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Sample records for quantitative temporal analysis

  1. Temporal Kinetics and Quantitative Analysis of Cryptococcus neoformans Nonlytic Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Stukes, Sabriya A.; Cohen, Hillel W.

    2014-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular pathogen and the causative agent of cryptococcosis, a disease that is often fatal to those with compromised immune systems. C. neoformans has the capacity to escape phagocytic cells through a process known as nonlytic exocytosis whereby the cryptococcal cell is released from the macrophage into the extracellular environment, leaving both the host and pathogen alive. Little is known about the mechanism behind nonlytic exocytosis, but there is evidence that both the fungal and host cells contribute to the process. In this study, we used time-lapse movies of C. neoformans-infected macrophages to delineate the kinetics and quantitative aspects of nonlytic exocytosis. We analyzed approximately 800 macrophages containing intracellular C. neoformans and identified 163 nonlytic exocytosis events that were further characterized into three subcategories: type I (complete emptying of macrophage), type II (partial emptying of macrophage), and type III (cell-to-cell transfer). The majority of type I and II events occurred after several hours of intracellular residence, whereas type III events occurred significantly (P < 0.001) earlier in the course of macrophage infection. Our results show that nonlytic exocytosis is a morphologically and temporally diverse process that occurs relatively rapidly in the course of macrophage infection. PMID:24595144

  2. Quantitative Spatial and Temporal Analysis of Fluorescein Angiography Dynamics in the Eye

    PubMed Central

    Hui, Flora; Nguyen, Christine T. O.; Bedggood, Phillip A.; He, Zheng; Fish, Rebecca L.; Gurrell, Rachel; Vingrys, Algis J.; Bui, Bang V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe a novel approach to analyze fluorescein angiography to investigate fluorescein flow dynamics in the rat posterior retina as well as identify abnormal areas following laser photocoagulation. Methods Experiments were undertaken in adult Long Evans rats. Using a rodent retinal camera, videos were acquired at 30 frames per second for 30 seconds following intravenous introduction of sodium fluorescein in a group of control animals (n = 14). Videos were image registered and analyzed using principle components analysis across all pixels in the field. This returns fluorescence intensity profiles from which, the half-rise (time to 50% brightness), half-fall (time for 50% decay) back to an offset (plateau level of fluorescence). We applied this analysis to video fluorescein angiography data collected 30 minutes following laser photocoagulation in a separate group of rats (n = 7). Results Pixel-by-pixel analysis of video angiography clearly delineates differences in the temporal profiles of arteries, veins and capillaries in the posterior retina. We find no difference in half-rise, half-fall or offset amongst the four quadrants (inferior, nasal, superior, temporal). We also found little difference with eccentricity. By expressing the parameters at each pixel as a function of the number of standard deviation from the average of the entire field, we could clearly identify the spatial extent of the laser injury. Conclusions This simple registration and analysis provides a way to monitor the size of vascular injury, to highlight areas of subtle vascular leakage and to quantify vascular dynamics not possible using current fluorescein angiography approaches. This can be applied in both laboratory and clinical settings for in vivo dynamic fluorescent imaging of vasculature. PMID:25365578

  3. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules by temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiography with a flat panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2007-03-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means to reduce cancer mortality; chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening examination or health checkup. The new examination method and the development of computer analysis system allow obtaining respiratory kinetics by the use of flat panel detector (FPD), which is the expanded method of chest X-ray radiography. Through such changes functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in chest has become available. Its introduction into clinical practice is expected in the future. In this study, we developed the computer analysis algorithm for the purpose of detecting lung nodules and evaluating quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiograph obtained by modified FPD was converted into 4 static images drawing the feature, by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphologic enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing, after the breath synchronization process utilizing the diaphragmatic analysis of the vector movement. The artificial neural network used to analyze the density patterns detected the true nodules by analyzing these static images, and drew their kinetic tracks. For the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness with 7 normal patients and simulated nodules, both showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without statistically significant difference. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules, and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  4. A semi-quantitative GeLC-MS analysis of temporal proteome expression in the emerging nosocomial pathogen Ochrobactrum anthropi

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert Leslie James; Sharma, Mohit K; Ternan, Nigel G; Weatherly, D Brent; Tarleton, Rick L; McMullan, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    Background The α-Proteobacteria are capable of interaction with eukaryotic cells, with some members, such as Ochrobactrum anthropi, capable of acting as human pathogens. O. anthropi has been the cause of a growing number of hospital-acquired infections; however, little is known about its growth, physiology and metabolism. We used proteomics to investigate how protein expression of this organism changes with time during growth. Results This first gel-based liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (GeLC-MS) temporal proteomic analysis of O. anthropi led to the positive identification of 131 proteins. These were functionally classified and physiochemically characterized. Utilizing the emPAI protocol to estimate protein abundance, we assigned molar concentrations to all proteins, and thus were able to identify 19 with significant changes in their expression. Pathway reconstruction led to the identification of a variety of central metabolic pathways, including nucleotide biosynthesis, fatty acid anabolism, glycolysis, TCA cycle and amino acid metabolism. In late phase growth we identified a number of gene products under the control of the oxyR regulon, which is induced in response to oxidative stress and whose protein products have been linked with pathogen survival in response to host immunity reactions. Conclusion This study identified distinct proteomic profiles associated with specific growth points for O. anthropi, while the use of emPAI allowed semi-quantitative analyses of protein expression. It was possible to reconstruct central metabolic pathways and infer unique functional and adaptive processes associated with specific growth phases, thereby resulting in a deeper understanding of the physiology and metabolism of this emerging pathogenic bacterium. PMID:17567905

  5. Quantitative kinetic analysis of lung nodules using the temporal subtraction technique in dynamic chest radiographies performed with a flat panel detector.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yuichiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru

    2009-04-01

    Early detection and treatment of lung cancer is one of the most effective means of reducing cancer mortality, and to this end, chest X-ray radiography has been widely used as a screening method. A related technique based on the development of computer analysis and a flat panel detector (FPD) has enabled the functional evaluation of respiratory kinetics in the chest and is expected to be introduced into clinical practice in the near future. In this study, we developed a computer analysis algorithm to detect lung nodules and to evaluate quantitative kinetics. Breathing chest radiographs obtained by modified FPD and breath synchronization utilizing diaphragmatic analysis of vector movement were converted into four static images by sequential temporal subtraction processing, morphological enhancement processing, kinetic visualization processing, and lung region detection processing. An artificial neural network analyzed these density patterns to detect the true nodules and draw their kinetic tracks. Both the algorithm performance and the evaluation of clinical effectiveness of seven normal patients and simulated nodules showed sufficient detecting capability and kinetic imaging function without significant differences. Our technique can quantitatively evaluate the kinetic range of nodules and is effective in detecting a nodule on a breathing chest radiograph. Moreover, the application of this technique is expected to extend computer-aided diagnosis systems and facilitate the development of an automatic planning system for radiation therapy.

  6. Quantitative temporal analysis of /sup 99m/Technetium p-isopropyl-iminodiacetic acid (PIPIDA) as a measure of hepatic function in health and disease

    SciTech Connect

    Joshi, S.N.; George, E.A.; Perrillo, R.P.

    1981-01-01

    Excretory liver function was analyzed in 10 healthy volunteers and 28 subjects with acute or chronic liver injury following intravenous administration of /sup 99m/technetium p-isopropyl iminodiacetic acid. Hepatobiliary transit of this agent was quantitated at 5-min intervals for a total of 60 min. Indices of total liver activity, liver cell uptake, liver parenchymal clearance, and bile duct clearance of /sup 99m/technetium p-isopropyl iminodiacetic acid were calculated from time--activity curves over heart, liver, extrahepatic bile ducts, and gallbladder. Seven subjects with acute viral hepatitis, 15 with extrahepatic biliary obstruction, and 6 with intrahepatic cholestasis were evaluated. Compared with healthy volunteers, a significant (p less than 0.0001) reduction in total liver activity and liver parenchymal clearance was demonstrated in all patient groups. Major resolution in all liver-derived indices, particularly total liver activity, occurred during convalescence from hepatitis and after biliary drainage. Nonmeasurable bile duct clearance always indicated a diagnosis of extrahepatic obstruction in cholestatic subjects, and this index normalized in subjects following biliary drainage. Whereas visual assessment of /sup 99m/technetium p-isopropyl iminodiacetic acid scans provided limited, useful information about the functional status of the liver, quantitative temporal analysis proved to be a much more effective technique.

  7. Temporal mapping and analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Hara, Charles G. (Inventor); Shrestha, Bijay (Inventor); Vijayaraj, Veeraraghavan (Inventor); Mali, Preeti (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A compositing process for selecting spatial data collected over a period of time, creating temporal data cubes from the spatial data, and processing and/or analyzing the data using temporal mapping algebra functions. In some embodiments, the temporal data cube is creating a masked cube using the data cubes, and computing a composite from the masked cube by using temporal mapping algebra.

  8. Multivariate Quantitative Chemical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinchen, David G.; Capezza, Mary

    1995-01-01

    Technique of multivariate quantitative chemical analysis devised for use in determining relative proportions of two components mixed and sprayed together onto object to form thermally insulating foam. Potentially adaptable to other materials, especially in process-monitoring applications in which necessary to know and control critical properties of products via quantitative chemical analyses of products. In addition to chemical composition, also used to determine such physical properties as densities and strengths.

  9. Time of flight mass spectrometry for quantitative data analysis in fast transient studies using a Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) reactor.

    PubMed

    Goguet, Alexandre; Hardacre, Christopher; Maguire, Noleen; Morgan, Kevin; Shekhtman, Sergiy O; Thompson, Steve P

    2011-01-07

    A Time of flight (ToF) mass spectrometer suitable in terms of sensitivity, detector response and time resolution, for application in fast transient Temporal Analysis of Products (TAP) kinetic catalyst characterization is reported. Technical difficulties associated with such application as well as the solutions implemented in terms of adaptations of the ToF apparatus are discussed. The performance of the ToF was validated and the full linearity of the specific detector over the full dynamic range was explored in order to ensure its applicability for the TAP application. The reported TAP-ToF setup is the first system that achieves the high level of sensitivity allowing monitoring of the full 0-200 AMU range simultaneously with sub-millisecond time resolution. In this new setup, the high sensitivity allows the use of low intensity pulses ensuring that transport through the reactor occurs in the Knudsen diffusion regime and that the data can, therefore, be fully analysed using the reported theoretical TAP models and data processing.

  10. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Surface Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, Vonnie M.

    2000-01-01

    The elimination of ozone depleting substances, such as carbon tetrachloride, has resulted in the use of new analytical techniques for cleanliness verification and contamination sampling. The last remaining application at Rocketdyne which required a replacement technique was the quantitative analysis of hydrocarbons by infrared spectrometry. This application, which previously utilized carbon tetrachloride, was successfully modified using the SOC-400, a compact portable FTIR manufactured by Surface Optics Corporation. This instrument can quantitatively measure and identify hydrocarbons from solvent flush of hardware as well as directly analyze the surface of metallic components without the use of ozone depleting chemicals. Several sampling accessories are utilized to perform analysis for various applications.

  11. Quantitative environmental risk analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Klovning, J.; Nilsen, E.F.

    1995-12-31

    According to regulations relating to implementation and rise of risk analysis in the petroleum activities issued by the Norwegian Petroleum Directorate, it is mandatory for an operator on the Norwegian Continental Shelf to establish acceptance criteria for environmental risk in the activities and carry out environmental risk analysis. This paper presents a {open_quotes}new{close_quotes} method for environmental risk analysis developed by the company. The objective has been to assist the company to meet rules and regulations and to assess and describe the environmental risk in a systematic manner. In the environmental risk analysis the most sensitive biological resource in the affected area is used to assess the environmental damage. The analytical method is based on the methodology for quantitative risk analysis related to loss of life. In addition it incorporates the effect of seasonal fluctuations in the environmental risk evaluations. The paper is describing the function of the main analytical sequences exemplified through an analysis of environmental risk related to exploration drilling in an environmental sensitive area on the Norwegian Continental Shelf.

  12. A Temporal View of Soft Tissue Quantitative Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, William D.

    The objective of soft tissue quantitative ultrasound (QUS) is to improve diagnostic ultrasound imaging capabilities via quantitative outcomes. Over the past three or so decades, there have been an increasing number of QUS successes. A temporal view moves us back in history almost six decades when techniques and theoretical developments were in their earliest stages that impacted modern QUS successes. The earliest theoretical developments and techniques some six decades ago can be attributed to Lev Chernov, Philip Morse, Herman Feshbach, Uno Ingard, John Wild and Jack Reid. Later, Floyd Dunn developed important views as to how connective tissue affected the interaction between ultrasound and soft tissue. Then, as the theory of wave propagation in soft tissues with random inhomogeneities was extended and applied by Fred Lizzi, Jim Zagzebski and Mike Insana (and their colleagues), contemporary QUS successes started to emerge.

  13. Quantitative methods for stochastic high frequency spatio-temporal and non-linear analysis: Assessing health effects of exposure to extreme ambient temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liss, Alexander

    Extreme weather events, such as heat waves and cold spells, cause substantial excess mortality and morbidity in the vulnerable elderly population, and cost billions of dollars. The accurate and reliable assessment of adverse effects of extreme weather events on human health is crucial for environmental scientists, economists, and public health officials to ensure proper protection of vulnerable populations and efficient allocation of scarce resources. However, the methodology for the analysis of large national databases is yet to be developed. The overarching objective of this dissertation is to examine the effect of extreme weather on the elderly population of the Conterminous US (ConUS) with respect to seasonality in temperature in different climatic regions by utilizing heterogeneous high frequency and spatio-temporal resolution data. To achieve these goals the author: 1) incorporated dissimilar stochastic high frequency big data streams and distinct data types into the integrated data base for use in analytical and decision support frameworks; 2) created an automated climate regionalization system based on remote sensing and machine learning to define climate regions for the Conterminous US; 3) systematically surveyed the current state of the art and identified existing gaps in the scientific knowledge; 4) assessed the dose-response relationship of exposure to temperature extremes on human health in relatively homogeneous climate regions using different statistical models, such as parametric and non-parametric, contemporaneous and asynchronous, applied to the same data; 5) assessed seasonal peak timing and synchronization delay of the exposure and the disease within the framework of contemporaneous high frequency harmonic time series analysis and modification of the effect by the regional climate; 6) modeled using hyperbolic functional form non-linear properties of the effect of exposure to extreme temperature on human health. The proposed climate

  14. Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmerman, John; Jacobsen, Jerrold J.

    1996-12-01

    Quantitative Techniques in Volumetric Analysis is a visual library of techniques used in making volumetric measurements. This 40-minute VHS videotape is designed as a resource for introducing students to proper volumetric methods and procedures. The entire tape, or relevant segments of the tape, can also be used to review procedures used in subsequent experiments that rely on the traditional art of quantitative analysis laboratory practice. The techniques included are: Quantitative transfer of a solid with a weighing spoon Quantitative transfer of a solid with a finger held weighing bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a paper strap held bottle Quantitative transfer of a solid with a spatula Examples of common quantitative weighing errors Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to beaker to volumetric flask Quantitative transfer of a solid from dish to volumetric flask Volumetric transfer pipet A complete acid-base titration Hand technique variations The conventional view of contemporary quantitative chemical measurement tends to focus on instrumental systems, computers, and robotics. In this view, the analyst is relegated to placing standards and samples on a tray. A robotic arm delivers a sample to the analysis center, while a computer controls the analysis conditions and records the results. In spite of this, it is rare to find an analysis process that does not rely on some aspect of more traditional quantitative analysis techniques, such as careful dilution to the mark of a volumetric flask. Figure 2. Transfer of a solid with a spatula. Clearly, errors in a classical step will affect the quality of the final analysis. Because of this, it is still important for students to master the key elements of the traditional art of quantitative chemical analysis laboratory practice. Some aspects of chemical analysis, like careful rinsing to insure quantitative transfer, are often an automated part of an instrumental process that must be understood by the

  15. Quantitative analysis of PET studies.

    PubMed

    Weber, Wolfgang A

    2010-09-01

    Quantitative analysis can be included relatively easily in clinical PET-imaging protocols, but in order to obtain meaningful quantitative results one needs to follow a standardized protocol for image acquisition and data analysis. Important factors to consider are the calibration of the PET scanner, the radiotracer uptake time and the approach for definition of regions of interests. Using such standardized acquisition protocols quantitative parameters of tumor metabolism or receptor status can be derived from tracer kinetic analysis and simplified approaches such as calculation of standardized uptake values (SUVs).

  16. A quantitative method for the evaluation of three-dimensional structure of temporal bone pneumatization

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Cheryl A.; Richtsmeier, Joan T.

    2010-01-01

    Temporal bone pneumatization has been included in lists of characters used in phylogenetic analyses of human evolution. While studies suggest that the extent of pneumatization has decreased over the course of human evolution, little is known about the processes underlying these changes or their significance. In short, reasons for the observed reduction and the potential reorganization within pneumatized spaces are unknown. Technological limitations have limited previous analyses of pneumatization in extant and fossil species to qualitative observations of the extent of temporal bone pneumatization. In this paper, we introduce a novel application of quantitative methods developed for the study of trabecular bone to the analysis of pneumatized spaces of the temporal bone. This method utilizes high-resolution X-ray computed tomography (HRXCT) images and quantitative software to estimate three-dimensional parameters (bone volume fractions, anisotropy, and trabecular thickness) of bone structure within defined units of pneumatized spaces. We apply this approach in an analysis of temporal bones of diverse but related primate species, Gorilla gorilla, Pan troglodytes, Homo sapiens, and Papio hamadryas anubis, to illustrate the potential of these methods. In demonstrating the utility of these methods, we show that there are interspecific differences in the bone structure of pneumatized spaces, perhaps reflecting changes in the localized growth dynamics, location of muscle attachments, encephalization, or basicranial flexion. PMID:18715622

  17. Quantitative analysis in megageomorphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, L.

    1985-01-01

    Megageomorphology is the study of regional topographic features and their relations to independent geomorphic variables that operate at the regional scale. These independent variables can be classified as either tectonic or climatic in nature. Quantitative megageomorphology stresses the causal relations between plate tectonic factors and landscape features or correlations between climatic factors and geomorphic processes. In addition, the cumulative effects of tectonics and climate on landscape evolution that simultaneously operate in a complex system of energy transfer is of interst. Regional topographic differentiation, say between continents and ocean floors, is largely the result of the different densities and density contrasts within the oceanic and continental lithosphere and their isostatic consequences. Regional tectonic processes that alter these lithospheric characteristics include rifting, collision, subduction, transpression and transtension.

  18. Quantitative Characterization of Tissue Microstructure with Temporal Diffusion Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junzhong; Does, Mark D.; Gore, John C.

    2009-01-01

    The signals recorded by diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI) are dependent on the micro-structural properties of biological tissues, so it is possible to obtain quantitative structural information non-invasively from such measurements. Oscillating gradient spin echo (OGSE) methods have the ability to probe the behavior of water diffusion over different time scales and the potential to detect variations in intracellular structure. To assist in the interpretation of OGSE data, analytical expressions have been derived for diffusion-weighted signals with OGSE methods for restricted diffusion in some typical structures, including parallel planes, cylinders and spheres, using the theory of temporal diffusion spectroscopy. These analytical predictions have been confirmed with computer simulations. These expressions suggest how OGSE signals from biological tissues should be analyzed to characterize tissue microstructure, including how to estimate cell nuclear sizes. This approach provides a model to interpret diffusion data obtained from OGSE measurements that can be used for applications such as monitoring tumor response to treatment in vivo. PMID:19616979

  19. Neurochemical phenotype of corticocortical connections in the macaque monkey: quantitative analysis of a subset of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive projection neurons in frontal, parietal, temporal, and cingulate cortices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hof, P. R.; Nimchinsky, E. A.; Morrison, J. H.; Bloom, F. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    The neurochemical characteristics of the neuronal subsets that furnish different types of corticocortical connections have been only partially determined. In recent years, several cytoskeletal proteins have emerged as reliable markers to distinguish subsets of pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex of primates. In particular, previous studies using an antibody to nonphosphorylated neurofilament protein (SMI-32) have revealed a consistent degree of regional and laminar specificity in the distribution of a subpopulation of pyramidal cells in the primate cerebral cortex. The density of neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons was shown to vary across corticocortical pathways in macaque monkeys. In the present study, we have used the antibody SMI-32 to examine further and to quantify the distribution of a subset of corticocortically projecting neurons in a series of long ipsilateral corticocortical pathways in comparison to short corticocortical, commissural, and limbic connections. The results demonstrate that the long association pathways interconnecting the frontal, parietal, and temporal neocortex have a high representation of neurofilament protein-enriched pyramidal neurons (45-90%), whereas short corticocortical, callosal, and limbic pathways are characterized by much lower numbers of such neurons (4-35%). These data suggest that different types of corticocortical connections have differential representation of highly specific neuronal subsets that share common neurochemical characteristics, thereby determining regional and laminar cortical patterns of morphological and molecular heterogeneity. These differences in neuronal neurochemical phenotype among corticocortical circuits may have considerable influence on cortical processing and may be directly related to the type of integrative function subserved by each cortical pathway. Finally, it is worth noting that neurofilament protein-immunoreactive neurons are dramatically affected in the course of

  20. A Novel Method of Quantitative Anterior Chamber Depth Estimation Using Temporal Perpendicular Digital Photography

    PubMed Central

    Zamir, Ehud; Kong, George Y.X.; Kowalski, Tanya; Coote, Michael; Ang, Ghee Soon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesize that: (1) Anterior chamber depth (ACD) is correlated with the relative anteroposterior position of the pupillary image, as viewed from the temporal side. (2) Such a correlation may be used as a simple quantitative tool for estimation of ACD. Methods Two hundred sixty-six phakic eyes had lateral digital photographs taken from the temporal side, perpendicular to the visual axis, and underwent optical biometry (Nidek AL scanner). The relative anteroposterior position of the pupillary image was expressed using the ratio between: (1) lateral photographic temporal limbus to pupil distance (“E”) and (2) lateral photographic temporal limbus to cornea distance (“Z”). In the first chronological half of patients (Correlation Series), E:Z ratio (EZR) was correlated with optical biometric ACD. The correlation equation was then used to predict ACD in the second half of patients (Prediction Series) and compared to their biometric ACD for agreement analysis. Results A strong linear correlation was found between EZR and ACD, R = −0.91, R2 = 0.81. Bland-Altman analysis showed good agreement between predicted ACD using this method and the optical biometric ACD. The mean error was −0.013 mm (range −0.377 to 0.336 mm), standard deviation 0.166 mm. The 95% limits of agreement were ±0.33 mm. Conclusions Lateral digital photography and EZR calculation is a novel method to quantitatively estimate ACD, requiring minimal equipment and training. Translational Relevance EZ ratio may be employed in screening for angle closure glaucoma. It may also be helpful in outpatient medical clinic settings, where doctors need to judge the safety of topical or systemic pupil-dilating medications versus their risk of triggering acute angle closure glaucoma. Similarly, non ophthalmologists may use it to estimate the likelihood of acute angle closure glaucoma in emergency presentations. PMID:27540496

  1. Software for quantitative trait analysis.

    PubMed

    Almasy, Laura; Warren, Diane M

    2005-09-01

    This paper provides a brief overview of software currently available for the genetic analysis of quantitative traits in humans. Programs that implement variance components, Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC), Haseman-Elston (H-E) and penetrance model-based linkage analyses are discussed, as are programs for measured genotype association analyses and quantitative trait transmission disequilibrium tests. The software compared includes LINKAGE, FASTLINK, PAP, SOLAR, SEGPATH, ACT, Mx, MERLIN, GENEHUNTER, Loki, Mendel, SAGE, QTDT and FBAT. Where possible, the paper provides URLs for acquiring these programs through the internet, details of the platforms for which the software is available and the types of analyses performed.

  2. Sobering up: A Quantitative Review of Temporal Declines in Expectations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweeny, Kate; Krizan, Zlatan

    2013-01-01

    Although people's outlook on the future tends to be characterized by hope and optimism, over time this outlook often becomes more dire. We review multiple theoretical accounts of this tendency to "sober up" as feedback about outcomes draws near, and we explicate factors critical to promoting these temporal declines in expectations. We then…

  3. Quantitative analysis of glycated proteins.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Ramírez-Boo, María; Finamore, Francesco; Gluck, Florent; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2014-02-07

    The proposed protocol presents a comprehensive approach for large-scale qualitative and quantitative analysis of glycated proteins (GP) in complex biological samples including biological fluids and cell lysates such as plasma and red blood cells. The method, named glycation isotopic labeling (GIL), is based on the differential labeling of proteins with isotopic [(13)C6]-glucose, which supports quantitation of the resulting glycated peptides after enzymatic digestion with endoproteinase Glu-C. The key principle of the GIL approach is the detection of doublet signals for each glycated peptide in MS precursor scanning (glycated peptide with in vivo [(12)C6]- and in vitro [(13)C6]-glucose). The mass shift of the doublet signals is +6, +3 or +2 Da depending on the peptide charge state and the number of glycation sites. The intensity ratio between doublet signals generates quantitative information of glycated proteins that can be related to the glycemic state of the studied samples. Tandem mass spectrometry with high-energy collisional dissociation (HCD-MS2) and data-dependent methods with collision-induced dissociation (CID-MS3 neutral loss scan) are used for qualitative analysis.

  4. Bioimaging for quantitative phenotype analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Xia, Xian; Huang, Yi; Chen, Xingwei; Han, Jing-Dong J

    2016-06-01

    With the development of bio-imaging techniques, an increasing number of studies apply these techniques to generate a myriad of image data. Its applications range from quantification of cellular, tissue, organismal and behavioral phenotypes of model organisms, to human facial phenotypes. The bio-imaging approaches to automatically detect, quantify, and profile phenotypic changes related to specific biological questions open new doors to studying phenotype-genotype associations and to precisely evaluating molecular changes associated with quantitative phenotypes. Here, we review major applications of bioimage-based quantitative phenotype analysis. Specifically, we describe the biological questions and experimental needs addressable by these analyses, computational techniques and tools that are available in these contexts, and the new perspectives on phenotype-genotype association uncovered by such analyses.

  5. Quantitative analysis of retinal OCT.

    PubMed

    Sonka, Milan; Abràmoff, Michael D

    2016-10-01

    Clinical acceptance of 3-D OCT retinal imaging brought rapid development of quantitative 3-D analysis of retinal layers, vasculature, retinal lesions as well as facilitated new research in retinal diseases. One of the cornerstones of many such analyses is segmentation and thickness quantification of retinal layers and the choroid, with an inherently 3-D simultaneous multi-layer LOGISMOS (Layered Optimal Graph Image Segmentation for Multiple Objects and Surfaces) segmentation approach being extremely well suited for the task. Once retinal layers are segmented, regional thickness, brightness, or texture-based indices of individual layers can be easily determined and thus contribute to our understanding of retinal or optic nerve head (ONH) disease processes and can be employed for determination of disease status, treatment responses, visual function, etc. Out of many applications, examples provided in this paper focus on image-guided therapy and outcome prediction in age-related macular degeneration and on assessing visual function from retinal layer structure in glaucoma.

  6. Visual constraints for the perception of quantitative depth from temporal interocular unmatched features.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Chen, Lin; Andersen, George J

    2010-07-21

    Previous research (Brooks & Gillam, 2006) has found that temporal interocular unmatched (IOUM) features generate a perception of subjective contours and can result in a perception of quantitative depth. In the present study we examine in detail the factors important for quantitative depth perception from IOUM features. In Experiments 1 and 2 observers were shown temporal IOUM features based on three dots that disappeared behind an implicit surface. Subjects reported a perception of a subjective surface and were able to perceive qualitative depth. In Experiments 3 and 4 metrical depth was perceived when binocular disparity features were added to the display. These results suggest that quantitative depth from IOUM information is perceived when binocular matched information is present in regions adjacent to the surface. In addition, the perceived depth of the subjective surface decreased with an increase in the width of the subjective surface suggesting a limitation in the propagation of quantitative depth to surface regions where qualitative depth information is available.

  7. Quantitative analysis of endogenous compounds.

    PubMed

    Thakare, Rhishikesh; Chhonker, Yashpal S; Gautam, Nagsen; Alamoudi, Jawaher Abdullah; Alnouti, Yazen

    2016-09-05

    Accurate quantitative analysis of endogenous analytes is essential for several clinical and non-clinical applications. LC-MS/MS is the technique of choice for quantitative analyses. Absolute quantification by LC/MS requires preparing standard curves in the same matrix as the study samples so that the matrix effect and the extraction efficiency for analytes are the same in both the standard and study samples. However, by definition, analyte-free biological matrices do not exist for endogenous compounds. To address the lack of blank matrices for the quantification of endogenous compounds by LC-MS/MS, four approaches are used including the standard addition, the background subtraction, the surrogate matrix, and the surrogate analyte methods. This review article presents an overview these approaches, cite and summarize their applications, and compare their advantages and disadvantages. In addition, we discuss in details, validation requirements and compatibility with FDA guidelines to ensure method reliability in quantifying endogenous compounds. The standard addition, background subtraction, and the surrogate analyte approaches allow the use of the same matrix for the calibration curve as the one to be analyzed in the test samples. However, in the surrogate matrix approach, various matrices such as artificial, stripped, and neat matrices are used as surrogate matrices for the actual matrix of study samples. For the surrogate analyte approach, it is required to demonstrate similarity in matrix effect and recovery between surrogate and authentic endogenous analytes. Similarly, for the surrogate matrix approach, it is required to demonstrate similar matrix effect and extraction recovery in both the surrogate and original matrices. All these methods represent indirect approaches to quantify endogenous compounds and regardless of what approach is followed, it has to be shown that none of the validation criteria have been compromised due to the indirect analyses.

  8. Quantitative spatiotemporal image analysis of fluorescein angiography in age-related macular degeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Jeffrey W.

    1998-06-01

    Interpretation and analysis of retinal angiographic studies has been largely qualitative. Quantitative analysis of pathologic fundus features will facilitate interpretation and potentiate clinical studies where precise image metrology is vital. Fluorescein angiography studies of patients with age- related macular degeneration were digitized. Sequential temporal images were spatially-registered with polynomial warping algorithms, allowing for the construction of a three- dimensional (two spatial and one temporal) angiogram vector. Temporal profiles through spatially-registered, temporally- sequential pixels were computed. Characteristic temporal profiles for fundus background, retinal vasculature, retinal pigment epithelial atrophy, and choroidal neovascular (CNV) membranes were observed, allowing for pixel assignment and fundus feature quantitation. Segmentation and quantitation of fundus features including geographic atrophy and CNV is facilitated by spatio-temporal image analysis.

  9. Issues in Quantitative Analysis of Ultraviolet Imager (UV) Data: Airglow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Germany, G. A.; Richards, P. G.; Spann, J. F.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.

    1999-01-01

    The GGS Ultraviolet Imager (UVI) has proven to be especially valuable in correlative substorm, auroral morphology, and extended statistical studies of the auroral regions. Such studies are based on knowledge of the location, spatial, and temporal behavior of auroral emissions. More quantitative studies, based on absolute radiometric intensities from UVI images, require a more intimate knowledge of the instrument behavior and data processing requirements and are inherently more difficult than studies based on relative knowledge of the oval location. In this study, UVI airglow observations are analyzed and compared with model predictions to illustrate issues that arise in quantitative analysis of UVI images. These issues include instrument calibration, long term changes in sensitivity, and imager flat field response as well as proper background correction. Airglow emissions are chosen for this study because of their relatively straightforward modeling requirements and because of their implications for thermospheric compositional studies. The analysis issues discussed here, however, are identical to those faced in quantitative auroral studies.

  10. Quantitative analysis of glycoprotein glycans.

    PubMed

    Orlando, Ron

    2013-01-01

    The ability to quantitatively determine changes in the N- and O-linked glycans is an essential component of comparative glycomics. Multiple strategies are available to by which this can be accomplished, including; both label free approaches and isotopic labeling strategies. The focus of this chapter is to describe each of these approaches while providing insight into their strengths and weaknesses, so that glycomic investigators can make an educated choice of the strategy that is best suited for their particular application.

  11. Auditory spectro-temporal pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Joseph W.

    1992-05-01

    The long-term aim of this project is a better understanding of auditory processes which use across frequency or across-ear temporal envelope difference cues to aid performance. Specific areas of investigation include comodulation masking release (CMR), the masking-level difference (MLD), temporal resolution, and the processing of amplitude and frequency modulation. The goal of the first proposed experiment is to examine the possible relation between CMR and auditory phenomena related to auditory scene analysis; the goal of the second experiment is to examine the possible relation between CMR and the MLD for narrowband noise maskers; the goal of the third experiment is to determine the extent to which across-frequency correlation of temporal envelope may influence gap detection for wideband stimuli; the goal of the fourth experiment is to determine whether masking release can be derived from cues based upon across-frequency coherence of frequency modulation; and the goal of the fifth experiment is to examine a modulation masking phenomenon related to frequency modulation. The tasks will be signal detection in masking noise, temporal gap detection, and the detection of frequency modulation. Testing will be performed in a sound-treated room, using a 3AFC adaptive procedure.

  12. Quantitative analysis of qualitative images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hockney, David; Falco, Charles M.

    2005-03-01

    We show optical evidence that demonstrates artists as early as Jan van Eyck and Robert Campin (c1425) used optical projections as aids for producing their paintings. We also have found optical evidence within works by later artists, including Bermejo (c1475), Lotto (c1525), Caravaggio (c1600), de la Tour (c1650), Chardin (c1750) and Ingres (c1825), demonstrating a continuum in the use of optical projections by artists, along with an evolution in the sophistication of that use. However, even for paintings where we have been able to extract unambiguous, quantitative evidence of the direct use of optical projections for producing certain of the features, this does not mean that paintings are effectively photographs. Because the hand and mind of the artist are intimately involved in the creation process, understanding these complex images requires more than can be obtained from only applying the equations of geometrical optics.

  13. Time series analysis of temporal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sikdar, Sandipan; Ganguly, Niloy; Mukherjee, Animesh

    2016-01-01

    A common but an important feature of all real-world networks is that they are temporal in nature, i.e., the network structure changes over time. Due to this dynamic nature, it becomes difficult to propose suitable growth models that can explain the various important characteristic properties of these networks. In fact, in many application oriented studies only knowing these properties is sufficient. For instance, if one wishes to launch a targeted attack on a network, this can be done even without the knowledge of the full network structure; rather an estimate of some of the properties is sufficient enough to launch the attack. We, in this paper show that even if the network structure at a future time point is not available one can still manage to estimate its properties. We propose a novel method to map a temporal network to a set of time series instances, analyze them and using a standard forecast model of time series, try to predict the properties of a temporal network at a later time instance. To our aim, we consider eight properties such as number of active nodes, average degree, clustering coefficient etc. and apply our prediction framework on them. We mainly focus on the temporal network of human face-to-face contacts and observe that it represents a stochastic process with memory that can be modeled as Auto-Regressive-Integrated-Moving-Average (ARIMA). We use cross validation techniques to find the percentage accuracy of our predictions. An important observation is that the frequency domain properties of the time series obtained from spectrogram analysis could be used to refine the prediction framework by identifying beforehand the cases where the error in prediction is likely to be high. This leads to an improvement of 7.96% (for error level ≤20%) in prediction accuracy on an average across all datasets. As an application we show how such prediction scheme can be used to launch targeted attacks on temporal networks. Contribution to the Topical Issue

  14. Runtime Analysis of Linear Temporal Logic Specifications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giannakopoulou, Dimitra; Havelund, Klaus

    2001-01-01

    This report presents an approach to checking a running program against its Linear Temporal Logic (LTL) specifications. LTL is a widely used logic for expressing properties of programs viewed as sets of executions. Our approach consists of translating LTL formulae to finite-state automata, which are used as observers of the program behavior. The translation algorithm we propose modifies standard LTL to B chi automata conversion techniques to generate automata that check finite program traces. The algorithm has been implemented in a tool, which has been integrated with the generic JPaX framework for runtime analysis of Java programs.

  15. Quantitative MRI in refractory temporal lobe epilepsy: relationship with surgical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bonilha, Leonardo

    2015-01-01

    Medically intractable temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) remains a serious health problem. Across treatment centers, up to 40% of patients with TLE will continue to experience persistent postoperative seizures at 2-year follow-up. It is unknown why such a large number of patients continue to experience seizures despite being suitable candidates for resective surgery. Preoperative quantitative MRI techniques may provide useful information on why some patients continue to experience disabling seizures, and may have the potential to develop prognostic markers of surgical outcome. In this article, we provide an overview of how quantitative MRI morphometric and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data have improved the understanding of brain structural alterations in patients with refractory TLE. We subsequently review the studies that have applied quantitative structural imaging techniques to identify the neuroanatomical factors that are most strongly related to a poor postoperative prognosis. In summary, quantitative imaging studies strongly suggest that TLE is a disorder affecting a network of neurobiological systems, characterized by multiple and inter-related limbic and extra-limbic network abnormalities. The relationship between brain alterations and postoperative outcome are less consistent, but there is emerging evidence suggesting that seizures are less likely to remit with surgery when presurgical abnormalities are observed in the connectivity supporting brain regions serving as network nodes located outside the resected temporal lobe. Future work, possibly harnessing the potential from multimodal imaging approaches, may further elucidate the etiology of persistent postoperative seizures in patients with refractory TLE. Furthermore, quantitative imaging techniques may be explored to provide individualized measures of postoperative seizure freedom outcome. PMID:25853080

  16. Quantitative multivariate analysis of dynamic multicellular morphogenic trajectories.

    PubMed

    White, Douglas E; Sylvester, Jonathan B; Levario, Thomas J; Lu, Hang; Streelman, J Todd; McDevitt, Todd C; Kemp, Melissa L

    2015-07-01

    Interrogating fundamental cell biology principles that govern tissue morphogenesis is critical to better understanding of developmental biology and engineering novel multicellular systems. Recently, functional micro-tissues derived from pluripotent embryonic stem cell (ESC) aggregates have provided novel platforms for experimental investigation; however elucidating the factors directing emergent spatial phenotypic patterns remains a significant challenge. Computational modelling techniques offer a unique complementary approach to probe mechanisms regulating morphogenic processes and provide a wealth of spatio-temporal data, but quantitative analysis of simulations and comparison to experimental data is extremely difficult. Quantitative descriptions of spatial phenomena across multiple systems and scales would enable unprecedented comparisons of computational simulations with experimental systems, thereby leveraging the inherent power of computational methods to interrogate the mechanisms governing emergent properties of multicellular biology. To address these challenges, we developed a portable pattern recognition pipeline consisting of: the conversion of cellular images into networks, extraction of novel features via network analysis, and generation of morphogenic trajectories. This novel methodology enabled the quantitative description of morphogenic pattern trajectories that could be compared across diverse systems: computational modelling of multicellular structures, differentiation of stem cell aggregates, and gastrulation of cichlid fish. Moreover, this method identified novel spatio-temporal features associated with different stages of embryo gastrulation, and elucidated a complex paracrine mechanism capable of explaining spatiotemporal pattern kinetic differences in ESC aggregates of different sizes.

  17. Quantitative histogram analysis of images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holub, Oliver; Ferreira, Sérgio T.

    2006-11-01

    A routine for histogram analysis of images has been written in the object-oriented, graphical development environment LabVIEW. The program converts an RGB bitmap image into an intensity-linear greyscale image according to selectable conversion coefficients. This greyscale image is subsequently analysed by plots of the intensity histogram and probability distribution of brightness, and by calculation of various parameters, including average brightness, standard deviation, variance, minimal and maximal brightness, mode, skewness and kurtosis of the histogram and the median of the probability distribution. The program allows interactive selection of specific regions of interest (ROI) in the image and definition of lower and upper threshold levels (e.g., to permit the removal of a constant background signal). The results of the analysis of multiple images can be conveniently saved and exported for plotting in other programs, which allows fast analysis of relatively large sets of image data. The program file accompanies this manuscript together with a detailed description of two application examples: The analysis of fluorescence microscopy images, specifically of tau-immunofluorescence in primary cultures of rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and the quantification of protein bands by Western-blot. The possibilities and limitations of this kind of analysis are discussed. Program summaryTitle of program: HAWGC Catalogue identifier: ADXG_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXG_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computers: Mobile Intel Pentium III, AMD Duron Installations: No installation necessary—Executable file together with necessary files for LabVIEW Run-time engine Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested: WindowsME/2000/XP Programming language used: LabVIEW 7.0 Memory required to execute with typical data:˜16MB for starting and ˜160MB used for

  18. Falcon: A Temporal Visual Analysis System

    SciTech Connect

    Steed, Chad A.

    2016-09-05

    Flexible visible exploration of long, high-resolution time series from multiple sensor streams is a challenge in several domains. Falcon is a visual analytics approach that helps researchers acquire a deep understanding of patterns in log and imagery data. Falcon allows users to interactively explore large, time-oriented data sets from multiple linked perspectives. Falcon provides overviews, detailed views, and unique segmented time series visualizations with multiple levels of detail. These capabilities are applicable to the analysis of any quantitative time series.

  19. Temporal analysis of multispectral scanner data.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, A. J.; Wiegand, C. L.; Torline, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    Multispectral scanner reflectance data were sampled for bare soil, cotton, sorghum, corn, and citrus at four dates during a growing season (April, May, June, and July 1969) to develop a time-dependent signature for crop and soil discrimination. Discrimination tests were conducted for single-date and multidate formats using training and test data sets. For classifications containing several crops, the multidate or temporal approach improved discrimination compared with the single-date approach. The multidate approach also preserved recognition accuracy better in going from training fields to test fields than the single-date analysis. The spectral distinctiveness of bare soil versus vegetation resulted in essentially equal discrimination using single-date versus multidate data for those two categories.

  20. Mobile app-based quantitative scanometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wong, Jessica X H; Liu, Frank S F; Yu, Hua-Zhong

    2014-12-16

    The feasibility of using smartphones and other mobile devices as the detection platform for quantitative scanometric assays is demonstrated. The different scanning modes (color, grayscale, black/white) and grayscale converting protocols (average, weighted average/luminosity, and software specific) have been compared in determining the optical darkness ratio (ODR) values, a conventional quantitation measure for scanometric assays. A mobile app was developed to image and analyze scanometric assays, as demonstrated by paper-printed tests and a biotin-streptavidin assay on a plastic substrate. Primarily for ODR analysis, the app has been shown to perform as well as a traditional desktop scanner, augmenting that smartphones (and other mobile devices) promise to be a practical platform for accurate, quantitative chemical analysis and medical diagnostics.

  1. Quantitative WDS analysis using electron probe microanalyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Ul-Hamid, Anwar . E-mail: anwar@kfupm.edu.sa; Tawancy, Hani M.; Mohammed, Abdul-Rashid I.; Al-Jaroudi, Said S.; Abbas, Nureddin M.

    2006-04-15

    In this paper, the procedure for conducting quantitative elemental analysis by ZAF correction method using wavelength dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (WDS) in an electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) is elaborated. Analysis of a thermal barrier coating (TBC) system formed on a Ni-based single crystal superalloy is presented as an example to illustrate the analysis of samples consisting of a large number of major and minor elements. The analysis was performed by known standards and measured peak-to-background intensity ratios. The procedure for using separate set of acquisition conditions for major and minor element analysis is explained and its importance is stressed.

  2. Seniors' Online Communities: A Quantitative Content Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimrod, Galit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the contents and characteristics of seniors' online communities and to explore their potential benefits to older adults. Design and Methods: Quantitative content analysis of a full year's data from 14 leading online communities using a novel computerized system. The overall database included 686,283 messages. Results: There was…

  3. A quantitative approach to scar analysis.

    PubMed

    Khorasani, Hooman; Zheng, Zhong; Nguyen, Calvin; Zara, Janette; Zhang, Xinli; Wang, Joyce; Ting, Kang; Soo, Chia

    2011-02-01

    Analysis of collagen architecture is essential to wound healing research. However, to date no consistent methodologies exist for quantitatively assessing dermal collagen architecture in scars. In this study, we developed a standardized approach for quantitative analysis of scar collagen morphology by confocal microscopy using fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. Full-thickness wounds were created on adult mice, closed by primary intention, and harvested at 14 days after wounding for morphometrics and standard Fourier transform-based scar analysis as well as fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis. In addition, transmission electron microscopy was used to evaluate collagen ultrastructure. We demonstrated that fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis were superior to Fourier transform analysis in discriminating scar versus unwounded tissue in a wild-type mouse model. To fully test the robustness of this scar analysis approach, a fibromodulin-null mouse model that heals with increased scar was also used. Fractal dimension and lacunarity analysis effectively discriminated unwounded fibromodulin-null versus wild-type skin as well as healing fibromodulin-null versus wild-type wounds, whereas Fourier transform analysis failed to do so. Furthermore, fractal dimension and lacunarity data also correlated well with transmission electron microscopy collagen ultrastructure analysis, adding to their validity. These results demonstrate that fractal dimension and lacunarity are more sensitive than Fourier transform analysis for quantification of scar morphology.

  4. An in Situ Intracellular Self-Assembly Strategy for Quantitatively and Temporally Monitoring Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yao-Xin; Qiao, Sheng-Lin; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Ruo-Xin; An, Hong-Wei; Ma, Yang; Rajapaksha, R P Yeshan J; Qiao, Zeng-Ying; Wang, Lei; Wang, Hao

    2017-02-28

    Autophagy plays a crucial role in the metabolic process. So far, conventional methods are incapable of rapid, precise, and real-time monitoring of autophagy in living objects. Herein, we describe an in situ intracellular self-assembly strategy for quantitative and temporal determination of autophagy in living objectives. The intelligent building blocks (DPBP) are composed by a bulky dendrimer as a carrier, a bis(pyrene) derivative (BP) as a signal molecule, and a peptide linker as a responsive unit that can be cleaved by an autophagy-specific enzyme, i.e., ATG4B. DPBP maintains the quenched fluorescence with monomeric BP. However, the responsive peptide is specifically tailored upon activation of autophagy, resulting in self-aggregation of BP residues which emit a 30-fold enhanced fluorescence. By measuring the intensity of fluorescent signal, we are able to quantitatively evaluate the autophagic level. In comparison with traditional techniques, such as TEM, Western blot, and GFP-LC3, the reliability and accuracy of this method are finally validated. We believe this in situ intracellular self-assembly strategy provides a rapid, effective, real-time, and quantitative method for monitoring autophagy in living objects, and it will be a useful tool for autophagy-related fundamental and clinical research.

  5. Quantitative ADF STEM: acquisition, analysis and interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, L.

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative annular dark-field in the scanning transmission electron microscope (ADF STEM), where image intensities are used to provide composition and thickness measurements, has enjoyed a renaissance during the last decade. Now in a post aberration-correction era many aspects of the technique are being revisited. Here the recent progress and emerging best-practice for such aberration corrected quantitative ADF STEM is discussed including issues relating to proper acquisition of experimental data and its calibration, approaches for data analysis, the utility of such data, its interpretation and limitations.

  6. Method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, James S.; Gjerde, Douglas T.; Schmuckler, Gabriella

    1981-06-09

    An improved apparatus and method for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single eluent and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  7. Quantitative analysis of blood vessel geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrman, Michael G.; Abdul-Karim, Othman; Shah, Sujal; Gilbert, Steven G.; Van Bibber, Richard

    2001-07-01

    Re-narrowing or restenosis of a human coronary artery occurs within six months in one third of balloon angioplasty procedures. Accurate and repeatable quantitative analysis of vessel shape is important to characterize the progression and type of restenosis, and to evaluate effects new therapies might have. A combination of complicated geometry and image variability, and the need for high resolution and large image size makes visual/manual analysis slow, difficult, and prone to error. The image processing and analysis described here was developed to automate feature extraction of the lumen, internal elastic lamina, neointima, external elastic lamina, and tunica adventitia and to enable an objective, quantitative definition of blood vessel geometry. The quantitative geometrical analysis enables the measurement of several features including perimeter, area, and other metrics of vessel damage. Automation of feature extraction creates a high throughput capability that enables analysis of serial sections for more accurate measurement of restenosis dimensions. Measurement results are input into a relational database where they can be statistically analyzed compared across studies. As part of the integrated process, results are also imprinted on the images themselves to facilitate auditing of the results. The analysis is fast, repeatable and accurate while allowing the pathologist to control the measurement process.

  8. Comprehensive quantitative analysis on privacy leak behavior.

    PubMed

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects.

  9. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis on Privacy Leak Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Lejun; Wang, Yuanzhuo; Jin, Xiaolong; Li, Jingyuan; Cheng, Xueqi; Jin, Shuyuan

    2013-01-01

    Privacy information is prone to be leaked by illegal software providers with various motivations. Privacy leak behavior has thus become an important research issue of cyber security. However, existing approaches can only qualitatively analyze privacy leak behavior of software applications. No quantitative approach, to the best of our knowledge, has been developed in the open literature. To fill this gap, in this paper we propose for the first time four quantitative metrics, namely, possibility, severity, crypticity, and manipulability, for privacy leak behavior analysis based on Privacy Petri Net (PPN). In order to compare the privacy leak behavior among different software, we further propose a comprehensive metric, namely, overall leak degree, based on these four metrics. Finally, we validate the effectiveness of the proposed approach using real-world software applications. The experimental results demonstrate that our approach can quantitatively analyze the privacy leak behaviors of various software types and reveal their characteristics from different aspects. PMID:24066046

  10. Quantitative and Temporal Requirements Revealed for Zap-70 Catalytic Activity During T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yeung, Byron B.; Melichar, Heather J.; Ross, Jenny O.; Cheng, Debra A.; Zikherman, Julie; Shokat, Kevan M.; Robey, Ellen A.; Weiss, Arthur

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic activity of Zap-70 is crucial for T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, but the quantitative and temporal requirements for its function in thymocyte development are not known. Using a chemical-genetic system to selectively and reversibly inhibit Zap-70 catalytic activity in a model of synchronized thymic selection, we showed that CD4+CD8+ thymocytes integrate multiple, transient, Zap-70-dependent signals over more than 36 h to reach a cumulative threshold for positive selection, whereas one hour of signaling was sufficient for negative selection. Titration of Zap-70 activity resulted in graded reductions in positive and negative selection but did not decrease the cumulative TCR signals integrated by positively selected OT-I cells, revealing heterogeneity, even among CD4+CD8+ thymocytes expressing identical TCRs undergoing positive selection. PMID:24908390

  11. Phase noise optimization in temporal phase-shifting digital holography with partial coherence light sources and its application in quantitative cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Remmersmann, Christian; Stürwald, Stephan; Kemper, Björn; Langehanenberg, Patrik; von Bally, Gert

    2009-03-10

    In temporal phase-shifting-based digital holographic microscopy, high-resolution phase contrast imaging requires optimized conditions for hologram recording and phase retrieval. To optimize the phase resolution, for the example of a variable three-step algorithm, a theoretical analysis on statistical errors, digitalization errors, uncorrelated errors, and errors due to a misaligned temporal phase shift is carried out. In a second step the theoretically predicted results are compared to the measured phase noise obtained from comparative experimental investigations with several coherent and partially coherent light sources. Finally, the applicability for noise reduction is demonstrated by quantitative phase contrast imaging of pancreas tumor cells.

  12. Decoding brain cancer dynamics: a quantitative histogram-based approach using temporal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mu; Hall, Lawrence O.; Goldgof, Dmitry B.; Russo, Robin; Gillies, Robert J.; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2015-03-01

    Brain tumor heterogeneity remains a challenge for probing brain cancer evolutionary dynamics. In light of evolution, it is a priority to inspect the cancer system from a time-domain perspective since it explicitly tracks the dynamics of cancer variations. In this paper, we study the problem of exploring brain tumor heterogeneity from temporal clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Our goal is to discover evidence-based knowledge from such temporal imaging data, where multiple clinical MRI scans from Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients are generated during therapy. In particular, we propose a quantitative histogram-based approach that builds a prediction model to measure the difference in histograms obtained from pre- and post-treatment. The study could significantly assist radiologists by providing a metric to identify distinctive patterns within each tumor, which is crucial for the goal of providing patient-specific treatments. We examine the proposed approach for a practical application - clinical survival group prediction. Experimental results show that our approach achieved 90.91% accuracy.

  13. Good practices for quantitative bias analysis.

    PubMed

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; MacLehose, Richard F; Maldonado, George; McCandless, Lawrence C; Greenland, Sander

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative bias analysis serves several objectives in epidemiological research. First, it provides a quantitative estimate of the direction, magnitude and uncertainty arising from systematic errors. Second, the acts of identifying sources of systematic error, writing down models to quantify them, assigning values to the bias parameters and interpreting the results combat the human tendency towards overconfidence in research results, syntheses and critiques and the inferences that rest upon them. Finally, by suggesting aspects that dominate uncertainty in a particular research result or topic area, bias analysis can guide efficient allocation of sparse research resources. The fundamental methods of bias analyses have been known for decades, and there have been calls for more widespread use for nearly as long. There was a time when some believed that bias analyses were rarely undertaken because the methods were not widely known and because automated computing tools were not readily available to implement the methods. These shortcomings have been largely resolved. We must, therefore, contemplate other barriers to implementation. One possibility is that practitioners avoid the analyses because they lack confidence in the practice of bias analysis. The purpose of this paper is therefore to describe what we view as good practices for applying quantitative bias analysis to epidemiological data, directed towards those familiar with the methods. We focus on answering questions often posed to those of us who advocate incorporation of bias analysis methods into teaching and research. These include the following. When is bias analysis practical and productive? How does one select the biases that ought to be addressed? How does one select a method to model biases? How does one assign values to the parameters of a bias model? How does one present and interpret a bias analysis?. We hope that our guide to good practices for conducting and presenting bias analyses will encourage

  14. Spatial and temporal epidemiological analysis in the Big Data era.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, Dirk U; Stevens, Kim B

    2015-11-01

    Concurrent with global economic development in the last 50 years, the opportunities for the spread of existing diseases and emergence of new infectious pathogens, have increased substantially. The activities associated with the enormously intensified global connectivity have resulted in large amounts of data being generated, which in turn provides opportunities for generating knowledge that will allow more effective management of animal and human health risks. This so-called Big Data has, more recently, been accompanied by the Internet of Things which highlights the increasing presence of a wide range of sensors, interconnected via the Internet. Analysis of this data needs to exploit its complexity, accommodate variation in data quality and should take advantage of its spatial and temporal dimensions, where available. Apart from the development of hardware technologies and networking/communication infrastructure, it is necessary to develop appropriate data management tools that make this data accessible for analysis. This includes relational databases, geographical information systems and most recently, cloud-based data storage such as Hadoop distributed file systems. While the development in analytical methodologies has not quite caught up with the data deluge, important advances have been made in a number of areas, including spatial and temporal data analysis where the spectrum of analytical methods ranges from visualisation and exploratory analysis, to modelling. While there used to be a primary focus on statistical science in terms of methodological development for data analysis, the newly emerged discipline of data science is a reflection of the challenges presented by the need to integrate diverse data sources and exploit them using novel data- and knowledge-driven modelling methods while simultaneously recognising the value of quantitative as well as qualitative analytical approaches. Machine learning regression methods, which are more robust and can handle

  15. Quantitative image analysis of celiac disease.

    PubMed

    Ciaccio, Edward J; Bhagat, Govind; Lewis, Suzanne K; Green, Peter H

    2015-03-07

    We outline the use of quantitative techniques that are currently used for analysis of celiac disease. Image processing techniques can be useful to statistically analyze the pixular data of endoscopic images that is acquired with standard or videocapsule endoscopy. It is shown how current techniques have evolved to become more useful for gastroenterologists who seek to understand celiac disease and to screen for it in suspected patients. New directions for focus in the development of methodology for diagnosis and treatment of this disease are suggested. It is evident that there are yet broad areas where there is potential to expand the use of quantitative techniques for improved analysis in suspected or known celiac disease patients.

  16. Quantitative analysis to guide orphan drug development.

    PubMed

    Lesko, L J

    2012-08-01

    The development of orphan drugs for rare diseases has made impressive strides in the past 10 years. There has been a surge in orphan drug designations, but new drug approvals have not kept up. This article presents a three-pronged hierarchical strategy for quantitative analysis of data at the descriptive, mechanistic, and systems levels of the biological system that could represent a standardized and rational approach to orphan drug development. Examples are provided to illustrate the concept.

  17. Using Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Guide Quantitative Safety Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, J. F.; Allocco, M.

    2005-01-01

    Quantitative methods can be beneficial in many types of safety investigations. However, there are many difficulties in using quantitative m ethods. Far example, there may be little relevant data available. This paper proposes a framework for using quantitative hazard analysis to prioritize hazard scenarios most suitable for quantitative mziysis. The framework first categorizes hazard scenarios by severity and likelihood. We then propose another metric "modeling difficulty" that desc ribes the complexity in modeling a given hazard scenario quantitatively. The combined metrics of severity, likelihood, and modeling difficu lty help to prioritize hazard scenarios for which quantitative analys is should be applied. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for airplane operatio ns at closely spaced parallel runways.

  18. Temporal Mixture Analysis of Hypertemporal Antarctic Sea Ice Data in the Sense of Machine Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, J.; Kim, H. C.

    2015-12-01

    Hypertemporal data, or time series acquired at high temporal frequencies, are often used to determine seasonal characteristics of environmental phenomena such as sea ice concentration. However, it is difficult to analyze long-term hypertemporal remote sensing data over extensive areas without prior information. Most pixels of hypertemporal data are highly mixed and contain several distinct temporal signals that represent seasonal characteristics of substances. This study performed temporal mixture analysis, which is algebraically similar to spectral mixture analysis, but occurs in the time domain instead of the spectral domain. Temporal mixture analysis was used to investigate the temporal characteristics of Antarctic sea ice. Two general steps were used to address mixing problems: 1) finding temporally unique signatures of pure components, which are referred to as temporal endmembers, and 2) unmixing each pixel in the time series data as a linear combination of the endmember fractional abundances. Because endmember selection is critical to the success of both spectral and temporal mixture analysis, it is important to select proper endmembers from large quantities of hypertemporal data. A machine learning algorithm was introduced to successfully identify endmembers without prior knowledge. A fully linear mixing model was then implemented in an attempt to produce more robust and physically meaningful abundance estimates. Experiments that quantitatively and qualitatively evaluated the proposed approaches were conducted. A temporal mixture analysis of high-temporal-dimensional data provides a unique summary of long-term Antarctic sea ice and noise-whitened reconstruction images via inverse processing. Further, comparisons of regional sea-ice fractions provide a better understanding of the overall Antarctic sea ice changes.

  19. Influence analysis in quantitative trait loci detection

    PubMed Central

    Dou, Xiaoling; Kuriki, Satoshi; Maeno, Akiteru; Takada, Toyoyuki; Shiroishi, Toshihiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents systematic methods for the detection of influential individuals that affect the log odds (LOD) score curve. We derive general formulas of influence functions for profile likelihoods and introduce them into two standard quantitative trait locus detection methods—the interval mapping method and single marker analysis. Besides influence analysis on specific LOD scores, we also develop influence analysis methods on the shape of the LOD score curves. A simulation-based method is proposed to assess the significance of the influence of the individuals. These methods are shown useful in the influence analysis of a real dataset of an experimental population from an F2 mouse cross. By receiver operating characteristic analysis, we confirm that the proposed methods show better performance than existing diagnostics. PMID:24740424

  20. Improved accuracy of quantitative parameter estimates in dynamic contrast-enhanced CT study with low temporal resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sun Mo; Jaffray, David A.

    2016-01-15

    Purpose: A previously proposed method to reduce radiation dose to patient in dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT is enhanced by principal component analysis (PCA) filtering which improves the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of time-concentration curves in the DCE-CT study. The efficacy of the combined method to maintain the accuracy of kinetic parameter estimates at low temporal resolution is investigated with pixel-by-pixel kinetic analysis of DCE-CT data. Methods: The method is based on DCE-CT scanning performed with low temporal resolution to reduce the radiation dose to the patient. The arterial input function (AIF) with high temporal resolution can be generated with a coarsely sampled AIF through a previously published method of AIF estimation. To increase the SNR of time-concentration curves (tissue curves), first, a region-of-interest is segmented into squares composed of 3 × 3 pixels in size. Subsequently, the PCA filtering combined with a fraction of residual information criterion is applied to all the segmented squares for further improvement of their SNRs. The proposed method was applied to each DCE-CT data set of a cohort of 14 patients at varying levels of down-sampling. The kinetic analyses using the modified Tofts’ model and singular value decomposition method, then, were carried out for each of the down-sampling schemes between the intervals from 2 to 15 s. The results were compared with analyses done with the measured data in high temporal resolution (i.e., original scanning frequency) as the reference. Results: The patients’ AIFs were estimated to high accuracy based on the 11 orthonormal bases of arterial impulse responses established in the previous paper. In addition, noise in the images was effectively reduced by using five principal components of the tissue curves for filtering. Kinetic analyses using the proposed method showed superior results compared to those with down-sampling alone; they were able to maintain the accuracy in the

  1. Quantitative resilience analysis through control design.

    SciTech Connect

    Sunderland, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Camphouse, Russell Chris

    2009-09-01

    Critical infrastructure resilience has become a national priority for the U. S. Department of Homeland Security. System resilience has been studied for several decades in many different disciplines, but no standards or unifying methods exist for critical infrastructure resilience analysis. Few quantitative resilience methods exist, and those existing approaches tend to be rather simplistic and, hence, not capable of sufficiently assessing all aspects of critical infrastructure resilience. This report documents the results of a late-start Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project that investigated the development of quantitative resilience through application of control design methods. Specifically, we conducted a survey of infrastructure models to assess what types of control design might be applicable for critical infrastructure resilience assessment. As a result of this survey, we developed a decision process that directs the resilience analyst to the control method that is most likely applicable to the system under consideration. Furthermore, we developed optimal control strategies for two sets of representative infrastructure systems to demonstrate how control methods could be used to assess the resilience of the systems to catastrophic disruptions. We present recommendations for future work to continue the development of quantitative resilience analysis methods.

  2. Temporal quantitative phosphoproteomics of ADP stimulation reveals novel central nodes in platelet activation and inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Florian; Geiger, Jörg; Gambaryan, Stepan; Solari, Fiorella A.; Dell’Aica, Margherita; Loroch, Stefan; Mattheij, Nadine J.; Mindukshev, Igor; Pötz, Oliver; Jurk, Kerstin; Burkhart, Julia M.; Fufezan, Christian; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; Walter, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) enhances platelet activation by virtually any other stimulant to complete aggregation. It binds specifically to the G-protein–coupled membrane receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12, stimulating intracellular signaling cascades, leading to integrin αIIbβ3 activation, a process antagonized by endothelial prostacyclin. P2Y12 inhibitors are among the most successful antiplatelet drugs, however, show remarkable variability in efficacy. We reasoned whether a more detailed molecular understanding of ADP-induced protein phosphorylation could identify (1) critical hubs in platelet signaling toward aggregation and (2) novel molecular targets for antiplatelet treatment strategies. We applied quantitative temporal phosphoproteomics to study ADP-mediated signaling at unprecedented molecular resolution. Furthermore, to mimic the antagonistic efficacy of endothelial-derived prostacyclin, we determined how Iloprost reverses ADP-mediated signaling events. We provide temporal profiles of 4797 phosphopeptides, 608 of which showed significant regulation. Regulated proteins are implicated in well-known activating functions such as degranulation and cytoskeletal reorganization, but also in less well-understood pathways, involving ubiquitin ligases and GTPase exchange factors/GTPase-activating proteins (GEF/GAP). Our data demonstrate that ADP-triggered phosphorylation occurs predominantly within the first 10 seconds, with many short rather than sustained changes. For a set of phosphorylation sites (eg, PDE3ASer312, CALDAG-GEFISer587, ENSASer109), we demonstrate an inverse regulation by ADP and Iloprost, suggesting that these are central modulators of platelet homeostasis. This study demonstrates an extensive spectrum of human platelet protein phosphorylation in response to ADP and Iloprost, which inversely overlap and represent major activating and inhibitory pathways. PMID:28060719

  3. Spatially, Temporally, and Quantitatively Controlled Delivery of Broad Range of Molecules into Selected Cells through Plasmonic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Messina, Gabriele C; Dipalo, Michele; La Rocca, Rosanna; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Caprettini, Valeria; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Toma, Andrea; Tantussi, Francesco; Berdondini, Luca; De Angelis, Francesco

    2015-11-25

    A Universal plasmonic/microfluidic platform for spatial and temporal controlled intracellular delivery is described. The system can inject/transfect the desired amount of molecules with an efficacy close to 100%. Moreover, it is highly scalable from single cells to large ensembles without administering the molecules to an extracellular bath. The latter enables quantitative control over the amount of injected molecules.

  4. Quantitative analysis of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, C R; Blewitt, R W; Bird, C C

    1982-01-01

    A preliminary attempt has been made to characterise a small series of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) by morphometric means using the Quantimet 720 Kontron MOP/AMO3 image analysis systems. In most cases it was found that the distribution of nuclear area and correlation between mean nuclear area and frequency per unit field, corresponded closely with tumour classification determined by light microscopy. These results suggest that it may be possible to devise an objective and reproducible grading system for NHL using quantitative morphometric techniques. PMID:7040479

  5. Quantitative NIR Raman analysis in liquid mixtures.

    PubMed

    Sato-Berrú, R Ysacc; Medina-Valtierra, Jorge; Medina-Gutiérrez, Cirilo; Frausto-Reyes, Claudio

    2004-08-01

    The capability to obtain quantitative information of a simple way from Raman spectra is a subject of considerable interest. In this work, this is demonstrated for mixtures of ethanol with water and rhodamine-6G (R-6G) with methanol, which were analyzed directly in glass vessel. The Raman intensities and a simple mathematical model have been used and applied for the analysis of liquid samples. It is starting point to generate a general expression, from the experimental spectra, as the sum of the particular expression for each pure compound allow us to obtain an expression for the mixtures which can be used for determining concentrations, from the Raman spectrum, of the mixture.

  6. An analysis of solar-cycle temporal relationships among activity indicators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, K. T.; Maymani, H.; Nautiyal, K.; te Velde, V.

    2004-01-01

    Differences in the time development of solar activity indices are an important clue in the search for physical processes responsible for changing solar emission at various wavelengths. In this paper we describe our investigation of temporal relationships among two space-based indices, Lyman-α 121.6 nm emission (Lα) and the Mg II 280 nm core-to-wing ratio, and four ground-based indices - the 10.7 cm flux (F10), the He I 1083 nm equivalent width, the Ca II K 393.4 nm emission index, and the International Sunspot Number (ISN). We provide scatterplots of index pairs passed through a 2-year Gaussian filter during each available solar cycle, and we approximate the temporal relationships quantitatively as overall temporal offsets with uncertainties. We reconcile our findings with qualitative ideas concerning the variation of solar emissions with solar activity. Since the F10 and ISN time series are longer than four complete solar cycles, we are able to evaluate the reproducibility of temporal offsets over multiple solar cycles. The chief motivation for our work is to improve solar indicator analysis by providing a method of seeing and analyzing temporal relationships clearly and easily. We believe that future physical models of magnetic activity and spectral emissions in the solar chromosphere and transition region may make quantitative predictions of temporal relationships among full-disk solar indices for comparison with analyses such as ours.

  7. Cotton Defense Induction Patterns Under Spatially, Temporally and Quantitatively Varying Herbivory Levels.

    PubMed

    Eisenring, Michael; Meissle, Michael; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Naranjo, Steven E; Wettstein, Felix; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In its defense against herbivores, cotton (Gossypium sp.) relies in part on the production of a set of inducible, non-volatile terpenoids. Under uniform damage levels, in planta allocation of induced cotton terpenoids has been found to be highest in youngest leaves, supporting assumptions of the optimal defense theory (ODT) which predicts that plants allocate defense compounds to tissues depending on their value and the likelihood of herbivore attack. However, our knowledge is limited on how varying, and thus more realistic, damage levels might affect cotton defense organization. We hypothesized that the allocation of terpenoids and densities of terpenoid-storing glands in leaves aligns with assumptions of the ODT, even when plants are subjected to temporally, spatially and quantitatively varying caterpillar (Heliothis virescens) damage. As expected, cotton plants allocated most of their defenses to their youngest leaves regardless of damage location. However, defense induction in older leaves varied with damage location. For at least 14 days after damage treatments ended, plants reallocated defense resources from previously young leaves to newly developed leaves. Furthermore, we observed a positive hyperbolic relationship between leaf damage area and both terpenoid concentrations and gland densities, indicating that cotton plants can fine-tune defense allocation. Although it appears that factors like vascular constraints and chemical properties of individual defense compounds can affect defense levels, our results overall demonstrate that induced defense organization of cotton subjected to varying damage treatments is in alignment with key assumptions of the ODT.

