCBF in PSS dogs was significantly decreased in the temporal lobes and increased in the subcortical (thalamic and striatal) area. Brain perfusion imaging alterations observed in the dogs with PSS and HE are similar to those in human patients with HE. These findings suggest that dogs with HE and PSS have altered perfusion of mainly the subcortical and the temporal regions of the brain.

  16. Quantitative analysis in outcome assessment of instrumented lumbosacral arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Christian; Mitulescu, Anca

    2007-01-01

    The outcome assessment in instrumented lumbosacral fusion mostly focuses on clinical criteria, complications and scores, with a high variability of imaging means, methods of fusion grading and parameters describing degenerative changes, making comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to evaluate the interest of quantified radiographic analysis of lumbar spine in global outcome assessment and to highlight the key biomechanical factors involved. Clinical data and Beaujon–Lassale scores were collected for 49 patients who underwent lumbosacral arthrodesis after prior lumbar discectomy (mean follow-up: 5 years). Sagittal standing and lumbar flexion-extension X-ray films allowed quantifying vertebral, lumbar, pelvic and kinematic parameters of the lumbar spine, which were compared to reference values. Statistics were performed to assess evolution for all variables. At long-term follow-up, 90% of patients presented satisfactory clinical outcomes, associated to normal sagittal alignment; vertebral parameters objectified adjacent level degeneration in four cases (8%). Clinical outcome was correlated (r = 0.8) with fusion that was confirmed in 80% of cases, doubtful in 16% and pseudarthrosis seemed to occur in 4% (2) of cases. In addition to clinical data (outcomes comparable to the literature), quantitative analysis accurately described lumbar spine geometry and kinematics, highlighting parameters related to adjacent level’s degeneration and a significant correlation between clinical outcome and fusion. Furthermore, criteria proposed to quantitatively evaluate fusion from lumbar dynamic radiographs seem to be appropriate and in agreement with surgeon’s qualitative grading in 87% of cases. PMID:17216227

  17. Assessment of coronary flow reserve using a combination of planar first-pass angiography and myocardial SPECT: Comparison with myocardial (15)O-water PET.

    PubMed

    Nose, Naoko; Fukushima, Kazuhito; Lapa, Constantin; Werner, Rudolf A; Javadi, Mehrbod Som; Taki, Junichi; Higuchi, Takahiro

    2016-11-01

    Coronary flow reserve (CFR), defined as the ratio of maximum coronary flow increase from baseline resting blood flow, is one of the most sensitive parameters to detect early signs of coronary arteriosclerosis at the microvascular level. Myocardial perfusion PET is a well-established technology for CFR measurement, however, availability is still limited. The aim of this study is to introduce and validate myocardial flow reserve measurement by myocardial perfusion SPECT. Myocardial perfusion SPECT at rest and ATP stress (0.16mg/Kg/min) was performed in 10 patients with known coronary artery disease. Immediately after the injection of Tc-99m sestamibi (MIBI), left ventricular (LV) dynamic planar angiographic data were obtained for 90s. Coronary flow reserve index as measured by MIBI SPECT (CFRMIBI) was calculated as follows: CFRMIBI=CmsSbmb/CmbSbms, where subscripts b, s, Cm, and Sbm indicate baseline, during stress, myocardial counts with MIBI SPECT, and integral of LV counts with first pass angiography, respectively. Additionally, standard stress/rest (15)O-water PET to estimate CFR was performed in all patients as standard of reference. CFRMIBI increased in conjunction with CFR, but underestimated blood flow at high flow rates. The relationship between CFRMIBI (Y) and CFRPET (X) was well fitted as follows: Y=1.40x(1-exp(1.79/x)) (r=0.84). The index of CFRMIBI reflects the CFR by (15)O-water PET but underestimates flow at high flows, maybe as a reflection of pharmacokinetic limitations of MIBI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Role of Brain Perfusion SPECT with 99mTc HMPAO in the Assessment of Response to Drug Therapy in Patients with Autoimmune Vasculitis: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Mauro, Liberatore; Manuela, Morreale; Valentina, Megna; Sara, Collorone; Chondrogiannis, Sotirios; Maria, Drudi Francesco; Christos, Anagnostou; Liana, Civitelli; Ada, Francia; Maffione, Anna Margherita; Marzola, Maria Cristina; Rubello, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Background: The diagnosis of vasculitis in the brain remains a quite difficult achievement. To the best of our knowledge, there is no imaging method reported in literature which is capable of reaching to a diagnosis of vasculitis with very high sensitivity. Aim: The aim of this study was to determine whether perfusion brain single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be usefully employed in monitoring the treatment of vasculitis, allowing treating only potentially responder patients and avoiding the side effects on patients who do not respond. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients (two males and 18 females) suffering from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 5), Behcet's disease (BD; n = 5), undifferentiated vasculitis (UV; n = 5), and Sjogren's syndrome (SS; n = 5) were included in the study. All patients underwent a wide neurological anamnestic investigation, a complete objective neurological examination and SPECT of the brain with 99mTc-hexamethyl-propylene-aminoxime (HMPAO). The brain SPECT was then repeated after appropriate medical treatment. The neurological and neuropsychiatric follow-up was performed at 6 months after the start of the treatment. Results: Overall, the differences between the scintigraphic results obtained after and before the medical treatment indicated a statistically significant increase of the cerebral perfusion (CP). In 19 out of 200 regions of interest (ROI) studied, the difference between pre- and post treatment percentages had negative sign, indicating a worsening of CP. This latter event has occurred six times (five in the same patients) in the UV, 10 times (eight in the same patients) in the SLE, never in BD, and three times (two in the same patient) in the SS. Conclusion: The reported results seem to indicate the possibility of identifying, by the means of a brain SPECT, responder and nonresponder (unchanged or worsened CP) patients, affected by autoimmune vasculitis, to the therapy. PMID:25973400

  19. Phase analysis of gated blood pool SPECT for multiple stress testing assessments of ventricular mechanical dyssynchrony in a tachycardia-induced dilated cardiomyopathy canine model.

    PubMed

    Salimian, Samaneh; Thibault, Bernard; Finnerty, Vincent; Grégoire, Jean; Harel, François

    2017-02-01

    Stress-induced dyssynchrony has been shown to be independently correlated with clinical outcomes in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) and narrow QRS complexes. However, the extent to which stress levels affect inter- and intraventricular dyssynchrony parameters remains unknown. Ten large dogs were submitted to tachycardia-induced DCM by pacing the right ventricular apex for 3-4 weeks to reach a target ejection fraction (EF) of 35% or less. Stress was then induced in DCM dogs by administering intravenous dobutamine up to a maximum of 20 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1). Hemodynamic and ventricular dyssynchrony data were analyzed by left ventricular (LV) pressure measurements and gated blood pool SPECT (GBPS) imaging. In order to assess mechanical dyssynchrony in DCM subjects and compare it with that of 8 normal counterparts, we extracted the following data: count-based indices of LV contraction homogeneity index (CHI), entropy and phase standard deviation, and interventricular dyssynchrony index. A significant LV intraventricular dyssynchrony (CHI: 96.4 ± 1.3% in control vs 78.6% ± 10.9% in DCM subjects) resulted in an intense LV dysfunction in DCM subjects (EF: 49.5% ± 8.4% in control vs 22.6% ± 6.0% in DCM), compared to control subjects. However, interventricular dyssynchrony did not vary significantly between the two groups. Under stress, DCM subjects showed a significant improvement in ventricular functional parameters at each level (EF: 22.6% ± 6.0% at rest vs 48.1% ± 5.8% at maximum stress). All intraventricular dyssynchrony indices showed a significant increase in magnitude of synchrony from baseline to stress levels of greater than or equal to 5 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1) dobutamine. There were individual differences in the magnitude and pattern of change in interventricular dyssynchrony during the various levels of stress. Based on GBPS analyses, different levels of functional stress, even in close intervals, can have a significant impact on

  20. A parallel-cone collimator for high-energy SPECT.

    PubMed

    Beijst, Casper; Elschot, Mattijs; Viergever, Max A; de Jong, Hugo W A M

    2015-03-01

    In SPECT using high-energy photon-emitting isotopes, such as (131)I, parallel-hole collimators with thick septa are required to limit septal penetration, at the cost of sensitivity and resolution. This study investigated a parallel-hole collimator with cone-shaped holes, which was designed to limit collimator penetration while preserving resolution and sensitivity. The objective was to demonstrate that a single-slice prototype of the parallel-cone (PC) collimator was capable of improving the image quality of high-energy SPECT. The image quality of the PC collimator was quantitatively compared with that of clinically used low-energy high-resolution (LEHR; for (99m)Tc) and high-energy general-purpose (HEGP; for (131)I and (18)F) parallel-hole collimators. First, Monte Carlo simulations of single and double point sources were performed to assess sensitivity and resolution by comparing point-spread functions (PSFs). Second, a prototype PC collimator was used in an experimental phantom study to assess and compare contrast recovery coefficients and image noise. Monte Carlo simulations showed reduced broadening of the PSF due to collimator penetration for the PC collimator as compared with the HEGP collimator (e.g., 0.9 vs. 1.4 cm in full width at half maximum for (131)I). Simulated double point sources placed 2 cm apart were separately detectable for the PC collimator, whereas this was not the case for (131)I and (18)F at distances from the collimator face of 10 cm or more for the HEGP collimator. The sensitivity, measured over the simulated profiles as the total amount of counts per decay, was found to be higher for the LEHR and HEGP collimators than for the PC collimator (e.g., 3.1 × 10(-5) vs. 2.9 × 10(-5) counts per decay for (131)I). However, at equal noise level, phantom measurements showed that contrast recovery coefficients were similar for the PC and LEHR collimators for (99m)Tc but that the PC collimator significantly improved the contrast recovery

  1. Remotely Sensed Quantitative Drought Risk Assessment in Vulnerable Agroecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalezios, N. R.; Blanta, A.; Spyropoulos, N. V.

    2012-04-01

    Hazard may be defined as a potential threat to humans and their welfare and risk (or consequence) as the probability of a hazard occurring and creating loss. Drought is considered as one of the major natural hazards with significant impact to agriculture, environment, economy and society. This paper deals with drought risk assessment, which the first step designed to find out what the problems are and comprises three distinct steps, namely risk identification, risk management which is not covered in this paper, there should be a fourth step to address the need for feedback and to take post-audits of all risk assessment exercises. In particular, quantitative drought risk assessment is attempted by using statistical methods. For the qualification of drought, the Reconnaissance Drought Index (RDI) is employed, which is a new index based on hydrometeorological parameters, such as precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. The remotely sensed estimation of RDI is based on NOA-AVHRR satellite data for a period of 20 years (1981-2001). The study area is Thessaly, central Greece, which is a drought-prone agricultural region characterized by vulnerable agriculture. Specifically, the undertaken drought risk assessment processes are specified as follows: 1. Risk identification: This step involves drought quantification and monitoring based on remotely sensed RDI and extraction of several features such as severity, duration, areal extent, onset and end time. Moreover, it involves a drought early warning system based on the above parameters. 2. Risk estimation: This step includes an analysis of drought severity, frequency and their relationships. 3. Risk evaluation: This step covers drought evaluation based on analysis of RDI images before and after each drought episode, which usually lasts one hydrological year (12month). The results of these three-step drought assessment processes are considered quite satisfactory in a drought-prone region such as Thessaly in central

  2. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  3. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, M. L.; Genant, H. K.; Cann, C. E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G. S.; Kolb, F. O.; Reiser, U. J.

    1985-01-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements. Knowledge of appendicular cortical mineral status is important in its own right but is not a valid predictor of axial trabecular mineral status, which may be disproportionately decreased in certain diseases. Quantitative CT provides a reliable means of assessing the latter region of the skeleton, correlates well with the spinal fracture index (a semiquantitative measurement of end-organ failure), and offers the clinician a sensitive means of following the effects of therapy.

  4. Brain perfusion imaging under acetazolamide challenge for detection of impaired cerebrovascular reserve capacity: positive findings with O-15-water PET in patients with negative Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT.

    PubMed

    Acker, Güliz; Lange, Catharina; Schatka, Imke; Pfeifer, Andreas; Czabanka, Marcus A; Vajkoczy, Peter; Buchert, Ralph

    2017-07-20

    Cerebrovascular reserve capacity (CVRC) is an important parameter for treatment decisions in chronic cerebrovascular diseases. It can be assessed by measuring the acetazolamide-induced change of regional cerebral blood flow using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Tc-99m-labeled hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO) or positron emission tomography (PET) with O-15-water. Methods: Our database was searched for patients with moyamoya vasculopathy (MMV) or atherosclerotic cerebrovascular disease who had underwent O-15-water PET after normal Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT with respect to CVRC. O-15-water PET was analyzed visually and quantitatively. Quantitative analysis was based on parametric CVRC maps generated by voxel-wise image subtraction. Results: The search identified 18 patients (43±15y, 12 MMV). PET revealed impaired CVRC in 8 patients (44%). Quantitative analysis confirmed the positive visual findings in O-15-water PET and the negative findings in Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Conclusion: O-15-water PET enables detection of impaired CVRC in a considerable fraction of symptomatic patients with steno-occlusion and negative Tc-99m-HMPAO SPECT. Copyright © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  5. Role of computed tomography in quantitative assessment of emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Choromańska, Agnieszka; Macura, Katarzyna J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pulmonary emphysema, together with chronic bronchitis is a part of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is one of the leading causes of death in the United States and worldwide. There are many methods to diagnose emphysema. Unfortunately many of them, for example pulmonary function tests (PFTs), clinical signs and conventional radiology are able to detect emphysema usually in its late stages when a great portion of lung parenchyma has been already destroyed by the disease. Computed tomography (CT) allows for early detection of emphysema. CT also makes it possible to quantify the total amount of emphysema in the lungs which is important in order to precisely estimate the severity of the disease. Those abilities of CT are important in monitoring the course of the disease and in attempts to prevent its further progression. In this review we discuss currently available methods for imaging emphysema with emphasis on the quantitative assessment of emphysema. To date, quantitative methods have not been widely used clinically, however, the initial results of several research studies regarding this subject are very encouraging. PMID:22802863

  6. A comparison of MR-based attenuation correction in PET versus SPECT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, H. R.; Stodilka, R. Z.; Theberge, J.; Sabondjian, E.; Legros, A.; Deans, L.; Sykes, J. M.; Thompson, R. T.; Prato, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Attenuation correction (AC) is a critical step in the reconstruction of quantitatively accurate positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Several groups have proposed magnetic resonance (MR)-based AC algorithms for application in hybrid PET/MR systems. However, none of these approaches have been tested on SPECT data. Since SPECT/MR systems are under active development, it is important to ascertain whether MR-based AC algorithms validated for PET can be applied to SPECT. To investigate this issue, two imaging experiments were performed: one with an anthropomorphic chest phantom and one with two groups of canines. Both groups of canines were imaged from neck to abdomen, one with PET/CT and MR (n = 4) and the other with SPECT/CT and MR (n = 4), while the phantom was imaged with all modalities. The quality of the nuclear medicine reconstructions using MR-based attenuation maps was compared between PET and SPECT on global and local scales. In addition, the sensitivity of these reconstructions to variations in the attenuation map was ascertained. On both scales, it was found that the SPECT reconstructions were of higher fidelity than the PET reconstructions. Further, they were less sensitive to changes to the MR-based attenuation map. Thus, MR-based AC algorithms that have been designed for PET/MR can be expected to demonstrate improved performance when used for SPECT/MR.

  7. Extending the quantitative assessment of industrial risks to earthquake effects.

    PubMed

    Campedel, Michela; Cozzani, Valerio; Garcia-Agreda, Anita; Salzano, Ernesto

    2008-10-01

    In the general framework of quantitative methods for natural-technological (NaTech) risk analysis, a specific methodology was developed for assessing risks caused by hazardous substances released due to earthquakes. The contribution of accidental scenarios initiated by seismic events to the overall industrial risk was assessed in three case studies derived from the actual plant layout of existing oil refineries. Several specific vulnerability models for different equipment classes were compared and assessed. The effect of differing structural resistances for process equipment on the final risk results was also investigated. The main factors influencing the final risk values resulted from the models for equipment vulnerability and the assumptions for the reference damage states of the process equipment. The analysis of case studies showed that in seismic zones the additional risk deriving from damage caused by earthquakes may be up to more than one order of magnitude higher than that associated to internal failure causes. Critical equipment was determined to be mainly pressurized tanks, even though atmospheric tanks were more vulnerable to containment loss. Failure of minor process equipment having a limited hold-up of hazardous substances (such as pumps) was shown to have limited influence on the final values of the risk increase caused by earthquakes.

  8. Quantitative assessment of building fire risk to life safety.

    PubMed

    Guanquan, Chu; Jinhua, Sun

    2008-06-01

    This article presents a quantitative risk assessment framework for evaluating fire risk to life safety. Fire risk is divided into two parts: probability and corresponding consequence of every fire scenario. The time-dependent event tree technique is used to analyze probable fire scenarios based on the effect of fire protection systems on fire spread and smoke movement. To obtain the variation of occurrence probability with time, Markov chain is combined with a time-dependent event tree for stochastic analysis on the occurrence probability of fire scenarios. To obtain consequences of every fire scenario, some uncertainties are considered in the risk analysis process. When calculating the onset time to untenable conditions, a range of fires are designed based on different fire growth rates, after which uncertainty of onset time to untenable conditions can be characterized by probability distribution. When calculating occupant evacuation time, occupant premovement time is considered as a probability distribution. Consequences of a fire scenario can be evaluated according to probability distribution of evacuation time and onset time of untenable conditions. Then, fire risk to life safety can be evaluated based on occurrence probability and consequences of every fire scenario. To express the risk assessment method in detail, a commercial building is presented as a case study. A discussion compares the assessment result of the case study with fire statistics.

