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Sample records for quantum chemistry

  1. Quantum computation for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-03-01

    Numerically exact simulation of quantum systems on classical computers is in general, an intractable computational problem. Computational chemists have made progress in the development of approximate methods to tackle complex chemical problems. The downside of these approximate methods is that their failure for certain important cases such as long-range charge transfer states in the case of traditional density functional theory. In 1982, Richard Feynman suggested that a quantum device should be able to simulate quantum systems (in our case, molecules) exactly using quantum computers in a tractable fashion. Our group has been working in the development of quantum chemistry algorithms for quantum devices. In this talk, I will describe how quantum computers can be employed to carry out numerically exact quantum chemistry and chemical reaction dynamics calculations, as well as molecular properties. Finally, I will describe our recent experimental quantum computation of the energy of the hydrogen molecule using an optical quantum computer.

  2. Computational quantum chemistry website

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-22

    This report contains the contents of a web page related to research on the development of quantum chemistry methods for computational thermochemistry and the application of quantum chemistry methods to problems in material chemistry and chemical sciences. Research programs highlighted include: Gaussian-2 theory; Density functional theory; Molecular sieve materials; Diamond thin-film growth from buckyball precursors; Electronic structure calculations on lithium polymer electrolytes; Long-distance electronic coupling in donor/acceptor molecules; and Computational studies of NOx reactions in radioactive waste storage.

  3. Quantum Computing for Quantum Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    random walks as the decoherence became strong. Recent experiments on photosynthetic light -harvesting complexes observed long-lived excitonic coherences...by the light -harvesting complex. In Environment-assisted quantum walks in energy transfer of photosynthetic complexes, J. Chem. Phys. 129 (2008...a decohered quantum walk. Motivated by the experiments on the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) light -harvesting complex of green sulfur bacteria, we

  4. Introducing Relativity into Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Wai-Kee; Blinder, S. M.

    2011-01-01

    It is not often realized by chemists that the special theory of relativity is behind several aspects of quantum chemistry. The Schrdinger equation itself is based on relations between space-time and energy-momentum four vectors. Electron spin is, of course, the most obvious manifestation of relativity. The chemistry of some heavy elements is…

  5. Remedial Mathematics for Quantum Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koopman, Lodewijk; Brouwer, Natasa; Heck, Andre; Buma, Wybren Jan

    2008-01-01

    Proper mathematical skills are important for every science course and mathematics-intensive chemistry courses rely on a sound mathematical pre-knowledge. In the first-year quantum chemistry course at this university, it was noticed that many students lack basic mathematical knowledge. To tackle the mathematics problem, a remedial mathematics…

  6. Quantum Chemistry via the Periodic Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinder, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an approach to quantum mechanics exploiting the periodic structure of the elements as a foundation for the quantum theory of matter. Indicates that a quantum chemistry course can be developed using this approach. (SK)

  7. Computing protein infrared spectroscopy with quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Besley, Nicholas A

    2007-12-15

    Quantum chemistry is a field of science that has undergone unprecedented advances in the last 50 years. From the pioneering work of Boys in the 1950s, quantum chemistry has evolved from being regarded as a specialized and esoteric discipline to a widely used tool that underpins much of the current research in chemistry today. This achievement was recognized with the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to John Pople and Walter Kohn. As the new millennium unfolds, quantum chemistry stands at the forefront of an exciting new era. Quantitative calculations on systems of the magnitude of proteins are becoming a realistic possibility, an achievement that would have been unimaginable to the early pioneers of quantum chemistry. In this article we will describe ongoing work towards this goal, focusing on the calculation of protein infrared amide bands directly with quantum chemical methods.

  8. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  9. Understanding Quantum Numbers in General Chemistry Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor; Fernandez, Ramon

    2008-01-01

    Quantum numbers and electron configurations form an important part of the general chemistry curriculum and textbooks. The objectives of this study are: (1) Elaboration of a framework based on the following aspects: (a) Origin of the quantum hypothesis, (b) Alternative interpretations of quantum mechanics, (c) Differentiation between an orbital and…

  10. A Quantum Chemistry Concept Inventory for Physical Chemistry Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick-Perez, Marilu; Luxford, Cynthia J.; Windus, Theresa L.; Holme, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    A 14-item, multiple-choice diagnostic assessment tool, the quantum chemistry concept inventory or QCCI, is presented. Items were developed based on published student misconceptions and content coverage and then piloted and used in advanced physical chemistry undergraduate courses. In addition to the instrument itself, data from both a pretest,…

  11. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  12. Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

  13. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.

  14. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  15. Adiabatic quantum simulation of quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-10-13

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Simulation of Quantum Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-01-01

    We show how to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm directly to the quantum computation of molecular properties. We describe a procedure to map electronic structure Hamiltonians to 2-body qubit Hamiltonians with a small set of physically realizable couplings. By combining the Bravyi-Kitaev construction to map fermions to qubits with perturbative gadgets to reduce the Hamiltonian to 2-body, we obtain precision requirements on the coupling strengths and a number of ancilla qubits that scale polynomially in the problem size. Hence our mapping is efficient. The required set of controllable interactions includes only two types of interaction beyond the Ising interactions required to apply the quantum adiabatic algorithm to combinatorial optimization problems. Our mapping may also be of interest to chemists directly as it defines a dictionary from electronic structure to spin Hamiltonians with physical interactions. PMID:25308187

  17. Algorithms Bridging Quantum Computation and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod Ryan

    The design of new materials and chemicals derived entirely from computation has long been a goal of computational chemistry, and the governing equation whose solution would permit this dream is known. Unfortunately, the exact solution to this equation has been far too expensive and clever approximations fail in critical situations. Quantum computers offer a novel solution to this problem. In this work, we develop not only new algorithms to use quantum computers to study hard problems in chemistry, but also explore how such algorithms can help us to better understand and improve our traditional approaches. In particular, we first introduce a new method, the variational quantum eigensolver, which is designed to maximally utilize the quantum resources available in a device to solve chemical problems. We apply this method in a real quantum photonic device in the lab to study the dissociation of the helium hydride (HeH+) molecule. We also enhance this methodology with architecture specific optimizations on ion trap computers and show how linear-scaling techniques from traditional quantum chemistry can be used to improve the outlook of similar algorithms on quantum computers. We then show how studying quantum algorithms such as these can be used to understand and enhance the development of classical algorithms. In particular we use a tool from adiabatic quantum computation, Feynman's Clock, to develop a new discrete time variational principle and further establish a connection between real-time quantum dynamics and ground state eigenvalue problems. We use these tools to develop two novel parallel-in-time quantum algorithms that outperform competitive algorithms as well as offer new insights into the connection between the fermion sign problem of ground states and the dynamical sign problem of quantum dynamics. Finally we use insights gained in the study of quantum circuits to explore a general notion of sparsity in many-body quantum systems. In particular we use

  18. Quantum theory and chemistry: Two propositions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aronowitz, S.

    1980-01-01

    Two propositions concerning quantum chemistry are proposed. First, it is proposed that the nonrelativistic Schroedinger equation, where the Hamiltonian operator is associated with an assemblage of nuclei and electrons, can never be arranged to yield specific molecules in the chemists' sense. It is argued that this result is a necessary condition if the Schroedinger has relevancy to chemistry. Second, once a system is in a particular state with regard to interactions among its components (the assemblage of nuclei and electrons), it cannot spontaneously eliminate any of those interactions. This leads to a subtle form of irreversibility.

  19. Quantum Chemistry, 5th Edition by Ira N. Levine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinde, Robert J.

    2000-12-01

    Of course, there is no one- or two-week shortcut by which nonspecialists can master enough quantum mechanics to become informed users of quantum chemical techniques. Nevertheless, a text that integrated the fundamentals of quantum theory with a rigorous introduction to quantum chemistry could help instructors design a class that would benefit both these nonspecialists and graduate students in physical chemistry. Could such a class overcome the (undeserved) stigma associated with the physical chemistry curriculum? That remains to be seen.

  20. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  1. Quantum Chemistry in Great Britain: Developing a Mathematical Framework for Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simões, Ana; Gavroglu, Kostas

    By 1935 quantum chemistry was already delineated as a distinct sub-discipline due to the contributions of Fritz London, Walter Heitler, Friedrich Hund, Erich Hückel, Robert Mulliken, Linus Pauling, John van Vleck and John Slater. These people are credited with showing that the application of quantum mechanics to the solution of chemical problems was, indeed, possible, especially so after the introduction of a number of new concepts and the adoption of certain approximation methods. And though a number of chemists had started talking of the formation of theoretical or, even, mathematical chemistry, a fully developed mathematical framework of quantum chemistry was still wanting. The work of three persons in particular-of John E. Lennard-Jones, Douglas R. Hartree, and Charles Alfred Coulson-has been absolutely crucial in the development of such a framework. In this paper we shall discuss the work of these three researchers who started their careers in the Cambridge tradition of mathematical physics and who at some point of their careers all became professors of applied mathematics. We shall argue that their work consisted of decisive contributions to the development of such a mathematical framework for quantum chemistry.

  2. First-principles quantum chemistry in the life sciences.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Tanja

    2004-12-15

    The area of computational quantum chemistry, which applies the principles of quantum mechanics to molecular and condensed systems, has developed drastically over the last decades, due to both increased computer power and the efficient implementation of quantum chemical methods in readily available computer programs. Because of this, accurate computational techniques can now be applied to much larger systems than before, bringing the area of biochemistry within the scope of electronic-structure quantum chemical methods. The rapid pace of progress of quantum chemistry makes it a very exciting research field; calculations that are too computationally expensive today may be feasible in a few months' time! This article reviews the current application of 'first-principles' quantum chemistry in biochemical and life sciences research, and discusses its future potential. The current capability of first-principles quantum chemistry is illustrated in a brief examination of computational studies on neurotransmitters, helical peptides, and DNA complexes.

  3. Experimental study of quantum simulation for quantum chemistry with a nuclear magnetic resonance simulator.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Nanyang; Xu, Boruo; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-10-13

    Quantum computers have been proved to be able to mimic quantum systems efficiently in polynomial time. Quantum chemistry problems, such as static molecular energy calculations and dynamical chemical reaction simulations, become very intractable on classical computers with scaling up of the system. Therefore, quantum simulation is a feasible and effective approach to tackle quantum chemistry problems. Proof-of-principle experiments have been implemented on the calculation of the hydrogen molecular energies and one-dimensional chemical isomerization reaction dynamics using nuclear magnetic resonance systems. We conclude that quantum simulation will surpass classical computers for quantum chemistry in the near future.

  4. Alternative algebraic approaches in quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mezey, Paul G.

    2015-01-22

    Various algebraic approaches of quantum chemistry all follow a common principle: the fundamental properties and interrelations providing the most essential features of a quantum chemical representation of a molecule or a chemical process, such as a reaction, can always be described by algebraic methods. Whereas such algebraic methods often provide precise, even numerical answers, nevertheless their main role is to give a framework that can be elaborated and converted into computational methods by involving alternative mathematical techniques, subject to the constraints and directions provided by algebra. In general, algebra describes sets of interrelations, often phrased in terms of algebraic operations, without much concern with the actual entities exhibiting these interrelations. However, in many instances, the very realizations of two, seemingly unrelated algebraic structures by actual quantum chemical entities or properties play additional roles, and unexpected connections between different algebraic structures are often giving new insight. Here we shall be concerned with two alternative algebraic structures: the fundamental group of reaction mechanisms, based on the energy-dependent topology of potential energy surfaces, and the interrelations among point symmetry groups for various distorted nuclear arrangements of molecules. These two, distinct algebraic structures provide interesting interrelations, which can be exploited in actual studies of molecular conformational and reaction processes. Two relevant theorems will be discussed.

  5. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  6. Steps toward fault-tolerant quantum chemistry.

    SciTech Connect

    Taube, Andrew Garvin

    2010-05-01

    Developing quantum chemistry programs on the coming generation of exascale computers will be a difficult task. The programs will need to be fault-tolerant and minimize the use of global operations. This work explores the use a task-based model that uses a data-centric approach to allocate work to different processes as it applies to quantum chemistry. After introducing the key problems that appear when trying to parallelize a complicated quantum chemistry method such as coupled-cluster theory, we discuss the implications of that model as it pertains to the computational kernel of a coupled-cluster program - matrix multiplication. Also, we discuss the extensions that would required to build a full coupled-cluster program using the task-based model. Current programming models for high-performance computing are fault-intolerant and use global operations. Those properties are unsustainable as computers scale to millions of CPUs; instead one must recognize that these systems will be hierarchical in structure, prone to constant faults, and global operations will be infeasible. The FAST-OS HARE project is introducing a scale-free computing model to address these issues. This model is hierarchical and fault-tolerant by design, allows for the clean overlap of computation and communication, reducing the network load, does not require checkpointing, and avoids the complexity of many HPC runtimes. Development of an algorithm within this model requires a change in focus from imperative programming to a data-centric approach. Quantum chemistry (QC) algorithms, in particular electronic structure methods, are an ideal test bed for this computing model. These methods describe the distribution of electrons in a molecule, which determine the properties of the molecule. The computational cost of these methods is high, scaling quartically or higher in the size of the molecule, which is why QC applications are major users of HPC resources. The complexity of these algorithms means that

  7. Quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Kenji; Sumimoto, Michinori; Murafuji, Toshihiro

    2015-12-01

    We have been investigating "quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development" using in silico screenings and applied the method to several targets. Another example was conducted to develop synthesis routes for a urea derivative, namely 1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)urea. While five synthesis routes were examined, only three routes passed the second in silico screening. Among them, the reaction of 7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromen-2-one and O-methyl carbamate with BF3 as an additive was ranked as the first choice for synthetic work. We were able to experimentally obtain the target compound even though its yield was as low as 21 %. The theoretical result was thus consistent with that observed. The summary of transition state data base (TSDB) is also provided. TSDB is the key to reducing time of in silico screenings.

  8. Quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development

    SciTech Connect

    Hori, Kenji; Sumimoto, Michinori; Murafuji, Toshihiro

    2015-12-31

    We have been investigating “quantum chemistry-assisted synthesis route development” using in silico screenings and applied the method to several targets. Another example was conducted to develop synthesis routes for a urea derivative, namely 1-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-2-oxo-2H-chromen-7-yl)urea. While five synthesis routes were examined, only three routes passed the second in silico screening. Among them, the reaction of 7-amino-4-(trifluoromethyl)-2H-chromen-2-one and O-methyl carbamate with BF{sub 3} as an additive was ranked as the first choice for synthetic work. We were able to experimentally obtain the target compound even though its yield was as low as 21 %. The theoretical result was thus consistent with that observed. The summary of transition state data base (TSDB) is also provided. TSDB is the key to reducing time of in silico screenings.

  9. Quantum chemistry study of dielectric materials deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widjaja, Yuniarto

    The drive to continually decrease the device dimensions of integrated circuits in the microelectronics industry requires that deposited films approach subnanometer thicknesses. Hence, a fundamental understanding of the physics and chemistry of film deposition is important to obtain better control of the properties of the deposited film. We use ab initio quantum chemistry calculations to explore chemical reactions at the atomic level. Important thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are then obtained, which can then be used as inputs in constructing first-principles based reactor models. Studies of new systems for which data are not available can be conducted as well. In this dissertation, we use quantum chemistry simulations to study the deposition of gate dielectrics for metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) devices. The focus of this study is on heterogeneous reactions between gaseous precursors and solid surfaces. Adsorbate-surface interactions introduce additional degrees of complexity compared to the corresponding gas-phase or solid-state reactions. The applicability and accuracy of cluster approximations to represent solid surfaces are first investigated. The majority of our results are obtained using B3LYP density functional theory (DFT). The structures of reactants, products, and transition states are obtained, followed by calculations of thermochemical and kinetic properties. Whenever experimental data are available, qualitative and/or quantitative comparisons are drawn. Atomistic mechanisms and the energetics of several reactions leading to the deposition of SiO2, Si3N4, and potential new high-kappa materials such as ZrO2, HfO2, and Al 2O3 have been explored in this dissertation. Competing reaction pathways are explored for each of the deposition reactions studied. For example, the potential energy surface (PES) for ZrO2 ALD shows that the reactions proceed through a trapping-mediated mechanism, which results in a competition between desorption and decomposition

  10. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  11. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  12. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-06-21

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  13. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  14. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  15. Computational quantum chemistry and adaptive ligand modeling in mechanistic QSAR.

    PubMed

    De Benedetti, Pier G; Fanelli, Francesca

    2010-10-01

    Drugs are adaptive molecules. They realize this peculiarity by generating different ensembles of prototropic forms and conformers that depend on the environment. Among the impressive amount of available computational drug discovery technologies, quantitative structure-activity relationship approaches that rely on computational quantum chemistry descriptors are the most appropriate to model adaptive drugs. Indeed, computational quantum chemistry descriptors are able to account for the variation of the intramolecular interactions of the training compounds, which reflect their adaptive intermolecular interaction propensities. This enables the development of causative, interpretive and reasonably predictive quantitative structure-activity relationship models, and, hence, sound chemical information finalized to drug design and discovery.

  16. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  17. Quantum kernel applications in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the quantum mechanics of biological molecules is being driven by computational advances. The notion of quantum kernels can be introduced to simplify the formalism of quantum mechanics, making it especially suitable for parallel computation of very large biological molecules. The essential idea is to mathematically break large biological molecules into smaller kernels that are calculationally tractable, and then to represent the full molecule by a summation over the kernels. The accuracy of the kernel energy method (KEM) is shown by systematic application to a great variety of molecular types found in biology. These include peptides, proteins, DNA and RNA. Examples are given that explore the KEM across a variety of chemical models, and to the outer limits of energy accuracy and molecular size. KEM represents an advance in quantum biology applicable to problems in medicine and drug design.

  18. Toward non-Born-Oppenheimer quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takatsuka, Kazuo

    A practical quantum theory for unifying electronic and nuclear dynamics, which were separated by the Born-Oppenheimer approximation, is proposed. The theory consists of two processes. Nonadiabatic (quantum) electron wavepacket dynamics on branching (non-Born-Oppenheimer) nuclear paths are first constructed. Since these paths are not the classical trajectories, most of the existing semiclassical theories to generate quantum wavepacket do not work. Therefore, we apply our own developed semiclassical wavepacket theory to these generated non-Born-Oppenheimer paths. This wavepacket is generated based on what we call the action decomposed function, which does not require the information of the so-called stability matrix. Thus, the motion of nuclei is also quantized, and consequently the total wavefunction is represented as a series of entanglement between the electronic and nuclear wavepackets.

  19. Ab initio quantum chemistry: Methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This Perspective provides an overview of state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemical methodology and applications. The methods that are discussed include coupled cluster theory, localized second-order Moller–Plesset perturbation theory, multireference perturbation approaches, and density functional theory. The accuracy of each approach for key chemical properties is summarized, and the computational performance is analyzed, emphasizing significant advances in algorithms and implementation over the past decade. Incorporation of a condensed-phase environment by means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics or self-consistent reaction field techniques, is presented. A wide range of illustrative applications, focusing on materials science and biology, are discussed briefly. PMID:15870212

  20. Quantum chemistry, band structures and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, Jean-Marie

    2012-06-01

    A short review of the long way from the first calculations on polyenes after the second world war to the recent electronic devices like Organic Light Emitting Diodes or Photovoltaic Cells is given. It shows how quantum chemical methods on one side and synthesis or experiments have (or should have) interacted as incentives to new methods and technologies.

  1. On the Making of Quantum Chemistry in Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karachalios, Andreas

    During the 1990s several historians of science have studied the emergence of quantum chemistry as an autonomous discipline in different national contexts (Nye, 1993; Simões, 1993; Simões, forthcoming; Gavroglu and Simões, 1994; Karachalios, 1997a). Beyond these disciplinary studies, a number of contributions to special aspects of this theme have appeared (Schweber, 1990; Gavroglu, 1995; Simões and Gavroglu, 1997, 1999a,b; Schwarz et al., 1999). In this literature the birth of quantum chemistry has generally been associated with two dates: the 1927 paper of Walter Heitler and Fritz London and the year 1931 in which Linus Pauling and John Clarke Slater independently explained the tetrahedral orientation of the four bonds of the carbon atom. To these dates we might also add a third: in 1928 London published a paper, 'Zur Quantentheorie der homöopolaren Valenzzahlen' (London, 1928), in which he gave a quantum mechanical explanation of the classical chemical notion of valency. There he showed a relationship between the valency numbers and the spectroscopical multiplicity, namely that valency=multiplicity-1. This relation established a bridge between physical and chemical facts. Taken together, these developments constitute important events for the international development of quantum chemistry.

  2. Optimizing qubit resources for quantum chemistry simulations in second quantization on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moll, Nikolaj; Fuhrer, Andreas; Staar, Peter; Tavernelli, Ivano

    2016-07-01

    Quantum chemistry simulations on a quantum computer suffer from the overhead needed for encoding the Fermionic problem in a system of qubits. By exploiting the block diagonality of a Fermionic Hamiltonian, we show that the number of required qubits can be reduced while the number of terms in the Hamiltonian will increase. All operations for this reduction can be performed in operator space. The scheme is conceived as a pre-computational step that would be performed prior to the actual quantum simulation. We apply this scheme to reduce the number of qubits necessary to simulate both the Hamiltonian of the two-site Fermi-Hubbard model and the hydrogen molecule. Both quantum systems can then be simulated with a two-qubit quantum computer. Despite the increase in the number of Hamiltonian terms, the scheme still remains a useful tool to reduce the dimensionality of specific quantum systems for quantum simulators with a limited number of resources.

  3. Complex Chemical Reaction Networks from Heuristics-Aided Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rappoport, Dmitrij; Galvin, Cooper J; Zubarev, Dmitry Yu; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-03-11

    While structures and reactivities of many small molecules can be computed efficiently and accurately using quantum chemical methods, heuristic approaches remain essential for modeling complex structures and large-scale chemical systems. Here, we present a heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology applicable to complex chemical reaction networks such as those arising in cell metabolism and prebiotic chemistry. Chemical heuristics offer an expedient way of traversing high-dimensional reactive potential energy surfaces and are combined here with quantum chemical structure optimizations, which yield the structures and energies of the reaction intermediates and products. Application of heuristics-aided quantum chemical methodology to the formose reaction reproduces the experimentally observed reaction products, major reaction pathways, and autocatalytic cycles.

  4. Quantum Chemistry via Walks in Determinant Space

    SciTech Connect

    Umrigar, Cyrus J.

    2016-01-05

    There are many chemical questions of practical interest to the DOE that could be answered if there were an electronic structure method that provided consistently accurate results for all systems at an affordable computational cost. The coupled cluster method with single, double and perturbative triple excitations (CCSD(T)) is the most frequently used high-order method, but it has known deficiencies, e.g., in the description of stretched bonds. The full configuration interaction (FCI) method is the most robust method for treating electronic correlations, but it is little used because its computational cost scales exponentially in the size of the system. The largest calculation that has been done to date employed 10 billion determinants. In this regard, there was a major advance in 2010. The Alavi group at Cambridge University developed a stochastic approach to FCI --- combining it with ideas from quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) --- called FCIQMC, that allows one to go to a far larger number of determinants in certain circumstances. The computational cost is exponential in the system and basis size but with a much reduced exponent compared to conventional FCI. In this project Umrigar's group made several major improvements to the FCIQMC method that increased its efficiency by many orders of magnitude. In addition this project resulted in a cross-fertilization of ideas between the FCIQMC method, the older phaseless auxilliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) method developed by Zhang and Krakauer (two of the PI's of this project), and symmetry-restored wavefunctions developed by Scuseria (also a PI of this project).

  5. Let Students Derive, by Themselves, Two-Dimensional Atomic and Molecular Quantum Chemistry from Scratch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ge, Yingbin

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on exercises are designed for undergraduate physical chemistry students to derive two-dimensional quantum chemistry from scratch for the H atom and H[subscript 2] molecule, both in the ground state and excited states. By reducing the mathematical complexity of the traditional quantum chemistry teaching, these exercises can be completed…

  6. NWChem: Quantum Chemistry Simulations at Scale

    SciTech Connect

    Apra, Edoardo; Kowalski, Karol; Hammond, Jeff R.; Klemm, Michael

    2015-01-17

    Methods based on quantum mechanics equations have been developed since the 1930's with the purpose of accurately studying the electronic structure of molecules. However, it is only during the last two decades that intense development of new computational algorithms has opened the possibility of performing accurate simulations of challenging molecular processes with high-order many-body methods. A wealth of evidence indicates that the proper inclusion of instantaneous interactions between electrons (or the so-called electron correlation effects) is indispensable for the accurate characterization of chemical reactivity, molecular properties, and interactions of light with matter. The availability of reliable methods for benchmarking of medium-size molecular systems provides also a unique chance to propagate high-level accuracy across spatial scales through the multiscale methodologies. Some of these methods have potential to utilize computational resources in an effi*cient way since they are characterized by high numerical complexity and appropriate level of data granularity, which can be effi*ciently distributed over multi-processor architectures. The broad spectrum of coupled cluster (CC) methods falls into this class of methodologies. Several recent CC implementations clearly demonstrated the scalability of CC formalisms on architectures composed of hundreds thousand computational cores. In this context NWChem provides a collection of Tensor Contraction Engine (TCE) generated parallel implementations of various coupled cluster methods capable of taking advantage of many thousand of cores on leadership class parallel architectures.

  7. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    C. F. Melius; M. D. Allendorf

    1999-04-01

    In the 1980's, the authors developed a bond-additivity correction procedure for quantum chemical calculations called BAC-MP4, which has proven reliable in calculating the thermochemical properties of molecular species, including radicals as well as stable closed-shell species. New Bond Additivity Correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid DFT/MP2 method, BAC-Hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-Hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-Hybrid method should scale well for large molecules. The BAC-Hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 as an indicator of the method's accuracy, while the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to provide an indicator of its accuracy. Indications of the average error as well as worst cases are provided for each of the BAC methods.

  8. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system

    PubMed Central

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Ågren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree–Fock, Kohn–Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller–Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms. PMID:25309629

  9. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system.

    PubMed

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Agren, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree-Fock, Kohn-Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller-Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms.