  8. Spatial, Temporal, and Quantitative Manipulation of Intracellular Hydrogen Peroxide in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Alim, Ishraq; Haskew-Layton, Renee E.; Aleyasin, Hossein; Guo, Hengchang; Ratan, Rajiv R.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is produced endogenously in a number of cellular compartments, including the mitochondria, the endoplasmic reticulum, peroxisomes, and at the plasma membrane, and can play divergent roles as a second messenger or a pathological toxin. It is assumed that the tuned production of H2O2 within neuronal and non-neuronal cells regulates a discreet balance between survival and death. However, a major challenge in understanding the physiological versus pathological role of H2O2 in cells has been the lack of validated methods that can spatially, temporally, and quantitatively modulate H2O2 production. A promising means of regulating endogenous H2O2 is through the expression of peroxide-producing enzyme D-amino acid oxidase (DAAO from Rhodotorula gracilis lacking a peroxisomal targeting sequence). Using viral vectors to express DAAO in distinct cell types and using targeting sequences to target DAAO to distinct subcellular sites, we can manipulate H2O2 production by applying the substrate D-alanine or permeable analogs of D-alanine. In this chapter, we describe the use of DAAO to produce H2O2 in culture models and the real-time visual validation of this technique using two-photon microscopy and chemoselective fluorescent probes. PMID:25416362

  9. Cotton Defense Induction Patterns Under Spatially, Temporally and Quantitatively Varying Herbivory Levels

    PubMed Central

    Eisenring, Michael; Meissle, Michael; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Naranjo, Steven E.; Wettstein, Felix; Romeis, Jörg

    2017-01-01

    In its defense against herbivores, cotton (Gossypium sp.) relies in part on the production of a set of inducible, non-volatile terpenoids. Under uniform damage levels, in planta allocation of induced cotton terpenoids has been found to be highest in youngest leaves, supporting assumptions of the optimal defense theory (ODT) which predicts that plants allocate defense compounds to tissues depending on their value and the likelihood of herbivore attack. However, our knowledge is limited on how varying, and thus more realistic, damage levels might affect cotton defense organization. We hypothesized that the allocation of terpenoids and densities of terpenoid-storing glands in leaves aligns with assumptions of the ODT, even when plants are subjected to temporally, spatially and quantitatively varying caterpillar (Heliothis virescens) damage. As expected, cotton plants allocated most of their defenses to their youngest leaves regardless of damage location. However, defense induction in older leaves varied with damage location. For at least 14 days after damage treatments ended, plants reallocated defense resources from previously young leaves to newly developed leaves. Furthermore, we observed a positive hyperbolic relationship between leaf damage area and both terpenoid concentrations and gland densities, indicating that cotton plants can fine-tune defense allocation. Although it appears that factors like vascular constraints and chemical properties of individual defense compounds can affect defense levels, our results overall demonstrate that induced defense organization of cotton subjected to varying damage treatments is in alignment with key assumptions of the ODT. PMID:28270830

  10. Spectral and Temporal Laser Fluorescence Analysis Such as for Natural Aquatic Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chekalyuk, Alexander (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An Advanced Laser Fluorometer (ALF) can combine spectrally and temporally resolved measurements of laser-stimulated emission (LSE) for characterization of dissolved and particulate matter, including fluorescence constituents, in liquids. Spectral deconvolution (SDC) analysis of LSE spectral measurements can accurately retrieve information about individual fluorescent bands, such as can be attributed to chlorophyll-a (Chl-a), phycobiliprotein (PBP) pigments, or chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), among others. Improved physiological assessments of photosynthesizing organisms can use SDC analysis and temporal LSE measurements to assess variable fluorescence corrected for SDC-retrieved background fluorescence. Fluorescence assessments of Chl-a concentration based on LSE spectral measurements can be improved using photo-physiological information from temporal measurements. Quantitative assessments of PBP pigments, CDOM, and other fluorescent constituents, as well as basic structural characterizations of photosynthesizing populations, can be performed using SDC analysis of LSE spectral measurements.

  11. Spatio-temporal analysis of irregular vocal fold oscillations: Biphonation due to desynchronization of spatial modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, Jürgen; Mergell, Patrick; Eysholdt, Ulrich; Herzel, Hanspeter

    2001-12-01

    This report is on direct observation and modal analysis of irregular spatio-temporal vibration patterns of vocal fold pathologies in vivo. The observed oscillation patterns are described quantitatively with multiline kymograms, spectral analysis, and spatio-temporal plots. The complex spatio-temporal vibration patterns are decomposed by empirical orthogonal functions into independent vibratory modes. It is shown quantitatively that biphonation can be induced either by left-right asymmetry or by desynchronized anterior-posterior vibratory modes, and the term ``AP (anterior-posterior) biphonation'' is introduced. The presented phonation examples show that for normal phonation the first two modes sufficiently explain the glottal dynamics. The spatio-temporal oscillation pattern associated with biphonation due to left-right asymmetry can be explained by the first three modes. Higher-order modes are required to describe the pattern for biphonation induced by anterior-posterior vibrations. Spatial irregularity is quantified by an entropy measure, which is significantly higher for irregular phonation than for normal phonation. Two asymmetry measures are introduced: the left-right asymmetry and the anterior-posterior asymmetry, as the ratios of the fundamental frequencies of left and right vocal fold and of anterior-posterior modes, respectively. These quantities clearly differentiate between left-right biphonation and anterior-posterior biphonation. This paper proposes methods to analyze quantitatively irregular vocal fold contour patterns in vivo and complements previous findings of desynchronization of vibration modes in computer modes and in in vitro experiments.

  12. Quantitative analysis of retinal changes in hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giansanti, Roberto; Boemi, Massimo; Fumelli, Paolo; Passerini, Giorgio; Zingaretti, Primo

    1995-05-01

    Arterial hypertension is a high prevalence disease in Western countries and it is associated with increased risk for cardiovascular accidents. Retinal vessel changes are common findings in patients suffering from long-standing hypertensive disease. Morphological evaluations of the fundus oculi represent a fundamental tool for the clinical approach to the patient with hypertension. A qualitative analysis of the retinal lesions is usually performed and this implies severe limitations both in the classification of the different degrees of the pathology and in the follow-up of the disease. A diagnostic system based on a quantitative analysis of the retinal changes could overcome these problems. Our computerized approach was intended for this scope. The paper concentrates on the results and the implications of a computerized approach to the automatic extraction of numerical indexes describing morphological details of the fundus oculi. A previously developed image processing and recognition system, documented elsewhere and briefly described here, was successfully tested in pre-clinical experiments and applied in the evaluation of normal as well as of pathological fundus. The software system was developed to extract indexes such as caliber and path of vessels, local tortuosity of arteries and arterioles, positions and angles of crossings between two vessels. The reliability of the results, justified by their low variability, makes feasible the standardization of quantitative parameters to be used both in the diagnosis and in the prognosis of hypertension, and also allows prospective studies based upon them.

  13. Quantitative interactome analysis reveals a chemoresistant edgotype

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Juan D.; Schweppe, Devin K.; Eng, Jimmy K.; Zheng, Chunxiang; Taipale, Alex; Zhang, Yiyi; Takara, Kohji; Bruce, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Chemoresistance is a common mode of therapy failure for many cancers. Tumours develop resistance to chemotherapeutics through a variety of mechanisms, with proteins serving pivotal roles. Changes in protein conformations and interactions affect the cellular response to environmental conditions contributing to the development of new phenotypes. The ability to understand how protein interaction networks adapt to yield new function or alter phenotype is limited by the inability to determine structural and protein interaction changes on a proteomic scale. Here, chemical crosslinking and mass spectrometry were employed to quantify changes in protein structures and interactions in multidrug-resistant human carcinoma cells. Quantitative analysis of the largest crosslinking-derived, protein interaction network comprising 1,391 crosslinked peptides allows for ‘edgotype' analysis in a cell model of chemoresistance. We detect consistent changes to protein interactions and structures, including those involving cytokeratins, topoisomerase-2-alpha, and post-translationally modified histones, which correlate with a chemoresistant phenotype. PMID:26235782

  14. Automated quantitative image analysis of nanoparticle assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murthy, Chaitanya R.; Gao, Bo; Tao, Andrea R.; Arya, Gaurav

    2015-05-01

    The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated manner. The software outputs averages and distributions in the size, radius of gyration, fractal dimension, backbone length, end-to-end distance, anisotropic ratio, and aspect ratio of NP clusters as a function of time along with bootstrapped error bounds for all calculated properties. The polydispersity in the NP building blocks and biases in the sampling of NP clusters are accounted for through the use of probabilistic weights. This software, named Particle Image Characterization Tool (PICT), has been made publicly available and could be an invaluable resource for researchers studying NP assembly. To demonstrate its practical utility, we used PICT to analyze scanning electron microscopy images taken during the assembly of surface-functionalized metal NPs of differing shapes and sizes within a polymer matrix. PICT is used to characterize and analyze the morphology of NP clusters, providing quantitative information that can be used to elucidate the physical mechanisms governing NP assembly.The ability to characterize higher-order structures formed by nanoparticle (NP) assembly is critical for predicting and engineering the properties of advanced nanocomposite materials. Here we develop a quantitative image analysis software to characterize key structural properties of NP clusters from experimental images of nanocomposites. This analysis can be carried out on images captured at intermittent times during assembly to monitor the time evolution of NP clusters in a highly automated

  15. Forecasting Antarctic Sea Ice Concentrations Using Results of Temporal Mixture Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Junhwa; Kim, Hyun-Cheol

    2016-06-01

    Sea ice concentration (SIC) data acquired by passive microwave sensors at daily temporal frequencies over extended areas provide seasonal characteristics of sea ice dynamics and play a key role as an indicator of global climate trends; however, it is typically challenging to study long-term time series. Of the various advanced remote sensing techniques that address this issue, temporal mixture analysis (TMA) methods are often used to investigate the temporal characteristics of environmental factors, including SICs in the case of the present study. This study aims to forecast daily SICs for one year using a combination of TMA and time series modeling in two stages. First, we identify temporally meaningful sea ice signatures, referred to as temporal endmembers, using machine learning algorithms, and then we decompose each pixel into a linear combination of temporal endmembers. Using these corresponding fractional abundances of endmembers, we apply a autoregressive model that generally fits all Antarctic SIC data for 1979 to 2013 to forecast SIC values for 2014. We compare our results using the proposed approach based on daily SIC data reconstructed from real fractional abundances derived from a pixel unmixing method and temporal endmember signatures. The proposed method successfully forecasts new fractional abundance values, and the resulting images are qualitatively and quantitatively similar to the reference data.

  16. Materials characterization through quantitative digital image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    J. Philliber; B. Antoun; B. Somerday; N. Yang

    2000-07-01

    A digital image analysis system has been developed to allow advanced quantitative measurement of microstructural features. This capability is maintained as part of the microscopy facility at Sandia, Livermore. The system records images digitally, eliminating the use of film. Images obtained from other sources may also be imported into the system. Subsequent digital image processing enhances image appearance through the contrast and brightness adjustments. The system measures a variety of user-defined microstructural features--including area fraction, particle size and spatial distributions, grain sizes and orientations of elongated particles. These measurements are made in a semi-automatic mode through the use of macro programs and a computer controlled translation stage. A routine has been developed to create large montages of 50+ separate images. Individual image frames are matched to the nearest pixel to create seamless montages. Results from three different studies are presented to illustrate the capabilities of the system.

  17. Near Real Time Quantitative Gas Analysis Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herget, William F.; Tromp, Marianne L.; Anderson, Charles R.

    1985-12-01

    A Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) - based system has been developed and is undergoing evaluation for near real time multicomponent quantitative analysis of undiluted gaseous automotive exhaust emissions. The total system includes: (1) a gas conditioning system (GCS) for tracer gas injection, gas mixing, and temperature stabilization; and (2) an exhaust gas analyzer (EGA) consisting of a sample cell, an FT-IR system, and a computerized data processing system. Tests have shown that the system can monitor about 20 individual species (concentrations down to the 1-20 ppm range) with a time resolution of one second. Tests have been conducted on a chassis dynamometer system utilizing different autos, different fuels, and different driving cycles. Results were compared with those obtained using a standard constant volume sampling (CVS) system.

  18. Nonlinear dynamics and quantitative EEG analysis.

    PubMed

    Jansen, B H

    1996-01-01

    Quantitative, computerized electroencephalogram (EEG) analysis appears to be based on a phenomenological approach to EEG interpretation, and is primarily rooted in linear systems theory. A fundamentally different approach to computerized EEG analysis, however, is making its way into the laboratories. The basic idea, inspired by recent advances in the area of nonlinear dynamics and chaos theory, is to view an EEG as the output of a deterministic system of relatively simple complexity, but containing nonlinearities. This suggests that studying the geometrical dynamics of EEGs, and the development of neurophysiologically realistic models of EEG generation may produce more successful automated EEG analysis techniques than the classical, stochastic methods. A review of the fundamentals of chaos theory is provided. Evidence supporting the nonlinear dynamics paradigm to EEG interpretation is presented, and the kind of new information that can be extracted from the EEG is discussed. A case is made that a nonlinear dynamic systems viewpoint to EEG generation will profoundly affect the way EEG interpretation is currently done.

  19. Analysis of brain patterns using temporal measures

    DOEpatents

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos

    2015-08-11

    A set of brain data representing a time series of neurophysiologic activity acquired by spatially distributed sensors arranged to detect neural signaling of a brain (such as by the use of magnetoencephalography) is obtained. The set of brain data is processed to obtain a dynamic brain model based on a set of statistically-independent temporal measures, such as partial cross correlations, among groupings of different time series within the set of brain data. The dynamic brain model represents interactions between neural populations of the brain occurring close in time, such as with zero lag, for example. The dynamic brain model can be analyzed to obtain the neurophysiologic assessment of the brain. Data processing techniques may be used to assess structural or neurochemical brain pathologies.

  20. Combining qualitative and quantitative spatial and temporal information in a hierarchical structure: Approximate reasoning for plan execution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoebel, Louis J.

    1993-01-01

    The problem of plan generation (PG) and the problem of plan execution monitoring (PEM), including updating, queries, and resource-bounded replanning, have different reasoning and representation requirements. PEM requires the integration of qualitative and quantitative information. PEM is the receiving of data about the world in which a plan or agent is executing. The problem is to quickly determine the relevance of the data, the consistency of the data with respect to the expected effects, and if execution should continue. Only spatial and temporal aspects of the plan are addressed for relevance in this work. Current temporal reasoning systems are deficient in computational aspects or expressiveness. This work presents a hybrid qualitative and quantitative system that is fully expressive in its assertion language while offering certain computational efficiencies. In order to proceed, methods incorporating approximate reasoning using hierarchies, notions of locality, constraint expansion, and absolute parameters need be used and are shown to be useful for the anytime nature of PEM.

  1. Applying temporal network analysis to the venture capital market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin; Feng, Ling; Zhu, Rongqian; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Using complex network theory to study the investment relationships of venture capital firms has produced a number of significant results. However, previous studies have often neglected the temporal properties of those relationships, which in real-world scenarios play a pivotal role. Here we examine the time-evolving dynamics of venture capital investment in China by constructing temporal networks to represent (i) investment relationships between venture capital firms and portfolio companies and (ii) the syndication ties between venture capital investors. The evolution of the networks exhibits rich variations in centrality, connectivity and local topology. We demonstrate that a temporal network approach provides a dynamic and comprehensive analysis of real-world networks.

  2. Quantitative analysis of protein turnover in plants.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Clark J; Li, Lei; Millar, A Harvey

    2014-03-01

    Proteins are constantly being synthesised and degraded as plant cells age and as plants grow, develop and adapt the proteome. Given that plants develop through a series of events from germination to fruiting and even undertake whole organ senescence, an understanding of protein turnover as a fundamental part of this process in plants is essential. Both synthesis and degradation processes are spatially separated in a cell across its compartmented structure. The majority of protein synthesis occurs in the cytosol, while synthesis of specific components occurs inside plastids and mitochondria. Degradation of proteins occurs in both the cytosol, through the action of the plant proteasome, and in organelles and lytic structures through different protease classes. Tracking the specific synthesis and degradation rate of individual proteins can be undertaken using stable isotope feeding and the ability of peptide MS to track labelled peptide fractions over time. Mathematical modelling can be used to follow the isotope signature of newly synthesised protein as it accumulates and natural abundance proteins as they are lost through degradation. Different technical and biological constraints govern the potential for the use of (13)C, (15)N, (2)H and (18)O for these experiments in complete labelling and partial labelling strategies. Future development of quantitative protein turnover analysis will involve analysis of protein populations in complexes and subcellular compartments, assessing the effect of PTMs and integrating turnover studies into wider system biology study of plants.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Triple Mutant Genetic Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E.; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E.; Krogan, Nevan J.

    2014-01-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven effective for characterizing cellular functions but can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed Triple Mutant Analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, that is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principle actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete, and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1536 single mutants. PMID:25010907

  4. Network Analysis Using Spatio-Temporal Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, Gisele H. B.; Machicao, Jeaneth; Bruno, Odemir M.

    2016-08-01

    Different network models have been proposed along the last years inspired by real-world topologies. The characterization of these models implies the understanding of the underlying network phenomena, which accounts structural and dynamic properties. Several mathematical tools can be employed to characterize such properties as Cellular Automata (CA), which can be defined as dynamical systems of discrete nature composed by spatially distributed units governed by deterministic rules. In this paper, we proposed a method based on the modeling of one specific CA over distinct network topologies in order to perform the classification of the network model. The proposed methodology consists in the modeling of a binary totalistic CA over a network. The transition function that governs each CA cell is based on the density of living neighbors. Secondly, the distribution of the Shannon entropy is obtained from the evolved spatio-temporal pattern of the referred CA and used as a network descriptor. The experiments were performed using a dataset composed of four different types of networks: random, small-world, scale-free and geographical. We also used cross-validation for training purposes. We evaluated the accuracy of classification as a function of the initial number of living neighbors, and, also, as a function of a threshold parameter related to the density of living neighbors. The results show high accuracy values in distinguishing among the network models which demonstrates the feasibility of the proposed method.

  5. Using repeated sources to quantitatively determine temporal change of medium properties: Theory and an example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Hui; Wen, Lianxing

    2012-09-01

    We develop a theory of using difference wavefields of repeated sources to locate and quantify temporal medium change and apply the theory to locate temporal change of seismic properties beneath the Japan subduction zone using repeated earthquakes. Our theory states the difference wavefields of two repeated sources in a temporally changed medium can be equivalently treated as wavefields propagating from conceptual sources, with their location at the place of temporal change and their strengths equal to the product of magnitude of medium property change and magnitude of the initial wavefields from the repeated sources. When the medium change extends to a finite region, the conceptual sources become volumetric sources distributed over the region of the medium change and propagating in the direction of the initial wave. The conceptualization establishes a theoretical framework for possible applications of using difference wavefields to locate and quantify temporal medium changes in geological sciences, ultrasonic experiments, civil engineering and medical imaging. We search repeating earthquakes occurring in the Japan subduction zone, formulate an empirical procedure to extract the difference wavefields between repeating earthquakes and determine temporal change of seismic properties using a back-projection method. We locate the temporal change of seismic properties beneath the Japan subduction zone to be at (37.2°N, 142°E), and estimate the magnitude of the conceptual body force associated with the temporal change to be 1.15 × 1010N, or as a reference, a 0.87% density change for an assumed volume of temporal change of 103 km3.

  6. Applying Knowledge of Quantitative Design and Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskas, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    This study compared and contrasted two quantitative scholarly articles in relation to their research designs. Their designs were analyzed by the comparison of research references and research specific vocabulary to describe how various research methods were used. When researching and analyzing quantitative scholarly articles, it is imperative to…

  7. A spatial-temporal covariance model for rainfall analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Shu, Hong; Xu, Zhengquan

    2009-10-01

    Many environmental phenomena are regarded as realizations of random functions which possess both spatial and temporal characteristics. In particular, Geostatistics with an extension of the existing spatial techniques into the space-time domain offers some kinds of methods to model such processes. Although these methods for the analysis of spatial-temporal data are becoming more important for many areas of application, they are less developed than those for the analysis of purely spatial or purely temporal data. In this paper, two kinds of spatial-temporal stationary covariance models are introduced. And the differences between spatial domain and time domain are examined. A product-sum covariance model originally given by De Cesare is extended for spatial-temporal analysis on daily rainfall measurements in the three provinces of Northeast China. Remarkably, this generalized non-separable model does not correspond to the use of a metric one in space-time. The rainfall measurements used for this experiment are taken at 104 monitoring stations from January 2000 to December 2005. In the experiment, the product-sum variogram model is employed for developing ordinary kriging and its application to interpolation of the monthly rainfall data from January 2000 to December 2004 has been used to predict the monthly rainfall of 2005. The true values and the predicted ones are compared. The experimental results have shown that this product-sum covariance model is very effective for rainfall analysis.

  8. Quantitative and temporal definition of the Mla transcriptional regulon during barley-powdery mildew interactions.

    PubMed

    Moscou, Matthew J; Lauter, Nick; Caldo, Rico A; Nettleton, Dan; Wise, Roger P

    2011-06-01

    Barley Mildew resistance locus a (Mla) is a major determinant of immunity to the powdery mildew pathogen, Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Alleles of Mla encode cytoplasmic- and membrane-localized coiled-coil, nucleotide binding site, leucine-rich repeat proteins that mediate resistance when complementary avirulence effectors (AVR(a)) are present in the pathogen. Presence of an appropriate AVR(a) protein triggers nuclear relocalization of MLA, in which MLA binds repressing host transcription factors. Timecourse expression profiles of plants harboring Mla1, Mla6, and Mla12 wild-type alleles versus paired loss-of-function mutants were compared to discover conserved transcriptional targets of MLA and downstream signaling cascades. Pathogen-dependent gene expression was equivalent or stronger in susceptible plants at 20 h after inoculation (HAI) and was attenuated at later timepoints, whereas resistant plants exhibited a time-dependent strengthening of the transcriptional response, increasing in both fold change and the number of genes differentially expressed. Deregulation at 20 HAI implicated 16 HAI as a crucial point in determining the future trajectory of this interaction and was interrogated by quantitative analysis. In total, 28 potential transcriptional targets of the MLA regulon were identified. These candidate targets possess a diverse set of predicted functions, suggesting that multiple pathways are required to mediate the hypersensitive reaction.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of Hypoperfusion in Acute Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Nael, Kambiz; Meshksar, Arash; Liebeskind, David S.; Coull, Bruce M.; Krupinski, Elizabeth A.; Villablanca, J. Pablo

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose This study compares the concordance between arterial spin labeling (ASL) and dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) for the identification of regional hypoperfusion and diffusion-perfusion mismatch tissue classification using a quantitative method. Methods The inclusion criteria for this retrospective study were as follows: patients with acute ischemic syndrome with symptom onset <24 hours and acquisition of both ASL and DSC MR perfusion. The volumes of infarction and hypoperfused lesions were calculated on ASL and DSC multi-parametric maps. Patients were classified into reperfused, matched, or mismatch groups using time to maximum >6 sec as the reference. In a subset of patients who were successfully recanalized, the identical analysis was performed and the infarction and hypoperfused lesion volumes were used for paired pre- and posttreatment comparisons. Results Forty-one patients met our inclusion criteria. Twenty patients underwent successful endovascular revascularization (TICI>2a), resulting in a total of 61 ASL-DSC data pairs for comparison. The hypoperfusion volume on ASL-cerebral blood flow best approximated the DSC-time to peak volume (r=0.83) in pretreatment group and time to maximum (r=0.46) after recanalization. Both ASL-cerebral blood flow and DSC-TTP overestimated the hypoperfusion volume compared with time to maximum volume in pretreatment (F=27.41, P<0.0001) and recanalized patients (F=8.78, P<0.0001). Conclusions ASL-cerebral blood flow overestimates the DSC time to maximum hypoperfusion volume and mismatch classification in patients with acute ischemic syndrome. Continued overestimation of hypoperfused volume after recanalization suggests flow pattern and velocity changes in addition to arterial transit delay can affects the performance of ASL. PMID:23988646

  10. Quantitative Auger analysis of Nb-Ge superconducting alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Buitrago, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of using Auger electron analysis for quantitative analysis was investigated by studying Nb/sub 3/Ge thin-film Auger data with different approaches. A method base on elemental standards gave consistent quantitative values with reported Nb-Ge data. Alloy sputter yields were also calculated and results were consistent with those for pure elements.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Radar Returns from Insects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, J. R.

    1979-01-01

    When a number of flying insects is low enough to permit their resolution as individual radar targets, quantitative estimates of their aerial density are developed. Accurate measurements of heading distribution using a rotating polarization radar to enhance the wingbeat frequency method of identification are presented.

  12. Some Epistemological Considerations Concerning Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrescu, Emilian

    2008-01-01

    This article presents the author's address at the 2007 "Journal of Applied Quantitative Methods" ("JAQM") prize awarding festivity. The festivity was included in the opening of the 4th International Conference on Applied Statistics, November 22, 2008, Bucharest, Romania. In the address, the author reflects on three theses that…

  13. Quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra with principal components analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, P. E.; Smith, M. O.; Adams, J. B.

    1985-01-01

    A technique is presented for quantitative analysis of planetary reflectance spectra as mixtures of particles on microscopic and macroscopic scales using principal components analysis. This technique allows for determination of the endmembers being mixed, their abundance, and the scale of mixing, as well as other physical parameters. Eighteen lunar telescopic reflectance spectra of the Copernicus crater region, from 600 nm to 1800 nm in wavelength, are modeled in terms of five likely endmembers: mare basalt, mature mare soil, anorthosite, mature highland soil, and clinopyroxene. These endmembers were chosen from a similar analysis of 92 lunar soil and rock samples. The models fit the data to within 2 percent rms. It is found that the goodness of fit is marginally better for intimate mixing over macroscopic mixing.

  14. Effect of improving spatial or temporal resolution on image quality and quantitative perfusion assessment with k-t SENSE acceleration in first-pass CMR myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Maredia, Neil; Radjenovic, Aleksandra; Kozerke, Sebastian; Larghat, Abdulghani; Greenwood, John P; Plein, Sven

    2010-12-01

    k-t Sensitivity-encoded (k-t SENSE) acceleration has been used to improve spatial resolution, temporal resolution, and slice coverage in first-pass cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion imaging. This study compares the effect of investing the speed-up afforded by k-t SENSE acceleration in spatial or temporal resolution. Ten healthy volunteers underwent adenosine stress myocardial perfusion imaging using four saturation-recovery gradient echo perfusion sequences: a reference sequence accelerated by sensitivity encoding (SENSE), and three k-t SENSE-accelerated sequences with higher spatial resolution ("k-t High"), shorter acquisition window ("k-t Fast"), or a shared increase in both parameters ("k-t Hybrid") relative to the reference. Dark-rim artifacts and image quality were analyzed. Semiquantitative myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI) and Fermi-derived quantitative MPR were also calculated. The k-t Hybrid sequence produced highest image quality scores at rest (P = 0.015). Rim artifact thickness and extent were lowest using k-t High and k-t Hybrid sequences (P < 0.001). There were no significant differences in MPRI and MPR values derived by each sequence. Maximizing spatial resolution by k-t SENSE acceleration produces the greatest reduction in dark rim artifact. There is good agreement between k-t SENSE and standard acquisition methods for semiquantitative and fully quantitative myocardial perfusion analysis.

  15. Effective and efficient analysis of spatio-temporal data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongnan

    Spatio-temporal data mining, i.e., mining knowledge from large amount of spatio-temporal data, is a highly demanding field because huge amounts of spatio-temporal data have been collected in various applications, ranging from remote sensing, to geographical information systems (GIS), computer cartography, environmental assessment and planning, etc. The collection data far exceeded human's ability to analyze which make it crucial to develop analysis tools. Recent studies on data mining have extended to the scope of data mining from relational and transactional datasets to spatial and temporal datasets. Among the various forms of spatio-temporal data, remote sensing images play an important role, due to the growing wide-spreading of outer space satellites. In this dissertation, we proposed two approaches to analyze the remote sensing data. The first one is about applying association rules mining onto images processing. Each image was divided into a number of image blocks. We built a spatial relationship for these blocks during the dividing process. This made a large number of images into a spatio-temporal dataset since each image was shot in time-series. The second one implemented co-occurrence patterns discovery from these images. The generated patterns represent subsets of spatial features that are located together in space and time. A weather analysis is composed of individual analysis of several meteorological variables. These variables include temperature, pressure, dew point, wind, clouds, visibility and so on. Local-scale models provide detailed analysis and forecasts of meteorological phenomena ranging from a few kilometers to about 100 kilometers in size. When some of above meteorological variables have some special change tendency, some kind of severe weather will happen in most cases. Using the discovery of association rules, we found that some special meteorological variables' changing has tight relation with some severe weather situation that will happen

  16. Quantitative analysis of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) for brain disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Seung; Im, In-Chul; Kang, Su-Man; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Kwak, Byung-Joon

    2013-07-01

    This study aimed to quantitatively analyze data from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) in patients with brain disorders and to assess its potential utility for analyzing brain function. DTI was obtained by performing 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging for patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD), and the data were analyzed using Matlab-based SPM software. The two-sample t-test was used for error analysis of the location of the activated pixels. We compared regions of white matter where the fractional anisotropy (FA) values were low and the apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) were increased. In the AD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right sub-lobar insula, and right occipital lingual gyrus whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the right inferior frontal gyrus and right middle frontal gyrus. In the VD group, the FA values were low in the right superior temporal gyrus, right inferior temporal gyrus, right limbic cingulate gyrus, and right sub-lobar caudate tail whereas the ADCs were significantly increased in the left lateral globus pallidus and left medial globus pallidus. In conclusion by using DTI and SPM analysis, we were able to not only determine the structural state of the regions affected by brain disorders but also quantitatively analyze and assess brain function.

  17. Advancing sensitivity analysis to precisely characterize temporal parameter dominance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guse, Björn; Pfannerstill, Matthias; Strauch, Michael; Reusser, Dominik; Lüdtke, Stefan; Volk, Martin; Gupta, Hoshin; Fohrer, Nicola

    2016-04-01

    Parameter sensitivity analysis is a strategy for detecting dominant model parameters. A temporal sensitivity analysis calculates daily sensitivities of model parameters. This allows a precise characterization of temporal patterns of parameter dominance and an identification of the related discharge conditions. To achieve this goal, the diagnostic information as derived from the temporal parameter sensitivity is advanced by including discharge information in three steps. In a first step, the temporal dynamics are analyzed by means of daily time series of parameter sensitivities. As sensitivity analysis method, we used the Fourier Amplitude Sensitivity Test (FAST) applied directly onto the modelled discharge. Next, the daily sensitivities are analyzed in combination with the flow duration curve (FDC). Through this step, we determine whether high sensitivities of model parameters are related to specific discharges. Finally, parameter sensitivities are separately analyzed for five segments of the FDC and presented as monthly averaged sensitivities. In this way, seasonal patterns of dominant model parameter are provided for each FDC segment. For this methodical approach, we used two contrasting catchments (upland and lowland catchment) to illustrate how parameter dominances change seasonally in different catchments. For all of the FDC segments, the groundwater parameters are dominant in the lowland catchment, while in the upland catchment the controlling parameters change seasonally between parameters from different runoff components. The three methodical steps lead to clear temporal patterns, which represent the typical characteristics of the study catchments. Our methodical approach thus provides a clear idea of how the hydrological dynamics are controlled by model parameters for certain discharge magnitudes during the year. Overall, these three methodical steps precisely characterize model parameters and improve the understanding of process dynamics in hydrological

  18. Temporal quantitation of mutant Kit tyrosine kinase signaling attenuated by a novel thiophene kinase inhibitor OSI-930.

    PubMed

    Petti, Filippo; Thelemann, April; Kahler, Jen; McCormack, Siobhan; Castaldo, Linda; Hunt, Tony; Nuwaysir, Lydia; Zeiske, Lynn; Haack, Herbert; Sullivan, Laura; Garton, Andrew; Haley, John D

    2005-08-01

    OSI-930, a potent thiophene inhibitor of the Kit, KDR, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor tyrosine kinases, was used to selectively inhibit tyrosine phosphorylation downstream of juxtamembrane mutant Kit in the mast cell leukemia line HMC-1. Inhibition of Kit kinase activity resulted in a rapid dephosphorylation of Kit and inhibition of the downstream signaling pathways. Attenuation of Ras-Raf-Erk (phospho-Erk, phospho-p38), phosphatidyl inositol-3' kinase (phospho-p85, phospho-Akt, phospho-S6), and signal transducers and activators of transcription signaling pathways (phospho-STAT3/5/6) were measured by affinity liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, by immunoblot, and by tissue microarrays of fixed cell pellets. To more globally define additional components of Kit signaling temporally altered by kinase inhibition, a novel multiplex quantitative isobaric peptide labeling approach was used. This approach allowed clustering of proteins by temporal expression patterns. Kit kinase, which dephosphorylates rapidly upon kinase inhibition, was shown to regulate both Shp-1 and BDP-1 tyrosine phosphatases and the phosphatase-interacting protein PSTPIP2. Interactions with SH2 domain adapters [growth factor receptor binding protein 2 (Grb2), Cbl, Slp-76] and SH3 domain adapters (HS1, cortactin, CD2BP3) were attenuated by inhibition of Kit kinase activity. Functional crosstalk between Kit and the non-receptor tyrosine kinases Fes/Fps, Fer, Btk, and Syk was observed. Inhibition of Kit modulated phosphorylation-dependent interactions with pathways controlling focal adhesion (paxillin, leupaxin, p130CAS, FAK1, the Src family kinase Lyn, Wasp, Fhl-3, G25K, Ack-1, Nap1, SH3P12/ponsin) and septin-actin complexes (NEDD5, cdc11, actin). The combined use of isobaric protein quantitation and expression clustering, immunoblot, and tissue microarray strategies allowed temporal measurement signaling pathways modulated by mutant Kit inhibition in a model of mast cell

  19. Investigation of Portevin-Le Chatelier band with temporal phase analysis of speckle interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhenyu; Zhang, Qingchuan; Wu, Xiaoping

    2003-04-01

    A new method combining temporal phase analysis with dynamic digital speckle pattern interferometry is proposed to study Portevin-Le Chatelier effect quantitatively. The principle bases on that the phase difference of interference speckle patterns is a time-dependent function related to the object deformation. The interference speckle patterns of specimen are recorded with high sampling rate while PLC effect occurs, and the 2D displacement map of PLC band and its width are obtained by analyzing the displacement of specimen with proposed method.

  20. Proxy-to-proxy calibration: increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions.

    PubMed

    von Gunten, Lucien; D'Andrea, William J; Bradley, Raymond S; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions are often restricted by the difficulties of sampling geologic archives in great detail and the analytical costs of processing large numbers of samples. Using sediments from Lake Braya Sø, Greenland, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative high-resolution paleoclimate record by combining measurements of the alkenone unsaturation index (U37(K)) with non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the visible range (VIS-RS). The proxy-to-proxy (PTP) method exploits two distinct calibrations: the in situ calibration of U37(K) to lake water temperature and the calibration of scanning VIS-RS data to down core U37(K) data. Using this approach, we produced a quantitative temperature record that is longer and has 5 times higher sampling resolution than the original U37(K) time series, thereby allowing detection of temperature variability in frequency bands characteristic of the AMO over the past 7,000 years.

  1. Proxy-to-proxy calibration: Increasing the temporal resolution of quantitative climate reconstructions

    PubMed Central

    von Gunten, Lucien; D'Andrea, William J.; Bradley, Raymond S.; Huang, Yongsong

    2012-01-01

    High-resolution paleoclimate reconstructions are often restricted by the difficulties of sampling geologic archives in great detail and the analytical costs of processing large numbers of samples. Using sediments from Lake Braya Sø, Greenland, we introduce a new method that provides a quantitative high-resolution paleoclimate record by combining measurements of the alkenone unsaturation index () with non-destructive scanning reflectance spectroscopic measurements in the visible range (VIS-RS). The proxy-to-proxy (PTP) method exploits two distinct calibrations: the in situ calibration of to lake water temperature and the calibration of scanning VIS-RS data to down core data. Using this approach, we produced a quantitative temperature record that is longer and has 5 times higher sampling resolution than the original time series, thereby allowing detection of temperature variability in frequency bands characteristic of the AMO over the past 7,000 years. PMID:22934132

  2. Quantitative imaging with Fucci and mathematics to uncover temporal dynamics of cell cycle progression.

    PubMed

    Saitou, Takashi; Imamura, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Cell cycle progression is strictly coordinated to ensure proper tissue growth, development, and regeneration of multicellular organisms. Spatiotemporal visualization of cell cycle phases directly helps us to obtain a deeper understanding of controlled, multicellular, cell cycle progression. The fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell cycle indicator (Fucci) system allows us to monitor, in living cells, the G1 and the S/G2/M phases of the cell cycle in red and green fluorescent colors, respectively. Since the discovery of Fucci technology, it has found numerous applications in the characterization of the timing of cell cycle phase transitions under diverse conditions and various biological processes. However, due to the complexity of cell cycle dynamics, understanding of specific patterns of cell cycle progression is still far from complete. In order to tackle this issue, quantitative approaches combined with mathematical modeling seem to be essential. Here, we review several studies that attempted to integrate Fucci technology and mathematical models to obtain quantitative information regarding cell cycle regulatory patterns. Focusing on the technological development of utilizing mathematics to retrieve meaningful information from the Fucci producing data, we discuss how the combined methods advance a quantitative understanding of cell cycle regulation.

  3. Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis Short Course. Introduction to X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectrometry and Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, Paul; Curreri, Peter A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This course will cover practical applications of the energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS) to x-ray microanalysis. Topics covered will include detector technology, advances in pulse processing, resolution and performance monitoring, detector modeling, peak deconvolution and fitting, qualitative and quantitative analysis, compositional mapping, and standards. An emphasis will be placed on use of the EDS for quantitative analysis, with discussion of typical problems encountered in the analysis of a wide range of materials and sample geometries.

  4. Local Spatio-Temporal Analysis in Vision Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-31

    evaluation, purchase and installation of a MasPar parallel computer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 30 •ic QuaLlY INSPECTED 3 16. PRICE CODE 17...called "energy" models of spatio-temporal v!ion), and also in engineering analysis of digitized images (viz: the Fast Fourier Transform , which decomposes...nonstationary image data, and (when coupled with multiband/ wavelet decompositions) for the computation of symbolic descriptions of space-varying

  5. Structural and quantitative analysis of Equisetum alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Luise; Ernst, Ludger; Lubienski, Marcus; Papke, Uli; Schiebel, Hans-Martin; Jerz, Gerold; Beuerle, Till

    2015-08-01

    Equisetum palustre L. is known for its toxicity for livestock. Several studies in the past addressed the isolation and identification of the responsible alkaloids. So far, palustrine (1) and N(5)-formylpalustrine (2) are known alkaloids of E. palustre. A HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method in combination with simple sample work-up was developed to identify and quantitate Equisetum alkaloids. Besides the two known alkaloids six related alkaloids were detected in different Equisetum samples. The structure of the alkaloid palustridiene (3) was derived by comprehensive 1D and 2D NMR experiments. N(5)-Acetylpalustrine (4) was also thoroughly characterized by NMR for the first time. The structure of N(5)-formylpalustridiene (5) is proposed based on mass spectrometry results. Twenty-two E. palustre samples were screened by a HPLC-ESI-MS/MS method after development of a simple sample work-up and in most cases the set of all eight alkaloids were detected in all parts of the plant. A high variability of the alkaloid content and distribution was found depending on plant organ, plant origin and season ranging from 88 to 597mg/kg dried weight. However, palustrine (1) and the alkaloid palustridiene (3) always represented the main alkaloids. For the first time, a comprehensive identification, quantitation and distribution of Equisetum alkaloids was achieved.

  6. Pharmacoproteomic study of the natural product Ebenfuran III in DU-145 prostate cancer cells: the quantitative and temporal interrogation of chemically induced cell death at the protein level.

    PubMed

    Roumeliotis, Theodoros I; Halabalaki, Maria; Alexi, Xanthippi; Ankrett, Dyan; Giannopoulou, Eugenia G; Skaltsounis, Alexios-Leandros; Sayan, Berna S; Alexis, Michael N; Townsend, Paul A; Garbis, Spiros D

    2013-04-05

    A naturally occurring benzofuran derivative, Ebenfuran III (Eb III), was investigated for its antiproliferative effects using the DU-145 prostate cell line. Eb III was isolated from Onobrychis ebenoides of the Leguminosae family, a plant endemic in Central and Southern Greece. We have previously reported that Eb III exerts significant cytotoxic effects on certain cancer cell lines. This effect is thought to occur via the isoprenyl moiety at the C-5 position of the molecule. The study aim was to gain a deeper understanding of the pharmacological effect of Eb III on DU-145 cell death at the translational level using a relative quantitative and temporal proteomics approach. Proteins extracted from the cell pellets were subjected to solution phase trypsin proteolysis followed by iTRAQ-labeling. The labeled tryptic peptide extracts were then fractionated using strong cation exchange chromatography and the fractions were analyzed by nanoflow reverse phase ultraperformance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry analysis using a hybrid QqTOF platform. Using this approach, we compared the expression levels of 1360 proteins analyzed at ≤ 1% global protein false discovery rate (FDR), commonly present in untreated (control, vehicle only) and Eb III-treated cells at the different exposure time points. Through the iterative use of Ingenuity Pathway Analysis with hierarchical clustering of protein expression patterns, followed by bibliographic research, the temporal regulation of the Calpain-1, ERK2, PAR-4, RAB-7, and Bap31 proteins were identified as potential nodes of multipathway convergence to Eb III induced DU-145 cell death. These proteins were further verified with Western blot analysis. This gel-free, quantitative 2DLC-MS/MS proteomics method effectively captured novel modulated proteins in the DU-145 cell line as a response to Eb III treatment. This approach also provided greater insight to the multifocal and combinatorial signaling

  7. Joint association analysis of bivariate quantitative and qualitative traits.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Mengdie; Diao, Guoqing

    2011-11-29

    Univariate genome-wide association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits has been investigated extensively in the literature. In the presence of correlated phenotypes, it is more intuitive to analyze all phenotypes simultaneously. We describe an efficient likelihood-based approach for the joint association analysis of quantitative and qualitative traits in unrelated individuals. We assume a probit model for the qualitative trait, under which an unobserved latent variable and a prespecified threshold determine the value of the qualitative trait. To jointly model the quantitative and qualitative traits, we assume that the quantitative trait and the latent variable follow a bivariate normal distribution. The latent variable is allowed to be correlated with the quantitative phenotype. Simultaneous modeling of the quantitative and qualitative traits allows us to make more precise inference on the pleiotropic genetic effects. We derive likelihood ratio tests for the testing of genetic effects. An application to the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 data is provided. The new method yields reasonable power and meaningful results for the joint association analysis of the quantitative trait Q1 and the qualitative trait disease status at SNPs with not too small MAF.

  8. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of endocytic recycling.

    PubMed

    Reineke, James B; Xie, Shuwei; Naslavsky, Naava; Caplan, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Endocytosis, which encompasses the internalization and sorting of plasma membrane (PM) lipids and proteins to distinct membrane-bound intracellular compartments, is a highly regulated and fundamental cellular process by which eukaryotic cells dynamically regulate their PM composition. Indeed, endocytosis is implicated in crucial cellular processes that include proliferation, migration, and cell division as well as maintenance of tissue homeostasis such as apical-basal polarity. Once PM constituents have been taken up into the cell, either via clathrin-dependent endocytosis (CDE) or clathrin-independent endocytosis (CIE), they typically have two fates: degradation through the late-endosomal/lysosomal pathway or returning to the PM via endocytic recycling pathways. In this review, we will detail experimental procedures that allow for both qualitative and quantitative assessment of endocytic recycling of transmembrane proteins internalized by CDE and CIE, using the HeLa cervical cancer cell line as a model system.

  9. Quantitative infrared analysis of hydrogen fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Manuta, D.M.

    1997-04-01

    This work was performed at the Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant where hydrogen fluoride is produced upon the hydrolysis of UF{sub 6}. This poses a problem for in this setting and a method for determining the mole percent concentration was desired. HF has been considered to be a non-ideal gas for many years. D. F. Smith utilized complex equations in his HF studies in the 1950s. We have evaluated HF behavior as a function of pressure from three different perspectives. (1) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of pressure for 100% HF. (2) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} as a function of increasing partial pressure HF. Total pressure = 300 mm HgA maintained with nitrogen. (3) Absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} for constant partial pressure HF. Total pressure is increased to greater than 800 mm HgA with nitrogen. These experiments have shown that at partial pressures up to 35mm HgA, HIF follows the ideal gas law. The absorbance at 3877 cm{sup -1} can be quantitatively analyzed via infrared methods.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of HIV-1 Preintegration Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Engelman, Alan; Oztop, Ilker; Vandegraaff, Nick; Raghavendra, Nidhanapati K.

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral replication proceeds through the formation of a provirus, an integrated DNA copy of the viral RNA genome. The linear cDNA product of reverse transcription is the integration substrate and two different integrase activities, 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer, are required for provirus formation. Integrase nicks the cDNA ends adjacent to phylogenetically-conserved CA dinucleotides during 3′ processing. After nuclear entry and locating a suitable chromatin acceptor site, integrase joins the recessed 3′-OHs to the 5′-phosphates of a double-stranded staggered cut in the DNA target. Integrase functions in the context of a large nucleoprotein complex, called the preintegration complex (PIC), and PICs are analyzed to determine levels of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities that occur during acute virus infection. Denatured cDNA end regions are monitored by indirect end-labeling to measure the extent of 3′ processing. Native PICs can efficiently integrate their viral cDNA into exogenously added target DNA in vitro, and Southern blotting or nested PCR assays are used to quantify the resultant DNA strand transfer activity. This study details HIV-1 infection, PIC extraction, partial purification, and quantitative analyses of integrase 3′ processing and DNA strand transfer activities. PMID:19233280

  11. Quantitative multi-modal NDT data analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Heideklang, René; Shokouhi, Parisa

    2014-02-18

    A single NDT technique is often not adequate to provide assessments about the integrity of test objects with the required coverage or accuracy. In such situations, it is often resorted to multi-modal testing, where complementary and overlapping information from different NDT techniques are combined for a more comprehensive evaluation. Multi-modal material and defect characterization is an interesting task which involves several diverse fields of research, including signal and image processing, statistics and data mining. The fusion of different modalities may improve quantitative nondestructive evaluation by effectively exploiting the augmented set of multi-sensor information about the material. It is the redundant information in particular, whose quantification is expected to lead to increased reliability and robustness of the inspection results. There are different systematic approaches to data fusion, each with its specific advantages and drawbacks. In our contribution, these will be discussed in the context of nondestructive materials testing. A practical study adopting a high-level scheme for the fusion of Eddy Current, GMR and Thermography measurements on a reference metallic specimen with built-in grooves will be presented. Results show that fusion is able to outperform the best single sensor regarding detection specificity, while retaining the same level of sensitivity.

  12. Quantitative measurement of intracellular transport of nanocarriers by spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, S.; Pozzi, D.; Candeloro De Sanctis, S.; Digman, M. A.; Gratton, E.; Caracciolo, G.

    2013-03-01

    Spatio-temporal image correlation spectroscopy (STICS) is a powerful technique for assessing the nature of particle motion in complex systems although it has been rarely used to investigate the intracellular dynamics of nanocarriers so far. Here we introduce a method for characterizing the mode of motion of nanocarriers and for quantifying their transport parameters on different length scales from single-cell to subcellular level. Using this strategy we were able to study the mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transport of DOTAP-DOPC/DNA (DOTAP: 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane; DOPC: dioleoylphosphocholine) and DC-Chol-DOPE/DNA (DC-Chol: 3β-[N-(N,N-dimethylaminoethane)-carbamoyl] cholesterol; DOPE: dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine) lipoplexes in CHO-K1 (CHO: Chinese hamster ovary) live cells. Measurement of both diffusion coefficients and velocity vectors (magnitude and direction) averaged over regions of the cell revealed the presence of distinct modes of motion. Lipoplexes diffused slowly on the cell surface (diffusion coefficient: D ≈ 0.003 μm2 s-1). In the cytosol, the lipoplexes’ motion was characterized by active transport with average velocity v ≈ 0.03 μm2 s-1 and random motion. The method permitted us to generate an intracellular transport map showing several regions of concerted motion of lipoplexes.

  13. [When does post-ictal period start in temporal lobe epilepsy? A quantitative EEG perspective].

    PubMed

    Sanz-Garcia, A; Vega-Zelaya, L; Pastor, J; Sola, R G; Ortega, G J

    2017-04-16

    Introduccion. En las crisis parciales, el periodo postictal presenta grandes dificultades de caracterizacion, tanto desde el punto de vista clinico como en electroencefalografia. Un analisis espectral y de redes complejas permitiria una definicion mas precisa de sus limites y una comprension mas completa de las crisis. Pacientes y metodos. Se analizaron registros digitales de electroencefalografia de electrodos de scalp y foramen oval, 32 crisis, de 15 pacientes con epilepsia farmacorresistente del lobulo temporal (Engel I). Numericamente se estudio la entropia espectral, las distintas bandas de frecuencia y medidas de caracterizacion de la red cortical, la densidad de enlaces, la modularidad, el coeficiente de agrupamiento y la longitud de camino medio, y se cuantifico la variacion del periodo postictal respecto al preictal. Resultados. Durante el periodo postictal de las crisis complejas existe un marcado aumento de la densidad de enlaces en la red cortical coincidente con un descenso en la entropia espectral, principalmente debido al aumento de la actividad en la banda delta. Los valores extremos de estas medidas se alcanzan aproximadamente un minuto despues del fin de las crisis, definidas electroencefalograficamente usando metodos tradicionales. Conclusiones. Nuestros resultados pueden explicarse por la aparicion de un mecanismo de 'finalizacion' de las crisis que comienza dentro del periodo ictal definido clasicamente y que alcanzan su efecto maximo durante el periodo postictal. Estos resultados podrian emplearse para definir el inicio del periodo postictal como aquel donde la sincronizacion es maxima, esto es, donde la densidad de enlaces resulta mayor y la entropia espectral es minima.

  14. Study of Discussion Record Analysis Using Temporal Data Crystallization and Its Application to TV Scene Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-31

    Scene Analysis 2.1 Scene Detection by Word Clustering with TDC To read a huge discussion record and recognize arguments in them takes long...read. We detect key utterances by a co-occurrence analysis tool. This analysis is based on the idea of Word Clustering with Temporal Data...Crystallization (TDC). Word Clustering with Temporal Data Crystallization is performed as follows. Where the discussion record is considered to be a set of S1

  15. The quantitative failure of human reliability analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, C.T.

    1995-07-01

    This philosophical treatise argues the merits of Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) in the context of the nuclear power industry. Actually, the author attacks historic and current HRA as having failed in informing policy makers who make decisions based on risk that humans contribute to systems performance. He argues for an HRA based on Bayesian (fact-based) inferential statistics, which advocates a systems analysis process that employs cogent heuristics when using opinion, and tempers itself with a rational debate over the weight given subjective and empirical probabilities.

  16. Temporal MDS Plots for Analysis of Multivariate Data.

    PubMed

    Jäckle, Dominik; Fischer, Fabian; Schreck, Tobias; Keim, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Multivariate time series data can be found in many application domains. Examples include data from computer networks, healthcare, social networks, or financial markets. Often, patterns in such data evolve over time among multiple dimensions and are hard to detect. Dimensionality reduction methods such as PCA and MDS allow analysis and visualization of multivariate data, but per se do not provide means to explore multivariate patterns over time. We propose Temporal Multidimensional Scaling (TMDS), a novel visualization technique that computes temporal one-dimensional MDS plots for multivariate data which evolve over time. Using a sliding window approach, MDS is computed for each data window separately, and the results are plotted sequentially along the time axis, taking care of plot alignment. Our TMDS plots enable visual identification of patterns based on multidimensional similarity of the data evolving over time. We demonstrate the usefulness of our approach in the field of network security and show in two case studies how users can iteratively explore the data to identify previously unknown, temporally evolving patterns.

  17. Quantitive and Sociological Analysis of Blog Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachnik, W.; Szymczyk, S.; Leszczynski, S.; Podsiadlo, R.; Rymszewicz, E.; Kurylo, L.; Makowiec, D.; Bykowska, B.

    2005-10-01

    This paper examines the emerging phenomenon of blogging, using three different Polish blogging services as the base of the research. Authors show that blog networks are sharing their characteristics with complex networks (gamma coefficients, small worlds, cliques, etc.). Elements of sociometric analysis were used to prove existence of some social structures in the blog networks.

  18. Systems nanobiology: from quantitative single molecule biophysics to microfluidic-based single cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Martini, Joerg; Hellmich, Wibke; Greif, Dominik; Becker, Anke; Merkle, Thomas; Ros, Robert; Ros, Alexandra; Toensing, Katja; Anselmetti, Dario

    2007-01-01

    Detailed and quantitative information about structure-function relation, concentrations and interaction kinetics of biological molecules and subcellular components is a key prerequisite to understand and model cellular organisation and temporal dynamics. In systems nanobi-ology, cellular processes are quantitatively investigated at the sensitivity level of single molecules and cells. This approach provides direct access to biomolecular information without being statistically ensemble-averaged, their associated distribution functions, and possible subpopulations. Moreover at the single cell level, the interplay of regulated genomic information and proteomic variabilities can be investigated and attributed to functional peculiarities. These requirements necessitate the development of novel and ultrasensitive methods and instruments for single molecule detection, microscopy and spectroscopy for analysis without the need of amplification and preconcentration. In this chapter, we present three methodological applications that demonstrate how quantitative informations can be accessed that are representative for cellular processes or single cell analysis like gene expression regulation, intracellular protein translocation dynamics, and single cell protein fingerprinting. First, the interaction kinetics of transcriptionally regulated DNA-protein interaction can be quantitatively investigated with single molecule force spectroscopy allowing a molecular affinity ranking. Second, intracellular protein dynamics for a transcription regulator migrating form the nucleus to the cytoplasm can be quantitatively monitored by photoactivable GFP and two-photon laser scanning microscopy. And third, a microfluidic-based method for label-free single cell proteomics and fingerprinting and first label-free single cell electropherograms are presented which include the manipulation and steering of single cells in a microfluidic device.

  19. A Comparative Assessment of Greek Universities' Efficiency Using Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katharaki, Maria; Katharakis, George

    2010-01-01

    In part due to the increased demand for higher education, typical evaluation frameworks for universities often address the key issue of available resource utilisation. This study seeks to estimate the efficiency of 20 public universities in Greece through quantitative analysis (including performance indicators, data envelopment analysis (DEA) and…

  20. Influence of corrosion layers on quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denker, A.; Bohne, W.; Opitz-Coutureau, J.; Rauschenberg, J.; Röhrich, J.; Strub, E.

    2005-09-01

    Art historians and restorers in charge of ancient metal objects are often reluctant to remove the corrosion layer evolved over time, as this would change the appearance of the artefact dramatically. Therefore, when an elemental analysis of the objects is required, this has to be done by penetrating the corrosion layer. In this work the influence of corrosion was studied on Chinese and Roman coins, where removal of oxidized material was possible. Measurements on spots with and without corrosion are presented and the results discussed.

  1. Segmentation and Quantitative Analysis of Epithelial Tissues.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoit; Umetsu, Daiki; Eaton, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are tissues that regulate exchanges with the environment. They are very dynamic and can acquire virtually any shape; at the cellular level, they are composed of cells tightly connected by junctions. Most often epithelia are amenable to live imaging; however, the large number of cells composing an epithelium and the absence of informatics tools dedicated to epithelial analysis largely prevented tissue scale studies. Here we present Tissue Analyzer, a free tool that can be used to segment and analyze epithelial cells and monitor tissue dynamics.

  2. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2017-03-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Seismicity in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeesi, Mohammad; Zarifi, Zoya; Nilfouroushan, Faramarz; Boroujeni, Samar Amini; Tiampo, Kristy

    2016-12-01

    We use historical and recent major earthquakes and GPS geodetic data to compute seismic strain rate, geodetic slip deficit, static stress drop, the parameters of the magnitude-frequency distribution and geodetic strain rate in the Iranian Plateau to identify seismically mature fault segments and regions. Our analysis suggests that 11 fault segments are in the mature stage of the earthquake cycle, with the possibility of generating major earthquakes. These faults primarily are located in the north and the east of Iran. Four seismically mature regions in southern Iran with the potential for damaging strong earthquakes are also identified. We also delineate four additional fault segments in Iran that can generate major earthquakes without robust clues to their maturity.The most important fault segment in this study is the strike-slip system near the capital city of Tehran, with the potential to cause more than one million fatalities.

  4. Uncertainty of quantitative microbiological methods of pharmaceutical analysis.

    PubMed

    Gunar, O V; Sakhno, N G

    2015-12-30

    The total uncertainty of quantitative microbiological methods, used in pharmaceutical analysis, consists of several components. The analysis of the most important sources of the quantitative microbiological methods variability demonstrated no effect of culture media and plate-count techniques in the estimation of microbial count while the highly significant effect of other factors (type of microorganism, pharmaceutical product and individual reading and interpreting errors) was established. The most appropriate method of statistical analysis of such data was ANOVA which enabled not only the effect of individual factors to be estimated but also their interactions. Considering all the elements of uncertainty and combining them mathematically the combined relative uncertainty of the test results was estimated both for method of quantitative examination of non-sterile pharmaceuticals and microbial count technique without any product. These data did not exceed 35%, appropriated for a traditional plate count methods.

  5. An adaptive gyroscope-based algorithm for temporal gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Greene, Barry R; McGrath, Denise; O'Neill, Ross; O'Donovan, Karol J; Burns, Adrian; Caulfield, Brian

    2010-12-01

    Body-worn kinematic sensors have been widely proposed as the optimal solution for portable, low cost, ambulatory monitoring of gait. This study aims to evaluate an adaptive gyroscope-based algorithm for automated temporal gait analysis using body-worn wireless gyroscopes. Gyroscope data from nine healthy adult subjects performing four walks at four different speeds were then compared against data acquired simultaneously using two force plates and an optical motion capture system. Data from a poliomyelitis patient, exhibiting pathological gait walking with and without the aid of a crutch, were also compared to the force plate. Results show that the mean true error between the adaptive gyroscope algorithm and force plate was -4.5 ± 14.4 ms and 43.4 ± 6.0 ms for IC and TC points, respectively, in healthy subjects. Similarly, the mean true error when data from the polio patient were compared against the force plate was -75.61 ± 27.53 ms and 99.20 ± 46.00 ms for IC and TC points, respectively. A comparison of the present algorithm against temporal gait parameters derived from an optical motion analysis system showed good agreement for nine healthy subjects at four speeds. These results show that the algorithm reported here could constitute the basis of a robust, portable, low-cost system for ambulatory monitoring of gait.

  6. Quantitative flow cytometric analysis of membrane antigen expression.

    PubMed

    D'hautcourt, Jean-Luc

    2002-11-01

    Immunological analysis for cell antigens has been performed by flow cytometry in a qualitative fashion for over thirty years. During that time it has become increasingly apparent that quantitative measurements such as number of antigens per cell provide unique and useful information. This unit on quantitative flow cytometry (QFCM) describes the most commonly used protocols, both direct and indirect, and the major methods of analysis for the number of antibody binding sites on a cell or particle. Practical applications include detection of antigen under- or overexpression in hematological malignancies, distinguishing between B cell lymphoproliferative disorders, and precise diagnosis of certain rare diseases.

  7. Control of separation and quantitative analysis by GC-FTIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semmoud, A.; Huvenne, Jean P.; Legrand, P.

    1992-03-01

    Software for 3-D representations of the 'Absorbance-Wavenumber-Retention time' is used to control the quality of the GC separation. Spectral information given by the FTIR detection allows the user to be sure that a chromatographic peak is 'pure.' The analysis of peppermint essential oil is presented as an example. This assurance is absolutely required for quantitative applications. In these conditions, we have worked out a quantitative analysis of caffeine. Correlation coefficients between integrated absorbance measurements and concentration of caffeine are discussed at two steps of the data treatment.

  8. A quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Stacy A.; Dugan, Joanne B.; Patterson-Hine, Ann

    1993-01-01

    This paper presents an informal quantitative analysis of the F18 flight control system (FCS). The analysis technique combines a coverage model with a fault tree model. To demonstrate the method's extensive capabilities, we replace the fault tree with a digraph model of the F18 FCS, the only model available to us. The substitution shows that while digraphs have primarily been used for qualitative analysis, they can also be used for quantitative analysis. Based on our assumptions and the particular failure rates assigned to the F18 FCS components, we show that coverage does have a significant effect on the system's reliability and thus it is important to include coverage in the reliability analysis.

  9. Looking for complexity in quantitative semiology of frontal and temporal lobe seizures using neuroethology and graph theory.

    PubMed

    Bertti, Poliana; Tejada, Julian; Martins, Ana Paula Pinheiro; Dal-Cól, Maria Luiza Cleto; Terra, Vera Cristina; de Oliveira, José Antônio Cortes; Velasco, Tonicarlo Rodrigues; Sakamoto, Américo Ceiki; Garcia-Cairasco, Norberto

    2014-09-01

    Epileptic syndromes and seizures are the expression of complex brain systems. Because no analysis of complexity has been applied to epileptic seizure semiology, our goal was to apply neuroethology and graph analysis to the study of the complexity of behavioral manifestations of epileptic seizures in human frontal lobe epilepsy (FLE) and temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE). We analyzed the video recordings of 120 seizures of 18 patients with FLE and 28 seizures of 28 patients with TLE. All patients were seizure-free >1 year after surgery (Engel Class I). All patients' behavioral sequences were analyzed by means of a glossary containing all behaviors and analyzed for neuroethology (Ethomatic software). The same series were used for graph analysis (CYTOSCAPE). Behaviors, displayed as nodes, were connected by edges to other nodes according to their temporal sequence of appearance. Using neuroethology analysis, we confirmed data in the literature such as in FLE: brief/frequent seizures, complex motor behaviors, head and eye version, unilateral/bilateral tonic posturing, speech arrest, vocalization, and rapid postictal recovery and in the case of TLE: presence of epigastric aura, lateralized dystonias, impairment of consciousness/speech during ictal and postictal periods, and development of secondary generalization. Using graph analysis metrics of FLE and TLE confirmed data from flowcharts. However, because of the algorithms we used, they highlighted more powerfully the connectivity and complex associations among behaviors in a quite selective manner, depending on the origin of the seizures. The algorithms we used are commonly employed to track brain connectivity from EEG and MRI sources, which makes our study very promising for future studies of complexity in this field.

  10. CUMULATIVE RISK ASSESSMENT: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    INTRODUCTION: GETTING FROM TOXICOLOGY TO QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS FOR CUMULATIVE RISK

    Hugh A. Barton1 and Carey N. Pope2
    1US EPA, Office of Research and Development, National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, Research Triangle Park, NC
    2Department of...

  11. Quantitating the subtleties of microglial morphology with fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Karperien, Audrey; Ahammer, Helmut; Jelinek, Herbert F.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that microglial form and function are inextricably linked. In recent years, the traditional view that microglial form ranges between “ramified resting” and “activated amoeboid” has been emphasized through advancing imaging techniques that point to microglial form being highly dynamic even within the currently accepted morphological categories. Moreover, microglia adopt meaningful intermediate forms between categories, with considerable crossover in function and varying morphologies as they cycle, migrate, wave, phagocytose, and extend and retract fine and gross processes. From a quantitative perspective, it is problematic to measure such variability using traditional methods, but one way of quantitating such detail is through fractal analysis. The techniques of fractal analysis have been used for quantitating microglial morphology, to categorize gross differences but also to differentiate subtle differences (e.g., amongst ramified cells). Multifractal analysis in particular is one technique of fractal analysis that may be useful for identifying intermediate forms. Here we review current trends and methods of fractal analysis, focusing on box counting analysis, including lacunarity and multifractal analysis, as applied to microglial morphology. PMID:23386810

  12. Quantitative analysis of regional myocardial performance in coronary artery disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, D. K.; Dodge, H. T.; Frimer, M.

    1975-01-01

    Findings from a group of subjects with significant coronary artery stenosis are given. A group of controls determined by use of a quantitative method for the study of regional myocardial performance based on the frame-by-frame analysis of biplane left ventricular angiograms are presented. Particular emphasis was placed upon the analysis of wall motion in terms of normalized segment dimensions, timing and velocity of contraction. The results were compared with the method of subjective assessment used clinically.

  13. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books.

    PubMed

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva Presser; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K; Pickett, Joseph P; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-14

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of 'culturomics,' focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. Culturomics extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities.

  14. Quantitative analysis of culture using millions of digitized books

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Jean-Baptiste; Shen, Yuan Kui; Aiden, Aviva P.; Veres, Adrian; Gray, Matthew K.; Pickett, Joseph P.; Hoiberg, Dale; Clancy, Dan; Norvig, Peter; Orwant, Jon; Pinker, Steven; Nowak, Martin A.; Aiden, Erez Lieberman

    2011-01-01

    We constructed a corpus of digitized texts containing about 4% of all books ever printed. Analysis of this corpus enables us to investigate cultural trends quantitatively. We survey the vast terrain of ‘culturomics’, focusing on linguistic and cultural phenomena that were reflected in the English language between 1800 and 2000. We show how this approach can provide insights about fields as diverse as lexicography, the evolution of grammar, collective memory, the adoption of technology, the pursuit of fame, censorship, and historical epidemiology. ‘Culturomics’ extends the boundaries of rigorous quantitative inquiry to a wide array of new phenomena spanning the social sciences and the humanities. PMID:21163965

  15. Quantitative numerical analysis of transient IR-experiments on buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maierhofer, Ch.; Wiggenhauser, H.; Brink, A.; Röllig, M.

    2004-12-01

    Impulse-thermography has been established as a fast and reliable tool in many areas of non-destructive testing. In recent years several investigations have been done to apply active thermography to civil engineering. For quantitative investigations in this area of application, finite difference calculations have been performed for systematic studies on the influence of environmental conditions, heating power and time, defect depth and size and thermal properties of the bulk material (concrete). The comparison of simulated and experimental data enables the quantitative analysis of defects.

  16. Improved method and apparatus for chromatographic quantitative analysis

    DOEpatents

    Fritz, J.S.; Gjerde, D.T.; Schmuckler, G.

    An improved apparatus and method are described for the quantitative analysis of a solution containing a plurality of anion species by ion exchange chromatography which utilizes a single element and a single ion exchange bed which does not require periodic regeneration. The solution containing the anions is added to an anion exchange resin bed which is a low capacity macroreticular polystyrene-divinylbenzene resin containing quarternary ammonium functional groups, and is eluted therefrom with a dilute solution of a low electrical conductance organic acid salt. As each anion species is eluted from the bed, it is quantitatively sensed by conventional detection means such as a conductivity cell.