  9. Quantitative Security Risk Assessment and Management for Railway Transportation Infrastructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flammini, Francesco; Gaglione, Andrea; Mazzocca, Nicola; Pragliola, Concetta

    Scientists have been long investigating procedures, models and tools for the risk analysis in several domains, from economics to computer networks. This paper presents a quantitative method and a tool for the security risk assessment and management specifically tailored to the context of railway transportation systems, which are exposed to threats ranging from vandalism to terrorism. The method is based on a reference mathematical model and it is supported by a specifically developed tool. The tool allows for the management of data, including attributes of attack scenarios and effectiveness of protection mechanisms, and the computation of results, including risk and cost/benefit indices. The main focus is on the design of physical protection systems, but the analysis can be extended to logical threats as well. The cost/benefit analysis allows for the evaluation of the return on investment, which is a nowadays important issue to be addressed by risk analysts.

  10. Quantitative assessment of scleroderma by surface wave technique.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoming; Osborn, Thomas G; Pittelkow, Mark R; Qiang, Bo; Kinnick, Randall R; Greenleaf, James F

    2011-01-01

    Scleroderma is a multisystem disease characterized by cutaneous and visceral fibrosis. Skin disease is both a disabling feature of scleroderma and a predictor of visceral involvement. The established method of skin assessment is the modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS) which uses semi-quantitative manual skin scoring. However, the Rodnan method is subjective. We have developed a technique and system for assessing skin health by producing and analyzing surface waves in the skin to determine the skin viscoelastic properties. Viscoelasticity of human skin is measured on 30 healthy volunteers and 10 scleroderma patients at six anatomic sites. A small force, monitored by a force transducer, is applied to the skin using a ball-tipped device attached to a mechanical shaker. The skin motion is measured by a scanning laser vibrometer. The surface wave speed is measured by the phase gradient method. The viscoelasticity is inversely estimated by the wave speed dispersion. A typical measurement of the surface wave speed is 3.25±0.19 m/s on the forearm of a volunteer at 200 Hz. With the wave speed dispersion from 100 Hz to 400 Hz, the shear elasticity μ(1) and shear viscosity μ(2) are estimated, respectively, 7.86±1.86 kPa and 5.03±0.60 Pa on the forearm. Statistical analyses suggest that there are significant differences of viscoelasticity between scleroderma patients and healthy subjects. Scleroderma can be effectively and quantitatively evaluated based on human skin viscoelasticity. Copyright © 2010 IPEM. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: 99m Tc, 111In and 131I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational efficiency

  12. Accelerated GPU based SPECT Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Marie-Paule; Bert, Julien; Benoit, Didier; Bardiès, Manuel; Visvikis, Dimitris

    2016-06-07

    Monte Carlo (MC) modelling is widely used in the field of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) as it is a reliable technique to simulate very high quality scans. This technique provides very accurate modelling of the radiation transport and particle interactions in a heterogeneous medium. Various MC codes exist for nuclear medicine imaging simulations. Recently, new strategies exploiting the computing capabilities of graphical processing units (GPU) have been proposed. This work aims at evaluating the accuracy of such GPU implementation strategies in comparison to standard MC codes in the context of SPECT imaging. GATE was considered the reference MC toolkit and used to evaluate the performance of newly developed GPU Geant4-based Monte Carlo simulation (GGEMS) modules for SPECT imaging. Radioisotopes with different photon energies were used with these various CPU and GPU Geant4-based MC codes in order to assess the best strategy for each configuration. Three different isotopes were considered: (99m) Tc, (111)In and (131)I, using a low energy high resolution (LEHR) collimator, a medium energy general purpose (MEGP) collimator and a high energy general purpose (HEGP) collimator respectively. Point source, uniform source, cylindrical phantom and anthropomorphic phantom acquisitions were simulated using a model of the GE infinia II 3/8" gamma camera. Both simulation platforms yielded a similar system sensitivity and image statistical quality for the various combinations. The overall acceleration factor between GATE and GGEMS platform derived from the same cylindrical phantom acquisition was between 18 and 27 for the different radioisotopes. Besides, a full MC simulation using an anthropomorphic phantom showed the full potential of the GGEMS platform, with a resulting acceleration factor up to 71. The good agreement with reference codes and the acceleration factors obtained support the use of GPU implementation strategies for improving computational

  13. Thermography as a quantitative imaging method for assessing postoperative inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, J; Matzen, LH; Vaeth, M; Schou, S; Wenzel, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess differences in skin temperature between the operated and control side of the face after mandibular third molar surgery using thermography. Methods 127 patients had 1 mandibular third molar removed. Before the surgery, standardized thermograms were taken of both sides of the patient's face using a Flir ThermaCam™ E320 (Precisions Teknik AB, Halmstad, Sweden). The imaging procedure was repeated 2 days and 7 days after surgery. A region of interest including the third molar region was marked on each image. The mean temperature within each region of interest was calculated. The difference between sides and over time were assessed using paired t-tests. Results No significant difference was found between the operated side and the control side either before or 7 days after surgery (p > 0.3). The temperature of the operated side (mean: 32.39 °C, range: 28.9–35.3 °C) was higher than that of the control side (mean: 32.06 °C, range: 28.5–35.0 °C) 2 days after surgery [0.33 °C, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.22–0.44 °C, p < 0.001]. No significant difference was found between the pre-operative and the 7-day post-operative temperature (p > 0.1). After 2 days, the operated side was not significantly different from the temperature pre-operatively (p = 0.12), whereas the control side had a lower temperature (0.57 °C, 95% CI: 0.29–0.86 °C, p < 0.001). Conclusions Thermography seems useful for quantitative assessment of inflammation between the intervention side and the control side after surgical removal of mandibular third molars. However, thermography cannot be used to assess absolute temperature changes due to normal variations in skin temperature over time. PMID:22752326

  14. Preschool Temperament Assessment: A Quantitative Assessment of the Validity of Behavioral Style Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huelsman, Timothy J.; Gagnon, Sandra Glover; Kidder-Ashley, Pamela; Griggs, Marissa Swaim

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Child temperament is an important construct, but its measurement has been marked by a number of weaknesses that have diminished the frequency with which it is assessed in practice. We address this problem by presenting the results of a quantitative construct validation study. We calculated validity indices by hypothesizing the…

  15. A Framework for General Education Assessment: Assessing Information Literacy and Quantitative Literacy with ePortfolios

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubert, David A.; Lewis, Kati J.

    2014-01-01

    This essay presents the findings of an authentic and holistic assessment, using a random sample of one hundred student General Education ePortfolios, of two of Salt Lake Community College's (SLCC) college-wide learning outcomes: quantitative literacy (QL) and information literacy (IL). Performed by four faculty from biology, humanities, and…

  16. Preschool Temperament Assessment: A Quantitative Assessment of the Validity of Behavioral Style Questionnaire Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huelsman, Timothy J.; Gagnon, Sandra Glover; Kidder-Ashley, Pamela; Griggs, Marissa Swaim

    2014-01-01

    Research Findings: Child temperament is an important construct, but its measurement has been marked by a number of weaknesses that have diminished the frequency with which it is assessed in practice. We address this problem by presenting the results of a quantitative construct validation study. We calculated validity indices by hypothesizing the…

  17. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume.

    PubMed

    Yao, Rutao; Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-01

    The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  18. Multipinhole SPECT helical scan parameters and imaging volume

    SciTech Connect

    Yao, Rutao Deng, Xiao; Wei, Qingyang; Dai, Tiantian; Ma, Tianyu; Lecomte, Roger

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The authors developed SPECT imaging capability on an animal PET scanner using a multiple-pinhole collimator and step-and-shoot helical data acquisition protocols. The objective of this work was to determine the preferred helical scan parameters, i.e., the angular and axial step sizes, and the imaging volume, that provide optimal imaging performance. Methods: The authors studied nine helical scan protocols formed by permuting three rotational and three axial step sizes. These step sizes were chosen around the reference values analytically calculated from the estimated spatial resolution of the SPECT system and the Nyquist sampling theorem. The nine helical protocols were evaluated by two figures-of-merit: the sampling completeness percentage (SCP) and the root-mean-square (RMS) resolution. SCP was an analytically calculated numerical index based on projection sampling. RMS resolution was derived from the reconstructed images of a sphere-grid phantom. Results: The RMS resolution results show that (1) the start and end pinhole planes of the helical scheme determine the axial extent of the effective field of view (EFOV), and (2) the diameter of the transverse EFOV is adequately calculated from the geometry of the pinhole opening, since the peripheral region beyond EFOV would introduce projection multiplexing and consequent effects. The RMS resolution results of the nine helical scan schemes show optimal resolution is achieved when the axial step size is the half, and the angular step size is about twice the corresponding values derived from the Nyquist theorem. The SCP results agree in general with that of RMS resolution but are less critical in assessing the effects of helical parameters and EFOV. Conclusions: The authors quantitatively validated the effective FOV of multiple pinhole helical scan protocols and proposed a simple method to calculate optimal helical scan parameters.

  19. Left-ventricular systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony as assessed by multi-harmonic phase analysis of gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging in patients with end-stage renal disease and normal LVEF

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ji; Kalogeropoulos, Andreas P.; Verdes, Liudmila; Butler, Javed; Garcia, Ernest V.

    2011-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to develop a multi-harmonic phase analysis method to measure diastolic dyssynchrony from conventional gated SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging(MPI) data and to compare it with systolic dyssynchrony in normal subjects and in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and normal left-ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Methods 121 consecutive patients with ESRD and normal LVEF and 30 consecutive normal controls were enrolled. Diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were calculated using 3-harmonic phase analysis. Systolic dyssynchrony parameters were calculated using the established 1-harmonic phase analysis. Results The systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were correlated, but significantly different in both control and ESRD groups, indicating they were physiologically related but measured different LV mechanisms. The systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony parameters were each significantly different between the control and the ESRD groups. Significant systolic and diastolic dyssynchrony were found in 47% and 65% of the entire ESRD group. Conclusion Multi-harmonic phase analysis has been developed to assess diastolic dyssynchrony, which measured a new LV mechanism of regional function from gated SPECT MPI and showed a significantly higher prevalence rate than systolic dyssynchrony in patients with ESRD and normal LVEF. PMID:21229401

  20. Computational technique for stepwise quantitative assessment of equation correctness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Othman, Nuru'l Izzah; Bakar, Zainab Abu

    2017-04-01

    Many of the computer-aided mathematics assessment systems that are available today possess the capability to implement stepwise correctness checking of a working scheme for solving equations. The computational technique for assessing the correctness of each response in the scheme mainly involves checking the mathematical equivalence and providing qualitative feedback. This paper presents a technique, known as the Stepwise Correctness Checking and Scoring (SCCS) technique that checks the correctness of each equation in terms of structural equivalence and provides quantitative feedback. The technique, which is based on the Multiset framework, adapts certain techniques from textual information retrieval involving tokenization, document modelling and similarity evaluation. The performance of the SCCS technique was tested using worked solutions on solving linear algebraic equations in one variable. 350 working schemes comprising of 1385 responses were collected using a marking engine prototype, which has been developed based on the technique. The results show that both the automated analytical scores and the automated overall scores generated by the marking engine exhibit high percent agreement, high correlation and high degree of agreement with manual scores with small average absolute and mixed errors.

  1. Dermal sensitization quantitative risk assessment (QRA) for fragrance ingredients.

    PubMed

    Api, Anne Marie; Basketter, David A; Cadby, Peter A; Cano, Marie-France; Ellis, Graham; Gerberick, G Frank; Griem, Peter; McNamee, Pauline M; Ryan, Cindy A; Safford, Robert

    2008-10-01

    Based on chemical, cellular, and molecular understanding of dermal sensitization, an exposure-based quantitative risk assessment (QRA) can be conducted to determine safe use levels of fragrance ingredients in different consumer product types. The key steps are: (1) determination of benchmarks (no expected sensitization induction level (NESIL)); (2) application of sensitization assessment factors (SAF); and (3) consumer exposure (CEL) calculation through product use. Using these parameters, an acceptable exposure level (AEL) can be calculated and compared with the CEL. The ratio of AEL to CEL must be favorable to support safe use of the potential skin sensitizer. This ratio must be calculated for the fragrance ingredient in each product type. Based on the Research Institute for Fragrance Materials, Inc. (RIFM) Expert Panel's recommendation, RIFM and the International Fragrance Association (IFRA) have adopted the dermal sensitization QRA approach described in this review for fragrance ingredients identified as potential dermal sensitizers. This now forms the fragrance industry's core strategy for primary prevention of dermal sensitization to these materials in consumer products. This methodology is used to determine global fragrance industry product management practices (IFRA Standards) for fragrance ingredients that are potential dermal sensitizers. This paper describes the principles of the recommended approach, provides detailed review of all the information used in the dermal sensitization QRA approach for fragrance ingredients and presents key conclusions for its use now and refinement in the future.

  2. A quantitative method for assessing the quality of meibomian glands.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert; Wilczyński, Sławomir; Olczyk, Paweł; Nowińska, Anna; Węglarz, Beata; Wylęgała, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Meibomian gland dysfunction is a common cause of dry eye syndrome which can also lead to eyelid inflammation. Today, diagnostics of meibomian glands is not fully automatic yet and is based on a qualitative assessment made by an ophthalmologist. Therefore, this article proposes a new automatic analysis method which provides a quantitative assessment of meibomian gland dysfunction. The new algorithm involves a sequence of operations: image acquisition (acquisition of data from OCULUS Keratograph® 5M); image pre-processing (image conversion to gray levels, median filtering, removal of uneven lighting, normalization); main image processing (binarization, morphological opening, labeling, Gaussian filtering, skeletonization, distance transform, watersheds). The algorithm was implemented in Matlab with Image Processing Toolbox (Matlab: Version 7.11.0.584, R2010b) on a PC running Windows 7 Professional, 64-bit with the Intel Core i7-4960X CPU @ 3.60GHz. The algorithm described in this article has the following features: it is fully automatic, provides fully reproducible results - sensitivity of 99.3% and specificity of 97.5% in the diagnosis of meibomian glands, and is insensitive to parameter changes. The time of image analysis for a single subject does not exceed 0.5s. Currently, the presented algorithm is tested in the Railway Hospital in Katowice, Poland. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The potential optical coherence tomography in tooth bleaching quantitative assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Y. R.; Guo, Z. Y.; Shu, S. Y.; Zeng, C. C.; Zhong, H. Q.; Chen, B. L.; Liu, Z. M.; Bao, Y.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we report the outcomes from a pilot study on using OCT functional imaging method to evaluate and quantify color alteration in the human teeth in vitro. The image formations of the dental tissues without and with treatment 35% hydrogen peroxide were obtained by an OCT system at a 1310 nm central wavelength. One parameter for the quantification of optical properties from OCT measurements is introduced in our study: attenuate coefficient (μ). And the attenuate coefficient have significant decrease ( p < 0.001) in dentine as well as a significant increase ( p < 0.001) in enamel was observed during tooth bleaching process. From the experimental results, it is found that attenuate coefficient could be useful to assess color alteration of the human tooth samples. OCT has a potential to become an effective tool for the assessment tooth bleaching. And our experiment offer a now method to evaluate color change in visible region by quantitative analysis of the infrared region information from OCT.

  4. Tc-99m SPECT sestamibi for the measurement of infarct size.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, Raymond J

    2011-01-01

    There are a variety of approaches to assess the efficacy of reperfusion therapy, and myocardial protection, in acute myocardial infarction. This review summarizes the available evidence validating the use of technetium-99m sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) for this purpose. Multiple lines of evidence have validated its clinical utility. SPECT sestamibi infarct size has been used as an endpoint in multiple randomized clinical trials. A smaller number of clinical trials have used both early and later imaging with SPECT sestamibi to assess myocardium at risk and myocardial salvage. SPECT sestamibi has a number of limitations which must be recognized. Nevertheless, SPECT sestamibi infarct size is a well-validated measurement with a long track record of performance as an endpoint in multicenter, randomized clinical trials.

  5. An Assessment of the Quantitative Literacy of Undergraduate Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Jesse L. M.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative literacy (QLT) represents an underlying higher-order construct that accounts for a person's willingness to engage in quantitative situations in everyday life. The purpose of this study is to retest the construct validity of a model of quantitative literacy (Wilkins, 2010). In this model, QLT represents a second-order factor that…

  6. Evaluation of SPECT quantification of radiopharmaceutical distribution in canine myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jianying; Jaszczak, R.L.; Greer, K.L.

    1995-02-01

    This study evaluates the quantitative accuracy of SPECT for in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals using fanbeam (FB) and parallel-beam (PB) collimators and compares uniform and nouniform attenuation correction methods in terms of quantitative accuracy. SPECT quantification of canine myocardial radioactivity was performed followed by well counter measurements of extracted myocardial tissue samples. Transmission scans using a line source and an FB collimator were performed to generate nonuniform attenuation maps of the canine thorax. Emission scans with two energy windows were acquired. Images were reconstructed using a filtered backprojection algorithm, with a dual-window scatter subtraction combined with either no attenuation compensation or single iteration Chang attenuation compensation based on a uniform attenuation map {mu}=0.152 cm{sup -1} or the nonuniform transmission map. The measured mean counts from the SPECT images were converted using the well counter. The experimental results demonstrate that, compared with well counter values, the in vivo distributions of {sup 99m}Tc were most accurately determined in FB and PB SPECT reconstructions with nonuniform attenuation compensation, under-estimated without attenuation compensation and overestimated with uniform attenuation compensation. 37 refs., 9 figs., 10 tabs.