  10. Block-adaptive quantum mechanics: an adaptive divide-and-conquer approach to interactive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Maël; Grudinin, Sergei; Redon, Stephane

    2013-03-05

    We present a novel Block-Adaptive Quantum Mechanics (BAQM) approach to interactive quantum chemistry. Although quantum chemistry models are known to be computationally demanding, we achieve interactive rates by focusing computational resources on the most active parts of the system. BAQM is based on a divide-and-conquer technique and constrains some nucleus positions and some electronic degrees of freedom on the fly to simplify the simulation. As a result, each time step may be performed significantly faster, which in turn may accelerate attraction to the neighboring local minima. By applying our approach to the nonself-consistent Atom Superposition and Electron Delocalization Molecular Orbital theory, we demonstrate interactive rates and efficient virtual prototyping for systems containing more than a thousand of atoms on a standard desktop computer.

  11. Development of massively parallel quantum chemistry program SMASH

    SciTech Connect

    Ishimura, Kazuya

    2015-12-31

    A massively parallel program for quantum chemistry calculations SMASH was released under the Apache License 2.0 in September 2014. The SMASH program is written in the Fortran90/95 language with MPI and OpenMP standards for parallelization. Frequently used routines, such as one- and two-electron integral calculations, are modularized to make program developments simple. The speed-up of the B3LYP energy calculation for (C{sub 150}H{sub 30}){sub 2} with the cc-pVDZ basis set (4500 basis functions) was 50,499 on 98,304 cores of the K computer.

  12. Applications of Quantum Chemistry to the Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    For several years, scientists at NASA Ames have been studying the properties of carbon nanotubes using various experimental and computational methods. In this talk, I will compare different strategies for using quantum chemistry calculations to describe the electronic structure, deformation and chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the physisorption of small molecules on nanotube surfaces. The SWNT can be treated as an infinite (periodic) or finite length carbon cylinder or as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule with an imposed curvature maintained by external constraints (as if it were cut out of the SWNT surface). Calculations are carried out using DFT and MP2 methods and a variety of atomic orbital basis sets from minimal (STO-3G) to valence triple zeta. The optimal approach is based on the particular SWNT property of interest. Examples to be discussed include: nanotube fluorination and other functionalization reactions; coating of nanotubes by water vapor and low-molecular weight organic molecules; and the nature of the interface between SWNT and liquids such as water and amines. In many cases, the quantum chemistry calculations are used to parameterize or validate force fields for molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these calculations have helped explain experimental data and contributed to the design of novel materials and sensors based on carbon nanotubes. Some of this research is described in the following papers:

  13. Fuzzy electron density fragments in macromolecular quantum chemistry, combinatorial quantum chemistry, functional group analysis, and shape-activity relations.

    PubMed

    Mezey, Paul G

    2014-09-16

    Conspectus Just as complete molecules have no boundaries and have "fuzzy" electron density clouds approaching zero density exponentially at large distances from the nearest nucleus, a physically justified choice for electron density fragments exhibits similar behavior. Whereas fuzzy electron densities, just as any fuzzy object, such as a thicker cloud on a foggy day, do not lend themselves to easy visualization, one may partially overcome this by using isocontours. Whereas a faithful representation of the complete fuzzy density would need infinitely many such isocontours, nevertheless, by choosing a selected few, one can still obtain a limited pictorial representation. Clearly, such images are of limited value, and one better relies on more complete mathematical representations, using, for example, density matrices of fuzzy fragment densities. A fuzzy density fragmentation can be obtained in an exactly additive way, using the output from any of the common quantum chemical computational techniques, such as Hartree-Fock, MP2, and various density functional approaches. Such "fuzzy" electron density fragments properly represented have proven to be useful in a rather wide range of applications, for example, (a) using them as additive building blocks leading to efficient linear scaling macromolecular quantum chemistry computational techniques, (b) the study of quantum chemical functional groups, (c) using approximate fuzzy fragment information as allowed by the holographic electron density theorem, (d) the study of correlations between local shape and activity, including through-bond and through-space components of interactions between parts of molecules and relations between local molecular shape and substituent effects, (e) using them as tools of density matrix extrapolation in conformational changes, (f) physically valid averaging and statistical distribution of several local electron densities of common stoichiometry, useful in electron density databank mining, for

  14. Quantum chemistry structures and properties of 134 kilo molecules.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Dral, Pavlo O; Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2014-01-01

    Computational de novo design of new drugs and materials requires rigorous and unbiased exploration of chemical compound space. However, large uncharted territories persist due to its size scaling combinatorially with molecular size. We report computed geometric, energetic, electronic, and thermodynamic properties for 134k stable small organic molecules made up of CHONF. These molecules correspond to the subset of all 133,885 species with up to nine heavy atoms (CONF) out of the GDB-17 chemical universe of 166 billion organic molecules. We report geometries minimal in energy, corresponding harmonic frequencies, dipole moments, polarizabilities, along with energies, enthalpies, and free energies of atomization. All properties were calculated at the B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) level of quantum chemistry. Furthermore, for the predominant stoichiometry, C7H10O2, there are 6,095 constitutional isomers among the 134k molecules. We report energies, enthalpies, and free energies of atomization at the more accurate G4MP2 level of theory for all of them. As such, this data set provides quantum chemical properties for a relevant, consistent, and comprehensive chemical space of small organic molecules. This database may serve the benchmarking of existing methods, development of new methods, such as hybrid quantum mechanics/machine learning, and systematic identification of structure-property relationships.

  15. Quantum-State-Resolved Ion-Molecule Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Gary; Yang, Tiangang; Campbell, Wesley; Hudson, Eric

    2016-05-01

    We propose a method to achieve quantum-state-resolved ion-molecule chemistry by utilizing cryogenic buffer gas cooling techniques and a combination of ion imaging and mass spectrometry of targets in an RF Paul trap. Cold molecular species produced by a cryogenic buffer gas beam (CBGB) are introduced to target ion species in an linear quadrupole trap (LQT) where ion imaging techniques and time of flight mass spectrometry (ToF) are then used to observe the target ions and the charged reaction products [1,2]. By taking advantage of the large ion-neutral interaction cross sections and characteristically long ion trap lifetimes, we can utilize the precision control over quantum states allowed by an ion trap to resolve state-to-state quantum chemical reactions without high-density molecular sample production, well within proposed capabilities. The combination of these two very general cold species production techniques allows for production and observation of a broad range of ion-neutral reactions. We initially plan to study chemical reactions between sympathetically cooled carbon ions (via laser cooled beryllium ions) with buffer gas cooled water. This work is supported by the US Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  16. Walking in the woods with quantum chemistry--applications of quantum chemical calculations in natural products research.

    PubMed

    Tantillo, Dean J

    2013-08-01

    This Highlight describes applications of quantum chemical calculations to problems in natural products chemistry, including the elucidation of natural product structures (distinguishing between constitutional isomers, distinguishing between diastereomers, and assigning absolute configuration) and determination of reasonable mechanisms for their formation.

  17. The fourth age of quantum chemistry: molecules in motion.

    PubMed

    Császár, Attila G; Fábri, Csaba; Szidarovszky, Tamás; Mátyus, Edit; Furtenbacher, Tibor; Czakó, Gábor

    2012-01-21

    Developments during the last two decades in nuclear motion theory made it possible to obtain variational solutions to the time-independent, nuclear-motion Schrödinger equation of polyatomic systems as "exact" as the potential energy surface (PES) is. Nuclear motion theory thus reached a level whereby this branch of quantum chemistry started to catch up with the well developed and widely applied other branch, electronic structure theory. It seems to be fair to declare that we are now in the fourth age of quantum chemistry, where the first three ages are principally defined by developments in electronic structure techniques (G. Richards, Nature, 1979, 278, 507). In the fourth age we are able to incorporate into our quantum chemical treatment the motion of nuclei in an exact fashion and, for example, go beyond equilibrium molecular properties and compute accurate, temperature-dependent, effective properties, thus closing the gap between measurements and electronic structure computations. In this Perspective three fundamental algorithms for the variational solution of the time-independent nuclear-motion Schrödinger equation employing exact kinetic energy operators are presented: one based on tailor-made Hamiltonians, one on the Eckart-Watson Hamiltonian, and one on a general internal-coordinate Hamiltonian. It is argued that the most useful and most widely applicable procedure is the third one, based on a Hamiltonian containing a kinetic energy operator written in terms of internal coordinates and an arbitrary embedding of the body-fixed frame of the molecule. This Hamiltonian makes it feasible to treat the nuclear motions of arbitrary quantum systems, irrespective of whether they exhibit a single well-defined minimum or not, and of arbitrary reduced-dimensional models. As a result, molecular spectroscopy, an important field for the application of nuclear motion theory, has almost black-box-type tools at its disposal. Variational nuclear motion computations, based on

  18. Detecting Secondary Bottlenecks in Parallel Quantum Chemistry Applications Using MPI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahajan, Reema; Kranzlmüller, Dieter; Volkert, Jens; Hansmann, Ulrich H. E.; Höfinger, Siegfried

    Profiling tools such as gprof and ssrun are used to analyze the run-time performance of a scientific application. The profiling is done in serial and in parallel mode using MPI as the communication interface. The application is a quantum chemistry program using Hartree Fock theory and Pulays DIIS method. An extensive set of test cases is taken into account in order to reach uniform conclusions. A known problem with decreased parallel scalability can thus be narrowed down to a single subroutine responsible for the reduction in Speed Up. The critical module is analyzed and a typical pitfall with triple matrix multiplications is identified. After overhauling the critical subroutine re-examination of the run-time behavior shows significantly improved performance and markedly improved parallel scalability. The lessons learned here might be of interest to other people working in similar fields with similar problems.

  19. Quantum Chemistry for Surface Segregation in Metal Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Sholl, David

    2006-08-31

    Metal alloys are vital materials for the fabrication of high-flux, high-selectivity hydrogen separation membranes. A phenomenon that occurs in alloys that does not arise in pure metals is surface segregation, where the composition of the surface differs from the bulk composition. Little is known about the strength of surface segregation in the alloys usually considered for hydrogen membranes. Despite this lack of knowledge, surface segregation may play a decisive role in the ability of appropriately chosen alloys to be resistant to chemical poisoning, since membrane poisoning is controlled by surface chemistry. The aim of this Phase I project is to develop quantum chemistry approaches to assess surface segregation in a prototypical hydrogen membrane alloy, fcc Pd{sub 75}Cu{sub 25}. This alloy is known experimentally to have favorable surface properties as a poison resistant H{sub 2} purification membrane (Kamakoti et al., Science 307 (2005) 569-573), but previous efforts at modeling surfaces of this alloy have ignored the possible role of surface segregation (Alfonso et al., Surf. Sci. 546 (2003) 12-26).

  20. Computations and interpretations: The growth of quantum chemistry, 1927-1967

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Buhm Soon

    1999-10-01

    This dissertation is a contribution to the historical study of scientific disciplines in the twentieth century. It seeks to examine the development of quantum chemistry during the four decades after its inception in 1927. This development was manifest in theories, tools, scientists, and institutions, all of which constituted the disciplinary identity of quantum chemistry. To characterize its identity, I deal with the origins of key ideas and concepts; the change of computational tools from desk calculators to digital computers; the formation of a network among research groups and individuals; and the institutionalization of annual meetings. The dissertation's thesis is three-fold. First, in the pre- World War II years, there were individual contributions to the development of theories in quantum chemistry, but the founding fathers worked in their disciplinary contexts of physics or chemistry with little interest in building a quantum chemistry community. Second, the introduction of electronic digital computers in the postwar years affected the resurgence of the ab initio approach-the attempt to solve the Schrödinger equation without recourse to empirical data-and also the emergence of a community of quantum chemists. But the use of computers did not give rise to a consensus over the aims, methods, or content of the discipline. Third, quantum chemistry exerted a significant influence upon the transformation of chemical education and research in general, thanks to ``chemical translators,'' who sought to explain the gist of quantum chemistry in a language that chemists could understand. In sum, quantum chemistry has been a discipline characterized by diverse traditions, and the whole of chemistry has been under the influence of computations and interpretations made by quantum chemists.

  1. Going beyond "no-pair relativistic quantum chemistry".

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjian; Lindgren, Ingvar

    2013-07-07

    The current field of relativistic quantum chemistry (RQC) has been built upon the no-pair and no-retardation approximations. While retardation effects must be treated in a time-dependent manner through quantum electrodynamics (QED) and are hence outside RQC, the no-pair approximation (NPA) has to be removed from RQC for it has some fundamental defects. Both configuration space and Fock space formulations have been proposed in the literature to do this. However, the former is simply wrong, whereas the latter is still incomplete. To resolve the old problems pertinent to the NPA itself and new problems beyond the NPA, we propose here an effective many-body (EMB) QED approach that is in full accordance with standard methodologies of electronic structure. As a first application, the full second order energy E2 of a closed-shell many-electron system subject to the instantaneous Coulomb-Breit interaction is derived, both algebraically and diagrammatically. It is shown that the same E2 can be obtained by means of 3 Goldstone-like diagrams through the standard many-body perturbation theory or 28 Feynman diagrams through the S-matrix technique. The NPA arises naturally by retaining only the terms involving the positive energy states. The potential dependence of the NPA can be removed by adding in the QED one-body counter terms involving the negative energy states, thereby leading to a "potential-independent no-pair approximation" (PI-NPA). The NPA, PI-NPA, EMB-QED, and full QED then span a continuous spectrum of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics.

  2. Going beyond ``no-pair relativistic quantum chemistry''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wenjian; Lindgren, Ingvar

    2013-07-01

    The current field of relativistic quantum chemistry (RQC) has been built upon the no-pair and no-retardation approximations. While retardation effects must be treated in a time-dependent manner through quantum electrodynamics (QED) and are hence outside RQC, the no-pair approximation (NPA) has to be removed from RQC for it has some fundamental defects. Both configuration space and Fock space formulations have been proposed in the literature to do this. However, the former is simply wrong, whereas the latter is still incomplete. To resolve the old problems pertinent to the NPA itself and new problems beyond the NPA, we propose here an effective many-body (EMB) QED approach that is in full accordance with standard methodologies of electronic structure. As a first application, the full second order energy E2 of a closed-shell many-electron system subject to the instantaneous Coulomb-Breit interaction is derived, both algebraically and diagrammatically. It is shown that the same E2 can be obtained by means of 3 Goldstone-like diagrams through the standard many-body perturbation theory or 28 Feynman diagrams through the S-matrix technique. The NPA arises naturally by retaining only the terms involving the positive energy states. The potential dependence of the NPA can be removed by adding in the QED one-body counter terms involving the negative energy states, thereby leading to a "potential-independent no-pair approximation" (PI-NPA). The NPA, PI-NPA, EMB-QED, and full QED then span a continuous spectrum of relativistic molecular quantum mechanics.

  3. Quantum Chemistry Meets Rotational Spectroscopy for Astrochemistry: Increasing Molecular Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puzzarini, Cristina

    2016-06-01

    For many years, scientists suspected that the interstellar medium was too hostile for organic species and that only a few simple molecules could be formed under such extreme conditions. However, the detection of approximately 180 molecules in interstellar or circumstellar environments in recent decades has changed this view dramatically. A rich chemistry has emerged, and relatively complex molecules such as C60 and C70 are formed. Recently, researchers have also detected complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules, such as amino acids, in meteorites and in other space environments. Those discoveries have further stimulated the debate on the origin of the building blocks of life in the universe. Rotational spectroscopy plays a crucial role in the investigation of planetary atmosphere and the interstellar medium. Increasingly these astrochemical investigations are assisted by quantum-mechanical calculations of structures as well as spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties to guide and support observations, line assignments, and data analysis in these new and chemically complicated situations. However, it has proved challenging to extend accurate quantum-chemical computational approaches to larger systems because of the unfavorable scaling with the number of degrees of freedom (both electronic and nuclear). In this contribution, it is demonstrated that it is now possible to compute physicochemical properties of building blocks of biomolecules with an accuracy rivaling that of the most sophisticated experimental techniques. We analyze the spectroscopic properties of representative building blocks of DNA bases (uracil and thiouracil), of proteins (glycine and glycine dipeptide analogue), and also of PAH (phenalenyl radical and cation). V. Barone, M. Biczysko, C. Puzzarini 2015, Acc. Chem. Res., 48, 1413

  4. Large Scale Electronic Structure Calculations using Quantum Chemistry Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scuseria, Gustavo E.

    1998-03-01

    This talk will address our recent efforts in developing fast, linear scaling electronic structure methods for large scale applications. Of special importance is our fast multipole method( M. C. Strain, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Science 271), 51 (1996). (FMM) for achieving linear scaling for the quantum Coulomb problem (GvFMM), the traditional bottleneck in quantum chemistry calculations based on Gaussian orbitals. Fast quadratures(R. E. Stratmann, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, Chem. Phys. Lett. 257), 213 (1996). combined with methods that avoid the Hamiltonian diagonalization( J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 106), 5569 (1997) have resulted in density functional theory (DFT) programs that can be applied to systems containing many hundreds of atoms and ---depending on computational resources or level of theory-- to many thousands of atoms.( A. D. Daniels, J. M. Millam and G. E. Scuseria, J. Chem. Phys. 107), 425 (1997). Three solutions for the diagonalization bottleneck will be analyzed and compared: a conjugate gradient density matrix search (CGDMS), a Hamiltonian polynomial expansion of the density matrix, and a pseudo-diagonalization method. Besides DFT, our near-field exchange method( J. C. Burant, G. E. Scuseria, and M. J. Frisch, J. Chem. Phys. 105), 8969 (1996). for linear scaling Hartree-Fock calculations will be discussed. Based on these improved capabilities, we have also developed programs to obtain vibrational frequencies (via analytic energy second derivatives) and excitation energies (through time-dependent DFT) of large molecules like porphyn or C_70. Our GvFMM has been extended to periodic systems( K. N. Kudin and G. E. Scuseria, Chem. Phys. Lett., in press.) and progress towards a Gaussian-based DFT and HF program for polymers and solids will be reported. Last, we will discuss our progress on a Laplace-transformed \\cal O(N^2) second-order pertubation theory (MP2) method.

  5. Quantum-chemistry descriptors for photosensitizers based on macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Bettanin, Fernanda; Antonio, Felipe C T; Honorio, Kathia M; Homem-de-Mello, Paula

    2017-02-01

    Phthalocyanines, porphyrins, and chlorins have been widely studied as photosensitizers. Both experimental and computational strategies are employed in order to propose new and more active molecules derived from those macrocycles. In this context, there are two main strategies used: (i) the addition of different substituents and (ii) the complexation of the macrocycle with different metallic ions. In this work, we present selected descriptors based on quantum chemistry calculations for forty macrocycles, including some approved drugs. We have found that density functional theory is a suitable methodology to study the large sets of molecules when applying the B3LYP/LanL2DZ methodology for geometry optimization and TD-OLYP/6-31G(d) for absorption spectrum. The inclusion of solvent effects by means of continuum model is important in order to obtain the accurate electronic data. We have verified that by bonding charged or polar substituents to the macrocycle, it is possible to enhance water solvation as well as to improve spectroscopic properties because molecular orbital contributions for Q band can be affected by some substituents. Selected descriptors, electronic and steric, were pointed out as important to propose the new photosensitizers.

  6. A quantum chemistry study of natural gas hydrates.

    PubMed

    Atilhan, Mert; Pala, Nezih; Aparicio, Santiago

    2014-04-01

    The structure and properties of natural gas hydrates containing hydrocarbons, CO₂, and N₂ molecules were studied by using computational quantum chemistry methods via the density functional theory approach. All host cages involved in I, II, and H types structures where filled with hydrocarbons up to pentanes, CO₂ and N₂ molecules, depending on their size, and the structures of these host-guest systems optimized. Structural properties, vibrational spectra, and density of states were analyzed together with results from atoms-in-a-molecule and natural bond orbitals methods. The inclusion of dispersion terms in the used functional plays a vital role for obtaining reliable information, and thus, B97D functional was shown to be useful for these systems. Results showed remarkable interaction energies, not strongly affected by the type of host cage, with molecules tending to be placed at the center of the cavities when host cages and guest molecules cavities are of similar size, but with molecules approaching hexagonal faces for larger cages. Vibrational properties show remarkable features in certain regions, with shiftings rising from host-guest interactions, and useful patterns in the terahertz region rising from water surface vibrations strongly coupled with guest molecules. Likewise, calculations on crystal systems for the I and H types were carried out using a pseudopotential approach combined with Grimme's method to take account of dispersion.

  7. Determining the Numerical Stability of Quantum Chemistry Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Knizia, Gerald; Li, Wenbin; Simon, Sven; Werner, Hans-Joachim

    2011-08-09

    We present a simple, broadly applicable method for determining the numerical properties of quantum chemistry algorithms. The method deliberately introduces random numerical noise into computations, which is of the same order of magnitude as the floating point precision. Accordingly, repeated runs of an algorithm give slightly different results, which can be analyzed statistically to obtain precise estimates of its numerical stability. This noise is produced by automatic code injection into regular compiler output, so that no substantial programming effort is required, only a recompilation of the affected program sections. The method is applied to investigate: (i) the numerical stability of the three-center Obara-Saika integral evaluation scheme for high angular momenta, (ii) if coupled cluster perturbative triples can be evaluated with single precision arithmetic, (iii) how to implement the density fitting approximation in Møller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) most accurately, and (iv) which parts of density fitted MP2 can be safely evaluated with single precision arithmetic. In the integral case, we find a numerical instability in an equation that is used in almost all integral programs. Due to the results of (ii) and (iv), we conjecture that single precision arithmetic can be applied whenever a calculation is done in an orthogonal basis set and excessively long linear sums are avoided.

  8. Teaching the Philosophical Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry Through Controversies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garritz, Andoni

    2013-07-01

    This study has the key premise of teaching history and philosophy of physical sciences to illustrate how controversies and rivalries among scientists play a key role in the progress of science and why scientific development is not only founded on the accumulation of experimental data. The author is a defender of teachers who consider philosophical, historical and socio-scientific issues. In particular, the disputes can be used in science teaching to promote students awareness of the "historicity" of science and to facilitate the understanding of scientific progress beyond that of inductive generalizations. The establishment of a theory is accompanied with philosophical interpretations all the way. The author will try to show that it gives excellent results in teaching and learning to bring to the foreground the complexity that surrounds the development of ideas in science, illustrating how controversies, presuppositions, contradictions and inconsistencies find a place in the work of scientists and philosophers alike. In this sense, the case of quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry is very solid because it is historically full of controversies among their heads: Einstein, Bohr, De Broglie, Heisenberg, Schrödinger, Born, Lewis, Langmuir, Bader, Hoffmann and Pauling, at least.

  9. Principles of conjugating quantum dots to proteins via carbodiimide chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C. W.

    2011-12-01

    The covalent coupling of nanomaterials to bio-recognition molecules is a critical intermediate step in using nanomaterials for biology and medicine. Here we investigate the carbodiimide-mediated conjugation of fluorescent quantum dots to different proteins (e.g., immunoglobulin G, bovine serum albumin, and horseradish peroxidase). To enable these studies, we developed a simple method to isolate quantum dot bioconjugates from unconjugated quantum dots. The results show that the reactant concentrations and protein type will impact the overall number of proteins conjugated onto the surfaces of the quantum dots, homogeneity of the protein-quantum dot conjugate population, quantum efficiency, binding avidity, and enzymatic kinetics. We propose general principles that should be followed for the successful coupling of proteins to quantum dots.

  10. Principles of conjugating quantum dots to proteins via carbodiimide chemistry.

    PubMed

    Song, Fayi; Chan, Warren C W

    2011-12-09

    The covalent coupling of nanomaterials to bio-recognition molecules is a critical intermediate step in using nanomaterials for biology and medicine. Here we investigate the carbodiimide-mediated conjugation of fluorescent quantum dots to different proteins (e.g., immunoglobulin G, bovine serum albumin, and horseradish peroxidase). To enable these studies, we developed a simple method to isolate quantum dot bioconjugates from unconjugated quantum dots. The results show that the reactant concentrations and protein type will impact the overall number of proteins conjugated onto the surfaces of the quantum dots, homogeneity of the protein-quantum dot conjugate population, quantum efficiency, binding avidity, and enzymatic kinetics. We propose general principles that should be followed for the successful coupling of proteins to quantum dots.

  11. Human development VIII: a theory of "deep" quantum chemistry and cell consciousness: quantum chemistry controls genes and biochemistry to give cells and higher organisms consciousness and complex behavior.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Hermansen, Tyge Dahl; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Nielsen, Maj Lyck; Merrick, Joav

    2006-11-14

    Deep quantum chemistry is a theory of deeply structured quantum fields carrying the biological information of the cell, making it able to remember, intend, represent the inner and outer world for comparison, understand what it "sees", and make choices on its structure, form, behavior and division. We suggest that deep quantum chemistry gives the cell consciousness and all the qualities and abilities related to consciousness. We use geometric symbolism, which is a pre-mathematical and philosophical approach to problems that cannot yet be handled mathematically. Using Occam's razor we have started with the simplest model that works; we presume this to be a many-dimensional, spiral fractal. We suggest that all the electrons of the large biological molecules' orbitals make one huge "cell-orbital", which is structured according to the spiral fractal nature of quantum fields. Consciousness of single cells, multi cellular structures as e.g. organs, multi-cellular organisms and multi-individual colonies (like ants) and human societies can thus be explained by deep quantum chemistry. When biochemical activity is strictly controlled by the quantum-mechanical super-orbital of the cell, this orbital can deliver energetic quanta as biological information, distributed through many fractal levels of the cell to guide form and behavior of an individual single or a multi-cellular organism. The top level of information is the consciousness of the cell or organism, which controls all the biochemical processes. By this speculative work inspired by Penrose and Hameroff we hope to inspire other researchers to formulate more strict and mathematically correct hypothesis on the complex and coherence nature of matter, life and consciousness.