  17. Brain regions involved in human movement perception: a quantitative voxel-based meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Grosbras, Marie-Hélène; Beaton, Susan; Eickhoff, Simon B

    2012-02-01

    Face, hands, and body movements are powerful signals essential for social interactions. In the last 2 decades, a large number of brain imaging studies have explored the neural correlates of the perception of these signals. Formal synthesis is crucially needed, however, to extract the key circuits involved in human motion perception across the variety of paradigms and stimuli that have been used. Here, we used the activation likelihood estimation (ALE) meta-analysis approach with random effect analysis. We performed meta-analyses on three classes of biological motion: movement of the whole body, hands, and face. Additional analyses of studies of static faces or body stimuli and sub-analyses grouping experiments as a function of their control stimuli or task employed allowed us to identify main effects of movements and forms perception, as well as effects of task demand. In addition to specific features, all conditions showed convergence in occipito-temporal and fronto-parietal regions, but with different peak location and extent. The conjunction of the three ALE maps revealed convergence in all categories in a region of the right posterior superior temporal sulcus as well as in a bilateral region at the junction between middle temporal and lateral occipital gyri. Activation in these regions was not a function of attentional demand and was significant also when controlling for non-specific motion perception. This quantitative synthesis points towards a special role for posterior superior temporal sulcus for integrating human movement percept, and supports a specific representation for body parts in middle temporal, fusiform, precentral, and parietal areas.

  18. Markov chain Monte Carlo linkage analysis of complex quantitative phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, A; Reich, T

    2001-01-01

    We report a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the five simulated quantitative traits in Genetic Analysis Workshop 12 using the Loki software. Our objectives were to determine the efficacy of the Markov chain Monte Carlo method and to test a new scoring technique. Our initial blind analysis, on replicate 42 (the "best replicate") successfully detected four out of the five disease loci and found no false positives. A power analysis shows that the software could usually detect 4 of the 10 trait/gene combinations at an empirical point-wise p-value of 1.5 x 10(-4).

  19. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth

    PubMed Central

    Jeffares, Daniel C.; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2017-01-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license. PMID:27712582

  20. Spotsizer: High-throughput quantitative analysis of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Leanne; Převorovský, Martin; Rallis, Charalampos; Jeffares, Daniel C; Arzhaeva, Yulia; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-10-01

    Microbial colony growth can serve as a useful readout in assays for studying complex genetic interactions or the effects of chemical compounds. Although computational tools for acquiring quantitative measurements of microbial colonies have been developed, their utility can be compromised by inflexible input image requirements, non-trivial installation procedures, or complicated operation. Here, we present the Spotsizer software tool for automated colony size measurements in images of robotically arrayed microbial colonies. Spotsizer features a convenient graphical user interface (GUI), has both single-image and batch-processing capabilities, and works with multiple input image formats and different colony grid types. We demonstrate how Spotsizer can be used for high-throughput quantitative analysis of fission yeast growth. The user-friendly Spotsizer tool provides rapid, accurate, and robust quantitative analyses of microbial growth in a high-throughput format. Spotsizer is freely available at https://data.csiro.au/dap/landingpage?pid=csiro:15330 under a proprietary CSIRO license.

  1. Cognitive control for language switching in bilinguals: A quantitative meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Gigi; Green, David W.; Abutalebi, Jubin; Grady, Cheryl

    2013-01-01

    In a quantitative meta-analysis, using the activation likelihood estimation method, we examined the neural regions involved in bilingual cognitive control, particularly when engaging in switching between languages. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the bilingual cognitive control model based on a qualitative analysis [Abutalebi, J., & Green, D. W. (2008). Control mechanisms in bilingual language production: Neural evidence from language switching studies. Language and Cognitive Processes, 23, 557–582.]. After reviewing 128 peer-reviewed articles, ten neuroimaging studies met our inclusion criteria and in each study, bilinguals switched between languages in response to cues. We isolated regions involved in voluntary language switching, by including reported contrasts between the switching conditions and high level baseline conditions involving similar tasks but requiring the use of only one language. Eight brain regions showed significant and reliable activation: left inferior frontal gyrus, left middle temporal gyrus, left middle frontal gyrus, right precentral gyrus, right superior temporal gyrus, midline pre-SMA and bilateral caudate nuclei. This quantitative result is consistent with bilingual aphasia studies that report switching deficits associated with lesions to the caudate nuclei or prefrontal cortex. It also extends the previously reported qualitative model. We discuss the implications of the findings for accounts of bilingual cognitive control. PMID:24795491

  2. FMRI signals associated with memory strength in the medial temporal lobes: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wais, Peter E

    2008-12-01

    To identify patterns of memory-related neural activity in the medial temporal lobes (MTL), a quantitative meta-analysis of 17 functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies was performed. The analysis shows that increased activity in the hippocampus and the parahippocampal cortex predicts subsequent memory strength. During retrieval, activity in the hippocampus increases in association with strong memory. In the perirhinal cortex, increased activity predicts subsequent recognition, whether based on weak or strong memory, whereas during retrieval activity decreases below the level for misses in association with both weak and strong memory. The results are consistent with the claim that the hippocampus selectively subserves recollection, whereas adjacent structures subserve familiarity [Eichenbaum, H., Yonelinas, A., & Ranganath, C. (2007). The medial temporal lobe and recognition memory. The Annual Review of Neuroscience, 30, 123-152]. However, this conclusion depends on a specific dual-process theory of recognition memory that has been used to interpret the results. An alternative dual-process model holds that the behavioral methods used to differentiate recollection from familiarity instead separate strong memories from weak memories. When the fMRI data are interpreted in terms of the alternative theory, the fMRI results do not point to selective roles for the hippocampus or the adjacent MTL structures. The fMRI data alone cannot distinguish between these two models, so other methods are needed to resolve the issue.

  3. Quantitative mass spectrometric analysis of glycoproteins combined with enrichment methods.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies.

  4. Local and global analysis of endocytic patch dynamics in fission yeast using a new “temporal superresolution” realignment method

    PubMed Central

    Berro, Julien; Pollard, Thomas D.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative microscopy is a valuable tool for inferring molecular mechanisms of cellular processes such as clathrin-mediated endocytosis, but, for quantitative microscopy to reach its potential, both data collection and analysis needed improvement. We introduce new tools to track and count endocytic patches in fission yeast to increase the quality of the data extracted from quantitative microscopy movies. We present a universal method to achieve “temporal superresolution” by aligning temporal data sets with higher temporal resolution than the measurement intervals. These methods allowed us to extract new information about endocytic actin patches in wild-type cells from measurements of the fluorescence of fimbrin-mEGFP. We show that the time course of actin assembly and disassembly varies <600 ms between patches. Actin polymerizes during vesicle formation, but we show that polymerization does not participate in vesicle movement other than to limit the complex diffusive motions of newly formed endocytic vesicles, which move faster as the surrounding actin meshwork decreases in size over time. Our methods also show that the number of patches in fission yeast is proportional to cell length and that the variability in the repartition of patches between the tips of interphase cells has been underestimated. PMID:25143395

  5. Temporal radiographic texture analysis in the detection of periprosthetic osteolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkie, Joel R.; Giger, Maryellen L.; Chinander, Michael R.; Engh, Charles A. Sr.; Hopper, Robert H. Jr.; Martell, John M.

    2008-01-15

    Periprosthetic osteolysis is one of the most serious long-term problems in total hip arthroplasty. It has been primarily attributed to the body's inflammatory response to submicron polyethylene particles worn from the hip implant, and it leads to bone loss and structural deterioration in the surrounding bone. It was previously demonstrated that radiographic texture analysis (RTA) has the ability to distinguish between osteolysis and normal cases at the time of clinical detection of the disease; however, that analysis did not take into account the changes in texture over time. The goal of this preliminary analysis, however, is to assess the ability of temporal radiographic texture analysis (tRTA) to distinguish between patients who develop osteolysis and normal cases. Two tRTA methods were used in the study: the RTA feature change from baseline at various follow-up intervals and the slope of the best-fit line to the RTA data series. These tRTA methods included Fourier-based and fractal-based features calculated from digitized images of 202 total hip replacement cases, including 70 that developed osteolysis. Results show that separation between the osteolysis and normal groups increased over time for the feature difference method, as the disease progressed, with area under the curve (AUC) values from receiver operating characteristic analysis of 0.65 to 0.72 at 15 years postsurgery. Separation for the slope method was also evident, with AUC values ranging from 0.65 to 0.76 for the task of distinguishing between osteolysis and normal cases. The results suggest that tRTA methods have the ability to measure changes in trabecular structure, and may be useful in the early detection of periprosthetic osteolysis.

  6. Some selected quantitative methods of thermal image analysis in Matlab.

    PubMed

    Koprowski, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The paper presents a new algorithm based on some selected automatic quantitative methods for analysing thermal images. It shows the practical implementation of these image analysis methods in Matlab. It enables to perform fully automated and reproducible measurements of selected parameters in thermal images. The paper also shows two examples of the use of the proposed image analysis methods for the area of ​​the skin of a human foot and face. The full source code of the developed application is also provided as an attachment. The main window of the program during dynamic analysis of the foot thermal image.

  7. Quantitative risk analysis of oil storage facilities in seismic areas.

    PubMed

    Fabbrocino, Giovanni; Iervolino, Iunio; Orlando, Francesca; Salzano, Ernesto

    2005-08-31

    Quantitative risk analysis (QRA) of industrial facilities has to take into account multiple hazards threatening critical equipment. Nevertheless, engineering procedures able to evaluate quantitatively the effect of seismic action are not well established. Indeed, relevant industrial accidents may be triggered by loss of containment following ground shaking or other relevant natural hazards, either directly or through cascade effects ('domino effects'). The issue of integrating structural seismic risk into quantitative probabilistic seismic risk analysis (QpsRA) is addressed in this paper by a representative study case regarding an oil storage plant with a number of atmospheric steel tanks containing flammable substances. Empirical seismic fragility curves and probit functions, properly defined both for building-like and non building-like industrial components, have been crossed with outcomes of probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) for a test site located in south Italy. Once the seismic failure probabilities have been quantified, consequence analysis has been performed for those events which may be triggered by the loss of containment following seismic action. Results are combined by means of a specific developed code in terms of local risk contour plots, i.e. the contour line for the probability of fatal injures at any point (x, y) in the analysed area. Finally, a comparison with QRA obtained by considering only process-related top events is reported for reference.

  8. An improved quantitative analysis method for plant cortical microtubules.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Huang, Chenyang; Wang, Jia; Shang, Peng

    2014-01-01

    The arrangement of plant cortical microtubules can reflect the physiological state of cells. However, little attention has been paid to the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules so far. In this paper, Bidimensional Empirical Mode Decomposition (BEMD) algorithm was applied in the image preprocessing of the original microtubule image. And then Intrinsic Mode Function 1 (IMF1) image obtained by decomposition was selected to do the texture analysis based on Grey-Level Cooccurrence Matrix (GLCM) algorithm. Meanwhile, in order to further verify its reliability, the proposed texture analysis method was utilized to distinguish different images of Arabidopsis microtubules. The results showed that the effect of BEMD algorithm on edge preserving accompanied with noise reduction was positive, and the geometrical characteristic of the texture was obvious. Four texture parameters extracted by GLCM perfectly reflected the different arrangements between the two images of cortical microtubules. In summary, the results indicate that this method is feasible and effective for the image quantitative analysis of plant cortical microtubules. It not only provides a new quantitative approach for the comprehensive study of the role played by microtubules in cell life activities but also supplies references for other similar studies.

  9. Data from quantitative label free proteomics analysis of rat spleen.

    PubMed

    Dudekula, Khadar; Le Bihan, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    The dataset presented in this work has been obtained using a label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of rat spleen. A robust method for extraction of proteins from rat spleen tissue and LC-MS-MS analysis was developed using a urea and SDS-based buffer. Different fractionation methods were compared. A total of 3484 different proteins were identified from the pool of all experiments run in this study (a total of 2460 proteins with at least two peptides). A total of 1822 proteins were identified from nine non-fractionated pulse gels, 2288 proteins and 2864 proteins were identified by SDS-PAGE fractionation into three and five fractions respectively. The proteomics data are deposited in ProteomeXchange Consortium via PRIDE PXD003520, Progenesis and Maxquant output are presented in the supported information. The generated list of proteins under different regimes of fractionation allow assessing the nature of the identified proteins; variability in the quantitative analysis associated with the different sampling strategy and allow defining a proper number of replicates for future quantitative analysis.

  10. Temporal instability analysis of inviscid compound jets falling under gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsin, Muhammad; Uddin, Jamal; Decent, Stephen P.; Afzaal, Muhammad F.

    2013-01-01

    Compound liquid jets can be used in a variety of industrial applications ranging from capsule production in pharmaceutics to enhance printing methods in ink-jet printing. An appreciation of how instability along compound jets can lead to breakup and droplet formation is thus critical in many fields in science and engineering. In this paper, we perform a theoretical analysis to examine the instability of an axisymmetric inviscid compound liquid jet which falls vertically under the influence of gravity. We use a long-wavelength, slender-jet asymptotic expansion to reduce the governing equations of the problem into a set of one-dimensional partial differential equations, which describe the evolution of the leading-order axial velocity of the jet as well as the radii of both the inner and the outer interfaces. We first determine the steady-state solutions of the one-dimensional model equations and then we perform a linear temporal instability analysis to obtain a dispersion relation, which gives us useful information about the maximum growth rate and the maximum wavenumber of the imposed wave-like disturbance. We use our results to estimate the location and qualitative nature of breakup and then compare our results with numerical simulations.

  11. Multi Temporal InSAR Analysis in Northwestern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daout, S.; Doin, M.-P.; Lasserre, C.; Peltzer, Gilles; Socquet, Anne

    2016-08-01

    We use Multi-Temporal Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (MT-InSAR) to study hydrological and intracontinental deformation in northwestern Tibet, between longitudes 82.5°E and 87°. We process the complete Envisat archive data along three 800 km-long tracks extending from the Tarim basin to the central part of the Tibetan plateau. Interferograms are processed through a time series analysis with the NSBAS chain to provide average velocity maps. We face two main processing challenges. The first one is related to the freeze-thaw cycles of the sedimentary basins on the highest part of the plateau. This seasonal signal is analyzed and extracted through a principal component analysis, which improves phase unwrapping across high fringe rates areas. The second challenge is to correct atmospheric delays, enhanced by the 3 km topographic step from the Tarim basin to the Tibetan plateau. We analyze the atmospheric signal across the topographic feature and assess errors to improve the time series inversion and better discriminate tectonic deformation from seasonal signals. Velocity maps highlight the interaction between active thrusts in the Tarim basin and the left-lateral Altyn Tagh fault, along the western end of the Kunlun chain.

  12. Qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of penta-rhythmic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwabedal, Justus T. C.; Knapper, Drake E.; Shilnikov, Andrey L.

    2016-12-01

    Inhibitory circuits of relaxation oscillators are often-used models for dynamics of biological networks. We present a qualitative and quantitative stability analysis of such a circuit constituted by three generic oscillators (of a Fitzhugh-Nagumo type) as its nodes coupled reciprocally. Depending on inhibitory strengths, and parameters of individual oscillators, the circuit exhibits polyrhythmicity of up to five simultaneously stable rhythms. With methods of bifurcation analysis and phase reduction, we investigate qualitative changes in stability of these circuit rhythms for a wide range of parameters. Furthermore, we quantify robustness of the rhythms maintained under random perturbations by monitoring phase diffusion in the circuit. Our findings allow us to describe how circuit dynamics relate to dynamics of individual nodes. We also find that quantitative and qualitative stability properties of polyrhythmicity do not always align.

  13. Implementing a Quantitative Analysis Design Tool for Future Generation Interfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    future MAC-enabled systems. A human-computer interaction ( HCI ) Index, originally applied to multi-function displays was applied to the prototype Vigilant...Spirit interface. A modified version of the HCI Index was successfully applied to perform a quantitative analysis of the baseline VSCS interface and...two modified interface designs. The modified HCI Index incorporates the Hick-Hyman decision time, Fitts’ Law time, and the physical actions

  14. Quantitative NMR Analysis of Partially Substituted Biodiesel Glycerols

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, M.; Alleman, T. L.; Dyer, T.; Ragauskas, A. J.

    2009-01-01

    Phosphitylation of hydroxyl groups in biodiesel samples with 2-chloro-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by 31P-NMR analysis provides a rapid quantitative analytical technique for the determination of substitution patterns on partially esterified glycerols. The unique 31P-NMR chemical shift data was established with a series mono and di-substituted fatty acid esters of glycerol and then utilized to characterize an industrial sample of partially processed biodiesel.

  15. Temporal Expectation and Information Processing: A Model-Based Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jepma, Marieke; Wagenmakers, Eric-Jan; Nieuwenhuis, Sander

    2012-01-01

    People are able to use temporal cues to anticipate the timing of an event, enabling them to process that event more efficiently. We conducted two experiments, using the fixed-foreperiod paradigm (Experiment 1) and the temporal-cueing paradigm (Experiment 2), to assess which components of information processing are speeded when subjects use such…

  16. a Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Urban Heat Island in Basin City Utilizing Remote Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao-Tung

    2016-06-01

    Urban Heat Island (UHI) has been becoming a key factor in deteriorating the urban ecological environment. Spatial-temporal analysis on its prototype of basin city's UHI and quantitatively evaluating effect from rapid urbanization will provide theoretical foundation for relieving UHI effect. Based on Landsat 8, ETM+ and TM images of Taipei basin areas from 1900 to 2015, this article has retrieved the land surface temperature (LST) at summer solstice of each year, and then analysed spatial-temporal pattern and evolution characters of UHI in Taipei basin in this decade. The results showed that the expansion built district, UHI area constantly expanded from centre city to the suburb areas. The prototype of UHI in Taipei basin that showed in addition to higher temperatures in the centre city also were relatively high temperatures gathered boundaries surrounded by foot of mountains side. It calls "sinking heat island". From 1900 to 2000, the higher UHI areas were different land use type change had obvious difference by public infrastructure works. And then, in next 15 years till 2015, building density of urban area has been increasing gradually. It has the trend that UHI flooding raises follow urban land use density. Hot spot of UHI in Taipei basin also has the same characteristics. The results suggest that anthropogenic heat release probably plays a significant role in the UHI effect, and must be considered in urban planning adaptation strategies.

  17. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of SQ Injection Using Multiple Chromatographic Technologies.

    PubMed

    Chau, Siu-Leung; Huang, Zhi-Bing; Song, Yan-Gang; Yue, Rui-Qi; Ho, Alan; Lin, Chao-Zhan; Huang, Wen-Hua; Han, Quan-Bin

    2016-08-19

    Quality control of Chinese medicine injections remains a challenge due to our poor knowledge of their complex chemical profile. This study aims to investigate the chemical composition of one of the best-selling injections, Shenqi Fuzheng (SQ) injection (SQI), via a full component quantitative analysis. A total of 15 representative small molecular components of SQI were simultaneously determined using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) coupled with quadrupole tandem time-of-flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS); saccharide composition of SQI was also quantitatively determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with evaporative light scattering detector (ELSD) on an amino column before and after acid hydrolysis. The existence of polysaccharides was also examined on a gel permeation chromatography column. The method was well validated in terms of linearity, sensitivity, precision, accuracy and stability, and was successfully applied to analyze 13 SQI samples. The results demonstrate that up to 94.69% (w/w) of this injection product are quantitatively determined, in which small molecules and monosaccharide/sucrose account for 0.18%-0.21%, and 53.49%-58.2%, respectively. The quantitative information contributes to accumulating scientific evidence to better understand the therapy efficacy and safety of complex Chinese medicine injections.

  18. Quantitative Proteomic Approaches for Analysis of Protein S-Nitrosylation.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhe; Greenlief, C Michael; Gu, Zezong

    2016-01-04

    S-Nitrosylation is a redox-based post-translational modification of a protein in response to nitric oxide (NO) signaling, and it participates in a variety of processes in diverse biological systems. The significance of this type of protein modification in health and diseases is increasingly recognized. In the central nervous system, aberrant S-nitrosylation, due to excessive NO production, is known to cause protein misfolding, mitochondrial dysfunction, transcriptional dysregulation, and neuronal death. This leads to an altered physiological state and consequently contributes to pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. To date, much effort has been made to understand the mechanisms underlying protein S-nitrosylation, and several approaches have been developed to unveil S-nitrosylated proteins from different organisms. Interest in determining the dynamic changes of protein S-nitrosylation under different physiological and pathophysiological conditions has underscored the need for the development of quantitative proteomic approaches. Currently, both gel-based and gel-free mass spectrometry-based quantitative methods are widely used, and they each have advantages and disadvantages but may also be used together to produce complementary data. This review evaluates current available quantitative proteomic techniques for the analysis of protein S-nitrosylation and highlights recent advances, with emphasis on applications in neurodegenerative diseases. An important goal is to provide a comprehensive guide of feasible quantitative proteomic methodologies for examining protein S-nitrosylation in research to yield insights into disease mechanisms, diagnostic biomarkers, and drug discovery.

  19. Quantitative analysis of the heterogeneous population of endocytic vesicles.

    PubMed

    Kozlov, Konstantin; Kosheverova, Vera; Kamentseva, Rimma; Kharchenko, Marianna; Sokolkova, Alena; Kornilova, Elena; Samsonova, Maria

    2017-03-07

    The quantitative characterization of endocytic vesicles in images acquired with microscope is critically important for deciphering of endocytosis mechanisms. Image segmentation is the most important step of quantitative image analysis. In spite of availability of many segmentation methods, the accurate segmentation is challenging when the images are heterogeneous with respect to object shapes and signal intensities what is typical for images of endocytic vesicles. We present a Morphological reconstruction and Contrast mapping segmentation method (MrComas) for the segmentation of the endocytic vesicle population that copes with the heterogeneity in their shape and intensity. The method uses morphological opening and closing by reconstruction in the vicinity of local minima and maxima respectively thus creating the strong contrast between their basins of attraction. As a consequence, the intensity is flattened within the objects and their edges are enhanced. The method accurately recovered quantitative characteristics of synthetic images that preserve characteristic features of the endocytic vesicle population. In benchmarks and quantitative comparisons with two other popular segmentation methods, namely manual thresholding and Squash plugin, MrComas shows the best segmentation results on real biological images of EGFR (Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor) endocytosis. As a proof of feasibility, the method was applied to quantify the dynamical behavior of Early Endosomal Autoantigen 1 (EEA1)-positive endosome subpopulations during EGF-stimulated endocytosis.

  20. Quantitative Assessment of Spatio-Temporal Desertification Rates in Azerbaijan during Using Timeseries Landsat-8 Satellite Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayramov, Emil; Mammadov, Ramiz

    2016-07-01

    The main goals of this research are the object-based landcover classification of LANDSAT-8 multi-spectral satellite images in 2014 and 2015, quantification of Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) rates within the land-cover classes, change detection analysis between the NDVIs derived from multi-temporal LANDSAT-8 satellite images and the quantification of those changes within the land-cover classes and detection of changes between land-cover classes. The object-based classification accuracy of the land-cover classes was validated through the standard confusion matrix which revealed 80 % of land-cover classification accuracy for both years. The analysis revealed that the area of agricultural lands increased from 30911 sq. km. in 2014 to 31999 sq. km. in 2015. The area of barelands increased from 3933 sq. km. in 2014 to 4187 sq. km. in 2015. The area of forests increased from 8211 sq. km. in 2014 to 9175 sq. km. in 2015. The area of grasslands decreased from 27176 sq. km. in 2014 to 23294 sq. km. in 2015. The area of urban areas increased from 12479 sq. km. in 2014 to 12956 sq. km. in 2015. The decrease in the area of grasslands was mainly explained by the landuse shifts of grasslands to agricultural and urban lands. The quantification of low and medium NDVI rates revealed the increase within the agricultural, urban and forest land-cover classes in 2015. However, the high NDVI rates within agricultural, urban and forest land-cover classes in 2015 revealed to be lower relative to 2014. The change detection analysis between landscover types of 2014 and 2015 allowed to determine that 7740 sq. km. of grasslands shifted to agricultural landcover type whereas 5442sq. km. of agricultural lands shifted to rangelands. This means that the spatio-temporal patters of agricultural activities occurred in Azerbaijan because some of the areas reduced agricultural activities whereas some of them changed their landuse type to agricultural. Based on the achieved results, it

  1. Multi-Temporal Analysis of WWII Reconnaissance Photos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meixner, P.; Eckstein, M.

    2016-06-01

    There are millions of aerial photographs from the period of the Second Wold War available in the Allied archives, obtained by aerial photo reconnaissance, covering most of today's European countries. They are spanning the time from 1938 until the end of the war and even beyond. Photo reconnaissance provided intelligence information for the Allied headquarters and accompanied the bombing offensive against the German homeland and the occupied territories. One of the initial principal targets in Bohemia were the synthetized fuel works STW AG (Sudetenländische Treibstoffwerke AG) in Zaluzi (formerly Maltheuren) near Most (formerly Brück), Czech Republic. The STW AG synthetized fuel plant was not only subject to bombing raids, but a subject to quite intensive photo reconnaissance, too - long before the start of the bombing campaign. With a multi-temporal analysis of the available imagery from international archives we will demonstrate the factory build-up during 1942 and 1943, the effects of the bombing raids in 1944 and the struggle to keep the plant working in the last year of the war. Furthermore we would like to show the impact the bombings have today, in form of potential unexploded ordnance in the adjacent area of the open cast mines.

  2. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  3. Quantitative Phosphoproteomic Analysis of T-Cell Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Ahsan, Nagib; Salomon, Arthur R

    2017-01-01

    TCR signaling critically depends on protein phosphorylation across many proteins. Localization of each phosphorylation event relative to the T-cell receptor (TCR) and canonical T-cell signaling proteins will provide clues about the structure of TCR signaling networks. Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis by mass spectrometry provides a wide-scale view of cellular phosphorylation networks. However, analysis of phosphorylation by mass spectrometry is still challenging due to the relative low abundance of phosphorylated proteins relative to all proteins and the extraordinary diversity of phosphorylation sites across the proteome. Highly selective enrichment of phosphorylated peptides is essential to provide the most comprehensive view of the phosphoproteome. Optimization of phosphopeptide enrichment methods coupled with highly sensitive mass spectrometry workflows significantly improves the sequencing depth of the phosphoproteome to over 10,000 unique phosphorylation sites from complex cell lysates. Here we describe a step-by-step method for phosphoproteomic analysis that has achieved widespread success for identification of serine, threonine, and tyrosine phosphorylation. Reproducible quantification of relative phosphopeptide abundance is provided by intensity-based label-free quantitation. An ideal set of mass spectrometry analysis parameters is also provided that optimize the yield of identified sites. We also provide guidelines for the bioinformatic analysis of this type of data to assess the quality of the data and to comply with proteomic data reporting requirements.

  4. A Quantitative Method for Microtubule Analysis in Fluorescence Images.

    PubMed

    Lan, Xiaodong; Li, Lingfei; Hu, Jiongyu; Zhang, Qiong; Dang, Yongming; Huang, Yuesheng

    2015-12-01

    Microtubule analysis is of significant value for a better understanding of normal and pathological cellular processes. Although immunofluorescence microscopic techniques have proven useful in the study of microtubules, comparative results commonly rely on a descriptive and subjective visual analysis. We developed an objective and quantitative method based on image processing and analysis of fluorescently labeled microtubular patterns in cultured cells. We used a multi-parameter approach by analyzing four quantifiable characteristics to compose our quantitative feature set. Then we interpreted specific changes in the parameters and revealed the contribution of each feature set using principal component analysis. In addition, we verified that different treatment groups could be clearly discriminated using principal components of the multi-parameter model. High predictive accuracy of four commonly used multi-classification methods confirmed our method. These results demonstrated the effectiveness and efficiency of our method in the analysis of microtubules in fluorescence images. Application of the analytical methods presented here provides information concerning the organization and modification of microtubules, and could aid in the further understanding of structural and functional aspects of microtubules under normal and pathological conditions.

  5. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-04-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells.

  6. Cell poking: quantitative analysis of indentation of thick viscoelastic layers.

    PubMed Central

    Duszyk, M; Schwab, B; Zahalak, G I; Qian, H; Elson, E L

    1989-01-01

    A recently introduced device, the cell poker, measures the force required to indent the exposed surface of a cell adherent to a rigid substratum. The cell poker has provided phenomenological information about the viscoelastic properties of several different types of cells, about mechanical changes triggered by external stimuli, and about the role of the cytoskeleton in these mechanical functions. Except in special cases, however, it has not been possible to extract quantitative estimates of viscosity and elasticity moduli from cell poker measurements. This paper presents cell poker measurements of well characterized viscoelastic polymeric materials, polydimethylsiloxanes of different degrees of polymerization, in a simple shape, a flat, thick layer, which for our purposes can be treated as a half space. Analysis of the measurements in terms of a linear viscoelasticity theory yields viscosity values for three polymer samples in agreement with those determined by measurements on a macroscopic scale. Theoretical analysis further indicates that the measured limiting static elasticity of the layers may result from the tension generated at the interface between the polymer and water. This work demonstrates the possibility of obtaining quantitative viscoelastic material properties from cell poker measurements and represents the first step in extending these quantitative studies to more complicated structures including cells. PMID:2720066

  7. Common and distinct neural correlates of personal and vicarious reward: A quantitative meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morelli, Sylvia A.; Sacchet, Matthew D.; Zaki, Jamil

    2015-01-01

    Individuals experience reward not only when directly receiving positive outcomes (e.g., food or money), but also when observing others receive such outcomes. This latter phenomenon, known as vicarious reward, is a perennial topic of interest among psychologists and economists. More recently, neuroscientists have begun exploring the neuroanatomy underlying vicarious reward. Here we present a quantitative whole-brain meta-analysis of this emerging literature. We identified 25 functional neuroimaging studies that included contrasts between vicarious reward and a neutral control, and subjected these contrasts to an activation likelihood estimate (ALE) meta-analysis. This analysis revealed a consistent pattern of activation across studies, spanning structures typically associated with the computation of value (especially ventromedial prefrontal cortex) and mentalizing (including dorsomedial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal sulcus). We further quantitatively compared this activation pattern to activation foci from a previous meta-analysis of personal reward. Conjunction analyses yielded overlapping VMPFC activity in response to personal and vicarious reward. Contrast analyses identified preferential engagement of the nucleus accumbens in response to personal as compared to vicarious reward, and in mentalizing-related structures in response to vicarious as compared to personal reward. These data shed light on the common and unique components of the reward that individuals experience directly and through their social connections. PMID:25554428

  8. Quantitative analysis of endocytosis with cytoplasmic pHluorin chimeras.

    PubMed

    Prosser, Derek C; Whitworth, Karen; Wendland, Beverly

    2010-09-01

    The pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein (GFP) variant pHluorin is typically fused to the extracellular domain of transmembrane proteins to monitor endocytosis. Here, we have turned pHluorin inside-out, and show that cytoplasmic fusions of pHluorin are effective quantitative reporters for endocytosis and multivesicular body (MVB) sorting. In yeast in particular, fusion of GFP and its variants on the extracellular side of transmembrane proteins can result in perturbed trafficking. In contrast, cytoplasmic fusions are well tolerated, allowing for the quantitative assessment of trafficking of virtually any transmembrane protein. Quenching of degradation-resistant pHluorin in the acidic vacuole permits quantification of extravacuolar cargo proteins at steady-state levels and is compatible with kinetic analysis of endocytosis in live cells.

  9. [Simultaneous quantitative analysis of four lignanoids in Schisandra chinensis by quantitative analysis of multi-components by single marker].

    PubMed

    He, Feng-Cheng; Li, Shou-Xin; Zhao, Zhi-Quan; Dong, Jin-Ping; Liu, Wu-Zhan; Su, Rui-Qiang

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study is to establish a new method of quality evaluation and validate its feasibilities by the simultaneous quantitative assay of four lignanoids in Schisandra chinensis. A new quality evaluation method, quantitative analysis of multi-components by single marker (QAMS), was established and validated with Schisandra chinensis. Four main lignanoids, schisandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and gamma-schizandrin, were selected as analytes and schisandrin as internal reference substance to evaluate the quality. Their contents in 13 different batches of samples, collected from different bathes, were determined by both external standard method and QAMS. The method was evaluated by comparison of the quantitative results between external standard method and QAMS. No significant differences were found in the quantitative results of four lignanoids in 13 batches of S. chinensis determined by external standard method and QAMS. QAMS is feasible for determination of four lignanoids simultaneously when some authentic standard substances were unavailable, and the developed method can be used for quality control of S. chinensis.

  10. Time-course analysis of temporal preparation on central processes.

    PubMed

    Leonhard, Tanja; Bratzke, Daniel; Schröter, Hannes; Ulrich, Rolf

    2012-03-01

    Participants usually respond faster to a response signal (RS) when this signal is preceded by a warning stimulus than when it is not. A question of theoretical importance is the locus of this facilitating effect within the information processing stream. Recently, Los and Schut (Cogn Psychol 57:20-55, 2008) suggested that temporal preparation acts on central processes while perception of the RS is under way. The present study provides a stochastic model (central preparation model, CPM) based on this hypothesis and presents three experiments testing this model. To track the complete time-course of temporal preparation, the warning signal could either precede or follow the RS. The data show some systematic deviation from the model's predictions, questioning CPM's assumption that temporal preparation acts only on central processes. An alternative mechanism of temporal preparation based on the parallel grains model [Miller and Ulrich (Cogn Psychol 46:101-151, 2003)] is discussed.

  11. Qualitative and temporal reasoning in engine behavior analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, W. E.; Stamps, M. E.; Ali, M.

    1987-01-01

    Numerical simulation models, engine experts, and experimental data are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of abnormal engine behavior. Engine parameters monitored during operation are used to generate qualitative and temporal representations of actual engine behavior. Similarities between the representations of failure scenarios and the actual engine behavior are used to diagnose fault conditions which have already occurred, or are about to occur; to increase the surveillance by the monitoring system of relevant engine parameters; and to predict likely future engine behavior.

  12. Quantitative analysis of in vivo confocal microscopy images: a review.

    PubMed

    Patel, Dipika V; McGhee, Charles N

    2013-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) is a non-invasive method of examining the living human cornea. The recent trend towards quantitative studies using IVCM has led to the development of a variety of methods for quantifying image parameters. When selecting IVCM images for quantitative analysis, it is important to be consistent regarding the location, depth, and quality of images. All images should be de-identified, randomized, and calibrated prior to analysis. Numerous image analysis software are available, each with their own advantages and disadvantages. Criteria for analyzing corneal epithelium, sub-basal nerves, keratocytes, endothelium, and immune/inflammatory cells have been developed, although there is inconsistency among research groups regarding parameter definition. The quantification of stromal nerve parameters, however, remains a challenge. Most studies report lower inter-observer repeatability compared with intra-observer repeatability, and observer experience is known to be an important factor. Standardization of IVCM image analysis through the use of a reading center would be crucial for any future large, multi-centre clinical trials using IVCM.

  13. Quantitative analysis of chromosome condensation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Boryana; Dehler, Sascha; Kruitwagen, Tom; Hériché, Jean-Karim; Miura, Kota; Haering, Christian H

    2013-03-01

    Chromosomes undergo extensive conformational rearrangements in preparation for their segregation during cell divisions. Insights into the molecular mechanisms behind this still poorly understood condensation process require the development of new approaches to quantitatively assess chromosome formation in vivo. In this study, we present a live-cell microscopy-based chromosome condensation assay in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. By automatically tracking the three-dimensional distance changes between fluorescently marked chromosome loci at high temporal and spatial resolution, we analyze chromosome condensation during mitosis and meiosis and deduct defined parameters to describe condensation dynamics. We demonstrate that this method can determine the contributions of condensin, topoisomerase II, and Aurora kinase to mitotic chromosome condensation. We furthermore show that the assay can identify proteins required for mitotic chromosome formation de novo by isolating mutants in condensin, DNA polymerase ε, and F-box DNA helicase I that are specifically defective in pro-/metaphase condensation. Thus, the chromosome condensation assay provides a direct and sensitive system for the discovery and characterization of components of the chromosome condensation machinery in a genetically tractable eukaryote.

  14. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Selection of Genes Associated with Pearl Millet Varietal Quantitative Traits In situ

    PubMed Central

    Mariac, Cédric; Ousseini, Issaka S.; Alio, Abdel-Kader; Jugdé, Hélène; Pham, Jean-Louis; Bezançon, Gilles; Ronfort, Joelle; Descroix, Luc; Vigouroux, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Ongoing global climate changes imply new challenges for agriculture. Whether plants and crops can adapt to such rapid changes is still a widely debated question. We previously showed adaptation in the form of earlier flowering in pearl millet at the scale of a whole country over three decades. However, this analysis did not deal with variability of year to year selection. To understand and possibly manage plant and crop adaptation, we need more knowledge of how selection acts in situ. Is selection gradual, abrupt, and does it vary in space and over time? In the present study, we tracked the evolution of allele frequency in two genes associated with pearl millet phenotypic variation in situ. We sampled 17 populations of cultivated pearl millet over a period of 2 years. We tracked changes in allele frequencies in these populations by genotyping more than seven thousand individuals. We demonstrate that several allele frequencies changes are compatible with selection, by correcting allele frequency changes associated with genetic drift. We found marked variation in allele frequencies from year to year, suggesting a variable selection effect in space and over time. We estimated the strength of selection associated with variations in allele frequency. Our results suggest that the polymorphism maintained at the genes we studied is partially explained by the spatial and temporal variability of selection. In response to environmental changes, traditional pearl millet varieties could rapidly adapt thanks to this available functional variability. PMID:27507986

  15. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed Central

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-01-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties. PMID:10049932

  16. Temporal and multiple quantitative trait loci analyses of resistance to bacterial wilt in tomato permit the resolution of linked loci.

    PubMed

    Mangin, B; Thoquet, P; Olivier, J; Grimsley, N H

    1999-03-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum is a soil-borne bacterium that causes the serious disease known as bacterial wilt in many plant species. In tomato, several QTL controlling resistance have been found, but in different studies, markers spanning a large region of chromosome 6 showed strong association with the resistance. By using two different approaches to analyze the data from a field test F3 population, we show that at least two separate loci approximately 30 cM apart on this chromosome are most likely involved in the resistance. First, a temporal analysis of the progression of symptoms reveals a distal locus early in the development of the disease. As the disease progresses, the maximum LOD peak observed shifts toward the proximal end of the chromosome, obscuring the distal locus. Second, although classical interval mapping could only detect the presence of one locus, a statistical "two-QTL model" test, specifically adapted for the resolution of linked QTL, strongly supported the hypothesis for the presence of two loci. These results are discussed in the context of current molecular knowledge about disease resistance genes on chromosome 6 and observations made by tomato breeders during the production of bacterial wilt-resistant varieties.

  17. Temporal Analysis of Remotely Sensed Precipitation Products for Hydrological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, K. J.; Bennett, M. E.

    2011-12-01

    No study has systematically evaluated streamflow modeling between monthly and daily timescales. This study examines streamflow from eight watersheds across the United States where five different precipitation products were used as primary input into the Soil and Water Assessment Tool to generate simulated streamflow. Timescales examined include monthly, dekad (10 day), pentad (5 day), triad (3 day), and daily. The eight basins studied are the San Pedro (Arizona); Cimarron (north-central Oklahoma); mid-Nueces (south Texas); mid-Rio Grande (south Texas and northern Mexico), Yocano (northern Mississippi); Alapaha (south Georgia); Upper Tar (North Carolina) and mid-St. Francis (eastern Arkansas). The precipitation products used to drive simulations include rain gauge, NWS Multisensor Precipitation Estimator, Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission, Multi-Satellite (TRMM) Precipitation Analysis, TRMM 3B42-V6, and Climate Prediction Center Morphing Method (CMORPH). Understanding how streamflow varies at sub-monthly timescales is important because there are a host of hydrological applications such a flood forecast guidance and reservoir inflow forecasts that reside in a temporal domain between monthly and daily timescales. The major finding of this study is the quantification of a strong positive correlation between performance metrics and time step at which model performance deteriorates. Basically, better performing simulations, with higher Nash-Sutcliffe values of 0.80 and above can support modeling at finer timescales to at least daily and perhaps beyond into the sub-daily realm. These findings are significant in that they clearly document the ability of SWAT to support modeling at sub-monthly time steps, which is beyond the capability for which SWAT was initially designed.

  18. Match analysis and temporal patterns of fatigue in rugby sevens.

    PubMed

    Granatelli, Giampietro; Gabbett, Tim J; Briotti, Gianluca; Padulo, Johnny; Buglione, Antonio; D'Ottavio, Stefano; Ruscello, Bruno M

    2014-03-01

    Rugby sevens is a rapidly growing sport. Match analysis is increasingly being used by sport scientists and coaches to improve the understanding of the physical demands of this sport. This study investigated the physical and physiological demands of elite men's rugby sevens, with special reference to the temporal patterns of fatigue during match play. Nine players, 4 backs and 5 forwards (age 25.1 ± 3.1 years) participated during 2 "Roma 7" international tournaments (2010 and 2011). All the players were at the professional level in the highest Italian rugby union, and 5 of these players also competed at the international level. During the matches (n = 15), the players were filmed to assess game performance. Global positioning system, heart rate (HR), and blood lactate (BLa) concentration data were measured and analyzed. The mean total distance covered throughout matches was 1,221 ± 118 m (first half = 643 ± 70 m and second half = 578 ± 77 m; with a decrease of 11.2%, p > 0.05, Effect Size [ES] = 0.29). The players achieved 88.3 ± 4.2 and 87.7 ± 3.4% of the HRmax during the first and second halves, respectively. The BLa for the first and second halves was 3.9 ± 0.9 and 11.2 ± 1.4 mmol·L, respectively. The decreases in performance occurred consistently in the final 3 minutes of the matches (-40.5% in the distance covered per minute). The difference found in relation to the playing position, although not statistically significant (p = 0.11), showed a large ES (η = 0.20), suggesting possible practical implications. These results demonstrate that rugby sevens is a demanding sport that places stress on both the anaerobic glycolytic and aerobic oxidative energy systems. Strength and conditioning programs designed to train these energy pathways may prevent fatigue-induced reductions in physical performance.

  19. A quantitative analysis of IRAS maps of molecular clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiseman, Jennifer J.; Adams, Fred C.

    1994-01-01

    We present an analysis of IRAS maps of five molecular clouds: Orion, Ophiuchus, Perseus, Taurus, and Lupus. For the classification and description of these astrophysical maps, we use a newly developed technique which considers all maps of a given type to be elements of a pseudometric space. For each physical characteristic of interest, this formal system assigns a distance function (a pseudometric) to the space of all maps: this procedure allows us to measure quantitatively the difference between any two maps and to order the space of all maps. We thus obtain a quantitative classification scheme for molecular clouds. In this present study we use the IRAS continuum maps at 100 and 60 micrometer(s) to produce column density (or optical depth) maps for the five molecular cloud regions given above. For this sample of clouds, we compute the 'output' functions which measure the distribution of density, the distribution of topological components, the self-gravity, and the filamentary nature of the clouds. The results of this work provide a quantitative description of the structure in these molecular cloud regions. We then order the clouds according to the overall environmental 'complexity' of these star-forming regions. Finally, we compare our results with the observed populations of young stellar objects in these clouds and discuss the possible environmental effects on the star-formation process. Our results are consistent with the recently stated conjecture that more massive stars tend to form in more 'complex' environments.

  20. Simulating realistic predator signatures in quantitative fatty acid signature analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bromaghin, Jeffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Diet estimation is an important field within quantitative ecology, providing critical insights into many aspects of ecology and community dynamics. Quantitative fatty acid signature analysis (QFASA) is a prominent method of diet estimation, particularly for marine mammal and bird species. Investigators using QFASA commonly use computer simulation to evaluate statistical characteristics of diet estimators for the populations they study. Similar computer simulations have been used to explore and compare the performance of different variations of the original QFASA diet estimator. In both cases, computer simulations involve bootstrap sampling prey signature data to construct pseudo-predator signatures with known properties. However, bootstrap sample sizes have been selected arbitrarily and pseudo-predator signatures therefore may not have realistic properties. I develop an algorithm to objectively establish bootstrap sample sizes that generates pseudo-predator signatures with realistic properties, thereby enhancing the utility of computer simulation for assessing QFASA estimator performance. The algorithm also appears to be computationally efficient, resulting in bootstrap sample sizes that are smaller than those commonly used. I illustrate the algorithm with an example using data from Chukchi Sea polar bears (Ursus maritimus) and their marine mammal prey. The concepts underlying the approach may have value in other areas of quantitative ecology in which bootstrap samples are post-processed prior to their use.

  1. Altered resting-state functional activity in posttraumatic stress disorder: A quantitative meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ting; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Junran; Zhan, Wang; Li, Lei; Wu, Min; Huang, Hua; Zhu, Hongyan; Kemp, Graham J.; Gong, Qiyong

    2016-01-01

    Many functional neuroimaging studies have reported differential patterns of spontaneous brain activity in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), but the findings are inconsistent and have not so far been quantitatively reviewed. The present study set out to determine consistent, specific regional brain activity alterations in PTSD, using the Effect Size Signed Differential Mapping technique to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis of resting-state functional neuroimaging studies of PTSD that used either a non-trauma (NTC) or a trauma-exposed (TEC) comparison control group. Fifteen functional neuroimaging studies were included, comparing 286 PTSDs, 203 TECs and 155 NTCs. Compared with NTC, PTSD patients showed hyperactivity in the right anterior insula and bilateral cerebellum, and hypoactivity in the dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); compared with TEC, PTSD showed hyperactivity in the ventral mPFC. The pooled meta-analysis showed hypoactivity in the posterior insula, superior temporal, and Heschl’s gyrus in PTSD. Additionally, subgroup meta-analysis (non-medicated subjects vs. NTC) identified abnormal activation in the prefrontal-limbic system. In meta-regression analyses, mean illness duration was positively associated with activity in the right cerebellum (PTSD vs. NTC), and illness severity was negatively associated with activity in the right lingual gyrus (PTSD vs. TEC). PMID:27251865

  2. Quantitative analysis of motion control in long term microgravity.

    PubMed

    Baroni, G; Ferrigno, G; Anolli, A; Andreoni, G; Pedotti, A

    1998-01-01

    In the frame of the 179-days EUROMIR '95 space mission, two in-flight experiments have foreseen quantitative three-dimensional human movement analysis in microgravity. For this aim, a space qualified opto-electronic motion analyser based on passive markers has been installed onboard the Russian Space Station MIR and 8 in flight sessions have been performed. Techhology and method for the collection of kinematics data are described, evaluating the accuracy in three-dimensional marker localisation. Results confirm the suitability of opto-electronic technology for quantitative human motion analysis on orbital modules and raise a set of "lessons learned", leading to the improvement of motion analyser performance with a contemporary swiftness of the on-board operations. Among the experimental program of T4, results of three voluntary posture perturbation protocols are described. The analysis suggests that a short term reinterpretation of proprioceptive information and re-calibration of sensorimotor mechanisms seem to end within the first weeks of flight, while a continuous long term adaptation process allows the refinement of motor performance, in the frame of never abandoned terrestrial strategies.

  3. QUANTITATIVE MASS SPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS OF GLYCOPROTEINS COMBINED WITH ENRICHMENT METHODS

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Yeong Hee; Kim, Jin Young; Yoo, Jong Shin

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) has been a core technology for high sensitive and high-throughput analysis of the enriched glycoproteome in aspects of quantitative assays as well as qualitative profiling of glycoproteins. Because it has been widely recognized that aberrant glycosylation in a glycoprotein may involve in progression of a certain disease, the development of efficient analysis tool for the aberrant glycoproteins is very important for deep understanding about pathological function of the glycoprotein and new biomarker development. This review first describes the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies mainly employing solid-phase extraction methods such as hydrizide-capturing, lectin-specific capturing, and affinity separation techniques based on porous graphitized carbon, hydrophilic interaction chromatography, or immobilized boronic acid. Second, MS-based quantitative analysis strategies coupled with the protein glycosylation-targeting enrichment technologies, by using a label-free MS, stable isotope-labeling, or targeted multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) MS, are summarized with recent published studies. © 2014 The Authors. Mass Spectrometry Reviews Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Rapid Commun. Mass Spec Rev 34:148–165, 2015. PMID:24889823

  4. Flow quantitation by radio frequency analysis of contrast echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Rovai, D; Lombardi, M; Mazzarisi, A; Landini, L; Taddei, L; Distante, A; Benassi, A; L'Abbate, A

    1993-03-01

    Contrast echocardiography has the potential for measuring cardiac output and regional blood flow. However, accurate quantitation is limited both by the use of non-standard contrast agents and by the electronic signal distortion inherent to the echocardiographic instruments. Thus, the aim of this study is to quantify flow by combining a stable contrast agent and a modified echo equipment, able to sample the radio frequency (RF) signal from a region of interest (ROI) in the echo image. The contrast agent SHU-454 (0.8 ml) was bolus injected into an in vitro calf vein, at 23 flow rates (ranging from 376 to 3620 ml/min) but constant volume and pressure. The ROI was placed in the centre of the vein, the RF signal was processed in real time and transferred to a personal computer to generate time-intensity curves. In the absence of recirculation, contrast washout slope and mean transit time (MTT) of curves (1.11-8.52 seconds) yielded excellent correlations with flow: r = 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. To compare the accuracy of RF analysis with that of conventional image processing as to flow quantitation, conventional images were collected in the same flow model by two different scanners: a) the mechanical sector scanner used for RF analysis, and b) a conventional electronic sector scanner. These images were digitized off-line, mean videodensity inside an identical ROI was measured and time-intensity curves were built. MTT by RF was shorter than by videodensitometric analysis of the images generated by the same scanner (p < 0.001). In contrast, MTT by RF was longer than by the conventional scanner (p < 0.001). Significant differences in MTT were also found with changes in the gain setting controls of the conventional scanner. To study the stability of the contrast effect, 6 contrast injections (20 ml) were performed at a constant flow rate during recirculation: the spontaneous decay in RF signal intensity (t1/2 = 64 +/- 8 seconds) was too long to affect MTT significantly

  5. Computer compensation for NMR quantitative analysis of trace components

    SciTech Connect

    Nakayama, T.; Fujiwara, Y.

    1981-07-22

    A computer program has been written that determines trace components and separates overlapping components in multicomponent NMR spectra. This program uses the Lorentzian curve as a theoretical curve of NMR spectra. The coefficients of the Lorentzian are determined by the method of least squares. Systematic errors such as baseline/phase distortion are compensated and random errors are smoothed by taking moving averages, so that there processes contribute substantially to decreasing the accumulation time of spectral data. The accuracy of quantitative analysis of trace components has been improved by two significant figures. This program was applied to determining the abundance of 13C and the saponification degree of PVA.

  6. Quantitative analysis of sideband coupling in photoinduced force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahng, Junghoon; Kim, Bongsu; Lee, Eun Seong; Potma, Eric Olaf

    2016-11-01

    We present a theoretical and experimental analysis of the cantilever motions detected in photoinduced force microscopy (PiFM) using the sideband coupling detection scheme. In sideband coupling, the cantilever dynamics are probed at a combination frequency of a fundamental mechanical eigenmode and the modulation frequency of the laser beam. Using this detection mode, we develop a method for reconstructing the modulated photoinduced force gradient from experimental parameters in a quantitative manner. We show evidence, both theoretically and experimentally, that the sideband coupling detection mode provides PiFM images with superior contrast compared to images obtained when detecting the cantilever motions directly at the laser modulation frequency.

  7. Temporal analysis of remotely sensed turbidity in a coastal archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suominen, Tapio; Tolvanen, Harri

    2016-07-01

    A topographically fragmental archipelago with dynamic waters set the preconditions for assessing coherent remotely sensed information. We generated a turbidity dataset for an archipelago coast in the Baltic Sea from MERIS data (FSG L1b), using CoastColour L1P, L2R and L2W processors. We excluded land and mixed pixels by masking the imagery with accurate (1:10 000) shoreline data. Using temporal linear averaging (TLA), we produced satellite-imagery datasets applicable to temporal composites for the summer seasons of three years. The turbidity assessments and temporally averaged data were compared to in situ observations obtained with coastal monitoring programs. The ability of TLA to estimate missing pixel values was further assessed by cross-validation with the leave-one-out method. The correspondence between L2W turbidity and in situ observations was good (r = 0.89), and even after applying TLA the correspondence remained acceptable (r = 0.78). The datasets revealed spatially divergent temporal water characteristics, which may be relevant to the management, design of monitoring and habitat models. Monitoring observations may be spatially biased if the temporal succession of water properties is not taken into account in coastal areas with anisotropic dispersion of waters and asynchronous annual cycles. Accordingly, areas of varying turbidity may offer a different habitat for aquatic biota than areas of static turbidity, even though they may appear similar if water properties are measured for short annual periods.

  8. Lipid biomarker analysis for the quantitative analysis of airborne microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Macnaughton, S.J.; Jenkins, T.L.; Cormier, M.R.

    1997-08-01

    There is an ever increasing concern regarding the presence of airborne microbial contaminants within indoor air environments. Exposure to such biocontaminants can give rise to large numbers of different health effects including infectious diseases, allergenic responses and respiratory problems, Biocontaminants typically round in indoor air environments include bacteria, fungi, algae, protozoa and dust mites. Mycotoxins, endotoxins, pollens and residues of organisms are also known to cause adverse health effects. A quantitative detection/identification technique independent of culturability that assays both culturable and non culturable biomass including endotoxin is critical in defining risks from indoor air biocontamination. Traditionally, methods employed for the monitoring of microorganism numbers in indoor air environments involve classical culture based techniques and/or direct microscopic counting. It has been repeatedly documented that viable microorganism counts only account for between 0.1-10% of the total community detectable by direct counting. The classic viable microbiologic approach doe`s not provide accurate estimates of microbial fragments or other indoor air components that can act as antigens and induce or potentiate allergic responses. Although bioaerosol samplers are designed to damage the microbes as little as possible, microbial stress has been shown to result from air sampling, aerosolization and microbial collection. Higher collection efficiency results in greater cell damage while less cell damage often results in lower collection efficiency. Filtration can collect particulates at almost 100% efficiency, but captured microorganisms may become dehydrated and damaged resulting in non-culturability, however, the lipid biomarker assays described herein do not rely on cell culture. Lipids are components that are universally distributed throughout cells providing a means to assess independent of culturability.

  9. The spatial and temporal analysis of forest resources and institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweik, Charles M.

    This study addresses a central puzzle facing the Human Dimensions of Global Change research community: How can we understand the influence of environmental policies on human behavior when little or no information is available on the condition of forest resources? This dissertation capitalizes on new research tools, methods and approaches to overcome the "no information about the resource" problem. Specifically, I combine (1) forest mensuration techniques, (2) Global Positioning Systems, (3) Geographic Information Systems (GIS), (4) spatial statistics, (5) remote sensing, and (6) institutional analysis to analyze forest vegetation patterns. I provide explanation of these patterns by considering the incentive structures driving human decision-making and activity and do this through two studies in very different empirical settings. Both studies apply applicable theory related to human behavior and action. Both examine the incentive structures individuals face as they undertake daily activities related to forest resources. The first study, set in East Chitwan, Nepal, identifies spatial patterns in georeferenced forest inventory data and links these to patterns predicted by optimal foraging subject to institutional constraints. The second study compares forest management in one state and one national forest in Indiana, U.S.A. In this effort, I identify spatio-temporal patterns in the forest vegetation captured by a time series of Landsat multispectral images. The combination of natural forest regrowth and property manager actions in response to incentives and constraints explain these patterns. Substantively, both studies identify change in forest resources associated with combinations of the physical, human community and institutional "landscapes" in their regions. In both cases, geographic attributes of institutions (e.g., laws, rules) are found to influence the type and location of human actions. Methodologically, the two studies provide examples of how to control

  10. Temporal scaling behavior of sea-level change in Hong Kong - Multifractal temporally weighted detrended fluctuation analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuanzhi; Ge, Erjia

    2013-01-01

    The rise in global sea levels has been recognized by many scientists as an important global research issue. The process of sea-level change has demonstrated a complex scaling behavior in space and time. Large numbers of tide gauge stations have been built to measure sea-level change in the North Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, North Atlantic Ocean, and Antarctic Ocean. Extensive studies have been devoted to exploring sea-level variation in Asia concerning the Bohai Gulf (China), the Yellow Sea (China), the Mekong Delta (Thailand), and Singapore. Hong Kong, however, a mega city with a population of over 7 million situated in the mouth of the Pear River Estuary in the west and the South China Sea in the east, has yet to be studied, particularly in terms of the temporal scaling behavior of sea-level change. This article presents an approach to studying the temporal scaling behavior of sea-level change over multiple time scales by analyzing the time series of sea-level change in Tai Po Kou, Tsim Bei Tsui, and Quarry Bay from the periods of 1964-2010, 1974-2010, and 1986-2010, respectively. The detection of long-range correlation and multi-fractality of sea-level change seeks answers to the following questions: (1) Is the current sea-level rise associated with and responsible for the next rise over time? (2) Does the sea-level rise have specific temporal patterns manifested by multi-scaling behaviors? and (3) Is the sea-level rise is temporally heterogeneous in the different parts of Hong Kong? Multi-fractal temporally weighted de-trended fluctuation analysis (MF-TWDFA), an extension of multi-fractal de-trended fluctuation analysis (MF-DFA), has been applied in this study to identify long-range correlation and multi-scaling behavior of the sea-level rise in Hong Kong. The experimental results show that the sea-level rise is long-range correlated and multi-fractal. The temporal patterns are heterogeneous over space. This finding implies that mechanisms associated with the

  11. Functional Regression Models for Epistasis Analysis of Multiple Quantitative Traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Futao; Xie, Dan; Liang, Meimei; Xiong, Momiao

    2016-04-01

    To date, most genetic analyses of phenotypes have focused on analyzing single traits or analyzing each phenotype independently. However, joint epistasis analysis of multiple complementary traits will increase statistical power and improve our understanding of the complicated genetic structure of the complex diseases. Despite their importance in uncovering the genetic structure of complex traits, the statistical methods for identifying epistasis in multiple phenotypes remains fundamentally unexplored. To fill this gap, we formulate a test for interaction between two genes in multiple quantitative trait analysis as a multiple functional regression (MFRG) in which the genotype functions (genetic variant profiles) are defined as a function of the genomic position of the genetic variants. We use large-scale simulations to calculate Type I error rates for testing interaction between two genes with multiple phenotypes and to compare the power with multivariate pairwise interaction analysis and single trait interaction analysis by a single variate functional regression model. To further evaluate performance, the MFRG for epistasis analysis is applied to five phenotypes of exome sequence data from the NHLBI's Exome Sequencing Project (ESP) to detect pleiotropic epistasis. A total of 267 pairs of genes that formed a genetic interaction network showed significant evidence of epistasis influencing five traits. The results demonstrate that the joint interaction analysis of multiple phenotypes has a much higher power to detect interaction than the interaction analysis of a single trait and may open a new direction to fully uncovering the genetic structure of multiple phenotypes.

  12. Quantitative chemical analysis of ocular melanosomes in the TEM.

    PubMed

    Eibl, O; Schultheiss, S; Blitgen-Heinecke, P; Schraermeyer, U

    2006-01-01

    Melanosomes in retinal tissues of a human, monkey and rat were analyzed by EDX in the TEM. Samples were prepared by ultramicrotomy at different thicknesses. The material was mounted on Al grids and samples were analyzed in a Zeiss 912 TEM equipped with an Omega filter and EDX detector with ultrathin window. Melanosomes consist of C and O as main components, mole fractions are about 90 and 3-10 at.%, respectively, and small mole fraction ratios, between 2 and 0.1 at.%, of Na, Mg, K, Si, P, S, Cl, Ca. All elements were measured quantitatively by standardless EDX with high precision. Mole fractions of transition metals Fe, Cu and Zn were also measured. For Fe a mole fraction ratio of less than 0.1at.% was found and gives the melanin its paramagnetic properties. Its mole fraction is however close to or below the minimum detectable mass fraction of the used equipment. Only in the human eye and only in the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) the mole fractions of Zn (0.1 at.% or 5000 microg/g) and Cu were clearly beyond the minimum detectable mass fraction. In the rat and monkey eye the mole fraction of Zn was at or below the minimum detectable mass fraction and could not be measured quantitatively. The obtained results yielded the chemical composition of the melanosomes in the choroidal tissue and the retinal pigment epitelium (rpe) of the three different species. The results of the chemical analysis are discussed by mole fraction correlation diagrams. Similarities and differences between the different species are outlined. Correlation behavior was found to hold over species, e.g. the Ca-O correlation. It indicates that Ca is bound to oxygen rich sites in the melanin. These are the first quantitative analyses of melanosomes by EDX reported so far. The quantitative chemical analysis should open a deeper understanding of the metabolic processes in the eye that are of central importance for the understanding of a large number of eye-related diseases. The chemical analysis also

  13. Quantitative Proteomic and Phosphoproteomic Analysis of Trypanosoma cruzi Amastigogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Queiroz, Rayner M. L.; Charneau, Sébastien; Mandacaru, Samuel C.; Schwämmle, Veit; Lima, Beatriz D.; Roepstorff, Peter; Ricart, Carlos A. O.

    2014-01-01

    Chagas disease is a tropical neglected disease endemic in Latin America caused by the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi. The parasite has four major life stages: epimastigote, metacyclic trypomastigote, bloodstream trypomastigote, and amastigote. The differentiation from infective trypomastigotes into replicative amastigotes, called amastigogenesis, takes place in vivo inside mammalian host cells after a period of incubation in an acidic phagolysosome. This differentiation process can be mimicked in vitro by incubating tissue-culture-derived trypomastigotes in acidic DMEM. Here we used this well-established differentiation protocol to perform a comprehensive quantitative proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of T. cruzi amastigogenesis. Samples from fully differentiated forms and two biologically relevant intermediate time points were Lys-C/trypsin digested, iTRAQ-labeled, and multiplexed. Subsequently, phosphopeptides were enriched using a TiO2 matrix. Non-phosphorylated peptides were fractionated via hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography prior to LC-MS/MS analysis. LC-MS/MS and bioinformatics procedures were used for protein and phosphopeptide quantitation, identification, and phosphorylation site assignment. We were able to identify regulated proteins and pathways involved in coordinating amastigogenesis. We also observed that a significant proportion of the regulated proteins were membrane proteins. Modulated phosphorylation events coordinated by protein kinases and phosphatases that are part of the signaling cascade induced by incubation in acidic medium were also evinced. To our knowledge, this work is the most comprehensive quantitative proteomics study of T. cruzi amastigogenesis, and these data will serve as a trustworthy basis for future studies, and possibly for new potential drug targets. PMID:25225356

  14. Analysis of Nociceptive Information Encoded in the Temporal Discharge Patterns of Cutaneous C-Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyeongwon; Jang, Jun Ho; Kim, Sung-Phil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Kim, In Young; Jang, Dong Pyo; Jung, Sung Jun

    2016-01-01

    The generation of pain signals from primary afferent neurons is explained by a labeled-line code. However, this notion cannot apply in a simple way to cutaneous C-fibers, which carry signals from a variety of receptors that respond to various stimuli including agonist chemicals. To represent the discharge patterns of C-fibers according to different agonist chemicals, we have developed a quantitative approach using three consecutive spikes. By using this method, the generation of pain in response to chemical stimuli is shown to be dependent on the temporal aspect of the spike trains. Furthermore, under pathological conditions, gamma-aminobutyric acid resulted in pain behavior without change of spike number but with an altered discharge pattern. Our results suggest that information about the agonist chemicals may be encoded in specific temporal patterns of signals in C-fibers, and nociceptive sensation may be influenced by the extent of temporal summation originating from the temporal patterns. PMID:27917120

  15. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    SciTech Connect

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.

  16. Quantitative analysis of Caenorhabditis elegans chemotaxis using a microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Hu, Liang; Ye, Jinjuan; Tan, Haowei; Ge, Anle; Tang, Lichun; Feng, Xiaojun; Du, Wei; Liu, Bi-Feng

    2015-08-05

    Caenorhabditis elegans, one of the widely studied model organisms, sense external chemical cues and perform relative chemotaxis behaviors through its simple chemosensory neuronal system. To study the mechanism underlying chemosensory behavior, a rapid and reliable method for quantitatively analyzing the worms' behaviors is essential. In this work, we demonstrated a microfluidic approach for investigating chemotaxis responses of worms to chemical gradients. The flow-based microfluidic chip was consisted of circular tree-like microchannels, which was able to generate eight flow streams containing stepwise chemical concentrations without the difference in flow velocity. Worms' upstream swimming into microchannels with various concentrations was monitored for quantitative analysis of the chemotaxis behavior. By using this microfluidic chip, the attractive and repellent responses of C. elegans to NaCl were successfully quantified within several minutes. The results demonstrated the wild type-like repellent responses and severely impaired attractive responses in grk-2 mutant animals with defects in calcium influx. In addition, the chemotaxis analysis of the third stage larvae revealed that its gustatory response was different from that in the adult stage. Thus, our microfluidic method provided a useful platform for studying the chemosensory behaviors of C. elegans and screening of chemosensation-related chemical drugs.

  17. Quantitative analysis in outcome assessment of instrumented lumbosacral arthrodesis.

    PubMed

    Champain, Sabina; Mazel, Christian; Mitulescu, Anca; Skalli, Wafa

    2007-08-01

    The outcome assessment in instrumented lumbosacral fusion mostly focuses on clinical criteria, complications and scores, with a high variability of imaging means, methods of fusion grading and parameters describing degenerative changes, making comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to evaluate the interest of quantified radiographic analysis of lumbar spine in global outcome assessment and to highlight the key biomechanical factors involved. Clinical data and Beaujon-Lassale scores were collected for 49 patients who underwent lumbosacral arthrodesis after prior lumbar discectomy (mean follow-up: 5 years). Sagittal standing and lumbar flexion-extension X-ray films allowed quantifying vertebral, lumbar, pelvic and kinematic parameters of the lumbar spine, which were compared to reference values. Statistics were performed to assess evolution for all variables. At long-term follow-up, 90% of patients presented satisfactory clinical outcomes, associated to normal sagittal alignment; vertebral parameters objectified adjacent level degeneration in four cases (8%). Clinical outcome was correlated (r = 0.8) with fusion that was confirmed in 80% of cases, doubtful in 16% and pseudarthrosis seemed to occur in 4% (2) of cases. In addition to clinical data (outcomes comparable to the literature), quantitative analysis accurately described lumbar spine geometry and kinematics, highlighting parameters related to adjacent level's degeneration and a significant correlation between clinical outcome and fusion. Furthermore, criteria proposed to quantitatively evaluate fusion from lumbar dynamic radiographs seem to be appropriate and in agreement with surgeon's qualitative grading in 87% of cases.

  18. Multivariate calibration applied to the quantitative analysis of infrared spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Haaland, D.M.

    1991-01-01

    Multivariate calibration methods are very useful for improving the precision, accuracy, and reliability of quantitative spectral analyses. Spectroscopists can more effectively use these sophisticated statistical tools if they have a qualitative understanding of the techniques involved. A qualitative picture of the factor analysis multivariate calibration methods of partial least squares (PLS) and principal component regression (PCR) is presented using infrared calibrations based upon spectra of phosphosilicate glass thin films on silicon wafers. Comparisons of the relative prediction abilities of four different multivariate calibration methods are given based on Monte Carlo simulations of spectral calibration and prediction data. The success of multivariate spectral calibrations is demonstrated for several quantitative infrared studies. The infrared absorption and emission spectra of thin-film dielectrics used in the manufacture of microelectronic devices demonstrate rapid, nondestructive at-line and in-situ analyses using PLS calibrations. Finally, the application of multivariate spectral calibrations to reagentless analysis of blood is presented. We have found that the determination of glucose in whole blood taken from diabetics can be precisely monitored from the PLS calibration of either mind- or near-infrared spectra of the blood. Progress toward the non-invasive determination of glucose levels in diabetics is an ultimate goal of this research. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  19. Quantitative analysis of live cells using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tan Rongwei; Qu, Weijuan; Chee, Oi Choo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, Anand

    2010-03-01

    During the life time of a cell, it goes through changes to the plasma membrane as well as its internal structures especially distinctive during processes like cell division and death. Different types of microscope are used to fulfill the observation of the cell's variation. In our experiment, Vero cells have been investigated by using phase contrast microscopy and digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A comparison of the images obtained for cell division is presented here. The conventional phase contrast microscope provided a good imaging method in the real time analysis of cell division. The off-axis digital hologram recorded by the DHM system can be reconstructed to obtain both the intensity image and phase contrast image of the test object. These can be used for live cell imaging to provide multiple results from a single equipment setup. The DHM system, besides being a qualitative tool, is able to provide quantitative results and 3D images of the cell division process. The ability of DHM to provide quantitative analysis makes it an ideal tool for life science applications.