  7. Readability of Wikipedia Pages on Autoimmune Disorders: Systematic Quantitative Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Brigo, Francesco; Sharif, Kassem; Amital, Howard; McGonagle, Dennis; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adawi, Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    Background In the era of new information and communication technologies, the Internet is being increasingly accessed for health-related information. Indeed, recently published patient surveys of people with autoimmune disorders confirmed that the Internet was reported as one of the most important health information sources. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopedia launched in 2001, is generally one of the most visited websites worldwide and is often consulted for health-related information. Objective The main objective of this investigation was to quantitatively assess whether the Wikipedia pages related to autoimmune disorders can be easily accessed by patients and their families, in terms of readability. Methods We obtained and downloaded a list of autoimmune disorders from the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) website. We analyzed Wikipedia articles for their overall level of readability with 6 different quantitative readability scales: (1) the Flesch Reading Ease, (2) the Gunning Fog Index, (3) the Coleman-Liau Index, (4) the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, (5) the Automated Readability Index (ARI), and (6) the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG). Further, we investigated the correlation between readability and clinical, pathological, and epidemiological parameters. Moreover, each Wikipedia analysis was assessed according to its content, breaking down the readability indices by main topic of each part (namely, pathogenesis, treatment, diagnosis, and prognosis plus a section containing paragraphs not falling into any of the previous categories). Results We retrieved 134 diseases from the AARDA website. The Flesch Reading Ease yielded a mean score of 24.34 (SD 10.73), indicating that the sites were very difficult to read and best understood by university graduates, while mean Gunning Fog Index and ARI scores were 16.87 (SD 2.03) and 14.06 (SD 2.12), respectively. The Coleman-Liau Index and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level yielded mean scores of 14

  8. Readability of Wikipedia Pages on Autoimmune Disorders: Systematic Quantitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Watad, Abdulla; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Brigo, Francesco; Sharif, Kassem; Amital, Howard; McGonagle, Dennis; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Adawi, Mohammad

    2017-07-18

    In the era of new information and communication technologies, the Internet is being increasingly accessed for health-related information. Indeed, recently published patient surveys of people with autoimmune disorders confirmed that the Internet was reported as one of the most important health information sources. Wikipedia, a free online encyclopedia launched in 2001, is generally one of the most visited websites worldwide and is often consulted for health-related information. The main objective of this investigation was to quantitatively assess whether the Wikipedia pages related to autoimmune disorders can be easily accessed by patients and their families, in terms of readability. We obtained and downloaded a list of autoimmune disorders from the American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association (AARDA) website. We analyzed Wikipedia articles for their overall level of readability with 6 different quantitative readability scales: (1) the Flesch Reading Ease, (2) the Gunning Fog Index, (3) the Coleman-Liau Index, (4) the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, (5) the Automated Readability Index (ARI), and (6) the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG). Further, we investigated the correlation between readability and clinical, pathological, and epidemiological parameters. Moreover, each Wikipedia analysis was assessed according to its content, breaking down the readability indices by main topic of each part (namely, pathogenesis, treatment, diagnosis, and prognosis plus a section containing paragraphs not falling into any of the previous categories). We retrieved 134 diseases from the AARDA website. The Flesch Reading Ease yielded a mean score of 24.34 (SD 10.73), indicating that the sites were very difficult to read and best understood by university graduates, while mean Gunning Fog Index and ARI scores were 16.87 (SD 2.03) and 14.06 (SD 2.12), respectively. The Coleman-Liau Index and the Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level yielded mean scores of 14.48 (SD 1.57) and 14.86 (1

  9. A quantitative risk assessment model for Salmonella and whole chickens.

    PubMed

    Oscar, Thomas P

    2004-06-01

    Existing data and predictive models were used to define the input settings of a previously developed but modified quantitative risk assessment model (QRAM) for Salmonella and whole chickens. The QRAM was constructed in an Excel spreadsheet and was simulated using @Risk. The retail-to-table pathway was modeled as a series of unit operations and associated pathogen events that included initial contamination at retail, growth during consumer transport, thermal inactivation during cooking, cross-contamination during serving, and dose response after consumption. Published data as well as predictive models for growth and thermal inactivation of Salmonella were used to establish input settings. Noncontaminated chickens were simulated so that the QRAM could predict changes in the incidence of Salmonella contamination. The incidence of Salmonella contamination changed from 30% at retail to 0.16% after cooking to 4% at consumption. Salmonella growth on chickens during consumer transport was the only pathogen event that did not impact the risk of salmonellosis. For the scenario simulated, the QRAM predicted 0.44 cases of salmonellosis per 100,000 consumers, which was consistent with recent epidemiological data that indicate a rate of 0.66-0.88 cases of salmonellosis per 100,000 consumers of chicken. Although the QRAM was in agreement with the epidemiological data, surrogate data and models were used, assumptions were made, and potentially important unit operations and pathogen events were not included because of data gaps and thus, further refinement of the QRAM is needed.

  10. Quantitative assessment of brain volumes in fish: comparison of methodologies.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Jeremy F P; Cowin, Gary; Collin, Shaun P

    2010-01-01

    When correlating brain areas with behavioral and environmental characteristics, a variety of techniques are employed. In fishes (elasmobranchs and teleosts), 2 methods, histology and the idealized ellipsoid and/or half-ellipsoid technique, are primarily used to calculate the volume of a brain area and therefore its relationship to social or ecological complexity. In this study on a perciform teleost, we have quantitatively compared brain volumes obtained using the conventional techniques of histology and approximating brain volume to an idealized ellipsoid (or half ellipsoid) and magnetic resonance imaging, an established clinical tool typically used for assessing brain volume in other vertebrates. Our results indicate that, when compared to brain volumes measured using magnetic resonance imaging of brain regions in situ, variations in brain shape and histological artifacts can lead to significant differences in brain volume, especially in the telencephalon and optic tecta. Consequently, in comparative studies of brain volumes, we advise caution when using the histological and/or ellipsoid methods to make correlations between brain area size and environmental, behavioral and social characteristics and, when possible, we propose the use of magnetic resonance imaging. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. A quantitative assessment of chemical perturbations in thermotropic cyanobiphenyls.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Sebastiano; Dutronc, Thibault; Terazzi, Emmanuel; Guénée, Laure; Piguet, Claude

    2016-05-25

    Chemical programming of the temperature domains of existence of liquid crystals is greatly desired by both academic workers and industrial partners. This contribution proposes to combine empirical approaches, which rely on systematic chemical substitutions of mesogenic molecules followed by thermal characterizations, with a rational thermodynamic assessment of the effects induced by chemical perturbations. Taking into account the similarities which exist between temperature-dependent cohesive Gibbs free energy densities (CFEDs) and pressure-temperature phase diagrams modeled with the Clapeyron equation, chemical perturbations are considered as pressure increments along phase boundaries, which control the thermotropic liquid crystalline properties. Taking the familiar calamitic amphiphilic cyanobiphenyl-type mesogens as models, the consequences of (i) methyl substitution of the aromatic polar heads and (ii) connections of bulky silyl groups at the termini of the apolar flexible alkyl chain on the melting and clearing temperatures are quantitatively analyzed. Particular efforts were focused on the translation of the thermodynamic rationalization into a predictive tool accessible to synthetic chemists mainly interested in designing liquid crystals with specific technological applications.

  12. Modeling logistic performance in quantitative microbial risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Rijgersberg, Hajo; Tromp, Seth; Jacxsens, Liesbeth; Uyttendaele, Mieke

    2010-01-01

    In quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA), food safety in the food chain is modeled and simulated. In general, prevalences, concentrations, and numbers of microorganisms in media are investigated in the different steps from farm to fork. The underlying rates and conditions (such as storage times, temperatures, gas conditions, and their distributions) are determined. However, the logistic chain with its queues (storages, shelves) and mechanisms for ordering products is usually not taken into account. As a consequence, storage times-mutually dependent in successive steps in the chain-cannot be described adequately. This may have a great impact on the tails of risk distributions. Because food safety risks are generally very small, it is crucial to model the tails of (underlying) distributions as accurately as possible. Logistic performance can be modeled by describing the underlying planning and scheduling mechanisms in discrete-event modeling. This is common practice in operations research, specifically in supply chain management. In this article, we present the application of discrete-event modeling in the context of a QMRA for Listeria monocytogenes in fresh-cut iceberg lettuce. We show the potential value of discrete-event modeling in QMRA by calculating logistic interventions (modifications in the logistic chain) and determining their significance with respect to food safety.

  13. Quantitative risk assessment of foods containing peanut advisory labeling.

    PubMed

    Remington, Benjamin C; Baumert, Joseph L; Marx, David B; Taylor, Steve L

    2013-12-01

    Foods with advisory labeling (i.e. "may contain") continue to be prevalent and the warning may be increasingly ignored by allergic consumers. We sought to determine the residual levels of peanut in various packaged foods bearing advisory labeling, compare similar data from 2005 and 2009, and determine any potential risk for peanut-allergic consumers. Of food products bearing advisory statements regarding peanut or products that had peanut listed as a minor ingredient, 8.6% and 37.5% contained detectable levels of peanut (>2.5 ppm whole peanut), respectively. Peanut-allergic individuals should be advised to avoid such products regardless of the wording of the advisory statement. Peanut was detected at similar rates and levels in products tested in both 2005 and 2009. Advisory labeled nutrition bars contained the highest levels of peanut and an additional market survey of 399 products was conducted. Probabilistic risk assessment showed the risk of a reaction to peanut-allergic consumers from advisory labeled nutrition bars was significant but brand-dependent. Peanut advisory labeling may be overused on some nutrition bars but prudently used on others. The probabilistic approach could provide the food industry with a quantitative method to assist with determining when advisory labeling is most appropriate. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Assessment of hair surface roughness using quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Park, K H; Kim, H J; Oh, B; Lee, E; Ha, J

    2017-07-19

    Focus on the hair and hair cuticle is increasing. The hair cuticle is the first layer to be exposed to damage and the area of primary protection. For such reasons, hair product manufacturers consider cuticle protection important. However, previous studies used only visual assessment to examine the cuticle. This study aimed to obtain the changes in cuticles and measure hair roughness using a HIROX microscope. A total of 23 female subjects used the same products daily for 4 weeks. Three hair samples per subject were collected from three different areas of the head. Measurements were taken before and after 4 weeks of daily product use. The hair surface changes were clearly observed on the captured images. Moreover, hair surface roughness was observed using various parameters on HIROX software. After 4 weeks of daily product use, the roughness parameter value of the hair surface was significantly decreased. Our result suggests that the hair roughness analytical method using HIROX can be a new paradigm for high-quality quantitative analysis of the hair cuticle. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. [Quantitative methods of cancer risk assessment in exposure to chemicals].

    PubMed

    Szymczak, Wiesław

    2009-01-01

    This is a methodology paper--it contains a review of different quantitative risk assessment methods and their comparison. There are two aspects of cancer risk modeling discussed here: 1. When there is one effective dose only. There were compared two models in this evaluation: one proposed by the Dutch Expert Committee on Occupational Standards and the other--a classical two-stage model. It was taken into account that in both models the animals were exposed for less than two years. An exposure period and a study period of animals were considered in the Dutch methodology. If we use as an exposure measure average lifespan dose estimated with different coefficients of exposure time in an experiment, we get two different dose-response models. And each of them will create different human risk models. There is no criterion that would let us assess which of them is better. 2. There are many models used in the BenchMark Dose (BMD) method. But there is no criterion that allows us to choose the best model objectively. In this paper a two-stage classical model and three BMD models (two-stage, Weibull and linear) were fit for particular data. Very small differences between all the models were noticed. The differences were insignificant because of uncertainties in the risk modeling. The possibility of choice of one model from a bigger set of models is the greatest benefit of this comparison. If the examined chemical is a genotoxic carcinogen, nothing more is needed than to estimate the threshold value.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Islets of Langerhans Encapsulated in Alginate

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy S.; O'Sullivan, Esther; D'Aoust, Laura N.; Omer, Abdulkadir; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Fisher, Robert J.; Weir, Gordon C.

    2011-01-01

    Improved methods have recently been developed for assessing islet viability and quantity in human islet preparations for transplantation, and these measurements have proven useful for predicting transplantation outcome. The objectives of this study were to adapt these methods for use with microencapsulated islets, to verify that they provide meaningful quantitative measurements, and to test them with two model systems: (1) barium alginate and (2) barium alginate containing a 70% (w/v) perfluorocarbon (PFC) emulsion, which presents challenges to use of these assays and is of interest in its own right as a means for reducing oxygen supply limitations to encapsulated tissue. Mitochondrial function was assessed by oxygen consumption rate measurements, and the analysis of data was modified to account for the increased solubility of oxygen in the PFC-alginate capsules. Capsules were dissolved and tissue recovered for nuclei counting to measure the number of cells. Capsule volume was determined from alginate or PFC content and used to normalize measurements. After low oxygen culture for 2 days, islets in normal alginate lost substantial viable tissue and displayed necrotic cores, whereas most of the original oxygen consumption rate was recovered with PFC alginate, and little necrosis was observed. All nuclei were recovered with normal alginate, but some nuclei from nonrespiring cells were lost with PFC alginate. Biocompatibility tests revealed toxicity at the islet periphery associated with the lipid emulsion used to provide surfactants during the emulsification process. We conclude that these new assay methods can be applied to islets encapsulated in materials as complex as PFC-alginate. Measurements made with these materials revealed that enhancement of oxygen permeability of the encapsulating material with a concentrated PFC emulsion improves survival of encapsulated islets under hypoxic conditions, but reformulation of the PFC emulsion is needed to reduce toxicity

  17. Quantitative assessment of computational models for retinotopic map formation

    PubMed Central

    Sterratt, David C; Cutts, Catherine S; Willshaw, David J; Eglen, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Molecular and activity‐based cues acting together are thought to guide retinal axons to their terminal sites in vertebrate optic tectum or superior colliculus (SC) to form an ordered map of connections. The details of mechanisms involved, and the degree to which they might interact, are still not well understood. We have developed a framework within which existing computational models can be assessed in an unbiased and quantitative manner against a set of experimental data curated from the mouse retinocollicular system. Our framework facilitates comparison between models, testing new models against known phenotypes and simulating new phenotypes in existing models. We have used this framework to assess four representative models that combine Eph/ephrin gradients and/or activity‐based mechanisms and competition. Two of the models were updated from their original form to fit into our framework. The models were tested against five different phenotypes: wild type, Isl2‐EphA3 ki/ki, Isl2‐EphA3 ki/+, ephrin‐A2,A3,A5 triple knock‐out (TKO), and Math5 −/− (Atoh7). Two models successfully reproduced the extent of the Math5 −/− anteromedial projection, but only one of those could account for the collapse point in Isl2‐EphA3 ki/+. The models needed a weak anteroposterior gradient in the SC to reproduce the residual order in the ephrin‐A2,A3,A5 TKO phenotype, suggesting either an incomplete knock‐out or the presence of another guidance molecule. Our article demonstrates the importance of testing retinotopic models against as full a range of phenotypes as possible, and we have made available MATLAB software, we wrote to facilitate this process. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 75: 641–666, 2015 PMID:25367067

  18. Quantitative assessment of hip osteoarthritis based on image texture analysis.

    PubMed

    Boniatis, I S; Costaridou, L I; Cavouras, D A; Panagiotopoulos, E C; Panayiotakis, G S

    2006-03-01

    A non-invasive method was developed to investigate the potential capacity of digital image texture analysis in evaluating the severity of hip osteoarthritis (OA) and in monitoring its progression. 19 textural features evaluating patterns of pixel intensity fluctuations were extracted from 64 images of radiographic hip joint spaces (HJS), corresponding to 32 patients with verified unilateral or bilateral OA. Images were enhanced employing custom developed software for the delineation of the articular margins on digitized pelvic radiographs. The severity of OA for each patient was assessed by expert orthopaedists employing the Kellgren and Lawrence (KL) scale. Additionally, an index expressing HJS-narrowing was computed considering patients from the unilateral OA-group. A textural feature that quantified pixel distribution non-uniformity (grey level non-uniformity, GLNU) demonstrated the strongest correlation with the HJS-narrowing index among all extracted features and utilized in further analysis. Classification rules employing GLNU feature were introduced to characterize a hip as normal or osteoarthritic and to assign it to one of three severity categories, formed in accordance with the KL scale. Application of the proposed rules resulted in relatively high classification accuracies in characterizing a hip as normal or osteoarthritic (90.6%) and in assigning it to the correct KL scale category (88.9%). Furthermore, the strong correlation between the HJS-narrowing index and the pathological GLNU (r = -0.9, p<0.001) was utilized to provide percentages quantifying hip OA-severity. Texture analysis may contribute in the quantitative assessment of OA-severity, in the monitoring of OA-progression and in the evaluation of a chondroprotective therapy.

  19. Quantitative Assessment of Molecular Dynamics Sampling for Flexible Systems.

    PubMed

    Nemec, Mike; Hoffmann, Daniel

    2017-02-14

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation is a natural method for the study of flexible molecules but at the same time is limited by the large size of the conformational space of these molecules. We ask by how much the MD sampling quality for flexible molecules can be improved by two means: the use of diverse sets of trajectories starting from different initial conformations to detect deviations between samples and sampling with enhanced methods such as accelerated MD (aMD) or scaled MD (sMD) that distort the energy landscape in controlled ways. To this end, we test the effects of these approaches on MD simulations of two flexible biomolecules in aqueous solution, Met-Enkephalin (5 amino acids) and HIV-1 gp120 V3 (a cycle of 35 amino acids). We assess the convergence of the sampling quantitatively with known, extensive measures of cluster number Nc and cluster distribution entropy Sc and with two new quantities, conformational overlap Oconf and density overlap Odens, both conveniently ranging from 0 to 1. These new overlap measures quantify self-consistency of sampling in multitrajectory MD experiments, a necessary condition for converged sampling. A comprehensive assessment of sampling quality of MD experiments identifies the combination of diverse trajectory sets and aMD as the most efficient approach among those tested. However, analysis of Odens between conventional and aMD trajectories also reveals that we have not completely corrected aMD sampling for the distorted energy landscape. Moreover, for V3, the courses of Nc and Odens indicate that much higher resources than those generally invested today will probably be needed to achieve convergence. The comparative analysis also shows that conventional MD simulations with insufficient sampling can be easily misinterpreted as being converged.

  20. Thallium-201 myocardial SPECT in left bundle branch block: diagnosis of myocardial ischemia with a disease-specific reference database.