  12. Atoms and molecules in cavities, from weak to strong coupling in quantum-electrodynamics (QED) chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we provide an overview of how well-established concepts in the fields of quantum chemistry and material sciences have to be adapted when the quantum nature of light becomes important in correlated matter–photon problems. We analyze model systems in optical cavities, where the matter–photon interaction is considered from the weak- to the strong-coupling limit and for individual photon modes as well as for the multimode case. We identify fundamental changes in Born–Oppenheimer surfaces, spectroscopic quantities, conical intersections, and efficiency for quantum control. We conclude by applying our recently developed quantum-electrodynamical density-functional theory to spontaneous emission and show how a straightforward approximation accurately describes the correlated electron–photon dynamics. This work paves the way to describe matter–photon interactions from first principles and addresses the emergence of new states of matter in chemistry and material science. PMID:28275094

  13. Atoms and molecules in cavities, from weak to strong coupling in quantum-electrodynamics (QED) chemistry.

    PubMed

    Flick, Johannes; Ruggenthaler, Michael; Appel, Heiko; Rubio, Angel

    2017-03-21

    In this work, we provide an overview of how well-established concepts in the fields of quantum chemistry and material sciences have to be adapted when the quantum nature of light becomes important in correlated matter-photon problems. We analyze model systems in optical cavities, where the matter-photon interaction is considered from the weak- to the strong-coupling limit and for individual photon modes as well as for the multimode case. We identify fundamental changes in Born-Oppenheimer surfaces, spectroscopic quantities, conical intersections, and efficiency for quantum control. We conclude by applying our recently developed quantum-electrodynamical density-functional theory to spontaneous emission and show how a straightforward approximation accurately describes the correlated electron-photon dynamics. This work paves the way to describe matter-photon interactions from first principles and addresses the emergence of new states of matter in chemistry and material science.

  14. Photoelectron Imaging as a Quantum Chemistry Visualization Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grumbling, Emily R.; Pichugin, Kostyantyn; Mabbs, Richard; Sanov, Andrei

    2011-01-01

    An overview and simple example of photoelectron imaging is presented, highlighting its efficacy as a pedagogical tool for visualizing quantum phenomena. Specifically, photoelectron imaging of H[superscript -] (the simplest negative ion) is used to demonstrate several quantum mechanical principles. This example could be incorporated into an…

  15. Ab initio Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics: Recent Applications in Combustion Chemistry (Briefing Charts)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-28

    Charts 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2015-June 2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AB INITIO QUANTUM CHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS: RECENT APPLICATIONS IN...Unlimited. 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Briefing Charts presented at 9th Int. Conf. Chemical Kinetics; Ghent, Belgium; 28 Jun 2015. PA#15351. 14. ABSTRACT...ghanshyam.vaghjiani@us.af.mil Ab initio Quantum Chemical Reaction Kinetics: Recent Applications in Combustion Chemistry Ghanshyam L. Vaghjiani* DISTRIBUTION A

  16. Linear-scaling and parallelisable algorithms for stochastic quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, George H.; Smart, Simon D.; Alavi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    For many decades, quantum chemical method development has been dominated by algorithms which involve increasingly complex series of tensor contractions over one-electron orbital spaces. Procedures for their derivation and implementation have evolved to require the minimum amount of logic and rely heavily on computationally efficient library-based matrix algebra and optimised paging schemes. In this regard, the recent development of exact stochastic quantum chemical algorithms to reduce computational scaling and memory overhead requires a contrasting algorithmic philosophy, but one which when implemented efficiently can achieve higher accuracy/cost ratios with small random errors. Additionally, they can exploit the continuing trend for massive parallelisation which hinders the progress of deterministic high-level quantum chemical algorithms. In the Quantum Monte Carlo community, stochastic algorithms are ubiquitous but the discrete Fock space of quantum chemical methods is often unfamiliar, and the methods introduce new concepts required for algorithmic efficiency. In this paper, we explore these concepts and detail an algorithm used for Full Configuration Interaction Quantum Monte Carlo (FCIQMC), which is implemented and available in MOLPRO and as a standalone code, and is designed for high-level parallelism and linear-scaling with walker number. Many of the algorithms are also in use in, or can be transferred to, other stochastic quantum chemical methods and implementations. We apply these algorithms to the strongly correlated chromium dimer to demonstrate their efficiency and parallelism.

  17. Students' Levels of Explanations, Models, and Misconceptions in Basic Quantum Chemistry: A Phenomenographic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefani, Christina; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2009-01-01

    We investigated students' knowledge constructions of basic quantum chemistry concepts, namely atomic orbitals, the Schrodinger equation, molecular orbitals, hybridization, and chemical bonding. Ausubel's theory of meaningful learning provided the theoretical framework and phenomenography the method of analysis. The semi-structured interview with…

  18. Molecular Orbitals of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]: A Computational Quantum Chemistry Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orenha, Renato P.; Galembeck, Sérgio E.

    2014-01-01

    This computational experiment presents qualitative molecular orbital (QMO) and computational quantum chemistry exercises of NO, NO[superscript+], and NO[superscript-]. Initially students explore several properties of the target molecules by Lewis diagrams and the QMO theory. Then, they compare qualitative conclusions with EHT and DFT calculations…

  19. The Relationships between PCK Components: The Case of Quantum Chemistry Professors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Padilla, Kira; Van Driel, Jan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to capture the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of university professors about quantum chemistry. More specifically, we aimed to identify and analyze relationships between specific PCK components, using an adapted version of the model of PCK of Magnusson "et al.". A sample of university professors (n = 6)…

  20. Big Data Meets Quantum Chemistry Approximations: The Δ-Machine Learning Approach.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; Dral, Pavlo O; Rupp, Matthias; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2015-05-12

    Chemically accurate and comprehensive studies of the virtual space of all possible molecules are severely limited by the computational cost of quantum chemistry. We introduce a composite strategy that adds machine learning corrections to computationally inexpensive approximate legacy quantum methods. After training, highly accurate predictions of enthalpies, free energies, entropies, and electron correlation energies are possible, for significantly larger molecular sets than used for training. For thermochemical properties of up to 16k isomers of C7H10O2 we present numerical evidence that chemical accuracy can be reached. We also predict electron correlation energy in post Hartree-Fock methods, at the computational cost of Hartree-Fock, and we establish a qualitative relationship between molecular entropy and electron correlation. The transferability of our approach is demonstrated, using semiempirical quantum chemistry and machine learning models trained on 1 and 10% of 134k organic molecules, to reproduce enthalpies of all remaining molecules at density functional theory level of accuracy.

  1. Quantum chemistry calculations for molecules coupled to reservoirs: Formalism, implementation, and application to benzenedithiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, A.; Weigend, F.; Evers, F.

    2007-05-01

    Modern quantum chemistry calculations are usually implemented for isolated systems—big molecules or atom clusters; total energy and particle number are fixed. However, in many situations, like quantum transport calculations or molecules in a electrochemical environment, the molecule can exchange particles (and energy) with a reservoir. Calculations for such cases require to switch from the canonical to a grand canonical description, where one fixes the chemical potential rather than particle number. To achieve this goal, the authors propose an implementation in standard quantum chemistry packages. An application to the nonlinear charge transport through 1,4-benzenedithiol will be presented. They explain the leading finite bias effect on the transmission as a consequence of a nonequilibrium Stark effect and discuss the relation to earlier work.

  2. Dynamical mean-field theory for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lin, Nan; Marianetti, C A; Millis, Andrew J; Reichman, David R

    2011-03-04

    The dynamical mean-field concept of approximating an unsolvable many-body problem in terms of the solution of an auxiliary quantum impurity problem, introduced to study bulk materials with a continuous energy spectrum, is here extended to molecules, i.e., finite systems with a discrete energy spectrum. The application to small clusters of hydrogen atoms yields ground state energies which are competitive with leading quantum chemical approaches at intermediate and large interatomic distances as well as good approximations to the excitation spectrum.

  3. Subtle Chemistry of Colloidal, Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B. K.; Luther, J. M.; Beard, M. C.

    2012-06-26

    Nanoscale colloidal semiconductor structures with at least one dimension small enough to experience quantum confinement effects have captured the imagination and attention of scientists interested in controlling various chemical and photophysical processes. Aside from having desirable quantum confinement properties, colloidal nanocrystals are attractive because they are often synthesized in low-temperature, low-cost, and potentially scalable manners using simple benchtop reaction baths. Considerable progress in producing a variety of shapes, compositions, and complex structures has been achieved. However, there are challenges to overcome in order for these novel materials to reach their full potential and become new drivers for commercial applications. The final shape, composition, nanocrystal-ligand structure, and size can depend on a delicate interplay of precursors, surface ligands, and other compounds that may or may not participate in the reaction. In this Perspective, we discuss current efforts toward better understanding how the reactivity of the reagents can be used to produce unique and complex nanostructures.

  4. Effects of Solution Chemistry on Quantum Dot Transport and Retention in Porous Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Englehart, J.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, H.; Colvin, V. L.; Pennell, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    Engineered nanomaterials with tunable surface chemistries, such as quantum dots, are becoming increasingly prevalent in commercial and medical applications. This increase in usage corresponds to an elevated risk of environmental exposures, and limited data are available on the fate and transport of quantum dots in the environment. The objective of this study was to quantify quantum dot transport and retention behavior under a variety of solution chemistries and in the presence of a non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) phase. The quantum dots were prepared with a CdSe/CdZnS core/shell that was coated with an amphiphilic copolymer. The primary quantum dot coating used in this study was octylamine modified polyacrylic acid, which yields a negative surface charge (zeta potential) ranging from -30 to -40 mV in water. The mean diameter of the quantum dots in deionized water ranged from 20-30 nm based on dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis. Higher salt concentrations, ranging from 3 to 1000 mM NaCl, resulted in increased diameters of the quantum dots (28 to 190 nm, respectively). Transport and retention behavior of the quantum dots was evaluated using borosilicate glass columns (2.5 cm i.d. x 10 cm length) packed with 40-50 mesh (d50 = 355 µm) Ottawa sand that had been completely saturated with water. A pulse (ca. 60mL) of quantum dot suspension was introduced to the column at a flow rate of 1mL/min (pore-water velocity of 8m/d), followed by three pore volumes of particle-free solution. To evaluate effects of the presence of a NAPL phase, a uniform distribution of residual NAPL (Soltrol 220) was established prior to the quantum dot pulse injection. Concentrations of quantum dots in the column effluent and extracted from solid samples, quantified using an Inductively Coupled Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer (ICP-OES), were used to construct an effluent breakthrough curve and retention profile for each experiment. The presence of a residual NAPL phase had negligible

  5. Determination of Quantum Chemistry Based Force Fields for Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Aromatic Polymers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Ab initio quantum chemistry calculations for model molecules can be used to parameterize force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of polymers. Emphasis in our research group is on using quantum chemistry-based force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of organic polymers in the melt and glassy states, but the methodology is applicable to simulations of small molecules, multicomponent systems and solutions. Special attention is paid to deriving reliable descriptions of the non-bonded and electrostatic interactions. Several procedures have been developed for deriving and calibrating these parameters. Our force fields for aromatic polyimide simulations will be described. In this application, the intermolecular interactions are the critical factor in determining many properties of the polymer (including its color).

  6. A Need to Reassess Physical-Organic Curricula: A Course Enhancement Using Readily Available Quantum Chemistry Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipkowitz, Kenny B.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a graduate-level course in physical-organic chemistry in which students learn to solve problems using computer programs available through the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange. Includes condensed syllabus and time line showing where various computational programs are introduced. (Author/JN)

  7. On the applicability of one- and many-electron quantum chemistry models for hydrated electron clusters.

    PubMed

    Turi, László

    2016-04-21

    We evaluate the applicability of a hierarchy of quantum models in characterizing the binding energy of excess electrons to water clusters. In particular, we calculate the vertical detachment energy of an excess electron from water cluster anions with methods that include one-electron pseudopotential calculations, density functional theory(DFT) based calculations, and ab initio quantum chemistry using MP2 and eom-EA-CCSD levels of theory. The examined clusters range from the smallest cluster size (n = 2) up to nearly nanosize clusters with n = 1000 molecules. The examined cluster configurations are extracted from mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics trajectories of cluster anions with n = 1000 water molecules using two different one-electron pseudopotenial models. We find that while MP2 calculations with large diffuse basis set provide a reasonable description for the hydrated electron system, DFT methods should be used with precaution and only after careful benchmarking. Strictly tested one-electron psudopotentials can still be considered as reasonable alternatives to DFT methods, especially in large systems. The results of quantum chemistry calculations performed on configurations, that represent possible excess electron binding motifs in the clusters, appear to be consistent with the results using a cavitystructure preferring one-electron pseudopotential for the hydrated electron, while they are in sharp disagreement with the structural predictions of a non-cavity model.

  8. Quantum chemistry of the minimal CdSe clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ping; Tretiak, Sergei; Masunov, Artëm E.; Ivanov, Sergei

    2008-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) which have stimulated a great deal of research and have attracted technical interest in recent years due to their chemical stability and the tunability of photophysical properties. While internal structure of large quantum dots is similar to bulk, their surface structure and passivating role of capping ligands (surfactants) are not fully understood to date. We apply ab initio wavefunction methods, density functional theory, and semiempirical approaches to study the passivation effects of substituted phosphine and amine ligands on the minimal cluster Cd2Se2, which is also used to benchmark different computational methods versus high level ab initio techniques. Full geometry optimization of Cd2Se2 at different theory levels and ligand coverage is used to understand the affinities of various ligands and the impact of ligands on cluster structure. Most possible bonding patterns between ligands and surface Cd/Se atoms are considered, including a ligand coordinated to Se atoms. The degree of passivation of Cd and Se atoms (one or two ligands attached to one atom) is also studied. The results suggest that B3LYP/LANL2DZ level of theory is appropriate for the system modeling, whereas frequently used semiempirical methods (such as AM1 and PM3) produce unphysical results. The use of hydrogen atom for modeling of the cluster passivating ligands is found to yield unphysical results as well. Hence, the surface termination of II-VI semiconductor NCs with hydrogen atoms often used in computational models should probably be avoided. Basis set superposition error, zero-point energy, and thermal corrections, as well as solvent effects simulated with polarized continuum model are found to produce minor variations on the ligand binding energies. The effects of Cd-Se complex structure on both the electronic band gap (highest occupied molecular orbital-lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy difference) and ligand binding

  9. Photodissociation of quantum state-selected diatomic molecules yields new insight into ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart H.; Lee, Chih-Hsi; Apfelbeck, Florian; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    When a molecule is subjected to a sufficiently energetic photon it can break apart into fragments through a process called ``photodissociation''. For over 70 years this simple chemical reaction has served as a vital experimental tool for acquiring information about molecular structure, since the character of the photodissociative transition can be inferred by measuring the 3D photofragment angular distribution (PAD). While theoretical understanding of this process has gradually evolved from classical considerations to a fully quantum approach, experiments to date have not yet revealed the full quantum nature of this process. In my talk I will describe recent experiments involving the photodissociation of ultracold, optical lattice-trapped, and fully quantum state-resolved 88Sr2 molecules. Optical absorption images of the PADs produced in these experiments reveal features which are inherently quantum mechanical in nature, such as matter-wave interference between output channels, and are sensitive to the quantum statistics of the molecular wavefunctions. The results of these experiments cannot be predicted using quasiclassical methods. Instead, we describe our results with a fully quantum mechanical model yielding new intuition about ultracold chemistry.

  10. Parallelism in computational chemistry: Applications in quantum and statistical mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, E.; Corongiu, G.; Detrich, J. H.; Kahnmohammadbaigi, H.; Chin, S.; Domingo, L.; Laaksonen, A.; Nguyen, N. L.

    1985-08-01

    Often very fundamental biochemical and biophysical problems defy simulations because of limitation in today's computers. We present and discuss a distributed system composed of two IBM-4341 and one IBM-4381, as front-end processors, and ten FPS-164 attached array processors. This parallel system-called LCAP-has presently a peak performance of about 120 MFlops; extensions to higher performance are discussed. Presently, the system applications use a modified version of VM/SP as the operating system: description of the modifications is given. Three applications programs have migrated from sequential to parallel; a molecular quantum mechanical, a Metropolis-Monte Carlo and a Molecular Dynamics program. Descriptions of the parallel codes are briefly outlined. As examples and tests of these applications we report on a study for proton tunneling in DNA base-pairs, very relevant to spontaneous mutations in genetics. As a second example, we present a Monte Carlo study of liquid water at room temperature where not only two- and three-body interactions are considered but-for the first time-also four-body interactions are included. Finally we briefly summarize a molecular dynamics study where two- and three-body interactions have been considered. These examples, and very positive performance comparison with today's supercomputers allow us to conclude that parallel computers and programming of the type we have considered, represent a pragmatic answer to many computer intensive problems.

  11. Crystal density predictions for nitramines based on quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Ling; Xiao, Heming; Gong, Xuedong; Ju, Xuehai; Zhu, Weihua

    2007-03-06

    An efficient and convenient method for predicting the crystalline densities of energetic materials was established based on the quantum chemical computations. Density functional theory (DFT) with four different basis sets (6-31G(**), 6-311G(**), 6-31+G(**), and 6-311++G(**)) and various semiempirical molecular orbital (MO) methods have been employed to predict the molecular volumes and densities of a series of energetic nitramines including acyclic, monocyclic, and polycyclic/cage molecules. The relationships between the calculated values and experimental data were discussed in detail, and linear correlations were suggested and compared at different levels. The calculation shows that if the selected basis set is larger, it will expend more CPU (central processing unit) time, larger molecular volume and smaller density will be obtained. And the densities predicted by the semiempirical MO methods are all systematically larger than the experimental data. In comparison with other methods, B3LYP/6-31G(**) is most accurate and economical to predict the solid-state densities of energetic nitramines. This may be instructive to the molecular designing and screening novel HEDMs.

  12. Surface Chemistry of Semiconducting Quantum Dots: Theoretical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kilina, Svetlana V; Tamukong, Patrick K; Kilin, Dmitri S

    2016-10-18

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) are near-ideal nanomaterials for energy conversion and lighting technologies. However, their photophysics exhibits supreme sensitivity to surface passivation and defects, of which control is problematic. The role of passivating ligands in photodynamics remains questionable and is a focus of ongoing research. The optically forbidden nature of surface-associated states makes direct measurements on them challenging. Therefore, computational modeling is imperative for insights into surface passivation and its impact on light-driven processes in QDs. This Account discusses challenges and recent progress in understanding surface effects on the photophysics of QDs addressed via quantum-chemical calculations. We overview different methods, including the effective mass approximation (EMA), time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT), and multiconfiguration approaches, considering their strengths and weaknesses relevant to modeling of QDs with a complicated surface. We focus on CdSe, PbSe, and Si QDs, where calculations successfully explain experimental trends sensitive to surface defects, doping, and ligands. We show that the EMA accurately describes both linear and nonlinear optical properties of large-sized CdSe QDs (>2.5 nm), while TDDFT is required for smaller QDs where surface effects dominate. Both approaches confirm efficient two-photon absorption enabling applications of QDs as nonlinear optical materials. TDDFT also describes the effects of morphology on the optical response of QDs: the photophysics of stoichiometric, magic-sized XnYn (X = Cd, Pb; Y = S, Se) QDs is less sensitive to their passivation compared with nonstoichiometric Xn≠mYm QDs. In the latter, surface-driven optically inactive midgap states can be eliminated by anionic ligands, explaining the better emission of metal-enriched QDs compared with nonmetal-enriched QDs. Ideal passivation of magic-sized QDs by amines and phosphine oxides leaves lower-energy transitions

  13. Computational Chemistry for Nuclear Waste Characterization and Processing: Relativistic Quantum Chemistry of Actinides

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Robert J.; Bernholdt, David E.; Bursten, Bruce E.; De Jong, Wibe A.; Dixon, David A.; Dyall, Kenneth G.; Ermler, Walter V.; Fann, George I.; Hay, P. J.; Ismail Buchner, Nina; Kendall, Ricky A.; Li, Jun; Marino, Maria M.; Marsden, Colin J.; Martin, Richard L.; Minkoff, Michael; Nichols, Jeffrey A.; Nieplocha, Jarek; Pitzer, Russell M.; Pratt, Lawrence R.; Schreckenbach, Hans Georg; Seth, Michael C.; Shepard, Ron; Stevens, Rick L.; Tilson, Jeffrey L.; Wagner, Albert F.; Wang, Qi; Windus, Theresa L.; Wong, Adrian; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2002-08-02

    In the course of the 3 years we have conducted calculations on molecular structures containing actinides, lanthanides, and other heavy elements. Our calculations were done at the relativistically-correct, all-electron, 4-component calculations (DHF, MP2, and CCSD(T)), using density functional theory (DFT) with relativistic effective core potentials (RECPs), and various other methodologies. We studied the ground- and excited state structures, energetics, vibrational frequencies, and NMR, excitation and ionization spectra. In addition a considerable amount of codes and methodologies have been developed during the GC3 period, enabling us to do the extensive research described in this final report, and providing researchers worldwide with new computational chemistry tools. In this section we will give a brief overview of our activities and accomplishments, grouped by each research institution. A more extensive overview can be found in the appendices containing the full yearly reports.

  14. Applications of quantum chemistry to gas and solid phase reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senosiain, Juan Pablo

    Chemical kinetics has nourished from the achievements of computational quantum chemistry as perhaps no other field. This thesis illustrates the application of first-principles calculations to elucidate complex reaction mechanisms, and to quantitatively simulate reaction rates. The work embodied in this dissertation encompasses several projects with very diverse applications. In some cases, quantum chemistry calculations have been used for predicting reaction rates, while in others they are used in a semi-qualitative manner to elucidate complex reaction mechanisms. The first two chapters of this dissertation explain some key theoretical concepts of quantum chemistry and chemical kinetics. They are not intended to be exhaustive or detailed, but rather to illustrate general principles that are applied in the subsequent chapters. Chapter three reviews the disperse literature on the statistical treatment of internal rotors and provides a comparison of commonly used approximations. Chapters four through six cover three areas of special interest to gas-phase kinetics: bond dissociation energies, transition state theory and unimolecular reactions, with particular emphasis on combustion and atmospheric chemistry applications. A critical assessment of reaction barriers and bond dissociation energies calculated with several ab initio methods in common use is provided in chapters four and five, respectively. Chapters seven and eight illustrate how quantum chemistry can be used to decipher complex reaction mechanisms, with applications to current and future problems in semiconductor processing. The former studies the mechanisms of boron diffusion through thin gate oxide layers in metal oxide field effect transistors (MOSFETs). The latter investigates the details of atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactions on germanium and silicon-germanium alloys. Both of these studies are motivated by the miniaturization trend in gate oxide layers in MOSFET devices. As the device feature size

  15. Development and Use of Quantum Chemistry Methods on Intel Many-Integrated Core Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apra, Edoardo

    2015-03-01

    We will describe the approach we have taken in porting quantum chemistry algorithms based on local basis functions to the Intel MIC hardware. The implementation completed in the NWChem code shows the feasibility of effectively combining the processing power of traditional CPU architecture and coprocessor hardware on Petascale class computers. Benchmarks of scientific applications will be presented to illustrate the performances of large scale calculations. This work was conducted in the William R. Wiley Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (EMSL), a national scientific user facility sponsored by DOE's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at PNNL.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray, photoluminescence, and quantum chemistry studies of bismuth-embedded dehydrated zeolite Y.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hong-Tao; Matsushita, Yoshitaka; Sakka, Yoshio; Shirahata, Naoto; Tanaka, Masahiko; Katsuya, Yoshio; Gao, Hong; Kobayashi, Keisuke

    2012-02-15

    For the first time, direct experimental evidence of the formation of monovalent Bi (i.e., Bi(+)) in zeolite Y is provided based on the analysis of high-resolution synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data. Photoluminescence results as well as quantum chemistry calculations suggest that the substructures of Bi(+) in the sodalite cages contribute to the ultrabroad near-infrared emission. These results not only enrich the well-established spectrum of optically active zeolites and deepen the understanding of bismuth related photophysical behaviors, but also may raise new possibilities for the design and synthesis of novel hybrid nanoporous photonic materials activated by other heavier p-block elements.

  17. FragBuilder: an efficient Python library to setup quantum chemistry calculations on peptides models.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Anders S; Hamelryck, Thomas; Jensen, Jan H

    2014-01-01

    We present a powerful Python library to quickly and efficiently generate realistic peptide model structures. The library makes it possible to quickly set up quantum mechanical calculations on model peptide structures. It is possible to manually specify a specific conformation of the peptide. Additionally the library also offers sampling of backbone conformations and side chain rotamer conformations from continuous distributions. The generated peptides can then be geometry optimized by the MMFF94 molecular mechanics force field via convenient functions inside the library. Finally, it is possible to output the resulting structures directly to files in a variety of useful formats, such as XYZ or PDB formats, or directly as input files for a quantum chemistry program. FragBuilder is freely available at https://github.com/jensengroup/fragbuilder/ under the terms of the BSD open source license.

  18. Chemical basis of Trotter-Suzuki errors in quantum chemistry simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; McClean, Jarrod; Wecker, Dave; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Wiebe, Nathan

    2015-02-01

    Although the simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the most anticipated applications of quantum computing, the scaling of known upper bounds on the complexity of these algorithms is daunting. Prior work has bounded errors due to discretization of the time evolution (known as "Trotterization") in terms of the norm of the error operator and analyzed scaling with respect to the number of spin orbitals. However, we find that these error bounds can be loose by up to 16 orders of magnitude for some molecules. Furthermore, numerical results for small systems fail to reveal any clear correlation between ground-state error and number of spin orbitals. We instead argue that chemical properties, such as the maximum nuclear charge in a molecule and the filling fraction of orbitals, can be decisive for determining the cost of a quantum simulation. Our analysis motivates several strategies to use classical processing to further reduce the required Trotter step size and estimate the necessary number of steps, without requiring additional quantum resources. Finally, we demonstrate improved methods for state preparation techniques which are asymptotically superior to proposals in the simulation literature.

  19. On the Chemical Basis of Trotter-Suzuki Errors in Quantum Chemistry Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babbush, Ryan; McClean, Jarrod; Wecker, Dave; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Wiebe, Nathan

    2015-03-01

    Although the simulation of quantum chemistry is one of the most anticipated applications of quantum computing, the scaling of known upper bounds on the complexity of these algorithms is daunting. Prior work has bounded errors due to Trotterization in terms of the norm of the error operator and analyzed scaling with respect to the number of spin-orbitals. However, we find that these error bounds can be loose by up to sixteen orders of magnitude for some molecules. Furthermore, numerical results for small systems fail to reveal any clear correlation between ground state error and number of spin-orbitals. We instead argue that chemical properties, such as the maximum nuclear charge in a molecule and the filling fraction of orbitals, can be decisive for determining the cost of a quantum simulation. Our analysis motivates several strategies to use classical processing to further reduce the required Trotter step size and to estimate the necessary number of steps, without requiring additional quantum resources. Finally, we demonstrate improved methods for state preparation techniques which are asymptotically superior to proposals in the simulation literature.