  20. Quantitative analysis of live cells using digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tan Rongwei; Qu, Weijuan; Chee, Oi Choo; Singh, Vijay Raj; Asundi, Anand

    2009-12-01

    During the life time of a cell, it goes through changes to the plasma membrane as well as its internal structures especially distinctive during processes like cell division and death. Different types of microscope are used to fulfill the observation of the cell's variation. In our experiment, Vero cells have been investigated by using phase contrast microscopy and digital holographic microscopy (DHM). A comparison of the images obtained for cell division is presented here. The conventional phase contrast microscope provided a good imaging method in the real time analysis of cell division. The off-axis digital hologram recorded by the DHM system can be reconstructed to obtain both the intensity image and phase contrast image of the test object. These can be used for live cell imaging to provide multiple results from a single equipment setup. The DHM system, besides being a qualitative tool, is able to provide quantitative results and 3D images of the cell division process. The ability of DHM to provide quantitative analysis makes it an ideal tool for life science applications.

  1. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    PubMed Central

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; Mamakhel, Aref H.; Wang, Xiaoping; Hoffmann, Christina M.; Sugimoto, Kunihisa; Overgaard, Jacob; Iversen, Bo Brummerstedt

    2015-01-01

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically, the presence of Cπ⋯Cπ interactions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. The quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations. PMID:26306198

  2. Quantitative analysis of intermolecular interactions in orthorhombic rubrene

    DOE PAGES

    Hathwar, Venkatesha R.; Sist, Mattia; Jørgensen, Mads R. V.; ...

    2015-08-14

    Rubrene is one of the most studied organic semiconductors to date due to its high charge carrier mobility which makes it a potentially applicable compound in modern electronic devices. Previous electronic device characterizations and first principles theoretical calculations assigned the semiconducting properties of rubrene to the presence of a large overlap of the extended π-conjugated core between molecules. We present here the electron density distribution in rubrene at 20 K and at 100 K obtained using a combination of high-resolution X-ray and neutron diffraction data. The topology of the electron density and energies of intermolecular interactions are studied quantitatively. Specifically,more » the presence of Cπ...Cπinteractions between neighbouring tetracene backbones of the rubrene molecules is experimentally confirmed from a topological analysis of the electron density, Non-Covalent Interaction (NCI) analysis and the calculated interaction energy of molecular dimers. A significant contribution to the lattice energy of the crystal is provided by H—H interactions. The electron density features of H—H bonding, and the interaction energy of molecular dimers connected by H—H interaction clearly demonstrate an importance of these weak interactions in the stabilization of the crystal structure. Finally, the quantitative nature of the intermolecular interactions is virtually unchanged between 20 K and 100 K suggesting that any changes in carrier transport at these low temperatures would have a different origin. The obtained experimental results are further supported by theoretical calculations.« less

  3. Evaluation of bitterness in white wine applying descriptive analysis, time-intensity analysis, and temporal dominance of sensations analysis.

    PubMed

    Sokolowsky, Martina; Fischer, Ulrich

    2012-06-30

    Bitterness in wine, especially in white wine, is a complex and sensitive topic as it is a persistent sensation with negative connotation by consumers. However, the molecular base for bitter taste in white wines is still widely unknown yet. At the same time studies dealing with bitterness have to cope with the temporal dynamics of bitter perception. The most common method to describe bitter taste is the static measurement amongst other attributes during a descriptive analysis. A less frequently applied method, the time-intensity analysis, evaluates the temporal gustatory changes focusing on bitterness alone. The most recently developed multidimensional approach of the temporal dominance of sensations method reveals the temporal dominance of bitter taste in relation to other attributes. In order to compare the results comprised with these different sensory methodologies, 13 commercial white wines were evaluated by the same panel. To facilitate a statistical comparison, parameters were extracted from bitterness curves obtained from time-intensity and temporal dominance of sensations analysis and were compared to bitter intensity as well as bitter persistency based on descriptive analysis. Analysis of variance differentiated significantly the wines regarding all measured bitterness parameters obtained from the three sensory techniques. Comparing the information of all sensory parameters by multiple factor analysis and correlation, each technique provided additional valuable information regarding the complex bitter perception in white wine.

  4. Automated monitoring and quantitative analysis of feeding behaviour in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Itskov, Pavel M.; Moreira, José-Maria; Vinnik, Ekaterina; Lopes, Gonçalo; Safarik, Steve; Dickinson, Michael H.; Ribeiro, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Food ingestion is one of the defining behaviours of all animals, but its quantification and analysis remain challenging. This is especially the case for feeding behaviour in small, genetically tractable animals such as Drosophila melanogaster. Here, we present a method based on capacitive measurements, which allows the detailed, automated and high-throughput quantification of feeding behaviour. Using this method, we were able to measure the volume ingested in single sips of an individual, and monitor the absorption of food with high temporal resolution. We demonstrate that flies ingest food by rhythmically extending their proboscis with a frequency that is not modulated by the internal state of the animal. Instead, hunger and satiety homeostatically modulate the microstructure of feeding. These results highlight similarities of food intake regulation between insects, rodents, and humans, pointing to a common strategy in how the nervous systems of different animals control food intake. PMID:25087594

  5. Matching Pursuit Analysis of Auditory Receptive Fields' Spectro-Temporal Properties

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Jörg-Hendrik; Kollmeier, Birger; Anemüller, Jörn

    2017-01-01

    Gabor filters have long been proposed as models for spectro-temporal receptive fields (STRFs), with their specific spectral and temporal rate of modulation qualitatively replicating characteristics of STRF filters estimated from responses to auditory stimuli in physiological data. The present study builds on the Gabor-STRF model by proposing a methodology to quantitatively decompose STRFs into a set of optimally matched Gabor filters through matching pursuit, and by quantitatively evaluating spectral and temporal characteristics of STRFs in terms of the derived optimal Gabor-parameters. To summarize a neuron's spectro-temporal characteristics, we introduce a measure for the “diagonality,” i.e., the extent to which an STRF exhibits spectro-temporal transients which cannot be factorized into a product of a spectral and a temporal modulation. With this methodology, it is shown that approximately half of 52 analyzed zebra finch STRFs can each be well approximated by a single Gabor or a linear combination of two Gabor filters. Moreover, the dominant Gabor functions tend to be oriented either in the spectral or in the temporal direction, with truly “diagonal” Gabor functions rarely being necessary for reconstruction of an STRF's main characteristics. As a toy example for the applicability of STRF and Gabor-STRF filters to auditory detection tasks, we use STRF filters as features in an automatic event detection task and compare them to idealized Gabor filters and mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCCs). STRFs classify a set of six everyday sounds with an accuracy similar to reference Gabor features (94% recognition rate). Spectro-temporal STRF and Gabor features outperform reference spectral MFCCs in quiet and in low noise conditions (down to 0 dB signal to noise ratio). PMID:28232791

  6. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zheng; Duan, Xiaojun; Ouyang, Zhenzheng; Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999-2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics.

  7. [Quantitative analysis of transformer oil dissolved gases using FTIR].

    PubMed

    Zhao, An-xin; Tang, Xiao-jun; Wang, Er-zhen; Zhang, Zhong-hua; Liu, Jun-hua

    2013-09-01

    For the defects of requiring carrier gas and regular calibration, and low safety using chromatography to on line monitor transformer dissolved gases, it was attempted to establish a dissolved gas analysis system based on Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Taking into account the small amount of characteristic gases, many components, detection limit and safety requirements and the difficulty of degasser to put an end to the presence of interference gas, the quantitative analysis model was established based on sparse partial least squares, piecewise section correction and feature variable extraction algorithm using improvement TR regularization. With the characteristic gas of CH4, C2H6, C2H6, and CO2, the results show that using FTIR meets DGA requirements with the spectrum wave number resolution of 1 cm(-1) and optical path of 10 cm.

  8. Quantitative Analysis of the Interdisciplinarity of Applied Mathematics

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of mathematical techniques in scientific research leads to the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. This viewpoint is validated quantitatively here by statistical and network analysis on the corpus PNAS 1999–2013. A network describing the interdisciplinary relationships between disciplines in a panoramic view is built based on the corpus. Specific network indicators show the hub role of applied mathematics in interdisciplinary research. The statistical analysis on the corpus content finds that algorithms, a primary topic of applied mathematics, positively correlates, increasingly co-occurs, and has an equilibrium relationship in the long-run with certain typical research paradigms and methodologies. The finding can be understood as an intrinsic cause of the interdisciplinarity of applied mathematics. PMID:26352604

  9. Fusing Quantitative Requirements Analysis with Model-based Systems Engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornford, Steven L.; Feather, Martin S.; Heron, Vance A.; Jenkins, J. Steven

    2006-01-01

    A vision is presented for fusing quantitative requirements analysis with model-based systems engineering. This vision draws upon and combines emergent themes in the engineering milieu. "Requirements engineering" provides means to explicitly represent requirements (both functional and non-functional) as constraints and preferences on acceptable solutions, and emphasizes early-lifecycle review, analysis and verification of design and development plans. "Design by shopping" emphasizes revealing the space of options available from which to choose (without presuming that all selection criteria have previously been elicited), and provides means to make understandable the range of choices and their ramifications. "Model-based engineering" emphasizes the goal of utilizing a formal representation of all aspects of system design, from development through operations, and provides powerful tool suites that support the practical application of these principles. A first step prototype towards this vision is described, embodying the key capabilities. Illustrations, implications, further challenges and opportunities are outlined.

  10. Quantitative Phase Analysis by the Rietveld Method for Forensic Science.

    PubMed

    Deng, Fei; Lin, Xiaodong; He, Yonghong; Li, Shu; Zi, Run; Lai, Shijun

    2015-07-01

    Quantitative phase analysis (QPA) is helpful to determine the type attribute of the object because it could present the content of the constituents. QPA by Rietveld method requires neither measurement of calibration data nor the use of an internal standard; however, the approximate crystal structure of each phase in a mixture is necessary. In this study, 8 synthetic mixtures composed of potassium nitrate and sulfur were analyzed by Rietveld QPA method. The Rietveld refinement was accomplished with a material analysis using diffraction program and evaluated by three agreement indices. Results showed that Rietveld QPA yielded precise results, with errors generally less than 2.0% absolute. In addition, a criminal case which was broken successfully with the help of Rietveld QPA method was also introduced. This method will allow forensic investigators to acquire detailed information of the material evidence, which could point out the direction for case detection and court proceedings.

  11. 3D quantitative analysis of brain SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loncaric, Sven; Ceskovic, Ivan; Petrovic, Ratimir; Loncaric, Srecko

    2001-07-01

    The main purpose of this work is to develop a computer-based technique for quantitative analysis of 3-D brain images obtained by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In particular, the volume and location of ischemic lesion and penumbra is important for early diagnosis and treatment of infracted regions of the brain. SPECT imaging is typically used as diagnostic tool to assess the size and location of the ischemic lesion. The segmentation method presented in this paper utilizes a 3-D deformable model in order to determine size and location of the regions of interest. The evolution of the model is computed using a level-set implementation of the algorithm. In addition to 3-D deformable model the method utilizes edge detection and region growing for realization of a pre-processing. Initial experimental results have shown that the method is useful for SPECT image analysis.

  12. The workflow for quantitative proteome analysis of chloroplast development and differentiation, chloroplast mutants, and protein interactions by spectral counting.

    PubMed

    Friso, Giulia; Olinares, Paul Dominic B; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2011-01-01

    This chapter outlines a quantitative proteomics workflow using a label-free spectral counting technique. The workflow has been tested on different aspects of chloroplast biology in maize and Arabidopsis, including chloroplast mutant analysis, cell-type specific chloroplast differentiation, and the proplastid-to-chloroplast transition. The workflow involves one-dimensional SDS-PAGE of the proteomes of leaves or chloroplast subfractions, tryptic digestions, online LC-MS/MS using a mass spectrometer with high mass accuracy and duty cycle, followed by semiautomatic data processing. The bioinformatics analysis can effectively select best gene models and deals with quantification of closely related proteins; the workflow avoids overidentification of proteins and results in more accurate protein quantification. The final output includes pairwise comparative quantitative analysis, as well as hierarchical clustering for discovery of temporal and spatial patterns of protein accumulation. A brief discussion about potential pitfalls, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of spectral counting, is provided.

  13. Advances in Temporal Analysis in Learning and Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Molenaar, Inge

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on a trend to analyse temporal characteristics of constructs important to learning and instruction. Different researchers have indicated that we should pay more attention to time in our research to enhance explanatory power and increase validity. Constructs formerly viewed as personal traits, such as self-regulated learning and…

  14. Cubic map algebra functions for spatio-temporal analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mennis, J.; Viger, R.; Tomlin, C.D.

    2005-01-01

    We propose an extension of map algebra to three dimensions for spatio-temporal data handling. This approach yields a new class of map algebra functions that we call "cube functions." Whereas conventional map algebra functions operate on data layers representing two-dimensional space, cube functions operate on data cubes representing two-dimensional space over a third-dimensional period of time. We describe the prototype implementation of a spatio-temporal data structure and selected cube function versions of conventional local, focal, and zonal map algebra functions. The utility of cube functions is demonstrated through a case study analyzing the spatio-temporal variability of remotely sensed, southeastern U.S. vegetation character over various land covers and during different El Nin??o/Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phases. Like conventional map algebra, the application of cube functions may demand significant data preprocessing when integrating diverse data sets, and are subject to limitations related to data storage and algorithm performance. Solutions to these issues include extending data compression and computing strategies for calculations on very large data volumes to spatio-temporal data handling.

  15. Quantitative morphometric analysis for the tectonic characterisation of northern Tunisia.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camafort, Miquel; Pérez-Peña, José Vicente; Booth-Rea, Guillermo; Ranero, César R.; Gràcia, Eulàlia; Azañón, José Miguel; Melki, Fetheddine; Ouadday, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    Northern Tunisia is characterized by low deformation rates and low to moderate seismicity. Although instrumental seismicity reaches maximum magnitudes of Mw 5.5, some historical earthquakes have occurred with catastrophic consequences in this region. Aiming to improve our knowledge of active tectonics in Tunisia, we carried out both a quantitative morphometric analysis and field study in the north-western region. We applied different morphometric tools, like river profiles, knickpoint analysis, hypsometric curves and integrals and drainage pattern anomalies in order to differentiate between zones with high or low recent tectonic activity. This analysis helps identifying uplift and subsidence zones, which we relate to fault activity. Several active faults in a sparse distribution were identified. A selected sector was studied with a field campaign to test the results obtained with the quantitative analysis. During the fieldwork we identified geological evidence of recent activity and a considerable seismogenic potential along El Alia-Teboursouk (ETF) and Dkhila (DF) faults. The ETF fault could be responsible of one of the most devastating historical earthquakes in northern Tunisia that destroyed Utique in 412 A.D. Geological evidence include fluvial terraces folded by faults, striated and cracked pebbles, clastic dikes, sand volcanoes, coseismic cracks, etc. Although not reflected in the instrumental seismicity, our results support an important seismic hazard, evidenced by the several active tectonic structures identified and the two seismogenic faults described. After obtaining the current active tectonic framework of Tunisia we discuss our results within the western Mediterranean trying to contribute to the understanding of the western Mediterranean tectonic context. With our results, we suggest that the main reason explaining the sparse and scarce seismicity of the area in contrast with the adjacent parts of the Nubia-Eurasia boundary is due to its extended

  16. Temporal proteomic analysis of HIV infection reveals remodelling of the host phosphoproteome by lentiviral Vif variants

    PubMed Central

    Greenwood, Edward JD; Matheson, Nicholas J; Wals, Kim; van den Boomen, Dick JH; Antrobus, Robin; Williamson, James C; Lehner, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Viruses manipulate host factors to enhance their replication and evade cellular restriction. We used multiplex tandem mass tag (TMT)-based whole cell proteomics to perform a comprehensive time course analysis of >6500 viral and cellular proteins during HIV infection. To enable specific functional predictions, we categorized cellular proteins regulated by HIV according to their patterns of temporal expression. We focussed on proteins depleted with similar kinetics to APOBEC3C, and found the viral accessory protein Vif to be necessary and sufficient for CUL5-dependent proteasomal degradation of all members of the B56 family of regulatory subunits of the key cellular phosphatase PP2A (PPP2R5A-E). Quantitative phosphoproteomic analysis of HIV-infected cells confirmed Vif-dependent hyperphosphorylation of >200 cellular proteins, particularly substrates of the aurora kinases. The ability of Vif to target PPP2R5 subunits is found in primate and non-primate lentiviral lineages, and remodeling of the cellular phosphoproteome is therefore a second ancient and conserved Vif function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18296.001 PMID:27690223

  17. Quantitative analysis of cyclic beta-turn models.

    PubMed Central

    Perczel, A.; Fasman, G. D.

    1992-01-01

    The beta-turn is a frequently found structural unit in the conformation of globular proteins. Although the circular dichroism (CD) spectra of the alpha-helix and beta-pleated sheet are well defined, there remains some ambiguity concerning the pure component CD spectra of the different types of beta-turns. Recently, it has been reported (Hollósi, M., Kövér, K.E., Holly, S., Radics, L., & Fasman, G.D., 1987, Biopolymers 26, 1527-1572; Perczel, A., Hollósi, M., Foxman, B.M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991a, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 113, 9772-9784) that some pseudohexapeptides (e.g., the cyclo[(delta)Ava-Gly-Pro-Aaa-Gly] where Aaa = Ser, Ser(OtBu), or Gly) in many solvents adopt a conformational mixture of type I and the type II beta-turns, although the X-ray-determined conformation was an ideal type I beta-turn. In addition to these pseudohexapeptides, conformational analysis was also carried out on three pseudotetrapeptides and three pseudooctapeptides. The target of the conformation analysis reported herein was to determine whether the ring stress of the above beta-turn models has an influence on their conformational properties. Quantitative nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) measurements yielded interproton distances. The conformational average distances so obtained were interpreted utilizing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to yield the conformational percentages. These conformational ratios were correlated with the conformational weights obtained by quantitative CD analysis of the same compounds. The pure component CD curves of type I and type II beta-turns were also obtained, using a recently developed algorithm (Perczel, A., Tusnády, G., Hollósi, M., & Fasman, G.D., 1991b, Protein Eng. 4(6), 669-679). For the first time the results of a CD deconvolution, based on the CD spectra of 14 beta-turn models, were assigned by quantitative NOE results. The NOE experiments confirmed the ratios of the component curves found for the two major beta-turns by CD analysis. These results

  18. Quantitative image analysis in sonograms of the thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catherine, Skouroliakou; Maria, Lyra; Aristides, Antoniou; Lambros, Vlahos

    2006-12-01

    High-resolution, real-time ultrasound is a routine examination for assessing the disorders of the thyroid gland. However, the current diagnosis practice is based mainly on qualitative evaluation of the resulting sonograms, therefore depending on the physician's experience. Computerized texture analysis is widely employed in sonographic images of various organs (liver, breast), and it has been proven to increase the sensitivity of diagnosis by providing a better tissue characterization. The present study attempts to characterize thyroid tissue by automatic texture analysis. The texture features that are calculated are based on co-occurrence matrices as they have been proposed by Haralick. The sample consists of 40 patients. For each patient two sonographic images (one for each lobe) are recorded in DICOM format. The lobe is manually delineated in each sonogram, and the co-occurrence matrices for 52 separation vectors are calculated. The texture features extracted from each one of these matrices are: contrast, correlation, energy and homogeneity. Primary component analysis is used to select the optimal set of features. The statistical analysis resulted in the extraction of 21 optimal descriptors. The optimal descriptors are all co-occurrence parameters as the first-order statistics did not prove to be representative of the images characteristics. The bigger number of components depends mainly on correlation for very close or very far distances. The results indicate that quantitative analysis of thyroid sonograms can provide an objective characterization of thyroid tissue.

  19. Quantitative FRET Analysis by Fast Acquisition Time Domain FLIM at High Spatial Resolution in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Padilla-Parra, Sergi; Audugé, Nicolas; Coppey-Moisan, Maïté; Tramier, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis in Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments in live cells for protein interaction studies is still a challenging issue. In a two-component system (FRET and no FRET donor species), fitting of fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) data gives the fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (fD) and the intrinsic transfer efficiency. But when fast FLIM acquisitions are used to monitor dynamic changes in protein-protein interactions at high spatial and temporal resolutions in living cells, photon statistics and time resolution are limited. In this case, fitting procedures are not reliable, even for single lifetime donors. We introduce the new concept of a minimal fraction of donor molecules involved in FRET (mfD), coming from the mathematical minimization of fD. We find particular advantage in the use of mfD because it can be obtained without fitting procedures and it is derived directly from FLIM data. mfD constitutes an interesting quantitative parameter for live cell studies because it is related to the minimal relative concentration of interacting proteins. For multi-lifetime donors, the process of fitting complex fluorescence decays to find at least four reliable lifetimes is a near impossible task. Here, mfD extension for multi-lifetime donors is the only quantitative determinant. We applied this methodology for imaging the interaction between the bromodomains of TAFII250 and acetylated histones H4 in living cells at high resolution. We show the existence of discrete acetylated chromatin domains where the minimal fraction of bromodomain interacting with acetylated H4 oscillates from 0.26 to 0.36 and whose size is smaller than half of one micron cube. We demonstrate that mfD by itself is a useful tool to investigate quantitatively protein interactions in live cells, especially when using fast FRET-FLIM acquisition times. PMID:18539634

  20. EBprot: Statistical analysis of labeling-based quantitative proteomics data.

    PubMed

    Koh, Hiromi W L; Swa, Hannah L F; Fermin, Damian; Ler, Siok Ghee; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Choi, Hyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Labeling-based proteomics is a powerful method for detection of differentially expressed proteins (DEPs). The current data analysis platform typically relies on protein-level ratios, which is obtained by summarizing peptide-level ratios for each protein. In shotgun proteomics, however, some proteins are quantified with more peptides than others, and this reproducibility information is not incorporated into the differential expression (DE) analysis. Here, we propose a novel probabilistic framework EBprot that directly models the peptide-protein hierarchy and rewards the proteins with reproducible evidence of DE over multiple peptides. To evaluate its performance with known DE states, we conducted a simulation study to show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot provides better receiver-operating characteristic and more accurate estimation of the false discovery rates than the methods based on protein-level ratios. We also demonstrate superior classification performance of peptide-level EBprot analysis in a spike-in dataset. To illustrate the wide applicability of EBprot in different experimental designs, we applied EBprot to a dataset for lung cancer subtype analysis with biological replicates and another dataset for time course phosphoproteome analysis of EGF-stimulated HeLa cells with multiplexed labeling. Through these examples, we show that the peptide-level analysis of EBprot is a robust alternative to the existing statistical methods for the DE analysis of labeling-based quantitative datasets. The software suite is freely available on the Sourceforge website http://ebprot.sourceforge.net/. All MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001426 (http://proteomecentral.proteomexchange.org/dataset/PXD001426/).

  1. In vivo osteogenesis assay: a rapid method for quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Dennis, J E; Konstantakos, E K; Arm, D; Caplan, A I

    1998-08-01

    A quantitative in vivo osteogenesis assay is a useful tool for the analysis of cells and bioactive factors that affect the amount or rate of bone formation. There are currently two assays in general use for the in vivo assessment of osteogenesis by isolated cells: diffusion chambers and porous calcium phosphate ceramics. Due to the relative ease of specimen preparation and reproducibility of results, the porous ceramic assay was chosen for the development of a rapid method for quantitating in vivo bone formation. The ceramic cube implantation technique consists of combining osteogenic cells with 27-mm3 porous calcium phosphate ceramics, implanting the cell-ceramic composites subcutaneously into an immuno-tolerant host, and, after 2-6 weeks, harvesting and preparing the ceramic implants for histologic analysis. A drawback to the analysis of bone formation within these porous ceramics is that the entire cube must be examined to find small foci of bone present in some samples; a single cross-sectional area is not representative. For this reason, image analysis of serial sections from ceramics is often prohibitively time-consuming. Two alternative scoring methodologies were tested and compared to bone volume measurements obtained by image analysis. The two subjective scoring methods were: (1) Bone Scale: the amount of bone within pores of the ceramic implant is estimated on a scale of 0-4 based on the degree of bone fill (0=no bone, 1=up to 25%, 2=25 to 75%, 4=75 to 100% fill); and (2) Percentage Bone: the amount of bone is estimated by determining the percentage of ceramic pores which contain bone. Every tenth section of serially sectioned cubes was scored by each of these methods under double-blind conditions, and the Bone Scale and Percentage Bone results were directly compared to image analysis measurements from identical samples. Correlation coefficients indicate that the Percentage Bone method was more accurate than the Bone Scale scoring method. The Bone Scale

  2. Phenotypic analysis of Arabidopsis mutants: quantitative analysis of root growth.

    PubMed

    Doerner, Peter

    2008-03-01

    INTRODUCTIONThe growth of plant roots is very easy to measure and is particularly straightforward in Arabidopsis thaliana, because the increase in organ size is essentially restricted to one dimension. The precise measurement of root apical growth can be used to accurately determine growth activity (the rate of growth at a given time) during development in mutants, transgenic backgrounds, or in response to experimental treatments. Root growth is measured in a number of ways, the simplest of which is to grow the seedlings in a Petri dish and record the position of the advancing root tip at appropriate time points. The increase in root length is measured with a ruler and the data are entered into Microsoft Excel for analysis. When dealing with large numbers of seedlings, however, this procedure can be tedious, as well as inaccurate. An alternative approach, described in this protocol, uses "snapshots" of the growing plants, which are taken using gel-documentation equipment (i.e., a video camera with a frame-grabber unit, now commonly used to capture images from ethidium-bromide-stained electrophoresis gels). The images are analyzed using publicly available software (NIH-Image), which allows the user simply to cut and paste data into Microsoft Excel.

  3. Functional Linear Models for Association Analysis of Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Mills, James L.; Wilson, Alexander F.; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E.; Xiong, Momiao

    2014-01-01

    Functional linear models are developed in this paper for testing associations between quantitative traits and genetic variants, which can be rare variants or common variants or the combination of the two. By treating multiple genetic variants of an individual in a human population as a realization of a stochastic process, the genome of an individual in a chromosome region is a continuum of sequence data rather than discrete observations. The genome of an individual is viewed as a stochastic function that contains both linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) information of the genetic markers. By using techniques of functional data analysis, both fixed and mixed effect functional linear models are built to test the association between quantitative traits and genetic variants adjusting for covariates. After extensive simulation analysis, it is shown that the F-distributed tests of the proposed fixed effect functional linear models have higher power than that of sequence kernel association test (SKAT) and its optimal unified test (SKAT-O) for three scenarios in most cases: (1) the causal variants are all rare, (2) the causal variants are both rare and common, and (3) the causal variants are common. The superior performance of the fixed effect functional linear models is most likely due to its optimal utilization of both genetic linkage and LD information of multiple genetic variants in a genome and similarity among different individuals, while SKAT and SKAT-O only model the similarities and pairwise LD but do not model linkage and higher order LD information sufficiently. In addition, the proposed fixed effect models generate accurate type I error rates in simulation studies. We also show that the functional kernel score tests of the proposed mixed effect functional linear models are preferable in candidate gene analysis and small sample problems. The methods are applied to analyze three biochemical traits in data from the Trinity Students Study. PMID:24130119

  4. Quantitative Analysis of Single-Molecule RNA-Protein Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, Alexander; Schoening, Jan C.; Anselmetti, Dario; Staiger, Dorothee; Ros, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Abstract RNA-binding proteins impact gene expression at the posttranscriptional level by interacting with cognate cis elements within the transcripts. Here, we apply dynamic single-molecule force spectroscopy to study the interaction of the Arabidopsis glycine-rich RNA-binding protein AtGRP8 with its RNA target. A dwell-time-dependent analysis of the single-molecule data in combination with competition assays and site-directed mutagenesis of both the RNA target and the RNA-binding domain of the protein allowed us to distinguish and quantify two different binding modes. For dwell times <0.21 s an unspecific complex with a lifetime of 0.56 s is observed, whereas dwell times >0.33 s result in a specific interaction with a lifetime of 208 s. The corresponding reaction lengths are 0.28 nm for the unspecific and 0.55 nm for the specific AtGRP8-RNA interactions, indicating formation of a tighter complex with increasing dwell time. These two binding modes cannot be dissected in ensemble experiments. Quantitative titration in RNA bandshift experiments yields an ensemble-averaged equilibrium constant of dissociation of KD = 2 × 10−7 M. Assuming comparable on-rates for the specific and nonspecific binding modes allows us to estimate their free energies as ΔG0 = −42 kJ/mol and ΔG0 = −28 kJ/mol for the specific and nonspecific binding modes, respectively. Thus, we show that single-molecule force spectroscopy with a refined statistical analysis is a potent tool for the analysis of protein-RNA interactions without the drawback of ensemble averaging. This makes it possible to discriminate between different binding modes or sites and to analyze them quantitatively. We propose that this method could be applied to complex interactions of biomolecules in general, and be of particular interest for the investigation of multivalent binding reactions. PMID:19527663

  5. Functional linear models for association analysis of quantitative traits.

    PubMed

    Fan, Ruzong; Wang, Yifan; Mills, James L; Wilson, Alexander F; Bailey-Wilson, Joan E; Xiong, Momiao

    2013-11-01

    Functional linear models are developed in this paper for testing associations between quantitative traits and genetic variants, which can be rare variants or common variants or the combination of the two. By treating multiple genetic variants of an individual in a human population as a realization of a stochastic process, the genome of an individual in a chromosome region is a continuum of sequence data rather than discrete observations. The genome of an individual is viewed as a stochastic function that contains both linkage and linkage disequilibrium (LD) information of the genetic markers. By using techniques of functional data analysis, both fixed and mixed effect functional linear models are built to test the association between quantitative traits and genetic variants adjusting for covariates. After extensive simulation analysis, it is shown that the F-distributed tests of the proposed fixed effect functional linear models have higher power than that of sequence kernel association test (SKAT) and its optimal unified test (SKAT-O) for three scenarios in most cases: (1) the causal variants are all rare, (2) the causal variants are both rare and common, and (3) the causal variants are common. The superior performance of the fixed effect functional linear models is most likely due to its optimal utilization of both genetic linkage and LD information of multiple genetic variants in a genome and similarity among different individuals, while SKAT and SKAT-O only model the similarities and pairwise LD but do not model linkage and higher order LD information sufficiently. In addition, the proposed fixed effect models generate accurate type I error rates in simulation studies. We also show that the functional kernel score tests of the proposed mixed effect functional linear models are preferable in candidate gene analysis and small sample problems. The methods are applied to analyze three biochemical traits in data from the Trinity Students Study.

  6. The Quantitative Analysis of Chennai Automotive Industry Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhaskaran, Ethirajan

    2016-07-01

    Chennai, also called as Detroit of India due to presence of Automotive Industry producing over 40 % of the India's vehicle and components. During 2001-2002, the Automotive Component Industries (ACI) in Ambattur, Thirumalizai and Thirumudivakkam Industrial Estate, Chennai has faced problems on infrastructure, technology, procurement, production and marketing. The objective is to study the Quantitative Performance of Chennai Automotive Industry Cluster before (2001-2002) and after the CDA (2008-2009). The methodology adopted is collection of primary data from 100 ACI using quantitative questionnaire and analyzing using Correlation Analysis (CA), Regression Analysis (RA), Friedman Test (FMT), and Kruskall Wallis Test (KWT).The CA computed for the different set of variables reveals that there is high degree of relationship between the variables studied. The RA models constructed establish the strong relationship between the dependent variable and a host of independent variables. The models proposed here reveal the approximate relationship in a closer form. KWT proves, there is no significant difference between three locations clusters with respect to: Net Profit, Production Cost, Marketing Costs, Procurement Costs and Gross Output. This supports that each location has contributed for development of automobile component cluster uniformly. The FMT proves, there is no significant difference between industrial units in respect of cost like Production, Infrastructure, Technology, Marketing and Net Profit. To conclude, the Automotive Industries have fully utilized the Physical Infrastructure and Centralised Facilities by adopting CDA and now exporting their products to North America, South America, Europe, Australia, Africa and Asia. The value chain analysis models have been implemented in all the cluster units. This Cluster Development Approach (CDA) model can be implemented in industries of under developed and developing countries for cost reduction and productivity

  7. Hydrodynamics Flow and Transport Characterization of a Karstified Physical Model Using Temporal Moment Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2013-12-01

    High productivity of karst groundwater systems is often associated with conduit flow and high matrix permeability. Spatial heterogeneities and anisotropy, among others factors, result in highly complex flow patterns in these systems. The same characteristics that make these aquifers very productive also make them highly vulnerable to contamination and a likely for contaminant exposure. The understanding of contamination fate and transport processes in these complex aquifers demand different statistical and numerical approaches, such as the Temporal Moment Analysis (TMA). TMA of solute breakthrough curves provide qualitative and quantitative results to characterize hydrodynamic variables that affect the release, mobility, persistence, and possible pathways of contaminants in karst groundwater systems. The general objective of this work is to characterize flow and transport processes in conduit and diffusion-dominated flow under low and high flow conditions using TMA in a karstified physical model. A multidimensional, laboratory-scale, Geo-Hydrobed model (GHM) containing a karstified limestone block collected from the karst aquifer formation of northern Puerto Rico are used for this purpose. Experimental work entails injecting dissolved CaCl2 and trichloroethene (TCE) in the upstream boundary of the GHM while monitoring their concentrations spatially and temporally in the limestone under different groundwater flow regimes. Results from the TMA show a highly heterogeneous system resulting in large preferential flow components and specific mass-transfer limitations zones especially in diffuse flow areas. Flow variables like velocity and Reynolds number indicates defined preferential flow paths increasing spatially as flow rate increase. TMA results show to be qualitatively consistent with a previous statistical novel approach developed using mixed models. Comparison between the dissolved CaCl2 tracer and TCE show implications for reactive contaminants in the karst

  8. Advance in orientation microscopy: quantitative analysis of nanocrystalline structures.

    PubMed

    Seyring, Martin; Song, Xiaoyan; Rettenmayr, Markus

    2011-04-26

    The special properties of nanocrystalline materials are generally accepted to be a consequence of the high density of planar defects (grain and twin boundaries) and their characteristics. However, until now, nanograin structures have not been characterized with similar detail and statistical relevance as coarse-grained materials, due to the lack of an appropriate method. In the present paper, a novel method based on quantitative nanobeam diffraction in transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented to determine the misorientation of adjacent nanograins and subgrains. Spatial resolution of <5 nm can be achieved. This method is applicable to characterize orientation relationships in wire, film, and bulk materials with nanocrystalline structures. As a model material, nanocrystalline Cu is used. Several important features of the nanograin structure are discovered utilizing quantitative analysis: the fraction of twin boundaries is substantially higher than that observed in bright-field images in the TEM; small angle grain boundaries are prominent; there is an obvious dependence of the grain boundary characteristics on grain size distribution and mean grain size.

  9. Quantitative analysis of tumor burden in mouse lung via MRI.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Vanessa K; Garbow, Joel R; Krupnick, Alexander S; Engelbach, John A; Nehorai, Arye

    2012-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Despite recent advances in screening protocols, the majority of patients still present with advanced or disseminated disease. Preclinical rodent models provide a unique opportunity to test novel therapeutic drugs for targeting lung cancer. Respiratory-gated MRI is a key tool for quantitatively measuring lung-tumor burden and monitoring the time-course progression of individual tumors in mouse models of primary and metastatic lung cancer. However, quantitative analysis of lung-tumor burden in mice by MRI presents significant challenges. Herein, a method for measuring tumor burden based upon average lung-image intensity is described and validated. The method requires accurate lung segmentation; its efficiency and throughput would be greatly aided by the ability to automatically segment the lungs. A technique for automated lung segmentation in the presence of varying tumor burden levels is presented. The method includes development of a new, two-dimensional parametric model of the mouse lungs and a multi-faceted cost function to optimally fit the model parameters to each image. Results demonstrate a strong correlation (0.93), comparable with that of fully manual expert segmentation, between the automated method's tumor-burden metric and the tumor burden measured by lung weight.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of Peripheral Tissue Perfusion Using Spatiotemporal Molecular Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jungsul; Koh, Gou Young; Kwon, Kihwan; Choi, Chulhee

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion is challenging but necessary to diagnose peripheral vascular insufficiency. Because near infrared (NIR) radiation can penetrate relatively deep into tissue, significant attention has been given to intravital NIR fluorescence imaging. Methodology/Principal Findings We developed a new optical imaging-based strategy for quantitative measurement of peripheral tissue perfusion by time-series analysis of local pharmacokinetics of the NIR fluorophore, indocyanine green (ICG). Time-series NIR fluorescence images were obtained after injecting ICG intravenously in a murine hindlimb ischemia model. Mathematical modeling and computational simulations were used for translating time-series ICG images into quantitative pixel perfusion rates and a perfusion map. We could successfully predict the prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs based on the perfusion profiles obtained immediately after surgery, which were dependent on the preexisting collaterals. This method also reflected increases in perfusion and improvements in prognosis of ischemic hindlimbs induced by treatment with vascular endothelial growth factor and COMP-angiopoietin-1. Conclusions/Significance We propose that this novel NIR-imaging-based strategy is a powerful tool for biomedical studies related to the evaluation of therapeutic interventions directed at stimulating angiogenesis. PMID:19169354

  11. Quantitative analysis of incipient mineral loss in hard tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matvienko, Anna; Mandelis, Andreas; Hellen, Adam; Jeon, Raymond; Abrams, Stephen; Amaechi, Bennett

    2009-02-01

    A coupled diffuse-photon-density-wave and thermal-wave theoretical model was developed to describe the biothermophotonic phenomena in multi-layered hard tissue structures. Photothermal Radiometry was applied as a safe, non-destructive, and highly sensitive tool for the detection of early tooth enamel demineralization to test the theory. Extracted human tooth was treated sequentially with an artificial demineralization gel to simulate controlled mineral loss in the enamel. The experimental setup included a semiconductor laser (659 nm, 120 mW) as the source of the photothermal signal. Modulated laser light generated infrared blackbody radiation from teeth upon absorption and nonradiative energy conversion. The infrared flux emitted by the treated region of the tooth surface and sub-surface was monitored with an infrared detector, both before and after treatment. Frequency scans with a laser beam size of 3 mm were performed in order to guarantee one-dimensionality of the photothermal field. TMR images showed clear differences between sound and demineralized enamel, however this technique is destructive. Dental radiographs did not indicate any changes. The photothermal signal showed clear change even after 1 min of gel treatment. As a result of the fittings, thermal and optical properties of sound and demineralized enamel were obtained, which allowed for quantitative differentiation of healthy and non-healthy regions. In conclusion, the developed model was shown to be a promising tool for non-invasive quantitative analysis of early demineralization of hard tissues.

  12. Temporal coherence and attention in auditory scene analysis.

    PubMed

    Shamma, Shihab A; Elhilali, Mounya; Micheyl, Christophe

    2011-03-01

    Humans and other animals can attend to one of multiple sounds and follow it selectively over time. The neural underpinnings of this perceptual feat remain mysterious. Some studies have concluded that sounds are heard as separate streams when they activate well-separated populations of central auditory neurons, and that this process is largely pre-attentive. Here, we argue instead that stream formation depends primarily on temporal coherence between responses that encode various features of a sound source. Furthermore, we postulate that only when attention is directed towards a particular feature (e.g. pitch) do all other temporally coherent features of that source (e.g. timbre and location) become bound together as a stream that is segregated from the incoherent features of other sources.

  13. Multi-Temporal Analysis of Landsat Imagery for Bathymetry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    assembled for calibration areas 3A, 3B, 3C, and 3D (see Figure 1, page 10). Each of these data sets consisted of the average ship-measured depth over...mathematical details of the parameter adjustment procedure were developed. Second, a multi-temporal data set was assembled from six previously processed...surface and atmospheric effects can lead to significant errors in this term. The extinction coefficient could be highly variable both spatially and

  14. Quantitative multi-image analysis for biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

    PubMed

    Hedegaard, Martin A B; Bergholt, Mads S; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-05-01

    Imaging by Raman spectroscopy enables unparalleled label-free insights into cell and tissue composition at the molecular level. With established approaches limited to single image analysis, there are currently no general guidelines or consensus on how to quantify biochemical components across multiple Raman images. Here, we describe a broadly applicable methodology for the combination of multiple Raman images into a single image for analysis. This is achieved by removing image specific background interference, unfolding the series of Raman images into a single dataset, and normalisation of each Raman spectrum to render comparable Raman images. Multivariate image analysis is finally applied to derive the contributing 'pure' biochemical spectra for relative quantification. We present our methodology using four independently measured Raman images of control cells and four images of cells treated with strontium ions from substituted bioactive glass. We show that the relative biochemical distribution per area of the cells can be quantified. In addition, using k-means clustering, we are able to discriminate between the two cell types over multiple Raman images. This study shows a streamlined quantitative multi-image analysis tool for improving cell/tissue characterisation and opens new avenues in biomedical Raman spectroscopic imaging.

  15. Quantitative three-dimensional holographic interferometry for flow field analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, C. M. E.; Parker, S. C. J.; Bryanston-Cross, P. J.

    Holographic interferometry offers the potential for quantitative, wholefield analysis of three-dimensional compressible flows. The technique is non-intrusive, does not require the introduction of seeding particles, and records the entire flow information within the pulse duration of a Q-switched ruby laser (~30ns). At present, however, holographic interferometry is mainly used qualitatively due to the practical restrictions of data recording, acquisition and processing. To address the potential of holographic flow analysis a prototype multi-channel interferometer has been designed and preliminary wind tunnel results have been obtained. The proposed configuration uses specular illumination which, unlike comparable diffuse systems, does not suffer from fringe localisation and speckle noise. Beam collimation and steering through the flow field is achieved in a single operation by the use of holographic optical elements (HOEs). The resulting design is compact, light efficient, has aberration compensation, and the recorded data are conducive to both tomographic analysis and direct comparison to computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions. Holograms have been recorded of simple two-dimensional and axisymmetric compressible flows, to compare the accuracy of holographic density measurements with data from conventional pressure sensors and CFD codes. Data extraction from the holograms, and the elimination of rigid body motion, was achieved using digital Fourier transform fringe analysis. The introduction of phase errors by image processing has been investigated by analysing simulated fringe patterns generated from a combination of experimental amplitude information and computer generated phase data.

  16. Multipoint quantitative-trait linkage analysis in general pedigrees.

    PubMed Central

    Almasy, L; Blangero, J

    1998-01-01

    Multipoint linkage analysis of quantitative-trait loci (QTLs) has previously been restricted to sibships and small pedigrees. In this article, we show how variance-component linkage methods can be used in pedigrees of arbitrary size and complexity, and we develop a general framework for multipoint identity-by-descent (IBD) probability calculations. We extend the sib-pair multipoint mapping approach of Fulker et al. to general relative pairs. This multipoint IBD method uses the proportion of alleles shared identical by descent at genotyped loci to estimate IBD sharing at arbitrary points along a chromosome for each relative pair. We have derived correlations in IBD sharing as a function of chromosomal distance for relative pairs in general pedigrees and provide a simple framework whereby these correlations can be easily obtained for any relative pair related by a single line of descent or by multiple independent lines of descent. Once calculated, the multipoint relative-pair IBDs can be utilized in variance-component linkage analysis, which considers the likelihood of the entire pedigree jointly. Examples are given that use simulated data, demonstrating both the accuracy of QTL localization and the increase in power provided by multipoint analysis with 5-, 10-, and 20-cM marker maps. The general pedigree variance component and IBD estimation methods have been implemented in the SOLAR (Sequential Oligogenic Linkage Analysis Routines) computer package. PMID:9545414

  17. Quantitative analysis of the reconstruction performance of interpolants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, Donald L.; Park, Stephen K.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis presented provides a quantitative measure of the reconstruction or interpolation performance of linear, shift-invariant interpolants. The performance criterion is the mean square error of the difference between the sampled and reconstructed functions. The analysis is applicable to reconstruction algorithms used in image processing and to many types of splines used in numerical analysis and computer graphics. When formulated in the frequency domain, the mean square error clearly separates the contribution of the interpolation method from the contribution of the sampled data. The equations provide a rational basis for selecting an optimal interpolant; that is, one which minimizes the mean square error. The analysis has been applied to a selection of frequently used data splines and reconstruction algorithms: parametric cubic and quintic Hermite splines, exponential and nu splines (including the special case of the cubic spline), parametric cubic convolution, Keys' fourth-order cubic, and a cubic with a discontinuous first derivative. The emphasis in this paper is on the image-dependent case in which no a priori knowledge of the frequency spectrum of the sampled function is assumed.

  18. A Temporal Examination of the Planktonic and Biofilm Proteome of Whole Cell Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Using Quantitative Mass Spectrometry*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Amber J.; Murphy, Kathleen; Krieger, Jonathan R.; Brewer, Dyanne; Taylor, Paul; Habash, Marc; Khursigara, Cezar M.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic polymicrobial lung infections are the chief complication in patients with cystic fibrosis. The dominant pathogen in late-stage disease is Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which forms recalcitrant, structured communities known as biofilms. Many aspects of biofilm biology are poorly understood; consequently, effective treatment of these infections is limited, and cystic fibrosis remains fatal. Here we combined in-solution protein digestion of triplicate growth-matched samples with a high-performance mass spectrometry platform to provide the most comprehensive proteomic dataset known to date for whole cell P. aeruginosa PAO1 grown in biofilm cultures. Our analysis included protein–protein interaction networks and PseudoCAP functional information for unique and significantly modulated proteins at three different time points. Secondary analysis of a subgroup of proteins using extracted ion currents validated the spectral counting data of 1884 high-confidence proteins. In this paper we demonstrate a greater representation of proteins related to metabolism, DNA stability, and molecular activity in planktonically grown P. aeruginosa PAO1. In addition, several virulence-related proteins were increased during planktonic growth, including multiple proteins encoded by the pyoverdine locus, uncharacterized proteins with sequence similarity to mammalian cell entry protein, and a member of the hemagglutinin family of adhesins, HecA. Conversely, biofilm samples contained an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to an adhesion protein with self-association characteristics (AidA). Increased levels of several phenazine biosynthetic proteins, an uncharacterized protein with sequence similarity to a metallo-beta-lactamase, and lower levels of the drug target gyrA support the putative characteristics of in situ P. aeruginosa infections, including competitive fitness and antibiotic resistance. This quantitative whole cell approach advances the existing P. aeruginosa

  19. Quantitative multielement analysis using high energy particle bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. J.; Neal, G. F.; Allen, R. O.

    1974-01-01

    Charged particles ranging in energy from 0.8 to 4.0 MeV are used to induce resonant nuclear reactions, Coulomb excitation (gamma X-rays), and X-ray emission in both thick and thin targets. Quantitative analysis is possible for elements from Li to Pb in complex environmental samples, although the matrix can severely reduce the sensitivity. It is necessary to use a comparator technique for the gamma-rays, while for X-rays an internal standard can be used. A USGS standard rock is analyzed for a total of 28 elements. Water samples can be analyzed either by nebulizing the sample doped with Cs or Y onto a thin formvar film or by extracting the sample (with or without an internal standard) onto ion exchange resin which is pressed into a pellet.

  20. Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of Painting Arts

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-01-01

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images – the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances. PMID:25501877

  1. Quantitative genetic analysis of injury liability in infants and toddlers

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, K.; Matheny, A.P. Jr.

    1995-02-27

    A threshold model of latent liability was applied to infant and toddler twin data on total count of injuries sustained during the interval from birth to 36 months of age. A quantitative genetic analysis of estimated twin correlations in injury liability indicated strong genetic dominance effects, but no additive genetic variance was detected. Because interpretations involving overdominance have little research support, the results may be due to low order epistasis or other interaction effects. Boys had more injuries than girls, but this effect was found only for groups whose parents were prompted and questioned in detail about their children`s injuries. Activity and impulsivity are two behavioral predictors of childhood injury, and the results are discussed in relation to animal research on infant and adult activity levels, and impulsivity in adult humans. Genetic epidemiological approaches to childhood injury should aid in targeting higher risk children for preventive intervention. 30 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Quantitative multielement analysis using high energy particle bombardment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, P. J.; Neal, G. F.; Allen, R. O.

    1975-01-01

    Charged particles ranging in energy from 0.8 to 4.0 MeV are used to induce resonant nuclear reactions, Coulomb excitation (gamma-rays), and X-ray emission in both thick and thin targets. Quantitative analysis is possible for elements from Li to Pb in complex environmental samples, although the matrix can severely reduce the sensitivity. It is necessary to use a comparator technique for the gamma-rays while for X-rays an internal standard can be used. A USGS standard rock is analyzed for a total of 28 elements. Water samples can be analyzed either by nebulizing the sample doped with Cs or Y a thin Formvar film or by extracting the sample onto ion exchange resin which is pressed into a pellet.

  3. Large-Scale Quantitative Analysis of Painting Arts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daniel; Son, Seung-Woo; Jeong, Hawoong

    2014-12-01

    Scientists have made efforts to understand the beauty of painting art in their own languages. As digital image acquisition of painting arts has made rapid progress, researchers have come to a point where it is possible to perform statistical analysis of a large-scale database of artistic paints to make a bridge between art and science. Using digital image processing techniques, we investigate three quantitative measures of images - the usage of individual colors, the variety of colors, and the roughness of the brightness. We found a difference in color usage between classical paintings and photographs, and a significantly low color variety of the medieval period. Interestingly, moreover, the increment of roughness exponent as painting techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato have advanced is consistent with historical circumstances.

  4. Quantitative image analysis of WE43-T6 cracking behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, A.; Yahya, Z.

    2013-06-01

    Environment-assisted cracking of WE43 cast magnesium (4.2 wt.% Yt, 2.3 wt.% Nd, 0.7% Zr, 0.8% HRE) in the T6 peak-aged condition was induced in ambient air in notched specimens. The mechanism of fracture was studied using electron backscatter diffraction, serial sectioning and in situ observations of crack propagation. The intermetallic (rare earthed-enriched divorced intermetallic retained at grain boundaries and predominantly at triple points) material was found to play a significant role in initiating cracks which leads to failure of this material. Quantitative measurements were required for this project. The populations of the intermetallic and clusters of intermetallic particles were analyzed using image analysis of metallographic images. This is part of the work to generate a theoretical model of the effect of notch geometry on the static fatigue strength of this material.

  5. Quantitative analysis of gallstones using laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Vivek K.; Singh, Vinita; Rai, Awadhesh K.; Thakur, Surya N.; Rai, Pradeep K.; Singh, Jagdish P

    2008-11-01

    The utility of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) for categorizing different types of gallbladder stone has been demonstrated by analyzing their major and minor constituents. LIBS spectra of three types of gallstone have been recorded in the 200-900 nm spectral region. Calcium is found to be the major element in all types of gallbladder stone. The spectrophotometric method has been used to classify the stones. A calibration-free LIBS method has been used for the quantitative analysis of metal elements, and the results have been compared with those obtained from inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) measurements. The single-shot LIBS spectra from different points on the cross section (in steps of 0.5 mm from one end to the other) of gallstones have also been recorded to study the variation of constituents from the center to the surface. The presence of different metal elements and their possible role in gallstone formation is discussed.

  6. Automatic analysis of quantitative NMR data of pharmaceutical compound libraries.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xuejun; Kolpak, Michael X; Wu, Jiejun; Leo, Gregory C

    2012-08-07

    In drug discovery, chemical library compounds are usually dissolved in DMSO at a certain concentration and then distributed to biologists for target screening. Quantitative (1)H NMR (qNMR) is the preferred method for the determination of the actual concentrations of compounds because the relative single proton peak areas of two chemical species represent the relative molar concentrations of the two compounds, that is, the compound of interest and a calibrant. Thus, an analyte concentration can be determined using a calibration compound at a known concentration. One particularly time-consuming step in the qNMR analysis of compound libraries is the manual integration of peaks. In this report is presented an automated method for performing this task without prior knowledge of compound structures and by using an external calibration spectrum. The script for automated integration is fast and adaptable to large-scale data sets, eliminating the need for manual integration in ~80% of the cases.

  7. Quantitative analysis of forest island pattern in selected Ohio landscapes

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, G.W.; Burgess, R.L.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to quantitatively describe the various aspects of regional distribution patterns of forest islands and relate those patterns to other landscape features. Several maps showing the forest cover of various counties in Ohio were selected as representative examples of forest patterns to be quantified. Ten thousand hectare study areas (landscapes) were delineated on each map. A total of 15 landscapes representing a wide variety of forest island patterns was chosen. Data were converted into a series of continuous variables which contained information pertinent to the sizes, shape, numbers, and spacing of woodlots within a landscape. The continuous variables were used in a factor analysis to describe the variation among landscapes in terms of forest island pattern. The results showed that forest island patterns are related to topography and other environmental features correlated with topography.

  8. Quantitative microstructure analysis of polymer-modified mortars.

    PubMed

    Jenni, A; Herwegh, M; Zurbriggen, R; Aberle, T; Holzer, L

    2003-11-01

    Digital light, fluorescence and electron microscopy in combination with wavelength-dispersive spectroscopy were used to visualize individual polymers, air voids, cement phases and filler minerals in a polymer-modified cementitious tile adhesive. In order to investigate the evolution and processes involved in formation of the mortar microstructure, quantifications of the phase distribution in the mortar were performed including phase-specific imaging and digital image analysis. The required sample preparation techniques and imaging related topics are discussed. As a form of case study, the different techniques were applied to obtain a quantitative characterization of a specific mortar mixture. The results indicate that the mortar fractionates during different stages ranging from the early fresh mortar until the final hardened mortar stage. This induces process-dependent enrichments of the phases at specific locations in the mortar. The approach presented provides important information for a comprehensive understanding of the functionality of polymer-modified mortars.

  9. Quantitative analysis in outcome assessment of instrumented lumbosacral arthrodesis

    PubMed Central

    Mazel, Christian; Mitulescu, Anca

    2007-01-01

    The outcome assessment in instrumented lumbosacral fusion mostly focuses on clinical criteria, complications and scores, with a high variability of imaging means, methods of fusion grading and parameters describing degenerative changes, making comparisons between studies difficult. The aim of this retrospective evaluation was to evaluate the interest of quantified radiographic analysis of lumbar spine in global outcome assessment and to highlight the key biomechanical factors involved. Clinical data and Beaujon–Lassale scores were collected for 49 patients who underwent lumbosacral arthrodesis after prior lumbar discectomy (mean follow-up: 5 years). Sagittal standing and lumbar flexion-extension X-ray films allowed quantifying vertebral, lumbar, pelvic and kinematic parameters of the lumbar spine, which were compared to reference values. Statistics were performed to assess evolution for all variables. At long-term follow-up, 90% of patients presented satisfactory clinical outcomes, associated to normal sagittal alignment; vertebral parameters objectified adjacent level degeneration in four cases (8%). Clinical outcome was correlated (r = 0.8) with fusion that was confirmed in 80% of cases, doubtful in 16% and pseudarthrosis seemed to occur in 4% (2) of cases. In addition to clinical data (outcomes comparable to the literature), quantitative analysis accurately described lumbar spine geometry and kinematics, highlighting parameters related to adjacent level’s degeneration and a significant correlation between clinical outcome and fusion. Furthermore, criteria proposed to quantitatively evaluate fusion from lumbar dynamic radiographs seem to be appropriate and in agreement with surgeon’s qualitative grading in 87% of cases. PMID:17216227

  10. Temporal-resolved characterization of laser-induced plasma for spectrochemical analysis of gas shales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Ming; He, Yi; Yu, Qiaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-07-01

    Optical emission of laser ablation plasma on a shale target surface provides sensitive laser-induced breakdown spectrometry (LIBS) detection of major, minor or trace elements. An exploratory study for the characterization of the plasma induced on shale materials was carried out with the aim to trigger a crucial step towards the quantitative LIBS measurement. In this work, the experimental strategies that optimize the plasma generation on a pressed shale pellet surface are presented. The temporal evolution properties of the plasma induced by ns Nd:YAG laser pulse at the fundamental wavelength in air were investigated using time-resolved space-integrated optical emission spectroscopy. The electron density as well as the temperatures of the plasma were diagnosed as functions of the decay time for the bulk plasma analysis. In particular, the values of time-resolved atomic and ionic temperatures of shale elements, such as Fe, Mg, Ca, and Ti, were extracted from the well-known Boltzmann or Saha-Boltzmann plot method. Further comparison of these temperatures validated the local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) within specific interval of the delay time. In addition, the temporal behaviors of the signal-to-noise ratio of shale elements, including Si, Al, Fe, Ca, Mg, Ba, Li, Ti, K, Na, Sr, V, Cr, and Ni, revealed the coincidence of their maximum values with LIBS LTE condition in the time frame, providing practical implications for an optimized LIBS detection of shale elements. Analytical performance of LIBS was further evaluated with the linear calibration procedure for the most concerned trace elements of Sr, V, Cr, and Ni present in different shales. Their limits of detection obtained are elementally dependent and can be lower than tens of parts per million with the present LIBS experimental configurations. However, the occurrence of saturation effect for the calibration curve is still observable with the increasing trace element content, indicating that, due to the

  11. Quantitative analysis of protein-ligand interactions by NMR.

    PubMed

    Furukawa, Ayako; Konuma, Tsuyoshi; Yanaka, Saeko; Sugase, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    Protein-ligand interactions have been commonly studied through static structures of the protein-ligand complex. Recently, however, there has been increasing interest in investigating the dynamics of protein-ligand interactions both for fundamental understanding of the underlying mechanisms and for drug development. NMR is a versatile and powerful tool, especially because it provides site-specific quantitative information. NMR has widely been used to determine the dissociation constant (KD), in particular, for relatively weak interactions. The simplest NMR method is a chemical-shift titration experiment, in which the chemical-shift changes of a protein in response to ligand titration are measured. There are other quantitative NMR methods, but they mostly apply only to interactions in the fast-exchange regime. These methods derive the dissociation constant from population-averaged NMR quantities of the free and bound states of a protein or ligand. In contrast, the recent advent of new relaxation-based experiments, including R2 relaxation dispersion and ZZ-exchange, has enabled us to obtain kinetic information on protein-ligand interactions in the intermediate- and slow-exchange regimes. Based on R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange, methods that can determine the association rate, kon, dissociation rate, koff, and KD have been developed. In these approaches, R2 dispersion or ZZ-exchange curves are measured for multiple samples with different protein and/or ligand concentration ratios, and the relaxation data are fitted to theoretical kinetic models. It is critical to choose an appropriate kinetic model, such as the two- or three-state exchange model, to derive the correct kinetic information. The R2 dispersion and ZZ-exchange methods are suitable for the analysis of protein-ligand interactions with a micromolar or sub-micromolar dissociation constant but not for very weak interactions, which are typical in very fast exchange. This contrasts with the NMR methods that are used

  12. Quantitative analysis of EEG effects following experimental marginal magnesium and boron deprivation.

    PubMed

    Penland, J G

    1995-12-01

    Magnesium (115 and 315 mg/d) and boron (0.23 and 3.23 mg/d) were fed in a double-blind Latin squares design to 13 healthy postmenopausal women (aged 50-78 years) living on a metabolic unit. An eight-channel electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded during the last week of each of four 6-week dietary periods. Power and coherence measures were determined for each of four EEG frequency bands: delta (1-3 Hz), theta (4-7 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), and beta (13-18 Hz). Compared to high dietary magnesium, the low magnesium intake increased total power in the frontal regions and right temporal and parietal regions and resulted in frequency-specific increases in left occipital delta power, theta power in all but the left temporal region, alpha power in the right frontal and right temporal regions, and beta power in the frontal regions. The proportion of theta to total power in the parietal regions also increased with the low magnesium intake. While magnesium effects were observed primarily during eyes-closed conditions, effects of dietary boron on EEG power were found only during eyes-open conditions. Relative to high dietary boron, the low boron intake increased delta power in the left parietal and left occipital regions, increased the proportion of delta to total power in the frontal regions, and decreased relative right frontal theta, right frontal alpha, and left frontal beta power. Additional magnesium and boron effects were evident in the measures of EEG coherence. Thus relatively short periods of marginal magnesium and boron deprivation can affect brain function in healthy older women. The findings extend previous qualitative observations of increased CNS activity following severe magnesium deprivation and deficiency to cases of experimentally induced marginal magnesium deficiency, and verify CNS hyperexcitability by quantitative analysis of the EEG.

  13. Automatic quantitative analysis of cardiac MR perfusion images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breeuwer, Marcel M.; Spreeuwers, Luuk J.; Quist, Marcel J.

    2001-07-01

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a powerful technique for imaging cardiovascular diseases. The introduction of cardiovascular MRI into clinical practice is however hampered by the lack of efficient and accurate image analysis methods. This paper focuses on the evaluation of blood perfusion in the myocardium (the heart muscle) from MR images, using contrast-enhanced ECG-triggered MRI. We have developed an automatic quantitative analysis method, which works as follows. First, image registration is used to compensate for translation and rotation of the myocardium over time. Next, the boundaries of the myocardium are detected and for each position within the myocardium a time-intensity profile is constructed. The time interval during which the contrast agent passes for the first time through the left ventricle and the myocardium is detected and various parameters are measured from the time-intensity profiles in this interval. The measured parameters are visualized as color overlays on the original images. Analysis results are stored, so that they can later on be compared for different stress levels of the heart. The method is described in detail in this paper and preliminary validation results are presented.

  14. QTL analysis for some quantitative traits in bread wheat*

    PubMed Central

    Pushpendra, Kumar Gupta; Harindra, Singh Balyan; Pawan, Laxminarayan Kulwal; Neeraj, Kumar; Ajay, Kumar; Reyazul, Rouf Mir; Amita, Mohan; Jitendra, Kumar

    2007-01-01

    Quantitative trait loci (QTL) analysis was conducted in bread wheat for 14 important traits utilizing data from four different mapping populations involving different approaches of QTL analysis. Analysis for grain protein content (GPC) suggested that the major part of genetic variation for this trait is due to environmental interactions. In contrast, pre-harvest sprouting tolerance (PHST) was controlled mainly by main effect QTL (M-QTL) with very little genetic variation due to environmental interactions; a major QTL for PHST was detected on chromosome arm 3AL. For grain weight, one QTL each was detected on chromosome arms 1AS, 2BS and 7AS. QTL for 4 growth related traits taken together detected by different methods ranged from 37 to 40; nine QTL that were detected by single-locus as well as two-locus analyses were all M-QTL. Similarly, single-locus and two-locus QTL analyses for seven yield and yield contributing traits in two populations respectively allowed detection of 25 and 50 QTL by composite interval mapping (CIM), 16 and 25 QTL by multiple-trait composite interval mapping (MCIM) and 38 and 37 QTL by two-locus analyses. These studies should prove useful in QTL cloning and wheat improvement through marker aided selection. PMID:17973342

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of the Solar Composition Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villante, F. L.; Serenelli, A. M.

    We perform a quantitative analysis of the solar composition problem by using a statistical approach that allows us to combine the information provided by helioseismic and solar neutrino data in an effective way. We show that the opacity profile of the Sun is well constrained by the solar observational properties. In the context of a two parameter analysis in which elements are grouped as volatiles (i.e. C, N, O and Ne) and refractories (i.e. Mg, Si, S, Fe), the optimal surface composition is found by increasing the abundance of volatiles by (45 ± 4) % and that of refractories by (19 ± 3) % with respect to the values provided by Asplund et al., 2009. As an additional result of our analysis, we show that the best fit to the observational data is obtained with values of input parameters of the standard solar models (radiative opacities, gravitational settling rate, the astrophysical factors S 34 and S 17) that differ at the ∼ 1σ level from those presently adopted.

  16. Functional analysis and quantitative determination of the expression profile of human parvovirus B19.

    PubMed

    Bonvicini, Francesca; Filippone, Claudia; Manaresi, Elisabetta; Zerbini, Marialuisa; Musiani, Monica; Gallinella, Giorgio

    2008-11-25

    Comprehension of the pathogenetic potential of human parvovirus B19 requires the definition of the complete spectrum of cellular tropism and a functional analysis of the viral genome in infected cells. In this study, we carried out a systematic functional analysis of B19 virus genome in the course of infection of susceptible bone marrow mononuclear cells and myeloblastoid UT7/EpoS1 cells, in terms of dynamics of nucleic acid synthesis. A PCR array was designed and a comprehensive analysis was performed by quantitative PCR and RT-PCR, yielding extended information on the presence and abundance of the diverse classes of viral nucleic acids, on the temporal regulation of genome expression and on its relationship with the cell cycle. The analysis performed indicate that the synthesis of viral nucleic acids is correlated to the progression through the S phase of the cell cycle, that an extended pattern of transcriptional activity occurs throughout the course of infection, with a maximal rate of transcription preceding the onset of S-phase dependent replication of the viral genome, and that utilization of transcript processing signals is relatively constant throughout the course of infection. The information obtained led to the definition of a unified model of functional and expression profiling of parvovirus B19 genome.

  17. An approach for quantitative image quality analysis for CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi, Amir; Cochran, Joe; Mooney, Doug; Regensburger, Joe

    2016-03-01

    An objective and standardized approach to assess image quality of Compute Tomography (CT) systems is required in a wide variety of imaging processes to identify CT systems appropriate for a given application. We present an overview of the framework we have developed to help standardize and to objectively assess CT image quality for different models of CT scanners used for security applications. Within this framework, we have developed methods to quantitatively measure metrics that should correlate with feature identification, detection accuracy and precision, and image registration capabilities of CT machines and to identify strengths and weaknesses in different CT imaging technologies in transportation security. To that end we have designed, developed and constructed phantoms that allow for systematic and repeatable measurements of roughly 88 image quality metrics, representing modulation transfer function, noise equivalent quanta, noise power spectra, slice sensitivity profiles, streak artifacts, CT number uniformity, CT number consistency, object length accuracy, CT number path length consistency, and object registration. Furthermore, we have developed a sophisticated MATLAB based image analysis tool kit to analyze CT generated images of phantoms and report these metrics in a format that is standardized across the considered models of CT scanners, allowing for comparative image quality analysis within a CT model or between different CT models. In addition, we have developed a modified sparse principal component analysis (SPCA) method to generate a modified set of PCA components as compared to the standard principal component analysis (PCA) with sparse loadings in conjunction with Hotelling T2 statistical analysis method to compare, qualify, and detect faults in the tested systems.

  18. Analysis of temporal jitter in a copper vapor laser system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Durga Praveen; Gantayet, L. M.; Singh, Sunita; Rawat, A. S.; Rana, Paramjit; V, Rajasree; Agarwalla, Sandeep K.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2012-02-01

    Temporal jitter in a magnetic pulse compression based copper vapor laser (CVL) system is analyzed by considering ripple present in the input dc power supply and ripple present in the magnetic core resetting power supply. It is shown that the jitter is a function of the ratio of operating voltage to the designed voltage, percentage ripple, and the total propagation delay of the magnetic pulse compression circuit. Experimental results from a CVL system operating at a repetition rate of 9 kHz are presented.