    PubMed

    Zupán, Kristóf; Kári, Béla; Fontos, Géza; Dékány, Péter; Pártos, Oszkár

    2006-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the value of a myocardial perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reference file for patients with left bundle branch block (LBBB). Tl-201 stress-redistribution myocardial perfusion SPECT studies of patients with complete, permanent LBBB were reviewed retrospectively. To develop a reference database, 18 patients with a low likelihood of coronary artery disease (CAD) were selected. Left ventricular regional average and standard deviation (SD) values of the reference file images were calculated. The diagnostic performance was tested on perfusion images of 49 patients with LBBB, undergoing both scintigraphic and coronary angiographic evaluation, and was compared with a commercial quantitative analysis system using a general reference database. The LBBB reference file performed significantly better in detecting epicardial CAD than did the general reference database (receiver operating characteristic area under the curve 0.835 +/- 0.06 vs 0.580 +/- 0.08, p < .01). Disease localization also was improved significantly in the territory of the left anterior descending and of the right coronary arteries. The use of a reference file of patients with LBBB and a low likelihood of CAD aids the detection and the localization of myocardial ischemia on Tl-201 myocardial SPECT images of this patient group.

  1. CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT treatment plans are comparable to SPECT ventilation functional image-based plans.

    PubMed

    Kida, Satoshi; Bal, Matthieu; Kabus, Sven; Negahdar, Mohammadreza; Shan, Xin; Loo, Billy W; Keall, Paul J; Yamamoto, Tokihiro

    2016-03-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans designed to avoid irradiating highly-functional lung regions are comparable to single-photon emission CT (SPECT) ventilation functional image-based plans. Three IMRT plans were created for eight thoracic cancer patients using: (1) CT ventilation functional images, (2) SPECT ventilation functional images, and (3) anatomic images (no functional images). CT ventilation images were created by deformable image registration of 4D-CT image data sets and quantitative analysis. The resulting plans were analyzed for the relationship between the deviations of CT-functional plan metrics from anatomic plan metrics (ΔCT-anatomic) and those of SPECT-functional plans (ΔSPECT-anatomic), and moreover for agreements of various metrics between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plans. The relationship between ΔCT-anatomic and ΔSPECT-anatomic was strong (e.g., R=0.94; linear regression slope 0.71). The average differences and 95% limits of agreement between the CT-functional and SPECT-functional plan metrics (except for monitor units) for various structures were mostly less than 1% and 2%, respectively. This study demonstrated a reasonable agreement between the CT ventilation functional image-based IMRT plans and SPECT-functional plans, suggesting the potential for CT ventilation imaging to serve as a surrogate for SPECT ventilation in functional image-guided radiotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Recent developments and future prospects of SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Zaman, Maseeh Uz; Hashmi, Ibrahim; Fatima, Nosheen

    2010-10-01

    Myocardial perfusion SPECT imaging is the most commonly performed functional imaging for assessment of coronary artery disease. High diagnostic accuracy and incremental prognostic value are the major benefits while suboptimal spatial resolution and significant radiation exposure are the main limitations. Its ability to detect hemodynamic significance of lesions seen on multidetector CT angiogram (MDCTA) has paved the path for a successful marriage between anatomical and functional imaging modalities in the form of hybrid SPECT/MDCTA system. In recent years, there have been enormous efforts by industry and academia to develop new SPECT imaging systems with better sensitivity, resolution, compact design and new reconstruction algorithms with ability to improve image quality and resolution. Furthermore, expected arrival of Tc-99m-labeled deoxyglucose in next few years would further strengthen the role of SPECT in imaging hibernating myocardium. In view of these developments, it seems that SPECT would enjoy its pivotal role in spite of major threat to be replaced by fluorine-18-labeled positron emission tomography perfusion and glucose metabolism imaging agents.

  3. Enhancing the utility of prostascint SPECT scans for patient management.

    PubMed

    Noz, Marilyn E; Chung, Grace; Lee, Benjamin Y; Maguire, Gerald Q; DeWyngaert, J Keith; Doshi, Jay V; Kramer, Elissa L; Murphy-Walcott, Antoinette D; Zeleznik, Michael P; Kwak, Noeun G

    2006-04-01

    This project investigated reducing the artifact content of In-ill ProstaScint SPECT scans for use in treatment planning and management. Forty-one patients who had undergone CT or MRI scans and simultaneous Tc-99m RBC/In-111 ProstaScint SPECT scans were included. SPECT volume sets, reconstructed using Ordered Set-Expectation Maximum (OS-EM) were compared against those reconstructed with standard Filtered Back projection (FBP). Bladder activity in Tc-99m scans was suppressed within an ellipsoidal volume. Tc-99m voxel values were subtracted from the corresponding In-111 after scaling based on peak activity within the descending aorta. The SPECT volume data sets were merged with the CT or MRI scans before and after processing. Volume merging, based both on visual assessment and statistical evaluation, was not affected. Thus iterative reconstruction together with bladder suppression and blood pool subtraction may improve the interpretation and utility of ProstaScint SPECT scans for patient management.

  4. Cardiac AAV9 Gene Delivery Strategies in Adult Canines: Assessment by Long-term Serial SPECT Imaging of Sodium Iodide Symporter Expression

    PubMed Central

    Moulay, Gilles; Ohtani, Tomohito; Ogut, Ozgur; Guenzel, Adam; Behfar, Atta; Zakeri, Rosita; Haines, Philip; Storlie, Jimmy; Bowen, Lorna; Pham, Linh; Kaye, David; Sandhu, Gurpreet; O'Connor, Michael; Russell, Stephen; Redfield, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality, and cardiac gene delivery has the potential to provide novel therapeutic approaches. Adeno-associated virus serotype 9 (AAV9) transduces the rodent heart efficiently, but cardiotropism, immune tolerance, and optimal delivery strategies in large animals are unclear. In this study, an AAV9 vector encoding canine sodium iodide symporter (NIS) was administered to adult immunocompetent dogs via epicardial injection, coronary infusion without and with cardiac recirculation, or endocardial injection via a novel catheter with curved needle and both end- and side-holes. As NIS mediates cellular uptake of clinical radioisotopes, expression was tracked by single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) imaging in addition to Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Direct epicardial or endocardial injection resulted in strong cardiac expression, whereas expression after intracoronary infusion or cardiac recirculation was undetectable. A threshold myocardial injection dose that provides robust nonimmunogenic expression was identified. The extent of transmural myocardial expression was greater with the novel catheter versus straight end-hole needle delivery. Furthermore, the authors demonstrate that cardiac NIS reporter gene expression and duration can be quantified using serial noninvasive SPECT imaging up to 1 year after vector administration. These data are relevant to efforts to develop cardiac gene delivery as heart failure therapy. PMID:25915925

  5. Quantitative assessment of the effectiveness of a rockfall warning system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bründl, Michael; Sättele, Martina; Krautblatter, Michael; Straub, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Rockslides and rockfalls can pose high risk to human settlements and traffic infrastructure. In addition to structural mitigation measures like rockfall nets, warning systems are increasingly installed to reduce rockfall risks. Whereas for structural mitigation measures with reducing effects on the spatial extent a structured evaluation method is existing, no or only few approaches to assess the effectiveness for warning systems are known. Especially for higher magnitude rockfalls structural mitigation measures are not effective, and reliable early warning systems will be essential in future. In response to that, we developed a classification and a framework to assess the reliability and effectiveness of early warning systems (Sättele et al, 2015a; 2016). Here, we demonstrate an application for the rockfall warning system installed in Preonzo prior to a major rockfall in May 2012 (Sättele et al., 2015b). We show that it is necessary to design such a warning system as fail-safe construction, which has to incorporate components with low failure probabilities, high redundancy, low warning thresholds, and additional control systems. With a hypothetical probabilistic analysis, we investigate the effect of the risk attitude of decision makers and of the number of sensors on the probability of detecting an event and on initiating a timely evacuation, as well as on related intervention cost. We conclude that it is possible to quantitatively assess the effectiveness of warning systems, which helps to optimize mitigation strategies against rockfall events. References Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Reliability and effectiveness of warning systems for natural hazards: concept and application to debris flow warning, Rel. Eng. Syst. Safety, 142, 192-202, 2015a. Sättele, M., Krautblatter, M., Bründl, M., and Straub, D.: Forecasting rock slope failure: How reliable and effective are warning systems?, Landslides, 605, 1-14, 2015b. Sättele, M., Bründl, M., and

  6. Quantitative risk assessment for a glass fiber insulation product.

    PubMed

    Fayerweather, W E; Bender, J R; Hadley, J G; Eastes, W

    1997-04-01

    California Proposition 65 (Prop65) provides a mechanism by which the manufacturer may perform a quantitative risk assessment to be used in determining the need for cancer warning labels. This paper presents a risk assessment under this regulation for professional and do-it-yourself insulation installers. It determines the level of insulation glass fiber exposure (specifically Owens Corning's R-25 PinkPlus with Miraflex) that, assuming a working lifetime exposure, poses no significant cancer risk under Prop65's regulations. "No significant risk" is defined under Prop65 as a lifetime risk of no more than one additional cancer case per 100,000 exposed persons, and nonsignificant exposure is defined as a working lifetime exposure associated with "no significant risk." This determination can be carried out despite the fact that the relevant underlying studies (i.e., chronic inhalation bioassays) of comparable glass wool fibers do not show tumorigenic activity. Nonsignificant exposures are estimated from (1) the most recent RCC chronic inhalation bioassay of nondurable fiberglass in rats; (2) intraperitoneal fiberglass injection studies in rats; (3) a distributional, decision analysis approach applied to four chronic inhalation rat bioassays of conventional fiberglass; (4) an extrapolation from the RCC chronic rat inhalation bioassay of durable refractory ceramic fibers; and (5) an extrapolation from the IOM chronic rat inhalation bioassay of durable E glass microfibers. When the EPA linear nonthreshold model is used, central estimates of nonsignificant exposure range from 0.36 fibers/cc (for the RCC chronic inhalation bioassay of fiberglass) through 21 fibers/cc (for the i.p. fiberglass injection studies). Lower 95% confidence bounds on these estimates vary from 0.17 fibers/cc through 13 fibers/cc. Estimates derived from the distributional approach or from applying the EPA linear nonthreshold model to chronic bioassays of durable fibers such as refractory ceramic fiber

  7. Is there a place for quantitative risk assessment?

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric J

    2009-06-01

    The use of ionising radiations is so well established, especially in the practice of medicine, that it is impossible to imagine contemporary life without them. At the same time, ionising radiations are a known and proven human carcinogen. Exposure to radiation in some contexts elicits fear and alarm (nuclear power for example) while in other situations, until recently at least, it was accepted with alacrity (diagnostic x-rays for example). This non-uniform reaction to the potential hazards of radiation highlights the importance of quantitative risk estimates, which are necessary to help put things into perspective. Three areas will be discussed where quantitative risk estimates are needed and where uncertainties and limitations are a problem. First, the question of diagnostic x-rays. CT usage over the past quarter of a century has increased about 12 fold in the UK and more than 20 fold in the US. In both countries, more than 90% of the collective population dose from diagnostic x-rays comes from the few high dose procedures, such as interventional radiology, CT scans, lumbar spine x-rays and barium enemas. These all involve doses close to the lower limit at which there are credible epidemiological data for an excess cancer incidence. This is a critical question; what is the lowest dose at which there is good evidence of an elevated cancer incidence? Without low dose risk estimates the risk-benefit ratio of diagnostic procedures cannot be assessed. Second, the use of new techniques in radiation oncology. IMRT is widely used to obtain a more conformal dose distribution, particularly in children. It results in a larger total body dose, due to an increased number of monitor units and to the application of more radiation fields. The Linacs used today were not designed for IMRT and are based on leakage standards that were decided decades ago. It will be difficult and costly to reduce leakage from treatment machines, and a necessary first step is to refine the available

  8. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging using thallium-201 with a novel multifocal collimator SPECT/CT: IQ-SPECT versus conventional protocols in normal subjects.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shinro; Nakajima, Kenichi; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Wakabayash, Hiroshi; Okuda, Koichi; Kinuya, Seigo

    2015-06-01

    A novel multifocal collimator, IQ-SPECT (Siemens) consists of SMARTZOOM, cardio-centric and 3D iterative SPECT reconstruction and makes it possible to perform MPI scans in a short time. The aims are to delineate the normal uptake in thallium-201 ((201)Tl) SPECT in each acquisition method and to compare the distribution between new and conventional protocol, especially in patients with normal imaging. Forty patients (eight women, mean age of 75 years) who underwent myocardial perfusion imaging were included in the study. All patients underwent one-day protocol perfusion scan after an adenosine-stress test and at rest after administering (201)Tl and showed normal results. Acquisition was performed on a Symbia T6 equipped with a conventional dual-headed gamma camera system (Siemens ECAM) and with a multifocal SMARTZOOM collimator. Imaging was performed with a conventional system followed by IQ-SPECT/computed tomography (CT). Reconstruction was performed with or without X-ray CT-derived attenuation correction (AC). Two nuclear physicians blinded to clinical information interpreted all myocardial perfusion images. A semi-quantitative myocardial perfusion was analyzed by a 17-segment model with a 5-point visual scoring. The uptake of each segment was measured and left ventricular functions were analyzed by QPS software. IQ-SPECT provided good or excellent image quality. The quality of IQ-SPECT images without AC was similar to those of conventional LEHR study. Mid-inferior defect score (0.3 ± 0.5) in the conventional LEHR study was increased significantly in IQ-SPECT with AC (0 ± 0). IQ-SPECT with AC improved the mid-inferior decreased perfusion shown in conventional images. The apical tracer count in IQ-SPECT with AC was decreased compared to that in LEHR (0.1 ± 0.3 vs. 0.5 ± 0.7, p < 0.05). The left ventricular ejection fraction from IQ-SPECT was significantly higher than that from the LEHR collimator (p = 0.0009). The images of IQ-SPECT acquired in a

  9. Quantitative risk assessment of Cryptosporidium in tap water in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Cummins, E; Kennedy, R; Cormican, M

    2010-01-15

    Cryptosporidium species are protozoan parasites associated with gastro-intestinal illness. Following a number of high profile outbreaks worldwide, it has emerged as a parasite of major public health concern. A quantitative Monte Carlo simulation model was developed to evaluate the annual risk of infection from Cryptosporidium in tap water in Ireland. The assessment considers the potential initial contamination levels in raw water, oocyst removal and decontamination events following various process stages, including coagulation/flocculation, sedimentation, filtration and disinfection. A number of scenarios were analysed to represent potential risks from public water supplies, group water schemes and private wells. Where surface water is used additional physical and chemical water treatment is important in terms of reducing the risk to consumers. The simulated annual risk of illness for immunocompetent individuals was below 1 x 10(-4) per year (as set by the US EPA) except under extreme contamination events. The risk for immunocompromised individuals was 2-3 orders of magnitude greater for the scenarios analysed. The model indicates a reduced risk of infection from tap water that has undergone microfiltration, as this treatment is more robust in the event of high contamination loads. The sensitivity analysis highlighted the importance of watershed protection and the importance of adequate coagulation/flocculation in conventional treatment. The frequency of failure of the treatment process is the most important parameter influencing human risk in conventional treatment. The model developed in this study may be useful for local authorities, government agencies and other stakeholders to evaluate the likely risk of infection given some basic input data on source water and treatment processes used.

  10. A poultry-processing model for quantitative microbiological risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Nauta, Maarten; van der Fels-Klerx, Ine; Havelaar, Arie

    2005-02-01

    A poultry-processing model for a quantitative microbiological risk assessment (QMRA) of campylobacter is presented, which can also be applied to other QMRAs involving poultry processing. The same basic model is applied in each consecutive stage of industrial processing. It describes the effects of inactivation and removal of the bacteria, and the dynamics of cross-contamination in terms of the transfer of campylobacter from the intestines to the carcass surface and the environment, from the carcasses to the environment, and from the environment to the carcasses. From the model it can be derived that, in general, the effect of inactivation and removal is dominant for those carcasses with high initial bacterial loads, and cross-contamination is dominant for those with low initial levels. In other QMRA poultry-processing models, the input-output relationship between the numbers of bacteria on the carcasses is usually assumed to be linear on a logarithmic scale. By including some basic mechanistics, it is shown that this may not be realistic. As nonlinear behavior may affect the predicted effects of risk mitigations; this finding is relevant for risk management. Good knowledge of the variability of bacterial loads on poultry entering the process is important. The common practice in microbiology to only present geometric mean of bacterial counts is insufficient: arithmetic mean are more suitable, in particular, to describe the effect of cross-contamination. The effects of logistic slaughter (scheduled processing) as a risk mitigation strategy are predicted to be small. Some additional complications in applying microbiological data obtained in processing plants are discussed.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Visceral Obesity and Postoperative Colon Cancer Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi. O.; Siegel, Erin M.; Srikumar, Thejal; Bloomer, Amanda M.; DeRenzis, Amanda; Shibata, David

    2017-01-01

    Background Quantitative computed tomography (CT) assessment of visceral adiposity may be superior to body mass index (BMI) as a predictor of surgical morbidity. We sought to examine the association of CT measures of obesity and BMI with short-term post-operative outcomes in colon cancer patients. Methods In this retrospective study, 110 patients treated with colectomy for Stage I–III colon cancer were classified as obese or non-obese by pre-operative CT-based measures of adiposity or BMI. [Obese: BMI≥30kg/m2, visceral fat area (VFA) to subcutaneous fat area ratio (V/S) ≥0.4 and VFA>100cm2)]. Post-operative morbidity and mortality rates were compared. Results Obese patients, by V/S and VFA but not BMI, were more likely to be male and have pre-existing hypertension and diabetes. The overall complication rate was 25.5% and there were no mortalities. Obese patients by VFA (with a trend for VS but not BMI) were more likely to develop postoperative complications as compared to patients classified as non-obese; VFA (30.5% vs.10.7%, p= 0.03), VS (29.2% vs. 9.5%, p=0.05) and BMI (32.4% vs. 21.9%, p=0.23). Conclusions Elevated visceral obesity quantified by CT is associated with the presence of key metabolic comorbidities and increased post-operative morbidity and may be superior to BMI for risk stratification. PMID:28101721

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Visceral Obesity and Postoperative Colon Cancer Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ozoya, Oluwatobi O; Siegel, Erin M; Srikumar, Thejal; Bloomer, Amanda M; DeRenzis, Amanda; Shibata, David

    2017-03-01

    Quantitative computed tomography (CT) assessment of visceral adiposity may be superior to body mass index (BMI) as a predictor of surgical morbidity. We sought to examine the association of CT measures of obesity and BMI with short-term postoperative outcomes in colon cancer patients. In this retrospective study, 110 patients treated with colectomy for stage I-III colon cancer were classified as obese or non-obese by preoperative CT-based measures of adiposity or BMI [obese: BMI ≥ 30 kg/m(2), visceral fat area (VFA) to subcutaneous fat area ratio (V/S) ≥0.4, and VFA > 100 cm(2)]. Postoperative morbidity and mortality rates were compared. Obese patients, by V/S and VFA but not BMI, were more likely to be male and have preexisting hypertension and diabetes. The overall complication rate was 25.5%, and there were no mortalities. Obese patients by VFA (with a trend for V/S but not BMI) were more likely to develop postoperative complications as compared to patients classified as non-obese: VFA (30.5 vs.10.7%, p = 0.03), V/S (29.2 vs. 9.5%, p = 0.05), and BMI (32.4 vs. 21.9%, p = 0.23). Elevated visceral obesity quantified by CT is associated with the presence of key metabolic comorbidities and increased postoperative morbidity and may be superior to BMI for risk stratification.