  20. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    PubMed Central

    Doğan, İlker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions. PMID:27389331

  1. Analysis of temporal evolution of quantum dot surface chemistry by surface-enhanced Raman scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doğan, Ilker; Gresback, Ryan; Nozaki, Tomohiro; van de Sanden, Mauritius C. M.

    2016-07-01

    Temporal evolution of surface chemistry during oxidation of silicon quantum dot (Si-QD) surfaces were probed using surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). A monolayer of hydrogen and chlorine terminated plasma-synthesized Si-QDs were spin-coated on silver oxide thin films. A clearly enhanced signal of surface modes, including Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes were observed from as-synthesized Si-QDs as a result of the plasmonic enhancement of the Raman signal at Si-QD/silver oxide interface. Upon oxidation, a gradual decrease of Si-Clx and Si-Hx modes, and an emergence of Si-Ox and Si-O-Hx modes have been observed. In addition, first, second and third transverse optical modes of Si-QDs were also observed in the SERS spectra, revealing information on the crystalline morphology of Si-QDs. An absence of any of the abovementioned spectral features, but only the first transverse optical mode of Si-QDs from thick Si-QD films validated that the spectral features observed from Si-QDs on silver oxide thin films are originated from the SERS effect. These results indicate that real-time SERS is a powerful diagnostic tool and a novel approach to probe the dynamic surface/interface chemistry of quantum dots, especially when they involve in oxidative, catalytic, and electrochemical surface/interface reactions.

  2. Code interoperability and standard data formats in quantum chemistry and quantum dynamics: The Q5/D5Cost data model.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Elda; Evangelisti, Stefano; Laganà, Antonio; Monari, Antonio; Rampino, Sergio; Verdicchio, Marco; Baldridge, Kim K; Bendazzoli, Gian Luigi; Borini, Stefano; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Angeli, Celestino; Kallay, Peter; Lüthi, Hans P; Ruud, Kenneth; Sanchez-Marin, José; Scemama, Anthony; Szalay, Peter G; Tajti, Attila

    2014-03-30

    Code interoperability and the search for domain-specific standard data formats represent critical issues in many areas of computational science. The advent of novel computing infrastructures such as computational grids and clouds make these issues even more urgent. The design and implementation of a common data format for quantum chemistry (QC) and quantum dynamics (QD) computer programs is discussed with reference to the research performed in the course of two Collaboration in Science and Technology Actions. The specific data models adopted, Q5Cost and D5Cost, are shown to work for a number of interoperating codes, regardless of the type and amount of information (small or large datasets) to be exchanged. The codes are either interfaced directly, or transfer data by means of wrappers; both types of data exchange are supported by the Q5/D5Cost library. Further, the exchange of data between QC and QD codes is addressed. As a proof of concept, the H + H2 reaction is discussed. The proposed scheme is shown to provide an excellent basis for cooperative code development, even across domain boundaries. Moreover, the scheme presented is found to be useful also as a production tool in the grid distributed computing environment.

  3. A Synthesis of Fluid Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry for the Design of Nanoelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacDougall, Preston J.

    1998-01-01

    In 1959, during a famous lecture entitled "There's Plenty of Room at the Bottom", Richard Feynman focused on the startling technical possibilities that would exist at the limit of miniaturization, that being atomically precise devices with dimensions in the nanometer range. A nanometer is both a convenient unit of length for medium to large sized molecules, and the root of the name of the new interdisciplinary field of "nanotechnology". Essentially, "nanoelectronics" denotes the goal of shrinking electronic devices, such as diodes and transistors, as well as integrated circuits of such devices that can perform logical operations, down to dimensions in the range of 100 nanometers. The thirty-year hiatus in the development of nanotechnology can figuratively be seen as a period of waiting for the bottom-up and atomically precise construction skills of synthetic chemistry to meet the top-down reductionist aspirations of device physics. The sub-nanometer domain of nineteenth-century classical chemistry has steadily grown, and state-of-the-art supramolecular chemistry can achieve atomic precision in non-repeating molecular assemblies of the size desired for nanotechnology. For nanoelectronics in particular, a basic understanding of the electron transport properties of molecules must also be developed. Quantum chemistry provides powerful computational methods that can accurately predict the properties of small to medium sized molecules on a desktop workstation, and those of large molecules if one has access to a supercomputer. Of the many properties of a molecule that quantum chemistry routinely predicts, the ability to carry a current is one that had not even been considered until recently. "Currently", there is a controversy over just how to define this key property. Reminiscent of the situation in high-Tc superconductivity, much of the difficulty arises from the different models that are used to simplify the complex electronic structure of real materials. A model

  4. Quantum dot DNA bioconjugates: attachment chemistry strongly influences the resulting composite architecture.

    PubMed

    Boeneman, Kelly; Deschamps, Jeffrey R; Buckhout-White, Susan; Prasuhn, Duane E; Blanco-Canosa, Juan B; Dawson, Philip E; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Goldman, Ellen R; Ancona, Mario; Medintz, Igor L

    2010-12-28

    The unique properties provided by hybrid semiconductor quantum dot (QD) bioconjugates continue to stimulate interest for many applications ranging from biosensing to energy harvesting. Understanding both the structure and function of these composite materials is an important component in their development. Here, we compare the architecture that results from using two common self-assembly chemistries to attach DNA to QDs. DNA modified to display either a terminal biotin or an oligohistidine peptidyl sequence was assembled to streptavidin/amphiphilic polymer- or PEG-functionalized QDs, respectively. A series of complementary acceptor dye-labeled DNA were hybridized to different positions on the DNA in each QD configuration and the separation distances between the QD donor and each dye-acceptor probed with Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). The polyhistidine self-assembly yielded QD-DNA bioconjugates where predicted and experimental separation distances matched reasonably well. Although displaying efficient FRET, data from QD-DNA bioconjugates assembled using biotin-streptavidin chemistry did not match any predicted separation distances. Modeling based upon known QD and DNA structures along with the linkage chemistry and FRET-derived distances was used to simulate each QD-DNA structure and provide insight into the underlying architecture. Although displaying some rotational freedom, the DNA modified with the polyhistidine assembles to the QD with its structure extended out from the QD-PEG surface as predicted. In contrast, the random orientation of streptavidin on the QD surface resulted in DNA with a wide variety of possible orientations relative to the QD which cannot be controlled during assembly. These results suggest that if a particular QD biocomposite structure is desired, for example, random versus oriented, the type of bioconjugation chemistry utilized will be a key influencing factor.

  5. Shielding of quantum dots using diblock copolymers: implementing copper catalyzed click chemistry to fluorescent quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merkl, Jan-Philip; Ostermann, Johannes; Schmidtke, Christian; Kloust, Hauke; Eggers, Robin; Feld, Artur; Wolter, Christopher; Kreuziger, Anna-Marlena; Flessau, Sandra; Mattoussi, Hedi; Weller, Horst

    2014-03-01

    We describe the design and optimization of an amphiphilic diblock copolymer and its use to provide surface functionalization of colloidal semiconductor nanoparticles (quantum dots, QDs). This polymer coating promotes hydrophilicity of the nanocrystals while providing numerous functional groups ideally suited for biofunctionalization of the QDs using copper-catalyzed azide alkyne Husigen 1,3-cyloaddition (i.e., cupper catalyzed "click" reaction). Copper ions are known to quench the fluorescence of QDs in solution. Thus effective shielding of the nanocrystal surface is essential to apply copper-catalyzed reactions to luminescent QDs without drastically quenching their emission. We have applied a strategy based on micellar encapsulation within poly(isoprene-block- ethylene oxide) diblock-copolymers (PI-b-PEO), where three critical factors promote and control the effectiveness of the shielding of copper ion penetration: 1) The excess of PI-b-PEO, 2) the size of PI-b-PEO and 3) insertion of an additional PS-shell grown via seeded emulsion polymerization (EP) reaction. Due to the amphiphilic character of the block-copolymer, this approach provides a shielding layer surrounding the particles, preventing metal ions from reaching the QD surfaces and maintaining high photoluminescence. The effective shielding allowed the use of copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne 1,3-cycloaddition (CuAAC) to hydrophilic and highly fluorescent QDs, opening up great possibilities for the bio functionalization of QDs.

  6. The successful merger of theoretical thermochemistry with fragment-based methods in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath O; Raghavachari, Krishnan

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Quantum chemistry and electronic structure theory have proven to be essential tools to the experimental chemist, in terms of both a priori predictions that pave the way for designing new experiments and rationalizing experimental observations a posteriori. Translating the well-established success of electronic structure theory in obtaining the structures and energies of small chemical systems to increasingly larger molecules is an exciting and ongoing central theme of research in quantum chemistry. However, the prohibitive computational scaling of highly accurate ab initio electronic structure methods poses a fundamental challenge to this research endeavor. This scenario necessitates an indirect fragment-based approach wherein a large molecule is divided into small fragments and is subsequently reassembled to compute its energy accurately. In our quest to further reduce the computational expense associated with the fragment-based methods and overall enhance the applicability of electronic structure methods to large molecules, we realized that the broad ideas involved in a different area, theoretical thermochemistry, are transferable to the area of fragment-based methods. This Account focuses on the effective merger of these two disparate frontiers in quantum chemistry and how new concepts inspired by theoretical thermochemistry significantly reduce the total number of electronic structure calculations needed to be performed as part of a fragment-based method without any appreciable loss of accuracy. Throughout, the generalized connectivity based hierarchy (CBH), which we developed to solve a long-standing problem in theoretical thermochemistry, serves as the linchpin in this merger. The accuracy of our method is based on two strong foundations: (a) the apt utilization of systematic and sophisticated error-canceling schemes via CBH that result in an optimal cutting scheme at any given level of fragmentation and (b) the use of a less expensive second

  7. Quantum Chemistry in Nanoscale Environments: Insights on Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering and Organic Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivares-Amaya, Roberto

    The understanding of molecular effects in nanoscale environments is becoming increasingly relevant for various emerging fields. These include spectroscopy for molecular identification as well as in finding molecules for energy harvesting. Theoretical quantum chemistry has been increasingly useful to address these phenomena to yield an understanding of these effects. In the first part of this dissertation, we study the chemical effect of surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We use quantum chemistry simulations to study the metal-molecule interactions present in these systems. We find that the excitations that provide a chemical enhancement contain a mixed contribution from the metal and the molecule. Moreover, using atomistic studies we propose an additional source of enhancement, where a transition metal dopant surface could provide an additional enhancement. We also develop methods to study the electrostatic effects of molecules in metallic environments. We study the importance of image-charge effects, as well as field-bias to molecules interacting with perfect conductors. The atomistic modeling and the electrostatic approximation enable us to study the effects of the metal interacting with the molecule in a complementary fashion, which provides a better understanding of the complex effects present in SERS. In the second part of this dissertation, we present the Harvard Clean Energy Project, a high-throughput approach for a large-scale computational screening and design of organic photovoltaic materials. We create molecular libraries to search for candidates structures and use quantum chemistry, machine learning and cheminformatics methods to characterize these systems and find structure-property relations. The scale of this study requires an equally large computational resource. We rely on distributed volunteer computing to obtain these properties. In the third part of this dissertation we present our work related to the acceleration of electronic structure

  8. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the Vadose Zone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and vadose zone processes on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles, laboratory scale transport experiments were performed. The complex coupled effects of ionic strength, size of QD aggregates, surface tension, contact angle, infiltrat...

  9. Quantum chemistry by random walk: Exact treatment of many-electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, James B.; Traynor, Carol A.; Boghosian, Bruce M.

    1991-11-01

    We report an improved Monte Carlo method for quantum chemistry which permits the exact treatment of many-electron systems. The method combines many of the best features of earlier fixed-node, released-node, and positive/negative cancellation methods with new ideas for relocation after node crossing, self-cancellations, multiple cancellations, maximum use of symmetry in promoting cancellations, and rigorous evaluation of energies using importance sampling with trial wave functions. The method is illustrated with applications to the problems of the first excited state of a particle in a two-dimensional box, the two-electron system of excited H2 3Σ+u, and the three-electron system of linear symmetric HHH, the intermediate for the reaction H+H2→H2+H.

  10. A quantum chemistry study of curvature effects on boron nitride nanotubes/nanosheets for gas adsorption.

    PubMed

    Sha, Haoyan; Faller, Roland

    2016-07-20

    Quantum chemistry calculations were performed to investigate the effect of the surface curvature of a Boron Nitride (BN) nanotube/nanosheet on gas adsorption. Curved boron nitride layers with different curvatures interacting with a number of different gases including noble gases, oxygen, and water on both their convex and concave sides of the surface were studied using density functional theory (DFT) with a high level dispersion corrected functional. Potential energy surfaces of the gas molecules interacting with the selected BN surfaces were investigated. In addition, the charge distribution and electrostatic potential contour of the selected BN surfaces are discussed. The results reveal how the curvature of the BN surfaces affects gas adsorption. In particular, small curvatures lead to a slight difference in the physisorption energy, while large curvatures present distinct potential energy surfaces, especially for the short-range repulsion.

  11. Quantum chemistry without diagonalization: An extension of the Lanczos method to molecules and solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedinger, Roland; Benard, Marc

    1991-01-01

    We implement here the recursion method and its extensions to the case of nonorthogonal bases (Riedinger et al., 1989) for determining the electronic structure of molecules of intermediate size. The recursion method, which is a variant of the Lanczos method, has been introduced by Heine, Haydock, and Kelly in solid state physics during the 1970s. It provides an invaluable tool for studying the electronic structure of solids and amorphs in direct space, without explicit diagonalization, in the case of orthogonal bases. Applications with nonorthogonal bases are made on the decavanadate ion (V10O28)6-, described within the extended Hückel model. Our extension of the recursion method may even be applied to molecules of large size or to infinite systems, where the usual methods of quantum chemistry fail. It applies to crystals as well as to glasses and molecules, for which no translational symmetry exists.

  12. Multireference quantum chemistry through a joint density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanai, Takeshi; Kurashige, Yuki; Neuscamman, Eric; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2010-01-01

    We describe the joint application of the density matrix renormalization group and canonical transformation theory to multireference quantum chemistry. The density matrix renormalization group provides the ability to describe static correlation in large active spaces, while the canonical transformation theory provides a high-order description of the dynamic correlation effects. We demonstrate the joint theory in two benchmark systems designed to test the dynamic and static correlation capabilities of the methods, namely, (i) total correlation energies in long polyenes and (ii) the isomerization curve of the [Cu2O2]2+ core. The largest complete active spaces and atomic orbital basis sets treated by the joint DMRG-CT theory in these systems correspond to a (24e,24o) active space and 268 atomic orbitals in the polyenes and a (28e,32o) active space and 278 atomic orbitals in [Cu2O2]2+.

  13. Sulfobetaine-Vinylimidazole Block Copolymers: A Robust Quantum Dot Surface Chemistry Expanding Bioimaging's Horizons.

    PubMed

    Tasso, Mariana; Giovanelli, Emerson; Zala, Diana; Bouccara, Sophie; Fragola, Alexandra; Hanafi, Mohamed; Lenkei, Zsolt; Pons, Thomas; Lequeux, Nicolas

    2015-11-24

    Long-term inspection of biological phenomena requires probes of elevated intra- and extracellular stability and target biospecificity. The high fluorescence and photostability of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles contributed to foster their promise as bioimaging tools that could overcome limitations associated with traditional fluorophores. However, QDs' potential as a bioimaging platform relies upon a precise control over the surface chemistry modifications of these nano-objects. Here, a zwitterion-vinylimidazole block copolymer ligand was synthesized, which regroups all anchoring groups in one compact terminal block, while the rest of the chain is endowed with antifouling and bioconjugation moieties. By further application of an oriented bioconjugation approach with whole IgG antibodies, QD nanobioconjugates were obtained that display outstanding intra- and extracellular stability as well as biorecognition capacity. Imaging the internalization and intracellular dynamics of a transmembrane cell receptor, the CB1 brain cannabinoid receptor, both in HEK293 cells and in neurons, illustrates the breadth of potential applications of these nanoprobes.

  14. Neutron scattering, solid state NMR and quantum chemistry studies of 11-keto-progesterone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2004-07-01

    The molecule geometry, frequency and intensity of the IINS and IR vibrational bands of 11-ketoprogesterone have been obtained by the HF, PM3 and density functional theory (DFT) with the B3LYP functionals and 6-31G(d,p) basis set. The optimised bond lengths and bond angles of the steroid skeleton are in good agreement with the X-ray data. The IR and IINS spectra of ketoprogesterone, computed at the DFT level, well reproduce the vibrational wavenumbers and intensities to an accuracy allowing reliable vibrational assignments. The molecular dynamic study by 1H NMR has confirmed the sequence of onset of reorientations of subsequent methyl groups indicated by the results of quantum chemistry calculations and INS spectra.

  15. Progesterone and testosterone studies by neutron scattering and nuclear magnetic resonance methods and quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szyczewski, A.; Hołderna-Natkaniec, K.; Natkaniec, I.

    2004-05-01

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering spectra of progesterone and testosterone measured at 20 and 290 K were compared with the IR spectra measured at 290 K. The Phonon Density of States spectra display well resolved peaks of low frequency internal vibration modes up to 1200 cm -1. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed by semiempirical PM3 method and by the density functional theory method with different basic sets for isolated molecule, as well as for the dimer system of testosterone. The proposed assignment of internal vibrations of normal modes enable us to conclude about the sequence of the onset of the torsion movements of the CH 3 groups. These conclusions were correlated with the results of proton molecular dynamics studies performed by NMR method. The GAUSSIAN program had been used for calculations.

  16. Advances in methods and algorithms in a modern quantum chemistry program package.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yihan; Molnar, Laszlo Fusti; Jung, Yousung; Kussmann, Jörg; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Brown, Shawn T; Gilbert, Andrew T B; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V; Levchenko, Sergey V; O'Neill, Darragh P; DiStasio, Robert A; Lochan, Rohini C; Wang, Tao; Beran, Gregory J O; Besley, Nicholas A; Herbert, John M; Lin, Ching Yeh; Van Voorhis, Troy; Chien, Siu Hung; Sodt, Alex; Steele, Ryan P; Rassolov, Vitaly A; Maslen, Paul E; Korambath, Prakashan P; Adamson, Ross D; Austin, Brian; Baker, Jon; Byrd, Edward F C; Dachsel, Holger; Doerksen, Robert J; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D; Dutoi, Anthony D; Furlani, Thomas R; Gwaltney, Steven R; Heyden, Andreas; Hirata, So; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Kedziora, Gary; Khalliulin, Rustam Z; Klunzinger, Phil; Lee, Aaron M; Lee, Michael S; Liang, Wanzhen; Lotan, Itay; Nair, Nikhil; Peters, Baron; Proynov, Emil I; Pieniazek, Piotr A; Rhee, Young Min; Ritchie, Jim; Rosta, Edina; Sherrill, C David; Simmonett, Andrew C; Subotnik, Joseph E; Woodcock, H Lee; Zhang, Weimin; Bell, Alexis T; Chakraborty, Arup K; Chipman, Daniel M; Keil, Frerich J; Warshel, Arieh; Hehre, Warren J; Schaefer, Henry F; Kong, Jing; Krylov, Anna I; Gill, Peter M W; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2006-07-21

    Advances in theory and algorithms for electronic structure calculations must be incorporated into program packages to enable them to become routinely used by the broader chemical community. This work reviews advances made over the past five years or so that constitute the major improvements contained in a new release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry package, together with illustrative timings and applications. Specific developments discussed include fast methods for density functional theory calculations, linear scaling evaluation of energies, NMR chemical shifts and electric properties, fast auxiliary basis function methods for correlated energies and gradients, equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods for ground and excited states, geminal wavefunctions, embedding methods and techniques for exploring potential energy surfaces.

  17. Bridging the Gap Between Quantum Chemistry and Classical Simulations for CO2 Capture

    SciTech Connect

    Gagliardi, Laura

    2015-09-17

    We have developed a systematic procedure to generate transferable force fields to simulate the behavior of CO2 and other gases in open-metal-site metal organic frameworks using high-level quantum chemical calculations. Monte Carlo simulations based on an ab initio force field for CO2 in the Mg2(dobpdc) material have been employed to describe the interactions of CO2 with open metals. Our study has shed some light on the interpretation of thermodynamic data of flue gas in Mg2(dobpdc). This force field accurately describes the chemistry of the open metal sites, and is transferable to other structures.

  18. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age.

    PubMed

    Adams, Sam; de Castro, Pablo; Echenique, Pablo; Estrada, Jorge; Hanwell, Marcus D; Murray-Rust, Peter; Sherwood, Paul; Thomas, Jens; Townsend, Joe

    2011-10-14

    Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication.In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today.Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of chemical data for use by other

  19. The Quixote project: Collaborative and Open Quantum Chemistry data management in the Internet age

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Computational Quantum Chemistry has developed into a powerful, efficient, reliable and increasingly routine tool for exploring the structure and properties of small to medium sized molecules. Many thousands of calculations are performed every day, some offering results which approach experimental accuracy. However, in contrast to other disciplines, such as crystallography, or bioinformatics, where standard formats and well-known, unified databases exist, this QC data is generally destined to remain locally held in files which are not designed to be machine-readable. Only a very small subset of these results will become accessible to the wider community through publication. In this paper we describe how the Quixote Project is developing the infrastructure required to convert output from a number of different molecular quantum chemistry packages to a common semantically rich, machine-readable format and to build respositories of QC results. Such an infrastructure offers benefits at many levels. The standardised representation of the results will facilitate software interoperability, for example making it easier for analysis tools to take data from different QC packages, and will also help with archival and deposition of results. The repository infrastructure, which is lightweight and built using Open software components, can be implemented at individual researcher, project, organisation or community level, offering the exciting possibility that in future many of these QC results can be made publically available, to be searched and interpreted just as crystallography and bioinformatics results are today. Although we believe that quantum chemists will appreciate the contribution the Quixote infrastructure can make to the organisation and and exchange of their results, we anticipate that greater rewards will come from enabling their results to be consumed by a wider community. As the respositories grow they will become a valuable source of chemical data for use by other

  20. PERSPECTIVE: From computational quantum chemistry to computational biology: experiments and computations are (full) partners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Buyong; Nussinov, Ruth

    2004-12-01

    Computations are being integrated into biological research at an increasingly fast pace. This has not only changed the way in which biological information is managed; it has also changed the way in which experiments are planned in order to obtain information from nature. Can experiments and computations be full partners? Computational chemistry has expanded over the years, proceeding from computations of a hydrogen molecule toward the challenging goal of systems biology, which attempts to handle the entire living cell. Applying theories from ab initio quantum mechanics to simplified models, the virtual worlds explored by computations provide replicas of real-world phenomena. At the same time, the virtual worlds can affect our perception of the real world. Computational biology targets a world of complex organization, for which a unified theory is unlikely to exist. A computational biology model, even if it has a clear physical or chemical basis, may not reduce to physics and chemistry. At the molecular level, computational biology and experimental biology have already been partners, mutually benefiting from each other. For the perception to become reality, computation and experiment should be united as full partners in biological research.

  1. GPU Linear Algebra Libraries and GPGPU Programming for Accelerating MOPAC Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    PubMed

    Maia, Julio Daniel Carvalho; Urquiza Carvalho, Gabriel Aires; Mangueira, Carlos Peixoto; Santana, Sidney Ramos; Cabral, Lucidio Anjos Formiga; Rocha, Gerd B

    2012-09-11

    In this study, we present some modifications in the semiempirical quantum chemistry MOPAC2009 code that accelerate single-point energy calculations (1SCF) of medium-size (up to 2500 atoms) molecular systems using GPU coprocessors and multithreaded shared-memory CPUs. Our modifications consisted of using a combination of highly optimized linear algebra libraries for both CPU (LAPACK and BLAS from Intel MKL) and GPU (MAGMA and CUBLAS) to hasten time-consuming parts of MOPAC such as the pseudodiagonalization, full diagonalization, and density matrix assembling. We have shown that it is possible to obtain large speedups just by using CPU serial linear algebra libraries in the MOPAC code. As a special case, we show a speedup of up to 14 times for a methanol simulation box containing 2400 atoms and 4800 basis functions, with even greater gains in performance when using multithreaded CPUs (2.1 times in relation to the single-threaded CPU code using linear algebra libraries) and GPUs (3.8 times). This degree of acceleration opens new perspectives for modeling larger structures which appear in inorganic chemistry (such as zeolites and MOFs), biochemistry (such as polysaccharides, small proteins, and DNA fragments), and materials science (such as nanotubes and fullerenes). In addition, we believe that this parallel (GPU-GPU) MOPAC code will make it feasible to use semiempirical methods in lengthy molecular simulations using both hybrid QM/MM and QM/QM potentials.

  2. Uquantchem: A versatile and easy to use quantum chemistry computational software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souvatzis, Petros

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we present the Uppsala Quantum Chemistry package (UQUANTCHEM), a new and versatile computational platform with capabilities ranging from simple Hartree-Fock calculations to state of the art First principles Extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (XL-BOMD) and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (DMC). The UQUANTCHEM package is distributed under the general public license and can be directly downloaded from the code web-site (http://www.anst.uu.se/pesou087/DOWNLOAD-UQUANTCHEM/DOWNLOAD-UQUANTCHEM/DOWNLOAD-SITE-UQUANTCHEM.html) [1]. Together with a presentation of the different capabilities of the uquantchem code and a more technical discussion on how these capabilities have been implemented, a presentation of the user-friendly aspect of the package on the basis of the large number of default settings will also be presented. Furthermore, since the code has been parallelized within the framework of the message passing interface (MPI), the timing of some benchmark calculations are reported to illustrate how the code scales with the number of computational nodes for different levels of chemical theory.