  19. Quantitative analysis of night skyglow amplification under cloudy conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocifaj, Miroslav; Solano Lamphar, Héctor Antonio

    2014-10-01

    The radiance produced by artificial light is a major source of nighttime over-illumination. It can, however, be treated experimentally using ground-based and satellite data. These two types of data complement each other and together have a high information content. For instance, the satellite data enable upward light emissions to be normalized, and this in turn allows skyglow levels at the ground to be modelled under cloudy or overcast conditions. Excessive night lighting imposes an unacceptable burden on nature, humans and professional astronomy. For this reason, there is a pressing need to determine the total amount of downwelling diffuse radiation. Undoubtedly, cloudy periods can cause a significant increase in skyglow as a result of amplification owing to diffuse reflection from clouds. While it is recognized that the amplification factor (AF) varies with cloud cover, the effects of different types of clouds, of atmospheric turbidity and of the geometrical relationships between the positions of an individual observer, the cloud layer, and the light source are in general poorly known. In this paper the AF is quantitatively analysed considering different aerosol optical depths (AODs), urban layout sizes and cloud types with specific albedos and altitudes. The computational results show that the AF peaks near the edges of a city rather than at its centre. In addition, the AF appears to be a decreasing function of AOD, which is particularly important when modelling the skyglow in regions with apparent temporal or seasonal variability of atmospheric turbidity. The findings in this paper will be useful to those designing engineering applications or modelling light pollution, as well as to astronomers and environmental scientists who aim to predict the amplification of skyglow caused by clouds. In addition, the semi-analytical formulae can be used to estimate the AF levels, especially in densely populated metropolitan regions for which detailed computations may be CPU

  20. The quantitative electroencephalogram and the low-resolution electrical tomographic analysis in posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Todder, Doran; Levine, Joseph; Abujumah, Ahmad; Mater, Michael; Cohen, Hagit; Kaplan, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    The electroencephalogram (EEG) is the recording of the brain electrical activity as measured on the scalp. Using mathematical algorithms, the 3-dimensional (3D) distribution of the electrical potential inside the brain can be calculated. One of the methods to calculate it is the low-resolution electrical tomographic analysis (LORETA). In this research, we seek to find the brain structures that differentiate patients with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) from controls. Ten right-handed consenting adult male patients were recruited from a PTSD clinic. All patients fulfilled Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Fourth Edition, Text Revision [DSM-IV-TR]) criteria for chronic PTSD (duration >2 years.) and were on drug treatment regimens that had been stable for at least 2 months (involving only serotonin reuptake inhibitors [SSRIs] and benzodiazepines).The control group consisted of 10 healthy hospital staff members. All study participants underwent 19 channel EEG measurements according to current standards of practice. All artifact-free EEG strips were examined for spectral as well as LORETA analysis focusing on the theta (4-7 Hz) band which is suggested to reflect the activity of the limbic system. The theta band showed a statistically significant difference (P < .05) between the 2 groups in the right temporal lobe and in both the right and left frontal lobes. Our findings support existing research data obtained via other imaging technologies, which demonstrated structural alterations in the right temporal and frontal areas in PTSD. These results indicate that combining quantitative EEG (QEEG) and the LORETA method, among other methods, may improve the neuroanatomical resolution of EEG data analysis.

  1. Spatio-temporal Linear Stability Analysis of Multiple Reacting Wakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunnumpuram Sebastian, Jacob; Emerson, Benjamin; Lieuwen, Tim

    2016-11-01

    Hydrodynamic stability of reacting shear flows plays a key role in controlling a variety of combustor behaviors, such as combustion instability, mixing and entrainment, and blowoff. A significant literature exists on the hydrodynamics of single bluff body flows, but not the multi-bluff body flows that are found in applications. The objective of this work was to compare the spatio-temporal stability of multiple reacting wakes and single reacting wakes, within the framework of linear stability theory. Spatio-temporal stability analyses are conducted on model velocity and density profiles, with key parameters being the density ratio across the flame, bluff body spacing, dimensionless shear, and asymmetry parameters (if the two wakes are dissimilar). The introduction of the additional bluff body can exert both a stabilizing and destabilizing effect on the combined two-wake system, depending on the spatial separation between the bluff bodies. Furthermore, while the most rapidly amplified mode of the single wake mode is the sinuous (asymmetric) one, in the two wake system, the most rapidly amplified mode can be either sinuous or varicose (symmetric), also depending on spatial separation.

  2. Quantitative analysis of drug-induced tremor in mice.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki, H

    1984-12-01

    A method of analyzing tremor in mice was developed using a power spectral analysis of the random current induced by the movement of a magnet attached to a mouse, on a wire coil. The power spectral density function defined the frequency composition of the tremor, and the mean square value of the data in any frequency range of concern was determined. It was possible to determine qualitative differences in the tremor caused by various tremorgenic agents, and to differentiate the drug-induced tremor from spontaneous motor activity. The power spectral densities of the tremorine- and oxotremorine-induced tremors were tentatively expressed as the sum of 3 main components (Cauchy distribution) with different peak frequencies, consisting of the spontaneous motor activity component and two tremor components. On the other hand, the power spectral densities of the harmaline-induced tremor were expressed as the sum of two components with two peak frequencies, and the plots of the power spectral densities versus frequency, consisting of the spontaneous motor activity component and a tremor component. The frequency of the peak spectral density was almost independent of the dose of tremorgenic agents, but changed slightly with the lapse of time after their injection. The severity of the tremor was determined quantitatively in terms of the sum of the mean square value. The sum of the mean square value for a period of 45 min after the injection of tremorine, changed in a dose-dependent manner. The severity of the tremor was different for each of the mouse strains. The method studied in the present paper is expected to be utilized for the quantitative examination of the fine motor movement of the experimental animal, particularly, for the screening test of new anti-tremor drugs.

  3. Towards quantitative analysis of retinal features in optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Baroni, Maurizio; Fortunato, Pina; La Torre, Agostino

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this paper was to propose a new computer method for quantitative evaluation of representative features of the retina using optical coherence tomography (OCT). A multi-step approach was devised and positively tested for segmentation of the three main retinal layers: the vitreo-retinal interface and the inner and outer retina. Following a preprocessing step, three regions of interest were delimited. Significant peaks corresponding to high and low intensity strips were located along the OCT A-scan lines and accurate boundaries between different layers were obtained by maximizing an edge likelihood function. For a quantitative description, thickness measurement, densitometry, texture and curvature analyses were performed. As a first application, the effect of intravitreal injection of triamcinolone acetonide (IVTA) for the treatment of vitreo-retinal interface syndrome was evaluated. Almost all the parameters, measured on a set of 16 pathologic OCT images, were statistically different before and after IVTA injection (p<0.05). Shape analysis of the internal limiting membrane confirmed the reduction of the pathological traction state. Other significant parameters, such as reflectivity and texture contrast, exhibited relevant changes both at the vitreo-retinal interface and in the inner retinal layers. Texture parameters in the inner and outer retinal layers significantly correlated with the visual acuity restoration. According to these findings an IVTA injection might be considered a possible alternative to surgery for selected patients. In conclusion, the proposed approach appeared to be a promising tool for the investigation of tissue changes produced by pathology and/or therapy.

  4. Quantitative analysis and parametric display of regional myocardial mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eusemann, Christian D.; Bellemann, Matthias E.; Robb, Richard A.

    2000-04-01

    Quantitative assessment of regional heart motion has significant potential for more accurate diagnosis of heart disease and/or cardiac irregularities. Local heart motion may be studied from medical imaging sequences. Using functional parametric mapping, regional myocardial motion during a cardiac cycle can be color mapped onto a deformable heart model to obtain better understanding of the structure- to-function relationships in the myocardium, including regional patterns of akinesis or diskinesis associated with ischemia or infarction. In this study, 3D reconstructions were obtained from the Dynamic Spatial Reconstructor at 15 time points throughout one cardiac cycle of pre-infarct and post-infarct hearts. Deformable models were created from the 3D images for each time point of the cardiac cycles. Form these polygonal models, regional excursions and velocities of each vertex representing a unit of myocardium were calculated for successive time-intervals. The calculated results were visualized through model animations and/or specially formatted static images. The time point of regional maximum velocity and excursion of myocardium through the cardiac cycle was displayed using color mapping. The absolute value of regional maximum velocity and maximum excursion were displayed in a similar manner. Using animations, the local myocardial velocity changes were visualized as color changes on the cardiac surface during the cardiac cycle. Moreover, the magnitude and direction of motion for individual segments of myocardium could be displayed. Comparison of these dynamic parametric displays suggest that the ability to encode quantitative functional information on dynamic cardiac anatomy enhances the diagnostic value of 4D images of the heart. Myocardial mechanics quantified this way adds a new dimension to the analysis of cardiac functional disease, including regional patterns of akinesis and diskinesis associated with ischemia and infarction. Similarly, disturbances in

  5. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  6. Quantitative Analysis Of Acoustic Emission From Rock Fracture Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodfellow, Sebastian David

    This thesis aims to advance the methods of quantitative acoustic emission (AE) analysis by calibrating sensors, characterizing sources, and applying the results to solve engi- neering problems. In the first part of this thesis, we built a calibration apparatus and successfully calibrated two commercial AE sensors. The ErgoTech sensor was found to have broadband velocity sensitivity and the Panametrics V103 was sensitive to surface normal displacement. These calibration results were applied to two AE data sets from rock fracture experiments in order to characterize the sources of AE events. The first data set was from an in situ rock fracture experiment conducted at the Underground Research Laboratory (URL). The Mine-By experiment was a large scale excavation response test where both AE (10 kHz - 1 MHz) and microseismicity (MS) (1 Hz - 10 kHz) were monitored. Using the calibration information, magnitude, stress drop, dimension and energy were successfully estimated for 21 AE events recorded in the tensile region of the tunnel wall. Magnitudes were in the range -7.5 < Mw < -6.8, which is consistent with other laboratory AE results, and stress drops were within the range commonly observed for induced seismicity in the field (0.1 - 10 MPa). The second data set was AE collected during a true-triaxial deformation experiment, where the objectives were to characterize laboratory AE sources and identify issues related to moving the analysis from ideal in situ conditions to more complex laboratory conditions in terms of the ability to conduct quantitative AE analysis. We found AE magnitudes in the range -7.8 < Mw < -6.7 and as with the in situ data, stress release was within the expected range of 0.1 - 10 MPa. We identified four major challenges to quantitative analysis in the laboratory, which in- hibited our ability to study parameter scaling (M0 ∝ fc -3 scaling). These challenges were 0c (1) limited knowledge of attenuation which we proved was continuously evolving, (2

  7. Quantitative analysis of bloggers' collective behavior powered by emotions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrović, Marija; Paltoglou, Georgios; Tadić, Bosiljka

    2011-02-01

    Large-scale data resulting from users' online interactions provide the ultimate source of information to study emergent social phenomena on the Web. From individual actions of users to observable collective behaviors, different mechanisms involving emotions expressed in the posted text play a role. Here we combine approaches of statistical physics with machine-learning methods of text analysis to study the emergence of emotional behavior among Web users. Mapping the high-resolution data from digg.com onto bipartite networks of users and their comments onto posted stories, we identify user communities centered around certain popular posts and determine emotional contents of the related comments by the emotion classifier developed for this type of text. Applied over different time periods, this framework reveals strong correlations between the excess of negative emotions and the evolution of communities. We observe avalanches of emotional comments exhibiting significant self-organized critical behavior and temporal correlations. To explore the robustness of these critical states, we design a network-automaton model on realistic network connections and several control parameters, which can be inferred from the dataset. Dissemination of emotions by a small fraction of very active users appears to critically tune the collective states.

  8. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Kris; Klammer, Martin; Jordan, Nicole; Elschenbroich, Sarah; Parade, Marc; Jacoby, Edgar; Linders, Joannes T. M.; Brehmer, Dirk; Cools, Jan; Daub, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    The four members of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR/ERBB) family form homo- and heterodimers which mediate ligand-specific regulation of many key cellular processes in normal and cancer tissues. While signaling through the EGFR has been extensively studied on the molecular level, signal transduction through ERBB3/ERBB4 heterodimers is less well understood. Here, we generated isogenic mouse Ba/F3 cells that express full-length and functional membrane-integrated ERBB3 and ERBB4 or ERBB4 alone, to serve as a defined cellular model for biological and phosphoproteomics analysis of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling. ERBB3 co-expression significantly enhanced Ba/F3 cell proliferation upon neuregulin-1 (NRG1) treatment. For comprehensive signaling studies we performed quantitative mass spectrometry (MS) experiments to compare the basal ERBB3/ERBB4 cell phosphoproteome to NRG1 treatment of ERBB3/ERBB4 and ERBB4 cells. We employed a workflow comprising differential isotope labeling with mTRAQ reagents followed by chromatographic peptide separation and final phosphopeptide enrichment prior to MS analysis. Overall, we identified 9686 phosphorylation sites which could be confidently localized to specific residues. Statistical analysis of three replicate experiments revealed 492 phosphorylation sites which were significantly changed in NRG1-treated ERBB3/ERBB4 cells. Bioinformatics data analysis recapitulated regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt pathways, but also indicated signaling links to cytoskeletal functions and nuclear biology. Comparative assessment of NRG1-stimulated ERBB4 Ba/F3 cells revealed that ERBB3 did not trigger defined signaling pathways but more broadly enhanced phosphoproteome regulation in cells expressing both receptors. In conclusion, our data provide the first global picture of ERBB3/ERBB4 signaling and provide numerous potential starting points for further mechanistic studies. PMID:26745281

  9. Quantitative evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation via fractal analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kyoung Ho; Kim, Yong-Il; Kim, Yong-Deok

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to determine whether the results of fractal analysis can be used as criteria for midpalatal suture maturation evaluation. Methods The study included 131 subjects aged over 18 years of age (range 18.1–53.4 years) who underwent cone-beam computed tomography. Skeletonized images of the midpalatal suture were obtained via image processing software and used to calculate fractal dimensions. Correlations between maturation stage and fractal dimensions were calculated using Spearman's correlation coefficient. Optimal fractal dimension cut-off values were determined using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Results The distribution of maturation stages of the midpalatal suture according to the cervical vertebrae maturation index was highly variable, and there was a strong negative correlation between maturation stage and fractal dimension (−0.623, p < 0.001). Fractal dimension was a statistically significant indicator of dichotomous results with regard to maturation stage (area under curve = 0.794, p < 0.001). A test in which fractal dimension was used to predict the resulting variable that splits maturation stages into ABC and D or E yielded an optimal fractal dimension cut-off value of 1.0235. Conclusions There was a strong negative correlation between fractal dimension and midpalatal suture maturation. Fractal analysis is an objective quantitative method, and therefore we suggest that it may be useful for the evaluation of midpalatal suture maturation. PMID:27668195

  10. A quantitative risk analysis approach to port hydrocarbon logistics.

    PubMed

    Ronza, A; Carol, S; Espejo, V; Vílchez, J A; Arnaldos, J

    2006-01-16

    A method is presented that allows quantitative risk analysis to be performed on marine hydrocarbon terminals sited in ports. A significant gap was identified in the technical literature on QRA for the handling of hazardous materials in harbours published prior to this work. The analysis is extended to tanker navigation through port waters and loading and unloading facilities. The steps of the method are discussed, beginning with data collecting. As to accident scenario identification, an approach is proposed that takes into account minor and massive spills due to loading arm failures and tank rupture. Frequency estimation is thoroughly reviewed and a shortcut approach is proposed for frequency calculation. This allows for the two-fold possibility of a tanker colliding/grounding at/near the berth or while navigating to/from the berth. A number of probability data defining the possibility of a cargo spill after an external impact on a tanker are discussed. As to consequence and vulnerability estimates, a scheme is proposed for the use of ratios between the numbers of fatal victims, injured and evacuated people. Finally, an example application is given, based on a pilot study conducted in the Port of Barcelona, where the method was tested.

  11. Inside Single Cells: Quantitative Analysis with Advanced Optics and Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Single cell explorations offer a unique window to inspect molecules and events relevant to mechanisms and heterogeneity constituting the central dogma of biology. A large number of nucleic acids, proteins, metabolites and small molecules are involved in determining and fine-tuning the state and function of a single cell at a given time point. Advanced optical platforms and nanotools provide tremendous opportunities to probe intracellular components with single-molecule accuracy, as well as promising tools to adjust single cell activity. In order to obtain quantitative information (e.g. molecular quantity, kinetics and stoichiometry) within an intact cell, achieving the observation with comparable spatiotemporal resolution is a challenge. For single cell studies both the method of detection and the biocompatibility are critical factors as they determine the feasibility, especially when considering live cell analysis. Although a considerable proportion of single cell methodologies depend on specialized expertise and expensive instruments, it is our expectation that the information content and implication will outweigh the costs given the impact on life science enabled by single cell analysis. PMID:25430077

  12. Therapeutic electrical stimulation for spasticity: quantitative gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Pease, W S

    1998-01-01

    Improvement in motor function following electrical stimulation is related to strengthening of the stimulated spastic muscle and inhibition of the antagonist. A 26-year-old man with familial spastic paraparesis presented with gait dysfunction and bilateral lower limb spastic muscle tone. Clinically, muscle strength and sensation were normal. He was considered appropriate for a trial of therapeutic electrical stimulation following failed trials of physical therapy and baclofen. No other treatment was used concurrent with the electrical stimulation. Before treatment, quantitative gait analysis revealed 63% of normal velocity and a crouched gait pattern, associated with excessive electromyographic activity in the hamstrings and gastrocnemius muscles. Based on these findings, bilateral stimulation of the quadriceps and anterior compartment musculature was performed two to three times per week for three months. Repeat gait analysis was conducted three weeks after the cessation of stimulation treatment. A 27% increase in velocity was noted associated with an increase in both cadence and right step length. Right hip and bilateral knee stance motion returned to normal (rather than "crouched"). No change in the timing of dynamic electromyographic activity was seen. These findings suggest a role for the use of electrical stimulation for rehabilitation of spasticity. The specific mechanism of this improvement remains uncertain.

  13. Comprehensive Quantitative Analysis of Ovarian and Breast Cancer Tumor Peptidomes

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Zhe; Wu, Chaochao; Xie, Fang; Slysz, Gordon W.; Tolic, Nikola; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Payne, Samuel H.; Fujimoto, Grant M.; Moore, Ronald J.; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Levine, Douglas; Townsend, Reid; Davies, Sherri; Li, Shunqiang; Ellis, Matthew; Boja, Emily; Rivers, Robert; Rodriguez, Henry; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Smith, Richard D.

    2015-01-02

    Aberrant degradation of proteins is associated with many pathological states, including cancers. Mass spectrometric analysis of tumor peptidomes, the intracellular and intercellular products of protein degradation, has the potential to provide biological insights on proteolytic processing in cancer. However, attempts to use the information on these smaller protein degradation products from tumors for biomarker discovery and cancer biology studies have been fairly limited to date, largely due to the lack of effective approaches for robust peptidomics identification and quantification, and the prevalence of confounding factors and biases associated with sample handling and processing. Herein, we have developed an effective and robust analytical platform for comprehensive analyses of tissue peptidomes, which is suitable for high throughput quantitative studies. The reproducibility and coverage of the platform, as well as the suitability of clinical ovarian tumor and patient-derived breast tumor xenograft samples with post-excision delay of up to 60 min before freezing for peptidomics analysis, have been demonstrated. Moreover, our data also show that the peptidomics profiles can effectively separate breast cancer subtypes, reflecting tumor-associated protease activities. Peptidomics complements results obtainable from conventional bottom-up proteomics, and provides insights not readily obtainable from such approaches.

  14. A Computational Tool for Quantitative Analysis of Vascular Networks

    PubMed Central

    Zudaire, Enrique; Gambardella, Laure; Kurcz, Christopher; Vermeren, Sonja

    2011-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the generation of mature vascular networks from pre-existing vessels. Angiogenesis is crucial during the organism' development, for wound healing and for the female reproductive cycle. Several murine experimental systems are well suited for studying developmental and pathological angiogenesis. They include the embryonic hindbrain, the post-natal retina and allantois explants. In these systems vascular networks are visualised by appropriate staining procedures followed by microscopical analysis. Nevertheless, quantitative assessment of angiogenesis is hampered by the lack of readily available, standardized metrics and software analysis tools. Non-automated protocols are being used widely and they are, in general, time - and labour intensive, prone to human error and do not permit computation of complex spatial metrics. We have developed a light-weight, user friendly software, AngioTool, which allows for quick, hands-off and reproducible quantification of vascular networks in microscopic images. AngioTool computes several morphological and spatial parameters including the area covered by a vascular network, the number of vessels, vessel length, vascular density and lacunarity. In addition, AngioTool calculates the so-called “branching index” (branch points / unit area), providing a measurement of the sprouting activity of a specimen of interest. We have validated AngioTool using images of embryonic murine hindbrains, post-natal retinas and allantois explants. AngioTool is open source and can be downloaded free of charge. PMID:22110636

  15. Quantitative analysis of triple-mutant genetic interactions.

    PubMed

    Braberg, Hannes; Alexander, Richard; Shales, Michael; Xu, Jiewei; Franks-Skiba, Kathleen E; Wu, Qiuqin; Haber, James E; Krogan, Nevan J

    2014-08-01

    The quantitative analysis of genetic interactions between pairs of gene mutations has proven to be effective for characterizing cellular functions, but it can miss important interactions for functionally redundant genes. To address this limitation, we have developed an approach termed triple-mutant analysis (TMA). The procedure relies on a query strain that contains two deletions in a pair of redundant or otherwise related genes, which is crossed against a panel of candidate deletion strains to isolate triple mutants and measure their growth. A central feature of TMA is to interrogate mutants that are synthetically sick when two other genes are deleted but interact minimally with either single deletion. This approach has been valuable for discovering genes that restore critical functions when the principal actors are deleted. TMA has also uncovered double-mutant combinations that produce severe defects because a third protein becomes deregulated and acts in a deleterious fashion, and it has revealed functional differences between proteins presumed to act together. The protocol is optimized for Singer ROTOR pinning robots, takes 3 weeks to complete and measures interactions for up to 30 double mutants against a library of 1,536 single mutants.

  16. Applying Qualitative Hazard Analysis to Support Quantitative Safety Analysis for Proposed Reduced Wake Separation Conops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shortle, John F.; Allocco, Michael

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes a scenario-driven hazard analysis process to identify, eliminate, and control safety-related risks. Within this process, we develop selective criteria to determine the applicability of applying engineering modeling to hypothesized hazard scenarios. This provides a basis for evaluating and prioritizing the scenarios as candidates for further quantitative analysis. We have applied this methodology to proposed concepts of operations for reduced wake separation for closely spaced parallel runways. For arrivals, the process identified 43 core hazard scenarios. Of these, we classified 12 as appropriate for further quantitative modeling, 24 that should be mitigated through controls, recommendations, and / or procedures (that is, scenarios not appropriate for quantitative modeling), and 7 that have the lowest priority for further analysis.

  17. Multi-scale spatio-temporal analysis of human mobility.

    PubMed

    Alessandretti, Laura; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Lehmann, Sune; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The recent availability of digital traces generated by phone calls and online logins has significantly increased the scientific understanding of human mobility. Until now, however, limited data resolution and coverage have hindered a coherent description of human displacements across different spatial and temporal scales. Here, we characterise mobility behaviour across several orders of magnitude by analysing ∼850 individuals' digital traces sampled every ∼16 seconds for 25 months with ∼10 meters spatial resolution. We show that the distributions of distances and waiting times between consecutive locations are best described by log-normal and gamma distributions, respectively, and that natural time-scales emerge from the regularity of human mobility. We point out that log-normal distributions also characterise the patterns of discovery of new places, implying that they are not a simple consequence of the routine of modern life.

  18. Multi-scale spatio-temporal analysis of human mobility

    PubMed Central

    Alessandretti, Laura; Sapiezynski, Piotr; Lehmann, Sune; Baronchelli, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    The recent availability of digital traces generated by phone calls and online logins has significantly increased the scientific understanding of human mobility. Until now, however, limited data resolution and coverage have hindered a coherent description of human displacements across different spatial and temporal scales. Here, we characterise mobility behaviour across several orders of magnitude by analysing ∼850 individuals’ digital traces sampled every ∼16 seconds for 25 months with ∼10 meters spatial resolution. We show that the distributions of distances and waiting times between consecutive locations are best described by log-normal and gamma distributions, respectively, and that natural time-scales emerge from the regularity of human mobility. We point out that log-normal distributions also characterise the patterns of discovery of new places, implying that they are not a simple consequence of the routine of modern life. PMID:28199347

  19. Dynamics and spatio-temporal variability of environmental factors in Eastern Australia using functional principal component analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Szabo, J.K.; Fedriani, E.M.; Segovia-Gonzalez, M. M.; Astheimer, L.B.; Hooper, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    This paper introduces a new technique in ecology to analyze spatial and temporal variability in environmental variables. By using simple statistics, we explore the relations between abiotic and biotic variables that influence animal distributions. However, spatial and temporal variability in rainfall, a key variable in ecological studies, can cause difficulties to any basic model including time evolution. The study was of a landscape scale (three million square kilometers in eastern Australia), mainly over the period of 19982004. We simultaneously considered qualitative spatial (soil and habitat types) and quantitative temporal (rainfall) variables in a Geographical Information System environment. In addition to some techniques commonly used in ecology, we applied a new method, Functional Principal Component Analysis, which proved to be very suitable for this case, as it explained more than 97% of the total variance of the rainfall data, providing us with substitute variables that are easier to manage and are even able to explain rainfall patterns. The main variable came from a habitat classification that showed strong correlations with rainfall values and soil types. ?? 2010 World Scientific Publishing Company.

  20. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of atmospheric organosulfates in Centreville, Alabama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hettiyadura, Anusha P. S.; Jayarathne, Thilina; Baumann, Karsten; Goldstein, Allen H.; de Gouw, Joost A.; Koss, Abigail; Keutsch, Frank N.; Skog, Kate; Stone, Elizabeth A.

    2017-01-01

    Organosulfates are components of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) that form from oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the presence of sulfate. In this study, the composition and abundance of organosulfates were determined in fine particulate matter (PM2.5) collected from Centreville, AL, during the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) in summer 2013. Six organosulfates were quantified using hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) with triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (TQD) against authentic standards. Among these, the three most abundant species were glycolic acid sulfate (0.5-52.5 ng m-3), lactic acid sulfate (0.5-36.7 ng m-3), and hydroxyacetone sulfate (0.5-14.3 ng m-3). These three species were strongly inter-correlated, suggesting similar precursors and/or formation pathways. Further correlations with sulfate, isoprene, and isoprene oxidation products indicate important roles for these precursors in organosulfate formation in Centreville. Positive filter sampling artifacts associated with these organosulfates due to gas adsorption or reaction of gas phase precursors of organosulfates with sulfuric acid were assessed for a subset of samples and were less than 7.8 % of their PM2.5 concentrations. Together, the quantified organosulfates accounted for < 0.3 % of organic carbon mass in PM2.5. To gain insights into other organosulfates in PM2.5 collected from Centreville, semi-quantitative analysis was employed by way of monitoring characteristic product ions of organosulfates (HSO4- at m/z 97 and SO4- ṡ at m/z 96) and evaluating relative signal strength by HILIC-TQD. Molecular formulas of organosulfates were determined by high-resolution time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry. The major organosulfate signal across all samples corresponded to 2-methyltetrol sulfates, which accounted for 42-62 % of the total bisulfate ion signal. Conversely, glycolic acid sulfate, the most abundant organosulfate quantified in this study, was 0

  1. Evaluating the Quantitative Capabilities of Metagenomic Analysis Software.

    PubMed

    Kerepesi, Csaba; Grolmusz, Vince

    2016-05-01

    DNA sequencing technologies are applied widely and frequently today to describe metagenomes, i.e., microbial communities in environmental or clinical samples, without the need for culturing them. These technologies usually return short (100-300 base-pairs long) DNA reads, and these reads are processed by metagenomic analysis software that assign phylogenetic composition-information to the dataset. Here we evaluate three metagenomic analysis software (AmphoraNet--a webserver implementation of AMPHORA2--, MG-RAST, and MEGAN5) for their capabilities of assigning quantitative phylogenetic information for the data, describing the frequency of appearance of the microorganisms of the same taxa in the sample. The difficulties of the task arise from the fact that longer genomes produce more reads from the same organism than shorter genomes, and some software assign higher frequencies to species with longer genomes than to those with shorter ones. This phenomenon is called the "genome length bias." Dozens of complex artificial metagenome benchmarks can be found in the literature. Because of the complexity of those benchmarks, it is usually difficult to judge the resistance of a metagenomic software to this "genome length bias." Therefore, we have made a simple benchmark for the evaluation of the "taxon-counting" in a metagenomic sample: we have taken the same number of copies of three full bacterial genomes of different lengths, break them up randomly to short reads of average length of 150 bp, and mixed the reads, creating our simple benchmark. Because of its simplicity, the benchmark is not supposed to serve as a mock metagenome, but if a software fails on that simple task, it will surely fail on most real metagenomes. We applied three software for the benchmark. The ideal quantitative solution would assign the same proportion to the three bacterial taxa. We have found that AMPHORA2/AmphoraNet gave the most accurate results and the other two software were under

  2. The Measles Vaccination Narrative in Twitter: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Radzikowski, Jacek; Jacobsen, Kathryn H; Croitoru, Arie; Crooks, Andrew; Delamater, Paul L

    2016-01-01

    Background The emergence of social media is providing an alternative avenue for information exchange and opinion formation on health-related issues. Collective discourse in such media leads to the formation of a complex narrative, conveying public views and perceptions. Objective This paper presents a study of Twitter narrative regarding vaccination in the aftermath of the 2015 measles outbreak, both in terms of its cyber and physical characteristics. We aimed to contribute to the analysis of the data, as well as presenting a quantitative interdisciplinary approach to analyze such open-source data in the context of health narratives. Methods We collected 669,136 tweets referring to vaccination from February 1 to March 9, 2015. These tweets were analyzed to identify key terms, connections among such terms, retweet patterns, the structure of the narrative, and connections to the geographical space. Results The data analysis captures the anatomy of the themes and relations that make up the discussion about vaccination in Twitter. The results highlight the higher impact of stories contributed by news organizations compared to direct tweets by health organizations in communicating health-related information. They also capture the structure of the antivaccination narrative and its terms of reference. Analysis also revealed the relationship between community engagement in Twitter and state policies regarding child vaccination. Residents of Vermont and Oregon, the two states with the highest rates of non-medical exemption from school-entry vaccines nationwide, are leading the social media discussion in terms of participation. Conclusions The interdisciplinary study of health-related debates in social media across the cyber-physical debate nexus leads to a greater understanding of public concerns, views, and responses to health-related issues. Further coalescing such capabilities shows promise towards advancing health communication, thus supporting the design of more

  3. Quantitative risk analysis for landslides -- Examples from Bíldudalur, NW-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R.; Glade, T.

    2004-03-01

    Although various methods to carry out quantitative landslide risk analyses are available, applications are still rare and mostly dependent on the occurrence of disasters. In Iceland, two catastrophic snow avalanches killed 34 people in 1995. As a consequence the Ministry of the Environment issued a new regulation on hazard zoning due to snow avalanches and landslides in 2000, which aims to prevent people living or working within the areas most at risk until 2010. The regulation requires to carry out landslide and snow avalanche risk analyses, however, a method to calculate landslide risk adopted to Icelandic conditions is still missing. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this study is to develop such a method for landslides, focussing on debris flows and rock falls and to test it in Bíldudalur, NW-Iceland. Risk analysis, beside risk evaluation and risk management, is part of the holistic concept of risk assessment. Within this study, risk analysis is considered only, focussing on the risks to life. To calculate landslide risk, the spatial and temporal probability of occurrence of potential damaging events, as well as the distribution of the elements at risk in space and time, considering also changing vulnerabilities, must be determined. Within this study, a new raster-based approach is developed. Thus, all existent vector data are transferred into raster data using a resolution of 1m x 1m. The specific attribute data are attributed to the grid cells, resulting in specific raster data layers for each input parameter. The calculation of the landslide risk follows a function of the input parameters hazard, damage potential of the elements at risk, vulnerability, probability of the spatial impact, probability of the temporal impact and probability of the seasonal occurrence. Finally, results are upscaled to a resolution of 20m x 20m and are presented as individual risk to life and object risk to life for each process. Within the quantitative landslide risk analysis the

  4. [Quantitative evaluation of inhibitory effects of epileptic spikes on theta rhythms in the network of hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortex in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy].

    PubMed

    Ge, Man-Ling; Guo, Jun-Dan; Chen, Sheng-Hua; Zhang, Ji-Chang; Fu, Xiao-Xuan; Chen, Yu-Min

    2017-02-25

    Epileptic spike is an indicator of hyper-excitability and hyper-synchrony in the neural networks. The inhibitory effects of spikes on theta rhythms (4-8 Hz) might be helpful to understand the mechanism of epileptic damage on the cognitive functions. To quantitatively evaluate the inhibitory effects of spikes on theta rhythms, intracerebral electroencephalogram (EEG) recordings with both sporadic spikes (SSs) and spike-free transient period between adjacent spikes were selected in 4 patients in the status of rapid eyes movement (REM) sleep with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) under the pre-surgical monitoring. The electrodes of hippocampal CA3 and entorhinal cortex (EC) were employed, since CA3 and EC built up one of key loops to investigate cognition and epilepsy. These SSs occurred only in CA3, only in EC, or in both CA3 and EC synchronously. Theta power was respectively estimated around SSs and during the spike-free transient period by Gabor wavelet transform and Hilbert transform. The intermittent extent was then estimated to represent for the loss of theta rhythms during the spike-free transient period. The following findings were obtained: (1) The prominent rhythms were in theta frequency band; (2) The spikes could transiently reduce theta power, and the inhibitory effect was severer around SSs in both CA3 and EC synchronously than that around either SSs only in EC or SSs only in CA3; (3) During the spike-free transient period, theta rhythms were interrupted with the intermittent theta rhythms left and theta power level continued dropping, implying the inhibitory effect was sustained. Additionally, the intermittent extent of theta rhythms was converged to the inhibitory extent around SSs; (4) The average theta power level during the spike-free transient period might not be in line with the inhibitory extent of theta rhythms around SSs. It was concluded that the SSs had negative effects on theta rhythms transiently and directly, the inhibitory effects aroused by

  5. Quantitative texture analysis of talc in mantle hydrated mylonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benitez-Perez, J. M.; Gomez Barreiro, J.; Wenk, H. R.; Vogel, S. C.; Soda, Y.; Voltolini, M.; Martinez-Catalan, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    A quantitative texture analysis of talc-serpentinite mylonites developed in highly deformed ultramafic rocks from different orogenic contexts have been done with neutorn diffraction at HIPPO (Los Álamos National Laboratory). Mineral assemblage, metamorphic evolution and deformative fabric of these samples could be correlated with those verified along the shallow levels (<100km; <5GPa) of a subduction zone. The hydration of mantle (ultramafic) rocks at those levels it is likely to occur dynamically, with important implications on seismogenesis. Given the high anisotropy of the major phases in the samples (i.e. talc and antigorite) it is expected to influence seismic anisotropy of the whole system, in the presence of texture. However to date there was no data on the crystallographic preferred orientation of talc and examples of antigorite textures are very limited. We explore the contribution of talc texture to the seismic anisotropy of mantle hydrated mylonites. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by research project CGL2011-22728 of Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness. JGB and JMBP are grateful to the Ramón y Cajal and FPI funding programs. Access to HIPPO (LANSCE) to conduct diffraction experiments is kindly acknowledged.

  6. Quantitative Analysis of Cellular Metabolic Dissipative, Self-Organized Structures

    PubMed Central

    de la Fuente, Ildefonso Martínez

    2010-01-01

    One of the most important goals of the postgenomic era is understanding the metabolic dynamic processes and the functional structures generated by them. Extensive studies during the last three decades have shown that the dissipative self-organization of the functional enzymatic associations, the catalytic reactions produced during the metabolite channeling, the microcompartmentalization of these metabolic processes and the emergence of dissipative networks are the fundamental elements of the dynamical organization of cell metabolism. Here we present an overview of how mathematical models can be used to address the properties of dissipative metabolic structures at different organizational levels, both for individual enzymatic associations and for enzymatic networks. Recent analyses performed with dissipative metabolic networks have shown that unicellular organisms display a singular global enzymatic structure common to all living cellular organisms, which seems to be an intrinsic property of the functional metabolism as a whole. Mathematical models firmly based on experiments and their corresponding computational approaches are needed to fully grasp the molecular mechanisms of metabolic dynamical processes. They are necessary to enable the quantitative and qualitative analysis of the cellular catalytic reactions and also to help comprehend the conditions under which the structural dynamical phenomena and biological rhythms arise. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for the metabolic dissipative structures is crucial for unraveling the dynamics of cellular life. PMID:20957111

  7. Separation and quantitative analysis of alkyl sulfate ethoxymers by HPLC.

    PubMed

    Morvan, Julien; Hubert-Roux, Marie; Agasse, Valérie; Cardinael, Pascal; Barbot, Florence; Decock, Gautier; Bouillon, Jean-Philippe

    2008-01-01

    Separation of alkyl sulfate ethoxymers is investigated on various high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) stationary phases: Acclaim C18 Surfactant, Surfactant C8, and Hypercarb. For a fixed alkyl chain length, ethoxymers are eluted in the order of increasing number of ethoxylated units on Acclaim C18 Surfactant, whereas a reversed elution order is observed on Surfactant C8 and Hypercarb. Moreover, on an Acclaim C18 Surfactant column, non-ethoxylated compounds are eluted in their ethoxymers distribution and the use of sodium acetate additive in mobile phase leads to a co-elution of ethoxymers. HPLC stationary phases dedicated to surfactants analysis are evaluated by means of the Tanaka test. Surfactant C8 presents a great silanol activity whereas Acclaim C18 Surfactant shows a high steric selectivity. For alkyl sulfates, linearity of the calibration curve and limits of detection and quantitation are evaluated. The amount of sodium laureth sulfate raw material found in commercial body product is in agreement with the specification of the manufacturer.

  8. Quantitative analysis of 3-OH oxylipins in fermentation yeast.

    PubMed

    Potter, Greg; Xia, Wei; Budge, Suzanne M; Speers, R Alex

    2017-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous distribution of oxylipins in plants, animals, and microbes, and the application of numerous analytical techniques to study these molecules, 3-OH oxylipins have never been quantitatively assayed in yeasts. The formation of heptafluorobutyrate methyl ester derivatives and subsequent analysis with gas chromatography - negative chemical ionization - mass spectrometry allowed for the first determination of yeast 3-OH oxylipins. The concentration of 3-OH 10:0 (0.68-4.82 ng/mg dry cell mass) in the SMA strain of Saccharomyces pastorianus grown in laboratory-scale beverage fermentations was elevated relative to oxylipin concentrations in plant tissues and macroalgae. In fermenting yeasts, the onset of 3-OH oxylipin formation has been related to fermentation progression and flocculation initiation. When the SMA strain was grown in laboratory-scale fermentations, the maximal sugar consumption rate preceded the lowest concentration of 3-OH 10:0 by ∼4.5 h and a distinct increase in 3-OH 10:0 concentration by ∼16.5 h.

  9. Quantitative analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging for hepatic encephalopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syh, Hon-Wei; Chu, Wei-Kom; Ong, Chin-Sing

    1992-06-01

    High intensity lesions around ventricles have recently been observed in T1-weighted brain magnetic resonance images for patients suffering hepatic encephalopathy. The exact etiology that causes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) gray scale changes has not been totally understood. The objective of our study was to investigate, through quantitative means, (1) the amount of changes to brain white matter due to the disease process, and (2) the extent and distribution of these high intensity lesions, since it is believed that the abnormality may not be entirely limited to the white matter only. Eleven patients with proven haptic encephalopathy and three normal persons without any evidence of liver abnormality constituted our current data base. Trans-axial, sagittal, and coronal brain MRI were obtained on a 1.5 Tesla scanner. All processing was carried out on a microcomputer-based image analysis system in an off-line manner. Histograms were decomposed into regular brain tissues and lesions. Gray scale ranges coded as lesion were then brought back to original images to identify distribution of abnormality. Our results indicated the disease process involved pallidus, mesencephalon, and subthalamic regions.

  10. Quantitative SERS sensors for environmental analysis of naphthalene.

    PubMed

    Péron, O; Rinnert, E; Toury, T; Lamy de la Chapelle, M; Compère, C

    2011-03-07

    In the investigation of chemical pollutants, such as PAHs (Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons) at low concentration in aqueous medium, Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) stands for an alternative to the inherent low cross-section of normal Raman scattering. Indeed, SERS is a very sensitive spectroscopic technique due to the excitation of the surface plasmon modes of the nanostructured metallic film. The surface of quartz substrates was coated with a hydrophobic film obtained by silanization and subsequently reacted with polystyrene (PS) beads coated with gold nanoparticles. The hydrophobic surface of the SERS substrates pre-concentrates non-polar molecules such as naphthalene. Under laser excitation, the SERS-active substrates allow the detection and the identification of the target molecules localized close to the gold nanoparticles. The morphology of the SERS substrates based on polystyrene beads surrounded by gold nanoparticles was characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Furthermore, the Raman fingerprint of the polystyrene stands for an internal spectral reference. To this extent, an innovative method to detect and to quantify organic molecules, as naphthalene in the range of 1 to 20 ppm, in aqueous media was carried out. Such SERS-active substrates tend towards an application as quantitative SERS sensors for the environmental analysis of naphthalene.

  11. Quantitative Financial Analysis of Alternative Energy Efficiency Shareholder Incentive Mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Cappers, Peter; Goldman, Charles; Chait, Michele; Edgar, George; Schlegel, Jeff; Shirley, Wayne

    2008-08-03

    Rising energy prices and climate change are central issues in the debate about our nation's energy policy. Many are demanding increased energy efficiency as a way to help reduce greenhouse gas emissions and lower the total cost of electricity and energy services for consumers and businesses. Yet, as the National Action Plan on Energy Efficiency (NAPEE) pointed out, many utilities continue to shy away from seriously expanding their energy efficiency program offerings because they claim there is insufficient profit-motivation, or even a financial disincentive, when compared to supply-side investments. With the recent introduction of Duke Energy's Save-a-Watt incentive mechanism and ongoing discussions about decoupling, regulators and policymakers are now faced with an expanded and diverse landscape of financial incentive mechanisms, Determining the 'right' way forward to promote deep and sustainable demand side resource programs is challenging. Due to the renaissance that energy efficiency is currently experiencing, many want to better understand the tradeoffs in stakeholder benefits between these alternative incentive structures before aggressively embarking on a path for which course corrections can be time-consuming and costly. Using a prototypical Southwest utility and a publicly available financial model, we show how various stakeholders (e.g. shareholders, ratepayers, etc.) are affected by these different types of shareholder incentive mechanisms under varying assumptions about program portfolios. This quantitative analysis compares the financial consequences associated with a wide range of alternative incentive structures. The results will help regulators and policymakers better understand the financial implications of DSR program incentive regulation.

  12. Quantitative analysis of plasma interleiukin-6 by immunoassay on microchip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, K.; Hashimoto, Y.; Yatsushiro, S.; Yamamura, S.; Tanaka, M.; Ooie, T.; Baba, Y.; Kataoka, M.

    2012-03-01

    Sandwich enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) is one of the most frequently employed assays for clinical diagnosis, since this enables the investigator to identify specific protein biomarkers. However, the conventional assay using a 96-well microtitration plate is time- and sample-consuming, and therefore is not suitable for rapid diagnosis. To overcome these drawbacks, we performed a sandwich ELISA on a microchip. We employed the piezoelectric inkjet printing for deposition and fixation of 1st antibody on the microchannnel surface (300 μm width and 100 μm depth). Model analyte was interleukin-6 (IL-6) which was one of the inflammatory cytokine. After blocking the microchannel, antigen, biotin-labeled 2nd antibody, and avidin-labeled peroxidase were infused into the microchannel and incubated for 20 min, 10 min, and 5 min, respectively. This assay could detect 2 pg/ml and quantitatively measure the range of 0-32 pg/ml. Liner regression analysis of plasma IL-6 concentration obtained by microchip and conventional methods exhibited a significant relationship (R2 = 0.9964). This assay reduced the time for the antigen-antibody reaction to 1/6, and the consumption of samples and reagents to 1/50 compared with the conventional method. This assay enables us to determine plasma IL-6 with accuracy, high sensitivity, time saving ability, and low consumption of sample and reagents, and thus will be applicable to clinic diagnosis.

  13. Quantitative produced water analysis using mobile 1H NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Lisabeth; Kalli, Chris; Fridjonsson, Einar O.; May, Eric F.; Stanwix, Paul L.; Graham, Brendan F.; Carroll, Matthew R. J.; Johns, Michael L.

    2016-10-01

    Measurement of oil contamination of produced water is required in the oil and gas industry to the (ppm) level prior to discharge in order to meet typical environmental legislative requirements. Here we present the use of compact, mobile 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, in combination with solid phase extraction (SPE), to meet this metrology need. The NMR hardware employed featured a sufficiently homogeneous magnetic field, such that chemical shift differences could be used to unambiguously differentiate, and hence quantitatively detect, the required oil and solvent NMR signals. A solvent system consisting of 1% v/v chloroform in tetrachloroethylene was deployed, this provided a comparable 1H NMR signal intensity for the oil and the solvent (chloroform) and hence an internal reference 1H signal from the chloroform resulting in the measurement being effectively self-calibrating. The measurement process was applied to water contaminated with hexane or crude oil over the range 1-30 ppm. The results were validated against known solubility limits as well as infrared analysis and gas chromatography.

  14. Quantitative analysis of dynamic association in live biological fluorescent samples.

    PubMed

    Ruusuvuori, Pekka; Paavolainen, Lassi; Rutanen, Kalle; Mäki, Anita; Huttunen, Heikki; Marjomäki, Varpu

    2014-01-01

    Determining vesicle localization and association in live microscopy may be challenging due to non-simultaneous imaging of rapidly moving objects with two excitation channels. Besides errors due to movement of objects, imaging may also introduce shifting between the image channels, and traditional colocalization methods cannot handle such situations. Our approach to quantifying the association between tagged proteins is to use an object-based method where the exact match of object locations is not assumed. Point-pattern matching provides a measure of correspondence between two point-sets under various changes between the sets. Thus, it can be used for robust quantitative analysis of vesicle association between image channels. Results for a large set of synthetic images shows that the novel association method based on point-pattern matching demonstrates robust capability to detect association of closely located vesicles in live cell-microscopy where traditional colocalization methods fail to produce results. In addition, the method outperforms compared Iterated Closest Points registration method. Results for fixed and live experimental data shows the association method to perform comparably to traditional methods in colocalization studies for fixed cells and to perform favorably in association studies for live cells.

  15. High throughput, quantitative analysis of human osteoclast differentiation and activity.

    PubMed

    Diepenhorst, Natalie A; Nowell, Cameron J; Rueda, Patricia; Henriksen, Kim; Pierce, Tracie; Cook, Anna E; Pastoureau, Philippe; Sabatini, Massimo; Charman, William N; Christopoulos, Arthur; Summers, Roger J; Sexton, Patrick M; Langmead, Christopher J

    2017-02-15

    Osteoclasts are multinuclear cells that degrade bone under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Osteoclasts are therefore a major target of osteoporosis therapeutics aimed at preserving bone. Consequently, analytical methods for osteoclast activity are useful for the development of novel biomarkers and/or pharmacological agents for the treatment of osteoporosis. The nucleation state of an osteoclast is indicative of its maturation and activity. To date, activity is routinely measured at the population level with only approximate consideration of the nucleation state (an 'osteoclast population' is typically defined as cells with ≥3 nuclei). Using a fluorescent substrate for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), a routinely used marker of osteoclast activity, we developed a multi-labelled imaging method for quantitative measurement of osteoclast TRAP activity at the single cell level. Automated image analysis enables interrogation of large osteoclast populations in a high throughput manner using open source software. Using this methodology, we investigated the effects of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANK-L) on osteoclast maturation and activity and demonstrated that TRAP activity directly correlates with osteoclast maturity (i.e. nuclei number). This method can be applied to high throughput screening of osteoclast-targeting compounds to determine changes in maturation and activity.

  16. Brain networks of temporal preparation: A multiple regression analysis of neuropsychological data.

    PubMed

    Triviño, Mónica; Correa, Ángel; Lupiáñez, Juan; Funes, María Jesús; Catena, Andrés; He, Xun; Humphreys, Glyn W

    2016-11-15

    There are only a few studies on the brain networks involved in the ability to prepare in time, and most of them followed a correlational rather than a neuropsychological approach. The present neuropsychological study performed multiple regression analysis to address the relationship between both grey and white matter (measured by magnetic resonance imaging in patients with brain lesion) and different effects in temporal preparation (Temporal orienting, Foreperiod and Sequential effects). Two versions of a temporal preparation task were administered to a group of 23 patients with acquired brain injury. In one task, the cue presented (a red versus green square) to inform participants about the time of appearance (early versus late) of a target stimulus was blocked, while in the other task the cue was manipulated on a trial-by-trial basis. The duration of the cue-target time intervals (400 versus 1400ms) was always manipulated within blocks in both tasks. Regression analysis were conducted between either the grey matter lesion size or the white matter tracts disconnection and the three temporal preparation effects separately. The main finding was that each temporal preparation effect was predicted by a different network of structures, depending on cue expectancy. Specifically, the Temporal orienting effect was related to both prefrontal and temporal brain areas. The Foreperiod effect was related to right and left prefrontal structures. Sequential effects were predicted by both parietal cortex and left subcortical structures. These findings show a clear dissociation of brain circuits involved in the different ways to prepare in time, showing for the first time the involvement of temporal areas in the Temporal orienting effect, as well as the parietal cortex in the Sequential effects.

  17. Temporal and Spatial Analysis of Monogenetic Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiyosugi, Koji

    Achieving an understanding of the nature of monogenetic volcanic fields depends on identification of the spatial and temporal patterns of volcanism in these fields, and their relationships to structures mapped in the shallow crust and inferred in the deep crust and mantle through interpretation of geochemical, radiometric and geophysical data. We investigate the spatial and temporal distributions of volcanism in the Abu Monogenetic Volcano Group, Southwest Japan. E-W elongated volcano distribution, which is identified by a nonparametric kernel method, is found to be consistent with the spatial extent of P-wave velocity anomalies in the lower crust and upper mantle, supporting the idea that the spatial density map of volcanic vents reflects the geometry of a mantle diapir. Estimated basalt supply to the lower crust is constant. This observation and the spatial distribution of volcanic vents suggest stability of magma productivity and essentially constant two-dimensional size of the source mantle diapir. We mapped conduits, dike segments, and sills in the San Rafael sub-volcanic field, Utah, where the shallowest part of a Pliocene magmatic system is exceptionally well exposed. The distribution of conduits matches the major features of dike distribution, including development of clusters and distribution of outliers. The comparison of San Rafael conduit distribution and the distributions of volcanoes in several recently active volcanic fields supports the use of statistical models, such as nonparametric kernel methods, in probabilistic hazard assessment for distributed volcanism. We developed a new recurrence rate calculation method that uses a Monte Carlo procedure to better reflect and understand the impact of uncertainties of radiometric age determinations on uncertainty of recurrence rate estimates for volcanic activity in the Abu, Yucca Mountain Region, and Izu-Tobu volcanic fields. Results suggest that the recurrence rates of volcanic fields can change by more

  18. Application of 3D Spatio-Temporal Data Modeling, Management, and Analysis in DB4GEO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuper, P. V.; Breunig, M.; Al-Doori, M.; Thomsen, A.

    2016-10-01

    Many of todaýs world wide challenges such as climate change, water supply and transport systems in cities or movements of crowds need spatio-temporal data to be examined in detail. Thus the number of examinations in 3D space dealing with geospatial objects moving in space and time or even changing their shapes in time will rapidly increase in the future. Prominent spatio-temporal applications are subsurface reservoir modeling, water supply after seawater desalination and the development of transport systems in mega cities. All of these applications generate large spatio-temporal data sets. However, the modeling, management and analysis of 3D geo-objects with changing shape and attributes in time still is a challenge for geospatial database architectures. In this article we describe the application of concepts for the modeling, management and analysis of 2.5D and 3D spatial plus 1D temporal objects implemented in DB4GeO, our service-oriented geospatial database architecture. An example application with spatio-temporal data of a landfill, near the city of Osnabrück in Germany demonstrates the usage of the concepts. Finally, an outlook on our future research focusing on new applications with big data analysis in three spatial plus one temporal dimension in the United Arab Emirates, especially the Dubai area, is given.

  19. Quantitative Analysis of Intracellular Fluorescent Foci in Live Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Moolman, M. Charl; Kerssemakers, Jacob W.J.; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescence microscopy has revolutionized in vivo cellular biology. Through the specific labeling of a protein of interest with a fluorescent protein, one is able to study movement and colocalization, and even count individual proteins in a live cell. Different algorithms exist to quantify the total intensity and position of a fluorescent focus. Although these algorithms have been rigorously studied for in vitro conditions, which are greatly different than the in-homogenous and variable cellular environments, their exact limits and applicability in the context of a live cell have not been thoroughly and systematically evaluated. In this study, we quantitatively characterize the influence of different background subtraction algorithms on several focus analysis algorithms. We use, to our knowledge, a novel approach to assess the sensitivity of the focus analysis algorithms to background removal, in which simulated and experimental data are combined to maintain full control over the sensitivity of a focus within a realistic background of cellular fluorescence. We demonstrate that the choice of algorithm and the corresponding error are dependent on both the brightness of the focus, and the cellular context. Expectedly, focus intensity estimation and localization accuracy suffer in all algorithms at low focus to background ratios, with the bacteroidal background subtraction in combination with the median excess algorithm, and the region of interest background subtraction in combination with a two-dimensional Gaussian fit algorithm, performing the best. We furthermore show that the choice of background subtraction algorithm is dependent on the expression level of the protein under investigation, and that the localization error is dependent on the distance of a focus from the bacterial edge and pole. Our results establish a set of guidelines for what signals can be analyzed to give a targeted spatial and intensity accuracy within a bacterial cell. PMID:26331246

  20. Communication about vaccinations in Italian websites: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Tafuri, Silvio; Gallone, Maria S; Gallone, Maria F; Zorico, Ivan; Aiello, Valeria; Germinario, Cinzia

    2014-01-01

    Babies' parents and people who look for information about vaccination often visit anti-vaccine movement's websites, blogs by naturopathic physicians or natural and alternative medicine practitioners. The aim of this work is to provide a quantitative analysis on the type of information available to Italian people regarding vaccination and a quality analysis of websites retrieved through our searches. A quality score was created to evaluate the technical level of websites. A research was performed through Yahoo, Google, and MSN using the keywords "vaccine" and "vaccination," with the function "OR" in order to identify the most frequently used websites. The 2 keywords were input in Italian, and the first 15 pages retrieved by each search engine were analyzed. 149 websites were selected through this methodology. Fifty-three per cent of the websites belonged to associations, groups, or scientific companies, 32.2% (n = 48) consisted of a personal blog and 14.8% (n = 22) belonged to some of the National Health System offices. Among all analyzed websites, 15.4% (n = 23) came from anti-vaccine movement groups. 37.6% reported webmaster name, 67.8% webmaster e-mail, 28.6% indicated the date of the last update and 46.6% the author's name. The quality score for government sites was higher on average than anti-vaccine websites; although, government sites don't use Web 2.0 functions, as the forums.: National Health System institutions who have to promote vaccination cannot avoid investing in web communication because it cannot be managed by private efforts but must be the result of Public Health, private and scientific association, and social movement synergy.

  1. Quantitative live-cell imaging reveals spatio-temporal dynamics and cytoplasmic assembly of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Pack, Chan-Gi; Yukii, Haruka; Toh-e, Akio; Kudo, Tai; Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Kaiho, Ai; Sakata, Eri; Murata, Shigeo; Yokosawa, Hideyoshi; Sako, Yasushi; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Tanaka, Keiji; Saeki, Yasushi

    2014-03-06

    The 26S proteasome is a 2.5-MDa multisubunit protease complex that degrades polyubiquitylated proteins. Although its functions and structure have been extensively characterized, little is known about its dynamics in living cells. Here, we investigate the absolute concentration, spatio-temporal dynamics and complex formation of the proteasome in living cells using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. We find that the 26S proteasome complex is highly mobile, and that almost all proteasome subunits throughout the cell are stably incorporated into 26S proteasomes. The interaction between 19S and 20S particles is stable even in an importin-α mutant, suggesting that the 26S proteasome is assembled in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a genetically stabilized 26S proteasome mutant is able to enter the nucleus. These results suggest that the 26S proteasome completes its assembly process in the cytoplasm and translocates into the nucleus through the nuclear pore complex as a holoenzyme.

  2. Higher-order aggregate networks in the analysis of temporal networks: path structures and centralities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholtes, Ingo; Wider, Nicolas; Garas, Antonios

    2016-03-01

    Despite recent advances in the study of temporal networks, the analysis of time-stamped network data is still a fundamental challenge. In particular, recent studies have shown that correlations in the ordering of links crucially alter causal topologies of temporal networks, thus invalidating analyses based on static, time-aggregated representations of time-stamped data. These findings not only highlight an important dimension of complexity in temporal networks, but also call for new network-analytic methods suitable to analyze complex systems with time-varying topologies. Addressing this open challenge, here we introduce a novel framework for the study of path-based centralities in temporal networks. Studying betweenness, closeness and reach centrality, we first show than an application of these measures to time-aggregated, static representations of temporal networks yields misleading results about the actual importance of nodes. To overcome this problem, we define path-based centralities in higher-order aggregate networks, a recently proposed generalization of the commonly used static representation of time-stamped data. Using data on six empirical temporal networks, we show that the resulting higher-order measures better capture the true, temporal centralities of nodes. Our results demonstrate that higher-order aggregate networks constitute a powerful abstraction, with broad perspectives for the design of new, computationally efficient data mining techniques for time-stamped relational data.

  3. Quantitative, Image-Based Phenotyping Methods Provide Insight into Spatial and Temporal Dimensions of Plant Disease1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Fentress, Sarah J.; Sher, Joel W.; Berry, Jeffrey C.; Pretz, Chelsea

    2016-01-01

    Plant disease symptoms exhibit complex spatial and temporal patterns that are challenging to quantify. Image-based phenotyping approaches enable multidimensional characterization of host-microbe interactions and are well suited to capture spatial and temporal data that are key to understanding disease progression. We applied image-based methods to investigate cassava bacterial blight, which is caused by the pathogen Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. manihotis (Xam). We generated Xam strains in which individual predicted type III effector (T3E) genes were mutated and applied multiple imaging approaches to investigate the role of these proteins in bacterial virulence. Specifically, we quantified bacterial populations, water-soaking disease symptoms, and pathogen spread from the site of inoculation over time for strains with mutations in avrBs2, xopX, and xopK as compared to wild-type Xam. ∆avrBs2 and ∆xopX both showed reduced growth in planta and delayed spread through the vasculature system of cassava. ∆avrBs2 exhibited reduced water-soaking symptoms at the site of inoculation. In contrast, ∆xopK exhibited enhanced induction of disease symptoms at the site of inoculation but reduced spread through the vasculature. Our results highlight the importance of adopting a multipronged approach to plant disease phenotyping to more fully understand the roles of T3Es in virulence. Finally, we demonstrate that the approaches used in this study can be extended to many host-microbe systems and increase the dimensions of phenotype that can be explored. PMID:27443602

  4. Software for quantitative analysis of radiotherapy: overview, requirement analysis and design solutions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanlan; Hub, Martina; Mang, Sarah; Thieke, Christian; Nix, Oliver; Karger, Christian P; Floca, Ralf O

    2013-06-01

    Radiotherapy is a fast-developing discipline which plays a major role in cancer care. Quantitative analysis of radiotherapy data can improve the success of the treatment and support the prediction of outcome. In this paper, we first identify functional, conceptional and general requirements on a software system for quantitative analysis of radiotherapy. Further we present an overview of existing radiotherapy analysis software tools and check them against the stated requirements. As none of them could meet all of the demands presented herein, we analyzed possible conceptional problems and present software design solutions and recommendations to meet the stated requirements (e.g. algorithmic decoupling via dose iterator pattern; analysis database design). As a proof of concept we developed a software library "RTToolbox" following the presented design principles. The RTToolbox is available as open source library and has already been tested in a larger-scale software system for different use cases. These examples demonstrate the benefit of the presented design principles.

  5. Column precipitation chromatography: an approach to quantitative analysis of eigencolloids.

    PubMed

    Breynaert, E; Maes, A

    2005-08-01

    A new column precipitation chromatography (CPC) technique, capable of quantitatively measuring technetium eigencolloids in aqueous solutions, is presented. The CPC technique is based on the destabilization and precipitation of eigencolloids by polycations in a confined matrix. Tc(IV) colloids can be quantitatively determined from their precipitation onto the CPC column (separation step) and their subsequent elution upon oxidation to pertechnetate by peroxide (elution step). A clean-bed particle removal model was used to explain the experimental results.

  6. Skunk and raccoon rabies in the eastern United States: temporal and spatial analysis.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Marta A; Curns, Aaron T; Rupprecht, Charles E; Hanlon, Cathleen A; Krebs, John W; Childs, James E

    2003-09-01

    Since 1981, an epizootic of raccoon rabies has spread throughout the eastern United States. A concomitant increase in reported rabies cases in skunks has raised concerns that an independent maintenance cycle of rabies virus in skunks could become established, affecting current strategies of wildlife rabies control programs. Rabies surveillance data from 1981 through 2000 obtained from the health departments of 11 eastern states were used to analyze temporal and spatial characteristics of rabies epizootics in each species. Spatial analysis indicated that epizootics in raccoons and skunks moved in a similar direction from 1990 to 2000. Temporal regression analysis showed that the number of rabid raccoons predicted the number of rabid skunks through time, with a 1-month lag. In areas where the raccoon rabies virus variant is enzootic, spatio-temporal analysis does not provide evidence that this rabies virus variant is currently cycling independently among skunks.

  7. Quantitative analysis of harmonic convergence in mosquito auditory interactions.

    PubMed

    Aldersley, Andrew; Champneys, Alan; Homer, Martin; Robert, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    This article analyses the hearing and behaviour of mosquitoes in the context of inter-individual acoustic interactions. The acoustic interactions of tethered live pairs of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, from same and opposite sex mosquitoes of the species, are recorded on independent and unique audio channels, together with the response of tethered individual mosquitoes to playbacks of pre-recorded flight tones of lone or paired individuals. A time-dependent representation of each mosquito's non-stationary wing beat frequency signature is constructed, based on Hilbert spectral analysis. A range of algorithmic tools is developed to automatically analyse these data, and used to perform a robust quantitative identification of the 'harmonic convergence' phenomenon. The results suggest that harmonic convergence is an active phenomenon, which does not occur by chance. It occurs for live pairs, as well as for lone individuals responding to playback recordings, whether from the same or opposite sex. Male-female behaviour is dominated by frequency convergence at a wider range of harmonic combinations than previously reported, and requires participation from both partners in the duet. New evidence is found to show that male-male interactions are more varied than strict frequency avoidance. Rather, they can be divided into two groups: convergent pairs, typified by tightly bound wing beat frequencies, and divergent pairs, that remain widely spaced in the frequency domain. Overall, the results reveal that mosquito acoustic interaction is a delicate and intricate time-dependent active process that involves both individuals, takes place at many different frequencies, and which merits further enquiry.

  8. Quantitative analysis of harmonic convergence in mosquito auditory interactions

    PubMed Central

    Aldersley, Andrew; Champneys, Alan; Robert, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    This article analyses the hearing and behaviour of mosquitoes in the context of inter-individual acoustic interactions. The acoustic interactions of tethered live pairs of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes, from same and opposite sex mosquitoes of the species, are recorded on independent and unique audio channels, together with the response of tethered individual mosquitoes to playbacks of pre-recorded flight tones of lone or paired individuals. A time-dependent representation of each mosquito's non-stationary wing beat frequency signature is constructed, based on Hilbert spectral analysis. A range of algorithmic tools is developed to automatically analyse these data, and used to perform a robust quantitative identification of the ‘harmonic convergence’ phenomenon. The results suggest that harmonic convergence is an active phenomenon, which does not occur by chance. It occurs for live pairs, as well as for lone individuals responding to playback recordings, whether from the same or opposite sex. Male–female behaviour is dominated by frequency convergence at a wider range of harmonic combinations than previously reported, and requires participation from both partners in the duet. New evidence is found to show that male–male interactions are more varied than strict frequency avoidance. Rather, they can be divided into two groups: convergent pairs, typified by tightly bound wing beat frequencies, and divergent pairs, that remain widely spaced in the frequency domain. Overall, the results reveal that mosquito acoustic interaction is a delicate and intricate time-dependent active process that involves both individuals, takes place at many different frequencies, and which merits further enquiry. PMID:27053654

  9. Quantitative analysis of flavanones and chalcones from willow bark.

    PubMed

    Freischmidt, A; Untergehrer, M; Ziegler, J; Knuth, S; Okpanyi, S; Müller, J; Kelber, O; Weiser, D; Jürgenliemk, G

    2015-09-01

    Willow bark extracts are used for the treatment of fever, pain and inflammation. Recent clinical and pharmacological research revealed that not only the salicylic alcohol derivatives, but also the polyphenols significantly contribute to these effects. Quantitative analysis of the European Pharmacopoeia still focuses on the determination of the salicylic alcohol derivatives. The objective of the present study was the development of an effective quantification method for the determination of as many flavanone and chalcone glycosides as possible in Salix purpurea and other Salix species as well as commercial preparations thereof. As Salix species contain a diverse spectrum of the glycosidated flavanones naringenin, eriodictyol, and the chalcone chalconaringenin, a subsequent acidic and enzymatic hydrolysis was developed to yield naringenin and eriodictyol as aglycones, which were quantified by HPLC. The 5-O-glucosides were cleaved with 11.5% TFA before subsequent hydrolysis of the 7-O-glucosides with an almond β-glucosidase at pH 6-7. The method was validated with regard to LOD, LOQ, intraday and interday precision, accuracy, stability, recovery, time of hydrolysis, robustness and applicability to extracts. All 5-O- and 7-O-glucosides of naringenin, eriodictyol and chalconaringenin were completely hydrolysed and converted to naringenin and eriodictyol. The LOD of the HPLC method was 0.77 μM of naringenin and 0.45 μM of eriodictyol. The LOQ was 2.34 μM of naringenin and 1.35 μM for eriodictyol. The method is robust with regard to sample weight, but susceptible concerning enzyme deterioration. The developed method is applicable to the determination of flavanone and chalcone glycosides in willow bark and corresponding preparations.

  10. Hydrocarbons on Phoebe, Iapetus, and Hyperion: Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruikshank, Dale P.; MoreauDalleOre, Cristina; Pendleton, Yvonne J.; Clark, Roger Nelson

    2012-01-01

    We present a quantitative analysis of the hydrocarbon spectral bands measured on three of Saturn's satellites, Phoebe, Iaperus, and Hyperion. These bands, measured with the Cassini Visible-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer on close fly-by's of these satellites, are the C-H stretching modes of aromatic hydrocarbons at approximately 3.28 micrometers (approximately 3050 per centimeter), and the are four blended bands of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3 in the range approximately 3.36-3.52 micrometers (approximately 2980- 2840 per centimeter) bably indicating the presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), is unusually strong in comparison to the aliphatic bands, resulting in a unique signarure among Solar System bodies measured so far, and as such offers a means of comparison among the three satellites. The ratio of the C-H bands in aromatic molecules to those in aliphatic molecules in the surface materials of Phoebe, NAro:NAliph approximately 24; for Hyperion the value is approximately 12, while laperus shows an intermediate value. In view of the trend of the evolution (dehydrogenation by heat and radiation) of aliphatic complexes toward more compact molecules and eventually to aromatics, the relative abundances of aliphatic -CH2- and -CH3- is an indication of the lengths of the molecular chain structures, hence the degree of modification of the original material. We derive CH2:CH3 approximately 2.2 in the spectrum of low-albedo material on laperus; this value is the same within measurement errors to the ratio in the diffuse interstellar medium. The similarity in the spectral signatures of the three satellites, plus the apparent weak trend of aromatic/aliphatic abundance from Phoebe to Hyperion, is consistent with, and effectively confirms that the source of the hydrocarbon-bearing material is Phoebe, and that the appearance of that material on the other two satellites arises from the deposition of the inward-spiraling dust that populates the Phoebe ring.

  11. Quantitative Analysis of the Effective Functional Structure in Yeast Glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    De la Fuente, Ildefonso M.; Cortes, Jesus M.