  13. Quantitative assessment of dictionary-based protein named entity tagging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongfang; Hu, Zhang-Zhi; Torii, Manabu; Wu, Cathy; Friedman, Carol

    2006-01-01

    Natural language processing (NLP) approaches have been explored to manage and mine information recorded in biological literature. A critical step for biological literature mining is biological named entity tagging (BNET) that identifies names mentioned in text and normalizes them with entries in biological databases. The aim of this study was to provide quantitative assessment of the complexity of BNET on protein entities through BioThesaurus, a thesaurus of gene/protein names for UniProt knowledgebase (UniProtKB) entries that was acquired using online resources. We evaluated the complexity through several perspectives: ambiguity (i.e., the number of genes/proteins represented by one name), synonymy (i.e., the number of names associated with the same gene/protein), and coverage (i.e., the percentage of gene/protein names in text included in the thesaurus). We also normalized names in BioThesaurus and measures were obtained twice, once before normalization and once after. The current version of BioThesaurus has over 2.6 million names or 2.1 million normalized names covering more than 1.8 million UniProtKB entries. The average synonymy is 3.53 (2.86 after normalization), ambiguity is 2.31 before normalization and 2.32 after, while the coverage is 94.0% based on the BioCreAtive data set comprising MEDLINE abstracts containing genes/proteins. The study indicated that names for genes/proteins are highly ambiguous and there are usually multiple names for the same gene or protein. It also demonstrated that most gene/protein names appearing in text can be found in BioThesaurus.

  14. A Quantitative Assessment Method for Ascaris Eggs on Hands

    PubMed Central

    Jeandron, Aurelie; Ensink, Jeroen H. J.; Thamsborg, Stig M.; Dalsgaard, Anders; Sengupta, Mita E.

    2014-01-01

    The importance of hands in the transmission of soil transmitted helminths, especially Ascaris and Trichuris infections, is under-researched. This is partly because of the absence of a reliable method to quantify the number of eggs on hands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method to assess the number of Ascaris eggs on hands and determine the egg recovery rate of the method. Under laboratory conditions, hands were seeded with a known number of Ascaris eggs, air dried and washed in a plastic bag retaining the washing water, in order to determine recovery rates of eggs for four different detergents (cationic [benzethonium chloride 0.1% and cetylpyridinium chloride CPC 0.1%], anionic [7X 1% - quadrafos, glycol ether, and dioctyl sulfoccinate sodium salt] and non-ionic [Tween80 0.1% -polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate]) and two egg detection methods (McMaster technique and FLOTAC). A modified concentration McMaster technique showed the highest egg recovery rate from bags. Two of the four diluted detergents (benzethonium chloride 0.1% and 7X 1%) also showed a higher egg recovery rate and were then compared with de-ionized water for recovery of helminth eggs from hands. The highest recovery rate (95.6%) was achieved with a hand rinse performed with 7X 1%. Washing hands with de-ionized water resulted in an egg recovery rate of 82.7%. This washing method performed with a low concentration of detergent offers potential for quantitative investigation of contamination of hands with Ascaris eggs and of their role in human infection. Follow-up studies are needed that validate the hand washing method under field conditions, e.g. including people of different age, lower levels of contamination and various levels of hand cleanliness. PMID:24802859

  15. A quantitative assessment method for Ascaris eggs on hands.

    PubMed

    Jeandron, Aurelie; Ensink, Jeroen H J; Thamsborg, Stig M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Sengupta, Mita E

    2014-01-01

    The importance of hands in the transmission of soil transmitted helminths, especially Ascaris and Trichuris infections, is under-researched. This is partly because of the absence of a reliable method to quantify the number of eggs on hands. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a method to assess the number of Ascaris eggs on hands and determine the egg recovery rate of the method. Under laboratory conditions, hands were seeded with a known number of Ascaris eggs, air dried and washed in a plastic bag retaining the washing water, in order to determine recovery rates of eggs for four different detergents (cationic [benzethonium chloride 0.1% and cetylpyridinium chloride CPC 0.1%], anionic [7X 1% - quadrafos, glycol ether, and dioctyl sulfoccinate sodium salt] and non-ionic [Tween80 0.1% -polyethylene glycol sorbitan monooleate]) and two egg detection methods (McMaster technique and FLOTAC). A modified concentration McMaster technique showed the highest egg recovery rate from bags. Two of the four diluted detergents (benzethonium chloride 0.1% and 7X 1%) also showed a higher egg recovery rate and were then compared with de-ionized water for recovery of helminth eggs from hands. The highest recovery rate (95.6%) was achieved with a hand rinse performed with 7X 1%. Washing hands with de-ionized water resulted in an egg recovery rate of 82.7%. This washing method performed with a low concentration of detergent offers potential for quantitative investigation of contamination of hands with Ascaris eggs and of their role in human infection. Follow-up studies are needed that validate the hand washing method under field conditions, e.g. including people of different age, lower levels of contamination and various levels of hand cleanliness.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Water Resources Adaptation Policies in Mediterranean Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrote, L. M.; Mediero, L.; Martin-Carrasco, F.

    2011-12-01

    Many factors challenge water management in Southern Europe: scarce water resources, climate change, population growth, environmental concerns and economic development, among others. Water policy in the region is designed to ensure future sustainability of water resources under strong socioeconomic forcing while maintaining the strategic ecological and social services of water. Climate change is projected to intensify these conflicts, since most models agree that Southern Europe will show a significant drying trend, especially during the second half of the century. For this reason, there is a strong need to integrate climate change adaptation into implementation of the EU Water Framework Directive. From the policy perspective, there are many studies on how climate change might lead to changes in hydrologic regime, water demands, water quality or ecosystems, but there little knowledge on how much water demand might be met with future hydrologic regime. In water scarce regions, water demands are supplied by means of hydraulic infrastructure, which performs functions of storage, transportation and distribution, to overcome the spatio-temporal irregularities of hydrologic regime. Knowledge on the relationship between natural water resources, reservoir storage and water demands is essential to assess the effectiveness of alternative policy options to ensure adequate public water supply. In this paper we provide a simple way to account for the influence of socioeconomic factors (hydraulic infrastructure and water policy) on climate change impacts on water resources in the Mediterranean region. We present a methodology to identify and evaluate climate change adaptation policies in this context. The methodology is based on the application of the WAAPA (Water Availability and Adaptation Policy Assessment) model, which computes net water availability for consumptive use for a river basin taking into account the regulation capacity of its water supply system and a set of

  17. Effect of power Doppler and digital subtraction techniques on the comparison of myocardial contrast echocardiography with SPECT.

    PubMed

    Haluska, B; Case, C; Short, L; Anderson, J; Marwick, T H

    2001-05-01

    To compare the accuracy and feasibility of harmonic power Doppler and digitally subtracted colour coded grey scale imaging for the assessment of perfusion defect severity by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in an unselected group of patients. Cohort study. Regional cardiothoracic unit. 49 patients (mean (SD) age 61 (11) years; 27 women, 22 men) with known or suspected coronary artery disease were studied with simultaneous myocardial contrast echo (MCE) and SPECT after standard dipyridamole stress. Regional myocardial perfusion by SPECT, performed with (99m)Tc tetrafosmin, scored qualitatively and also quantitated as per cent maximum activity. Normal perfusion was identified by SPECT in 225 of 270 segments (83%). Contrast echo images were interpretable in 92% of patients. The proportion of normal MCE by grey scale, subtracted, and power Doppler techniques were respectively 76%, 74%, and 88% (p < 0.05) at > 80% of maximum counts, compared with 65%, 69%, and 61% at < 60% of maximum counts. For each technique, specificity was lowest in the lateral wall, although power Doppler was the least affected. Grey scale and subtraction techniques were least accurate in the septal wall, but power Doppler showed particular problems in the apex. On a per patient analysis, the sensitivity was 67%, 75%, and 83% for detection of coronary artery disease using grey scale, colour coded, and power Doppler, respectively, with a significant difference between power Doppler and grey scale only (p < 0.05). Specificity was also the highest for power Doppler, at 55%, but not significantly different from subtracted colour coded images. Myocardial contrast echo using harmonic power Doppler has greater accuracy than with grey scale imaging and digital subtraction. However, power Doppler appears to be less sensitive for mild perfusion defects.

  18. Monte Carlo simulation of PET and SPECT imaging of {sup 90}Y

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Akihiko Sasaki, Masayuki; Himuro, Kazuhiko; Yamashita, Yasuo; Komiya, Isao; Baba, Shingo

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: Yittrium-90 ({sup 90}Y) is traditionally thought of as a pure beta emitter, and is used in targeted radionuclide therapy, with imaging performed using bremsstrahlung single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). However, because {sup 90}Y also emits positrons through internal pair production with a very small branching ratio, positron emission tomography (PET) imaging is also available. Because of the insufficient image quality of {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung SPECT, PET imaging has been suggested as an alternative. In this paper, the authors present the Monte Carlo-based simulation–reconstruction framework for {sup 90}Y to comprehensively analyze the PET and SPECT imaging techniques and to quantitatively consider the disadvantages associated with them. Methods: Our PET and SPECT simulation modules were developed using Monte Carlo simulation of Electrons and Photons (MCEP), developed by Dr. S. Uehara. PET code (MCEP-PET) generates a sinogram, and reconstructs the tomography image using a time-of-flight ordered subset expectation maximization (TOF-OSEM) algorithm with attenuation compensation. To evaluate MCEP-PET, simulated results of {sup 18}F PET imaging were compared with the experimental results. The results confirmed that MCEP-PET can simulate the experimental results very well. The SPECT code (MCEP-SPECT) models the collimator and NaI detector system, and generates the projection images and projection data. To save the computational time, the authors adopt the prerecorded {sup 90}Y bremsstrahlung photon data calculated by MCEP. The projection data are also reconstructed using the OSEM algorithm. The authors simulated PET and SPECT images of a water phantom containing six hot spheres filled with different concentrations of {sup 90}Y without background activity. The amount of activity was 163 MBq, with an acquisition time of 40 min. Results: The simulated {sup 90}Y-PET image accurately simulated the experimental results. PET image is visually

  19. Progress in BazookaSPECT.

    PubMed

    Miller, Brian W; Barber, H Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R; Moore, Stephen K; Barrett, Harrison H

    2009-01-01

    Recent progress on a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray imager called BazookaSPECT is presented. BazookaSPECT is an example of a new class of scintillation detectors based on integrating detectors such as CCD(charge-coupled device) or CMOS(complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors. BazookaSPECT is unique in that it makes use of a scintillator in close proximity to a microchannel plate-based image intensifier for up-front optical amplification of scintillation light. We discuss progress made in bringing about compact BazookaSPECT modules and in real-time processing of event data using graphics processing units (GPUs). These advances are being implemented in the design of a high-resolution rodent brain imager called FastSPECT III. A key benefit of up-front optical gain is that any CCD/CMOS sensor can now be utilized for photon counting. We discuss the benefits and feasibility of using CMOS sensors as photon-counting detectors for digital radiography, with application in mammography and computed tomography (CT). We present as an appendix a formal method for comparing various photon-counting integrating detectors using objective statistical criteria.

  20. Progress in BazookaSPECT

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Brian W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Furenlid, Lars R.; Moore, Stephen K.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2010-01-01

    Recent progress on a high-resolution, photon-counting gamma-ray and x-ray imager called BazookaSPECT is presented. BazookaSPECT is an example of a new class of scintillation detectors based on integrating detectors such as CCD(charge-coupled device) or CMOS(complementary metal-oxide semiconductor) sensors. BazookaSPECT is unique in that it makes use of a scintillator in close proximity to a microchannel plate-based image intensifier for up-front optical amplification of scintillation light. We discuss progress made in bringing about compact BazookaSPECT modules and in real-time processing of event data using graphics processing units (GPUs). These advances are being implemented in the design of a high-resolution rodent brain imager called FastSPECT III. A key benefit of up-front optical gain is that any CCD/CMOS sensor can now be utilized for photon counting. We discuss the benefits and feasibility of using CMOS sensors as photon-counting detectors for digital radiography, with application in mammography and computed tomography (CT). We present as an appendix a formal method for comparing various photon-counting integrating detectors using objective statistical criteria. PMID:21297897

  1. Evaluation of hardware in a small-animal SPECT system using reconstructed images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Wilson, Donald W.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2007-03-01

    Evaluation of imaging hardware represents a vital component of system design. In small-animal SPECT imaging, this evaluation has become increasingly diffcult with the emergence of multi-pinhole apertures and adaptive, or patient-specific, imaging. This paper will describe two methods for hardware evaluation using reconstructed images. The first method is a rapid technique incorporating a system-specific non-linear, three-dimensional point response. This point response is easily computed and offers qualitative insight into an aperture's resolution and artifact characteristics. The second method is an objective assessment of signal detection in lumpy backgrounds using the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO) with 3D Laguerre-Gauss and difference-of-Gaussian channels to calculate area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC). Previous work presented at this meeting described a unique, small-animal SPECT system (M 3R) capable of operating under a myriad of hardware configurations and ideally suited for image quality studies. Measured system matrices were collected for several hardware configurations of M 3R. The data used to implement these two methods was then generated by taking simulated objects through the measured system matrices. The results of these two methods comprise a combination of qualitative and quantitative analysis that is well-suited for hardware assessment.

  2. Nonlinear dual reconstruction of SPECT activity and attenuation images.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction.

  3. Nonlinear Dual Reconstruction of SPECT Activity and Attenuation Images

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Huafeng; Guo, Min; Hu, Zhenghui; Shi, Pengcheng; Hu, Hongjie

    2014-01-01

    In single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), accurate attenuation maps are needed to perform essential attenuation compensation for high quality radioactivity estimation. Formulating the SPECT activity and attenuation reconstruction tasks as coupled signal estimation and system parameter identification problems, where the activity distribution and the attenuation parameter are treated as random variables with known prior statistics, we present a nonlinear dual reconstruction scheme based on the unscented Kalman filtering (UKF) principles. In this effort, the dynamic changes of the organ radioactivity distribution are described through state space evolution equations, while the photon-counting SPECT projection data are measured through the observation equations. Activity distribution is then estimated with sub-optimal fixed attenuation parameters, followed by attenuation map reconstruction given these activity estimates. Such coupled estimation processes are iteratively repeated as necessary until convergence. The results obtained from Monte Carlo simulated data, physical phantom, and real SPECT scans demonstrate the improved performance of the proposed method both from visual inspection of the images and a quantitative evaluation, compared to the widely used EM-ML algorithms. The dual estimation framework has the potential to be useful for estimating the attenuation map from emission data only and thus benefit the radioactivity reconstruction. PMID:25225796

  4. Comparative evaluation of MRS and SPECT in prognostication of patients with mild to moderate head injury.

    PubMed

    Dhandapani, Sivashanmugam; Sharma, Anurag; Sharma, Karamchand; Das, Lakshman

    2014-05-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) have only been individually studied in patients with head injury. This study aimed to comparatively assess both in patients with mild to moderate head injury. Patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score of 9-14 who underwent MRS and/or SPECT were evaluated in relation to various clinical factors and neurological outcome at 3months. There were 56 SPECT (Tc99m-ethylcysteinate dimer [ECD]) studies and 41 single voxel proton MRS performed in 53 patients, with 41 patients having both. Of the 41 who underwent MRS, 13 had a lower N-acetyl-aspartate/creatine (NAA/Cr) ratio, 14 had a higher choline (Cho)/Cr ratio, 19 were normal, and nine had bilateral MRS abnormalities. Of the 56 who underwent SPECT, 22 and 19 had severe and moderate hypoperfusion, respectively. Among those in Traumatic Coma Data Bank CT scan category 1 and 2, 50% had MRS abnormalities, whereas 64% had SPECT hypoperfusion, suggesting greater incremental validity of SPECT over MRS. In univariate analyses, GCS, moderate/severe hypoperfusion and bilateral SPECT changes were found to have significant association with unfavorable outcome (odds ratio 13.2, 15.9, and 4.4, and p values <0.01, 0.01, and 0.05, respectively). Patients with lower NAA/Cr ratio in MRS had more unfavorable outcomes, however this was not significant. In multivariate analysis employing binary logistic regression, GCS and severe hypoperfusion on SPECT were noted to have significant association with unfavorable outcome, independent of age, CT scan category, and MRS abnormalities (p values=0.02 and 0.04, respectively). To conclude, ECD-SPECT seems to have greater sensitivity, incremental validity and prognostic value than single voxel proton MRS in select patients with head injury, with only severe hypoperfusion in SPECT significantly associated with unfavorable outcome independent of other confounding factors.