  3. The structural chemistry of metallocorroles: combined X-ray crystallography and quantum chemistry studies afford unique insights.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Kolle E; Alemayehu, Abraham B; Conradie, Jeanet; Beavers, Christine M; Ghosh, Abhik

    2012-08-21

    Although they share some superficial structural similarities with porphyrins, corroles, trianionic ligands with contracted cores, give rise to fundamentally different transition metal complexes in comparison with the dianionic porphyrins. Many metallocorroles are formally high-valent, although a good fraction of them are also noninnocent, with significant corrole radical character. These electronic-structural characteristics result in a variety of fascinating spectroscopic behavior, including highly characteristic, paramagnetically shifted NMR spectra and textbook cases of charge-transfer spectra. Although our early research on corroles focused on spectroscopy, we soon learned that the geometric structures of metallocorroles provide a fascinating window into their electronic-structural characteristics. Thus, we used X-ray structure determinations and quantum chemical studies, chiefly using DFT, to obtain a comprehensive understanding of metallocorrole geometric and electronic structures. This Account describes our studies of the structural chemistry of metallocorroles. At first blush, the planar or mildly domed structure of metallocorroles might appear somewhat uninteresting particularly when compared to metalloporphyrins. Metalloporphyrins, especially sterically hindered ones, are routinely ruffled or saddled, but the missing meso carbon apparently makes the corrole skeleton much more resistant to nonplanar distortions. Ruffling, where the pyrrole rings are alternately twisted about the M-N bonds, is energetically impossible for metallocorroles. Saddling is also uncommon; thus, a number of sterically hindered, fully substituted metallocorroles exhibit almost perfectly planar macrocycle cores. Against this backdrop, copper corroles stand out as an important exception. As a result of an energetically favorable Cu(d(x2-y2))-corrole(π) orbital interaction, copper corroles, even sterically unhindered ones, are inherently saddled. Sterically hindered substituents

  4. International journal of quantum chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 27: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowdin, Per-Olov; Ohrn, N. Y.; Sabin, John R.; Zerner, Michael C.

    1993-03-01

    The topics covered at the 33rd annual Sanibel Symposium, organized by the faculty and staff of the Quantum Theory Project of the University of Florida, and held March 13 - 20, 1993, include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems.

  5. Quantum Chemistry Meets Spectroscopy for Astrochemistry: Increasing Complexity toward Prebiotic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Barone, Vincenzo; Biczysko, Malgorzata; Puzzarini, Cristina

    2015-05-19

    For many years, scientists suspected that the interstellar medium was too hostile for organic species and that only a few simple molecules could be formed under such extreme conditions. However, the detection of approximately 180 molecules in interstellar or circumstellar environments in recent decades has changed this view dramatically. A rich chemistry has emerged, and relatively complex molecules such as C60 and C70 are formed. Recently, researchers have also detected complex organic and potentially prebiotic molecules, such as amino acids, in meteorites and in other space environments. Those discoveries have further stimulated the debate on the origin of the building blocks of life in the universe. Many efforts continue to focus on the physical, chemical, and astrophysical processes by which prebiotic molecules can be formed in the interstellar dust and dispersed to Earth or to other planets.Spectroscopic techniques, which are widely used to infer information about molecular structure and dynamics, play a crucial role in the investigation of planetary atmosphere and the interstellar medium. Increasingly these astrochemical investigations are assisted by quantum-mechanical calculations of structures as well as spectroscopic and thermodynamic properties, such as transition frequencies and reaction enthalpies, to guide and support observations, line assignments, and data analysis in these new and chemically complicated situations. However, it has proved challenging to extend accurate quantum-chemical computational approaches to larger systems because of the unfavorable scaling with the number of degrees of freedom (both electronic and nuclear).In this Account, we show that it is now possible to compute physicochemical properties of building blocks of biomolecules with an accuracy rivaling that of the most sophisticated experimental techniques, and we summarize specific contributions from our groups. As a test case, we present the underlying computational machinery

  6. Quantum chemistry calculation-aided structural optimization of combretastatin A-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors: improved stability and biological activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Junhang; Zheng, Canhui; Zhu, Kongkai; Liu, Jia; Sun, Nannan; Wang, Chongqing; Jiang, Hualiang; Zhu, Ju; Luo, Cheng; Zhou, Youjun

    2015-03-12

    A potent combretastatin A-4 (CA-4) like tubulin polymerization inhibitor 22b was found with strong antitumor activity previously. However, it easily undergoes cis-trans isomerization under natural light, and the resulting decrease in activity limits its further applications. In this study, we used quantum chemistry calculations to explore the molecular basis of its instability. Aided by the calculations, two rounds of structural optimization of 22b were conducted. Accelerated quantitative light stability testing confirmed that the stability of these designed compounds was significantly improved as predicted. Among them, compounds 1 and 3b displayed more potent inhibitory activity on tumor cell growth than 22b. In addition, the potent in vivo antitumor activity of compound 1 was confirmed. Quantum chemistry calculations were used in the optimization of stilbene-like molecules, providing new insight into stilbenoid optimization and important implications for the future development of novel CA-4-like tubulin polymerization inhibitors.

  7. Comparison of Oxygen Gauche Effects in Poly(Oxyethylene) and Poly(ethylene terephtylene) Based on Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The so-called oxygen gauche effect in poly(oxyethylene) (POE) and its model molecules such as 1,2-dimethoxyethane (DME) and diglyme (CH3OC2H4OC2H4OCH3) is manifested in the preference for gauche C-C bond conformations over trans. This has also been observed for poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET). Our previous quantum chemistry calculations demonstrated that the large C-C gauche population in DME is due, in part, to a low-lying tg +/- g+ conformer that exhibits a substantial 1,5 CH ... O attraction. New calculations will be described that demonstrate the accuracy of the original quantum chemistry calculations. In addition, an extension of this work to model molecules for PET will be presented. It is seen that the C-C gauche preference is much stronger in 1,2 diacetoxyethane than in DME. In addition, there exist low-lying tg +/- g+/- and g+/-g+/-g+/- conformers that exhibit 1,5 CH ... O attractions involving the carbonyl oxygens. It is expected that the -O-C-C-O- torsional properties will be quite different in these two polymers. The quantum chemistry results are used to parameterize rotational isomeric states models (RIS) and force fields for molecular dynamics simulations of these polymers.

  8. Quantum Chemistry for Large Molecules: Linear-Scaling Mean-Field and Correlated Approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochsenfeld, Christian

    2009-03-01

    A brief review of our work to attain linear scaling computational effort for Hartree-Fock (HF), Density-Functional Theory (DFT), and second-order Mo/ller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) is presented. While we describe linear-scaling methods for calculating molecular response properties of large molecules for HF and DFT, we focus on energetics and energy gradients at the MP2 level. A key element of our approach is the use of multipole-based integral estimates (MBIE) which allow to rigorously preselect four-center two-electron integrals ubiquitous in quantum chemistry. MBIE does not only account for the exponential coupling between basis functions forming charge distributions, but also for the 1/R coupling between the charge distributions. In context of an atomic-orbital based formulation of MP2 theory, the MBIE preselection of significant contributions opens the way to achieve linear scaling, while numerical errors remain fully controlled. The largest system computed sofar at the MP2 level is a DNA strand with 16 base pairs, 1052 atoms, and 10 674 basis functions.

  9. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH2, treated in a 3-21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10(15) W/cm(2)), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  10. Glycoconjugated amphiphilic polymers via click-chemistry for the encapsulation of quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Schmidtke, Christian; Kreuziger, Anna-Marlena; Alpers, Dirk; Jacobsen, Anna; Leshch, Yevgeniy; Eggers, Robin; Kloust, Hauke; Tran, Huong; Ostermann, Johannes; Schotten, Theo; Thiem, Joachim; Thimm, Julian; Weller, Horst

    2013-10-08

    Herein, we present a strategy for the glycoconjugation of nanoparticles (NPs), with a special focus on fluorescent quantum dots (QDs), recently described by us as "preassembly" approach. Therein, prior to the encapsulation of diverse nanoparticles by an amphiphilic poly(isoprene)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) diblock copolymer (PI-b-PEG), the terminal PEG appendage was modified by covalently attaching a carbohydrate moiety using Huisgen-type click-chemistry. Successful functionalization was proven by NMR spectroscopy. The terminally glycoconjugated polymers were subsequently used for the encapsulation of QDs in a phase transfer process, which fully preserved fluorescence properties. Binding of these nanoconstructs to the lectin Concanavalin A (Con A) was studied via surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Depending on the carbohydrate moiety, namely, D-manno-heptulose, D-glucose, D-galactose, 2-deoxy-2-{[methylamino)carbonyl]amino}-D-glucopyranose ("des(nitroso)-streptozotocin"), or D-maltose, the glycoconjugated QDs showed enhanced affinity constants due to multivalent binding effects. None of the constructs showed toxicity from 0.001 to 1 μM (particle concentration) using standard WST and LDH assays on A549 cells.

  11. IR spectrum simulation of molecular structure model of Shendong coal vitrinite by using quantum chemistry method.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jian-Bo; Wang, Ying; Li, Feng-Hai; Yi, Gui-Yun; Zeng, Fan-Gui; Guo, Hong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    The structure of coal needs to be understood from a molecular point of view for clean, effective and high value-added utilization of coal. In the literature, molecular structure model of Shendong coal vitrinite (SV) was established by the authors on the basis of experimental results of ultimate analysis and 13C NMR, and the calculated 13C NMR spectrum of SV model was consistent with the experimental spectrum. In order to further verify the accuracy of SV structure model established by the authors, the infrared spectrum of SV structure model was calculated using quantum chemistry semi-empirical VAMP in this thesis. The results showed that the peak shape of calculated IR spectrum of SV structure model was similar to the experiment's, but the wave number of calculated IR spectrum was obviously higher than that of experimental spectrum. According to the calculated results for model compounds by using the same method, calculated vibrational frequency was higher than that of experiment for the same functional groups. Hence, the calculated IR spectrum should be corrected. After correction the calculated IR spectrum of SV structure model matched well with the experimental spectrum. In other words, the SV structure model can truly reflect the structure characteristics of SV.

  12. Surface chemistry of InP quantum dots: a comprehensive study.

    PubMed

    Cros-Gagneux, Arnaud; Delpech, Fabien; Nayral, Céline; Cornejo, Alfonso; Coppel, Yannick; Chaudret, Bruno

    2010-12-29

    Advanced (1)H, (13)C, and (31)P solution and solid-state NMR studies combined with IR spectroscopy were used to probe, at the molecular scale, the composition and the surface chemistry of indium phosphide (InP) quantum dots (QDs) prepared via a non-coordinating solvent strategy. This nanomaterial can be described as a core-multishell object: an InP core, with a zinc blende bulk structure, is surrounded first by a partially oxidized surface shell, which is itself surrounded by an organic coating. This organic passivating layer is composed, in the first coordination sphere, of tightly bound palmitate ligands which display two different bonding modes. A second coordination sphere includes an unexpected dialkyl ketone and residual long-chain non-coordinating solvents (ODE and its isomers) which interact through weak intermolecular bonds with the alkyl chains of the carboxylate ligands. We show that this ketone is formed during the synthesis process via a decarboxylative coupling route and provides oxidative conditions which are responsible for the oxidation of the InP core surface. This phenomenon has a significant impact on the photoluminescence properties of the as-synthesized QDs and probably accounts for the failure of further growth of the InP core.

  13. Merging quantum-chemistry with B-splines to describe molecular photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argenti, L.; Marante, C.; Klinker, M.; Corral, I.; Gonzalez, J.; Martin, F.

    2016-05-01

    Theoretical description of observables in attosecond pump-probe experiments requires a good representation of the system's ionization continuum. For polyelectronic atoms and molecules, however, this is still a challenge, due to the complicated short-range structure of correlated electronic wavefunctions. Whereas quantum chemistry packages (QCP) implementing sophisticated methods to compute bound electronic molecular states are well established, comparable tools for the continuum are not widely available yet. To tackle this problem, we have developed a new approach that, by means of a hybrid Gaussian-B-spline basis, interfaces existing QCPs with close-coupling scattering methods. To illustrate the viability of this approach, we report results for the multichannel ionization of the helium atom and of the hydrogen molecule that are in excellent agreement with existing accurate benchmarks. These findings, together with the flexibility of QCPs, make of this approach a good candidate for the theoretical study of the ionization of poly-electronic systems. FP7/ERC Grant XCHEM 290853.

  14. Advances in molecular quantum chemistry contained in the Q-Chem 4 program package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yihan; Gan, Zhengting; Epifanovsky, Evgeny; Gilbert, Andrew T. B.; Wormit, Michael; Kussmann, Joerg; Lange, Adrian W.; Behn, Andrew; Deng, Jia; Feng, Xintian; Ghosh, Debashree; Goldey, Matthew; Horn, Paul R.; Jacobson, Leif D.; Kaliman, Ilya; Khaliullin, Rustam Z.; Kuś, Tomasz; Landau, Arie; Liu, Jie; Proynov, Emil I.; Rhee, Young Min; Richard, Ryan M.; Rohrdanz, Mary A.; Steele, Ryan P.; Sundstrom, Eric J.; Woodcock, H. Lee, III; Zimmerman, Paul M.; Zuev, Dmitry; Albrecht, Ben; Alguire, Ethan; Austin, Brian; Beran, Gregory J. O.; Bernard, Yves A.; Berquist, Eric; Brandhorst, Kai; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Brown, Shawn T.; Casanova, David; Chang, Chun-Min; Chen, Yunqing; Chien, Siu Hung; Closser, Kristina D.; Crittenden, Deborah L.; Diedenhofen, Michael; DiStasio, Robert A., Jr.; Do, Hainam; Dutoi, Anthony D.; Edgar, Richard G.; Fatehi, Shervin; Fusti-Molnar, Laszlo; Ghysels, An; Golubeva-Zadorozhnaya, Anna; Gomes, Joseph; Hanson-Heine, Magnus W. D.; Harbach, Philipp H. P.; Hauser, Andreas W.; Hohenstein, Edward G.; Holden, Zachary C.; Jagau, Thomas-C.; Ji, Hyunjun; Kaduk, Benjamin; Khistyaev, Kirill; Kim, Jaehoon; Kim, Jihan; King, Rollin A.; Klunzinger, Phil; Kosenkov, Dmytro; Kowalczyk, Tim; Krauter, Caroline M.; Lao, Ka Un; Laurent, Adèle D.; Lawler, Keith V.; Levchenko, Sergey V.; Lin, Ching Yeh; Liu, Fenglai; Livshits, Ester; Lochan, Rohini C.; Luenser, Arne; Manohar, Prashant; Manzer, Samuel F.; Mao, Shan-Ping; Mardirossian, Narbe; Marenich, Aleksandr V.; Maurer, Simon A.; Mayhall, Nicholas J.; Neuscamman, Eric; Oana, C. Melania; Olivares-Amaya, Roberto; O'Neill, Darragh P.; Parkhill, John A.; Perrine, Trilisa M.; Peverati, Roberto; Prociuk, Alexander; Rehn, Dirk R.; Rosta, Edina; Russ, Nicholas J.; Sharada, Shaama M.; Sharma, Sandeep; Small, David W.; Sodt, Alexander; Stein, Tamar; Stück, David; Su, Yu-Chuan; Thom, Alex J. W.; Tsuchimochi, Takashi; Vanovschi, Vitalii; Vogt, Leslie; Vydrov, Oleg; Wang, Tao; Watson, Mark A.; Wenzel, Jan; White, Alec; Williams, Christopher F.; Yang, Jun; Yeganeh, Sina; Yost, Shane R.; You, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Igor Ying; Zhang, Xing; Zhao, Yan; Brooks, Bernard R.; Chan, Garnet K. L.; Chipman, Daniel M.; Cramer, Christopher J.; Goddard, William A., III; Gordon, Mark S.; Hehre, Warren J.; Klamt, Andreas; Schaefer, Henry F., III; Schmidt, Michael W.; Sherrill, C. David; Truhlar, Donald G.; Warshel, Arieh; Xu, Xin; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Baer, Roi; Bell, Alexis T.; Besley, Nicholas A.; Chai, Jeng-Da; Dreuw, Andreas; Dunietz, Barry D.; Furlani, Thomas R.; Gwaltney, Steven R.; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Jung, Yousung; Kong, Jing; Lambrecht, Daniel S.; Liang, WanZhen; Ochsenfeld, Christian; Rassolov, Vitaly A.; Slipchenko, Lyudmila V.; Subotnik, Joseph E.; Van Voorhis, Troy; Herbert, John M.; Krylov, Anna I.; Gill, Peter M. W.; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2015-01-01

    A summary of the technical advances that are incorporated in the fourth major release of the Q-Chem quantum chemistry program is provided, covering approximately the last seven years. These include developments in density functional theory methods and algorithms, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) property evaluation, coupled cluster and perturbation theories, methods for electronically excited and open-shell species, tools for treating extended environments, algorithms for walking on potential surfaces, analysis tools, energy and electron transfer modelling, parallel computing capabilities, and graphical user interfaces. In addition, a selection of example case studies that illustrate these capabilities is given. These include extensive benchmarks of the comparative accuracy of modern density functionals for bonded and non-bonded interactions, tests of attenuated second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) methods for intermolecular interactions, a variety of parallel performance benchmarks, and tests of the accuracy of implicit solvation models. Some specific chemical examples include calculations on the strongly correlated Cr2 dimer, exploring zeolite-catalysed ethane dehydrogenation, energy decomposition analysis of a charged ter-molecular complex arising from glycerol photoionisation, and natural transition orbitals for a Frenkel exciton state in a nine-unit model of a self-assembling nanotube.

  15. Time-dependent quantum chemistry of laser driven many-electron molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen-Dang, Thanh-Tung; Couture-Bienvenue, Étienne; Viau-Trudel, Jérémy; Sainjon, Amaury

    2014-12-28

    A Time-Dependent Configuration Interaction approach using multiple Feshbach partitionings, corresponding to multiple ionization stages of a laser-driven molecule, has recently been proposed [T.-T. Nguyen-Dang and J. Viau-Trudel, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 244102 (2013)]. To complete this development toward a fully ab-initio method for the calculation of time-dependent electronic wavefunctions of an N-electron molecule, we describe how tools of multiconfiguration quantum chemistry such as the management of the configuration expansion space using Graphical Unitary Group Approach concepts can be profitably adapted to the new context, that of time-resolved electronic dynamics, as opposed to stationary electronic structure. The method is applied to calculate the detailed, sub-cycle electronic dynamics of BeH{sub 2}, treated in a 3–21G bound-orbital basis augmented by a set of orthogonalized plane-waves representing continuum-type orbitals, including its ionization under an intense λ = 800 nm or λ = 80 nm continuous-wave laser field. The dynamics is strongly non-linear at the field-intensity considered (I ≃ 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}), featuring important ionization of an inner-shell electron and strong post-ionization bound-electron dynamics.

  16. Progesterone and testosterone studies by neutron-scattering methods and quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holderna-Natkaniec, K.; Szyczewski, A.; Natkaniec, I.; Khavryutchenko, V. D.; Pawlukojc, A.

    Inelastic incoherent neutron scattering (IINS) and neutron diffraction spectra of progesterone and testosterone were measured simultaneously on the NERA spectrometer at the IBR-2 pulsed reactor in Dubna. Both studied samples do not indicate any phase transition in the temperature range from 20 to 290K. The IINS spectra have been transformed to the phonon density of states (PDS) in the one-phonon scattering approximation. The PDS spectra display well-resolved peaks of low-frequency internal vibration modes up to 600cm-1. The assignment of these modes was proposed taking into account the results of calculations of the structure and dynamics of isolated molecules of the investigated substances. The quantum chemistry calculations were performed by the semi-empirical PM3 method and at the restricted Hartree-Fock level with the 6-31* basis set. The lower internal modes assigned to torsional vibration of the androstane skeleton mix with the lattice vibrations. The intense bands in the PDS spectra in the frequency range from 150 to 300cm-1 are related to librations of structurally inequivalent methyl groups.

  17. Quantum chemistry investigation on the reaction mechanism of the elemental mercury, chlorine, bromine and ozone system.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhengyang; Lv, Shaokun; Yang, Weijie; Yang, Pengfei; Ji, Shuo; Meng, Xinxin

    2015-06-01

    Ab initio calculations were performed to study the quantum chemistry reactions mechanisms among Hg(0), elemental halogen and O3. The geometry of reactions, transition states (TS), intermediates (M) and products were optimized using the MP2 method at the SDD basis function level for Hg, and using 6-311++G (3df, 3pd) for other species. Molecular energies were calculated at QCISD (T) level with zero point energy. Activation energies were calculated along with pre-exponential factors . The reaction rate constants within 298-1800 K were calculated according to transition state theory (TST). The influences of O3 on the reaction of Hg(0) with halogen are discussed. Hg(0) can be oxidized to Hg(1+) by halogen and O3, and halogen and O3 can be arranged in decreasing order as: Br2 > BrO > O3 > Br > Cl, BrCl > HBr > HCl, Br2 > Cl2 according to reaction rate constants. When O3 is presented, Br2, HBr, BrCl, Cl2 and HCl react with O3 and are initially converted to BrO and ClO. O3 is unfavorable for oxidation of Hg(0) by Br2. The mixture of HBr and O3 has better oxidizing Hg(0) performance than HBr and O3. Cl is less effective than Br for oxidation of Hg(0).

  18. Programmability of the HPCS Languages: A Case Study with a Quantum Chemistry Kernel

    SciTech Connect

    Shet, Aniruddha G; Elwasif, Wael R; Harrison, Robert J; Bernholdt, David E

    2008-01-01

    As high-end computer systems present users with rapidly increasing numbers of processors, possibly also incorporating attached co-processors, programmers are increasingly challenged to express the necessary levels of concurrency with the dominant parallel programming model, Fortran+MPI+OpenMP (or minor variations). In this paper, we examine the languages developed under the DARPA High-Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program (Chapel, Fortress, and X10) as representatives of a different parallel programming model which might be more effective on coming high-performance systems. The application used in this study is the Hartree-Fock method from quantum chemistry, which combines access to distributed data with a task-parallel algorithm and is characterized by significant irregularity in the computational tasks. We present several different implementation strategies for load balancing of the task parallel computation, as well as distributed array operations, in each of the three languages. We conclude that the HPCS languages provide a wide variety of mechanisms for expressing parallelism, which can be combined at multiple levels, making them quite expressive for this problem.

  19. Programmability of the HPCS Languages: A Case Study with a Quantum Chemistry Kernel (Extended Version)

    SciTech Connect

    Shet, Aniruddha G; Elwasif, Wael R; Harrison, Robert J; Bernholdt, David E

    2008-04-01

    As high-end computer systems present users with rapidly increasing numbers of processors, possibly also incorporating attached co-processors, programmers are increasingly challenged to express the necessary levels of concurrency with the dominant parallel programming model, Fortran+MPI+OpenMP (or minor variations). In this paper, we examine the languages developed under the DARPA High-Productivity Computing Systems (HPCS) program (Chapel, Fortress, and X10) as representatives of a different parallel programming model which might be more effective on coming high-performance systems. The application used in this study is the Hartree-Fock method from quantum chemistry, which combines access to distributed data with a task-parallel algorithm and is characterized by significant irregularity in the computational tasks. We present several different implementation strategies for load balancing of the task parallel computation, as well as distributed array operations, in each of the three languages. We conclude that the HPCS languages provide a wide variety of mechanisms for expressing parallelism, which can be combined at multiple levels, making them quite expressive for this problem.

  20. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Bernholdt, David E; Pitzer, R. M.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-01-01

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations, such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions, are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multidimensional tensors is described, and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  1. Performance Optimization of Tensor Contraction Expressions for Many Body Methods in Quantum Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Hartono, Albert; Lu, Qingda; henretty, thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; zhang, huaijian; Baumgartner, Gerald; Bernholdt, David E.; Nooijen, Marcel; Pitzer, Russell M.; Ramanujam, J.; Sadayappan, Ponnuswamy

    2009-11-12

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multi-dimensional tensors is described and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  2. Pressure-driven phase transition mechanisms revealed by quantum chemistry: l-serine polymorphs.

    PubMed

    Rychkov, Denis A; Stare, Jernej; Boldyreva, Elena V

    2017-03-01

    The present study delivers a computational approach for the understanding of the mechanism of phase transitions between polymorphs of small organic molecules. By using state of the art periodic DFT calculations augmented with dispersion corrections and an external stress tensor together with gas-phase cluster calculations, we thoroughly explained the reversible phase transitions of three polymorphs of the model system, namely crystalline l-serine in the pressure range up to 8 GPa. This study has shown that at the macroscopic level the main driving force of the phase transitions is the decrease in the volume of the crystal unit cell, which contributes to the enthalpy difference between the two forms, but not to the difference in their internal crystal energies. At the microscopic level we suggest that hydrogen bond overstrain leads to a martensitic-like, cooperative, displacive phase transition with substantial experimental hysteresis, while no such overstrain was found for the "normal type", atom per atom, reconstructive phase transition. The predicted pressures for the phase transitions deducted by the minimum enthalpy criterion are in reasonable agreement with the observed ones. By delivering unambiguous explanations not provided by previous studies and probably not accessible to experiment, this work demonstrates the predictive and explanatory power of quantum chemistry, confirming its indispensable role in structural studies.

  3. Performance optimization of tensor contraction expressions for many-body methods in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hartono, Albert; Lu, Qingda; Henretty, Thomas; Krishnamoorthy, Sriram; Zhang, Huaijian; Baumgartner, Gerald; Bernholdt, David E; Nooijen, Marcel; Pitzer, Russell; Ramanujam, J; Sadayappan, P

    2009-11-12

    Complex tensor contraction expressions arise in accurate electronic structure models in quantum chemistry, such as the coupled cluster method. This paper addresses two complementary aspects of performance optimization of such tensor contraction expressions. Transformations using algebraic properties of commutativity and associativity can be used to significantly decrease the number of arithmetic operations required for evaluation of these expressions. The identification of common subexpressions among a set of tensor contraction expressions can result in a reduction of the total number of operations required to evaluate the tensor contractions. The first part of the paper describes an effective algorithm for operation minimization with common subexpression identification and demonstrates its effectiveness on tensor contraction expressions for coupled cluster equations. The second part of the paper highlights the importance of data layout transformation in the optimization of tensor contraction computations on modern processors. A number of considerations, such as minimization of cache misses and utilization of multimedia vector instructions, are discussed. A library for efficient index permutation of multidimensional tensors is described, and experimental performance data is provided that demonstrates its effectiveness.