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the effective functionality that governs the enzymatic self-organized processes in cellular conditions is a crucial topic in the post-genomic era. In recent studies, Transfer Entropy has been proposed as a rigorous, robust and self-consistent method for the causal quantification of the functional information flow among nonlinear processes. Here, in order to quantify the functional connectivity for the glycolytic enzymes in dissipative conditions we have analyzed different catalytic patterns using the technique of Transfer Entropy. The data were obtained by means of a yeast glycolytic model formed by three delay differential equations where the enzymatic rate equations of the irreversible stages have been explicitly considered. These enzymatic activity functions were previously modeled and tested experimentally by other different groups. The results show the emergence of a new kind of dynamical functional structure, characterized by changing connectivity flows and a metabolic invariant that constrains the activity of the irreversible enzymes. In addition to the classical topological structure characterized by the specific location of enzymes, substrates, products and feedback-regulatory metabolites, an effective functional structure emerges in the modeled glycolytic system, which is dynamical and characterized by notable variations of the functional interactions. The dynamical structure also exhibits a metabolic invariant which constrains the functional attributes of the enzymes. Finally, in accordance with the classical biochemical studies, our numerical analysis reveals in a quantitative manner that the enzyme phosphofructokinase is the key-core of the metabolic system, behaving for all conditions as the main source of the effective causal flows in yeast glycolysis. PMID:22393350

  12. Gaussian Process Based Independent Analysis for Temporal Source Separation in fMRI.

    PubMed

    Hald, Ditte Høvenhoff; Henao, Ricardo; Winther, Ole

    2017-02-26

    Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) gives us a unique insight into the processes of the brain, and opens up for analyzing the functional activation patterns of the underlying sources. Task-inferred supervised learning with restrictive assumptions in the regression set-up, restricts the exploratory nature of the analysis. Fully unsupervised independent component analysis (ICA) algorithms, on the other hand, can struggle to detect clear classifiable components on single-subject data. We attribute this shortcoming to inadequate modeling of the fMRI source signals by failing to incorporate its temporal nature. fMRI source signals, biological stimuli and non-stimuli-related artifacts are all smooth over a time-scale compatible with the sampling time (TR). We therefore propose Gaussian process ICA (GPICA), which facilitates temporal dependency by the use of Gaussian process source priors. On two fMRI data sets with different sampling frequency, we show that the GPICA-inferred temporal components and associated spatial maps allow for a more definite interpretation than standard temporal ICA methods. The temporal structures of the sources are controlled by the covariance of the Gaussian process, specified by a kernel function with an interpretable and controllable temporal length scale parameter. We propose a hierarchical model specification, considering both instantaneous and convolutive mixing, and we infer source spatial maps, temporal patterns and temporal length scale parameters by Markov Chain Monte Carlo. A companion implementation made as a plug-in for SPM can be downloaded from https://github.com/dittehald/GPICA.

  13. Large-scale temporal analysis of computer and information science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soos, Sandor; Kampis, George; Gulyás, László

    2013-09-01

    The main aim of the project reported in this paper was twofold. One of the primary goals was to produce an extensive source of network data for bibliometric analyses of field dynamics in the case of Computer and Information Science. To this end, we rendered the raw material of the DBLP computer and infoscience bibliography into a comprehensive collection of dynamic network data, promptly available for further statistical analysis. The other goal was to demonstrate the value of our data source via its use in mapping Computer and Information Science (CIS). An analysis of the evolution of CIS was performed in terms of collaboration (co-authorship) network dynamics. Dynamic network analysis covered three quarters of the XX. century (76 years, from 1936 to date). Network evolution was described both at the macro- and the mezo level (in terms of community characteristics). Results show that the development of CIS followed what appears to be a universal pattern of growing into a "mature" discipline.

  14. Quantitative landslide risk analysis Examples from Bíldudalur, NW-Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, R.; Glade, T.

    2003-04-01

    Risk analysis, risk evaluation and risk management are integrated in the holistic concept of risk assessment. Internationally, various quantitative, semiquantitative and qualitative approaches exist to analyse the risk to life and/or the economic risk caused by landslides. In Iceland, a method to carry out snow avalanche risk analysis was developed in 1999, followed by rough guidelines on how to integrate results from landslide hazard assessments into a comprehensive landslide and snow avalanche risk assessment in 2002. The Icelandic regulation on hazard zoning due to snow avalanches and landslides, issued by the Icelandic Ministry of the Environment in the year 2000, aims to prevent people living or working within the areas most at risk, until 2010. The regulation requires to carry out landslide and snow avalanche risk analyses, however, an approach to calculate landslide risk in detail is still missing. Therefore, the ultimate goal of this study is to develop such a method and apply it in Bildudalur, NW-Iceland. Within this presentation, the risk analysis focuses on the risks to loose life. To calculate landslide risk, the spatial and temporal probability of occurrence of potential damaging events, as well as the distribution of the elements at risk in space and time, under the consideration of changing vulnerabilities must be determined. Based on existent debris flow and rock fall run-out maps, hazard maps are derived and the respective risks are calculated. Already digitized elements at risk (people in houses) are verified and updated. The damage potential (the number of all of the people living or working at a specific location), derived from official statistics and own investigations, are attributed to each house. The vulnerability of the elements at risk is mainly based on literature studies. The probability of spatial impact (i.e. of the hazardous event impacting a building) is estimated using benchmarks given in literature, results from field

  15. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K. A. Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S.; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J.

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4–5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39–4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51–4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94–6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and

  16. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K A Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4-5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39-4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51-4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94-6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and T

  17. Temporal Land Cover Analysis for Net Ecosystem Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Ke, Yinghai; Coleman, Andre M.; Diefenderfer, Heida L.

    2013-04-09

    We delineated 8 watersheds contributing to previously defined river reaches within the 1,468-km2 historical floodplain of the tidally influenced lower Columbia River and estuary. We assessed land-cover change at the watershed, reach, and restoration site scales by reclassifying remote-sensing data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Change Analysis Program’s land cover/land change product into forest, wetland, and urban categories. The analysis showed a 198.3 km2 loss of forest cover during the first 6 years of the Columbia Estuary Ecosystem Restoration Program, 2001–2006. Total measured urbanization in the contributing watersheds of the estuary during the full 1996-2006 change analysis period was 48.4 km2. Trends in forest gain/loss and urbanization differed between watersheds. Wetland gains and losses were within the margin of error of the satellite imagery analysis. No significant land cover change was measured at restoration sites, although it was visible in aerial imagery, therefore, the 30-m land-cover product may not be appropriate for assessment of early-stage wetland restoration. These findings suggest that floodplain restoration sites in reaches downstream of watersheds with decreasing forest cover will be subject to increased sediment loads, and those downstream of urbanization will experience effects of increased impervious surfaces on hydrologic processes.

  18. Temporal geospatial analysis of secondary school students’ examination performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nik Abd Kadir, ND; Adnan, NA

    2016-06-01

    Malaysia's Ministry of Education has improved the organization of the data to have the geographical information system (GIS) school database. However, no further analysis is done using geospatial analysis tool. Mapping has emerged as a communication tool and becomes effective way to publish the digital and statistical data such as school performance results. The objective of this study is to analyse secondary school student performance of science and mathematics scores of the Sijil Pelajaran Malaysia Examination result in the year 2010 to 2014 for the Kelantan's state schools with the aid of GIS software and geospatial analysis. The school performance according to school grade point average (GPA) from Grade A to Grade G were interpolated and mapped and query analysis using geospatial tools able to be done. This study will be beneficial to the education sector to analyse student performance not only in Kelantan but to the whole Malaysia and this will be a good method to publish in map towards better planning and decision making to prepare young Malaysians for the challenges of education system and performance.

  19. Temporal Distributions of Problem Behavior Based on Scatter Plot Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahng, SungWoo; Iwata, Brian A.; Fischer, Sonya M.; Page, Terry J.; Treadwell, Kimberli R. H.; Williams, Don E.; Smith, Richard G.

    1998-01-01

    A large-scale analysis was conducted of problem behavior by observing 20 individuals living in residential facilities. Data were converted into scatter plot formats. When the data were transformed into aggregate "control charts," 12 of 15 sets of data revealed 30-minute intervals during which problem behavior was more likely to occur.…

  20. Towards a temporal network analysis of interactive WiFi users

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yan; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Yi-Qing; Li, Xiang

    2012-06-01

    Complex networks are used to depict topological features of complex systems. The structure of a network characterizes the interactions among elements of the system, and facilitates the study of many dynamical processes taking place on it. In previous investigations, the topological infrastructure underlying dynamical systems is simplified as a static and invariable skeleton. However, this assumption cannot cover the temporal features of many time-evolution networks, whose components are evolving and mutating. In this letter, utilizing the log data of WiFi users in a Chinese university campus, we infuse the temporal dimension into the construction of dynamical human contact network. By quantitative comparison with the traditional aggregation approach, we find that the temporal contact network differs in many features, e.g., the reachability, the path length distribution. We conclude that the correlation between temporal path length and duration is not only determined by their definitions, but also influenced by the micro-dynamical features of human activities under certain social circumstance as well. The time order of individuals' interaction events plays a critical role in understanding many dynamical processes via human close proximity interactions studied in this letter. Besides, our study also provides a promising measure to identify the potential superspreaders by distinguishing the nodes functioning as the relay hub. The first two authors contributed equally to this paper.

  1. A Quantitative Analysis of the Behavioral Checklist of the Movement ABC Motor Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruiz, Luis Miguel; Gomez, Marta; Graupera, Jose Luis; Gutierrez, Melchor; Linaza, Jose Luis

    2007-01-01

    The fifth section of the Henderson and Sugden's Movement ABC Checklist is part of the general Checklist that accompanies The Movement ABC Battery. The authors maintain that the analysis of this section must be mainly qualitative instead of quantitative. The main objective of this study was to employ a quantitative analysis of this behavioural…

  2. Quantitative proton nuclear magnetic resonance for the structural and quantitative analysis of atropine sulfate.

    PubMed

    Shen, Shi; Yao, Jing; Shi, Yaqin

    2014-02-01

    This study assessed a general method of quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (qNMR) for the calibration of atropine sulfate (Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient, API) as reference standard. The spectra were acquired in D2O using maleic acid as the internal standard. Conformational behaviors of tropane ring were observed and studied by means of NMR and ROESY experiments at different temperature, which showed that the azine methyl group was at equilibrium for axial and equatorial conformations at room temperature. Signal delay and monitor signals of qNMR experimentation were optimized for quantification. The study reported here validated the method's linearity, range, limit of quantification, stability and precision. The results were consistent with the results obtained from mass balance approach.

  3. Analysis of the temporal dynamics of model performance and parameter sensitivity for hydrological models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, D.; Zehe, E.

    2009-04-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. We present a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution. Information about possible relevant processes during times with distinct model performance is obtained from parameter sensitivity analysis - also with high temporal resolution. We illustrate the combined approach of temporally resolved model performance and parameter sensitivity for a rainfall-runoff modeling case study. The headwater catchment of the Wilde Weisseritz in the eastern Ore mountains is simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs) and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The temporally resolved sensitivity analysis is based on the FAST algorithm. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types as well as a time series of the relative parameter sensitivity. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns which can lead to the identification of model structural errors. The parameter sensitivity helps to identify the relevant model parts.

  4. Impaired processing of binaural temporal cues to auditory scene analysis in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Natasha; Todd, Juanita; Mannion, Damien J; Finnigan, Simon; Catts, Stanley; Michie, Patricia T

    2013-05-01

    It is well established that individuals with schizophrenia demonstrate alterations in auditory perception beginning at the very earliest stages of information processing. However, it is not clear how these impairments in basic information processing translate into high-order cognitive deficits. Auditory scene analysis allows listeners to group auditory information into meaningful objects, and as such provides an important link between low-level auditory processing and higher cognitive abilities. In the present study we investigated whether low-level impairments in the processing of binaural temporal information impact upon auditory scene analysis ability. Binaural temporal processing ability was investigated in 19 individuals with schizophrenia and 19 matched controls. Individuals with schizophrenia showed impaired binaural temporal processing ability on an inter-aural time difference (ITD) discrimination task. In addition, patients demonstrated impairment in two measures of auditory scene analysis. Specifically, patients had reduced ability to use binaural temporal cues to extract signal from noise in a masking level difference paradigm, and to separate the location of a source sound in the presence of an echo in the precedence effect paradigm. These findings demonstrate that individuals with schizophrenia have impairments in the accuracy with which simple binaural temporal information is encoded in the auditory system, and furthermore, this impairment has functional consequences in terms of the use of these cues to extract information in complex auditory environments.

  5. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  6. Hydrological drought types in cold climates: quantitative analysis of causing factors and qualitative survey of impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Loon, A. F.; Ploum, S. W.; Parajka, J.; Fleig, A. K.; Garnier, E.; Laaha, G.; Van Lanen, H. A. J.

    2015-04-01

    For drought management and prediction, knowledge of causing factors and socio-economic impacts of hydrological droughts is crucial. Propagation of meteorological conditions in the hydrological cycle results in different hydrological drought types that require separate analysis. In addition to the existing hydrological drought typology, we here define two new drought types related to snow and ice. A snowmelt drought is a deficiency in the snowmelt discharge peak in spring in snow-influenced basins and a glaciermelt drought is a deficiency in the glaciermelt discharge peak in summer in glacierised basins. In 21 catchments in Austria and Norway we studied the meteorological conditions in the seasons preceding and at the time of snowmelt and glaciermelt drought events. Snowmelt droughts in Norway were mainly controlled by below-average winter precipitation, while in Austria both temperature and precipitation played a role. For glaciermelt droughts, the effect of below-average summer air temperature was dominant, both in Austria and Norway. Subsequently, we investigated the impacts of temperature-related drought types (i.e. snowmelt and glaciermelt drought, but also cold and warm snow season drought and rain-to-snow-season drought). In historical archives and drought databases for the US and Europe many impacts were found that can be attributed to these temperature-related hydrological drought types, mainly in the agriculture and electricity production (hydropower) sectors. However, drawing conclusions on the frequency of occurrence of different drought types from reported impacts is difficult, mainly because of reporting biases and the inevitably limited spatial and temporal scales of the information. Finally, this study shows that complete integration of quantitative analysis of causing factors and qualitative analysis of impacts of temperature-related droughts is not yet possible. Analysis of selected events, however, points out that it can be a promising research

  7. Integrated Analysis and Tools for Land Subsidence Surveying and Monitoring: a Semi-Quantitative Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosconi, A.; Pozzoli, A.; Meroni, A.; Gagliano, S.

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents an integrated approach for land subsidence monitoring using measures coming from different sensors. Eni S.p.A., the main Italian oil and gas company, constantly surveys the land with all the state of the art and innovative techniques, and a method able to integrate the results is an important and actual topic. Nowadays the world is a multi-sensor platform, and measure integration is strictly necessary. Combining the different data sources should be done in a clever way, taking advantages from the best performances of each technique. An integrated analysis allows the interpretation of simultaneous temporal series of data, coming from different sources, and try to separate subsidence contributions. With this purpose Exelis VIS in collaboration with Eni S.p.A. customize PISAV (Permanent Interferometric Scatterometer Analysis and Visualization), an ENVI extension able to capitalize on and combine all the different data collected in the surveys. In this article are presented some significant examples to show the potential of this tool in oil and gas activity: a hydrocarbon storage field where the comparison between SAR and production volumes emphasise a correlation between the two measures in few steps; and a hydrocarbon production field with the Satellite Survey Unit (S.S.U.), where SAR, CGPS, piezometers and assestimeters measure in the same area at the same time, giving the opportunity to analyse data contextually. In the integrated analysis performed with PISAV not always a mathematical rigorous study is possible, and a semi-quantitative approach is the only method for results interpretation. As a result, in the first test case strong correlation between injected hydrocarbon volume and vertical displacement were highlighted; in the second one the integrated analysis has different advantages in monitoring the land subsidence: permits a first qualitative "differentiation" of the natural and anthropic component of subsidence, and also gives more

  8. Microchromatography of hemoglobins. VIII. A general qualitative and quantitative method in plastic drinking straws and the quantitative analysis of Hb-F.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, W A; Pace, L A

    1978-03-01

    The microchromatographic procedure for the quantitative analysis of the hemoglobin components in a hemolysate uses columns of DEAE-cellulose in a plastic drinking straw with a glycine-KCN-NaCl developer. Not only may the method be used for the quantitative analysis of Hb-F but also for the analysis of the varied components in mixtures of hemoglobins.

  9. Geographical classification of Epimedium based on HPLC fingerprint analysis combined with multi-ingredients quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ning; Zhou, Guofu; Li, Xiaojuan; Lu, Heng; Meng, Fanyun; Zhai, Huaqiang

    2017-05-01

    A reliable and comprehensive method for identifying the origin and assessing the quality of Epimedium has been developed. The method is based on analysis of HPLC fingerprints, combined with similarity analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), principal component analysis (PCA) and multi-ingredient quantitative analysis. Nineteen batches of Epimedium, collected from different areas in the western regions of China, were used to establish the fingerprints and 18 peaks were selected for the analysis. Similarity analysis, HCA and PCA all classified the 19 areas into three groups. Simultaneous quantification of the five major bioactive ingredients in the Epimedium samples was also carried out to confirm the consistency of the quality tests. These methods were successfully used to identify the geographical origin of the Epimedium samples and to evaluate their quality.

  10. Analysis of temporal stability of autostereoscopic 3D displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubiño, Manuel; Salas, Carlos; Pozo, Antonio M.; Castro, J. J.; Pérez-Ocón, Francisco

    2013-11-01

    An analysis has been made of the stability of the images generated by electronic autostereoscopic 3D displays, studying the time course of the photometric and colorimetric parameters. The measurements were made on the basis of the procedure recommended in the European guideline EN 61747-6 for the characterization of electronic liquid-crystal displays (LCD). The study uses 3 different models of autostereoscopic 3D displays of different sizes and numbers of pixels, taking the measurements with a spectroradiometer (model PR-670 SpectraScan of PhotoResearch). For each of the displays, the time course is shown for the tristimulus values and the chromaticity coordinates in the XYZ CIE 1931 system and values from the time periods required to reach stable values of these parameters are presented. For the analysis of how the procedure recommended in the guideline EN 61747-6 for 2D displays influenced the results, and for the adaption of the procedure to the characterization of 3D displays, the experimental conditions of the standard procedure were varied, making the stability analysis in the two ocular channels (RE and LE) of the 3D mode and comparing the results with those corresponding to the 2D. The results of our study show that the stabilization time of a autostereoscopic 3D display with parallax barrier technology depends on the tristimulus value analysed (X, Y, Z) as well as on the presentation mode (2D, 3D); furthermore, it was found that whether the 3D mode is used depends on the ocular channel evaluated (RE, LE).

  11. Analysis of the temporal properties in car accident time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele

    2008-05-01

    In this paper we study the time-clustering behavior of sequences of car accidents, using data from a freely available database in the internet. The Allan Factor analysis, which is a well-suited method to investigate time-dynamical behaviors in point processes, has revealed that the car accident sequences are characterized by a general time-scaling behavior, with the presence of cyclic components. These results indicate that the time dynamics of the events are not Poissonian but long range correlated with periodicities ranging from 12 h to 1 year.

  12. Quantitative analysis of autophagy using advanced 3D fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Changou, Chun A; Wolfson, Deanna L; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh; Bold, Richard J; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Chuang, Frank Y S

    2013-05-03

    Prostate cancer is the leading form of malignancies among men in the U.S. While surgery carries a significant risk of impotence and incontinence, traditional chemotherapeutic approaches have been largely unsuccessful. Hormone therapy is effective at early stage, but often fails with the eventual development of hormone-refractory tumors. We have been interested in developing therapeutics targeting specific metabolic deficiency of tumor cells. We recently showed that prostate tumor cells specifically lack an enzyme (argininosuccinate synthase, or ASS) involved in the synthesis of the amino acid arginine(1). This condition causes the tumor cells to become dependent on exogenous arginine, and they undergo metabolic stress when free arginine is depleted by arginine deiminase (ADI)(1,10). Indeed, we have shown that human prostate cancer cells CWR22Rv1 are effectively killed by ADI with caspase-independent apoptosis and aggressive autophagy (or macroautophagy)(1,2,3). Autophagy is an evolutionarily-conserved process that allows cells to metabolize unwanted proteins by lysosomal breakdown during nutritional starvation(4,5). Although the essential components of this pathway are well-characterized(6,7,8,9), many aspects of the molecular mechanism are still unclear - in particular, what is the role of autophagy in the death-response of prostate cancer cells after ADI treatment? In order to address this question, we required an experimental method to measure the level and extent of autophagic response in cells - and since there are no known molecular markers that can accurately track this process, we chose to develop an imaging-based approach, using quantitative 3D fluorescence microscopy(11,12). Using CWR22Rv1 cells specifically-labeled with fluorescent probes for autophagosomes and lysosomes, we show that 3D image stacks acquired with either widefield deconvolution microscopy (and later, with super-resolution, structured-illumination microscopy) can clearly capture the early

  13. Ictal Spread of Medial Temporal Lobe Seizures With and Without Secondary Generalization: An Intracranial EEG Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Ji Yeoun; Farooque, Pue; Chen, William; Youngblood, Mark W.; Zaveri, Hitten P.; Gerrard, Jason L.; Spencer, Dennis D.; Hirsch, Lawrence J.; Blumenfeld, Hal

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Secondary generalization of seizures has devastating consequences for patient safety and quality of life. The aim of this intracranial EEG (icEEG) study was to investigate the differences in onset and propagation patterns of temporal lobe seizures that remained focal vs. those with secondary generalization in order to better understand the mechanism of secondary generalization. Methods A total of 39 seizures were analyzed in 9 patients who met the following criteria: 1) icEEG-video monitoring with at least 1 secondarily generalized tonic clonic seizure (GTC), 2) pathologically proven hippocampal sclerosis, and 3) no seizures for at least 1 year after anteromedial temporal lobe resection. Seizures were classified as focal or secondary generalized by behavioral analysis of video. Onset and propagation patterns were compared by analysis of icEEG. Results We obtained data from 22 focal seizures without generalization (FS), and 17 GTC. Seizure onset patterns did not differ between FS and GTCs, but there were differences in later propagation. All seizures started with low voltage fast activity except 7 seizures in one patient (6 FS, 1 GTC), which started with sharply contoured theta activity. 15 of 39 seizures started from the hippocampus and 24 seizures (including 6 seizures in a patient without hippocampal contacts) started from other medial temporal lobe areas. We observed involvement or more prominent activation of the posterior-lateral temporal regions in GTCs prior to propagation to the other cortical regions, vs. FS which had no involvement or less prominent activation of the posterior lateral temporal cortex. Occipital contacts were not involved at the time of clinical secondary generalization. Significance The posterior-lateral temporal cortex may serve as an important “gateway” controlling propagation of medial temporal lobe seizures to other cortical regions. Identifying the mechanisms of secondary generalization of focal seizures may

  14. Analysis of temporal fluctuations in Bach’s sinfonias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Telesca, Luciano; Lovallo, Michele

    2012-06-01

    The correlation structures in 15 Bach's sinfonias were analyzed. Each sinfonia is characterized by the superposition of three voices. Each voice is a sequence of pitches. Each voice was transformed in a time series, in which the sampling time was given by the smallest pitch duration in that voice. The scaling properties of the three voices of each sinfonia was quantified by means of the estimate of the scaling exponent, performed using the power spectral density (PSD) and the detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA). The results show that the voice time series are persistent. The DFA was applied not only to any single voice time series, but also to couples (2-DFA) of voices and to the triple (3-DFA) of voices. It was found that the first voice of each sinfonia modulates the scaling behavior of the whole sinfonia.

  15. Teaching Quantitative Reasoning for Nonscience Majors through Carbon Footprint Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boose, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative reasoning is a key intellectual skill, applicable across disciplines and best taught in the context of authentic, relevant problems. Here, I describe and assess a laboratory exercise that has students calculate their "carbon footprint" and evaluate the impacts of various behavior choices on that footprint. Students gather…

  16. Quantitative proteomic analysis by accurate mass retention time pairs.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jeffrey C; Denny, Richard; Dorschel, Craig A; Gorenstein, Marc; Kass, Ignatius J; Li, Guo-Zhong; McKenna, Therese; Nold, Michael J; Richardson, Keith; Young, Phillip; Geromanos, Scott

    2005-04-01

    Current methodologies for protein quantitation include 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis techniques, metabolic labeling, and stable isotope labeling methods to name only a few. The current literature illustrates both pros and cons for each of the previously mentioned methodologies. Keeping with the teachings of William of Ockham, "with all things being equal the simplest solution tends to be correct", a simple LC/MS based methodology is presented that allows relative changes in abundance of proteins in highly complex mixtures to be determined. Utilizing a reproducible chromatographic separations system along with the high mass resolution and mass accuracy of an orthogonal time-of-flight mass spectrometer, the quantitative comparison of tens of thousands of ions emanating from identically prepared control and experimental samples can be made. Using this configuration, we can determine the change in relative abundance of a small number of ions between the two conditions solely by accurate mass and retention time. Employing standard operating procedures for both sample preparation and ESI-mass spectrometry, one typically obtains under 5 ppm mass precision and quantitative variations between 10 and 15%. The principal focus of this paper will demonstrate the quantitative aspects of the methodology and continue with a discussion of the associated, complementary qualitative capabilities.

  17. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  18. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of Biomarkers in Fusarium verticillioides

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study, a combination HPLC-DART-TOF-MS system was utilized to identify and quantitatively analyze carbohydrates in wild type and mutant strains of Fusarium verticillioides. Carbohydrate fractions were isolated from F. verticillioides cellular extracts by HPLC using a cation-exchange size-excl...

  19. Assessing temporal variations in connectivity through suspended sediment hysteresis analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherriff, Sophie; Rowan, John; Fenton, Owen; Jordan, Phil; Melland, Alice; Mellander, Per-Erik; hUallacháin, Daire Ó.

    2016-04-01

    Connectivity provides a valuable concept for understanding catchment-scale sediment dynamics. In intensive agricultural catchments, land management through tillage, high livestock densities and extensive land drainage practices significantly change hydromorphological behaviour and alter sediment supply and downstream delivery. Analysis of suspended sediment-discharge hysteresis has offered insights into sediment dynamics but typically on a limited selection of events. Greater availability of continuous high-resolution discharge and turbidity data and qualitative hysteresis metrics enables assessment of sediment dynamics during more events and over time. This paper assesses the utility of this approach to explore seasonal variations in connectivity. Data were collected from three small (c. 10 km2) intensive agricultural catchments in Ireland with contrasting morphologies, soil types, land use patterns and management practices, and are broadly defined as low-permeability supporting grassland, moderate-permeability supporting arable and high-permeability supporting arable. Suspended sediment concentration (using calibrated turbidity measurements) and discharge data were collected at 10-min resolution from each catchment outlet and precipitation data were collected from a weather station within each catchment. Event databases (67-90 events per catchment) collated information on sediment export metrics, hysteresis category (e.g., clockwise, anti-clockwise, no hysteresis), numeric hysteresis index, and potential hydro-meteorological controls on sediment transport including precipitation amount, duration, intensity, stream flow and antecedent soil moisture and rainfall. Statistical analysis of potential controls on sediment export was undertaken using Pearson's correlation coefficient on separate hysteresis categories in each catchment. Sediment hysteresis fluctuations through time were subsequently assessed using the hysteresis index. Results showed the numeric

  20. A new quantitative method for gunshot residue analysis by ion beam analysis.

    PubMed

    Christopher, Matthew E; Warmenhoeven, John-William; Romolo, Francesco S; Donghi, Matteo; Webb, Roger P; Jeynes, Christopher; Ward, Neil I; Kirkby, Karen J; Bailey, Melanie J

    2013-08-21

    Imaging and analyzing gunshot residue (GSR) particles using the scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (SEM-EDS) is a standard technique that can provide important forensic evidence, but the discrimination power of this technique is limited due to low sensitivity to trace elements and difficulties in obtaining quantitative results from small particles. A new, faster method using a scanning proton microbeam and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (μ-PIXE), together with Elastic Backscattering Spectrometry (EBS) is presented for the non-destructive, quantitative analysis of the elemental composition of single GSR particles. In this study, the GSR particles were all Pb, Ba, Sb. The precision of the method is assessed. The grouping behaviour of different makes of ammunition is determined using multivariate analysis. The protocol correctly groups the cartridges studied here, with a confidence >99%, irrespective of the firearm or population of particles selected.

  1. Exploratory Analysis of Spatial-Temporal Patterns of Air Pollution in the City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Champendal, Alexandre; Kanevski, Mikhail; Huguenot, Pierre-Emmanuel; Golay, Jean

    2013-04-01

    Air pollution in the city is an important problem influencing environment, well-being of society, economy, management of urban zones, etc. The problem is extremely difficult due to a very complex distribution of the pollution sources, morphology of the city and dispersion processes leading to multivariate nature of the phenomena and high local spatial-temporal variability. The task of understanding, modelling and prediction of spatial-temporal patterns of air pollution in urban zones is an interesting and challenging topic having many research axes from science-based modelling to geostatistics and data mining. The present research mainly deals with a comprehensive exploratory analysis of spatial-temporal air pollution data using statistical, geostatistical and machine learning tools. This analysis helps to 1) understand and model spatial-temporal correlations using variography, 2) explore the temporal evolution of spatial correlation matrix; 3) analyse and visualize an interconnection between measurement stations using network science tools; 4) quantify the availability and predictability of structured patterns. The real data case study deals with spatial-temporal air pollution data of canton Geneva (2002-2011). Carbon dioxide (NO2) have caught our attention. It has effects on health: nitrogen dioxide can irritate the lungs, effects on plants; NO2 contributes to the phenomenon of acid rain. The negative effects of nitrogen dioxides on plants are reducing the growth, production and pesticide resistance. And finally the effects on materials: nitrogen dioxides increase the corrosion. Well-defined patterns of spatial-temporal correlations were detected. The analysis and visualization of spatial correlation matrix for 91 stations were carried out using the network science tools and high levels of clustering were revealed. Moving Window Correlation Matrix and Spatio-temporal variography methods were applied to define and explore the dynamic of our data. More than just

  2. Structural and Quantitative Analysis of Three C-Glycosylflavones by Variable Temperature Proton Quantitative Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yang; Dai, Zhong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance is a powerful tool in drug analysis because of its speed, precision, and efficiency. In present study, the application of variable temperature proton quantitative nuclear magnetic resonance (VT-1H-qNMR) for the calibration of three C-glycosylflavones including orientin, isoorientin, and schaftoside as reference substances was reported. Since there was conformational equilibrium due to the restricted rotation around the C(sp3)-C(sp2) bond in C-glycosylflavones, the conformational behaviors were investigated by VT-NMR and verified by molecular mechanics (MM) calculation. The VT-1H-qNMR method was validated including the linearity, limit of quantification, precision, and stability. The results were consistent with those obtained from mass balance approach. VT-1H-qNMR can be deployed as an effective tool in analyzing C-glycosylflavones. PMID:28243484

  3. Temporal analysis of social networks using three-way DEDICOM.

    SciTech Connect

    Bader, Brett William; Harshman, Richard A. (University of Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada); Kolda, Tamara Gibson

    2006-06-01

    DEDICOM is an algebraic model for analyzing intrinsically asymmetric relationships, such as the balance of trade among nations or the flow of information among organizations or individuals. It provides information on latent components in the data that can be regarded as ''properties'' or ''aspects'' of the objects, and it finds a few patterns that can be combined to describe many relationships among these components. When we apply this technique to adjacency matrices arising from directed graphs, we obtain a smaller graph that gives an idealized description of its patterns. Three-way DEDICOM is a higher-order extension of the model that has certain uniqueness properties. It allows for a third mode of the data, such as time, and permits the analysis of semantic graphs. We present an improved algorithm for computing three-way DEDICOM on sparse data and demonstrate it by applying it to the adjacency tensor of a semantic graph with time-labeled edges. Our application uses the Enron email corpus, from which we construct a semantic graph corresponding to email exchanges among Enron personnel over a series of 44 months. Meaningful patterns are recovered in which the representation of asymmetries adds insight into the social networks at Enron.

  4. Spatial temporal analysis of urban heat hazard in Tangerang City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wibowo, Adi; Kuswantoro; Ardiansyah; Rustanto, Andry; Putut Ash Shidiq, Iqbal

    2016-11-01

    Urban heat is a natural phenomenon which might caused by human activities. The human activities were represented by various types of land-use such as urban and non-urban area. The aim of this study is to identify the urban heat behavior in Tangerang City as it might threats the urban environment. This study used three types of remote sensing data namely, Landsat TM, Landsat ETM+ and Landsat OLI-TIRS, to capture the urban heat behavior and to analysis the urban heat signature of Tangerang City in 2001, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. The result showed that urban heat signature change dynamically each month based on the sun radiation. The urban heat island covered only small part of Tangerang City in 2001, but it was significantly increased and reached 50% of the area in 2012. Based on the result on urban heat signature, the threshold for threatening condition is 30 oC which recognized from land surface temperature (LST). The effective temperature (ET) index explains that condition as warm, uncomfortable, increase stress due to sweating and blood flow and may causing cardiovascular disorder.

  5. Temporal Sequence of Hemispheric Network Activation during Semantic Processing: A Functional Network Connectivity Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Assaf, Michal; Jagannathan, Kanchana; Calhoun, Vince; Kraut, Michael; Hart, John, Jr.; Pearlson, Godfrey

    2009-01-01

    To explore the temporal sequence of, and the relationship between, the left and right hemispheres (LH and RH) during semantic memory (SM) processing we identified the neural networks involved in the performance of functional MRI semantic object retrieval task (SORT) using group independent component analysis (ICA) in 47 healthy individuals. SORT…

  6. Quantitative sectioning and noise analysis for structured illumination microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Nathan; Gao, Liang; Tkaczyk, Tomasz S.

    2011-01-01

    Structured illumination (SI) has long been regarded as a nonquantitative technique for obtaining sectioned microscopic images. Its lack of quantitative results has restricted the use of SI sectioning to qualitative imaging experiments, and has also limited researchers’ ability to compare SI against competing sectioning methods such as confocal microscopy. We show how to modify the standard SI sectioning algorithm to make the technique quantitative, and provide formulas for calculating the noise in the sectioned images. The results indicate that, for an illumination source providing the same spatially-integrated photon flux at the object plane, and for the same effective slice thicknesses, SI sectioning can provide higher SNR images than confocal microscopy for an equivalent setup when the modulation contrast exceeds about 0.09. PMID:22274364

  7. Quantitative analysis of immobilized metalloenzymes by atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Opwis, Klaus; Knittel, Dierk; Schollmeyer, Eckhard

    2004-12-01

    A new, sensitive assay for the quantitative determination of immobilized metal containing enzymes has been developed using atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). In contrast with conventionally used indirect methods the described quantitative AAS assay for metalloenzymes allows more exact analyses, because the carrier material with the enzyme is investigated directly. As an example, the validity and reliability of the method was examined by fixing the iron-containing enzyme catalase on cotton fabrics using different immobilization techniques. Sample preparation was carried out by dissolving the loaded fabrics in sulfuric acid before oxidising the residues with hydrogen peroxide. The iron concentrations were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrometry after calibration of the spectrometer with solutions of the free enzyme at different concentrations.

  8. Temporal Variations of Water Productivity in Irrigated Corn: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Yield and Water Use across Central Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Carr, Tony; Yang, Haishun; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Water Productivity (WP) of a crop defines the relationship between the economic or physical yield of the crop and its water use. With this concept it is possible to identify disproportionate water use or water-limited yield gaps and thereby support improvements in agricultural water management. However, too often important qualitative and quantitative environmental factors are not part of a WP analysis and therefore neglect the aspect of maintaining a sustainable agricultural system. In this study, we examine both the physical and economic WP in perspective with temporally changing environmental conditions. The physical WP analysis was performed by comparing simulated maximum attainable corn yields per unit of water using the crop model Hybrid-Maize with observed data from 2005 through 2013 from 108 farm plots in the Central Platte and the Tri Basin Natural Resource Districts of Nebraska. In order to expand the WP analysis on external factors influencing yields, a second model, Maize-N, was used to estimate optimal nitrogen (N)-fertilizer rate for specific fields in the study area. Finally, a vadose zone flow and transport model, HYDRUS-1D for simulating vertical nutrient transport in the soil, was used to estimate locations of nitrogen pulses in the soil profile. The comparison of simulated and observed data revealed that WP was not on an optimal level, mainly due to large amounts of irrigation used in the study area. The further analysis illustrated year-to-year variations of WP during the nine consecutive years, as well as the need to improve fertilizer management to favor WP and environmental quality. In addition, we addressed the negative influence of groundwater depletion on the economic WP through increasing pumping costs. In summary, this study demonstrated that involving temporal variations of WP as well as associated environmental and economic issues can represent a bigger picture of WP that can help to create incentives to sustainably improve

  9. Temporal Variations of Water Productivity in Irrigated Corn: An Analysis of Factors Influencing Yield and Water Use across Central Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Tony; Yang, Haishun; Ray, Chittaranjan

    2016-01-01

    Water Productivity (WP) of a crop defines the relationship between the economic or physical yield of the crop and its water use. With this concept it is possible to identify disproportionate water use or water-limited yield gaps and thereby support improvements in agricultural water management. However, too often important qualitative and quantitative environmental factors are not part of a WP analysis and therefore neglect the aspect of maintaining a sustainable agricultural system. In this study, we examine both the physical and economic WP in perspective with temporally changing environmental conditions. The physical WP analysis was performed by comparing simulated maximum attainable corn yields per unit of water using the crop model Hybrid-Maize with observed data from 2005 through 2013 from 108 farm plots in the Central Platte and the Tri Basin Natural Resource Districts of Nebraska. In order to expand the WP analysis on external factors influencing yields, a second model, Maize-N, was used to estimate optimal nitrogen (N)–fertilizer rate for specific fields in the study area. Finally, a vadose zone flow and transport model, HYDRUS-1D for simulating vertical nutrient transport in the soil, was used to estimate locations of nitrogen pulses in the soil profile. The comparison of simulated and observed data revealed that WP was not on an optimal level, mainly due to large amounts of irrigation used in the study area. The further analysis illustrated year-to-year variations of WP during the nine consecutive years, as well as the need to improve fertilizer management to favor WP and environmental quality. In addition, we addressed the negative influence of groundwater depletion on the economic WP through increasing pumping costs. In summary, this study demonstrated that involving temporal variations of WP as well as associated environmental and economic issues can represent a bigger picture of WP that can help to create incentives to sustainably improve

  10. Semi-quantitative spectrographic analysis and rank correlation in geochemistry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flanagan, F.J.

    1957-01-01

    The rank correlation coefficient, rs, which involves less computation than the product-moment correlation coefficient, r, can be used to indicate the degree of relationship between two elements. The method is applicable in situations where the assumptions underlying normal distribution correlation theory may not be satisfied. Semi-quantitative spectrographic analyses which are reported as grouped or partly ranked data can be used to calculate rank correlations between elements. ?? 1957.

  11. Quantitative analysis of cortical pyramidal neurons after corpus callosotomy.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Bob; Creswell, Johanna; Britt, Jonathan P; Ford, Kevin L; Bogen, Joseph E; Zaidel, Eran

    2003-07-01

    This study quantitatively explored the dendritic/spine extent of supragranular pyramidal neurons across several cortical areas in two adult male subjects who had undergone a callosotomy several decades before death. In all cortical areas, there were numerous atypical, supragranular pyramidal neurons with elongated "tap root" basilar dendrites. These atypical cells could be associated with an underlying epileptic condition and/or could represent a compensatory mechanism in response to deafferentation after callosotomy.

  12. Fluorescent microscopy approaches of quantitative soil microbial analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Konstantin; Polyanskaya, Lubov

    2015-04-01

    Classical fluorescent microscopy method was used during the last decades in various microbiological studies of terrestrial ecosystems. The method provides representative results and simple application which is allow to use it both as routine part of amplitudinous research and in small-scaled laboratories. Furthermore, depending on research targets a lot of modifications of fluorescent microscopy method were established. Combination and comparison of several approaches is an opportunity of quantitative estimation of microbial community in soil. The first analytical part of the study was dedicated to soil bacterial density estimation by fluorescent microscopy in dynamic of several 30-days experiments. The purpose of research was estimation of changes in soil bacterial community on the different soil horizons under aerobic and anaerobic conditions with adding nutrients in two experimental sets: cellulose and chitin. Was modified the nalidixic acid method for inhibition of DNA division of gram-negative bacteria, and the method provides the quantification of this bacterial group by fluorescent microscopy. Established approach allowed to estimate 3-4 times more cells of gram-negative bacteria in soil. The functions of actinomyces in soil polymer destruction are traditionally considered as dominant in comparison to gram-negative bacterial group. However, quantification of gram-negative bacteria in chernozem and peatland provides underestimation of classical notion for this bacterial group. Chitin introduction had no positive effect to gram-negative bacterial population density changes in chernozem but concurrently this nutrient provided the fast growing dynamics at the first 3 days of experiment both under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This is confirming chitinolytic activity of gram-negative bacteria in soil organic matter decomposition. At the next part of research modified method for soil gram-negative bacteria quantification was compared to fluorescent in situ

  13. The Effects of Selection on Linkage Analysis for Quantitative Traits

    PubMed Central

    Mackinnon, M. J.; Georges, MAJ.

    1992-01-01

    The effects of within-sample selection on the outcome of analyses detecting linkage between genetic markers and quantitative traits were studied. It was found that selection by truncation for the trait of interest significantly reduces the differences between marker genotype means thus reducing the power to detect linked quantitative trait loci (QTL). The size of this reduction is a function of proportion selected, the magnitude of the QTL effect, recombination rate between the marker locus and the QTL, and the allele frequency of the QTL. Proportion selected was the most influential of these factors on bias, e.g., for an allele substitution effect of one standard deviation unit, selecting the top 80%, 50% or 20% of the population required 2,6 or 24 times the number of progeny, respectively, to offset the loss of power caused by this selection. The effect on power was approximately linear with respect to the size of gene effect, almost invariant to recombination rate, and a complex function of QTL allele frequency. It was concluded that experimental samples from animal populations which have been subjected to even minor amounts of selection will be inefficient in yielding information on linkage between markers and loci influencing the quantitative trait under selection. PMID:1459434

  14. Fractal dimension-bound spatio-temporal analysis of digital mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shanmugavadivu, P.; Sivakumar, V.; Sudhir, Rashmi

    2016-02-01

    A new Fractal Dimension-based diagnosis technique for the change detection and time-series analysis of masses in the temporal digital mammogram is presented in this paper. As the digital mammograms are confirmed as a reliable source for the prognosis of breast cancer, the demand for the development of precise computer aided detection techniques is constantly on the increase. This formed the basis for the development of this method using Fractal geometry, which is an efficient mathematical approach that deals with self-similar and irregular geometric objects called fractals. This work comprises of the detection of spatial masses using Fractal Hurst bound enhancement and segmentation of those temporal masses using Fractal Thresholding. The consultant radiologist's assessment of mass lesions forms the baseline for comparison and validation of the detected masses. Further, this research work performs temporal analysis of mass lesions, detected from the mammograms of the current and the respective prior view using the principle of Fractal Dimension. The precision of Fractal-dimension based temporal texture analysis of malignant masses of digital mammograms subsequently attributes to their characterization.

  15. An Adaptive Organization Method of Geovideo Data for Spatio-Temporal Association Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, C.; Zhu, Q.; Zhang, Y. T.; Du, Z. Q.; Zhou, Y.; Xie, X.; He, F.

    2015-07-01

    Public security incidents have been increasingly challenging to address with their new features, including large-scale mobility, multi-stage dynamic evolution, spatio-temporal concurrency and uncertainty in the complex urban environment, which require spatio-temporal association analysis among multiple regional video data for global cognition. However, the existing video data organizational methods that view video as a property of the spatial object or position in space dissever the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video shots captured from multiple video channels, limit the query functions on interactive retrieval between a camera and its video clips and hinder the comprehensive management of event-related scattered video shots. GeoVideo, which maps video frames onto a geographic space, is a new approach to represent the geographic world, promote security monitoring in a spatial perspective and provide a highly feasible solution to this problem. This paper analyzes the large-scale personnel mobility in public safety events and proposes a multi-level, event-related organization method with massive GeoVideo data by spatio-temporal trajectory. This paper designs a unified object identify(ID) structure to implicitly store the spatio-temporal relationship of scattered video clips and support the distributed storage management of massive cases. Finally, the validity and feasibility of this method are demonstrated through suspect tracking experiments.

  16. An Inexpensive Electrodeposition Device and Its Use in a Quantitative Analysis Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Richard H.

    2011-01-01

    An experimental procedure, using an apparatus that is easy to construct, was developed to incorporate a quantitative electrogravimetric determination of the solution nickel content into an undergraduate or advanced high school quantitative analysis laboratory. This procedure produces results comparable to the procedure used for the gravimetric…

  17. Quantitative Analysis of Single Amino Acid Variant Peptides Associated with Pancreatic Cancer in Serum by an Isobaric Labeling Quantitative Method

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Single amino acid variations are highly associated with many human diseases. The direct detection of peptides containing single amino acid variants (SAAVs) derived from nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in serum can provide unique opportunities for SAAV associated biomarker discovery. In the present study, an isobaric labeling quantitative strategy was applied to identify and quantify variant peptides in serum samples of pancreatic cancer patients and other benign controls. The largest number of SAAV peptides to date in serum including 96 unique variant peptides were quantified in this quantitative analysis, of which five variant peptides showed a statistically significant difference between pancreatic cancer and other controls (p-value < 0.05). Significant differences in the variant peptide SDNCEDTPEAGYFAVAVVK from serotransferrin were detected between pancreatic cancer and controls, which was further validated by selected reaction monitoring (SRM) analysis. The novel biomarker panel obtained by combining α-1-antichymotrypsin (AACT), Thrombospondin-1 (THBS1) and this variant peptide showed an excellent diagnostic performance in discriminating pancreatic cancer from healthy controls (AUC = 0.98) and chronic pancreatitis (AUC = 0.90). These results suggest that large-scale analysis of SAAV peptides in serum may provide a new direction for biomarker discovery research. PMID:25393578

  18. Quantitative image analysis in the assessment of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chabot-Richards, Devon S; Martin, David R; Myers, Orrin B; Czuchlewski, David R; Hunt, Kristin E

    2011-12-01

    Proliferation rates in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma have been associated with conflicting outcomes in the literature, more often with high proliferation associated with poor prognosis. In most studies, the proliferation rate was estimated by a pathologist using an immunohistochemical stain for the monoclonal antibody Ki-67. We hypothesized that a quantitative image analysis algorithm would give a more accurate estimate of the proliferation rate, leading to better associations with survival. In all, 84 cases of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma were selected according to the World Health Organization criteria. Ki-67 percentage positivity estimated by the pathologist was recorded from the original report. The same slides were then scanned using an Aperio ImageScope, and Ki-67 percentage positivity was calculated using a computer-based quantitative immunohistochemistry nuclear algorithm. In addition, chart review was performed and survival time was recorded. The Ki-67 percentage estimated by the pathologist from the original report versus quantitative image analysis was significantly correlated (P<0.001), but pathologist Ki-67 percentages were significantly higher than quantitative image analysis (P=0.021). There was less agreement at lower Ki-67 percentages. Comparison of Ki-67 percentage positivity versus survival did not show significant association either with pathologist estimate or quantitative image analysis. However, although not significant, there was a trend of worse survival at higher proliferation rates detected by the pathologist but not by quantitative image analysis. Interestingly, our data suggest that the Ki-67 percentage positivity as assessed by the pathologist may be more closely associated with survival outcome than that identified by quantitative image analysis. This may indicate that pathologists are better at selecting appropriate areas of the slide. More cases are needed to assess whether this finding would be statistically significant. Due to

  19. MCM - 2 and Ki - 67 as proliferation markers in renal cell carcinoma: A quantitative and semi - quantitative analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Muhammad Zain; Nagi, Abdul Hanan; Naseem, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction/Background: Fuhrman nuclear grade is the most important histological parameter to predict prognosis in a patient of renal cell carcinoma (RCC). However, it suffers from inter-observer and intra-observer variation giving rise to need of a parameter that not only correlates with nuclear grade but is also objective and reproducible. Proliferation is the measure of aggressiveness of a tumour and it is strongly correlated with Fuhrman nuclear grade, clinical survival and recurrence in RCC. Ki-67 is conventionally used to assess proliferation. Mini-chromosome maintenance 2 (MCM-2) is a lesser known marker of proliferation and identifies a greater proliferation faction. This study was designed to assess the prognostic significance of MCM-2 by comparing it with Fuhrman nuclear grade and Ki-67. Material and Methods: n=50 cases of various ages, stages, histological subtypes and grades of RCC were selected for this study. Immunohistochemical staining using Ki-67(MIB-1, Mouse monoclonal antibody, Dako) and MCM-2 (Mouse monoclonal antibody, Thermo) was performed on the paraffin embedded blocks in the department of Morbid anatomy and Histopathology, University of Health Sciences, Lahore. Labeling indices (LI) were determined by two pathologists independently using quantitative and semi-quantitative analysis. Statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 20.0. Kruskall-Wallis test was used to determine a correlation of proliferation markers with grade, and Pearson's correlate was used to determine correlation between the two proliferation markers. Results: Labeling index of MCM-2 (median=24.29%) was found to be much higher than Ki-67(median=13.05%). Both markers were significantly related with grade (p=0.00; Kruskall-Wallis test). LI of MCM-2 was found to correlate significantly with LI of Ki-67(r=0.0934;p=0.01 with Pearson's correlate). Results of semi-quantitative analysis correlated well with quantitative analysis. Conclusion: Both Ki-67 and MCM-2 are

  20. Spatially-Resolved Proteomics: Rapid Quantitative Analysis of Laser Capture Microdissected Alveolar Tissue Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Clair, Geremy; Piehowski, Paul D.; Nicola, Teodora; Kitzmiller, Joseph A.; Huang, Eric L.; Zink, Erika M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Orton, Daniel J.; Moore, Ronald J.; Carson, James P.; Smith, Richard D.; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.; Corley, Richard A.; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam; Ansong, Charles

    2016-12-22

    Global proteomics approaches allow characterization of whole tissue lysates to an impressive depth. However, it is now increasingly recognized that to better understand the complexity of multicellular organisms, global protein profiling of specific spatially defined regions/substructures of tissues (i.e. spatially-resolved proteomics) is essential. Laser capture microdissection (LCM) enables microscopic isolation of defined regions of tissues preserving crucial spatial information. However, current proteomics workflows entail several manual sample preparation steps and are challenged by the microscopic mass-limited samples generated by LCM, and that impact measurement robustness, quantification, and throughput. Here, we coupled LCM with a fully automated sample preparation workflow that with a single manual step allows: protein extraction, tryptic digestion, peptide cleanup and LC-MS/MS analysis of proteomes from microdissected tissues. Benchmarking against the current state of the art in ultrasensitive global proteomic analysis, our approach demonstrated significant improvements in quantification and throughput. Using our LCM-SNaPP proteomics approach, we characterized to a depth of more than 3,400 proteins, the ontogeny of protein changes during normal lung development in laser capture microdissected alveolar tissue containing ~4,000 cells per sample. Importantly, the data revealed quantitative changes for 350 low abundance transcription factors and signaling molecules, confirming earlier transcript-level observations and defining seven modules of coordinated transcription factor/signaling molecule expression patterns, suggesting that a complex network of temporal regulatory control directs normal lung development with epigenetic regulation fine-tuning pre-natal developmental processes. Our LCM-proteomics approach facilitates efficient, spatially-resolved, ultrasensitive global proteomics analyses in high-throughput that will be enabling for several clinical and

  1. Temporal Binding and Segmentation in Visual Search: A Computational Neuroscience Analysis.

    PubMed

    Mavritsaki, Eirini; Humphreys, Glyn

    2016-10-01

    Human visual search operates not only over space but also over time, as old items remain in the visual field and new items appear. Preview search (where one set of distractors appears before the onset of a second set) has been used as a paradigm to study search over time and space [Watson, D. G., & Humphreys, G. W. Visual marking: Prioritizing selection for new objects by top-down attentional inhibition of old objects. Psychological Review, 104, 90-122, 1997], with participants showing efficient search when old distractors can be ignored and new targets prioritized. The benefits of preview search are lost, however, if a temporal gap is introduced between a first presentation of the old items and the re-presentation of all the items in the search display [Kunar, M. A., Humphreys, G. W., & Smith, K. J. History matters: The preview benefit in search is not onset capture. Psychological Science, 14, 181-185, 2003a], consistent with the old items being bound by temporal onset to the new stimuli. This effect of temporal binding can be eliminated if the old items reappear briefly before the new items, indicating also a role for the memory of the old items. Here we simulate these effects of temporal coding in search using the spiking search over time and space model [Mavritsaki, E., Heinke, D., Allen, H., Deco, G., & Humphreys, G. W. Bridging the gap between physiology and behavior: Evidence from the sSoTS model of human visual attention. Psychological Review, 118, 3-41, 2011]. We show that a form of temporal binding by new onsets has to be introduced to the model to simulate the effects of a temporal gap, but that effects of the memory of the old item can stem from continued neural suppression across a temporal gap. We also show that the model can capture the effects of brain lesion on preview search under the different temporal conditions. The study provides a proof-of-principle analysis that neural suppression and temporal binding can be sufficient to account for human

  2. Study of proper conditions for quantitative atom-probe analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolander, Ulf; Andrén, Hans-Olof

    1994-03-01

    Atom-probe microanalysis is a truly quantitative method only if certain requirements are fulfilled. Field evaporation must only happen when the detector system is active; ions must travel from specimen to detector without being obstructed; and ions must be detected with the same probability regardless of mass and energy. Designs and methods to achieve these requirements are presented in the paper, such as a controlled high-voltage pulser, a detector with good and variable multi-hit resolution, ion optical alignment procedures, and a method to statistically correct for pile-up in the detector.

  3. Multivariate temporal pattern analysis applied to the study of rat behavior in the elevated plus maze: methodological and conceptual highlights.

    PubMed

    Casarrubea, M; Magnusson, M S; Roy, V; Arabo, A; Sorbera, F; Santangelo, A; Faulisi, F; Crescimanno, G

    2014-08-30

    Aim of this article is to illustrate the application of a multivariate approach known as t-pattern analysis in the study of rat behavior in elevated plus maze. By means of this multivariate approach, significant relationships among behavioral events in the course of time can be described. Both quantitative and t-pattern analyses were utilized to analyze data obtained from fifteen male Wistar rats following a trial 1-trial 2 protocol. In trial 2, in comparison with the initial exposure, mean occurrences of behavioral elements performed in protected zones of the maze showed a significant increase counterbalanced by a significant decrease of mean occurrences of behavioral elements in unprotected zones. Multivariate t-pattern analysis, in trial 1, revealed the presence of 134 t-patterns of different composition. In trial 2, the temporal structure of behavior become more simple, being present only 32 different t-patterns. Behavioral strings and stripes (i.e. graphical representation of each t-pattern onset) of all t-patterns were presented both for trial 1 and trial 2 as well. Finally, percent distributions in the three zones of the maze show a clear-cut increase of t-patterns in closed arm and a significant reduction in the remaining zones. Results show that previous experience deeply modifies the temporal structure of rat behavior in the elevated plus maze. In addition, this article, by highlighting several conceptual, methodological and illustrative aspects on the utilization of t-pattern analysis, could represent a useful background to employ such a refined approach in the study of rat behavior in elevated plus maze.

  4. Spatial-temporal data model and fractal analysis of transportation network in GIS environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongjiu; Tong, Xiaohua; Li, Yangdong

    2008-10-01

    How to organize transportation data characterized by multi-time, multi-scale, multi-resolution and multi-source is one of the fundamental problems of GIS-T development. A spatial-temporal data model for GIS-T is proposed based on Spatial-temporal- Object Model. Transportation network data is systemically managed using dynamic segmentation technologies. And then a spatial-temporal database is built to integrally store geographical data of multi-time for transportation. Based on the spatial-temporal database, functions of spatial analysis of GIS-T are substantively extended. Fractal module is developed to improve the analyzing in intensity, density, structure and connectivity of transportation network based on the validation and evaluation of topologic relation. Integrated fractal with GIS-T strengthens the functions of spatial analysis and enriches the approaches of data mining and knowledge discovery of transportation network. Finally, the feasibility of the model and methods are tested thorough Guangdong Geographical Information Platform for Highway Project.

  5. Sustainability, substance flow management and time. Part I Temporal analysis of substance flows.

    PubMed

    Kümmerer, Klaus; Hofmeister, Sabine

    2008-09-01

    Flows of chemical substances need to be managed in a sustainable way. Sustainable development as a whole and the sustainable management of substance flows in particular are both time issues. These include the importance of the dynamics of substance flows and the way these interconnect with the use of resources, the avoidance of environmental pollution, and their effects on health and food production. Another prerequisite for the proper management of substance flows is justice within and between generations. This requires a systematic approach and a systematic analysis of the issues as well as of the actions to be taken. One tool for such a systematic approach is temporal analysis. It brings the temporal aspects of the substances themselves and of their intended use, as well as factors affecting the stakeholders, such as decision makers, producers and consumers, into focus. In the past, timing factors were rarely taken into account. Knowledge of the temporal dynamics of substance flows and their resultant outcomes, as well as of their interaction with ecological, economic and social systems, is a basic requirement for successful substance flow management. The need to include temporal aspects into substance flow management and how to do so is outlined here. Included are not only politicians but also practitioners and scientists who must explicitly take into account adequate time scales, points in time, breaks and other forms of time in planning and acting.

  6. Analysis of spatial-temporal gene expression patterns reveals dynamics and regionalization in developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Chou, Shen-Ju; Wang, Chindi; Sintupisut, Nardnisa; Niou, Zhen-Xian; Lin, Chih-Hsu; Li, Ker-Chau; Yeang, Chen-Hsiang

    2016-01-20

    Allen Brain Atlas (ABA) provides a valuable resource of spatial/temporal gene expressions in mammalian brains. Despite rich information extracted from this database, current analyses suffer from several limitations. First, most studies are either gene-centric or region-centric, thus are inadequate to capture the superposition of multiple spatial-temporal patterns. Second, standard tools of expression analysis such as matrix factorization can capture those patterns but do not explicitly incorporate spatial dependency. To overcome those limitations, we proposed a computational method to detect recurrent patterns in the spatial-temporal gene expression data of developing mouse brains. We demonstrated that regional distinction in brain development could be revealed by localized gene expression patterns. The patterns expressed in the forebrain, medullary and pontomedullary, and basal ganglia are enriched with genes involved in forebrain development, locomotory behavior, and dopamine metabolism respectively. In addition, the timing of global gene expression patterns reflects the general trends of molecular events in mouse brain development. Furthermore, we validated functional implications of the inferred patterns by showing genes sharing similar spatial-temporal expression patterns with Lhx2 exhibited differential expression in the embryonic forebrains of Lhx2 mutant mice. These analysis outcomes confirm the utility of recurrent expression patterns in studying brain development.

  7. Examination of the temporal effect in a flow injection analysis system using multi-channel absorbance detection.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shu-Hui; Chang, Kai-Chieh; Chen, Yu-Chun; Yu, Tiing; Pai, Su-Cheng

    2009-05-22

    In addition to the Poiseuille effect, a so-called temporal effect was proposed recently to elucidate the commonly observed tailing peak signals of flow injection analysis (FIA). A multi-channel absorbance detector was used in this study to obtain the FIA peaks on both the spatial and temporal coordinates. The temporal effect was analyzed by comparison of the profiles between the experimental and the corresponding Gaussian peaks, and by comparison of asymmetry factors between the spatial and the temporal peaks. The temporal effect appeared to be the major factor under flow rates ranging from 0.5 to 8 ml min (-1). This was despite the presence of a spatially frontal peak observed in the FIA tubing, which was found to result in a tailing peak on the temporal coordinate due to this discussed cause. In addition, the temporal effect became greater as the flow rate increased.

  8. Quantitative analysis of Euclidean distance to complement qualitative analysis of facial expression during deception

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Ananya; Mukhopadhyay, Pritha; Basu, Nabanita; Bandyopadhyay, Samir Kumar; Chatterjee, Tanima

    2016-01-01

    Background: Accurate evaluation of an individuals' veracity is a fundamental aspect of social functioning that allows individuals to act in adaptive ways. The domain of deception detection ability is still young, and many components in this field are yet to be touched which demands more research in this field. Aims: The present study aims at deciphering the structural composition of face during felt, posed, and deceived emotions in facial expression unique to Indian culture, using Facial Action Coding System (FACS). Quantitative analysis of Euclidean distance has been done to complement qualitative FACS analysis. Methods: In this study, thirty female, young adults with age range of 23–27 years were chosen randomly for portraying their (felt, posed, and deceived) facial expression. All facial expressions were captured through instruction, and videos were converted into static images. The static images were coded on the basis of FACS to decipher the felt, posed, and deceived expressions. Quantitative analysis of the data has been done using MATLAB to meet the objectives of the study and to complement the qualitative analysis. Results: Felt and posed emotions differ in terms of intensity of the expression and subjective experience. Posed emotional and deceived expressions differ in intent. Facial asymmetry is an important indicator for detecting deception. PMID:28163412

  9. Chemical Fingerprint Analysis and Quantitative Analysis of Rosa rugosa by UPLC-DAD.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Sanawar; Abdulla, Rahima; Ayupbec, Amatjan; Aisa, Haji Akbar

    2016-12-21

    A method based on ultra performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector (UPLC-DAD) was developed for quantitative analysis of five active compounds and chemical fingerprint analysis of Rosa rugosa. Ten batches of R. rugosa collected from different plantations in the Xinjiang region of China were used to establish the fingerprint. The feasibility and advantages of the used UPLC fingerprint were verified for its similarity evaluation by systematically comparing chromatograms with professional analytical software recommended by State Food and Drug Administration (SFDA) of China. In quantitative analysis, the five compounds showed good regression (R² = 0.9995) within the test ranges, and the recovery of the method was in the range of 94.2%-103.8%. The similarities of liquid chromatography fingerprints of 10 batches of R. rugosa were more than 0.981. The developed UPLC fingerprint method is simple, reliable, and validated for the quality control and identification of R. rugosa. Additionally, simultaneous quantification of five major bioactive ingredients in the R. rugosa samples was conducted to interpret the consistency of the quality test. The results indicated that the UPLC fingerprint, as a characteristic distinguishing method combining similarity evaluation and quantification analysis, can be successfully used to assess the quality and to identify the authenticity of R. rugosa.

  10. Quantitative Analysis of the Displacement of the Anterior Visual Pathway by Pituitary Lesions and the Associated Visual Field Loss

    PubMed Central

    Boland, Michael V.; Lee, In Ho; Zan, Elcin; Yousem, David M.; Miller, Neil R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate quantitatively the relationship between the displacement of anterior visual pathway structures by pituitary tumors and visual field damage with the goal of improving diagnosis and management. Methods Subjects had pituitary macroadenomas and both magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and static perimetry. Neuroradiologists measured the displacement of anterior visual pathway structures and right–left tumor asymmetry. To quantify the degree and laterality of visual field loss, we used algorithms from the neurologic hemifield test to analyze each right–left pair of visual fields with respect to temporal asymmetry, the proportion of loss that was temporal, total asymmetry, and total damage. We compared these metrics with the displacement of anterior visual pathway structures and tumor asymmetry. Results Of 114 subjects, 64 (56%) were male and the median age was 57 years (range, 14–88). The summation of vision loss in both eyes and the proportion of temporal loss were statistically significantly related to the maximum displacement of the anterior visual pathway (both P < 0.001 for fit of linear regression). The relationship between the asymmetry of visual field loss in the two eyes and the subjective assignment of tumor asymmetry on MRI did not achieve statistical significance (P = 0.06 by analysis of variance). Conclusions Displacement of the anterior visual pathway by pituitary tumors is associated with both the total amount of visual field loss and the proportion of temporal visual field loss. Although there was right–left asymmetry of vision loss in some subjects, it was not related to the subjective assessment of tumor asymmetry. PMID:27388050

  11. Annotating spatio-temporal datasets for meaningful analysis in the Web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stasch, Christoph; Pebesma, Edzer; Scheider, Simon

    2014-05-01

    More and more environmental datasets that vary in space and time are available in the Web. This comes along with an advantage of using the data for other purposes than originally foreseen, but also with the danger that users may apply inappropriate analysis procedures due to lack of important assumptions made during the data collection process. In order to guide towards a meaningful (statistical) analysis of spatio-temporal datasets available in the Web, we have developed a Higher-Order-Logic formalism that captures some relevant assumptions in our previous work [1]. It allows to proof on meaningful spatial prediction and aggregation in a semi-automated fashion. In this poster presentation, we will present a concept for annotating spatio-temporal datasets available in the Web with concepts defined in our formalism. Therefore, we have defined a subset of the formalism as a Web Ontology Language (OWL) pattern. It allows capturing the distinction between the different spatio-temporal variable types, i.e. point patterns, fields, lattices and trajectories, that in turn determine whether a particular dataset can be interpolated or aggregated in a meaningful way using a certain procedure. The actual annotations that link spatio-temporal datasets with the concepts in the ontology pattern are provided as Linked Data. In order to allow data producers to add the annotations to their datasets, we have implemented a Web portal that uses a triple store at the backend to store the annotations and to make them available in the Linked Data cloud. Furthermore, we have implemented functions in the statistical environment R to retrieve the RDF annotations and, based on these annotations, to support a stronger typing of spatio-temporal datatypes guiding towards a meaningful analysis in R. [1] Stasch, C., Scheider, S., Pebesma, E., Kuhn, W. (2014): "Meaningful spatial prediction and aggregation", Environmental Modelling & Software, 51, 149-165.

  12. Temporal transcriptomic analysis as Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough transitions into stationary phase during electron donor depletion.

    PubMed

    Clark, M E; He, Q; He, Z; Huang, K H; Alm, E J; Wan, X-F; Hazen, T C; Arkin, A P; Wall, J D; Zhou, J-Z; Fields, M W

    2006-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe2+ acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute of

  13. Temporal transcriptomic analysis of Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough transition into stationary phase growth during electrondonor depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, M.E.; He, Q.; He, Z.; Huang, K.H.; Alm, E.J.; Wan, X.-F.; Hazen, T.C.; Arkin, A.P.; Wall, J.D.; Zhou, J.-Z.; Fields, M.W.