  5. Use of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment to Improve Interpretation of a Recreational Water Epidemiological Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a supplemental water quality monitoring study and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to complement the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water study at Boq...

  6. Use of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment to Improve Interpretation of a Recreational Water Epidemiological Study

    EPA Science Inventory

    We conducted a supplemental water quality monitoring study and quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to complement the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) National Epidemiological and Environmental Assessment of Recreational Water study at Boq...

  7. SPECT imaging with resolution recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Bronnikov, A. V.

    2011-07-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a method of choice for imaging spatial distributions of radioisotopes. Many applications of this method are found in nuclear industry, medicine, and biomedical research. We study mathematical modeling of a micro-SPECT system by using a point-spread function (PSF) and implement an OSEM-based iterative algorithm for image reconstruction with resolution recovery. Unlike other known implementations of the OSEM algorithm, we apply en efficient computation scheme based on a useful approximation of the PSF, which ensures relatively fast computations. The proposed approach can be applied with the data acquired with any type of collimators, including parallel-beam fan-beam, cone-beam and pinhole collimators. Experimental results obtained with a micro SPECT system demonstrate high efficiency of resolution recovery. (authors)

  8. The AAPM/RSNA physics tutorial for residents. Physics of SPECT.

    PubMed

    Tsui, B M

    1996-01-01

    Single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) provides three-dimensional (3D) image information about the distribution of a radiopharmaceutical injected into the patient for diagnostic purposes. By combining conventional scintigraphic and computed tomographic methods, SPECT images present 3D functional information about the patient in more detail and higher contrast than found in planar scintigrams. A typical SPECT system consists of one or more scintillation cameras that acquire multiple two-dimensional planar projection images around the patient. The projection data are reconstructed into 3D images. The collimator of the scintillation camera has substantial effects on the spatial resolution and detection efficiency of the SPECT system. Physical factors such as photon attenuation and scatter affect the quantitative accuracy and quality of SPECT images, and various methods have been developed to compensate for these image-degrading effects. In myocardial SPECT, an important application of SPECT, recent use of attenuation compensation methods has provided images with reduced artifacts and distortions caused by the non-uniform attenuation in the chest region and by the diaphragmatic and breast attenuation. Attenuation-compensated myocardial SPECT images have the potential to improve clinical diagnosis by reducing the false-positive and false-negative detection of myocardial defects. In the future, further improvement in SPECT images will be realized from the continuous development of new radio-pharmaceuticals for new clinical applications, instrumentation with high spatial resolution and detection efficiency, and image reconstruction algorithms and compensation methods that reduce the image-degrading effects of the collimator-detector, attenuation, and scatter.

  9. SPECT attenuation correction: an essential tool to realize nuclear cardiology's manifest destiny.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Ernest V

    2007-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) myocardial perfusion imaging has attained widespread clinical acceptance as a standard of care for cardiac patients. Yet, physical phenomena degrade the accuracy of how our cardiac images are visually interpreted or quantitatively analyzed. This degradation results in cardiac images in which brightness or counts are not necessarily linear with tracer uptake or myocardial perfusion. Attenuation correction (AC) is a methodology that has evolved over the last 30 years to compensate for this degradation. Numerous AC clinical trials over the last 10 years have shown increased diagnostic accuracy over non-AC SPECT for detecting and localizing coronary artery disease, particularly for significantly increasing specificity and normalcy rate. This overwhelming evidence has prompted our professional societies to issue a joint position statement in 2004 recommending the use of AC to maximize SPECT diagnostic accuracy and clinical usefulness. Phantom and animal studies have convincingly shown how SPECT AC recovers the true regional myocardial activity concentration, while non-AC SPECT does not. Thus, AC is also an essential tool for extracting quantitative parameters from all types of cardiac radionuclide distributions, and plays an important role in establishing cardiac SPECT for flow, metabolic, innervation, and molecular imaging, our manifest destiny.

  10. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. Comprehensive progress report, September 1989--February 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  11. Partition Model-Based 99mTc-MAA SPECT/CT Predictive Dosimetry Compared with 90Y TOF PET/CT Posttreatment Dosimetry in Radioembolization of Hepatocellular Carcinoma: A Quantitative Agreement Comparison.

    PubMed

    Gnesin, Silvano; Canetti, Laurent; Adib, Salim; Cherbuin, Nicolas; Silva Monteiro, Marina; Bize, Pierre; Denys, Alban; Prior, John O; Baechler, Sebastien; Boubaker, Ariane

    2016-11-01

    (90)Y-microsphere selective internal radiation therapy (SIRT) is a valuable treatment in unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Partition-model predictive dosimetry relies on differential tumor-to-nontumor perfusion evaluated on pretreatment (99m)Tc-macroaggregated albumin (MAA) SPECT/CT. The aim of this study was to evaluate agreement between the predictive dosimetry of (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and posttreatment dosimetry based on (90)Y time-of-flight (TOF) PET/CT. We compared the (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT results for 27 treatment sessions (25 HCC patients, 41 tumors) with (90)Y SIRT (7 glass spheres, 20 resin spheres) and the posttreatment (90)Y TOF PET/CT results. Three-dimensional voxelized dose maps were computed from the (99m)Tc-MAA SPECT/CT and (90)Y TOF PET/CT data. Mean absorbed dose ([Formula: see text]) was evaluated to compute the predicted-to-actual dose ratio ([Formula: see text]) in tumor volumes (TVs) and nontumor volumes (NTVs) for glass and resin spheres. The Lin concordance ([Formula: see text]) was used to measure accuracy ([Formula: see text]) and precision (ρ). Administered activity ranged from 0.8 to 1.9 GBq for glass spheres and from 0.6 to 3.4 GBq for resin spheres, and the respective TVs ranged from 2 to 125 mL and from 6 to 1,828 mL. The mean dose [Formula: see text] was 240 Gy for glass and 122 Gy for resin in TVs and 72 Gy for glass and 47 Gy for resin in NTVs. [Formula: see text] was 1.46 ± 0.58 (0.65-2.53) for glass and 1.16 ± 0.41 (0.54-2.54) for resin, and the respective values for [Formula: see text] were 0.88 ± 0.15 (0.56-1.00) and 0.86 ± 0.2 (0.58-1.35). DR variability was substantially lower in NTVs than in TVs. The Lin concordance between [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] (resin) was significantly better for tumors larger than 150 mL than for tumors 150 mL or smaller ([Formula: see text] = 0.93 and [Formula: see text] = 0.95 vs. [Formula: see text] = 0.57 and [Formula: see text] = 0.93; P < 0.05). In (90)Y

  12. Technetium-99m-labelled red blood cell imaging in the diagnosis of hepatic haemangiomas: the role of SPECT/CT with a hybrid camera.

    PubMed

    Schillaci, Orazio; Danieli, Roberta; Manni, Carlo; Capoccetti, Francesca; Simonetti, Giovanni

    2004-07-01

    Delayed liver single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) after (99m)Tc red blood cell (RBC) labelling is helpful in detecting hepatic haemangiomas; however, diagnosis can be difficult when lesions are situated adjacent to structures like the inferior vena cava, the heart or hepatic vessels, where blood activity persists. The aims of this study were to evaluate the usefulness of RBC SPECT and transmission computed tomography (RBC SPECT/CT) performed simultaneously with a hybrid imaging system for correct characterisation of hepatic lesions in patients with suspected haemangioma, and to assess the additional value of fused images compared with SPECT alone. Twelve patients with 24 liver lesions were studied. The acquisitions of both anatomical (CT) and functional (SPECT) data were performed during a single session. SPECT images were first interpreted alone and then re-evaluated after adding the transmission anatomical maps. Image fusion was successful in all patients, with perfect correspondence between SPECT and CT data, allowing the precise anatomical localisation of sites of increased blood pool activity. SPECT/CT had a significant impact on results in four patients (33.3%) with four lesions defined as indeterminate on SPECT images, accurately characterising the hot spot foci located near vascular structures. In conclusion, RBC SPECT/CT imaging using this hybrid SPECT/CT system is feasible and useful in the identification or exclusion of suspected hepatic haemangiomas located near regions with high vascular activity.

  13. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods.

    PubMed

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-04-07

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  14. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Abhinav K.; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C.

    2016-04-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  15. A no-gold-standard technique for objective assessment of quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods

    PubMed Central

    Jha, Abhinav K; Caffo, Brian; Frey, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    The objective optimization and evaluation of nuclear-medicine quantitative imaging methods using patient data is highly desirable but often hindered by the lack of a gold standard. Previously, a regression-without-truth (RWT) approach has been proposed for evaluating quantitative imaging methods in the absence of a gold standard, but this approach implicitly assumes that bounds on the distribution of true values are known. Several quantitative imaging methods in nuclear-medicine imaging measure parameters where these bounds are not known, such as the activity concentration in an organ or the volume of a tumor. We extended upon the RWT approach to develop a no-gold-standard (NGS) technique for objectively evaluating such quantitative nuclear-medicine imaging methods with patient data in the absence of any ground truth. Using the parameters estimated with the NGS technique, a figure of merit, the noise-to-slope ratio (NSR), can be computed, which can rank the methods on the basis of precision. An issue with NGS evaluation techniques is the requirement of a large number of patient studies. To reduce this requirement, the proposed method explored the use of multiple quantitative measurements from the same patient, such as the activity concentration values from different organs in the same patient. The proposed technique was evaluated using rigorous numerical experiments and using data from realistic simulation studies. The numerical experiments demonstrated that the NSR was estimated accurately using the proposed NGS technique when the bounds on the distribution of true values were not precisely known, thus serving as a very reliable metric for ranking the methods on the basis of precision. In the realistic simulation study, the NGS technique was used to rank reconstruction methods for quantitative single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) based on their performance on the task of estimating the mean activity concentration within a known volume of interest

  16. Assessing framing assumptions in quantitative health impact assessments: a housing intervention example.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Frias, Marco; Chalabi, Zaid; Foss, Anna M

    2013-09-01

    Health impact assessment (HIA) is often used to determine ex ante the health impact of an environmental policy or an environmental intervention. Underpinning any HIA is the framing assumption, which defines the causal pathways mapping environmental exposures to health outcomes. The sensitivity of the HIA to the framing assumptions is often ignored. A novel method based on fuzzy cognitive map (FCM) is developed to quantify the framing assumptions in the assessment stage of a HIA, and is then applied to a housing intervention (tightening insulation) as a case-study. Framing assumptions of the case-study were identified through a literature search of Ovid Medline (1948-2011). The FCM approach was used to identify the key variables that have the most influence in a HIA. Changes in air-tightness, ventilation, indoor air quality and mould/humidity have been identified as having the most influence on health. The FCM approach is widely applicable and can be used to inform the formulation of the framing assumptions in any quantitative HIA of environmental interventions. We argue that it is necessary to explore and quantify framing assumptions prior to conducting a detailed quantitative HIA during the assessment stage.

  17. [Utility of SPECT in gallium scintigraphy].

    PubMed

    Uto, Tomoyuki

    2002-11-01

    Whole-body gallium planar scintigraphy is a mainstay for the detection of tumors and inflammatory lesions. Recently, gallium SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography) has become more common in the clinical setting. This diagnostic modality is widely employed in our hospital, and lesions are actually detected by SPECT in some cases. Although the contrast of SPECT images is better than that of planar images, spatial resolution is limited by the limited matrix size. Thus, the overall diagnostic utility of SPECT remains to be confirmed. The usefulness of SPECT for the detection of gallium-accumulated lesions was evaluated in a phantom. In this study, we showed that SPECT is able to detect more smaller and lower gallium accumulations than planar imaging. Thus, SPECT imaging is useful in gallium scintigraphy.

  18. Hotspot quantification of myocardial focal tracer uptake from molecular targeted SPECT/CT images: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi-Hwa; Sahul, Zakir; Weyman, Christopher A.; Ryder, William J.; Dione, Donald P.; Dobrucki, Lawrence W.; Mekkaoui, Choukri; Brennan, Matthew P.; Hu, Xiaoyue; Hawley, Christi; Sinusas, Albert J.

    2008-03-01

    We have developed a new single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) hotspot quantification method incorporating extra cardiac activity correction and hotspot normal limit estimation. The method was validated for estimation accuracy of myocardial tracer focal uptake in a chronic canine model of myocardial infarction (MI). Dogs (n = 4) at 2 weeks post MI were injected with Tl-201 and a Tc-99m-labeled hotspot tracer targeted at matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). An external point source filled with Tc-99m was used for a reference of absolute radioactivity. Dual-isotope (Tc-99m/Tl-201) SPECT images were acquired simultaneously followed by an X-ray CT acquisition. Dogs were sacrificed after imaging for myocardial gamma well counting. Images were reconstructed with CT-based attenuation correction (AC) and without AC (NAC) and were quantified using our quantification method. Normal limits for myocardial hotspot uptake were estimated based on 3 different schemes: maximum entropy, meansquared-error minimization (MSEM) and global minimization. Absolute myocardial hotspot uptake was quantified from SPECT images using the normal limits and compared with well-counted radioactivity on a segment-by-segment basis (n = 12 segments/dog). Radioactivity was expressed as % injected dose (%ID). There was an excellent correlation (r = 0.78-0.92) between the estimated activity (%ID) derived using the SPECT quantitative approach and well-counting, independent of AC. However, SPECT quantification without AC resulted in the significant underestimation of radioactivity. Quantification using SPECT with AC and the MSEM normal limit yielded the best results compared with well-counting. In conclusion, focal myocardial "hotspot" uptake of a targeted radiotracer can be accurately quantified in vivo using a method that incorporates SPECT imaging with AC, an external reference, background scatter compensation, and a suitable normal limit. This hybrid SPECT/CT approach allows for the serial

  19. Iterative restoration of SPECT projection images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glick, S. J.; Xia, Weishi

    1997-04-01

    Photon attenuation and the limited nonstationary spatial resolution of the detector can reduce both qualitative and quantitative image quality in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In this paper, a reconstruction approach is described which can compensate for both of these degradations. The approach involves processing the projection data with Bellini's method for attenuation compensation followed by an iterative deconvolution technique which uses the frequency distance principle (FDP) to model the distance-dependent camera blur. Modeling of the camera blur with the FDP allows an efficient implementation using fast Fourier transform (FFT) methods. After processing of the projection data, reconstruction is performed using filtered backprojection. Simulation studies using two different brain phantoms show that this approach gives reconstructions with a favorable bias versus noise tradeoff, provides no visually undesirable noise artifacts, and requires a low computational load.

  20. A potential quantitative method for assessing individual tree performance

    Treesearch

    Lance A. Vickers; David R. Larsen; Daniel C. Dey; John M. Kabrick; Benjamin O. Knapp

    2014-01-01

    By what standard should a tree be judged? This question, perhaps unknowingly, is posed almost daily by practicing foresters. Unfortunately, there are few cases in which clearly defined quantitative (i.e., directly measurable) references have been established in forestry. A lack of common references may be an unnecessary source of error in silvicultural application and...

  1. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    Hugh A. Barton1 and Carey N. Pope2
    1US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2Department of...

  2. A Comparative Assessment of Greek Universities' Efficiency Using Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2010-01-01

    In part due to the increased demand for higher education, typical evaluation frameworks for universities often address the key issue of available resource utilisation. This study seeks to estimate the efficiency of 20 public universities in Greece through quantitative analysis (including performance indicators, data envelopment analysis (DEA) and…

  3. Assessing the Impact of a Quantitative Skills Course for Undergraduates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersen, Kristi; Harsell, Dana Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper evaluates the long-term benefits of a Syracuse University course offering, "Maxwell 201: Quantitative Methods for the Social Sciences" (MAX 201). The authors analyze data collected from class-administered pre- and post-tests and from a questionnaire sent to a random sample MAX 201 alumni to evaluate the extent to which…

  4. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    Hugh A. Barton1 and Carey N. Pope2
    1US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2Department of...

  5. A Comparative Assessment of Greek Universities' Efficiency Using Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2010-01-01

    In part due to the increased demand for higher education, typical evaluation frameworks for universities often address the key issue of available resource utilisation. This study seeks to estimate the efficiency of 20 public universities in Greece through quantitative analysis (including performance indicators, data envelopment analysis (DEA) and…

  6. Detection of Sentinel Lymph Nodes in Gynecologic Tumours by Planar Scintigraphy and SPECT/CT

    PubMed Central

    Kraft, Otakar; Havel, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Assess the role of planar lymphoscintigraphy and fusion imaging of SPECT/CT in sentinel lymph node (SLN) detection in patients with gynecologic tumours. Material and Methods: Planar scintigraphy and hybrid modality SPECT/CT were performed in 64 consecutive women with gynecologic tumours (mean age 53.6 with range 30-77 years): 36 pts with cervical cancer (Group A), 21 pts with endometrial cancer (Group B), 7 pts with vulvar carcinoma (Group C). Planar and SPECT/CT images were interpreted separately by two nuclear medicine physicians. Efficacy of these two techniques to image SLN were compared. Results: Planar scintigraphy did not image SLN in 7 patients (10.9%), SPECT/CT was negative in 4 patients (6.3%). In 35 (54.7%) patients the number of SLNs captured on SPECT/CT was higher than on planar imaging. Differences in detection of SLN between planar and SPECT/CT imaging in the group of all 64 patients are statistically significant (p<0.05). Three foci of uptake (1.7% from totally visible 177 foci on planar images) in 2 patients interpreted on planar images as hot LNs were found to be false positive non-nodal sites of uptake when further assessed on SPECT/CT. SPECT/CT showed the exact anatomical location of all visualised sentinel nodes. Conclusion: In some patients with gynecologic cancers SPECT/CT improves detection of sentinel lymph nodes. It can image nodes not visible on planar scintigrams, exclude false positive uptake and exactly localise pelvic and paraaortal SLNs. It improves anatomic localization of SLNs. Conflict of interest:None declared. PMID:23486989

  7. Assessing Student Teachers' Reflective Writing through Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing students' reflective writings in teacher education…

  8. Assessing Student Teachers' Reflective Writing through Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poldner, Eric; Van der Schaaf, Marieke; Simons, P. Robert-Jan; Van Tartwijk, Jan; Wijngaards, Guus

    2014-01-01

    Students' reflective essay writing can be stimulated by the formative assessments provided to them by their teachers. Such assessments contain information about the quality of students' reflective writings and offer suggestions for improvement. Despite the importance of formatively assessing students' reflective writings in teacher education…

  9. Assessment of left ventricular volumes, ejection fraction and mass. Comparison of model-based analysis of ECG-gated (⁹⁹m)Tc-SPECT and ¹⁸F-FDG-PET.