  4. Influence of Force Fields and Quantum Chemistry Approach on Spectral Densities of BChl a in Solution and in FMO Proteins.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Suryanarayanan; Aghtar, Mortaza; Valleau, Stéphanie; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Kleinekathöfer, Ulrich

    2015-08-06

    Studies on light-harvesting (LH) systems have attracted much attention after the finding of long-lived quantum coherences in the exciton dynamics of the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex. In this complex, excitation energy transfer occurs between the bacteriochlorophyll a (BChl a) pigments. Two quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) studies, each with a different force-field and quantum chemistry approach, reported different excitation energy distributions for the FMO complex. To understand the reasons for these differences in the predicted excitation energies, we have carried out a comparative study between the simulations using the CHARMM and AMBER force field and the Zerner intermediate neglect of differential orbital (ZINDO)/S and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) quantum chemistry methods. The calculations using the CHARMM force field together with ZINDO/S or TDDFT always show a wider spread in the energy distribution compared to those using the AMBER force field. High- or low-energy tails in these energy distributions result in larger values for the spectral density at low frequencies. A detailed study on individual BChl a molecules in solution shows that without the environment, the density of states is the same for both force field sets. Including the environmental point charges, however, the excitation energy distribution gets broader and, depending on the applied methods, also asymmetric. The excitation energy distribution predicted using TDDFT together with the AMBER force field shows a symmetric, Gaussian-like distribution.

  5. Final report summary of LDRD 02-LW-022''Quantum Vibrations in Molecules: A New Frontier in Computational Chemistry''

    SciTech Connect

    Glaesemann, K R

    2004-01-22

    With the trend towards needing information about chemistry at conditions significantly different from 298K and 1 atm., methods need to be developed to generate and interpret this data. This demand for information about chemistry at extreme conditions comes from many fields. The study of atmospheric chemistry requires knowledge of unusual species that are formed when molecules are exposed to ultraviolet radiation. Studying of energetic materials requires knowledge of the thermochemical and structural properties of a myriad of chemical species under a wide range of temperatures. Basic scientific understanding of the very nature of a chemical bond requires detailed information. Studying these problems computationally requires multiple capabilities. The methodology used must provide both high accuracy and computational efficiency. Studying extreme chemistry also suffers from all the challenges of studying chemistry under non-extreme conditions. Therefore, either a new method must be developed or an old method must be applied in an innovative way. The method we have chosen to use is path integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) for the nuclear degrees of freedom and ab initio electronic structure methods for the electronic degrees of freedom. PIMC and ab initio electronic structure are methods of treating the quantum nature of particles. These methods have been chosen, because an accurate treatment requires treating both the electrons and the nuclei as quantum particles. We developed new ''projected'' methods that reduce the computational demands. These methods along with PIMC in general are described in two Journal of Chemical Physics articles (UCRL-JC-144960 and UCRL-JC-147423). This methodology was implemented into a PIMC code developed as part of this LDRD. The code was parallelized in order to utilize the computational resources of LLNL.

  6. Mapping of the interaction sites of galanthamine: a quantitative analysis through pairwise potentials and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Galland, Nicolas; Kone, Soleymane; Le Questel, Jean-Yves

    2012-10-01

    A quantitative analysis of the interaction sites of the anti-Alzheimer drug galanthamine with molecular probes (water and benzene molecules) representative of its surroundings in the binding site of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) has been realized through pairwise potentials calculations and quantum chemistry. This strategy allows a full and accurate exploration of the galanthamine potential energy surface of interaction. Significantly different results are obtained according to the distances of approaches between the various molecular fragments and the conformation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent. The geometry of the most relevant complexes has then been fully optimized through MPWB1K/6-31 + G(d,p) calculations, final energies being recomputed at the LMP2/aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) level of theory. Unexpectedly, galanthamine is found to interact mainly from its hydrogen-bond donor groups. Among those, CH groups in the vicinity of the ammonium group are prominent. The trends obtained provide rationales to the predilection of the equatorial orientation of the galanthamine N-methyl substituent for binding to AChE. The analysis of the interaction energies pointed out the independence between the various interaction sites and the rigid character of galanthamine. The comparison between the cluster calculations and the crystallographic observations in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals allows the validation of the theoretical methodology. In particular, the positions of several water molecules appearing as strongly conserved in galanthamine-AChE co-crystals are predicted by the calculations. Moreover, the experimental position and orientation of lateral chains of functionally important aminoacid residues are in close agreement with the ones predicted theoretically. Our study provides relevant information for a rational drug design of galanthamine based AChE inhibitors.

  7. Secondary Structures in Phe-Containing Isolated Dipeptide Chains: Laser Spectroscopy vs Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Loquais, Yohan; Gloaguen, Eric; Habka, Sana; Vaquero-Vara, Vanesa; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel

    2015-06-11

    The intrinsic conformational landscape of two phenylalanine-containing protein chain models (-Gly-Phe- and -Ala-Phe- sequences) has been investigated theoretically and experimentally in the gas phase. The near UV spectroscopy (first ππ* transition of the Phe ring) is obtained experimentally under jet conditions where the conformational features can be resolved. Single-conformation IR spectroscopy in the NH stretch region is then obtained by IR/UV double resonance in the ground state, leading to resolved vibrational spectra that are assigned in terms of conformation and H-bonding content from comparison with quantum chemistry calculations. For the main conformer, whose UV spectrum exhibits a significant Franck-Condon activity in low frequency modes involving peptide backbone motions relative to the Phe chromophore, excited state IR spectroscopy has also been recorded in a UV/IR/UV experiment. The NH stretch spectral changes observed in such a ππ* labeling experiment enable us to determine those NH bonds that are coupled to the phenyl ring; they are compared to CC2 excited state calculations to quantify the geometry change upon ππ* excitation. The complete and consistent series of data obtained enable us to propose an unambiguous assignment for the gallery of conformers observed and to demonstrate that, in these two sequences, three conceptually important local structural motifs of proteins (β-strands, 27 ribbons, and β-turns) are represented. The satisfactory agreement between the experimental conformational distribution and the predicted landscape anticipated from the DFT-D approach demonstrates the capabilities of a theoretical method that accounts for dispersive interactions. It also shows that the flaws, inherent to a resonant two-photon ionization detection scheme, often evoked for aromatic chromophores, do not seem to be significant in the case of Phe.

  8. Low-rank spectral expansions of two electron excitations for the acceleration of quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwerdtfeger, Christine A.; Mazziotti, David A.

    2012-12-01

    Treatment of two-electron excitations is a fundamental but computationally expensive part of ab initio calculations of many-electron correlation. In this paper we develop a low-rank spectral expansion of two-electron excitations for accelerated electronic-structure calculations. The spectral expansion differs from previous approaches by relying upon both (i) a sum of three expansions to increase the rank reduction of the tensor and (ii) a factorization of the tensor into geminal (rank-two) tensors rather than orbital (rank-one) tensors. We combine three spectral expansions from the three distinct forms of the two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM), (i) the two-particle 2D, (ii) the two-hole 2Q, and the (iii) particle-hole 2G matrices, to produce a single spectral expansion with significantly accelerated convergence. While the resulting expansion is applicable to any quantum-chemistry calculation with two-particle excitation amplitudes, it is employed here in the parametric 2-RDM method [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253002 (2008)], 10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.253002. The low-rank parametric 2-RDM method scales quartically with the basis-set size, but like its full-rank version it can capture multi-reference correlation effects that are difficult to treat efficiently by traditional single-reference wavefunction methods. Applications are made to computing potential energy curves of HF and triplet OH+, equilibrium bond distances and frequencies, the HCN-HNC isomerization, and the energies of hydrocarbon chains. Computed 2-RDMs nearly satisfy necessary N-representability conditions. The low-rank spectral expansion has the potential to expand the applicability of the parametric 2-RDM method as well as other ab initio methods to large-scale molecular systems that are often only treatable by mean-field or density functional theories.

  9. Automated quantum chemistry based molecular dynamics simulations of electron ionization induced fragmentations of the nucleobases Uracil, Thymine, Cytosine, and Guanine.

    PubMed

    Grimme, Stefan; Bauer, Christopher Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The gas-phase decomposition pathways of electron ionization (EI)-induced radical cations of the nucleobases uracil, thymine, cytosine, and guanine are investigated by means of mixed quantum-classical molecular dynamics. No preconceived fragmentation channels are used in the calculations. The results compare well to a plethora of experimental and theoretical data for these important biomolecules. With our combined stochastic and dynamic approach, one can access in an unbiased way the energetically available decomposition mechanisms. Additionally, we are able to separate the EI mass spectra of different tautomers of cytosine and guanine. Our method (previously termed quantum chemistry electron ionization mass spectra) reproduces free nucleobase experimental mass spectra well and provides detailed mechanistic in-sight into high-energy unimolecular decomposition processes.

  10. Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry 2014: Celebrating the International Year of Light 2015, commemorating the Old Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yu

    2015-01-01

    2015 is the International Year of Light and Light-based Technologies (IYL), while the physics and chemistry Nobel Prizes 2014 are both about light. The work leading to the two prizes share the same basic theoretical foundation: when an electron jumps from a higher energy level to a lower energy level, the energy difference is transformed into a photon. This basic way of light generation is a key part of the Old Quantum Theory. Interestingly, the date of announcing the 2014 Nobel Prize for physics coincided with the birthdays of Niels Bohr and, especially, of Planck's blackbody radiation formula. In connection with the two 2014 Nobel Prizes, we recall the development of the Old Quantum Theory by Planck, Einstein and Bohr.

  11. THE IONIC PATHWAYS OF LITHIUM CHEMISTRY IN THE EARLY UNIVERSE: QUANTUM CALCULATIONS FOR LiH{sup +} REACTING WITH H

    SciTech Connect

    Bovino, S.; Gianturco, F. A.; Stoecklin, T.

    2010-01-10

    To better understand the overall role of lithium chemistry in the early universe, reactive quantum calculations involving LiH{sup +} have been carried out and rate coefficients have been obtained. The reactive quantum calculations have been performed using a negative imaginary potential method. Infinite-order sudden approximation and the coupled state approximation have been used to simplify the angular coupling dynamics. Rate coefficients are obtained from the reactive cross sections by further integration over Boltzmann distribution of velocities. The results from the present calculations suggest that, at low redshifts (z), LiH{sup +} should be amenable to observation as imprinted on the cosmic background radiation, in contrast with its neutral counterpart. At higher z, the ionic species may disappear through both depletion reaction and three-body break-up processes.

  12. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  13. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  14. Integration of graph theory and quantum chemistry for structure-activity relationships.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, K

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this article is to outline both graph-theoretically based and quantum chemically based structural indices of potential use in quantitative structure activity correlations. We consider graph-theoretical indices such as the connectivity index, topological index, Wiener index and molecular ID indices. Several structural and geometry-dependent indices can be derived from semiempirical and ab initio quantum calculations based on the charge densities, overlap matrices, frontier orbitals, molecular hardness, free valence, density matrices, quantum spectral difference indices, quantum spectral indices and bond matrices. Finally, the use of electrostatic potentials and charge densities for the prediction of reactive sites will be discussed.

  15. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-07

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  16. On the interaction between supercritical CO2 and epoxides combining infrared absorption spectroscopy and quantum chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Foltran, Stéphanie; Méreau, Raphaël; Tassaing, Thierry

    2011-05-28

    The nature and strength of the interactions occurring between epoxides and CO(2) have been investigated by combining infrared spectroscopy with quantum chemistry calculations. A series of infrared absorption experiments on four model epoxide molecules highly diluted in supercritical CO(2) have been performed at constant temperature T = 40 °C for various CO(2) pressures varying from 1 to 30 MPa. Then, we carried out a theoretical analysis based on quantum chemistry calculations using Density Functional Theory (B3PW91 and CAM-B3LYP) and ab initio (MP2) computational methods. A very good agreement between experimental and calculated vibrational frequency shifts of the epoxide ring vibrations group was obtained using the CAM-B3LYP functional, hence validating the calculated optimized geometries of the epoxide-CO(2) complexes. Whatever the epoxide considered, CO(2) is found to be on average above the oxygen atom of the epoxy ring and interacts with the carbon atom of CO(2) through a Lewis acid-Lewis base type of interaction. The substituents on the epoxide ring are found to influence the stability of the epoxide-CO(2) complexes mainly because of the partial charge on the oxygen atom that is sensitive to the nature of the substituent.

  17. Characterizing Surface Acidic Sites in Mesoporous-Silica-Supported Tungsten Oxide Catalysts Using Solid State NMR and Quantum Chemistry Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Kwak, Ja Hun; Wang, Yong; Hu, Mary Y.; Turcu, Romulus VF; Peden, Charles HF

    2011-10-18

    The acidic sites in dispersed tungsten oxide supported on SBA-15 mesoporous silica were investigated using a combination of pyridine titration, both fast-, and slow-MAS {sup 15}N NMR, static {sup 2}H NMR, and quantum chemistry calculations. It is found that the bridged acidic -OH groups in surface adsorbed tungsten dimers (i.e., W-OH-W) are the Broensted acid sites. The unusually strong acidity of these Broensted acid sites is confirmed by quantum chemistry calculations. In contrast, terminal W-OH sites are very stable and only weakly acidic as are terminal Si-OH sites. Furthermore, molecular interactions between pyridine molecules and the dimer Broensted and terminal W-OH sites for dispersed tungsten oxide species is strong. This results in restricted molecular motion for the interacting pyridine molecules even at room temperature, i.e., a reorientation mainly about the molecular 2-fold axis. This restricted reorientation makes it possible to estimate the relative ratio of the Broensted (tungsten dimer) to the weakly acidic terminal W-OH sites in the catalyst using the slow-MAS {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N CP PASS method.

  18. A Component Approach to Collaborative Scientific Software Development: Tools and Techniques Utilized by the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership

    DOE PAGES

    Kenny, Joseph P.; Janssen, Curtis L.; Gordon, Mark S.; ...

    2008-01-01

    Cutting-edge scientific computing software is complex, increasingly involving the coupling of multiple packages to combine advanced algorithms or simulations at multiple physical scales. Component-based software engineering (CBSE) has been advanced as a technique for managing this complexity, and complex component applications have been created in the quantum chemistry domain, as well as several other simulation areas, using the component model advocated by the Common Component Architecture (CCA) Forum. While programming models do indeed enable sound software engineering practices, the selection of programming model is just one building block in a comprehensive approach to large-scale collaborative development which must also addressmore » interface and data standardization, and language and package interoperability. We provide an overview of the development approach utilized within the Quantum Chemistry Science Application Partnership, identifying design challenges, describing the techniques which we have adopted to address these challenges and highlighting the advantages which the CCA approach offers for collaborative development.« less

  19. Quantum chemistry and dynamics of the abstraction reaction of H atoms from formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siaï, A.; Oueslati, I.; Kerkeni, Boutheïna

    2016-08-01

    This work reports a reduced dimensionality rate constant calculation of the H-abstraction reaction from formaldehyde. Quantum scattering calculations are performed treating explicitly the bonds being broken and formed. Geometry optimisations and frequency calculations are done at the MP2/cc-pVTZ level while energies are calculated with the CCSD(T) method. An analytical potential energy surface was developed from a relatively small number of grid points. When compared to semi-classical approaches, the quantum scattering calculations show that quantum tunnelling yields large contributions at low temperatures. At 200 K, we note a difference of about 5 orders of magnitude between transition state theory (TST) and quantum rate constants. Our predicted results show that the quantum and the CVT/SCT rate constants are in reasonable agreement with the available experiment at high temperatures, but that the last one gives better agreement to experimental results at low temperatures.

  20. Quantum Chemistry on Quantum Computers: A Polynomial-Time Quantum Algorithm for Constructing the Wave Functions of Open-Shell Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2016-08-18

    Quantum computers are capable to efficiently perform full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations of atoms and molecules by using the quantum phase estimation (QPE) algorithm. Because the success probability of the QPE depends on the overlap between approximate and exact wave functions, efficient methods to prepare accurate initial guess wave functions enough to have sufficiently large overlap with the exact ones are highly desired. Here, we propose a quantum algorithm to construct the wave function consisting of one configuration state function, which is suitable for the initial guess wave function in QPE-based FCI calculations of open-shell molecules, based on the addition theorem of angular momentum. The proposed quantum algorithm enables us to prepare the wave function consisting of an exponential number of Slater determinants only by a polynomial number of quantum operations.

  1. InAs Colloidal Quantum Dots Synthesis via Aminopnictogen Precursor Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Grigel, Valeriia; Dupont, Dorian; De Nolf, Kim; Hens, Zeger; Tessier, Mickael D

    2016-10-05

    Despite their various potential applications, InAs colloidal quantum dots have attracted considerably less attention than more classical II-VI materials because of their complex syntheses that require hazardous precursors. Recently, amino-phosphine has been introduced as a cheap, easy-to-use and efficient phosphorus precursor to synthesize InP quantum dots. Here, we use aminopnictogen precursors to implement a similar approach for synthesizing InAs quantum dots. We develop a two-step method based on the combination of aminoarsine as the arsenic precursor and aminophosphine as the reducing agent. This results in state-of-the-art InAs quantum dots with respect to the size dispersion and band-gap range. Moreover, we present shell coating procedures that lead to the formation of InAs/ZnS(e) core/shell quantum dots that emit in the infrared region. This innovative synthesis approach can greatly facilitate the research on InAs quantum dots and may lead to synthesis protocols for a wide range of III-V quantum dots.

  2. Surface functionalization of glassy carbon electrodes via adsorption, electrografting and click chemistry using quantum dots and alkynyl substituted phthalocyanines: a brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nxele, Siphesihle Robin; Mashazi, Philani; Nyokong, Tebello

    2016-02-01

    In this work, glassy carbon electrodes are functionalised with alkynyl substituted phthalocyanines via electrografting and click chemistry as well as with quantum dots (QDs)-phthalocyanine conjugates via adsorption. The use of click chemistry and the addition of QDs is to try observe improvements in the electrocatalytic behaviour of electrocatalyst compared to similar electrocatalysts in literature. The electrografting and click chemistry methods provide greater molecule stability on the substrate surface due to the covalent bonds formed. Results show that these methods of electrode fabrication do improve the functionality of the electrocatalysts.

  3. A Surface Chemistry Approach to Enhancing Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids for Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Graham Hamilton

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaic devices have improved rapidly over the past decade of research. By taking advantage of the quantum confinement effect, solar cells constructed using films of infrared-bandgap nanoparticles are able to capture previously untapped ranges of the solar energy spectrum. Additionally, films are fabricated using simple, cheap, reproducible solution processing techniques, enabling the creation of low-cost, flexible photovoltaic devices. A key factor limiting the creation of high efficiency CQD solar cells is the short charge carrier diffusion length in films. Driven by a combination of limited carrier mobility, poor nanoparticle surface passivation, and the presence of unexamined electrically active impurities throughout the film, the poor diffusion length limits the active layer thickness in CQD solar cells, leading to lower-than-desired light absorption, and curtailing the photocurrent generated by such devices. This thesis seeks to address poor diffusion length by addressing each of the limiting factors in turn. Electrical transport in quantum dot solids is examined in the context of improved quantum dot packing; methods are developed to improve packing by using actively densifying components, or by dramatically lowering the volume change required between quantum dots in solution and in solid state. Quantum dot surface passivation is improved by introducing a crucial secondary, small halide ligand source, and by surveying the impact of the processing environment on the final quality of the quantum dot surface. A heretofore unidentified impurity present in quantum dot solids is identified, characterized, and chemically eliminated. Finally, lessons learned through these experiments are combined into a single, novel materials system, leading to quantum dot devices with a significantly improved diffusion length (enhanced from 70 to 230 nm). This enabled thick, high current density (30 mA cm -2, compared to typical values in the 20

  4. Negative muon chemistry: the quantum muon effect and the finite nuclear mass effect.

    PubMed

    Posada, Edwin; Moncada, Félix; Reyes, Andrés

    2014-10-09

    The any-particle molecular orbital method at the full configuration interaction level has been employed to study atoms in which one electron has been replaced by a negative muon. In this approach electrons and muons are described as quantum waves. A scheme has been proposed to discriminate nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on chemical properties of muonic and regular atoms. This study reveals that the differences in the ionization potentials of isoelectronic muonic atoms and regular atoms are of the order of millielectronvolts. For the valence ionizations of muonic helium and muonic lithium the nuclear mass effects are more important. On the other hand, for 1s ionizations of muonic atoms heavier than beryllium, the quantum muon effects are more important. In addition, this study presents an assessment of the nuclear mass and quantum muon effects on the barrier of Heμ + H2 reaction.

  5. Rigorous Ab Initio Quantum Embedding for Quantum Chemistry Using Green's Function Theory: Screened Interaction, Nonlocal Self-Energy Relaxation, Orbital Basis, and Chemical Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Lan, Tran; Kananenka, Alexei A; Zgid, Dominika

    2016-10-11

    We present a detailed discussion of the self-energy embedding theory (SEET), which is a quantum embedding scheme allowing us to describe a chosen subsystem very accurately while keeping the description of the environment at a lower level. We apply SEET to molecular examples where our chosen subsystem is made out of a set of strongly correlated orbitals while the weakly correlated orbitals constitute an environment. Consequently, a highly accurate method is used to calculate the self-energy for the system, while a lower-level method is employed to find the self-energy for the environment. Such a self-energy separation is very general, and to make the SEET procedure applicable to multiple systems, a detailed and practical procedure for the evaluation of the system and environment self-energy is necessary. We list all of the intricacies for one of the possible procedures while focusing our discussion on many practical implementation aspects such as the choice of best orbital basis, impurity solver, and many steps necessary to reach chemical accuracy. Finally, on a set of carefully chosen molecular examples, we demonstrate that SEET, which is a controlled, systematically improvable Green's function method, can be as accurate as established wave function quantum chemistry methods.

  6. Carrier mobility in double-helix DNA and RNA: A quantum chemistry study with Marcus-Hush theory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Sun, Lei; Shi, Qi; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Weiqiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2016-12-21

    Charge mobilities of six DNAs and RNAs have been computed using quantum chemistry calculation combined with the Marcus-Hush theory. Based on this simulation model, we obtained quite reasonable results when compared with the experiment, and the obtained charge mobility strongly depends on the molecular reorganization and electronic coupling. Besides, we find that hole mobilities are larger than electron mobilities no matter in DNAs or in RNAs, and the hole mobility of 2L8I can reach 1.09 × 10(-1) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) which can be applied in the molecular wire. The findings also show that our theoretical model can be regarded as a promising candidate for screening DNA- and RNA-based molecular electronic devices.

  7. Comparison of Chain Conformation of Poly(vinyl alcohol) in Solutions and Melts from Quantum Chemistry Based Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Matsuda, Tsunetoshi; Yoon, Do; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Confirmations of 2,4-dihydroxypentane (DHP), a model molecule for poly(vinyl alcohol), have been studied by quantum chemistry (QC) calculations and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. QC calculations at the 6-311G MP2 level show the meso tt conformer to be lowest in energy followed by the racemic tg, due to intramolecular hydrogen bond between the hydroxy groups. The Dreiding force field has been modified to reproduce the QC conformer energies for DHP. MD simulations using this force field have been carried out for DHP molecules in the gas phase, melt, and CHCl3 and water solutions. Extensive intramolecular hydrogen bonding is observed for the gas phase and CHCl3 solution, but not for the melt or aqueous solution, Such a condensed phase effect due to intermolecular interactions results in a drastic change in chain conformations, in agreement with experiments.

  8. Carrier mobility in double-helix DNA and RNA: A quantum chemistry study with Marcus-Hush theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Sun, Lei; Shi, Qi; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Weiqiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2016-12-01

    Charge mobilities of six DNAs and RNAs have been computed using quantum chemistry calculation combined with the Marcus-Hush theory. Based on this simulation model, we obtained quite reasonable results when compared with the experiment, and the obtained charge mobility strongly depends on the molecular reorganization and electronic coupling. Besides, we find that hole mobilities are larger than electron mobilities no matter in DNAs or in RNAs, and the hole mobility of 2L8I can reach 1.09 × 10-1 cm2 V-1 s-1 which can be applied in the molecular wire. The findings also show that our theoretical model can be regarded as a promising candidate for screening DNA- and RNA-based molecular electronic devices.

  9. Electron diffraction study of the equilibrium structure of hexamethylenetetramine involving data from quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaikin, L. S.; Grikina, O. E.; Karasev, N. M.; Kovtun, D. M.; Kochikov, I. V.

    2014-04-01

    The equilibrium structure of the urotropine molecule is characterized by means of gas electron diffraction (GED) with the involvement of quantum chemistry and vibrational spectroscopy. A structural analysis of the GED data is performed based on the parameters of the intramolecular potential function using of the program complex SYMM/DISP/ELDIFF/LARGE. The quadratic and cubic force constants of the urotropine molecule were obtained earlier on the basis of calculations at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level and assuming molecular symmetry T d . The values of the equilibrium geometric parameters r e of the urotropine molecule are found. The experimental structural parameters are in good agreement with those calculated at the MP2(full)/cc-pVTZ level.