    2006-08-01

    Desulfovibrio vulgaris was cultivated in a defined medium, and biomass was sampled for approximately 70 h to characterize the shifts in gene expression as cells transitioned from the exponential to the stationary phase during electron donor depletion. In addition to temporal transcriptomics, total protein, carbohydrate, lactate, acetate, and sulfate levels were measured. The microarray data were examined for statistically significant expression changes, hierarchical cluster analysis, and promoter element prediction and were validated by quantitative PCR. As the cells transitioned from the exponential phase to the stationary phase, a majority of the down-expressed genes were involved in translation and transcription, and this trend continued at the remaining times. There were general increases in relative expression for intracellular trafficking and secretion, ion transport, and coenzyme metabolism as the cells entered the stationary phase. As expected, the DNA replication machinery was down-expressed, and the expression of genes involved in DNA repair increased during the stationary phase. Genes involved in amino acid acquisition, carbohydrate metabolism, energy production, and cell envelope biogenesis did not exhibit uniform transcriptional responses. Interestingly, most phage-related genes were up-expressed at the onset of the stationary phase. This result suggested that nutrient depletion may affect community dynamics and DNA transfer mechanisms of sulfate-reducing bacteria via the phage cycle. The putative feoAB system (in addition to other presumptive iron metabolism genes) was significantly up-expressed, and this suggested the possible importance of Fe{sup 2+} acquisition under metal-reducing conditions. The expression of a large subset of carbohydrate-related genes was altered, and the total cellular carbohydrate levels declined during the growth phase transition. Interestingly, the D. vulgaris genome does not contain a putative rpoS gene, a common attribute

  14. A Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of In Vitro Assembled Chromatin*

    PubMed Central

    Völker-Albert, Moritz Carl; Pusch, Miriam Caroline; Fedisch, Andreas; Schilcher, Pierre; Schmidt, Andreas; Imhof, Axel

    2016-01-01

    The structure of chromatin is critical for many aspects of cellular physiology and is considered to be the primary medium to store epigenetic information. It is defined by the histone molecules that constitute the nucleosome, the positioning of the nucleosomes along the DNA and the non-histone proteins that associate with it. These factors help to establish and maintain a largely DNA sequence-independent but surprisingly stable structure. Chromatin is extensively disassembled and reassembled during DNA replication, repair, recombination or transcription in order to allow the necessary factors to gain access to their substrate. Despite such constant interference with chromatin structure, the epigenetic information is generally well maintained. Surprisingly, the mechanisms that coordinate chromatin assembly and ensure proper assembly are not particularly well understood. Here, we use label free quantitative mass spectrometry to describe the kinetics of in vitro assembled chromatin supported by an embryo extract prepared from preblastoderm Drosophila melanogaster embryos. The use of a data independent acquisition method for proteome wide quantitation allows a time resolved comparison of in vitro chromatin assembly. A comparison of our in vitro data with proteomic studies of replicative chromatin assembly in vivo reveals an extensive overlap showing that the in vitro system can be used for investigating the kinetics of chromatin assembly in a proteome-wide manner. PMID:26811354

  15. Quantitative analysis of biopolymers by matrix-assisted laser desorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, K.; Allman, S.L.; Jones, R.B.; Chen, C.H. )

    1993-08-01

    During the past few years, major efforts have been made to use mass spectrometry to measure biopolymers because of the great potential benefit to biological and medical research. Although the theoretical details of laser desorption and ionization mechanisms of MALDI are not yet fully understood, several models have been presented to explain the production of large biopolymer ions. In brief, it is very difficult to obtain reliable measurements of the absolute quantity of analytes by MALDI. If MALDI is going to become a routine analytical tool, it is obvious that quantitative measurement capability must be pursued. Oligonucleotides and protein samples used in this work were purchased from commercial sources. Nicotinic acid was used as matrix for both types of biopolymers. From this experiment, it is seen that it is difficult to obtain absolute quantitative measurements of biopolymers using MALDI. However, internal calibration with molecules having similar chemical properties can be used to resolve these difficulties. Chemical reactions between biopolymers must be avoided to prevent the destruction of the analyte materials. 10 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Quantitative Spectral Analysis of Evolved Low-Mass Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, Klaus; Rauch, Thomas; Kruk, Jeffrey W.

    2009-09-01

    The hydrogen-deficiency in extremely hot post-AGB stars of spectral class PG1159 is probably caused by a (very) late helium-shell flash or a AGB final thermal pulse that consumes the hydrogen envelope, exposing the usually-hidden intershell region. Thus, the photospheric element abundances of these stars allow us to draw conclusions about details of nuclear burning and mixing processes in the precursor AGB stars. We compare predicted element abundances to those determined by quantitative spectral analyses performed with advanced non-LTE model atmospheres. A good qualitative and quantitative agreement is found for many species (He, C, N, O, Ne, F, Si, Ar) but discrepancies for others (P, S, Fe) point at shortcomings in stellar evolution models for AGB stars. Almost all of the chemical trace elements in these hot stars can only be identified in the UV spectral range. The Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer and the Hubble Space Telescope played a crucial role for this research.

  17. Quantitative analysis of radiation-induced changes in sperm morphology

    SciTech Connect

    Young, I.T.; Gledhill, B.L.; Lake, S.; Wyrobek, A.J.

    1982-09-01

    When developing spermatogenic cells are exposed to radiation, chemical carcinogens or mutagens, the transformation in the morphology of the mature sperm can be used to determine the severity of the exposure. In this study five groups of mice with three mice per group received testicular doses of X irradiation at dosage levels ranging from 0 rad to 120 rad. A random sample of 100 mature sperm per mouse was analyzed five weeks later for the quantitative morphologic transformation as a function of dosage level. The cells were stained with gallocyanin chrome alum (GCA) so that only the DNA in the sperm head was visible. The ACUity quantitative microscopy system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was used to scan the sperm at a sampling density of 16 points per linear micrometer and with 256 brightness levels per point. The contour of each cell was extracted using conventional thresholding techniques on the high-contrast images. For each contour a variety of shape features was then computed to characterize the morphology of that cell. Using the control group and the distribution of their shape features to establish the variability of a normal sperm population, the 95% limits on normal morphology were established. Using only four shape features, a doubling dose of approximately 39 rad was determined. That is, at 39 rad exposure the percentage of abnormal cells was twice that occurring in the control population. This compared to a doubling dose of approximately 70 rad obtained from a concurrent visual procedure.

  18. Quantitative Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of carrot bioactives.

    PubMed

    Killeen, Daniel P; Sansom, Catherine E; Lill, Ross E; Eason, Jocelyn R; Gordon, Keith C; Perry, Nigel B

    2013-03-20

    Rapid quantitative near-infrared Fourier transform Raman analyses of the key phytonutrients in carrots, polyacetylenes and carotenoids, are reported here for the first time. Solvent extracts of 31 carrot lines were analyzed for these phytonutrients by conventional methods, polyacetylenes by GC-FID and carotenoids by visible spectrophotometry. Carotenoid concentrations were 0-5586 μg g(-1) dry weight (DW). Polyacetylene concentrations were 74-4846 μg g(-1) DW, highest in wild carrots. The polyacetylenes were falcarinol, 6-1237 μg g(-1) DW; falcarindiol, 42-3475 μg g(-1) DW; and falcarindiol 3-acetate, 27-649 μg g(-1) DW. Strong Raman bands for carotenoids gave good correlation to results by visible spectrophotometry. A chemometric model capable of quantitating carotenoids from Raman data was developed. A classification model for rapidly distinguishing carrots with high and low polyacetylene (limit of detection = 1400 μg g(-1)) concentrations based on Raman spectral intensity in the region of 2250 cm(-1) was produced.

  19. Quantitative characterization of surface topography using spectral analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Tevis D. B.; Junge, Till; Pastewka, Lars

    2017-03-01

    Roughness determines many functional properties of surfaces, such as adhesion, friction, and (thermal and electrical) contact conductance. Recent analytical models and simulations enable quantitative prediction of these properties from knowledge of the power spectral density (PSD) of the surface topography. The utility of the PSD is that it contains statistical information that is unbiased by the particular scan size and pixel resolution chosen by the researcher. In this article, we first review the mathematical definition of the PSD, including the one- and two-dimensional cases, and common variations of each. We then discuss strategies for reconstructing an accurate PSD of a surface using topography measurements at different size scales. Finally, we discuss detecting and mitigating artifacts at the smallest scales, and computing upper/lower bounds on functional properties obtained from models. We accompany our discussion with virtual measurements on computer-generated surfaces. This discussion summarizes how to analyze topography measurements to reconstruct a reliable PSD. Analytical models demonstrate the potential for tuning functional properties by rationally tailoring surface topography—however, this potential can only be achieved through the accurate, quantitative reconstruction of the PSDs of real-world surfaces.

  20. QUANTITATIVE CT ANALYSIS, AIRFLOW OBSTRUCTION AND LUNG CANCER IN THE PITTSBURGH LUNG SCREENING STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David O; Leader, Joseph K; Fuhrman, Carl R; Reilly, John J; Sciurba, Frank C.; Weissfeld, Joel L

    2011-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between emphysema, airflow obstruction and lung cancer in a high risk population we performed quantitative analysis of screening computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods Subjects completed questionnaires, spirometry and low-dose helical chest CT. Analyses compared cases and controls according to automated quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airways measures. Results Our case-control study of 117 matched pairs of lung cancer cases and controls did not reveal any airway or lung parenchymal findings on quantitative analysis of screening CT scans that were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Airway measures including wall area %, lumen perimeter, lumen area and average wall HU, and parenchymal measures including lung fraction < −910 Hounsfield Units (HU), were not statistically different between cases and controls. Conclusions The relationship between visual assessment of emphysema and increased lung cancer risk could not be verified by quantitative analysis of low-dose screening CT scans in a high risk tobacco exposed population. PMID:21610523

  1. Grid-Enabled Quantitative Analysis of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    large-scale, multi-modality computerized image analysis . The central hypothesis of this research is that large-scale image analysis for breast cancer...research, we designed a pilot study utilizing large scale parallel Grid computing harnessing nationwide infrastructure for medical image analysis . Also

  2. Analysis of Artifacts Suggests DGGE Should Not Be Used For Quantitative Diversity Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Neilson, Julia W.; Jordan, Fiona L.; Maier, Raina M.

    2014-01-01

    PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) is widely used in microbial ecology for the analysis of comparative community structure. However, artifacts generated during PCR-DGGE of mixed template communities impede the application of this technique to quantitative analysis of community diversity. The objective of the current study was to employ an artificial bacterial community to document and analyze artifacts associated with multiband signatures and preferential template amplification and to highlight their impacts on the use of this technique for quantitative diversity analysis. Six bacterial species (three Betaproteobacteria, two Alphaproteobacteria, and one Firmicutes) were amplified individually and in combinations with primers targeting the V7/V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene. Two of the six isolates produced multiband profiles demonstrating that band number does not correlate directly with α-diversity. Analysis of the multiple bands from one of these isolates confirmed that both bands had identical sequences which lead to the hypothesis that the multiband pattern resulted from two distinct structural conformations of the same amplicon. In addition, consistent preferential amplification was demonstrated following pairwise amplifications of the six isolates. DGGE and real time PCR analysis identified primer mismatch and PCR inhibition due to 16S rDNA secondary structure as the most probable causes of preferential amplification patterns. Reproducible DGGE community profiles generated in this study confirm that PCR-DGGE provides an excellent high-throughput tool for comparative community structure analysis, but that method-specific artifacts preclude its use for accurate comparative diversity analysis. PMID:23313091

  3. Spatial and Temporal Dust Source Variability in Northern China Identified Using Advanced Remote Sensing Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taramelli, A.; Pasqui, M.; Barbour, J.; Kirschbaum, D.; Bottai, L.; Busillo, C.; Calastrini, F.; Guarnieri, F.; Small, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this research is to provide a detailed characterization of spatial patterns and temporal trends in the regional and local dust source areas within the desert of the Alashan Prefecture (Inner Mongolia, China). This problem was approached through multi-scale remote sensing analysis of vegetation changes. The primary requirements for this regional analysis are high spatial and spectral resolution data, accurate spectral calibration and good temporal resolution with a suitable temporal baseline. Landsat analysis and field validation along with the low spatial resolution classifications from MODIS and AVHRR are combined to provide a reliable characterization of the different potential dust-producing sources. The representation of intra-annual and inter-annual Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) trend to assess land cover discrimination for mapping potential dust source using MODIS and AVHRR at larger scale is enhanced by Landsat Spectral Mixing Analysis (SMA). The combined methodology is to determine the extent to which Landsat can distinguish important soils types in order to better understand how soil reflectance behaves at seasonal and inter-annual timescales. As a final result mapping soil surface properties using SMA is representative of responses of different land and soil cover previously identified by NDVI trend. The results could be used in dust emission models even if they are not reflecting aggregate formation, soil stability or particle coatings showing to be critical for accurately represent dust source over different regional and local emitting areas.

  4. Spatial-Temporal Analysis of Environmental Data of North Beijing District Using Hilbert-Huang Transform

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenyong; Moran, William

    2016-01-01

    Temperature, solar radiation and water are major important variables in ecosystem models which are measurable via wireless sensor networks (WSN). Effective data analysis is necessary to extract significant spatial and temporal information. In this work, information regarding the long term variation of seasonal field environment conditions is explored using Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) based analysis on the wireless sensor network data collection. The data collection network, consisting of 36 wireless nodes, covers an area of 100 square kilometres in Yanqing, the northwest of Beijing CBD, in China and data collection involves environmental parameter observations taken over a period of three months in 2011. The analysis used the empirical mode decomposition (EMD/EEMD) to break a time sequence of data down to a finite set of intrinsic mode functions (IMFs). Both spatial and temporal properties of data explored by HHT analysis are demonstrated. Our research shows potential for better understanding the spatial-temporal relationships among environmental parameters using WSN and HHT. PMID:27936056

  5. Quantitative Anatomic Analysis of the Native Ligamentum Teres

    PubMed Central

    Mikula, Jacob D.; Slette, Erik L.; Chahla, Jorge; Brady, Alex W.; Locks, Renato; Trindade, Christiano A. C.; Rasmussen, Matthew T.; LaPrade, Robert F.; Philippon, Marc J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: While recent studies have addressed the biomechanical function of the ligamentum teres and provided descriptions of ligamentum teres reconstruction techniques, its detailed quantitative anatomy remains relatively undocumented. Moreover, there is a lack of consensus in the literature regarding the number and morphology of the acetabular attachments of the ligamentum teres. Purpose: To provide a clinically relevant quantitative anatomic description of the native human ligamentum teres. Study Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Methods: Ten human cadaveric hemipelvises, complete with femurs (mean age, 59.6 years; range, 47-65 years), were dissected free of all extra-articular soft tissues to isolate the ligamentum teres and its attachments. A coordinate measuring device was used to quantify the attachment areas and their relationships to pertinent open and arthroscopic landmarks on both the acetabulum and the femur. The clock face reference system was utilized to describe acetabular anatomy, and all anatomic relationships were described using the mean and 95% confidence intervals. Results: There were 6 distinct attachments to the acetabulum and 1 to the femur. The areas of the acetabular and femoral attachment footprints of the ligamentum teres were 434 mm2 (95% CI, 320-549 mm2) and 84 mm2 (95% CI, 65-104 mm2), respectively. The 6 acetabular clock face locations were as follows: anterior attachment, 4:53 o’clock (95% CI, 4:45-5:02); posterior attachment, 6:33 o’clock (95% CI, 6:23-6:43); ischial attachment, 8:07 o’clock (95% CI, 7:47-8:26); iliac attachment, 1:49 o’clock (95% CI, 1:04-2:34); and a smaller pubic attachment that was located at 3:50 o’clock (95% CI, 3:41-4:00). The ischial attachment possessed the largest cross-sectional attachment area (127.3 mm2; 95% CI, 103.0-151.7 mm2) of all the acetabular attachments of the ligamentum teres. Conclusion: The most important finding of this study was that the human ligamentum teres had 6

  6. Bridging the gaps for global sustainable development: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Udo, Victor E; Jansson, Peter Mark

    2009-09-01

    Global human progress occurs in a complex web of interactions between society, technology and the environment as driven by governance and infrastructure management capacity among nations. In our globalizing world, this complex web of interactions over the last 200 years has resulted in the chronic widening of economic and political gaps between the haves and the have-nots with consequential global cultural and ecosystem challenges. At the bottom of these challenges is the issue of resource limitations on our finite planet with increasing population. The problem is further compounded by pleasure-driven and poverty-driven ecological depletion and pollution by the haves and the have-nots respectively. These challenges are explored in this paper as global sustainable development (SD) quantitatively; in order to assess the gaps that need to be bridged. Although there has been significant rhetoric on SD with very many qualitative definitions offered, very few quantitative definitions of SD exist. The few that do exist tend to measure SD in terms of social, energy, economic and environmental dimensions. In our research, we used several human survival, development, and progress variables to create an aggregate SD parameter that describes the capacity of nations in three dimensions: social sustainability, environmental sustainability and technological sustainability. Using our proposed quantitative definition of SD and data from relatively reputable secondary sources, 132 nations were ranked and compared. Our comparisons indicate a global hierarchy of needs among nations similar to Maslow's at the individual level. As in Maslow's hierarchy of needs, nations that are struggling to survive are less concerned with environmental sustainability than advanced and stable nations. Nations such as the United States, Canada, Finland, Norway and others have higher SD capacity, and thus, are higher on their hierarchy of needs than nations such as Nigeria, Vietnam, Mexico and other

  7. Single and two-shot quantitative phase imaging using Hilbert-Huang Transform based fringe pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trusiak, Maciej; Micó, Vicente; Patorski, Krzysztof; García-Monreal, Javier; Sluzewski, Lukasz; Ferreira, Carlos

    2016-08-01

    In this contribution we propose two Hilbert-Huang Transform based algorithms for fast and accurate single-shot and two-shot quantitative phase imaging applicable in both on-axis and off-axis configurations. In the first scheme a single fringe pattern containing information about biological phase-sample under study is adaptively pre-filtered using empirical mode decomposition based approach. Further it is phase demodulated by the Hilbert Spiral Transform aided by the Principal Component Analysis for the local fringe orientation estimation. Orientation calculation enables closed fringes efficient analysis and can be avoided using arbitrary phase-shifted two-shot Gram-Schmidt Orthonormalization scheme aided by Hilbert-Huang Transform pre-filtering. This two-shot approach is a trade-off between single-frame and temporal phase shifting demodulation. Robustness of the proposed techniques is corroborated using experimental digital holographic microscopy studies of polystyrene micro-beads and red blood cells. Both algorithms compare favorably with the temporal phase shifting scheme which is used as a reference method.

  8. Quantitative interpretation of mineral hyperspectral images based on principal component analysis and independent component analysis methods.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiping; Jiang, Yu; Wu, Fang; Wu, Fenghuang

    2014-01-01

    Interpretation of mineral hyperspectral images provides large amounts of high-dimensional data, which is often complicated by mixed pixels. The quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images is known to be extremely difficult when three types of information are unknown, namely, the number of pure pixels, the spectrum of pure pixels, and the mixing matrix. The problem is made even more complex by the disturbance of noise. The key to interpreting abstract mineral component information, i.e., pixel unmixing and abundance inversion, is how to effectively reduce noise, dimension, and redundancy. A three-step procedure is developed in this study for quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images. First, the principal component analysis (PCA) method can be used to process the pixel spectrum matrix and keep characteristic vectors with larger eigenvalues. This can effectively reduce the noise and redundancy, which facilitates the abstraction of major component information. Second, the independent component analysis (ICA) method can be used to identify and unmix the pixels based on the linear mixed model. Third, the pure-pixel spectrums can be normalized for abundance inversion, which gives the abundance of each pure pixel. In numerical experiments, both simulation data and actual data were used to demonstrate the performance of our three-step procedure. Under simulation data, the results of our procedure were compared with theoretical values. Under the actual data measured from core hyperspectral images, the results obtained through our algorithm are compared with those of similar software (Mineral Spectral Analysis 1.0, Nanjing Institute of Geology and Mineral Resources). The comparisons show that our method is effective and can provide reference for quantitative interpretation of hyperspectral images.

  9. Spatio-Temporal Distribution Characteristics and Trajectory Similarity Analysis of Tuberculosis in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lan; Xi, Yuliang; Ren, Fu

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease with one of the highest reported incidences in China. The detection of the spatio-temporal distribution characteristics of TB is indicative of its prevention and control conditions. Trajectory similarity analysis detects variations and loopholes in prevention and provides urban public health officials and related decision makers more information for the allocation of public health resources and the formulation of prioritized health-related policies. This study analysed the spatio-temporal distribution characteristics of TB from 2009 to 2014 by utilizing spatial statistics, spatial autocorrelation analysis, and space-time scan statistics. Spatial statistics measured the TB incidence rate (TB patients per 100,000 residents) at the district level to determine its spatio-temporal distribution and to identify characteristics of change. Spatial autocorrelation analysis was used to detect global and local spatial autocorrelations across the study area. Purely spatial, purely temporal and space-time scan statistics were used to identify purely spatial, purely temporal and spatio-temporal clusters of TB at the district level. The other objective of this study was to compare the trajectory similarities between the incidence rates of TB and new smear-positive (NSP) TB patients in the resident population (NSPRP)/new smear-positive TB patients in the TB patient population (NSPTBP)/retreated smear-positive (RSP) TB patients in the resident population (RSPRP)/retreated smear-positive TB patients in the TB patient population (RSPTBP) to detect variations and loopholes in TB prevention and control among the districts in Beijing. The incidence rates in Beijing exhibited a gradual decrease from 2009 to 2014. Although global spatial autocorrelation was not detected overall across all of the districts of Beijing, individual districts did show evidence of local spatial autocorrelation: Chaoyang and Daxing were Low-Low districts over the six

  10. Torpedo electromotor system development: a quantitative analysis of synaptogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fox, G Q; Kötting, D

    1984-04-10

    Synaptogenesis in the electric organ of Torpedo marmorato has been studied quantitatively at the ultrastructural level of observation. In addition to establishing the normal developmental time course for this event we were interested in determining whether a gradient of synaptogenesis might be present because the electric organ produces several morphologically recognizable spatiotemporal gradients during its early ontogeny. These gradients genesis of electrocyte columns, both gradients of which are operative for periods of weeks. No gradient of synaptogenesis was found, indicating this to be a synchronous process. The idea is advanced that synaptogenesis in the electric organ is modulated by extrinsic influences, many of which may originate from the target electrocytes which, by this time, have become synchronized in their development.

  11. Microfluidic platform for the quantitative analysis of leukocyte migration signatures.

    PubMed

    Boneschansker, Leo; Yan, Jun; Wong, Elisabeth; Briscoe, David M; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-09-03

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. It is usually measured in vitro as the average displacement of populations of cells towards a chemokine gradient, not acknowledging other patterns of cell migration. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic migration platform to simultaneously analyse four qualitative migration patterns: chemoattraction, -repulsion, -kinesis and -inhibition, using single-cell quantitative metrics of direction, speed, persistence and fraction of cells responding. We find that established chemokines, complement component 5a and IL-8 induce chemoattraction and repulsion in equal proportions, resulting in the dispersal of cells. These migration signatures are characterized by high persistence and speed and are independent of the chemokine dose or receptor expression. Furthermore, we find that twice as many T lymphocytes migrate away than towards stromal cell-derived factor 1 and their directional migration patterns are not persistent. Overall, our platform helps discover migratory signature responses and uncovers an avenue for precise characterization of leukocyte migration and therapeutic modulators.

  12. MICROFLUIDIC PLATFORM FOR THE QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS OF LEUKOCYTE MIGRATION SIGNATURES

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Elisabeth; Briscoe, David M.; Irimia, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Leukocyte migration into tissues is characteristic of inflammation. It is usually measured in vitro as the average displacement of populations of cells towards a chemokine gradient, not acknowledging other patterns of cell migration. Here, we designed and validated a microfluidic migration platform to simultaneously analyze four qualitative migration patterns: chemo-attraction, -repulsion, -kinesis and -inhibition, using single-cell quantitative metrics of direction, speed, persistence, and fraction of cells responding. We find that established chemokines C5a and IL-8 induce chemoattraction and repulsion in equal proportions, resulting in the dispersal of cells. These migration signatures are characterized by high persistence and speed and are independent of the chemokine dose or receptor expression. Furthermore, we find that twice as many T-lymphocytes migrate away than towards SDF-1 and their directional migration patterns are not persistent. Overall, our platform characterizes migratory signature responses and uncovers an avenue for precise characterization of leukocyte migration and therapeutic modulators. PMID:25183261

  13. Comparative analysis of quantitative methodologies for Vibrionaceae biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Chavez-Dozal, Alba A.; Nourabadi, Neda; Erken, Martina; McDougald, Diane; Nishiguchi, Michele K.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple symbiotic and free living Vibrio sp. grow as a form of microbial community known as biofilm. In the laboratory, methods to quantify Vibrio biofilm mass include crystal violet staining, direct Colony Forming Unit (CFU) counting, dry biofilm cell mass measurement, and observation of development of wrinkled colonies. Another approach for bacterial biofilms also involves the use of tetrazolium (XTT) assays (used widely in studies of fungi) that are an appropriate measure of metabolic activity and vitality of cells within the biofilm matrix. This study systematically tested five techniques, among which the XTT assay and wrinkled colony measurement provided the most reproducible, accurate, and efficient methods for the quantitative estimation of Vibrionaceae biofilms. PMID:27009592

  14. Quantitative Analysis of Matrine in Liquid Crystalline Nanoparticles by HPLC

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xinsheng; Hu, Min; Ling, Yahao; Tian, Yuan; Zhou, Yanxing; Zhou, Yanfang

    2014-01-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatographic method has been developed to quantitatively determine matrine in liquid crystal nanoparticles. The chromatographic method is carried out using an isocratic system. The mobile phase was composed of methanol-PBS(pH6.8)-triethylamine (50 : 50 : 0.1%) with a flow rate of 1 mL/min with SPD-20A UV/vis detector and the detection wavelength was at 220 nm. The linearity of matrine is in the range of 1.6 to 200.0 μg/mL. The regression equation is y = 10706x − 2959 (R2 = 1.0). The average recovery is 101.7%; RSD = 2.22%  (n = 9). This method provides a simple and accurate strategy to determine matrine in liquid crystalline nanoparticle. PMID:24834359

  15. Copper in silicon: Quantitative analysis of internal and proximity gettering

    SciTech Connect

    McHugo, S.A.; Flink, C.; Weber, E.R.

    1997-08-01

    The behavior of copper in the presence of a proximity gettering mechanism and a standard internal gettering mechanism in silicon was studied. He implantation-induced cavities in the near surface region were used as a proximity gettering mechanism and oxygen precipitates in the bulk of the material provided internal gettering sites. Moderate levels of copper contamination were introduced by ion implantation such that the copper was not supersaturated during the anneals, thus providing realistic copper contamination/gettering conditions. Copper concentrations at cavities and internal gettering sites were quantitatively measured after the annealings. In this manner, the gettering effectiveness of cavities was measured when in direct competition with internal gettering sites. The cavities were found to be the dominant gettering mechanism with only a small amount of copper gettered at the internal gettering sites. These results reveal the benefits of a segregation-type gettering mechanism for typical contamination conditions.

  16. Quantitative analysis of peptide-MHC class II interaction.

    PubMed

    Fleckenstein, B; Jung, G; Wiesmüller, K H

    1999-12-01

    The tremendous progress in the field of basic immunology and immunochemistry made in the last decade has significantly advanced our understanding of antigen processing and presentation by MHC class I and II proteins. In this review different techniques to study peptide interaction with MHC class II molecules are summarized and their impact on the elucidation of quantitative parameters, like affinities or kinetic data, is discussed. A recently introduced method based on synthetic combinatorial peptide libraries allows to quantify the binding contribution of each amino acid residue in a class II ligand and is presented in more detail. As this knowledge is fundamental for current investigations in modern medicine, e.g. for novel immune system based therapy concepts, further aspects like the design of new high affinity MHC class II ligands and the prediction of peptide antigens are discussed.

  17. McMaster Mesonet soil moisture dataset: description and spatio-temporal variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelsen, K. C.; Coulibaly, P.

    2012-12-01

    This paper introduces and describes the hourly high resolution soil moisture dataset continuously recorded by the McMaster Mesonet located in the Hamilton-Halton Watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada. The McMaster Mesonet consists of a network of time domain reflectometer (TDR) probes collecting hourly soil moisture data at six depths between 10 cm and 100 cm at nine locations per site spread across four sites in the 1250 km2 watershed. The sites for the soil moisture arrays are designed to further improve understanding of soil moisture dynamics in a cold and snowy climate and to capture soil moisture transitions in areas that have different topography, soil and land-cover. The McMaster Mesonet soil moisture constitutes a unique database in Canada because of its high spatio-temporal resolution. In order to provide some insight into the dominant processes at the McMaster Mesonet sites a spatio-temporal and temporal stability analysis were conducted to identify spatio-temporal patterns in the data and to suggest some physical interpretation of soil moisture variability. It was found that the seasonal Canadian climate causes a transition in soil moisture patterns at seasonal time scales. During winter and early spring months, and at the meadow sites, soil moisture distribution is governed by topographic redistribution, whereas following efflorescence in the spring and summer, soil moisture spatial distribution at the forested site was equally dominated by vegetation canopy. Analysis of short-term temporal stability revealed that the relative difference between sites was maintained unless there was significant rainfall (> 20 mm) or wet conditions a priori. Following a disturbance in the spatial soil moisture distribution due to wetting, the relative soil moisture pattern re-emerged in 18 to 24 h. Access to the McMaster Mesonet data can be provided by visiting http://www.hydrology.mcmaster.ca.

  18. McMaster Mesonet soil moisture dataset: description and spatio-temporal variability analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornelsen, K. C.; Coulibaly, P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper introduces and describes the hourly, high-resolution soil moisture dataset continuously recorded by the McMaster Mesonet located in the Hamilton-Halton Watershed in Southern Ontario, Canada. The McMaster Mesonet consists of a network of time domain reflectometer (TDR) probes collecting hourly soil moisture data at six depths between 10 cm and 100 cm at nine locations per site, spread across four sites in the 1250 km2 watershed. The sites for the soil moisture arrays are designed to further improve understanding of soil moisture dynamics in a seasonal climate and to capture soil moisture transitions in areas that have different topography, soil and land cover. The McMaster Mesonet soil moisture constitutes a unique database in Canada because of its high spatio-temporal resolution. In order to provide some insight into the dominant processes at the McMaster Mesonet sites, a spatio-temporal and temporal stability analysis were conducted to identify spatio-temporal patterns in the data and to suggest some physical interpretation of soil moisture variability. It was found that the seasonal climate of the Great Lakes Basin causes a transition in soil moisture patterns at seasonal timescales. During winter and early spring months, and at the meadow sites, soil moisture distribution is governed by topographic redistribution, whereas following efflorescence in the spring and summer, soil moisture spatial distribution at the forested site was also controlled by vegetation canopy. Analysis of short-term temporal stability revealed that the relative difference between sites was maintained unless there was significant rainfall (> 20 mm) or wet conditions a priori. Following a disturbance in the spatial soil moisture distribution due to wetting, the relative soil moisture pattern re-emerged in 18 to 24 h. Access to the McMaster Mesonet data can be provided by visiting www.hydrology.mcmaster.ca/mesonet.

  19. Grid-Enabled Quantitative Analysis of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    large-scale, multi-modality computerized image analysis . The central hypothesis of this research is that large-scale image analysis for breast cancer...pilot study to utilize large scale parallel Grid computing to harness the nationwide cluster infrastructure for optimization of medical image ... analysis parameters. Additionally, we investigated the use of cutting edge dataanalysis/ mining techniques as applied to Ultrasound, FFDM, and DCE-MRI Breast

  20. The cortical analysis of speech-specific temporal structure revealed by responses to sound quilts

    PubMed Central

    Overath, Tobias; McDermott, Josh H; Zarate, Jean Mary; Poeppel, David

    2016-01-01

    Speech contains temporal structure that the brain must analyze to enable linguistic processing. To investigate the neural basis of this analysis, we used sound quilts, stimuli constructed by shuffling segments of a natural sound, approximately preserving its properties on short timescales while disrupting them on longer scales. We generated quilts from foreign speech to eliminate language cues and manipulated the extent of natural acoustic structure by varying the segment length. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we identified bilateral regions of the superior temporal sulcus (STS) whose responses varied with segment length. This effect was absent in primary auditory cortex and did not occur for quilts made from other natural sounds or acoustically matched synthetic sounds, suggesting tuning to speech-specific spectrotemporal structure. When examined parametrically, the STS response increased with segment length up to ~500 ms. Our results identify a locus of speech analysis in human auditory cortex that is distinct from lexical, semantic or syntactic processes. PMID:25984889

  1. Temporal analysis of feeding patterns of Culex erraticus in central Alabama.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana; Katholi, Charles R; Burkett-Cadena, Nathan; Hassan, Hassan K; Kristensen, Sibylle; Unnasch, Thomas R

    2011-04-01

    Host blood meals in seven mosquito species previously shown to be infected with eastern equine encephalitis virus at a site in the Tuskegee National Forest in southcentral Alabama were investigated. Of 1374 blood meals derived from 88 different host species collected over 6 years from these seven mosquito species, 1099 were derived from Culex erraticus. Analysis of the temporal pattern of Cx. erraticus meals using a Runs test revealed that the patterns of feeding upon avian and mammalian hosts from March to September of each year were not randomly distributed over time. Similarly, meals taken from the three most commonly targeted host species (yellow-crowned night heron, great blue heron, and white-tailed deer) were not randomly distributed. A Tukey's two-way analysis of variance test demonstrated that although the temporal pattern of meals taken from avian hosts were consistent over the years, the patterns of meals taken from the individual host species were not consistent from year to year.

  2. Quantitative analysis of the 2002 phocine distemper epidemic in the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Rijks, J M; Read, F L; van de Bildt, M W G; van Bolhuis, H G; Martina, B E E; Wagenaar, J A; van der Meulen, K; Osterhaus, A D M E; Kuiken, T

    2008-07-01

    Phocine distemper virus (PDV) caused thousands of deaths among harbor seals (Phoca vitulina) from the North Sea in 1988 and 2002. To examine the effects of different factors on the pathology of phocine distemper, we performed necropsies and laboratory analyses on 369 harbor seals that stranded along the Dutch coast during the 2002 PDV epidemic. Diagnostic tests for morbillivirus infection indicated a differential temporal presence of morbillivirus in lung and brain. Seals of 3 years or older were significantly more often IgG positive than younger seals. The most frequent lesions in PDV cases were bronchopneumonia, broncho-interstitial pneumonia, and interstitial emphysema. Extra-thoracic emphysema was rare in <1-year-olds compared with older seals, even though severe pneumonia was more common. PDV cases generally had empty stomachs and less blubber than by-caught seals from before the epidemic. In PDV cases involving older animals, lung, kidney, and adrenal weights were significantly increased. Bordetella bronchiseptica was isolated from lungs in two thirds of the PDV cases examined. Our results indicate that brain should be included among the tissues tested for PDV by RT-PCR; that either phocine distemper has a longer duration in older seals or that there are age-related differences in immunity and organ development; that dehydration could play a role in the course and outcome of phocine distemper; and that bacterial coinfections in lungs are more frequent in PDV cases than gross lesions suggest. These results illustrate how quantitative analysis of pathology data from such epidemics can improve understanding of the causative disease.

  3. Technical note: Sampling and processing of mesocosm sediment trap material for quantitative biogeochemical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxhammer, Tim; Bach, Lennart T.; Czerny, Jan; Riebesell, Ulf

    2016-05-01

    Sediment traps are the most common tool to investigate vertical particle flux in the marine realm. However, the spatial and temporal decoupling between particle formation in the surface ocean and particle collection in sediment traps at depth often handicaps reconciliation of production and sedimentation even within the euphotic zone. Pelagic mesocosms are restricted to the surface ocean, but have the advantage of being closed systems and are therefore ideally suited to studying how processes in natural plankton communities influence particle formation and settling in the ocean's surface. We therefore developed a protocol for efficient sample recovery and processing of quantitatively collected pelagic mesocosm sediment trap samples for biogeochemical analysis. Sedimented material was recovered by pumping it under gentle vacuum through a silicon tube to the sea surface. The particulate matter of these samples was subsequently separated from bulk seawater by passive settling, centrifugation or flocculation with ferric chloride, and we discuss the advantages and efficiencies of each approach. After concentration, samples were freeze-dried and ground with an easy to adapt procedure using standard lab equipment. Grain size of the finely ground samples ranged from fine to coarse silt (2-63 µm), which guarantees homogeneity for representative subsampling, a widespread problem in sediment trap research. Subsamples of the ground material were perfectly suitable for a variety of biogeochemical measurements, and even at very low particle fluxes we were able to get a detailed insight into various parameters characterizing the sinking particles. The methods and recommendations described here are a key improvement for sediment trap applications in mesocosms, as they facilitate the processing of large amounts of samples and allow for high-quality biogeochemical flux data.

  4. China's water resources vulnerability: A spatio-temporal analysis during 2003-2013

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, J.; Varis, O.; Yin, H.

    2015-12-01

    The present highly serious situation of China's water environment and aquatic ecosystems has occurred in the context of its stunning socioeconomic development over the past several decades. Therefore, an analysis with a high spatio-temporal resolution of the vulnerability assessment of water resources (VAWR) in China is burningly needed. However, to our knowledge, the temporal analysis of VAWR has been not yet addressed. Consequently, we performed, for the first time, a comprehensive spatio-temporal analysis of China's water resources vulnerability (WRV), using a composite index approach with an array of aspects highlighting key challenges that China's water resources system is nowadays facing. During our study period of 2003-2013, the political weight of China's integrated water resources management has been increasing continuously. Hence, it is essential and significant, based on the historical socioeconomic changes influenced by water-environment policy making and implementation, to reveal China's WRV for pinpointing key challenges to the healthy functionality of its water resources system. The water resources system in North and Central Coast appeared more vulnerable than that in Western China. China's water use efficiency has grown substantially over the study period, and so is water supply and sanitation coverage. In contrast, water pollution has been worsening remarkably in most parts of China, and so have water scarcity and shortage in the most stressed parts of the country. This spatio-temporal analysis implies that the key challenges to China's water resources system not only root in the geographical mismatch between socioeconomic development (e.g. water demand) and water resources endowments (e.g. water resources availability), but also stem from the intertwinement between socioeconomic development and national strategic policy making.

  5. Spatial-Temporal Epidemiology of Tuberculosis in Mainland China: An Analysis Based on Bayesian Theory

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Kai; Yang, Kun; Wang, Chao; Guo, Jin; Tao, Lixin; Liu, Qingrong; Gehendra, Mahara; Zhang, Yingjie; Guo, Xiuhua

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore the spatial-temporal interaction effect within a Bayesian framework and to probe the ecological influential factors for tuberculosis. Methods: Six different statistical models containing parameters of time, space, spatial-temporal interaction and their combination were constructed based on a Bayesian framework. The optimum model was selected according to the deviance information criterion (DIC) value. Coefficients of climate variables were then estimated using the best fitting model. Results: The model containing spatial-temporal interaction parameter was the best fitting one, with the smallest DIC value (−4,508,660). Ecological analysis results showed the relative risks (RRs) of average temperature, rainfall, wind speed, humidity, and air pressure were 1.00324 (95% CI, 1.00150–1.00550), 1.01010 (95% CI, 1.01007–1.01013), 0.83518 (95% CI, 0.93732–0.96138), 0.97496 (95% CI, 0.97181–1.01386), and 1.01007 (95% CI, 1.01003–1.01011), respectively. Conclusions: The spatial-temporal interaction was statistically meaningful and the prevalence of tuberculosis was influenced by the time and space interaction effect. Average temperature, rainfall, wind speed, and air pressure influenced tuberculosis. Average humidity had no influence on tuberculosis. PMID:27164117

  6. Network Analysis of Foramen Ovale Electrode Recordings in Drug-resistant Temporal Lobe Epilepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Vega-Zelaya, Lorena; Pastor, Jesús; Torres, Cristina V.; Sola, Rafael G.; Ortega, Guillermo J.

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 30% of epilepsy patients are refractory to antiepileptic drugs. In these cases, surgery is the only alternative to eliminate/control seizures. However, a significant minority of patients continues to exhibit post-operative seizures, even in those cases in which the suspected source of seizures has been correctly localized and resected. The protocol presented here combines a clinical procedure routinely employed during the pre-operative evaluation of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients with a novel technique for network analysis. The method allows for the evaluation of the temporal evolution of mesial network parameters. The bilateral insertion of foramen ovale electrodes (FOE) into the ambient cistern simultaneously records electrocortical activity at several mesial areas in the temporal lobe. Furthermore, network methodology applied to the recorded time series tracks the temporal evolution of the mesial networks both interictally and during the seizures. In this way, the presented protocol offers a unique way to visualize and quantify measures that considers the relationships between several mesial areas instead of a single area. PMID:28060326

  7. Response Neighborhoods in Online Learning Networks: A Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aviv, Reuven; Erlich, Zippy; Ravid, Gilad

    2005-01-01

    Theoretical foundation of Response mechanisms in networks of online learners are revealed by Statistical Analysis of p* Markov Models for the Networks. Our comparative analysis of two networks shows that the minimal-effort hunt-for-social-capital mechanism controls a major behavior of both networks: negative tendency to respond. Differences in…

  8. Afghanistan Reconstruction - A Quantitative Analysis of the International Effort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-01

    Trinkunas Chairman, Department of National Security Affairs iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT Since the start of Operation Enduring...10 4. Chapter V - Provincial Level Analysis - Part II ........................11 5. Chapter VI - Conclusions...Level Approach.......80 C. PRESENTATION OF RESULTS................................................................82 V . PROVINCIAL LEVEL ANALYSIS

  9. Joint modality fusion and temporal context exploitation for semantic video analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Georgios Th; Mezaris, Vasileios; Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Strintzis, Michael G.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, a multi-modal context-aware approach to semantic video analysis is presented. Overall, the examined video sequence is initially segmented into shots and for every resulting shot appropriate color, motion and audio features are extracted. Then, Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) are employed for performing an initial association of each shot with the semantic classes that are of interest separately for each modality. Subsequently, a graphical modeling-based approach is proposed for jointly performing modality fusion and temporal context exploitation. Novelties of this work include the combined use of contextual information and multi-modal fusion, and the development of a new representation for providing motion distribution information to HMMs. Specifically, an integrated Bayesian Network is introduced for simultaneously performing information fusion of the individual modality analysis results and exploitation of temporal context, contrary to the usual practice of performing each task separately. Contextual information is in the form of temporal relations among the supported classes. Additionally, a new computationally efficient method for providing motion energy distribution-related information to HMMs, which supports the incorporation of motion characteristics from previous frames to the currently examined one, is presented. The final outcome of this overall video analysis framework is the association of a semantic class with every shot. Experimental results as well as comparative evaluation from the application of the proposed approach to four datasets belonging to the domains of tennis, news and volleyball broadcast video are presented.

  10. Quantitative analysis of numerical solvers for oscillatory biomolecular system models

    PubMed Central

    Quo, Chang F; Wang, May D

    2008-01-01

    Background This article provides guidelines for selecting optimal numerical solvers for biomolecular system models. Because various parameters of the same system could have drastically different ranges from 10-15 to 1010, the ODEs can be stiff and ill-conditioned, resulting in non-unique, non-existing, or non-reproducible modeling solutions. Previous studies have not examined in depth how to best select numerical solvers for biomolecular system models, which makes it difficult to experimentally validate the modeling results. To address this problem, we have chosen one of the well-known stiff initial value problems with limit cycle behavior as a test-bed system model. Solving this model, we have illustrated that different answers may result from different numerical solvers. We use MATLAB numerical solvers because they are optimized and widely used by the modeling community. We have also conducted a systematic study of numerical solver performances by using qualitative and quantitative measures such as convergence, accuracy, and computational cost (i.e. in terms of function evaluation, partial derivative, LU decomposition, and "take-off" points). The results show that the modeling solutions can be drastically different using different numerical solvers. Thus, it is important to intelligently select numerical solvers when solving biomolecular system models. Results The classic Belousov-Zhabotinskii (BZ) reaction is described by the Oregonator model and is used as a case study. We report two guidelines in selecting optimal numerical solver(s) for stiff, complex oscillatory systems: (i) for problems with unknown parameters, ode45 is the optimal choice regardless of the relative error tolerance; (ii) for known stiff problems, both ode113 and ode15s are good choices under strict relative tolerance conditions. Conclusions For any given biomolecular model, by building a library of numerical solvers with quantitative performance assessment metric, we show that it is possible

  11. Fractal analysis and graph theory applied to the spatial and temporal variability of soil water content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, Sidney R.; Vidal Vázquez, Eva; Miranda, José G. V.; Paz Ferreiro, Jorge; Topp, George C.

    2010-05-01

    Spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture content has been frequently evaluated using statistical and geostatistical methods for several issues. For example, the statistical study of the temporal persistence or temporal stability in spatial patterns of soil moisture content has found interest to improve soil water monitoring strategies and to correct the average soil water content for missing data. Fractal analysis and graph theory are additional tools that can provide information and further insight to assess and to model indirect or hidden interactions in soil moisture content. In fractal analysis the fractal dimension (D) is an indicator of the pattern and extent of spatial and/or temporal variability. Large D values indicate the importance of short-range variation, while small D values reflect the importance of long-range variation when spatial and temporal data sets are analyzed. Moreover, for spatial and temporal variability, D can range from 1 to 2 for a profile and from 2 to 3 for a two dimensional network. Moreover, as the fractal dimension value increases the degree of roughness also increases. Graph theory tools take into account network structure by modelling pair wise relations between objects, which allow considering explicitly spatial-temporal connectivity of a given data set. The objective of this study was to use fractal analysis and graph theory to characterize the pattern of spatial and temporal variability of soil moisture content. The experimental field was located at Ottawa, Canada. Volumetric water content was monitored using Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) during 34 dates at 164 locations per date. The depth of the TDR probes was 20 cm. The first and last measurements were 21 month apart and no data were taken in winter when the soil was covered by snow. The fractal dimension, D, was estimated from the slope of the regression line of log semivariogram versus distance for each of studied data sets. Using graph theory various

  12. Quantitative Expression Analysis in Brassica napus by Northern Blot Analysis and Reverse Transcription-Quantitative PCR in a Complex Experimental Setting.

    PubMed

    Rumlow, Annekathrin; Keunen, Els; Klein, Jan; Pallmann, Philip; Riemenschneider, Anja; Cuypers, Ann; Papenbrock, Jutta

    Analysis of gene expression is one of the major ways to better understand plant reactions to changes in environmental conditions. The comparison of many different factors influencing plant growth challenges the gene expression analysis for specific gene-targeted experiments, especially with regard to the choice of suitable reference genes. The aim of this study is to compare expression results obtained by Northern blot, semi-quantitative PCR and RT-qPCR, and to identify a reliable set of reference genes for oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) suitable for comparing gene expression under complex experimental conditions. We investigated the influence of several factors such as sulfur deficiency, different time points during the day, varying light conditions, and their interaction on gene expression in oilseed rape plants. The expression of selected reference genes was indeed influenced under these conditions in different ways. Therefore, a recently developed algorithm, called GrayNorm, was applied to validate a set of reference genes for normalizing results obtained by Northern blot analysis. After careful comparison of the three methods mentioned above, Northern blot analysis seems to be a reliable and cost-effective alternative for gene expression analysis under a complex growth regime. For using this method in a quantitative way a number of references was validated revealing that for our experiment a set of three references provides an appropriate normalization. Semi-quantitative PCR was prone to many handling errors and difficult to control while RT-qPCR was very sensitive to expression fluctuations of the reference genes.

  13. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the Salmonella-lettuce interaction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuping; Nandakumar, Renu; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Hodges, Laurie; Li, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Human pathogens can internalize food crops through root and surface uptake and persist inside crop plants. The goal of the study was to elucidate the global modulation of bacteria and plant protein expression after Salmonella internalizes lettuce. A quantitative proteomic approach was used to analyse the protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis and lettuce cultivar Green Salad Bowl 24 h after infiltrating S. Infantis into lettuce leaves. Among the 50 differentially expressed proteins identified by comparing internalized S. Infantis against S. Infantis grown in Luria Broth, proteins involved in glycolysis were down-regulated, while one protein involved in ascorbate uptake was up-regulated. Stress response proteins, especially antioxidant proteins, were up-regulated. The modulation in protein expression suggested that internalized S. Infantis might utilize ascorbate as a carbon source and require multiple stress response proteins to cope with stresses encountered in plants. On the other hand, among the 20 differentially expressed lettuce proteins, proteins involved in defense response to bacteria were up-regulated. Moreover, the secreted effector PipB2 of S. Infantis and R proteins of lettuce were induced after bacterial internalization into lettuce leaves, indicating human pathogen S. Infantis triggered the defense mechanisms of lettuce, which normally responds to plant pathogens. PMID:24512637

  14. [Device for quantitative analysis of perception and pain sensation].

    PubMed

    Arita, Hideko; Kato, Jitsu; Ogawa, Setsuro; Hanaoka, Kazuo

    2014-07-01

    The article describes an analysing device that measures the perception and intensity of pain quantitatively. While it is not necessarily true that psychological aspect is totally irrelevant to pain measurement, this device is remarkable in that it is capable of measuring the intensity of pain felt by the patient more objectively by using electric stimuli. The feature of this device is that it uses a non-pain heteresthesia for measuring the intensity of pain. The device is compact, light-weight, and portable. Unlike VAS that requires only a scale, the device requires a person to carry out the measurement. Nevertheless, as the National Health Insurance (NHI) coverage has been approved, introduction of the device may be facilitated in terms of budget for the purchase and labor. The device is useful to better understand not only the intensity of pain but also the pathological conditions, resulting in more appropriate treatment, by (1) comparing degree of pain or VAS values taken by a multicenter study with those of a patient; (2) using both degree of pain and VAS; and (3) multiple measurements of degree of pain and VAS in one case.

  15. Quantitative analysis of virus and plasmid trafficking in cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagache, Thibault; Dauty, Emmanuel; Holcman, David

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular transport of DNA carriers is a fundamental step of gene delivery. By combining both theoretical and numerical approaches we study here single and several viruses and DNA particles trafficking in the cell cytoplasm to a small nuclear pore. We present a physical model to account for certain aspects of cellular organization, starting with the observation that a viral trajectory consists of epochs of pure diffusion and epochs of active transport along microtubules. We define a general degradation rate to describe the limitations of the delivery of plasmid or viral particles to a nuclear pore imposed by various types of direct and indirect hydrolysis activity inside the cytoplasm. By replacing the switching dynamics by a single steady state stochastic description, we obtain estimates for the probability and the mean time for the first one of many particles to go from the cell membrane to a small nuclear pore. Computational simulations confirm that our model can be used to analyze and interpret viral trajectories and estimate quantitatively the success of nuclear delivery.

  16. Quantitative Analysis of CME Deflections in the Corona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gui, Bin; Shen, Chenglong; Wang, Yuming; Ye, Pinzhong; Liu, Jiajia; Wang, Shui; Zhao, Xuepu

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, ten CME events viewed by the STEREO twin spacecraft are analyzed to study the deflections of CMEs during their propagation in the corona. Based on the three-dimensional information of the CMEs derived by the graduated cylindrical shell (GCS) model (Thernisien, Howard, and Vourlidas in Astrophys. J. 652, 1305, 2006), it is found that the propagation directions of eight CMEs had changed. By applying the theoretical method proposed by Shen et al. ( Solar Phys. 269, 389, 2011) to all the CMEs, we found that the deflections are consistent, in strength and direction, with the gradient of the magnetic energy density. There is a positive correlation between the deflection rate and the strength of the magnetic energy density gradient and a weak anti-correlation between the deflection rate and the CME speed. Our results suggest that the deflections of CMEs are mainly controlled by the background magnetic field and can be quantitatively described by the magnetic energy density gradient (MEDG) model.

  17. Space-to-Ground Communication for Columbus: A Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Thomas; Mannel, Thurid; Fortunato, Antonio; Illmer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are only the most visible part of a much larger team engaged around the clock in the performance of science and technical activities in space. The bulk of such team is scattered around the globe in five major Mission Control Centers (MCCs), as well as in a number of smaller payload operations centres. Communication between the crew in space and the flight controllers at those locations is an essential element and one of the key drivers to efficient space operations. Such communication can be carried out in different forms, depending on available technical assets and the selected operational approach for the activity at hand. This paper focuses on operational voice communication and provides a quantitative overview of the balance achieved in the Columbus program between collaborative space/ground operations and autonomous on-board activity execution. An interpretation of the current situation is provided, together with a description of potential future approaches for deep space exploration missions.

  18. Quantitative analysis of task selection for brain-computer interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llera, Alberto; Gómez, Vicenç; Kappen, Hilbert J.

    2014-10-01

    Objective. To assess quantitatively the impact of task selection in the performance of brain-computer interfaces (BCI). Approach. We consider the task-pairs derived from multi-class BCI imagery movement tasks in three different datasets. We analyze for the first time the benefits of task selection on a large-scale basis (109 users) and evaluate the possibility of transferring task-pair information across days for a given subject. Main results. Selecting the subject-dependent optimal task-pair among three different imagery movement tasks results in approximately 20% potential increase in the number of users that can be expected to control a binary BCI. The improvement is observed with respect to the best task-pair fixed across subjects. The best task-pair selected for each subject individually during a first day of recordings is generally a good task-pair in subsequent days. In general, task learning from the user side has a positive influence in the generalization of the optimal task-pair, but special attention should be given to inexperienced subjects. Significance. These results add significant evidence to existing literature that advocates task selection as a necessary step towards usable BCIs. This contribution motivates further research focused on deriving adaptive methods for task selection on larger sets of mental tasks in practical online scenarios.

  19. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the Salmonella-lettuce interaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuping; Nandakumar, Renu; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Hodges, Laurie; Li, Xu

    2014-11-01

    Human pathogens can internalize food crops through root and surface uptake and persist inside crop plants. The goal of the study was to elucidate the global modulation of bacteria and plant protein expression after Salmonella internalizes lettuce. A quantitative proteomic approach was used to analyse the protein expression of Salmonella enterica serovar Infantis and lettuce cultivar Green Salad Bowl 24 h after infiltrating S. Infantis into lettuce leaves. Among the 50 differentially expressed proteins identified by comparing internalized S. Infantis against S. Infantis grown in Luria Broth, proteins involved in glycolysis were down-regulated, while one protein involved in ascorbate uptake was up-regulated. Stress response proteins, especially antioxidant proteins, were up-regulated. The modulation in protein expression suggested that internalized S. Infantis might utilize ascorbate as a carbon source and require multiple stress response proteins to cope with stresses encountered in plants. On the other hand, among the 20 differentially expressed lettuce proteins, proteins involved in defense response to bacteria were up-regulated. Moreover, the secreted effector PipB2 of S. Infantis and R proteins of lettuce were induced after bacterial internalization into lettuce leaves, indicating human pathogen S. Infantis triggered the defense mechanisms of lettuce, which normally responds to plant pathogens.

  20. Quantitative proteomic analysis of amphotericin B resistance in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Brotherton, Marie-Christine; Bourassa, Sylvie; Légaré, Danielle; Poirier, Guy G; Droit, Arnaud; Ouellette, Marc

    2014-08-01

    Amphotericin B (AmB) in its liposomal form is now considered as either first- or second-line treatment against Leishmania infections in different part of the world. Few cases of AmB resistance have been reported and resistance mechanisms toward AmB are still poorly understood. This paper reports a large-scale comparative proteomic study in the context of AmB resistance. Quantitative proteomics using stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was used to better characterize cytoplasmic and membrane-enriched (ME) proteomes of the in vitro generated Leishmania infantum AmB resistant mutant AmB1000.1. In total, 97 individual proteins were found as differentially expressed between the mutant and its parental sensitive strain (WT). More than half of these proteins were either metabolic enzymes or involved in transcription or translation processes. Key energetic pathways such as glycolysis and TCA cycle were up-regulated in the mutant. Interestingly, many proteins involved in reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging and heat-shock proteins were also up-regulated in the resistant mutant. This work provides a basis for further investigations to understand the roles of proteins differentially expressed in relation with AmB resistance.

  1. Space-to-Ground Communication for Columbus: A Quantitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Uhlig, Thomas; Mannel, Thurid; Fortunato, Antonio; Illmer, Norbert

    2015-01-01

    The astronauts on board the International Space Station (ISS) are only the most visible part of a much larger team engaged around the clock in the performance of science and technical activities in space. The bulk of such team is scattered around the globe in five major Mission Control Centers (MCCs), as well as in a number of smaller payload operations centres. Communication between the crew in space and the flight controllers at those locations is an essential element and one of the key drivers to efficient space operations. Such communication can be carried out in different forms, depending on available technical assets and the selected operational approach for the activity at hand. This paper focuses on operational voice communication and provides a quantitative overview of the balance achieved in the Columbus program between collaborative space/ground operations and autonomous on-board activity execution. An interpretation of the current situation is provided, together with a description of potential future approaches for deep space exploration missions. PMID:26290898

  2. Quantitative analysis on electric dipole energy in Rashba band splitting

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Jisook; Rhim, Jun-Won; Kim, Changyoung; Ryong Park, Seung; Hoon Shim, Ji

    2015-01-01

    We report on quantitative comparison between the electric dipole energy and the Rashba band splitting in model systems of Bi and Sb triangular monolayers under a perpendicular electric field. We used both first-principles and tight binding calculations on p-orbitals with spin-orbit coupling. First-principles calculation shows Rashba band splitting in both systems. It also shows asymmetric charge distributions in the Rashba split bands which are induced by the orbital angular momentum. We calculated the electric dipole energies from coupling of the asymmetric charge distribution and external electric field, and compared it to the Rashba splitting. Remarkably, the total split energy is found to come mostly from the difference in the electric dipole energy for both Bi and Sb systems. A perturbative approach for long wave length limit starting from tight binding calculation also supports that the Rashba band splitting originates mostly from the electric dipole energy difference in the strong atomic spin-orbit coupling regime. PMID:26323493

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Synaptic Release at the Photoreceptor Synapse

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Gabriel; Rabl, Katalin; Gemp, Ian; Heidelberger, Ruth; Thoreson, Wallace B.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Exocytosis from the rod photoreceptor is stimulated by submicromolar Ca2+ and exhibits an unusually shallow dependence on presynaptic Ca2+. To provide a quantitative description of the photoreceptor Ca2+ sensor for exocytosis, we tested a family of conventional and allosteric computational models describing the final Ca2+-binding steps leading to exocytosis. Simulations were fit to two measures of release, evoked by flash-photolysis of caged Ca2+: exocytotic capacitance changes from individual rods and postsynaptic currents of second-order neurons. The best simulations supported the occupancy of only two Ca2+ binding sites on the rod Ca2+ sensor rather than the typical four or five. For most models, the on-rates for Ca2+ binding and maximal fusion rate were comparable to those of other neurons. However, the off-rates for Ca2+ unbinding were unexpectedly slow. In addition to contributing to the high-affinity of the photoreceptor Ca2+ sensor, slow Ca2+ unbinding may support the fusion of vesicles located at a distance from Ca2+ channels. In addition, partial sensor occupancy due to slow unbinding may contribute to the linearization of the first synapse in vision. PMID:20483317

  4. Quantitative analysis of ultrasound images for computer-aided diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie Ying; Tuomi, Adam; Beland, Michael D.; Konrad, Joseph; Glidden, David; Grand, David; Merck, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. We propose an adaptable framework for analyzing ultrasound (US) images quantitatively to provide computer-aided diagnosis using machine learning. Our preliminary clinical targets are hepatic steatosis, adenomyosis, and craniosynostosis. For steatosis and adenomyosis, we collected US studies from 288 and 88 patients, respectively, as well as their biopsy or magnetic resonanceconfirmed diagnosis. Radiologists identified a region of interest (ROI) on each image. We filtered the US images for various texture responses and use the pixel intensity distribution within each ROI as feature parameterizations. Our craniosynostosis dataset consisted of 22 CT-confirmed cases and 22 age-matched controls. One physician manually measured the vectors from the center of the skull to the outer cortex at every 10 deg for each image and we used the principal directions as shape features for parameterization. These parameters and the known diagnosis were used to train classifiers. Testing with cross-validation, we obtained 72.74% accuracy and 0.71 area under receiver operating characteristics curve for steatosis (p<0.0001), 77.27% and 0.77 for adenomyosis (p<0.0001), and 88.63% and 0.89 for craniosynostosis (p=0.0006). Our framework is able to detect a variety of diseases with high accuracy. We hope to include it as a routinely available support system in the clinic. PMID:26835502

  5. Quantitative analysis of a frequency-domain nonlinearity indicator.

    PubMed

    Reichman, Brent O; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Miller, Kyle G

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, quantitative understanding of a frequency-domain nonlinearity indicator is developed. The indicator is derived from an ensemble-averaged, frequency-domain version of the generalized Burgers equation, which can be rearranged in order to directly compare the effects of nonlinearity, absorption, and geometric spreading on the pressure spectrum level with frequency and distance. The nonlinear effect is calculated using pressure-squared-pressure quadspectrum. Further theoretical development has given an expression for the role of the normalized quadspectrum, referred to as Q/S by Morfey and Howell [AIAA J. 19, 986-992 (1981)], in the spatial rate of change of the pressure spectrum level. To explore this finding, an investigation of the change in level for initial sinusoids propagating as plane waves through inviscid and thermoviscous media has been conducted. The decibel change with distance, calculated through Q/S, captures the growth and decay of the harmonics and indicates that the most significant changes in level occur prior to sawtooth formation. At large distances, the inviscid case results in a spatial rate of change that is uniform across all harmonics. For thermoviscous media, large positive nonlinear gains are observed but offset by absorption, which leads to a greater overall negative spatial rate of change for higher harmonics.

  6. Quantitative analysis of pheromone-binding protein specificity

    PubMed Central

    Katti, S.; Lokhande, N.; González, D.; Cassill, A.; Renthal, R.

    2012-01-01

    Many pheromones have very low water solubility, posing experimental difficulties for quantitative binding measurements. A new method is presented for determining thermodynamically valid dissociation constants for ligands binding to pheromone-binding proteins (OBPs), using β-cyclodextrin as a solubilizer and transfer agent. The method is applied to LUSH, a Drosophila OBP that binds the pheromone 11-cis vaccenyl acetate (cVA). Refolding of LUSH expressed in E. coli was assessed by measuring N-phenyl-1-naphthylamine (NPN) binding and Förster resonance energy transfer between LUSH tryptophan 123 (W123) and NPN. Binding of cVA was measured from quenching of W123 fluorescence as a function of cVA concentration. The equilibrium constant for transfer of cVA between β-cyclodextrin and LUSH was determined from a linked equilibria model. This constant, multiplied by the β-cyclodextrin-cVA dissociation constant, gives the LUSH-cVA dissociation constant: ~100 nM. It was also found that other ligands quench W123 fluorescence. The LUSH-ligand dissociation constants were determined to be ~200 nM for the silk moth pheromone bombykol and ~90 nM for methyl oleate. The results indicate that the ligand-binding cavity of LUSH can accommodate a variety ligands with strong binding interactions. Implications of this for the pheromone receptor model proposed by Laughlin et al. (Cell 133: 1255–65, 2008) are discussed. PMID:23121132

  7. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1990-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body, a wide variety of technologies was developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development coupled with recent advances in video technology have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System to develop data on shirt-sleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. The system is described.

  8. From quantitative protein complex analysis to disease mechanism.

    PubMed

    Texier, Y; Kinkl, N; Boldt, K; Ueffing, M

    2012-12-15

    Interest in the field of cilia biology and cilia-associated diseases - ciliopathies - has strongly increased over the last few years. Proteomic technologies, especially protein complex analysis by affinity purification-based methods, have been used to decipher various basic but also disease-associated mechanisms. This review focusses on some selected recent studies using affinity purification-based protein complex analysis, thereby exemplifying the great possibilities this technology offers.

  9. [Quantitative spectrum analysis of characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion coal].

    PubMed

    Liang, Yun-Tao; Tang, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Hai-Zhu; Sun, Yong

    2011-09-01

    Aimed at the characteristics of spontaneous combustion gas such as a variety of gases, lou limit of detection, and critical requirement of safety, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectral analysis is presented to analyze characteristic gases of spontaneous combustion In this paper, analysis method is introduced at first by combing characteristics of absorption spectra of analyte and analysis requirement. Parameter setting method, sample preparation, feature variable abstract and analysis model building are taken into consideration. The methods of sample preparation, feature abstraction and analysis model are introduced in detail. And then, eleven kinds of gases were tested with Tensor 27 spectrometer. CH4, C2H6, C3H8, iC4H10, nC4H10, C2 H4, C3 H6, C3 H2, SF6, CO and CO2 were included. The optical path length was 10 cm while the spectra resolution was set as 1 cm(-1). The testing results show that the detection limit of all analytes is less than 2 x 10(-6). All the detection limits fit the measurement requirement of spontaneous combustion gas, which means that FTIR may be an ideal instrument and the analysis method used in this paper is competent for spontaneous combustion gas measurement on line.

  10. Spatio-Temporal Gap Analysis of OBIS-SEAMAP Project Data: Assessment and Way Forward

    PubMed Central

    Kot, Connie Y.; Fujioka, Ei; Hazen, Lucie J.; Best, Benjamin D.; Read, Andrew J.; Halpin, Patrick N.

    2010-01-01

    The OBIS-SEAMAP project has acquired and served high-quality marine mammal, seabird, and sea turtle data to the public since its inception in 2002. As data accumulated, spatial and temporal biases resulted and a comprehensive gap analysis was needed in order to assess coverage to direct data acquisition for the OBIS-SEAMAP project and for taxa researchers should true gaps in knowledge exist. All datasets published on OBIS-SEAMAP up to February 2009 were summarized spatially and temporally. Seabirds comprised the greatest number of records, compared to the other two taxa, and most records were from shipboard surveys, compared to the other three platforms. Many of the point observations and polyline tracklines were located in northern and central Atlantic and the northeastern and central-eastern Pacific. The Southern Hemisphere generally had the lowest representation of data, with the least number of records in the southern Atlantic and western Pacific regions. Temporally, records of observations for all taxa were the lowest in fall although the number of animals sighted was lowest in the winter. Oceanographic coverage of observations varied by platform for each taxa, which showed that using two or more platforms represented habitat ranges better than using only one alone. Accessible and published datasets not already incorporated do exist within spatial and temporal gaps identified. Other related open-source data portals also contain data that fill gaps, emphasizing the importance of dedicated data exchange. Temporal and spatial gaps were mostly a result of data acquisition effort, development of regional partnerships and collaborations, and ease of field data collection. Future directions should include fostering partnerships with researchers in the Southern Hemisphere while targeting datasets containing species with limited representation. These results can facilitate prioritizing datasets needed to be represented and for planning research for true gaps in space

  11. Development of spatial-temporal ventilation heterogeneity and probability analysis tools for hyperpolarized 3He magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, S.; Ahmed, H.; Wheatley, A.; McCormack, D. G.; Parraga, G.

    2010-03-01

    We developed image analysis tools to evaluate spatial and temporal 3He magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) ventilation in asthma and cystic fibrosis. We also developed temporal ventilation probability maps to provide a way to describe and quantify ventilation heterogeneity over time, as a way to test respiratory exacerbations or treatment predictions and to provide a discrete probability measurement of 3He ventilation defect persistence.

  12. Software applications toward quantitative metabolic flux analysis and modeling.

    PubMed

    Dandekar, Thomas; Fieselmann, Astrid; Majeed, Saman; Ahmed, Zeeshan

    2014-01-01

    Metabolites and their pathways are central for adaptation and survival. Metabolic modeling elucidates in silico all the possible flux pathways (flux balance analysis, FBA) and predicts the actual fluxes under a given situation, further refinement of these models is possible by including experimental isotopologue data. In this review, we initially introduce the key theoretical concepts and different analysis steps in the modeling process before comparing flux calculation and metabolite analysis programs such as C13, BioOpt, COBRA toolbox, Metatool, efmtool, FiatFlux, ReMatch, VANTED, iMAT and YANA. Their respective strengths and limitations are discussed and compared to alternative software. While data analysis of metabolites, calculation of metabolic fluxes, pathways and their condition-specific changes are all possible, we highlight the considerations that need to be taken into account before deciding on a specific software. Current challenges in the field include the computation of large-scale networks (in elementary mode analysis), regulatory interactions and detailed kinetics, and these are discussed in the light of powerful new approaches.

  13. Quantitative assessment of human motion using video motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Probe, John D.

    1993-01-01

    In the study of the dynamics and kinematics of the human body a wide variety of technologies has been developed. Photogrammetric techniques are well documented and are known to provide reliable positional data from recorded images. Often these techniques are used in conjunction with cinematography and videography for analysis of planar motion, and to a lesser degree three-dimensional motion. Cinematography has been the most widely used medium for movement analysis. Excessive operating costs and the lag time required for film development, coupled with recent advances in video technology, have allowed video based motion analysis systems to emerge as a cost effective method of collecting and analyzing human movement. The Anthropometric and Biomechanics Lab at Johnson Space Center utilizes the video based Ariel Performance Analysis System (APAS) to develop data on shirtsleeved and space-suited human performance in order to plan efficient on-orbit intravehicular and extravehicular activities. APAS is a fully integrated system of hardware and software for biomechanics and the analysis of human performance and generalized motion measurement. Major components of the complete system include the video system, the AT compatible computer, and the proprietary software.