    PubMed

    Khorsand, A; Gyöngyösi, M; Sochor, H; Maurer, G; Karanikas, G; Dudczak, R; Schuster, E; Porenta, G; Graf, S

    2011-01-01

    We compared and delineated possible differences of model-based analysis of ECG-gated SPECT using (⁹⁹m)Tc-sestamibi (Tc-SPECT) with ECG-gated ¹⁸F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET (FDG-PET) for determination of end-diastolic (EDV) and end-systolic (ESV) cardiac volumes, left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), and myocardial mass (LVMM). 24 patients (21 men; age: 54±12years) with coronary artery disease underwent Tc-SPECT and FDG-PET imaging for evaluation of myocardial perfusion and viability. By using model-based analysis EDV, ESV, LVEF and LVMM were calculated from short axis images of both Tc-SPECT and FDG-PET. Left ventricular volumes by Tc-SPECT and FDG-PET were 176±60 ml and 181±59 ml for EDV, and 97±44 ml and 103±45 ml for ESV respectively, LVEF was 47±8% by Tc-SPECT and 45±9% by FDG-PET. The LVMM was 214±40 g (Tc-SPECT) and 202±43 g (FDG-PET) (all p = NS, paired t-test). A significant correlation was observed between Tc-SPECT and FDG-PET imaging for calculation of EDV (r = 0.93), ESV (r = 0.93), LVEF (r = 0.83) and LVMM (r = 0.72). ECG-gated Tc-SPECT and FDG-PET using two tracers with different characteristics (perfusion versus metabolism) showed close agreement concerning measurements of left ventricular volumes, contractile function and myocardial mass by using a model-based analysis.

  10. Regional cardiac wall motion from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M. F.; Brigger, P.; Ferrand, S. K.; Dilsizian, V.; Bacharach, S. L.

    1999-06-01

    A method for estimating regional epicardial and endocardial wall motion from gated myocardial perfusion SPECT studies has been developed. The method uses epicardial and endocardial boundaries determined from four long-axis slices at each gate of the cardiac cycle. The epicardial and endocardial wall position at each time gate is computed with respect to stationary reference ellipsoids, and wall motion is measured along lines normal to these ellipsoids. An initial quantitative evaluation of the method was made using the beating heart from the dynamic mathematical cardiac torso (MCAT) phantom, with and without a 1.5-cm FWHM Gaussian blurring filter. Epicardial wall motion was generally well-estimated within a fraction of a 3.56-mm voxel, although apical motion was overestimated with the Gaussian filter. Endocardial wall motion was underestimated by about two voxels with and without the Gaussian filter. The MCAT heart phantom was modified to model hypokinetic and dyskinetic wall motion. The wall motion analysis method enabled this abnormal motion to be differentiated from normal motion. Regional cardiac wall motion also was analyzed for /sup 201/Tl patient studies. Estimated wall motion was consistent with a nuclear medicine physician's visual assessment of motion from gated long-axis slices for male and female study examples. Additional research is required for a comprehensive evaluation of the applicability of the method to patient studies with normal and abnormal wall motion.

  11. Analytically based photon scatter modeling for a multipinhole cardiac SPECT camera.

    PubMed

    Pourmoghaddas, Amir; Wells, R Glenn

    2016-11-01

    projections (120 ± 6 keV ) were also extracted from the acquired list-mode SPECT data. Either APD or DEW scatter projections were subtracted from corresponding 140 keV measured projections and then reconstructed with AC (APD-SC and DEW-SC). Quantitative accuracy of the activity measured in the heart for the APD-SC and DEW-SC images was assessed against dose calibrator measurements. The difference between modeled and acquired projections was measured as the root-mean-squared-error (RMSE). APD-modeled projections for a clinical cardiac study were also evaluated. APD-modeled projections showed good agreement with SPECT measurements and had reduced noise compared to DEW scatter estimates. APD-SC reduced mean error in activity measurement compared to DEW-SC in images and the reduction was statistically significant where the scatter fraction (SF) was large (mean SF = 28.5%, T-test p = 0.007). APD-SC reduced measurement uncertainties as well; however, the difference was not found to be statistically significant (F-test p > 0.5). RMSE comparisons showed that elevated levels of scatter did not significantly contribute to a change in RMSE (p > 0.2). Model-based APD scatter estimation is feasible for dedicated cardiac SPECT scanners with pinhole collimators. APD-SC images performed better than DEW-SC images and improved the accuracy of activity measurement in high-scatter scenarios.

  12. Sci—Thur PM: Imaging — 04: An iterative triple energy window (TEW) approach to cross talk correction in quantitative small animal Tc99m and In111 SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Prior, P; Timmins, R; Wells, R G

    2014-08-15

    Dual isotope SPECT allows simultaneous measurement of two different tracers in vivo. With In111 (emission energies of 171keV and 245keV) and Tc99m (140keV), quantification of Tc99m is degraded by cross talk from the In111 photons that scatter and are detected at an energy corresponding to Tc99m. TEW uses counts recorded in two narrow windows surrounding the Tc99m primary window to estimate scatter. Iterative TEW corrects for the bias introduced into the TEW estimate resulting from un-scattered counts detected in the scatter windows. The contamination in the scatter windows is iteratively estimated and subtracted as a fraction of the scatter-corrected primary window counts. The iterative TEW approach was validated with a small-animal SPECT/CT camera using a 2.5mL plastic container holding thoroughly mixed Tc99m/In111 activity fractions of 0.15, 0.28, 0.52, 0.99, 2.47 and 6.90. Dose calibrator measurements were the gold standard. Uncorrected for scatter, the Tc99m activity was over-estimated by as much as 80%. Unmodified TEW underestimated the Tc99m activity by 13%. With iterative TEW corrections applied in projection space, the Tc99m activity was estimated within 5% of truth across all activity fractions above 0.15. This is an improvement over the non-iterative TEW, which could not sufficiently correct for scatter in the 0.15 and 0.28 phantoms.

  13. Filtering in SPECT Image Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Lyra, Maria; Ploussi, Agapi

    2011-01-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging is widely implemented in nuclear medicine as its clinical role in the diagnosis and management of several diseases is, many times, very helpful (e.g., myocardium perfusion imaging). The quality of SPECT images are degraded by several factors such as noise because of the limited number of counts, attenuation, or scatter of photons. Image filtering is necessary to compensate these effects and, therefore, to improve image quality. The goal of filtering in tomographic images is to suppress statistical noise and simultaneously to preserve spatial resolution and contrast. The aim of this work is to describe the most widely used filters in SPECT applications and how these affect the image quality. The choice of the filter type, the cut-off frequency and the order is a major problem in clinical routine. In many clinical cases, information for specific parameters is not provided, and findings cannot be extrapolated to other similar SPECT imaging applications. A literature review for the determination of the mostly used filters in cardiac, brain, bone, liver, kidneys, and thyroid applications is also presented. As resulting from the overview, no filter is perfect, and the selection of the proper filters, most of the times, is done empirically. The standardization of image-processing results may limit the filter types for each SPECT examination to certain few filters and some of their parameters. Standardization, also, helps in reducing image processing time, as the filters and their parameters must be standardised before being put to clinical use. Commercial reconstruction software selections lead to comparable results interdepartmentally. The manufacturers normally supply default filters/parameters, but these may not be relevant in various clinical situations. After proper standardisation, it is possible to use many suitable filters or one optimal filter. PMID:21760768

  14. Characteristics of regional myocardial stunning after exercise in gated myocardial SPECT.

    PubMed

    Paul, Asit Kr; Hasegawa, Shinji; Yoshioka, Jun; Mu, Xiuli; Maruyama, Kaoru; Kusuoka, Hideo; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2002-01-01

    A number of studies have demonstrated prolonged left ventricular (LV) global dysfunction after exercise-induced ischemia in gated myocardial single photon emission tomography (SPECT) as a manifestation of exercise-induced stunning. This study investigated the residual effects of exercise on postexercise LV regional function and its implications on the detection of stunning in gated SPECT. Fifty-three subjects with known or suspected coronary artery disease and 10 control subjects underwent myocardial SPECT according to a same-day exercise-rest protocol. Both postexercise and resting images were gated and acquired 1 hour after injection of technetium 99m tetrofosmin. The LV global ejection fraction and segmental systolic wall thickening were quantitated with the use of an automatic program. Segmental perfusion was assessed semiquantitatively on summed nongated tomograms. Wall thickening index (WTI), the ratio of systolic wall thickening of a segment to that of a corresponding control segment, was significantly lower after exercise than at rest in the reversible defect (RD) segments (0.66 +/- 0.24 vs 0.78 +/- 0.24; P <.0001). In patients with exercise-induced ischemia, the difference in WTI between rest and after exercise was significantly greater in the RD segments, which represented ischemia, than in the non-RD segments. Postexercise WTIs were not different from the resting values in subjects with no perfusion abnormalities or who had fixed defects (infarction). Significant postexercise dysfunction was present in 44% of the RD segments, compared with 5% of the normal and 3% of the fixed defect segments. Postexercise segmental dysfunction was correlated with the segmental reversibility score, the difference in defect scores between exercise and rest images (n = 82, Spearman rank correlation coefficient = -0.78, P <.0001). Among 19 patients with ischemia, 9 (47%) exhibited concurrent segmental and global dysfunction, but segmental dysfunction persisted in the absence

  15. Distinguishing nanomaterial particles from background airborne particulate matter for quantitative exposure assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono-Ogasawara, Mariko; Serita, Fumio; Takaya, Mitsutoshi

    2009-10-01

    As the production of engineered nanomaterials quantitatively expands, the chance that workers involved in the manufacturing process will be exposed to nanoparticles also increases. A risk management system is needed for workplaces in the nanomaterial industry based on the precautionary principle. One of the problems in the risk management system is difficulty of exposure assessment. In this article, examples of exposure assessment in nanomaterial industries are reviewed with a focus on distinguishing engineered nanomaterial particles from background nanoparticles in workplace atmosphere. An approach by JNIOSH (Japan National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health) to quantitatively measure exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials is also introduced. In addition to real-time measurements and qualitative analysis by electron microscopy, quantitative chemical analysis is necessary for quantitatively assessing exposure to nanomaterials. Chemical analysis is suitable for quantitative exposure measurement especially at facilities with high levels of background NPs.

  16. Quantitative phylogenetic assessment of microbial communities indiverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    von Mering, C.; Hugenholtz, P.; Raes, J.; Tringe, S.G.; Doerks,T.; Jensen, L.J.; Ward, N.; Bork, P.

    2007-01-01

    The taxonomic composition of environmental communities is an important indicator of their ecology and function. Here, we use a set of protein-coding marker genes, extracted from large-scale environmental shotgun sequencing data, to provide a more direct, quantitative and accurate picture of community composition than traditional rRNA-based approaches using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). By mapping marker genes from four diverse environmental data sets onto a reference species phylogeny, we show that certain communities evolve faster than others, determine preferred habitats for entire microbial clades, and provide evidence that such habitat preferences are often remarkably stable over time.

  17. SPECT (Single-Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) Scan

    MedlinePlus

    SPECT scan Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff A single-photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) scan lets your doctor analyze the function of some of your internal organs. A SPECT scan is a type of nuclear imaging test, ...

  18. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S.; Endres, Christopher J.; Foss, Catherine A.; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard, James S.; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander V.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin G.

    2013-06-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a ^99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, ^99mTc-methylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand ^123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of ^123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  19. Molecular Imaging of Conscious, Unrestrained Mice with AwakeSPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Endres, Christopher; Foss, Catherine; Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Jung, Hyeyun; Goddard Jr, James Samuel; Lee, Seung Joon; McKisson, John; Smith, Mark F.; Stolin, Alexander; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Pomper, Martin

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a SPECT imaging system, AwakeSPECT, to enable molecular brain imaging of untrained mice that are conscious, unanesthetized, and unrestrained. We accomplished this with head tracking and motion correction techniques. Methods: The capability of the system for motion-corrected imaging was demonstrated with a 99mTc-pertechnetate phantom, 99mTcmethylene diphosphonate bone imaging, and measurement of the binding potential of the dopamine transporter radioligand 123I-ioflupane in mouse brain in the awake and anesthetized (isoflurane) states. Stress induced by imaging in the awake state was assessed through measurement of plasma corticosterone levels. Results: AwakeSPECT provided high-resolution bone images reminiscent of those obtained from CT. The binding potential of 123I-ioflupane in the awake state was on the order of 50% of that obtained with the animal under anesthesia, consistent with previous studies in nonhuman primates. Levels of stress induced were on the order of those seen in other behavioral tasks and imaging studies of awake animals. Conclusion: These results demonstrate the feasibility of SPECT molecular brain imaging of mice in the conscious, unrestrained state and demonstrate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia on radiotracer uptake.

  20. V/P SPECT as a diagnostic tool for pregnant women with suspected pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Bajc, Marika; Olsson, Berit; Gottsäter, Anders; Hindorf, Cecilia; Jögi, Jonas

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the prevalence of pulmonary embolism (PE) and other lung diseases among pregnant women with suspected PE and to calculate the radiation exposure to patient and fetus in this population. As a secondary aim, we evaluated the negative predictive value of a normal ventilation/perfusion single photon emission computed tomography (V/P SPECT) examination in pregnancy. We studied all 127 pregnant women who had suspected PE and had undergone V/P SPECT at our institution in the course of a 5-year period. Radiation exposure to patient and fetus and the negative predictive value of a normal V/P SPECT examination were also measured. V/P SPECT identified PE in 11 women (9%). Moreover, in 15 women (12%) the examination revealed pneumonia (in 2 cases in addition to PE) and in 1 woman signs of airway obstruction were revealed. Among the 116/127 women (91%) where PE was ruled out by V/P SPECT, none was diagnosed subsequently with PE or deep venous thrombosis (DVT) during the same pregnancy or puerperal period. For P SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.6 mGy,and the calculated breast absorbed dose 0.6 mGy. For V SPECT, the calculated fetal absorbed dose was < 0.014 mGy and the breast absorbed dose 0.25 mGy. The prevalence of PE was low (9%) among pregnant women with suspected disease. Pneumonia was diagnosed in 12% of patients. The negative predictive value of V/P SPECT was high, and the radiation exposure from V/P SPECT was low both for fetus and patient.

  1. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  2. Onboard functional and molecular imaging: A design investigation for robotic multipinhole SPECT

    SciTech Connect

    Bowsher, James Giles, William; Yin, Fang-Fang; Yan, Susu; Roper, Justin

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Onboard imaging—currently performed primarily by x-ray transmission modalities—is essential in modern radiation therapy. As radiation therapy moves toward personalized medicine, molecular imaging, which views individual gene expression, may also be important onboard. Nuclear medicine methods, such as single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT), are premier modalities for molecular imaging. The purpose of this study is to investigate a robotic multipinhole approach to onboard SPECT. Methods: Computer-aided design (CAD) studies were performed to assess the feasibility of maneuvering a robotic SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. In order to obtain fast, high-quality SPECT images, a 49-pinhole SPECT camera was designed which provides high sensitivity to photons emitted from an imaging region of interest. This multipinhole system was investigated by computer-simulation studies. Seventeen hot spots 10 and 7 mm in diameter were placed in the breast region of a supine female phantom. Hot spot activity concentration was six times that of background. For the 49-pinhole camera and a reference, more conventional, broad field-of-view (FOV) SPECT system, projection data were computer simulated for 4-min scans and SPECT images were reconstructed. Hot-spot localization was evaluated using a nonprewhitening forced-choice numerical observer. Results: The CAD simulation studies found that robots could maneuver SPECT cameras about patients in position for radiation therapy. In the imaging studies, most hot spots were apparent in the 49-pinhole images. Average localization errors for 10-mm- and 7-mm-diameter hot spots were 0.4 and 1.7 mm, respectively, for the 49-pinhole system, and 3.1 and 5.7 mm, respectively, for the reference broad-FOV system. Conclusions: A robot could maneuver a multipinhole SPECT system about a patient in position for radiation therapy. The system could provide onboard functional and molecular imaging with 4-min

  3. Assessment of metabolic bone diseases by quantitative computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, M.L.; Genant, H.K.; Cann, C.E.; Ettinger, B.; Gordan, G.S.; Kolb, F.O.; Reiser, U.J.

    1985-05-01

    Advances in the radiologic sciences have permitted the development of numerous noninvasive techniques for measuring the mineral content of bone, with varying degrees of precision, accuracy, and sensitivity. The techniques of standard radiography, radiogrammetry, photodensitometry, Compton scattering, neutron activation analysis, single and dual photon absorptiometry, and quantitative computed tomography (QCT) are described and reviewed in depth. Results from previous cross-sectional and longitudinal QCT investigations are given. They then describe a current investigation in which they studied 269 subjects, including 173 normal women, 34 patients with hyperparathyroidism, 24 patients with steroid- induced osteoporosis, and 38 men with idiopathic osteoporosis. Spinal quantitative computed tomography, radiogrammetry, and single photon absorptiometry were performed, and a spinal fracture index was calculated on all patients. The authors found a disproportionate loss of spinal trabecular mineral compared to appendicular mineral in the men with idiopathic osteoporosis and the patients with steroid-induced osteoporosis. They observed roughly equivalent mineral loss in both the appendicular and axial regions in the hyperparathyroid patients. The appendicular cortical measurements correlated moderately well with each other but less well with spinal trabecular QCT. The spinal fracture index correlated well with QCT and less well with the appendicular measurements.