  10. A Writing and Ethics Component for a Quantum Mechanics, Physical Chemistry Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reilly, John T.; Strickland, Michael

    2010-01-01

    A writing-across-the-curriculum and ethics component is presented for a second-semester, physical chemistry course. The activity involves introducing ethical issues pertinent to scientists. Students are asked to read additional material, participate in discussions, and write essays and a paper on an ethical issue. The writing and discussion…

  11. Picture this: The value of multiple visual representations for student learning of quantum concepts in general chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Emily Christine

    Mental models for scientific learning are often defined as, "cognitive tools situated between experiments and theories" (Duschl & Grandy, 2012). In learning, these cognitive tools are used to not only take in new information, but to help problem solve in new contexts. Nancy Nersessian (2008) describes a mental model as being "[loosely] characterized as a representation of a system with interactive parts with representations of those interactions. Models can be qualitative, quantitative, and/or simulative (mental, physical, computational)" (p. 63). If conceptual parts used by the students in science education are inaccurate, then the resulting model will not be useful. Students in college general chemistry courses are presented with multiple abstract topics and often struggle to fit these parts into complete models. This is especially true for topics that are founded on quantum concepts, such as atomic structure and molecular bonding taught in college general chemistry. The objectives of this study were focused on how students use visual tools introduced during instruction to reason with atomic and molecular structure, what misconceptions may be associated with these visual tools, and how visual modeling skills may be taught to support students' use of visual tools for reasoning. The research questions for this study follow from Gilbert's (2008) theory that experts use multiple representations when reasoning and modeling a system, and Kozma and Russell's (2005) theory of representational competence levels. This study finds that as students developed greater command of their understanding of abstract quantum concepts, they spontaneously provided additional representations to describe their more sophisticated models of atomic and molecular structure during interviews. This suggests that when visual modeling with multiple representations is taught, along with the limitations of the representations, it can assist students in the development of models for reasoning about

  12. Strong electron correlation in UO{sub 2}{sup −}: A photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei-Li; Jian, Tian; Lopez, Gary V.; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Su, Jing; Hu, Han-Shi; Cao, Guo-Jin; Li, Jun

    2014-03-07

    The electronic structures of actinide systems are extremely complicated and pose considerable challenges both experimentally and theoretically because of significant electron correlation and relativistic effects. Here we report an investigation of the electronic structure and chemical bonding of uranium dioxides, UO{sub 2}{sup −} and UO{sub 2}, using photoelectron spectroscopy and relativistic quantum chemistry. The electron affinity of UO{sub 2} is measured to be 1.159(20) eV. Intense detachment bands are observed from the UO{sub 2}{sup −} low-lying (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} orbitals and the more deeply bound O2p-based molecular orbitals which are separated by a large energy gap from the U-based orbitals. Surprisingly, numerous weak photodetachment transitions are observed in the gap region due to extensive two-electron transitions, suggesting strong electron correlations among the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 2}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}{sup −} and the (7sσ{sub g}){sup 1}(5fϕ{sub u}){sup 1} electrons in UO{sub 2}. These observations are interpreted using multi-reference ab initio calculations with inclusion of spin-orbit coupling. The strong electron correlations and spin-orbit couplings generate orders-of-magnitude more detachment transitions from UO{sub 2}{sup −} than expected on the basis of the Koopmans’ theorem. The current experimental data on UO{sub 2}{sup −} provide a long-sought opportunity to arbitrating various relativistic quantum chemistry methods aimed at handling systems with strong electron correlations.

  13. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of functionalized CdSe quantum dots prepared by plasma sputtering and wet chemistry.

    PubMed

    Humbert, Christophe; Dahi, Abdellatif; Dalstein, Laetitia; Busson, Bertrand; Lismont, Marjorie; Colson, Pierre; Dreesen, Laurent

    2015-05-01

    We develop an innovative manufacturing process, based on radio-frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS), to prepare neat CdSe quantum dots (QDs) on glass and silicon substrates and further chemically functionalize them. In order to validate the fabrication protocol, their optical properties are compared with those of QDs obtained from commercial solutions and deposited by wet chemistry on the substrates. Firstly, AFM measurements attest that nano-objects with a mean diameter around 13 nm are located on the substrate after RFMS treatment. Secondly, the UV-Vis absorption study of this deposited layer shows a specific optical absorption band, located at 550 nm, which is related to a discrete energy level of QDs. Thirdly, by using two-color sum-frequency generation (2C-SFG) nonlinear optical spectroscopy, we show experimentally the functionalization efficiency of the RFMS CdSe QDs layer with thiol derived molecules, which is not possible on the QDs layer prepared by wet chemistry due to the surfactant molecules from the native solution. Finally, 2C-SFG spectroscopy, performed at different visible wavelengths, highlights modifications of the vibration mode shape whatever the QDs deposition method, which is correlated to the discrete energy level of the QDs.

  14. The Variation Theorem Applied to H-2+: A Simple Quantum Chemistry Computer Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robiette, Alan G.

    1975-01-01

    Describes a student project which requires limited knowledge of Fortran and only minimal computing resources. The results illustrate such important principles of quantum mechanics as the variation theorem and the virial theorem. Presents sample calculations and the subprogram for energy calculations. (GS)

  15. Monte-Carlo Quantum Chemistry of Biogene Amines. Laser and Neutron Capture Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, A. V.; Malinovskaya, S. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.

    2009-03-01

    Monte-Carlo quantum calculation of the cluster consisting of the serotonine ST (histamine HM) molecules and 100 molecules of water is carried out. It is found that the zwitterion appears as expected to be strongly favoured with respect to neutral molecule. The perspective possibilities of laser and neutron capture action on different biomolecules are indicated.

  16. Monte-Carlo Quantum Chemistry of Biogene Amines. Laser and Neutron Capture Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Glushkov, A. V.; Malinovskaya, S. V.; Khetselius, O. Yu.; Loboda, A. V.

    2009-03-09

    Monte-Carlo quantum calculation of the cluster consisting of the serotonine ST (histamine HM) molecules and 100 molecules of water is carried out. It is found that the zwitterion appears as expected to be strongly favoured with respect to neutral molecule. The perspective possibilities of laser and neutron capture action on different biomolecules are indicated.

  17. Dynamics of the Chemistry of Electronically Excited Atoms in Defined Quantum States.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-05-01

    laser development . In essence, this research concerns itself with the elucidation of the role of electronic energy in affecting the chemistry or photochemistry of excited halogen atoms and molecules. While much is known about the dynamics of chemical and physical processes which are carried out on the lowest potential energy hypersurface correlating with reactants and products in their electronic ground state, relatively little is known about the dynamics of such phenomena as energy transfer and chemical reactivity on higher-lying potential

  18. The molecular dissociation of formaldehyde at medium photoexcitation energies: A quantum chemistry and direct quantum dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Araujo, Marta; Magalhaes, Alexandre L.; Lasorne, Benjamin; Worth, Graham A.; Bearpark, Michael J.; Robb, Michael A.

    2009-10-14

    The mechanisms of radiationless decay involved in the photodissociation of formaldehyde into H{sub 2} and CO have been investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations and direct dynamics variational multiconfiguration Gaussian (DD-vMCG) quantum dynamics in the S{sub 1}, T{sub 1}, and S{sub 0} states. A commonly accepted scheme involves Fermi Golden Rule internal conversion from S{sub 1} followed by dissociation of vibrationally hot H{sub 2}CO in S{sub 0}. We recently proposed a novel mechanism [M. Araujo et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 112, 7489 (2008)] whereby internal conversion and dissociation take place in concert through a seam of conical intersection between S{sub 1} and S{sub 0} after the system has passed through an S{sub 1} transition barrier. The relevance of this mechanism depends on the efficiency of tunneling in S{sub 1}. At lower energy, an alternative scheme to internal conversion involves intersystem crossing via T{sub 1} to regenerate the reactant before the S{sub 0} barrier to dissociation. We propose here a previously unidentified mechanism leading directly to H{sub 2} and CO products via T{sub 1}. This channel opens at medium energies, near or above the T{sub 1} barrier to dissociation and still lower than the S{sub 1} barrier, thus making T{sub 1} a possible shortcut to molecular dissociation.

  19. A potential from quantum chemistry for thermodynamic property predictions for methanethiol.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Stephen L; Sandler, Stanley I

    2005-08-01

    An ab initio potential for methanethiol is determined by computing quantum-chemical interaction energies for a range of orientations and center-of-mass separation distances. These energies are initially fitted to a pairwise-additive, site-site Morse-C6 intermolecular potential. Additional interaction energies were then calculated at separation distances determined to be important from the angle-averaged Mayer f function calculated with the initial potential. This expanded set of interaction energies is then fitted using Boltzmann-type weighting to obtain the final intermolecular potential. Although there are some discrepancies in the fit for a particular type of orientation, the phase behavior calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations using this final potential is in very good agreement with experimental data. The prescription used here for obtaining the optimum potential from quantum-chemical methods should be applicable to other systems.

  20. A potential from quantum chemistry for thermodynamic property predictions for methanethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison, Stephen L.; Sandler, Stanley I.

    2005-08-01

    An ab initio potential for methanethiol is determined by computing quantum-chemical interaction energies for a range of orientations and center-of-mass separation distances. These energies are initially fitted to a pairwise-additive, site-site Morse-C6 intermolecular potential. Additional interaction energies were then calculated at separation distances determined to be important from the angle-averaged Mayer f function calculated with the initial potential. This expanded set of interaction energies is then fitted using Boltzmann-type weighting to obtain the final intermolecular potential. Although there are some discrepancies in the fit for a particular type of orientation, the phase behavior calculated from Gibbs ensemble Monte Carlo simulations using this final potential is in very good agreement with experimental data. The prescription used here for obtaining the optimum potential from quantum-chemical methods should be applicable to other systems.

  1. Ion Coulomb crystals: from quantum technology to chemistry close to the absolute zero point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulieu, O.; Willitsch, S.

    2017-03-01

    Ion Coulomb crystals are ordered structures of atomic or molecular ions stored in ion traps at temperatures close to the absolute zero point. These unusual "crystals" form the basis of extremely accurate clocks, provide an environment for precise studies of chemical reactions and enable advanced implementations of the technology for a quantum computer. In this article, we discuss the techniques for generating atomic and molecular Coulomb crystals and highlight some of their applications.

  2. Multi-state Approach to Chemical Reactivity in Fragment Based Quantum Chemistry Calculations.

    PubMed

    Lange, Adrian W; Voth, Gregory A

    2013-09-10

    We introduce a multistate framework for Fragment Molecular Orbital (FMO) quantum mechanical calculations and implement it in the context of protonated water clusters. The purpose of the framework is to address issues of nonuniqueness and dynamic fragmentation in FMO as well as other related fragment methods. We demonstrate that our new approach, Fragment Molecular Orbital Multistate Reactive Molecular Dynamics (FMO-MS-RMD), can improve energetic accuracy and yield stable molecular dynamics for small protonated water clusters undergoing proton transfer reactions.

  3. One-Step Synthesis of Boron Nitride Quantum Dots: Simple Chemistry Meets Delicate Nanotechnology.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bingping; Yan, Shihai; Song, Zhongqian; Liu, Mengli; Ji, Xuqiang; Yang, Wenrong; Liu, Jingquan

    2016-12-23

    Herein, a conceptually new and straightforward aqueous route is described for the synthesis of hydroxyl- and amino-functionalized boron nitride quantum dots (BNQDs) with quantum yields (QY) as high as 18.3 % by using a facile bottom-up approach, in which a mixture of boric acid and ammonia solution was hydrothermally treated in one pot at 200 °C for 12 h. The functionalized BNQDs, with excellent photoluminescence properties, could be easily dispersed in an aqueous medium and applied as fluorescent probes for the detection of ferrous (Fe(2+) ) and ferric (Fe(3+) ) ions with excellent selectivity and low detection limits. The mechanisms for the hydrothermal reaction and fluorescence quenching were also simulated by using density functional theory (DFT), which confirmed the feasibility and advantages of this strategy. It provides a scalable and eco-friendly method for preparation of BNQDs with good dispersability and could also be generalized to the synthesis of other 2D quantum dots and nanoplates.

  4. Yb-based heavy fermion compounds and field tuned quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Mun, Eundeok

    2010-01-01

    The motivation of this dissertation was to advance the study of Yb-based heavy fermion (HF) compounds especially ones related to quantum phase transitions. One of the topics of this work was the investigation of the interaction between the Kondo and crystalline electric field (CEF) energy scales in Yb-based HF systems by means of thermoelectric power (TEP) measurements. In these systems, the Kondo interaction and CEF excitations generally give rise to large anomalies such as maxima in ρ(T) and as minima in S(T). The TEP data were use to determine the evolution of Kondo and CEF energy scales upon varying transition metals for YbT2Zn20 (T = Fe, Ru, Os, Ir, Rh, and Co) compounds and applying magnetic fields for YbAgGe and YbPtBi. For YbT2Zn20 and YbPtBi, the Kondo and CEF energy scales could not be well separated in S(T), presumably because of small CEF level splittings. A similar effect was observed for the magnetic contribution to the resistivity. For YbAgGe, S(T) has been successfully applied to determine the Kondo and CEF energy scales due to the clear separation between the ground state and thermally excited CEF states. The Kondo temperature, TK, inferred from the local maximum in S(T), remains finite as magnetic field increases up to 140 kOe. In this dissertation we have examined the heavy quasi-particle behavior, found near the field tuned AFM quantum critical point (QCP), with YbAgGe and YbPtBi. Although the observed nFL behaviors in the vicinity of the QCP are different between YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the constructed H-T phase diagram including the two crossovers are similar. For both YbAgGe and YbPtBi, the details of the quantum criticality turn out to be complicated. We expect that YbPtBi will provide an additional example of field tuned quantum criticality, but clearly there are further experimental investigations left and more ideas needed to understand the basic physics of field-induced quantum

  5. Spectroscopic accuracy directly from quantum chemistry: Application to ground and excited states of beryllium dimer

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep; Booth, George H.; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Yanai, Takeshi; Umrigar, C. J.

    2014-03-14

    We combine explicit correlation via the canonical transcorrelation approach with the density matrix renormalization group and initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo methods to compute a near-exact beryllium dimer curve, without the use of composite methods. In particular, our direct density matrix renormalization group calculations produce a well-depth of D{sub e} = 931.2 cm{sup −1} which agrees very well with recent experimentally derived estimates D{sub e} = 929.7±2 cm{sup −1} [J. M. Merritt, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, Science 324, 1548 (2009)] and D{sub e}= 934.6 cm{sup −1} [K. Patkowski, V. Špirko, and K. Szalewicz, Science 326, 1382 (2009)], as well the best composite theoretical estimates, D{sub e} = 938±15 cm{sup −1} [K. Patkowski, R. Podeszwa, and K. Szalewicz, J. Phys. Chem. A 111, 12822 (2007)] and D{sub e}=935.1±10 cm{sup −1} [J. Koput, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 20311 (2011)]. Our results suggest possible inaccuracies in the functional form of the potential used at shorter bond lengths to fit the experimental data [J. M. Merritt, V. E. Bondybey, and M. C. Heaven, Science 324, 1548 (2009)]. With the density matrix renormalization group we also compute near-exact vertical excitation energies at the equilibrium geometry. These provide non-trivial benchmarks for quantum chemical methods for excited states, and illustrate the surprisingly large error that remains for 1 {sup 1}Σ{sub g}{sup −} state with approximate multi-reference configuration interaction and equation-of-motion coupled cluster methods. Overall, we demonstrate that explicitly correlated density matrix renormalization group and initiator full configuration interaction quantum Monte Carlo methods allow us to fully converge to the basis set and correlation limit of the non-relativistic Schrödinger equation in small molecules.

  6. Visually impaired researchers get their hands on quantum chemistry: application to a computational study on the isomerization of a sterol.

    PubMed

    Lounnas, Valère; Wedler, Henry B; Newman, Timothy; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Harrison, Jason G; Nepomuceno, Gabriella; Pemberton, Ryan; Tantillo, Dean J; Vriend, Gert

    2014-11-01

    In molecular sciences, articles tend to revolve around 2D representations of 3D molecules, and sighted scientists often resort to 3D virtual reality software to study these molecules in detail. Blind and visually impaired (BVI) molecular scientists have access to a series of audio devices that can help them read the text in articles and work with computers. Reading articles published in this journal, though, is nearly impossible for them because they need to generate mental 3D images of molecules, but the article-reading software cannot do that for them. We have previously designed AsteriX, a web server that fully automatically decomposes articles, detects 2D plots of low molecular weight molecules, removes meta data and annotations from these plots, and converts them into 3D atomic coordinates. AsteriX-BVI goes one step further and converts the 3D representation into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations. These Braille-annotated physical 3D models allow BVI scientists to generate a complete mental model of the molecule. AsteriX-BVI uses Molden to convert the meta data of quantum chemistry experiments into BVI friendly formats so that the entire line of scientific information that sighted people take for granted-from published articles, via printed results of computational chemistry experiments, to 3D models-is now available to BVI scientists too. The possibilities offered by AsteriX-BVI are illustrated by a project on the isomerization of a sterol, executed by the blind co-author of this article (HBW).

  7. Visually impaired researchers get their hands on quantum chemistry: application to a computational study on the isomerization of a sterol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lounnas, Valère; Wedler, Henry B.; Newman, Timothy; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Harrison, Jason G.; Nepomuceno, Gabriella; Pemberton, Ryan; Tantillo, Dean J.; Vriend, Gert

    2014-11-01

    In molecular sciences, articles tend to revolve around 2D representations of 3D molecules, and sighted scientists often resort to 3D virtual reality software to study these molecules in detail. Blind and visually impaired (BVI) molecular scientists have access to a series of audio devices that can help them read the text in articles and work with computers. Reading articles published in this journal, though, is nearly impossible for them because they need to generate mental 3D images of molecules, but the article-reading software cannot do that for them. We have previously designed AsteriX, a web server that fully automatically decomposes articles, detects 2D plots of low molecular weight molecules, removes meta data and annotations from these plots, and converts them into 3D atomic coordinates. AsteriX-BVI goes one step further and converts the 3D representation into a 3D printable, haptic-enhanced format that includes Braille annotations. These Braille-annotated physical 3D models allow BVI scientists to generate a complete mental model of the molecule. AsteriX-BVI uses Molden to convert the meta data of quantum chemistry experiments into BVI friendly formats so that the entire line of scientific information that sighted people take for granted—from published articles, via printed results of computational chemistry experiments, to 3D models—is now available to BVI scientists too. The possibilities offered by AsteriX-BVI are illustrated by a project on the isomerization of a sterol, executed by the blind co-author of this article (HBW).

  8. Extended Lagrangian quantum molecular dynamics simulations of shock-induced chemistry in hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Sanville, Edward J; Bock, Nicolas; Challacombe, William M; Cawkwell, Marc J; Niklasson, Anders M N; Dattelbaum, Dana M; Sheffield, Stephen; Sewell, Thomas D

    2010-01-01

    A set of interatomic potentials for hydrocarbons that are based upon the self-consistent charge transfer tight-binding approximation to density functional theory have been developed and implemented into the quantum molecular dynamics code ''LATTE''. The interatomic potentials exhibit an outstanding level of transferability and have been applied in molecular dynamics simulations of tert-butylacetylene under thermodynamic conditions that correspond to its single-shock Hugoniot. We have achieved precise conservation of the total energy during microcanonical molecular dynamics trajectories under incomplete convergence via the extended Lagrangian Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics formalism. In good agreement with the results of a series of flyer-plate impact experiments, our SCC-TB molecular dynamics simulations show that tert-butylactylene molecules polymerize at shock pressures around 6.1 GPa.

  9. High-throughput quantum chemistry and virtual screening for OLED material components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halls, Mathew D.; Giesen, David J.; Hughes, Thomas F.; Goldberg, Alexander; Cao, Yixiang

    2013-09-01

    Computational structure enumeration, analysis using an automated simulation workflow and filtering of large chemical structure libraries to identify lead systems, has become a central paradigm in drug discovery research. Transferring this paradigm to challenges in materials science is now possible due to advances in the speed of computational resources and the efficiency and stability of chemical simulation packages. State-of-the-art software tools that have been developed for drug discovery can be applied to efficiently explore the chemical design space to identify solutions for problems such as organic light-emitting diode material components. In this work, virtual screening for OLED materials based on intrinsic quantum mechanical properties is illustrated. Also, a new approach to more reliably identify candidate systems is introduced that is based on the chemical reaction energetics of defect pathways for OLED materials.

  10. Structure and internal dynamics of n-propyl acetate studied by microwave spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutikdja, Lilian W.; Stahl, Wolfgang; Sironneau, Vincent; Nguyen, Ha Vinh Lam; Kleiner, Isabelle

    2016-10-01

    The gas phase structure of n-propyl acetate was determined using molecular beam Fourier transform microwave spectroscopy from 2 to 40 GHz supplemented by quantum chemical calculations. The experimental spectrum revealed only one conformer with trans configuration and C1 symmetry. Torsional splittings occurred for each rotational transition due to the internal rotation of the acetyl methyl group with a barrier height of approximately 100 cm-1. The XIAM and BELGI-C1 codes were applied to reproduce the spectrum within the measurement accuracy. This investigation on n-propyl acetate has accomplished our studies on saturated linear aliphatic acetates CH3COOCnH2n+1 (n = 1-6).

  11. A mild and reliable method to label enveloped virus with quantum dots by copper-free click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jian; Huang, Li-Li; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Han-Zhong; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2012-10-02

    Real-time tracking of the dynamic process of virus invasion is crucial to understanding the infection mechanism. For successful tracking, efficient labeling methods are indispensable. In this paper, we report a mild and reliable method for labeling viruses, especially with regard to easily disabled enveloped viruses. The copper-free click chemistry has been used to label enveloped viruses with quantum dots (QDs) by linking virions modified with azide to the QDs derived with dibenzocyclooctynes (DBCO). Both vaccinia virus (VACV) and avian influenza A virus (H9N2) can be specifically and rapidly labeled under mild conditions, with a labeling efficiency of more than 80%. The labeled virions were of intact infectivity, and their fluorescence was strong enough to realize single-virion tracking. Compared to previously reported methods, our method is less destructive, reliable, and universal, without specific requirements for the type and structure of viruses to be labeled, which has laid the foundation for long-term dynamic visualization of virus infection process.

  12. The SOA formation model combined with semiempirical quantum chemistry for predicting UV-Vis absorption of secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Min; Jang, Myoseon; Oliferenko, Alexander; Pillai, Girinath G; Katritzky, Alan R

    2012-07-07

    A new model for predicting the UV-visible absorption spectra of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) has been developed. The model consists of two primary parts: a SOA formation model and a semiempirical quantum chemistry method. The mass of SOA is predicted using the PHRCSOA (Partitioning Heterogeneous Reaction Consortium Secondary Organic Aerosol) model developed by Cao and Jang [Environ. Sci. Technol., 2010, 44, 727]. The chemical composition is estimated using a combination of the kinetic model (MCM) and the PHRCSOA model. The absorption spectrum is obtained by taking the sum of the spectrum of each SOA product calculated using a semiempirical NDDO (Neglect of Diatomic Differential Overlap)-based method. SOA was generated from the photochemical reaction of toluene or α-pinene at different NO(x) levels (low NO(x): 24-26 ppm, middle NO(x): 49 ppb, high NO(x): 104-105 ppb) using a 2 m(3) indoor Teflon film chamber. The model simulation reasonably agrees with the measured absorption spectra of α-pinene SOA but underestimates toluene SOA under high and middle NO(x) conditions. The absorption spectrum of toluene SOA is moderately enhanced with increasing NO(x) concentrations, while that of α-pinene SOA is not affected. Both measured and calculated UV-visible spectra show that the light absorption of toluene SOA is much stronger than that of α-pinene SOA.

  13. Accuracy of color prediction of anthraquinone dyes in methanol solution estimated from first principle quantum chemistry computations.

    PubMed

    Cysewski, Piotr; Jeliński, Tomasz

    2013-10-01

    The electronic spectrum of four different anthraquinones (1,2-dihydroxyanthraquinone, 1-aminoanthraquinone, 2-aminoanthraquinone and 1-amino-2-methylanthraquinone) in methanol solution was measured and used as reference data for theoretical color prediction. The visible part of the spectrum was modeled according to TD-DFT framework with a broad range of DFT functionals. The convoluted theoretical spectra were validated against experimental data by a direct color comparison in terms of CIE XYZ and CIE Lab tristimulus model color. It was found, that the 6-31G** basis set provides the most accurate color prediction and there is no need to extend the basis set since it does not improve the prediction of color. Although different functionals were found to give the most accurate color prediction for different anthraquinones, it is possible to apply the same DFT approach for the whole set of analyzed dyes. Especially three functionals seem to be valuable, namely mPW1LYP, B1LYP and PBE0 due to very similar spectra predictions. The major source of discrepancies between theoretical and experimental spectra comes from L values, representing the lightness, and the a parameter, depicting the position on green→magenta axis. Fortunately, the agreement between computed and observed blue→yellow axis (parameter b) is very precise in the case of studied anthraquinone dyes in methanol solution. Despite discussed shortcomings, color prediction from first principle quantum chemistry computations can lead to quite satisfactory results, expressed in terms of color space parameters.

  14. Hybrid-Basis Close-Coupling Interface to Quantum Chemistry Packages for the Treatment of Ionization Problems.

    PubMed

    Marante, Carlos; Klinker, Markus; Corral, Inés; González-Vázquez, Jesús; Argenti, Luca; Martín, Fernando

    2017-02-14

    The theoretical description of observables in attosecond pump-probe experiments requires a good representation of the system's ionization continuum. For polyelectronic molecules, however, this is still a challenge, due to the complicated short-range structure of correlated electronic wave functions. Whereas quantum chemistry packages (QCP) implementing sophisticated methods to compute bound electronic molecular states are well-established, comparable tools for the continuum are not widely available yet. To tackle this problem, we have developed a new approach that, by means of a hybrid Gaussian-B-spline basis, interfaces existing QCPs with close-coupling scattering methods. To illustrate the viability of this approach, we report results for the multichannel ionization of the helium atom and of the hydrogen molecule that are in excellent agreement with existing accurate benchmarks. These findings, together with the versatility of QCPs to describe a broad range of chemical systems, indicate that this is a valid approach to study the ionization of polyelectronic systems in which correlation and exchange symmetry play a major role.

  15. Communication: Towards ab initio self-energy embedding theory in quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Tran Nguyen; Kananenka, Alexei A.; Zgid, Dominika

    2015-12-28

    The self-energy embedding theory (SEET), in which the active space self-energy is embedded in the self-energy obtained from a perturbative method treating the non-local correlation effects, was recently developed in our group. In SEET, the double counting problem does not appear and the accuracy can be improved either by increasing the perturbation order or by enlarging the active space. This method was first calibrated for the 2D Hubbard lattice showing promising results. In this paper, we report an extension of SEET to quantum chemical ab initio Hamiltonians for applications to molecular systems. The self-consistent second-order Green’s function method is used to describe the non-local correlations, while the full configuration interaction method is carried out to capture strong correlation within the active space. Using few proof-of-concept examples, we show that SEET yields results of comparable quality to n-electron valence state second-order perturbation theory with the same active space, and furthermore, the full active space can be split into smaller active spaces without further implementation. Moreover, SEET avoids intruder states and does not require any high-order reduced density matrices. These advantages show that SEET is a promising method to describe physical and chemical properties of challenging molecules requiring large active spaces.