  14. Geysers of Enceladus: Quantitative analysis of qualitative models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilliantov, Nikolai V.; Schmidt, Jürgen; Spahn, Frank

    2008-11-01

    Aspects of two qualitative models of Enceladus' dust plume - the so-called "Cold Faithful" [Porco, C.C., et al., 2006. Cassini observes the active south pole of Enceladus. Science 311, 1393-1401; Ingersoll, A.P., et al., 2006. Models of the Enceladus plumes. In: Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, vol. 38, p. 508] and "Frigid Faithful" [Kieffer, S.W., et al., 2006. A clathrate reservoir hypothesis for Enceladus' south polar plume. Science 314, 1764; Gioia, G., et al., 2007. Unified model of tectonics and heat transport in a Frigid Enceladus. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 104, 13578-13591] models - are analyzed quantitatively. The former model assumes an explosive boiling of subsurface liquid water, when pressure exerted by the ice crust is suddenly released due to an opening crack. In the latter model the existence of a deep shell of clathrates below Enceladus' south pole is conjectured; clathrates can decompose explosively when exposed to vacuum through a fracture in the outer icy shell. For the Cold Faithful model we estimate the maximal velocity of ice grains, originating from water splashing in explosive boiling. We find that for water near the triple point this velocity is far too small to explain the observed plume properties. For the Frigid Faithful model we consider the problem of momentum transfer from gas to ice particles. It arises since any change in the direction of the gas flow in the cracks of the shell requires re-acceleration of the entrained grains. While this effect may explain the observed speed difference of gas and grains if the gas evaporates from triple point temperature (273.15 K) [Schmidt, J., et al., 2008. Formation of Enceladus dust plume. Nature 451, 685], the low temperatures of the Frigid Faithful model (˜140-170K) imply a too dilute vapor to support the observed high particle fluxes in Enceladus' plume.

  15. Quantitative Analysis of Shoot Development and Branching Patterns in Actinidia

    PubMed Central

    SELEZNYOVA, ALLA N.; THORP, T. GRANT; BARNETT, ANDREW M.; COSTES, EVELYNE

    2002-01-01

    We developed a framework for the quantitative description of Actinidia vine architecture, classifying shoots into three types (short, medium and long) corresponding to the modes of node number distribution and the presence/absence of neoformed nodes. Short and medium shoots were self‐terminated and had only preformed nodes. Based on the cut‐off point between their two modes of node number distribution, short shoots were defined as having nine or less nodes, and medium shoots as having more than nine nodes. Long shoots were non‐terminated and had a number of neoformed nodes; the total number of nodes per shoot was up to 90. Branching patterns for each parent shoot type were represented by a succession of branching zones. Probabilities of different types of axillary production (latent bud, short, medium or long shoot) and the distributions of length for each branching zone were estimated from experimental data using hidden semi‐Markov chain stochastic models. Branching was acrotonic on short and medium parent shoots, with most axillary shoots being located near the shoot tip. For long parent shoots, branching was mesotonic, with most long axillary shoots being located in the transition zone between the preformed and neoformed part of the parent shoot. Although the shoot classification is based on node number distribution there was a marked difference in average (per shoot) internode length between the shoot types, with mean values of 9, 27 and 47 mm for short, medium and long shoots, respectively. Bud and shoot development is discussed in terms of environmental controls. PMID:12096808

  16. Quantitative analysis of lymphangiogenic markers in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Parr, C; Jiang, W G

    2003-08-01

    Lymphatic spread of colorectal cancer cells to regional lymph nodes is one of the early events in metastatic cancer, and is often associated with distant metastatic spread and a poor prognosis. This study examined lymphangiogenic factors, and in particular a panel of newly discovered lymphangiogenic markers, in colorectal cancer tissues from a cohort of patients. Paired samples (background normal mucosa and cancer) of colon tissue were obtained from patients with colorectal cancer. The expression and levels of the VEGF-C and VEGF-D cytokines, the VEGF receptors VEGFR-2 and VEGFR-3, and newly described lymphatic endothelial markers, LYVE-1, Prox-1, podoplanin and 5'-nucleotidase were assessed. RNA was extracted from the frozen colon tissues. The level of expression for each factor/marker was determined using RT-PCR and quantified using a real-time quantitative PCR (RT-QPCR) technique, with respective cloned cDNA plasmids as internal standards. VEGF-D was expressed to a significantly higher degree in the colon tumour tissues. There was no significant difference between the expression levels for both VEGF-C and its receptor, VEGFR-2, in background and cancer tissues. However, levels of the VEGFR-3 receptor were found to be significantly higher in colon cancer than the normal background tissues. LYVE-1 levels were below detection in most cases. There was a significant increase in the degree of Prox-1 and 5'-nucleotidase expression in colon cancer tissue. Podoplanin expression was also increased in the cancer samples. These markers indicate an increase in lymphangiogenesis in colon cancer, and may therefore have prognostic value for colon cancer patients.

  17. Dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis for quantitative microcirculation research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Xiaoyou; Xiu, Rui-juan

    1994-05-01

    Based on analyses of various types of digital microcirculatory image (DMCI), we summed up the image features of DMCI, the digitizing demands for digital microcirculatory imaging, and the basic characteristics of the DMCI processing. A dynamic and still imaging separation processing (DSISP) mode was designed for developing a DMCI workstation and the DMCI processing. Original images in this study were clinical microcirculatory images from human finger nail-bed and conjunctiva microvasculature, and intravital microvascular network images from animal tissue or organs. A series of dynamic and still microcirculatory image analysis functions were developed in this study. The experimental results indicate most of the established analog video image analysis methods for microcirculatory measurement could be realized in a more flexible way based on the DMCI. More information can be rapidly extracted from the quality improved DMCI by employing intelligence digital image analysis methods. The DSISP mode is very suitable for building a DMCI workstation.

  18. Automated quantitative analysis of ventilation-perfusion lung scintigrams

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, G.H.; Vernon, P.; Seed, W.A.

    1984-05-01

    An automated computer analysis of ventilation (Kr-81m) and perfusion (Tc-99m) lung images has been devised that produces a graphical image of the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, and of ventilation-perfusion ratios. The analysis has overcome the following problems: the identification of the midline between two lungs and the lung boundaries, the exclusion of extrapulmonary radioactivity, the superimposition of lung images of different sizes, and the format for presentation of the data. Therefore, lung images of different sizes and shapes may be compared with each other. The analysis has been used to develop normal ranges from 55 volunteers. Comparison of younger and older age groups of men and women show small but significant differences in the distribution of ventilation and perfusion, but no differences in ventilation-perfusion ratios.

  19. Quantitative spectroscopy for the analysis of GOME data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chance, K.

    1997-01-01

    Accurate analysis of the global ozone monitoring experiment (GOME) data to obtain atmospheric constituents requires reliable, traceable spectroscopic parameters for atmospheric absorption and scattering. Results are summarized for research that includes: the re-determination of Rayleigh scattering cross sections and phase functions for the 200 nm to 1000 nm range; the analysis of solar spectra to obtain a high-resolution reference spectrum with excellent absolute vacuum wavelength calibration; Ring effect cross sections and phase functions determined directly from accurate molecular parameters of N2 and O2; O2 A band line intensities and pressure broadening coefficients; and the analysis of absolute accuracies for ultraviolet and visible absorption cross sections of O3 and other trace species measurable by GOME.

  20. Development of an apnea detection algorithm based on temporal analysis of thoracic respiratory effort signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dell'Aquila, C. R.; Cañadas, G. E.; Correa, L. S.; Laciar, E.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the design of an algorithm for detecting apnea episodes, based on analysis of thorax respiratory effort signal. Inspiration and expiration time, and range amplitude of respiratory cycle were evaluated. For range analysis the standard deviation statistical tool was used over respiratory signal temporal windows. The validity of its performance was carried out in 8 records of Apnea-ECG database that has annotations of apnea episodes. The results are: sensitivity (Se) 73%, specificity (Sp) 83%. These values can be improving eliminating artifact of signal records.

  1. Single radial immunodiffusion analysis for quantitation of colostral immunoglobulin concentration.

    PubMed

    Fleenor, W A; Stott, G H

    1981-05-01

    Relative accuracy of the single radial immunodiffusion technique to measure immunoglobulin concentrations of colostral preparations (whey, whole, or fat-free) has been assessed. Fresh colostrum samples were analyzed for major constituents. Gammaglobulin as a standard was compared to total immunoglobulin concentration derived from single radial immunodiffusion analysis of colostral preparations with no differences except between standard and whey. Differences were in part from either enhancement or interference of immunoglobulin diffusion by colostral constituents. Removal of casein and fat during whey preparations caused a concentrating effect upon immunoglobulin constituents resulting in exaggerated precipitin rings. Whey has produced unreliable results: therefore, whole colostrum is recommended for single radial immunodiffusion analysis.

  2. Temporal analysis of laser beam propagation in the atmosphere using computer-generated long phase screens.

    PubMed

    Dios, Federico; Recolons, Jaume; Rodríguez, Alejandro; Batet, Oscar

    2008-02-04

    Temporal analysis of the irradiance at the detector plane is intended as the first step in the study of the mean fade time in a free optical communication system. In the present work this analysis has been performed for a Gaussian laser beam propagating in the atmospheric turbulence by means of computer simulation. To this end, we have adapted a previously known numerical method to the generation of long phase screens. The screens are displaced in a transverse direction as the wave is propagated, in order to simulate the wind effect. The amplitude of the temporal covariance and its power spectrum have been obtained at the optical axis, at the beam centroid and at a certain distance from these two points. Results have been worked out for weak, moderate and strong turbulence regimes and when possible they have been compared with theoretical models. These results show a significant contribution of beam wander to the temporal behaviour of the irradiance, even in the case of weak turbulence. We have also found that the spectral bandwidth of the covariance is hardly dependent on the Rytov variance.

  3. Temporal changes in cytoskeletal organisation within isolated chondrocytes quantified using a novel image analysis technique.

    PubMed

    Knight, M M; Idowu, B D; Lee, D A; Bader, D L

    2001-05-01

    This paper examines temporal changes in the organisation of the cytoskeleton within isolated articular chondrocytes cultured for up to 7 days in agarose constructs. Fluorescent labelling and confocal microscopy were employed to visualise microtubules (MT), vimentin intermediate filaments (VIF) and actin microfilaments (AMF). To quantify the degree of cytoskeletal organisation within populations of cells, a novel image analysis technique has been developed and fully characterised. Organisation was quantified in terms of an Edge Index, which reflects the density of 'edges' present within the confocal images as defined by a Sobel digital filter. This parameter was shown to be independent of image intensity and, for all three cytoskeletal components, was validated statistically against a visual assessment of organisation. Both MT and VIF exhibited fibrous networks extending throughout the cytoplasm, while AMF appeared as punctate units associated with the cell membrane. The use of the Edge Index parameter revealed statistical significant temporal variation, in particular associated with VIF and AMF. These findings indicate the possibility of cytoskeletal mediated temporal variation in many aspects of cell behaviour following isolation from the intact tissue. Furthermore, the image analysis techniques are likely to be useful for future studies aiming to quantify changes in cytoskeletal organisation.

  4. Numerical simulation for optimization of temporal gatings in Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamashita, Rodrigo K.; Hotate, Kazuo

    2013-05-01

    Brillouin sensors have the potential to measure strain or temperature distribution along the optical fiber, by determination of the Brillouin frequency shift (BFS). The Brillouin optical correlation domain analysis (BOCDA) is an important technique in Brillouin sensors, having great spatial resolution over a restricted measurement range, comparing to other systems, such as the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA). To elongate the restricted measurement range, temporal gating techniques have been proposed and demonstrated, but the influence of these techniques on the performance of the BOCDA system or the parameter requirement for system optimization have not been investigated. In this report, we first determine a simulation method to calculate the BOCDA output with temporal gatings and find out that the phase relation between the gating pulses and the sinusoidal frequency modulation (FM) may change the system output. Although that influence can be neglected for most cases, the phase optimization can make the system output approach the ideal case that the temporal gating is not being applied. Finally, calculations of system output for different gating pulse lengths are held, showing that the pulse length does not have to strictly match one period of the sinusoidal FM of the laser source.

  5. Field-Based High-Throughput Plant Phenotyping Reveals the Temporal Patterns of Quantitative Trait Loci Associated with Stress-Responsive Traits in Cotton

    PubMed Central

    Pauli, Duke; Andrade-Sanchez, Pedro; Carmo-Silva, A. Elizabete; Gazave, Elodie; French, Andrew N.; Heun, John; Hunsaker, Douglas J.; Lipka, Alexander E.; Setter, Tim L.; Strand, Robert J.; Thorp, Kelly R.; Wang, Sam; White, Jeffrey W.; Gore, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of high-throughput plant phenotyping (HTPP) to continuously study plant populations under relevant growing conditions creates the possibility to more efficiently dissect the genetic basis of dynamic adaptive traits. Toward this end, we employed a field-based HTPP system that deployed sets of sensors to simultaneously measure canopy temperature, reflectance, and height on a cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) recombinant inbred line mapping population. The evaluation trials were conducted under well-watered and water-limited conditions in a replicated field experiment at a hot, arid location in central Arizona, with trait measurements taken at different times on multiple days across 2010–2012. Canopy temperature, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), height, and leaf area index (LAI) displayed moderate-to-high broad-sense heritabilities, as well as varied interactions among genotypes with water regime and time of day. Distinct temporal patterns of quantitative trait loci (QTL) expression were mostly observed for canopy temperature and NDVI, and varied across plant developmental stages. In addition, the strength of correlation between HTPP canopy traits and agronomic traits, such as lint yield, displayed a time-dependent relationship. We also found that the genomic position of some QTL controlling HTPP canopy traits were shared with those of QTL identified for agronomic and physiological traits. This work demonstrates the novel use of a field-based HTPP system to study the genetic basis of stress-adaptive traits in cotton, and these results have the potential to facilitate the development of stress-resilient cotton cultivars. PMID:26818078

  6. EXPLoRA-web: linkage analysis of quantitative trait loci using bulk segregant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pulido-Tamayo, Sergio; Duitama, Jorge; Marchal, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    Identification of genomic regions associated with a phenotype of interest is a fundamental step toward solving questions in biology and improving industrial research. Bulk segregant analysis (BSA) combined with high-throughput sequencing is a technique to efficiently identify these genomic regions associated with a trait of interest. However, distinguishing true from spuriously linked genomic regions and accurately delineating the genomic positions of these truly linked regions requires the use of complex statistical models currently implemented in software tools that are generally difficult to operate for non-expert users. To facilitate the exploration and analysis of data generated by bulked segregant analysis, we present EXPLoRA-web, a web service wrapped around our previously published algorithm EXPLoRA, which exploits linkage disequilibrium to increase the power and accuracy of quantitative trait loci identification in BSA analysis. EXPLoRA-web provides a user friendly interface that enables easy data upload and parallel processing of different parameter configurations. Results are provided graphically and as BED file and/or text file and the input is expected in widely used formats, enabling straightforward BSA data analysis. The web server is available at http://bioinformatics.intec.ugent.be/explora-web/. PMID:27105844

  7. Regression Commonality Analysis: A Technique for Quantitative Theory Building

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nimon, Kim; Reio, Thomas G., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    When it comes to multiple linear regression analysis (MLR), it is common for social and behavioral science researchers to rely predominately on beta weights when evaluating how predictors contribute to a regression model. Presenting an underutilized statistical technique, this article describes how organizational researchers can use commonality…

  8. Reflectance spectroscopy: quantitative analysis techniques for remote sensing applications.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, R.N.; Roush, T.L.

    1984-01-01

    Several methods for the analysis of remotely sensed reflectance data are compared, including empirical methods and scattering theories, both of which are important for solving remote sensing problems. The concept of the photon mean path length and the implications for use in modeling reflectance spectra are presented.-from Authors

  9. Identification and quantitative analysis of tissue particulate burden.

    PubMed

    Abraham, J L

    1984-01-01

    The analysis of particles in tissue samples, especially in lung tissue samples, has been of great use diagnostically and in the search for more precise information on the etiology of occupational/environmental diseases. There is a strong need for an interdisciplinary approach involving patients, epidemiologists, clinicians, pathologists, toxicologists, and microscopists if advancement in the recognition, diagnosis, and prevention of disease is to proceed.

  10. Quantitative analysis of cell migration using optical flow.

    PubMed

    Boric, Katica; Orio, Patricio; Viéville, Thierry; Whitlock, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Neural crest cells exhibit dramatic migration behaviors as they populate their distant targets. Using a line of zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (sox10:EGFP) in neural crest cells we developed an assay to analyze and quantify cell migration as a population, and use it here to characterize in detail the subtle defects in cell migration caused by ethanol exposure during early development. The challenge was to quantify changes in the in vivo migration of all Sox10:EGFP expressing cells in the visual field of time-lapse movies. To perform this analysis we used an Optical Flow algorithm for motion detection and combined the analysis with a fit to an affine transformation. Through this analysis we detected and quantified significant differences in the cell migrations of Sox10:EGFP positive cranial neural crest populations in ethanol treated versus untreated embryos. Specifically, treatment affected migration by increasing the left-right asymmetry of the migrating cells and by altering the direction of cell movements. Thus, by applying this novel computational analysis, we were able to quantify the movements of populations of cells, allowing us to detect subtle changes in cell behaviors. Because cranial neural crest cells contribute to the formation of the frontal mass these subtle differences may underlie commonly observed facial asymmetries in normal human populations.

  11. Efficacy of Rational-Emotive Therapy: A Quantitative Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engels, Gemma I.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Meta-analysis of 28 controlled studies on rational-emotive therapy (RET) showed RET superior to placebo and no treatment, but equally effective in comparison with treatments such as combination therapies and systematic desensitization. No support was found for view that RET with main or balanced emphasis on behavioral techniques is more…

  12. Geographic boundary analysis in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology: Perspective and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Jacquez, Geoffrey M.

    2010-01-01

    Geographic boundary analysis is a relatively new approach that is just beginning to be applied in spatial and spatio-temporal epidemiology to quantify spatial variation in health outcomes, predictors and correlates; generate and test epidemiologic hypotheses; to evaluate health-environment relationships; and to guide sampling design. Geographic boundaries are zones of rapid change in the value of a spatially distributed variable, and mathematically may be defined as those locations with a large second derivative of the spatial response surface. Here we introduce a pattern analysis framework based on Value, Change and Association questions, and boundary analysis is shown to fit logically into Change and Association paradigms. This article addresses fundamental questions regarding what boundary analysis can tell us in public health and epidemiology. It explains why boundaries are of interest, illustrates analysis approaches and limitations, and concludes with prospects and future research directions. PMID:21218153

  13. Spatio-temporal registration in multiplane MRI acquisitions for 3D colon motiliy analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Oliver; Kirchhoff, Sonja; Berkovich, Marina; Reiser, Maximilian; Navab, Nassir

    2008-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel method for analyzing and visualizing dynamic peristaltic motion of the colon in 3D from two series of differently oriented 2D MRI images. To this end, we have defined an MRI examination protocol, and introduced methods for spatio-temporal alignment of the two MRI image series into a common reference. This represents the main contribution of this paper, which enables the 3D analysis of peristaltic motion. The objective is to provide a detailed insight into this complex motion, aiding in the diagnosis and characterization of colon motion disorders. We have applied the proposed spatio-temporal method on Cine MRI data sets of healthy volunteers. The results have been inspected and validated by an expert radiologist. Segmentation and cylindrical approximation of the colon results in a 4D visualization of the peristaltic motion.

  14. Mass Spectrometric Analysis of Spatio-Temporal Dynamics of Crustacean Neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    OuYang, Chuanzi; Liang, Zhidan; Li, Lingjun

    2014-01-01

    Neuropeptides represent one of the largest classes of signaling molecules used by nervous systems to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Over the past several years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategies have revolutionized the discovery of neuropeptides in numerous model organisms, especially in decapod crustaceans. Here, we focus our discussion on recent advances in the use of MS-based techniques to map neuropeptides in spatial domain and monitoring their dynamic changes in temporal domain. These MS-enabled investigations provide valuable information about the distribution, secretion and potential function of neuropeptides with high molecular specificity and sensitivity. In situ MS imaging and in vivo microdialysis are highlighted as key technologies for probing spatio-temporal dynamics of neuropeptides in the crustacean nervous system. This review summarizes the latest advancement in MS-based methodologies for neuropeptide analysis including typical workflow and sample preparation strategies as well as major neuropeptide families discovered in decapod crustaceans. PMID:25448012

  15. Analysis of spatial-temporal converters for all-optical communication links.

    PubMed

    Marom, D M; Sun, P C; Fainman, Y

    1998-05-10

    We analyze parallel-to-serial transmitters and serial-to-parallel receivers that use ultrashort optical pulses to increase the bandwidth of a fiber-optic communication link. This method relies on real-time holographic material for conversion of information between spatial and temporal frequencies. The analysis reveals that the temporal output of the pulses will consist of chirped pulses, which has been verified experimentally. When the signal pulses are transmitted along with a reference pulse, the distortions of the received signal, caused by dispersion and other factors in the fiber, are canceled because of the phase-conjugation property of the receiver. This self-referencing scheme simplifies the receiver structure and ensures perfect timing for the serial-to-parallel conversion.

  16. Quantitative histology analysis of the ovarian tumour microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lan, Chunyan; Heindl, Andreas; Huang, Xin; Xi, Shaoyan; Banerjee, Susana; Liu, Jihong; Yuan, Yinyin

    2015-01-01

    Concerted efforts in genomic studies examining RNA transcription and DNA methylation patterns have revealed profound insights in prognostic ovarian cancer subtypes. On the other hand, abundant histology slides have been generated to date, yet their uses remain very limited and largely qualitative. Our goal is to develop automated histology analysis as an alternative subtyping technology for ovarian cancer that is cost-efficient and does not rely on DNA quality. We developed an automated system for scoring primary tumour sections of 91 late-stage ovarian cancer to identify single cells. We demonstrated high accuracy of our system based on expert pathologists’ scores (cancer = 97.1%, stromal = 89.1%) as well as compared to immunohistochemistry scoring (correlation = 0.87). The percentage of stromal cells in all cells is significantly associated with poor overall survival after controlling for clinical parameters including debulking status and age (multivariate analysis p = 0.0021, HR = 2.54, CI = 1.40–4.60) and progression-free survival (multivariate analysis p = 0.022, HR = 1.75, CI = 1.09–2.82). We demonstrate how automated image analysis enables objective quantification of microenvironmental composition of ovarian tumours. Our analysis reveals a strong effect of the tumour microenvironment on ovarian cancer progression and highlights the potential of therapeutic interventions that target the stromal compartment or cancer-stroma signalling in the stroma-high, late-stage ovarian cancer subset. PMID:26573438

  17. A quantitative analysis of fish consumption and stroke risk.

    PubMed

    Bouzan, Colleen; Cohen, Joshua T; Connor, William E; Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Gray, George M; König, Ariane; Lawrence, Robert S; Savitz, David A; Teutsch, Steven M

    2005-11-01

    Although a rich source of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) that may confer multiple health benefits, some fish contain methyl mercury (MeHg), which may harm the developing fetus. U.S. government recommendations for women of childbearing age are to modify consumption of high-MeHg fish to reduce MeHg exposure, while recommendations encourage fish consumption among the general population because of the nutritional benefits. The Harvard Center for Risk Analysis convened an expert panel (see acknowledgements) to quantify the net impact of resulting hypothetical changes in fish consumption across the population. This paper estimates the impact of fish consumption on stroke risk. Other papers quantify coronary heart disease mortality risk and the impacts of both prenatal MeHg exposure and maternal intake of n-3 PUFAs on cognitive development. This analysis identified articles in a recent qualitative literature review that are appropriate for the development of a dose-response relationship between fish consumption and stroke risk. Studies had to satisfy quality criteria, quantify fish intake, and report the precision of the relative risk estimates. The analysis combined the relative risk results, weighting each proportionately to its precision. Six studies were identified as appropriate for inclusion in this analysis, including five prospective cohort studies and one case-control study (total of 24 exposure groups). Our analysis indicates that any fish consumption confers substantial relative risk reduction compared to no fish consumption (12% for the linear model), with the possibility that additional consumption confers incremental benefits (central estimate of 2.0% per serving per week).

  18. Fast multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition for the analysis of big spatio-temporal datasets

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhaohua; Feng, Jiaxin; Qiao, Fangli; Tan, Zhe-Min

    2016-01-01

    In this big data era, it is more urgent than ever to solve two major issues: (i) fast data transmission methods that can facilitate access to data from non-local sources and (ii) fast and efficient data analysis methods that can reveal the key information from the available data for particular purposes. Although approaches in different fields to address these two questions may differ significantly, the common part must involve data compression techniques and a fast algorithm. This paper introduces the recently developed adaptive and spatio-temporally local analysis method, namely the fast multidimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD), for the analysis of a large spatio-temporal dataset. The original MEEMD uses ensemble empirical mode decomposition to decompose time series at each spatial grid and then pieces together the temporal–spatial evolution of climate variability and change on naturally separated timescales, which is computationally expensive. By taking advantage of the high efficiency of the expression using principal component analysis/empirical orthogonal function analysis for spatio-temporally coherent data, we design a lossy compression method for climate data to facilitate its non-local transmission. We also explain the basic principles behind the fast MEEMD through decomposing principal components instead of original grid-wise time series to speed up computation of MEEMD. Using a typical climate dataset as an example, we demonstrate that our newly designed methods can (i) compress data with a compression rate of one to two orders; and (ii) speed-up the MEEMD algorithm by one to two orders. PMID:26953173

  19. Quantitative full time course analysis of nonlinear enzyme cycling kinetics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenxiang; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2013-01-01

    Enzyme inhibition due to the reversible binding of reaction products is common and underlies the origins of negative feedback inhibition in many metabolic and signaling pathways. Product inhibition generates non-linearity in steady-state time courses of enzyme activity, which limits the utility of well-established enzymology approaches developed under the assumption of irreversible product release. For more than a century, numerous attempts to find a mathematical solution for analysis of kinetic time courses with product inhibition have been put forth. However, no practical general method capable of extracting common enzymatic parameters from such non-linear time courses has been successfully developed. Here we present a simple and practical method of analysis capable of efficiently extracting steady-state enzyme kinetic parameters and product binding constants from non-linear kinetic time courses with product inhibition and/or substrate depletion. The method is general and applicable to all enzyme systems, independent of reaction schemes and pathways.

  20. Efficacy of rational-emotive therapy: a quantitative analysis.

    PubMed

    Engels, G I; Garnefski, N; Diekstra, R F

    1993-12-01

    Meta-analysis of 28 controlled studies on the efficacy of rational-emotive therapy (RET) showed RET to be superior to placebo and no treatment but equally effective in comparison with other types of treatment such as combination therapies and systematic desensitization. No support was found for the view that RET with a main or balanced emphasis on behavioral techniques is more efficacious than RET with a primarily or exclusively cognitive approach. However, given the heterogeneity of the set of studies and its relatively small sample size, interpretations of results have to be made with caution, particularly because evidence was found for a relationship between study characteristics and magnitude of effect size. For the sake of meta-analysis, outcome studies should be required to report at least the means and standard deviations for all experimental groups.

  1. African Primary Care Research: quantitative analysis and presentation of results.

    PubMed

    Mash, Bob; Ogunbanjo, Gboyega A

    2014-06-06

    This article is part of a series on Primary Care Research Methods. The article describes types of continuous and categorical data, how to capture data in a spreadsheet, how to use descriptive and inferential statistics and, finally, gives advice on how to present the results in text, figures and tables. The article intends to help Master's level students with writing the data analysis section of their research proposal and presenting their results in their final research report.

  2. [Quantitative image analysis in pulmonary pathology - digitalization of preneoplastic lesions in human bronchial epithelium (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Steinbach, T; Müller, K M; Kämper, H

    1979-01-01

    The report concerns the first phase of a quantitative study of normal and abnormal bronchial epithelium with the objective of establishing the digitalization of histologic patterns. Preparative methods, data collecting and handling, and further mathematical analysis are described. In cluster and discriminatory analysis the digitalized histologic features can be used to separate and classify the individual cases into the respective diagnostic groups.

  3. Digitally Enhanced Thin-Layer Chromatography: An Inexpensive, New Technique for Qualitative and Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Amber Victoria Irish

    2007-01-01

    A study conducted shows that if digital photography is combined with regular thin-layer chromatography (TLC), it could perform highly improved qualitative analysis as well as make accurate quantitative analysis possible for a much lower cost than commercial equipment. The findings suggest that digitally enhanced TLC (DE-TLC) is low-cost and easy…

  4. Kinetic Analysis of Amylase Using Quantitative Benedict's and Iodine Starch Reagents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Beverly; Lunday, Deborah; Miskevich, Frank

    2008-01-01

    Quantitative analysis of carbohydrates is a fundamental analytical tool used in many aspects of biology and chemistry. We have adapted a technique developed by Mathews et al. using an inexpensive scanner and open-source image analysis software to quantify amylase activity using both the breakdown of starch and the appearance of glucose. Breakdown…

  5. Revisiting the quantitative features of surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Yi; Lee, Kai-Chieh; Kuo, Yen-Ling; Chen, Yu-Chie

    2016-10-28

    Surface-assisted laser desorption/ionization (SALDI) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) is frequently used to analyse small organics owing to its clean background. Inorganic materials can be used as energy absorbers and the transfer medium to facilitate the desorption/ionization of analytes; thus, they are used as SALDI-assisting materials. Many studies have demonstrated the usefulness of SALDI-MS in quantitative analysis of small organics. However, some characteristics occurring in SALDI-MS require certain attention to ensure the reliability of the quantitative analysis results. The appearance of a coffee-ring effect in SALDI sample preparation is the primary factor that can affect quantitative SALDI-MS analysis results. However, to the best of our knowledge, there are no reports relating to quantitative SALDI-MS analysis that discuss or consider this effect. In this study, the coffee-ring effect is discussed using nanoparticles and nanostructured substrates as SALDI-assisting materials to show how this effect influences SALDI-MS analysis results. Potential solutions for overcoming the existing problems are also suggested.This article is part of the themed issue 'Quantitative mass spectrometry'.

  6. [Study on the multivariate quantitative analysis method for steel alloy elements using LIBS].

    PubMed

    Gu, Yan-hong; Li, Ying; Tian, Ye; Lu, Yuan

    2014-08-01

    Quantitative analysis of steel alloys was carried out using laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) taking into account the complex matrix effects in steel alloy samples. The laser induced plasma was generated by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and repeated frequency of 10 Hz. The LIBS signal was coupled to the echelle spectrometer and recorded by a high sensitive ICCD detector. To get the best experimental conditions, some parameters, such as the detection delay, the CCDs integral gate width and the detecting position from the sample surface, were optimized. The experimental results showed that the optimum detection delay time was 1.5 micros, the optimal CCDs integral gate width was 2 micros and the best detecting position was 1.5 mm below the alloy sample's surface. The samples used in the experiments are ten standard steel alloy samples and two unknown steel alloy samples. The quantitative analysis was investigated with the optimum experimental parameters. Elements Cr and Ni in steel alloy samples were taken as the detection targets. The analysis was carried out with the methods based on conditional univariate quantitative analysis, multiple linear regression and partial least squares (PLS) respectively. It turned out that the correlation coefficients of calibration curves are not very high in the conditional univariate calibration method. The analysis results were obtained with the unsatisfied relative errors for the two predicted samples. So the con- ditional univariate quantitative analysis method can't effectively serve the quantitative analysis purpose for multi-components and complex matrix steel alloy samples. And with multiple linear regression method, the analysis accuracy was improved effectively. The method based on partial least squares (PLS) turned out to be the best method among all the three quantitative analysis methods applied. Based on PLS, the correlation coefficient of calibration curve for Cr is 0

  7. Mapping land cover gradients through analysis of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Amjad; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Skidmore, A. K.; Scarrott, R. G.; Hamad, Amina; Venus, V.; Lymberakis, Petros

    2013-08-01

    The green cover of the earth exhibits various spatial gradients that represent gradual changes in space of vegetation density and/or in species composition. To date, land cover mapping methods differentiate at best, mapping units with different cover densities and/or species compositions, but typically fail to express such differences as gradients. Present interpretation techniques still make insufficient use of freely available spatial-temporal Earth Observation (EO) data that allow detection of existing land cover gradients. This study explores the use of hyper-temporal NDVI imagery to detect and delineate land cover gradients analyzing the temporal behavior of NDVI values. MODIS-Terra MVC-images (250 m, 16-day) of Crete, Greece, from February 2000 to July 2009 are used. The analysis approach uses an ISODATA unsupervised classification in combination with a Hierarchical Clustering Analysis (HCA). Clustering of class-specific temporal NDVI profiles through HCA resulted in the identification of gradients in landcover vegetation growth patterns. The detected gradients were arranged in a relational diagram, and mapped. Three groups of NDVI-classes were evaluated by correlating their class-specific annual average NDVI values with the field data (tree, shrub, grass, bare soil, stone, litter fraction covers). Multiple regression analysis showed that within each NDVI group, the fraction cover data were linearly related with the NDVI data, while NDVI groups were significantly different with respect to tree cover (adj. R2 = 0.96), shrub cover (adj. R2 = 0.83), grass cover (adj. R2 = 0.71), bare soil (adj. R2 = 0.88), stone cover (adj. R2 = 0.83) and litter cover (adj. R2 = 0.69) fractions. Similarly, the mean Sorenson dissimilarity values were found high and significant at confidence interval of 95% in all pairs of three NDVI groups. The study demonstrates that hyper-temporal NDVI imagery can successfully detect and map land cover gradients. The results may improve land

  8. Some remarks on the quantitative analysis of behavior

    PubMed Central

    Marr, M. Jackson

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses similarities between the mathematization of operant behavior and the early history of the most mathematical of sciences—physics. Galileo explored the properties of motion without dealing with the causes of motion, focusing on changes in motion. Newton's dynamics were concerned with the action of forces as causes of change. Skinner's rationale for using rate to describe behavior derived from an interest in changes in rate. Reinforcement has played the role of force in the dynamics of behavior. Behavioral momentum and maximization have received mathematical formulations in behavior analysis. Yet to be worked out are the relations between molar and molecular formulations of behavioral theory. PMID:22478028

  9. Quantitative Computed Tomography and Image Analysis for Advanced Muscle Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Edmunds, Kyle Joseph; Gíslason, Magnus K.; Arnadottir, Iris D.; Marcante, Andrea; Piccione, Francesco; Gargiulo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Medical imaging is of particular interest in the field of translational myology, as extant literature describes the utilization of a wide variety of techniques to non-invasively recapitulate and quantity various internal and external tissue morphologies. In the clinical context, medical imaging remains a vital tool for diagnostics and investigative assessment. This review outlines the results from several investigations on the use of computed tomography (CT) and image analysis techniques to assess muscle conditions and degenerative process due to aging or pathological conditions. Herein, we detail the acquisition of spiral CT images and the use of advanced image analysis tools to characterize muscles in 2D and 3D. Results from these studies recapitulate changes in tissue composition within muscles, as visualized by the association of tissue types to specified Hounsfield Unit (HU) values for fat, loose connective tissue or atrophic muscle, and normal muscle, including fascia and tendon. We show how results from these analyses can be presented as both average HU values and compositions with respect to total muscle volumes, demonstrating the reliability of these tools to monitor, assess and characterize muscle degeneration. PMID:27478562

  10. Quantitative assessment of human body shape using Fourier analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friess, Martin; Rohlf, F. J.; Hsiao, Hongwei

    2004-04-01

    Fall protection harnesses are commonly used to reduce the number and severity of injuries. Increasing the efficiency of harness design requires the size and shape variation of the user population to be assessed as detailed and as accurately as possible. In light of the unsatisfactory performance of traditional anthropometry with respect to such assessments, we propose the use of 3D laser surface scans of whole bodies and the statistical analysis of elliptic Fourier coefficients. Ninety-eight male and female adults were scanned. Key features of each torso were extracted as a 3D curve along front, back and the thighs. A 3D extension of Elliptic Fourier analysis4 was used to quantify their shape through multivariate statistics. Shape change as a function of size (allometry) was predicted by regressing the coefficients onto stature, weight and hip circumference. Upper and lower limits of torso shape variation were determined and can be used to redefine the design of the harness that will fit most individual body shapes. Observed allometric changes are used for adjustments to the harness shape in each size. Finally, the estimated outline data were used as templates for a free-form deformation of the complete torso surface using NURBS models (non-uniform rational B-splines).

  11. The Ring-Barking Experiment: Analysis of Forest Vitality Using Multi-Temporal Hyperspectral Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichmuth, Anne; Bachmann, Martin; Heiden, Uta; Pinnel, Nicole; Holzwarth, Stefanie; Muller, Andreas; Henning, Lea; Einzmann, Kathrin; Immitzer, Markus; Seitz, Rudolf

    2016-08-01

    Through new operational optical spaceborne sensors (En- MAP and Sentinel-2) the impact analysis of climate change on forest ecosystems will be fostered. This analysis examines the potential of high spectral, spatial and temporal resolution data for detecting forest vegetation parameters, in particular Chlorophyll and Canopy Water content. The study site is a temperate spruce forest in Germany where in 2013 several trees were Ring-barked for a controlled die-off. During this experiment Ring- barked and Control trees were observed. Twelve airborne hyperspectral HySpex VNIR (Visible/Near Infrared) and SWIR (Shortwave Infrared) data with 1m spatial and 416 bands spectral resolution were acquired during the vegetation periods of 2013 and 2014. Additional laboratory spectral measurements of collected needle samples from Ring-barked and Control trees are available for needle level analysis. Index analysis of the laboratory measurements and image data are presented in this study.

  12. Quantitative analysis of facial paralysis using local binary patterns in biomedical videos.

    PubMed

    He, Shu; Soraghan, John J; O'Reilly, Brian F; Xing, Dongshan

    2009-07-01

    Facial paralysis is the loss of voluntary muscle movement of one side of the face. A quantitative, objective, and reliable assessment system would be an invaluable tool for clinicians treating patients with this condition. This paper presents a novel framework for objective measurement of facial paralysis. The motion information in the horizontal and vertical directions and the appearance features on the apex frames are extracted based on the local binary patterns (LBPs) on the temporal-spatial domain in each facial region. These features are temporally and spatially enhanced by the application of novel block processing schemes. A multiresolution extension of uniform LBP is proposed to efficiently combine the micropatterns and large-scale patterns into a feature vector. The symmetry of facial movements is measured by the resistor-average distance (RAD) between LBP features extracted from the two sides of the face. Support vector machine is applied to provide quantitative evaluation of facial paralysis based on the House-Brackmann (H-B) scale. The proposed method is validated by experiments with 197 subject videos, which demonstrates its accuracy and efficiency.

  13. [Quantitative analysis of seven phenolic acids in eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations by quantitative analysis of multi-components with single-marker].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun-jun; Zhang, Li; Guo, Qing; Kou, Jun-ping; Yu, Bo-yang; Gu, Dan-hua

    2015-04-01

    The study aims to develop a unified method to determine seven phenolic acids (neochlorogenic acid, chlorogenic acid, 4-caffeoylquinic acid, caffeic acid, isochlorogenic acid B, isochlorogenic acid A and isochlorogenic acid C) contained in honeysuckle flower that is the monarch drug of all the eight Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations using quantitative analysis of multi-components by single-marker (QAMS). Firstly, chlorogenic acid was used as a reference to get the average relative correction factors (RCFs) of the other phenolic acids in ratios to the reference; columns and instruments from different companies were used to validate the durability of the achieved RCFs in different levels of standard solutions; and honeysuckle flower extract was used as the reference substance to fix the positions of chromatographic peaks. Secondly, the contents of seven phenolic acids in eight different Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations samples were calculated based on the RCFs durability. Finally, the quantitative results were compared between QAMS and the external standard (ES) method. The results have showed that the durability of the achieved RCFs is good (RSD during 0.80% - 2.56%), and there are no differences between the quantitative results of QAMS and ES (the relative average deviation < 0.93%). So it can be successfully used to the quantitative control of honeysuckle flower principally prescribed in Yinqiao Jiedu serial preparations.

  14. Temporal clustering analysis of cerebral blood flow activation maps measured by laser speckle contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zheng; Luo, Qingming

    2004-05-01

    Temporal and spatial orchestration of neurovascular coupling in the brain neuronal activity is crucial for us to comprehend mechanism of functional cerebral metabolism and pathophysiology. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) through a thinned skull over the somatosensory cortex was utilized to map the spatiotemporal characteristics of local cerebral blood flow (CBF) in anesthetized rats during sciatic nerve stimulation. Since the time course of signals from all spatial loci among the massive dataset is hard to analyze, especially for the thousands of images each of which composes of millions of pixels, we introduced a temporal clustering analysis (TCA) method, which was proved as an efficient method to analyze functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data in the temporal domain. The timing and location of CBF activation showed that contralateral hindlimb sensory cortical microflow was activated to increase promptly in less than 1 s after the onset of 2 s electrical stimulation then evolved in different discrete regions. This pattern is similar but slightly elaborated to the results obtained from laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) and fMRI. We presented this combination to investigate interacting brain regions and provided network-level analyses, which might possibly lead to a better understanding of the nature of brain parcellation and effective connectivity.

  15. Exploring temporal and functional synchronization in integrating models: A sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belete, Getachew F.; Voinov, Alexey

    2016-05-01

    When integrating independently built models, we may encounter components that describe the same processes or groups of processes using different assumptions and formalizations. The time stepping in component models can also be very different depending upon the temporal resolution chosen. Even if this time stepping is handled outside of the components (as assumed by good practice of component building) the use of inappropriate temporal synchronization can produce either major run-time redundancy or loss of model accuracy. While components may need to be run asynchronously, finding the right times for them to communicate and exchange information becomes a challenge. We are illustrating this by experimenting with a couple of simple component models connected by means of Web services to explore how the timing of their input-output data exchange affects the performance of the overall integrated model. We have also considered how to best communicate information between components that use a different formalism for the same processes. Currently there are no generic recommendations for component synchronization but including sensitivity analysis for temporal and functional synchronization should be recommended as an essential part of integrated modeling.

  16. Insights into Primary Immune Deficiency from quantitative microscopy analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mace, Emily M.; Orange, Jordan S.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics based technology have resulted in an increase in our understanding of the molecular basis of many primary immune deficiencies. Along with this increased knowledge comes an increased responsibility to understand the underlying mechanism of disease, and thus increasingly sophisticated technologies are being used to investigate the cell biology of human immune deficiencies. One such technology, which has, itself, undergone a recent explosion in innovation, is that of high-resolution microscopy and image analysis. These advances complement innovative studies that have previously shed light on critical cell biological processes that are perturbed by single gene mutations in primary immune deficiency. Here, we highlight advances made specifically in the following cell biological processes: 1) cytoskeletal-related processes; 2) cell signaling; 3) intercellular trafficking; and 4) cellular host defense. PMID:26078103

  17. Digital photogrammetry for quantitative wear analysis of retrieved TKA components.

    PubMed

    Grochowsky, J C; Alaways, L W; Siskey, R; Most, E; Kurtz, S M

    2006-11-01

    The use of new materials in knee arthroplasty demands a way in which to accurately quantify wear in retrieved components. Methods such as damage scoring, coordinate measurement, and in vivo wear analysis have been used in the past. The limitations in these methods illustrate a need for a different methodology that can accurately quantify wear, which is relatively easy to perform and uses a minimal amount of expensive equipment. Off-the-shelf digital photogrammetry represents a potentially quick and easy alternative to what is readily available. Eighty tibial inserts were visually examined for front and backside wear and digitally photographed in the presence of two calibrated reference fields. All images were segmented (via manual and automated algorithms) using Adobe Photoshop and National Institute of Health ImageJ. Finally, wear was determined using ImageJ and Rhinoceros software. The absolute accuracy of the method and repeatability/reproducibility by different observers were measured in order to determine the uncertainty of wear measurements. To determine if variation in wear measurements was due to implant design, 35 implants of the three most prevalent designs were subjected to retrieval analysis. The overall accuracy of area measurements was 97.8%. The error in automated segmentation was found to be significantly lower than that of manual segmentation. The photogrammetry method was found to be reasonably accurate and repeatable in measuring 2-D areas and applicable to determining wear. There was no significant variation in uncertainty detected among different implant designs. Photogrammetry has a broad range of applicability since it is size- and design-independent. A minimal amount of off-the-shelf equipment is needed for the procedure and no proprietary knowledge of the implant is needed.

  18. Scalp Surgery: Quantitative Analysis of Follicular Unit Growth

    PubMed Central

    Caruana, Giorgia

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the years, different kinds of hair transplantation have been compared in an attempt to overcome male pattern alopecia and, at the same time, maximize both the survival and growth rate of grafted hair. In this study, we have assessed the survival and growth rate of follicular units (FU) in an in vitro model, as compared with that of conventional hair micrografts, to experimentally evaluate and elaborate on the differences between these 2 approaches in hair transplantation procedures. Methods: Group A (control; n = 100 follicles) was composed of hair micrografts, whereas FUs were assigned to Group B (experimental; n = 100 follicles, n = 35 FUs). Each group was cultured for a period of 10 days; the total stretch of follicles was measured soon after the harvest and 10 days later. The Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance on ranks test was used to perform statistical analysis. Results: The growth rate of follicles from Group A (mean 10-day shaft growth rate = 0.30 mm) proved to be statistically different compared with that of Group B (mean 10-day shaft growth rate = 0.23 mm). Conversely, our data did not show any significant difference between the survival rate of hair grafts from these 2 groups. Conclusions: Our data highlighted a reduced FU shaft growth compared with that of hair micrografts, corroborating, to a certain extent, the hypothesis that a significant amount of adipose tissue surrounding the follicle included in the graft may result in an inadequate nourishment supply to follicular cells. PMID:26579345

  19. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the brainstem following lethal sarin exposure.

    PubMed

    Meade, Mitchell L; Hoffmann, Andrea; Makley, Meghan K; Snider, Thomas H; Schlager, John J; Gearhart, Jeffery M

    2015-06-22

    The brainstem represents a major tissue area affected by sarin organophosphate poisoning due to its function in respiratory and cardiovascular control. While the acute toxic effects of sarin on brainstem-related responses are relatively unknown, other brain areas e.g., cortex or cerebellum, have been studied more extensively. The study objective was to analyze the guinea pig brainstem toxicology response following sarin (2×LD50) exposure by proteome pathway analysis to gain insight into the complex regulatory mechanisms that lead to impairment of respiratory and cardiovascular control. Guinea pig exposure to sarin resulted in the typical acute behavior/physiology outcomes with death between 15 and 25min. In addition, brain and blood acetylcholinesterase activity was significantly reduced in the presence of sarin to 95%, and 89%, respectively, of control values. Isobaric-tagged (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) identified 198 total proteins of which 23% were upregulated, and 18% were downregulated following sarin exposure. Direct gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed a sarin-specific broad-spectrum proteomic profile including glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity, calcium overload, energy depletion responses, and compensatory carbohydrate metabolism, increases in ROS defense, DNA damage and chromatin remodeling, HSP response, targeted protein degradation (ubiquitination) and cell death response. With regards to the sarin-dependent effect on respiration, our study supports the potential interference of sarin with CO2/H(+) sensitive chemoreceptor neurons of the brainstem retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) that send excitatory glutamergic projections to the respiratory centers. In conclusion, this study gives insight into the brainstem broad-spectrum proteome following acute sarin exposure and the gained information will assist in the development of novel countermeasures.

  20. Enabling Quantitative Analysis in Ambient Ionization Mass Spectrometry: Internal Standard Coated Capillary Samplers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangjiang; Cooks, R. Graham; Ouyang, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    We describe a sampling method using glass capillaries for quantitative analysis of trace analytes in small volumes of complex mixtures (~1 μL) using ambient ionization mass spectrometry. The internal surface of a sampling glass capillary was coated with internal standard then used to draw liquid sample and so transfer both the analyte and internal standard in a single fixed volume onto a substrate for analysis. The internal standard was automatically mixed into the sample during this process and the volumes of the internal standard solution and sample are both fixed by the capillary volume. Precision in quantitation is insensitive to variations in length of the capillary, making the preparation of the sampling capillary simple and providing a robust sampling protocol. Significant improvements in quantitation accuracy were obtained for analysis of 1 μL samples using various ambient ionization methods. PMID:23731380

  1. Statistical shape analysis using 3D Poisson equation--A quantitatively validated approach.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yi; Bouix, Sylvain

    2016-05-01

    Statistical shape analysis has been an important area of research with applications in biology, anatomy, neuroscience, agriculture, paleontology, etc. Unfortunately, the proposed methods are rarely quantitatively evaluated, and as shown in recent studies, when they are evaluated, significant discrepancies exist in their outputs. In this work, we concentrate on the problem of finding the consistent location of deformation between two population of shapes. We propose a new shape analysis algorithm along with a framework to perform a quantitative evaluation of its performance. Specifically, the algorithm constructs a Signed Poisson Map (SPoM) by solving two Poisson equations on the volumetric shapes of arbitrary topology, and statistical analysis is then carried out on the SPoMs. The method is quantitatively evaluated on synthetic shapes and applied on real shape data sets in brain structures.

  2. Reliable Quantitative SERS Analysis Facilitated by Core-Shell Nanoparticles with Embedded Internal Standards.

    PubMed

    Shen, Wei; Lin, Xuan; Jiang, Chaoyang; Li, Chaoyu; Lin, Haixin; Huang, Jingtao; Wang, Shuo; Liu, Guokun; Yan, Xiaomei; Zhong, Qiling; Ren, Bin

    2015-06-15

    Quantitative analysis is a great challenge in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). Core-molecule-shell nanoparticles with two components in the molecular layer, a framework molecule to form the shell, and a probe molecule as a Raman internal standard, were rationally designed for quantitative SERS analysis. The signal of the embedded Raman probe provides effective feedback to correct the fluctuation of samples and measuring conditions. Meanwhile, target molecules with different affinities can be adsorbed onto the shell. The quantitative analysis of target molecules over a large concentration range has been demonstrated with a linear response of the relative SERS intensity versus the surface coverage, which has not been achieved by conventional SERS methods.

  3. Analysis of SAR and optical temporal signatures of grapevine over a heterogeneous vineyard landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loussert, P.; Baup, F.; Corgne, S.; Quénol, H.; Ortega, A.

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this work is to analyse grapevine temporal signatures over a viticultural landscape with remote sensing data in order to evaluate the impact of the perennial practices on optical and SAR signals. For this, the effects of different combinations of vineyard organisations on multi-temporal high and very high spatial resolution SAR and optical data have been analysed. The study area is located in Mendoza (Argentina). All the ground data were acquired during an experimental campaign performed in 2014-2015 over 153 vineyards (around 400ha). The data of the perennial practices were recorded over each of the 153 vineyards. The schedule of the annual practices were also provided over the all site. The grapevine phenological cycle was finally monitored on 14 fields through GLAI (Green Leaf Area index) estimation using hemispherical images and grapevine canopy height measurements. The satellite images dataset is composed of 6 Dual-Pol TerraSAR-X images, 5 Pleiades images, and 6 Landsat-8 images. After calibrating the images, backscattering coefficients and polarimetric parameters were extracted from Terrasar-X images (entropy and alpha angle) and the NDVI from optical images. The analysis of the temporal signatures regarding perennial practices revealed a strong impact of the inter-row spacing management. Ranges of values of backscattering coefficients differ with the type of management but their temporal variation seems to be linked to soil moisture changes. Depending on the roughness of the inter-row spacing the alpha angle evolution is linked to grapevine growth in the case of a chemically weeded inter-row spacing. But it remains at high values when the inter-row spacing is ploughed or grassed. In those cases, the entropy increases along the growth cycle. The vegetation indexes series are increasing with the grapevine growth depending on canopy width and soil management. Thus this work highlighted the variability of the SAR and optical signals due to

  4. Analysis of the Temporal Dynamics of Model Performance for Hydrological Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, D. E.; Blume, T.; Schaefli, B.; Zehe, E.

    2008-12-01

    The temporal dynamics of hydrological model performance gives insights into errors that cannot be obtained from global performance measures assigning a single number to the fit of a simulated time series to an observed reference series. These errors can include errors in in data, model parameters, or model structure. Dealing with a set of performance measures evaluated at a high temporal resolution implies analyzing and interpreting a high dimensional data set. We present a method for such a hydrological model performance assessment with a high temporal resolution and illustrate its application for two very different rainfall-runoff modeling case studies. The first is the Wilde Weisseritz case study, a headwater catchment in the eastern Ore Mountains, simulated with the conceptual model WaSiM-ETH. The second is the Malalcahuello case study, a headwater catchment in the Chilean Andes, simulated with the physics-based model Catflow. The proposed time-resolved performance assessment starts with the computation of a large set of classically used performance measures for a moving window. The key of the developed approach is a data-reduction method based on self-organizing maps (SOMs) and cluster analysis to classify the high-dimensional performance matrix. Synthetic peak errors are used to interpret the resulting error classes. The final outcome of the proposed method is a time series of the occurrence of dominant error types. For the two case studies analyzed here, 6 such error types have been identified. They show clear temporal patterns which can lead to the identification of model structural errors.

  5. Performance evaluation of spatio-temporal multi-resolution analysis with deinterlacer banks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Takuma; Muramatsu, Shogo; Kitagawa, Daisuke; Uchita, Jun; Hiki, Minoru; Kikuchi, Hisakazu

    2005-07-01

    In this work, hierarchical motion compensated three-dimensional (3-D) filter banks for spatio-temporal multi-resoution analysis are presented as new tools for scalable video format control. For recent developments in scalable video coding, most of them are based on 3-D wavelet transform with motion compensation. To achieve the function of frame-rate and spatial resolution scalabilities, motion compensated temporal filtering (MCTF) through lifting wavelet transform currently attracts many researchers as an effective temporal decomposition tool. As previous works, we proposed single stage deinterlacer banks as novel 3-D filter banks. Unlike other filter banks, our proposed system is constructed in a way unique to multi-dimensional systems by using invertible deinterlacers, which we have proposed before. The single stage deinterlacer banks decompose a progressive video into two subband sequences of a half frame-rate in the progressive scanning manner. Even though the system handles interlaced videos as intermediate data, introducing a multistage decomposition is simply achieved because the output sequences have also the progressive format as like the input. Our proposed hierarchical deinterlacer banks are accompanied by 2-D discrete wavelet transforms (DWT) as spatial transforms. The multistage technique provides interlaced sequences as well as several reduced-rate progressive sequences while maintaining the reconstruction of the original full-resolution full-rate video sequence. We show that fine granular control of spatio-temporal resolution can be acchieved through the hierarchical process. Some experimental results show novel functions and the significance of the proposed filter banks.

  6. Segmentation of vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3D microscopy images and quantitative analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Jian; Yang, Lin; Kamocka, Malgorzata M.; Zollman, Amy L.; Carlesso, Nadia; Chen, Danny Z.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, we present image processing methods for quantitative study of how the bone marrow microenvironment changes (characterized by altered vascular structure and hematopoietic cell distribution) caused by diseases or various factors. We develop algorithms that automatically segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells in 3-D microscopy images, perform quantitative analysis of the properties of the segmented vascular structures and cells, and examine how such properties change. In processing images, we apply local thresholding to segment vessels, and add post-processing steps to deal with imaging artifacts. We propose an improved watershed algorithm that relies on both intensity and shape information and can separate multiple overlapping cells better than common watershed methods. We then quantitatively compute various features of the vascular structures and hematopoietic cells, such as the branches and sizes of vessels and the distribution of cells. In analyzing vascular properties, we provide algorithms for pruning fake vessel segments and branches based on vessel skeletons. Our algorithms can segment vascular structures and hematopoietic cells with good quality. We use our methods to quantitatively examine the changes in the bone marrow microenvironment caused by the deletion of Notch pathway. Our quantitative analysis reveals property changes in samples with deleted Notch pathway. Our tool is useful for biologists to quantitatively measure changes in the bone marrow microenvironment, for developing possible therapeutic strategies to help the bone marrow microenvironment recovery.

  7. Direct Quantitative Analysis of Arsenic in Coal Fly Ash

    PubMed Central

    Hartuti, Sri; Kambara, Shinji; Takeyama, Akihiro; Kumabe, Kazuhiro; Moritomi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A rapid, simple method based on graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry is described for the direct determination of arsenic in coal fly ash. Solid samples were directly introduced into the atomizer without preliminary treatment. The direct analysis method was not always free of spectral matrix interference, but the stabilization of arsenic by adding palladium nitrate (chemical modifier) and the optimization of the parameters in the furnace program (temperature, rate of temperature increase, hold time, and argon gas flow) gave good results for the total arsenic determination. The optimal furnace program was determined by analyzing different concentrations of a reference material (NIST1633b), which showed the best linearity for calibration. The optimized parameters for the furnace programs for the ashing and atomization steps were as follows: temperatures of 500–1200 and 2150°C, heating rates of 100 and 500°C s−1, hold times of 90 and 7 s, and medium then maximum and medium argon gas flows, respectively. The calibration plots were linear with a correlation coefficient of 0.9699. This method was validated using arsenic-containing raw coal samples in accordance with the requirements of the mass balance calculation; the distribution rate of As in the fly ashes ranged from 101 to 119%. PMID:23251836

  8. Quantitative real-time single particle analysis of virions

    SciTech Connect

    Heider, Susanne; Metzner, Christoph

    2014-08-15

    Providing information about single virus particles has for a long time been mainly the domain of electron microscopy. More recently, technologies have been developed—or adapted from other fields, such as nanotechnology—to allow for the real-time quantification of physical virion particles, while supplying additional information such as particle diameter concomitantly. These technologies have progressed to the stage of commercialization increasing the speed of viral titer measurements from hours to minutes, thus providing a significant advantage for many aspects of virology research and biotechnology applications. Additional advantages lie in the broad spectrum of virus species that may be measured and the possibility to determine the ratio of infectious to total particles. A series of disadvantages remain associated with these technologies, such as a low specificity for viral particles. In this review we will discuss these technologies by comparing four systems for real-time single virus particle analysis and quantification. - Highlights: • We introduce four methods for virus particle-based quantification of viruses. • They allow for quantification of a wide range of samples in under an hour time. • The additional measurement of size and zeta potential is possible for some.

  9. Quantitative Analysis of the Microstructure of Auxetic Foams

    SciTech Connect

    Gaspar, N.; Smith, C.W.; Miller, E.A.; Seidler, G.T.; Evans, K.E.

    2008-07-28

    The auxetic foams first produced by Lakes have been modelled in a variety of ways, each model trying to reproduce some observed feature of the microscale of the foams. Such features include bent or broken ribs or inverted angles between ribs. These models can reproduce the Poisson's ratio or Poisson's function of auxetic foam if the model parameters are carefully chosen. However these model parameters may not actually reflect the internal structure of the foams. A big problem is that measurement of parameters such as lengths and angles is not straightforward within a 3-d sample. In this work a sample of auxetic foam has been imaged by 3-d X-ray computed tomography. The resulting image is translated to a form that emphasises the geometrical structure of connected ribs. This connected rib data are suitably analysed to describe both the microstructural construction of auxetic foams and the statistical spread of structure, that is, the heterogeneity of an auxetic foam. From the analysis of the microstructure, observations are made about the requirements for microstructural models and comparisons made to previous existing models. From the statistical data, measures of heterogeneity are made that will help with future modelling that includes the heterogeneous aspect of auxetic foams.

  10. Quantitative XPS analysis of silica-supported Cu Co oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cesar, Deborah V.; Peréz, Carlos A.; Schmal, Martin; Salim, Vera Maria M.

    2000-04-01

    Copper-cobalt oxides with Cu/Co=5:5, 15:15 and 35:35 bulk ratio have been prepared by deposition-precipitation method at constant pH from copper and cobalt nitrate solutions. Different oxides were obtained by decomposition of the precursors at 673 K for 7 h in air and analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). XRD data showed the formation of different oxide phases; for the bulk atomic ratio of 15Cu:15Co, a phase containing Cu and Co with spinel-like structure was observed, while the other bimetallic oxides presented CuO and Co 3O 4 as distinct phases. The XPS qualitative analysis has shown that all samples exhibited Cu 2+ and Co 3+ species at the surface. The Cu-Co spinel presented a displacement in Cu 2p binding energy value. A mathematical model was proposed from relative intensity ratios, which allowed the determination of the oxide particle thickness and the fraction of coverage at the support. This model described accurately the system and showed that cobalt improved the copper dispersion.

  11. Quantitative Analysis with Heavy Ion E-TOF ERD

    SciTech Connect

    Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.; Font, A. Climent

    1999-07-23

    Heavy ion TOF ERD combined with energy detection (E-TOF-ERD) is a powerful analytical technique taking advantage of the following facts: the scattering cross section is usually very high ({approximately}10{sup {minus}21} cm{sup 2}/sr) compared to regular He RBS ({approximately}10{sup {minus}25} cm{sup 2}/sr), contrary to what happens with the energy resolution in ordinary surface solid barrier detectors, time resolution is almost independent of the atomic mass of the detected element, and the detection in coincidence of time and energy signals allows for the mass separation of overlapping signals with the same energy (or time of flight). Measurements on several oxides have been performed with the E-TOF-ERD set up at Sandia National Laboratories using an incident beam of 10-15 MeV Au. The information on the composition of the sample is obtained from the time domain spectrum, which is converted to energy domain, and then, using existing software codes, the analysis is performed. During the quantification of the results, they have found problems related to the interaction of the beam with the sample and to the tabulated values of the stopping powers for heavy ions.

  12. Segmentation and learning in the quantitative analysis of microscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Christy; Ross, Amy; Porter, Reid

    2015-02-01

    In material science and bio-medical domains the quantity and quality of microscopy images is rapidly increasing and there is a great need to automatically detect, delineate and quantify particles, grains, cells, neurons and other functional "objects" within these images. These are challenging problems for image processing because of the variability in object appearance that inevitably arises in real world image acquisition and analysis. One of the most promising (and practical) ways to address these challenges is interactive image segmentation. These algorithms are designed to incorporate input from a human operator to tailor the segmentation method to the image at hand. Interactive image segmentation is now a key tool in a wide range of applications in microscopy and elsewhere. Historically, interactive image segmentation algorithms have tailored segmentation on an image-by-image basis, and information derived from operator input is not transferred between images. But recently there has been increasing interest to use machine learning in segmentation to provide interactive tools that accumulate and learn from the operator input over longer periods of time. These new learning algorithms reduce the need for operator input over time, and can potentially provide a more dynamic balance between customization and automation for different applications. This paper reviews the state of the art in this area, provides a unified view of these algorithms, and compares the segmentation performance of various design choices.

  13. Funtools: Fits Users Need Tools for Quick, Quantitative Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, Eric; Brederkamp, Joe (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Funtools project arose out of conversations with astronomers about the decline in their software development efforts over the past decade. A stated reason for this decline is that it takes too much effort to master one of the existing FITS libraries simply in order to write a few analysis programs. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that astronomers typically develop new programs only occasionally, and the long interval between coding efforts often necessitates re-learning the FITS interfaces. We therefore set ourselves the goal of developing a minimal buy-in FITS library for researchers who are occasional (but serious) coders. In this case, "minimal buy-in" meant "easy to learn, easy to use, and easy to re-learn next month". Based on conversations with astronomers interested in writing code, we concluded that this goal could be achieved by emphasizing two essential capabilities. The first was the ability to write FITS programs without knowing much about FITS, i.e., without having to deal with the arcane rules for generating a properly formatted FITS file. The second was to support the use of already-familiar C/Unix facilities, especially C structs and Unix stdio. Taken together, these two capabilities would allow researchers to leverage their existing programming expertise while minimizing the need to learn new and complex coding rules.

  14. Temporal uncertainty analysis of human errors based on interrelationships among multiple factors: a case of Minuteman III missile accident.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hao; Tian, Jin; Zhao, Tingdi

    2016-01-01

    In traditional approaches of human reliability assessment (HRA), the definition of the error producing conditions (EPCs) and the supporting guidance are such that some of the conditions (especially organizational or managerial conditions) can hardly be included, and thus the analysis is burdened with incomprehensiveness without reflecting the temporal trend of human reliability. A method based on system dynamics (SD), which highlights interrelationships among technical and organizational aspects that may contribute to human errors, is presented to facilitate quantitatively estimating the human error probability (HEP) and its related variables changing over time in a long period. Taking the Minuteman III missile accident in 2008 as a case, the proposed HRA method is applied to assess HEP during missile operations over 50 years by analyzing the interactions among the variables involved in human-related risks; also the critical factors are determined in terms of impact that the variables have on risks in different time periods. It is indicated that both technical and organizational aspects should be focused on to minimize human errors in a long run.

  15. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Micro Economic Activities in Rome Reveals Patterns of Mixed-Use Urban Evolution.

    PubMed

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Strano, Emanuele; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Porta, Sergio; Latora, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Understanding urban growth is one with understanding how society evolves to satisfy the needs of its individuals in sharing a common space and adapting to the territory. We propose here a quantitative analysis of the historical development of a large urban area by investigating the spatial distribution and the age of commercial activities in the whole city of Rome. We find that the age of activities of various categories presents a very interesting double exponential trend, with a transition possibly related to the long-term economical effects determined by the oil crisis of the Seventies. The diversification of commercial categories, studied through various measures of entropy, shows, among other interesting features, a saturating behaviour with the density of activities. Moreover, different couples of commercial categories exhibit over the years a tendency to attract in space. Our results demonstrate that the spatio-temporal distribution of commercial activities can provide important insights on the urbanisation processes at work, revealing specific and non trivial socio-economical dynamics, as the presence of crisis periods and expansion trends, and contributing to the characterisation of the maturity of urban areas.

  16. Temporal measurement and analysis of high-resolution spectral signatures of plants and relationships to biophysical characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Rebbman, Jan; Hall, Carlton; Provancha, Mark; Vieglais, David

    1995-11-01

    Measurements of temporal reflectance signatures as a function of growing season for sand live oak (Quercus geminata), myrtle oak (Q. myrtifolia, and saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) were collected during a two year study period. Canopy level spectral reflectance signatures, as a function of 252 channels between 368 and 1115 nm, were collected using near nadir viewing geometry and a consistent sun illumination angle. Leaf level reflectance measurements were made in the laboratory using a halogen light source and an environmental optics chamber with a barium sulfate reflectance coating. Spectral measurements were related to several biophysical measurements utilizing optimal passive ambient correlation spectroscopy (OPACS) technique. Biophysical parameters included percent moisture, water potential (MPa), total chlorophyll, and total Kjeldahl nitrogen. Quantitative data processing techniques were used to determine optimal bands based on the utilization of a second order derivative or inflection estimator. An optical cleanup procedure was then employed that computes the double inflection ratio (DIR) spectra for all possible three band combinations normalized to the previously computed optimal bands. These results demonstrate a unique approach to the analysis of high spectral resolution reflectance signatures for estimation of several biophysical measures of plants at the leaf and canopy level from optimally selected bands or bandwidths.

  17. Spatio-Temporal Analysis of Micro Economic Activities in Rome Reveals Patterns of Mixed-Use Urban Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Fiasconaro, Alessandro; Strano, Emanuele; Nicosia, Vincenzo; Porta, Sergio; Latora, Vito

    2016-01-01

    Understanding urban growth is one with understanding how society evolves to satisfy the needs of its individuals in sharing a common space and adapting to the territory. We propose here a quantitative analysis of the historical development of a large urban area by investigating the spatial distribution and the age of commercial activities in the whole city of Rome. We find that the age of activities of various categories presents a very interesting double exponential trend, with a transition possibly related to the long-term economical effects determined by the oil crisis of the Seventies. The diversification of commercial categories, studied through various measures of entropy, shows, among other interesting features, a saturating behaviour with the density of activities. Moreover, different couples of commercial categories exhibit over the years a tendency to attract in space. Our results demonstrate that the spatio-temporal distribution of commercial activities can provide important insights on the urbanisation processes at work, revealing specific and non trivial socio-economical dynamics, as the presence of crisis periods and expansion trends, and contributing to the characterisation of the maturity of urban areas. PMID:26982028

  18. Quantitative gas chromatographic analysis of volatile fatty acids in spent culture media and body fluids.

    PubMed Central

    van den Bogaard, A E; Hazen, M J; Van Boven, C P

    1986-01-01

    Gas chromatographic analysis of volatile fatty acids f