  4. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory…

  5. Development and Assessment of Modules to Integrate Quantitative Skills in Introductory Biology Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kathleen; Leupen, Sarah; Dowell, Kathy; Kephart, Kerrie; Leips, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Redesigning undergraduate biology courses to integrate quantitative reasoning and skill development is critical to prepare students for careers in modern medicine and scientific research. In this paper, we report on the development, implementation, and assessment of stand-alone modules that integrate quantitative reasoning into introductory…

  6. Quantitative Assessment of Countermeasure Efficacy for Long-Term Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.

    2000-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the development of quantitative assessments of the effectiveness of countermeasures (CM) for the effects of space travel on humans for long term space missions. An example of bone mineral density (BMD) is examined to show specific quantitative measures for failure and success.

  7. Diagnostic accuracy of stress perfusion CMR in comparison with quantitative coronary angiography: fully quantitative, semiquantitative, and qualitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Mordini, Federico E; Haddad, Tariq; Hsu, Li-Yueh; Kellman, Peter; Lowrey, Tracy B; Aletras, Anthony H; Bandettini, W Patricia; Arai, Andrew E

    2014-01-01

    This study's primary objective was to determine the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of fully quantitative stress perfusion cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) versus a reference standard of quantitative coronary angiography. We hypothesized that fully quantitative analysis of stress perfusion CMR would have high diagnostic accuracy for identifying significant coronary artery stenosis and exceed the accuracy of semiquantitative measures of perfusion and qualitative interpretation. Relatively few studies apply fully quantitative CMR perfusion measures to patients with coronary disease and comparisons to semiquantitative and qualitative methods are limited. Dual bolus dipyridamole stress perfusion CMR exams were performed in 67 patients with clinical indications for assessment of myocardial ischemia. Stress perfusion images alone were analyzed with a fully quantitative perfusion (QP) method and 3 semiquantitative methods including contrast enhancement ratio, upslope index, and upslope integral. Comprehensive exams (cine imaging, stress/rest perfusion, late gadolinium enhancement) were analyzed qualitatively with 2 methods including the Duke algorithm and standard clinical interpretation. A 70% or greater stenosis by quantitative coronary angiography was considered abnormal. The optimum diagnostic threshold for QP determined by receiver-operating characteristic curve occurred when endocardial flow decreased to <50% of mean epicardial flow, which yielded a sensitivity of 87% and specificity of 93%. The area under the curve for QP was 92%, which was superior to semiquantitative methods: contrast enhancement ratio: 78%; upslope index: 82%; and upslope integral: 75% (p = 0.011, p = 0.019, p = 0.004 vs. QP, respectively). Area under the curve for QP was also superior to qualitative methods: Duke algorithm: 70%; and clinical interpretation: 78% (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001 vs. QP, respectively). Fully quantitative stress perfusion CMR has high diagnostic accuracy for

  8. Disordered Speech Assessment Using Automatic Methods Based on Quantitative Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Lingyun; Harris, John G.; Shrivastav, Rahul; Sapienza, Christine

    2005-12-01

    Speech quality assessment methods are necessary for evaluating and documenting treatment outcomes of patients suffering from degraded speech due to Parkinson's disease, stroke, or other disease processes. Subjective methods of speech quality assessment are more accurate and more robust than objective methods but are time-consuming and costly. We propose a novel objective measure of speech quality assessment that builds on traditional speech processing techniques such as dynamic time warping (DTW) and the Itakura-Saito (IS) distortion measure. Initial results show that our objective measure correlates well with the more expensive subjective methods.

  9. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. Methods An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Results Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). Conclusions We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images. PMID:25386389

  10. U-SPECT-BioFluo: an integrated radionuclide, bioluminescence, and fluorescence imaging platform.

    PubMed

    van Oosterom, Matthias N; Kreuger, Rob; Buckle, Tessa; Mahn, Wendy A; Bunschoten, Anton; Josephson, Lee; van Leeuwen, Fijs Wb; Beekman, Freek J

    2014-01-01

    In vivo bioluminescence, fluorescence, and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging provide complementary information about biological processes. However, to date these signatures are evaluated separately on individual preclinical systems. In this paper, we introduce a fully integrated bioluminescence-fluorescence-SPECT platform. Next to an optimization in logistics and image fusion, this integration can help improve understanding of the optical imaging (OI) results. An OI module was developed for a preclinical SPECT system (U-SPECT, MILabs, Utrecht, the Netherlands). The applicability of the module for bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging was evaluated in both a phantom and in an in vivo setting using mice implanted with a 4 T1-luc + tumor. A combination of a fluorescent dye and radioactive moiety was used to directly relate the optical images of the module to the SPECT findings. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) was compared to the localization of the fluorescence signal in the tumors. Both the phantom and in vivo mouse studies showed that superficial fluorescence signals could be imaged accurately. The SPECT and bioluminescence images could be used to place the fluorescence findings in perspective, e.g. by showing tracer accumulation in non-target organs such as the liver and kidneys (SPECT) and giving a semi-quantitative read-out for tumor spread (bioluminescence). We developed a fully integrated multimodal platform that provides complementary registered imaging of bioluminescent, fluorescent, and SPECT signatures in a single scanning session with a single dose of anesthesia. In our view, integration of these modalities helps to improve data interpretation of optical findings in relation to radionuclide images.

  11. Incremental diagnostic benefit of resolution recovery software in patients with equivocal myocardial perfusion single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT).

    PubMed

    Qutub, Mohammed A; Dowsley, Taylor; Ali, Iftikhar; Wells, R Glenn; Chen, Li; Ruddy, Terrence D; Chow, Benjamin J W

    2013-08-01

    Though myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is an established diagnostic method, equivocal studies are commonly encountered. New software has been introduced that incorporates resolution recovery (RR) and noise regulation into the reconstruction algorithm and has been used to facilitate "half-dose" and "half-time" studies. Its utility with "full-time, full-dose" acquisition has not been well studied. We sought to understand the potential benefit of incorporating RR software in equivocal SPECT studies. Patients with full-time, full-dose SPECT MPI were reviewed and those with equivocal results, who subsequently underwent cardiac Rb-82 positron emission tomography (PET) scan were identified. Image reconstruction was performed with iterative reconstruction (IR), attenuation correction (IR + AC), and RR software (IR + AC + RR). Images were anonymized and read blindly by consensus of two experienced readers. All images were qualitatively assessed and semi-quantitatively graded using summed stress and summed rest scores. 45 patients were included (28 males, age = 59.6 ± 9.9 years) and the diagnostic accuracy of each of the reconstruction algorithms (IR, IR + AC, IR + AC + RR) was compared to Rb-82 PET. Agreement of clinical diagnosis of each SPECT reconstruction with Rb-PET showed incremental improvement. The agreement with PET for IR + AC + RR (κ = 0.66, CI 0.454-0.875) is significantly better than for IR (κ = 0.22, CI 0.0-0.450, P = .005) and for IR + AC (κ = 0.32, CI 0.077-0.563, P = .03). Also, IR + AC + RR improved the clinical diagnosis in 14 cases and with overall improvement of reclassification proportion of 23.5% compared to IR (P = .01). Using PET as a reference standard, ROC curves were created for IR + AC + RR, IR + AC, and IR which showed incremental value of the area under the curve of IR + AC + RR (AUC: 0.87; CI 0.76-0.98) over IR + AC (AUC: 0.75; CI 0.61-0.89, P = .078), and over IR (AUC 0.68; CI 0

  12. Quantitative Assessment of Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro test methods can provide a rapid approach for the screening of large numbers of chemicals for their potential to produce toxicity. In order to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants, assessment of critical neurodevelopmental processes such as neuronal differenti...

  13. Quantitative Assessment of Neurite Outgrowth in PC12 Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    In vitro test methods can provide a rapid approach for the screening of large numbers of chemicals for their potential to produce toxicity. In order to identify potential developmental neurotoxicants, assessment of critical neurodevelopmental processes such as neuronal differenti...

  14. Quantitative risk assessment: an emerging tool for emerging foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Lammerding, A. M.; Paoli, G. M.

    1997-01-01

    New challenges to the safety of the food supply require new strategies for evaluating and managing food safety risks. Changes in pathogens, food preparation, distribution, and consumption, and population immunity have the potential to adversely affect human health. Risk assessment offers a framework for predicting the impact of changes and trends on the provision of safe food. Risk assessment models facilitate the evaluation of active or passive changes in how foods are produced, processed, distributed, and consumed. PMID:9366601

  15. Direct, quantitative clinical assessment of hand function: usefulness and reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Goodson, Alexander; McGregor, Alison H; Douglas, Jane; Taylor, Peter

    2007-05-01

    Methods of assessing functional impairment in arthritic hands include pain assessments and disability scoring scales which are subjective, variable over time and fail to take account of the patients' need to adapt to deformities. The aim of this study was to evaluate measures of functional strength and joint motion in the assessment of the rheumatoid (RA) and osteoarthritic (OA) hand. Ten control subjects, ten RA and ten OA patients were recruited for the study. All underwent pain and disability scoring and functional assessment of the hand using measures of pinch/grip strength and range of joint motion (ROM). Functional assessments including ROM analyses at interphalangeal (IP), metacarpophalangeal (MCP) and wrist joints along with pinch/grip strength clearly discriminated between patient groups (RA vs. OA MCP ROM P<0.0001), pain and disability scales were unable to. In the RA there were demonstrable relationships between ROM measurements and disability (R2=0.31) as well as disease duration (R2=0.37). Intra-patient measures of strength were robust whereas inter-patient comparisons showed variability. In conclusion, pinch/grip strength and ROM are clinically reproducible assessments that may more accurately reflect functional impairment associated with arthritis.

  16. Quantitative Assessment of Neuromotor Function in Adolescents with High Functioning Autism and Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freitag, Christine M.; Kleser, Christina; Schneider, Marc; von Gontard, Alexander

    2007-01-01

    Background: Motor impairment in children with Asperger Syndrome (AS) or High functioning autism (HFA) has been reported previously. This study presents results of a quantitative assessment of neuromotor skills in 14-22 year old HFA/AS. Methods: 16 HFA/AS and 16 IQ-matched controls were assessed by the Zurich Neuromotor Assessment (ZNA). Results:…

  17. Using integrated environmental modeling to automate a process-based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and human health effect...

  18. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial: Installation of Software for Watershed Modeling in Support of QMRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tutorial provides instructions for accessing, retrieving, and downloading the following software to install on a host computer in support of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) modeling:• SDMProjectBuilder (which includes the Microbial Source Module as part...

  19. Using integrated environmental modeling to automate a process-based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, an...

  20. Using Integrated Environmental Modeling to Automate a Process-Based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and...

  1. Using integrated environmental modeling to automate a process-based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, an...

  2. Using Integrated Environmental Modeling to Automate a Process-Based Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (presentation)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM) organizes multidisciplinary knowledge that explains and predicts environmental-system response to stressors. A Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) is an approach integrating a range of disparate data (fate/transport, exposure, and...

  3. Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment Tutorial: Installation of Software for Watershed Modeling in Support of QMRA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This tutorial provides instructions for accessing, retrieving, and downloading the following software to install on a host computer in support of Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment (QMRA) modeling:• SDMProjectBuilder (which includes the Microbial Source Module as part...

  4. A quantitative assessment of Arctic shipping in 2010-2014.

    PubMed

    Eguíluz, Victor M; Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M

    2016-08-01

    Rapid loss of sea ice is opening up the Arctic Ocean to shipping, a practice that is forecasted to increase rapidly by 2050 when many models predict that the Arctic Ocean will largely be free of ice toward the end of summer. These forecasts carry considerable uncertainty because Arctic shipping was previously considered too sparse to allow for adequate validation. Here, we provide quantitative evidence that the extent of Arctic shipping in the period 2011-2014 is already significant and that it is concentrated (i) in the Norwegian and Barents Seas, and (ii) predominantly accessed via the Northeast and Northwest Passages. Thick ice along the forecasted direct trans-Arctic route was still present in 2014, preventing transit. Although Arctic shipping remains constrained by the extent of ice coverage, during every September, this coverage is at a minimum, allowing the highest levels of shipping activity. Access to Arctic resources, particularly fisheries, is the most important driver of Arctic shipping thus far.

  5. A quantitative assessment of Arctic shipping in 2010–2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eguíluz, Victor M.; Fernández-Gracia, Juan; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2016-08-01

    Rapid loss of sea ice is opening up the Arctic Ocean to shipping, a practice that is forecasted to increase rapidly by 2050 when many models predict that the Arctic Ocean will largely be free of ice toward the end of summer. These forecasts carry considerable uncertainty because Arctic shipping was previously considered too sparse to allow for adequate validation. Here, we provide quantitative evidence that the extent of Arctic shipping in the period 2011–2014 is already significant and that it is concentrated (i) in the Norwegian and Barents Seas, and (ii) predominantly accessed via the Northeast and Northwest Passages. Thick ice along the forecasted direct trans-Arctic route was still present in 2014, preventing transit. Although Arctic shipping remains constrained by the extent of ice coverage, during every September, this coverage is at a minimum, allowing the highest levels of shipping activity. Access to Arctic resources, particularly fisheries, is the most important driver of Arctic shipping thus far.

  6. Assessing the Phagosome Proteome by Quantitative Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Peltier, Julien; Härtlova, Anetta; Trost, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    Phagocytosis is the process that engulfs particles in vesicles called phagosomes that are trafficked through a series of maturation steps, culminating in the destruction of the internalized cargo. Because phagosomes are in direct contact with the particle and undergo constant fusion and fission events with other organelles, characterization of the phagosomal proteome is a powerful tool to understand mechanisms controlling innate immunity as well as vesicle trafficking. The ability to isolate highly pure phagosomes through the use of latex beads led to an extensive use of proteomics to study phagosomes under different stimuli. Thousands of different proteins have been identified and quantified, revealing new properties and shedding new light on the dynamics and composition of maturing phagosomes and innate immunity mechanisms. In this chapter, we describe how quantitative-based proteomic methods such as label-free, dimethyl labeling or Tandem Mass Tag (TMT) labeling can be applied for the characterization of protein composition and translocation during maturation of phagosomes in macrophages.

  7. [SPECT radiopharmaceuticals -- novelties and new possibilities].

    PubMed

    Balogh, Lajos; Polyák, András; Pöstényi, Zita; Haász, Veronika; Dabasi, Gabriella; Jóba, Róbert; Bús, Katalin; Jánoki, Gergely; Thuróczy, Julianna; Zámbó, Katalin; Garai, Ildikó; Környei, József; Jánoki, Gyõzõ

    2014-12-01

    Actual state of affairs and future perspectives of SPECT radiopharmaceuticals regarding local and international data were summarized. Beyond conventional gamma-emitting radioisotopes, localization studies with beta emitting therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals hold increasing importance. Extension of hybrid (SPECT/CT) equipments has modified conventional scintigraphic and SPECT methods as well but more important changes come into the world through novel ligands for specific diagnoses and therapy.

  8. Uncertainty in environmental health impact assessment: quantitative methods and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mesa-Frias, Marco; Chalabi, Zaid; Vanni, Tazio; Foss, Anna M

    2013-01-01

    Environmental health impact assessment models are subjected to great uncertainty due to the complex associations between environmental exposures and health. Quantifying the impact of uncertainty is important if the models are used to support health policy decisions. We conducted a systematic review to identify and appraise current methods used to quantify the uncertainty in environmental health impact assessment. In the 19 studies meeting the inclusion criteria, several methods were identified. These were grouped into random sampling methods, second-order probability methods, Bayesian methods, fuzzy sets, and deterministic sensitivity analysis methods. All 19 studies addressed the uncertainty in the parameter values but only 5 of the studies also addressed the uncertainty in the structure of the models. None of the articles reviewed considered conceptual sources of uncertainty associated with the framing assumptions or the conceptualisation of the model. Future research should attempt to broaden the way uncertainty is taken into account in environmental health impact assessments.

  9. Role of Quantitative Bone Scanning in the Assessment of Bone Turnover in Patients With Charcot Foot

    PubMed Central

    Bem, Robert; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Dubský, Michal; Fejfarová, Vladimira; Buncová, Marie; Skibová, Jelena; Jude, Edward B.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the new quantitative bone scan parameters as markers of Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy (CNO) activity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Forty-two patients with acute (n = 21) and nonacute (n = 21) CNO underwent quantitative bone scanning. Patients with acute CNO were followed for 3–12 months and bone scans were repeated after treatment. New quantitative parameters were assessed and compared with markers of bone turnover and with skin temperature difference (STD). RESULTS Significant correlations between quantitative bone scan parameters and bone turnover markers were observed (all P < 0.05). These parameters decreased after treatment of CNO, and its reduction to the baseline value correlated with differences of bone turnover markers and STD (all P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS Our study suggests that bone scanning can be used not only for diagnosis of CNO but also for monitoring disease activity by quantitative bone scan parameters. PMID:19933988

  10. Role of quantitative bone scanning in the assessment of bone turnover in patients with Charcot foot.

    PubMed

    Bem, Robert; Jirkovská, Alexandra; Dubsky, Michal; Fejfarová, Vladimira; Buncová, Marie; Skibová, Jelena; Jude, Edward B

    2010-02-01

    To assess the new quantitative bone scan parameters as markers of Charcot neuroosteoarthropathy (CNO) activity. Forty-two patients with acute (n = 21) and nonacute (n = 21) CNO underwent quantitative bone scanning. Patients with acute CNO were followed for 3-12 months and bone scans were repeated after treatment. New quantitative parameters were assessed and compared with markers of bone turnover and with skin temperature difference (STD). Significant correlations between quantitative bone scan parameters and bone turnover markers were observed (all P < 0.05). These parameters decreased after treatment of CNO, and its reduction to the baseline value correlated with differences of bone turnover markers and STD (all P < 0.05). Our study suggests that bone scanning can be used not only for diagnosis of CNO but also for monitoring disease activity by quantitative bone scan parameters.

  11. Spatial correspondence of 4D CT ventilation and SPECT