  16. New algorithms for iterative matrix-free eigensolvers in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zuev, Dmitry; Vecharynski, Eugene; Yang, Chao; Orms, Natalie; Krylov, Anna I

    2015-02-15

    New algorithms for iterative diagonalization procedures that solve for a small set of eigen-states of a large matrix are described. The performance of the algorithms is illustrated by calculations of low and high-lying ionized and electronically excited states using equation-of-motion coupled-cluster methods with single and double substitutions (EOM-IP-CCSD and EOM-EE-CCSD). We present two algorithms suitable for calculating excited states that are close to a specified energy shift (interior eigenvalues). One solver is based on the Davidson algorithm, a diagonalization procedure commonly used in quantum-chemical calculations. The second is a recently developed solver, called the "Generalized Preconditioned Locally Harmonic Residual (GPLHR) method." We also present a modification of the Davidson procedure that allows one to solve for a specific transition. The details of the algorithms, their computational scaling, and memory requirements are described. The new algorithms are implemented within the EOM-CC suite of methods in the Q-Chem electronic structure program.

  17. RM1 Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry: Parameters for Trivalent Lanthanum, Cerium and Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Dutra, José Diogo L; Filho, Manoel A M; Rocha, Gerd B; Simas, Alfredo M; Freire, Ricardo O

    2015-01-01

    The RM1 model for the lanthanides is parameterized for complexes of the trications of lanthanum, cerium, and praseodymium. The semiempirical quantum chemical model core stands for the [Xe]4fn electronic configuration, with n =0,1,2 for La(III), Ce(III), and Pr(III), respectively. In addition, the valence shell is described by three electrons in a set of 5d, 6s, and 6p orbitals. Results indicate that the present model is more accurate than the previous sparkle models, although these are still very good methods provided the ligands only possess oxygen or nitrogen atoms directly coordinated to the lanthanide ion. For all other different types of coordination, the present RM1 model for the lanthanides is much superior and must definitely be used. Overall, the accuracy of the model is of the order of 0.07Å for La(III) and Pr(III), and 0.08Å for Ce(III) for lanthanide-ligand atom distances which lie mostly around the 2.3Å to 2.6Å interval, implying an error around 3% only.

  18. Quantum dot surface chemistry and functionalization for cell targeting and imaging.

    PubMed

    Bilan, Regina; Fleury, Fabrice; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2015-04-15

    Quantum dots (QDs) are highly fluorescent nanoscale crystals with size-dependent emission spectra. Due to their excellent photophysical properties, QDs are a promising alternative to organic fluorescent dyes and fluorescent proteins for cell targeting, imaging, and drug delivery. For biomedical applications, QDs should be chemically modified to be stable in aqueous solutions and tagged with the recognition molecules or drugs. Here, we review surface modification approaches to, and strategies for, conjugation of bioactive molecules with QDs. There are a variety of methods of QD surface modification and QD incorporation into larger delivery systems that yield fluorescent nanocarriers from 10 nm to several micrometers. Conjugates of QDs with peptides, proteins, antibodies, oligonucleotides, and small molecules have been used for fluorescent targeting, tracking, and imaging both in vitro and in vivo. Due to an extremely high stability to photobleaching, QDs were used for long-term visualization. QD applications pave the way for new generations of ultrasensitive detection, diagnostic systems, as well as drug delivery approaches, combining accurate targeting, delivery, and imaging in a single assay.

  19. RM1 Semiempirical Quantum Chemistry: Parameters for Trivalent Lanthanum, Cerium and Praseodymium

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, José Diogo L.; Filho, Manoel A. M.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Simas, Alfredo M.; Freire, Ricardo O.

    2015-01-01

    The RM1 model for the lanthanides is parameterized for complexes of the trications of lanthanum, cerium, and praseodymium. The semiempirical quantum chemical model core stands for the [Xe]4fn electronic configuration, with n =0,1,2 for La(III), Ce(III), and Pr(III), respectively. In addition, the valence shell is described by three electrons in a set of 5d, 6s, and 6p orbitals. Results indicate that the present model is more accurate than the previous sparkle models, although these are still very good methods provided the ligands only possess oxygen or nitrogen atoms directly coordinated to the lanthanide ion. For all other different types of coordination, the present RM1 model for the lanthanides is much superior and must definitely be used. Overall, the accuracy of the model is of the order of 0.07Å for La(III) and Pr(III), and 0.08Å for Ce(III) for lanthanide-ligand atom distances which lie mostly around the 2.3Å to 2.6Å interval, implying an error around 3% only. PMID:26132289

  20. Gas-Phase Reactivity of Cesium-Containing Species by Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Šulková, Katarína; Cantrel, Laurent; Louis, Florent

    2015-09-03

    Thermodynamics and kinetics of cesium species reactions have been studied by using high-level quantum chemical tools. A systematic theoretical study has been done to find suitable methodology for calculation of reliable thermodynamic properties, allowing us to determine bimolecular rate constants with appropriate kinetic theories of gas-phase reactions. Four different reactions have been studied in this work: CsO + H2 = CsOH + H (R1), Cs + HI = CsI + H (R2), CsI + H2O = CsOH + HI (R3), and CsI + OH = CsOH + I (R4). All reactions involve steam, hydrogen, and iodine in addition of cesium. Most of the reactions are fast and (R3) and (R4) proceed even without energetic barrier. In terms of chemical reactivity in the reactor coolant system (RCS) in the case of severe accident, it can be expected that there will be no kinetic limitations for main cesium species (CsOH and CsI) transported along the RCS. Cs chemical speciation inside the RCS should be governed by the thermodynamics.

  1. Spin-spin and spin-orbit interactions in nanographene fragments: a quantum chemistry approach.

    PubMed

    Perumal, S; Minaev, B; Ågren, H

    2012-03-14

    The relativistic behavior of graphene structures, starting from the fundamental building blocks--the poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) along with other PAH nanographenes--is studied to quantify any associated intrinsic magnetism in the triplet (T) state and subsequently in the ground singlet (S) state with account of possible S-T mixture induced by spin-orbit coupling (SOC). We employ a first principle quantum chemical-based approach and density functional theory (DFT) for a systematic treatment of the spin-Hamiltonian by considering both the spin-orbit and spin-spin interactions as dependent on different numbers of benzene rings. We assess these relativistic spin-coupling phenomena in terms of splitting parameters which cause magnetic anisotropy in absence of external perturbations. Possible routes for changes in the couplings in terms of doping and defects are also simulated and discussed. Accounting for the artificial character of the broken-symmetry solutions for strong spin polarization of the so-called "singlet open-shell" ground state in zigzag graphene nanoribbons predicted by spin-unrestricted DFT approaches, we interpolate results from more sophisticated methods for the S-T gaps and spin-orbit coupling (SOC) integrals and find that these spin interactions become weak as function of size and increasing decoupling of electrons at the edges. This leads to reduced electron spin-spin interaction and hence almost negligible intrinsic magnetism in the carbon-based PAHs and carbon nanographene fragments. Our results are in agreement with the fact that direct experimental evidence of edge magnetism in pristine graphene has been reported so far. We support the notion that magnetism in graphene only can be ascribed to structural defects or impurities.

  2. From C60 to Infinity: Large-Scale Quantum Chemistry Calculations of the Heats of Formation of Higher Fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Chan, Bun; Kawashima, Yukio; Katouda, Michio; Nakajima, Takahito; Hirao, Kimihiko

    2016-02-03

    We have carried out large-scale computational quantum chemistry calculations on the K computer to obtain heats of formation for C60 and some higher fullerenes with the DSD-PBE-PBE/cc-pVQZ double-hybrid density functional theory method. Our best estimated values are 2520.0 ± 20.7 (C60), 2683.4 ± 17.7 (C70), 2862.0 ± 18.5 (C76), 2878.8 ± 13.3 (C78), 2946.4 ± 14.5 (C84), 3067.3 ± 15.4 (C90), 3156.6 ± 16.2 (C96), 3967.7 ± 33.4 (C180), 4364 (C240) and 5415 (C320) kJ mol(-1). In our assessment, we also find that the B3-PW91-D3BJ and BMK-D3(BJ) functionals perform reasonably well. Using the convergence behavior for the calculated per-atom heats of formation, we obtained the formula ΔfH per carbon = 722n(-0.72) + 5.2 kJ mol(-1) (n = the number of carbon atoms), which enables an estimation of ΔfH for higher fullerenes more generally. A slow convergence to the graphene limit is observed, which we attribute to the relatively small proportion of fullerene carbons that are in "low-strain" regions. We further propose that it would take tens, if not hundreds, of thousands of carbons for a fullerene to roughly approach the limit. Such a distinction may be a contributing factor to the discrete properties between the two types of nanomaterials. During the course of our study, we also observe a fairly reliable means for the theoretical calculation of heats of formation for medium-sized fullerenes. This involves the use of isodesmic-type reactions with fullerenes of similar sizes to provide a good balance of the chemistry and to minimize the use of accompanying species.

  3. Information carriers and (reading them through) information theory in quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Geerlings, Paul; Borgoo, Alex

    2011-01-21

    This Perspective discusses the reduction of the electronic wave function via the second-order reduced density matrix to the electron density ρ(r), which is the key ingredient in density functional theory (DFT) as a basic carrier of information. Simplifying further, the 1-normalized density function turns out to contain essentially the same information as ρ(r) and is even of preferred use as an information carrier when discussing the periodic properties along Mendeleev's table where essentially the valence electrons are at stake. The Kullback-Leibler information deficiency turns out to be the most interesting choice to obtain information on the differences in ρ(r) or σ(r) between two systems. To put it otherwise: when looking for the construction of a functional F(AB) = F[ζ(A)(r),ζ(B)(r)] for extracting differences in information from an information carrier ζ(r) (i.e. ρ(r), σ(r)) for two systems A and B the Kullback-Leibler information measure ΔS is a particularly adequate choice. Examples are given, varying from atoms, to molecules and molecular interactions. Quantum similarity of atoms indicates that the shape function based KL information deficiency is the most appropriate tool to retrieve periodicity in the Periodic Table. The dissimilarity of enantiomers for which different information measures are presented at global and local (i.e. molecular and atomic) level leads to an extension of Mezey's holographic density theorem and shows numerical evidence that in a chiral molecule the whole molecule is pervaded by chirality. Finally Kullback-Leibler information profiles are discussed for intra- and intermolecular proton transfer reactions and a simple S(N)2 reaction indicating that the theoretical information profile can be used as a companion to the energy based Hammond postulate to discuss the early or late transition state character of a reaction. All in all this Perspective's answer is positive to the question of whether an even simpler carrier of

  4. Accurate and efficient quantum chemistry calculations for noncovalent interactions in many-body systems: the XSAPT family of methods.

    PubMed

    Lao, Ka Un; Herbert, John M

    2015-01-15

    We present an overview of "XSAPT", a family of quantum chemistry methods for noncovalent interactions. These methods combine an efficient, iterative, monomer-based approach to computing many-body polarization interactions with a two-body version of symmetry-adapted perturbation theory (SAPT). The result is an efficient method for computing accurate intermolecular interaction energies in large noncovalent assemblies such as molecular and ionic clusters, molecular crystals, clathrates, or protein-ligand complexes. As in traditional SAPT, the XSAPT energy is decomposable into physically meaningful components. Dispersion interactions are problematic in traditional low-order SAPT, and two new approaches are introduced here in an attempt to improve this situation: (1) third-generation empirical atom-atom dispersion potentials, and (2) an empirically scaled version of second-order SAPT dispersion. Comparison to high-level ab initio benchmarks for dimers, water clusters, halide-water clusters, a methane clathrate hydrate, and a DNA intercalation complex illustrate both the accuracy of XSAPT-based methods as well as their limitations. The computational cost of XSAPT scales as O(N(3))-O(N(5)) with respect to monomer size, N, depending upon the particular version that is employed, but the accuracy is typically superior to alternative ab initio methods with similar scaling. Moreover, the monomer-based nature of XSAPT calculations makes them trivially parallelizable, such that wall times scale linearly with respect to the number of monomer units. XSAPT-based methods thus open the door to both qualitative and quantitative studies of noncovalent interactions in clusters, biomolecules, and condensed-phase systems.

  5. A Quantum Origin of Life?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Paul C. W.

    The following sections are included: * Chemistry and Information * Q-life * The Problem of Decoherence * Life as the "Solution" of a Quantum Search Algorithm * Quantum Choreography * Acknowledgements * References

  6. Quantum-chemistry based calibration of the alkali metal cation series (Li(+)-Cs(+)) for large-scale polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Dudev, Todor; Devereux, Mike; Meuwly, Markus; Lim, Carmay; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Gresh, Nohad

    2015-02-15

    The alkali metal cations in the series Li(+)-Cs(+) act as major partners in a diversity of biological processes and in bioinorganic chemistry. In this article, we present the results of their calibration in the context of the SIBFA polarizable molecular mechanics/dynamics procedure. It relies on quantum-chemistry (QC) energy-decomposition analyses of their monoligated complexes with representative O-, N-, S-, and Se- ligands, performed with the aug-cc-pVTZ(-f) basis set at the Hartree-Fock level. Close agreement with QC is obtained for each individual contribution, even though the calibration involves only a limited set of cation-specific parameters. This agreement is preserved in tests on polyligated complexes with four and six O- ligands, water and formamide, indicating the transferability of the procedure. Preliminary extensions to density functional theory calculations are reported.

  7. Combustion chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, N.J.

    1993-12-01

    This research is concerned with the development and use of sensitivity analysis tools to probe the response of dependent variables to model input variables. Sensitivity analysis is important at all levels of combustion modeling. This group`s research continues to be focused on elucidating the interrelationship between features in the underlying potential energy surface (obtained from ab initio quantum chemistry calculations) and their responses in the quantum dynamics, e.g., reactive transition probabilities, cross sections, and thermal rate coefficients. The goals of this research are: (i) to provide feedback information to quantum chemists in their potential surface refinement efforts, and (ii) to gain a better understanding of how various regions in the potential influence the dynamics. These investigations are carried out with the methodology of quantum functional sensitivity analysis (QFSA).

  8. Coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility and transport of quantum dot nanomaterials in the vadose zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uyusur, Burcu; Darnault, Christophe J. G.; Snee, Preston T.; Kokën, Emre; Jacobson, Astrid R.; Wells, Robert R.

    2010-11-01

    To investigate the coupled effects of solution chemistry and hydrodynamics on the mobility of quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles in the vadose zone, laboratory scale transport experiments involving single and/or sequential infiltrations of QDs in unsaturated and saturated porous media, and computations of total interaction and capillary potential energies were performed. As ionic strength increased, QD retention in the unsaturated porous media increased; however, this retention was significantly suppressed in the presence of a non-ionic surfactant in the infiltration suspensions as indicated by surfactant enhanced transport of QDs. In the vadose zone, the non-ionic surfactant limited the formation of QD aggregates, enhanced QD mobility and transport, and lowered the solution surface tension, which resulted in a decrease in capillary forces that not only led to a reduction in the removal of QDs, but also impacted the vadose zone flow processes. When chemical transport conditions were favorable (ionic strength of 5 × 10 -4 M and 5 × 10 -3 M, or ionic strengths of 5 × 10 -2 M and 0.5 M with surfactant), the dominating phenomena controlling the mobility and transport of QDs in the vadose zone were meso-scale processes, where infiltration by preferential flow results in the rapid transport of QDs. When chemical transport conditions were unfavorable (ionic strength of 5 × 10 -2 M and 0.5 M) the dominating phenomena controlling the mobility and transport of QDs in the vadose zone were pore-scale processes governed by gas-water interfaces (GWI) that impact the mobility of QDs. The addition of surfactant enhanced the transport of QDs both in favorable and unfavorable chemical transport conditions. The mobility and retention of QDs was controlled by interaction and capillary forces, with the latter being the most influential. GWI were found to be the dominant mechanism and site for QD removal compared with solid-water interfaces (SWI) and pore straining. Additionally

  9. Deposition kinetics of quantum dots and polystyrene latex nanoparticles onto alumina: role of water chemistry and particle coating.

    PubMed

    Quevedo, Ivan R; Olsson, Adam L J; Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2013-03-05

    A clear understanding of the factors controlling the deposition behavior of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as quantum dots (QDs), is necessary for predicting their transport and fate in natural subsurface environments and in water filtration processes. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) was used to study the effect of particle surface coatings and water chemistry on the deposition of commercial QDs onto Al2O3. Two carboxylated QDs (CdSe and CdTe) with different surface coatings were compared with two model nanoparticles: sulfate-functionalized (sPL) and carboxyl-modified (cPL) polystyrene latex. Deposition rates were assessed over a range of ionic strengths (IS) in simple electrolyte (KCl) and in electrolyte supplemented with two organic molecules found in natural waters; namely, humic acid and rhamnolipid. The Al2O3 collector used here is selected to be representative of oxide patches found on the surface of aquifer or filter grains. Deposition studies showed that ENP deposition rates on bare Al2O3 generally decreased with increasing salt concentration, with the exception of the polyacrylic-acid (PAA) coated CdTe QD which exhibited unique deposition behavior due to changes in the conformation of the PAA coating. QD deposition rates on bare Al2O3 were approximately 1 order of magnitude lower than those of the polystyrene latex nanoparticles, likely as a result of steric stabilization imparted by the QD surface coatings. Adsorption of humic acid or rhamnolipid on the Al2O3 surface resulted in charge reversal of the collector and subsequent reduction in the deposition rates of all ENPs. Moreover, the ratio of the two QCM-D output parameters, frequency and dissipation, revealed key structural information of the ENP-collector interface; namely, on bare Al2O3, the latex particles were rigidly attached as compared to the more loosely attached QDs. This study emphasizes the importance of considering the nature of ENP coatings as well

  10. Primary reactions of the LOV2 domain of phototropin studied with ultrafast mid-infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alexandre, Maxime T A; Domratcheva, Tatiana; Bonetti, Cosimo; van Wilderen, Luuk J G W; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie-Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J; Kennis, John T M

    2009-07-08

    Phototropins, major blue-light receptors in plants, are sensitive to blue light through a pair of flavin mononucleotide (FMN)-binding light oxygen and voltage (LOV) domains, LOV1 and LOV2. LOV2 undergoes a photocycle involving light-driven covalent adduct formation between a conserved cysteine and the FMN C(4a) atom. Here, the primary reactions of Avena sativa phototropin 1 LOV2 (AsLOV2) were studied using ultrafast mid-infrared spectroscopy and quantum chemistry. The singlet excited state (S1) evolves into the triplet state (T1) with a lifetime of 1.5 ns at a yield of approximately 50%. The infrared signature of S1 is characterized by absorption bands at 1657 cm(-1), 1495-1415 cm(-1), and 1375 cm(-1). The T1 state shows infrared bands at 1657 cm(-1), 1645 cm(-1), 1491-1438 cm(-1), and 1390 cm(-1). For both electronic states, these bands are assigned principally to C=O, C=N, C-C, and C-N stretch modes. The overall downshifting of C=O and C=N bond stretch modes is consistent with an overall bond-order decrease of the conjugated isoalloxazine system upon a pi-pi* transition. The configuration interaction singles (CIS) method was used to calculate the vibrational spectra of the S1 and T1 excited pipi* states, as well as respective electronic energies, structural parameters, electronic dipole moments, and intrinsic force constants. The harmonic frequencies of S1 and T1, as calculated by the CIS method, are in satisfactory agreement with the evident band positions and intensities. On the other hand, CIS calculations of a T1 cation that was protonated at the N(5) site did not reproduce the experimental FMN T1 spectrum. We conclude that the FMN T1 state remains nonprotonated on a nanosecond timescale, which rules out an ionic mechanism for covalent adduct formation involving cysteine-N(5) proton transfer on this timescale. Finally, we observed a heterogeneous population of singly and doubly H-bonded FMN C(4)=O conformers in the dark state, with stretch frequencies at 1714

  11. Merging Structural Information from X-ray Crystallography, Quantum Chemistry, and EXAFS Spectra: The Oxygen-Evolving Complex in PSII.

    PubMed

    Chernev, Petko; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Rossini, Emanuele; Galstyan, Artur; Dau, Holger; Knapp, Ernst-Walter

    2016-10-12

    Structural data of the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PSII) determined by X-ray crystallography, quantum chemistry (QC), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analyses are presently inconsistent. Therefore, a detailed study of what information can be gained about the OEC through a comparison of QC and crystallographic structure information combined with the information from range-extended EXAFS spectra was undertaken. An analysis for determining the precision of the atomic coordinates of the OEC by QC is carried out. OEC model structures based on crystallographic data that are obtained by QC from different research groups are compared with one another and with structures obtained by high-resolution crystallography. The theory of EXAFS spectra is summarized, and the application of EXAFS spectra to the experimental determination of the structure of the OEC is detailed. We discriminate three types of parameters entering the formula for the EXAFS spectrum: (1) model-independent, predefined, and fixed; (2) model-dependent that can be computed or adjusted; and (3) model-dependent that must be adjusted. The information content of EXAFS spectra is estimated and is related to the precision of atomic coordinates and resolution power to discriminate different atom-pair distances of the OEC. It is demonstrated how a precise adjustment of atomic coordinates can yield a nearly perfect representation of the experimental OEC EXAFS spectrum, but at the expense of overfitting and losing the knowledge of the initial OEC model structure. Introducing a novel type of penalty function, it is shown that moderate adjustment of atomic coordinates to the EXAFS spectrum limited by constraints avoids overfitting and can be used to validate different OEC model structures. This technique is used to identify the OEC model structures whose computed OEC EXAFS spectra agree best with the measured spectrum. In this way, the most likely S-state and protonation pattern

  12. Low-Scaling Quantum Chemistry Approach to Excited-State Properties via an ab Initio Exciton Model: Application to Excitation Energy Transfer in a Self-Assembled Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Adrian F; Herbert, John M

    2015-11-05

    We introduce a charge-embedding scheme for an excited-state quantum chemistry method aimed at weakly interacting molecular aggregates. The Hamiltonian matrix for the aggregate is constructed in a basis of direct products of configuration-state functions for the monomers, and diagonalization of this matrix affords excitation energies within ∼0.2 eV of the corresponding supersystem calculation. Both the basis states and the coupling matrix elements can be computed in a distributed way, resulting in an algorithm whose time-to-solution is independent of the number of chromophores, and we report calculations on systems with almost 55 000 basis functions using fewer than 450 processors. In a semiconducting organic nanotube, we find evidence of ultrafast, coherent dynamics followed by energy localization driven by static disorder. Truncation of the model system has a qualitative effect on the energy-transfer dynamics, demonstrating the importance of simulating an extended portion of the nanotube, which is not feasible using traditional quantum chemistry.

  13. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations.

    PubMed

    Bylaska, Eric J; Weare, Jonathan Q; Weare, John H

    2013-08-21

    distributed computing environment using very slow transmission control protocol/Internet protocol networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl + 4H2O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. Using these algorithms, we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 s/time step to 6.9 s/time step.

  14. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-01

    environment using very slow transmission control protocol/Internet protocol networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl + 4H2O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. Using these algorithms, we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 s/time step to 6.9 s/time step.

  15. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl+4H2O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. By using these algorithms we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 seconds per time step to 6.9 seconds per time step.

  16. Extending molecular simulation time scales: Parallel in time integrations for high-level quantum chemistry and complex force representations

    SciTech Connect

    Bylaska, Eric J.; Weare, Jonathan Q.; Weare, John H.

    2013-08-21

    to 14.3. The parallel in time algorithms can be implemented in a distributed computing environment using very slow transmission control protocol/Internet protocol networks. Scripts written in Python that make calls to a precompiled quantum chemistry package (NWChem) are demonstrated to provide an actual speedup of 8.2 for a 2.5 ps AIMD simulation of HCl + 4H{sub 2}O at the MP2/6-31G* level. Implemented in this way these algorithms can be used for long time high-level AIMD simulations at a modest cost using machines connected by very slow networks such as WiFi, or in different time zones connected by the Internet. The algorithms can also be used with programs that are already parallel. Using these algorithms, we are able to reduce the cost of a MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) simulation that had reached its maximum possible speedup in the parallelization of the electronic structure calculation from 32 s/time step to 6.9 s/time step.

  17. Enhancing Quantum Dots for Bioimaging using Advanced Surface Chemistry and Advanced Optical Microscopy: Application to Silicon Quantum Dots (SiQDs).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xiaoyu; Hinde, Elizabeth; Owen, Dylan M; Lowe, Stuart B; Reece, Peter J; Gaus, Katharina; Gooding, J Justin

    2015-10-28

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy is successfully demonstrated in both one- and two-photon cases with surface modified, nanocrystalline silicon quantum dots in the context of bioimaging. The technique is further demonstrated in combination with Förster resonance energy transfer studies where the color of the nanoparticles is tuned by using organic dye acceptors directly conjugated onto the nanoparticle surface.

  18. Low temperature synthesis of silicon quantum dots with plasma chemistry control in dual frequency non-thermal plasmas.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Bibhuti Bhusan; Yin, Yongyi; Han, Jeon Geon; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2016-06-21

    The advanced materials process by non-thermal plasmas with a high plasma density allows the synthesis of small-to-big sized Si quantum dots by combining low-temperature deposition with superior crystalline quality in the background of an amorphous hydrogenated silicon nitride matrix. Here, we make quantum dot thin films in a reactive mixture of ammonia/silane/hydrogen utilizing dual-frequency capacitively coupled plasmas with high atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radical densities. Systematic data analysis using different film and plasma characterization tools reveals that the quantum dots with different sizes exhibit size dependent film properties, which are sensitively dependent on plasma characteristics. These films exhibit intense photoluminescence in the visible range with violet to orange colors and with narrow to broad widths (∼0.3-0.9 eV). The observed luminescence behavior can come from the quantum confinement effect, quasi-direct band-to-band recombination, and variation of atomic hydrogen and nitrogen radicals in the film growth network. The high luminescence yields in the visible range of the spectrum and size-tunable low-temperature synthesis with plasma and radical control make these quantum dot films good candidates for light emitting applications.

  19. Interfacial chemistry and the design of solid-phase nucleic acid hybridization assays using immobilized quantum dots as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Algar, W Russ; Krull, Ulrich J

    2011-01-01

    The use of quantum dots (QDs) as donors in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) offer several advantages for the development of multiplexed solid-phase QD-FRET nucleic acid hybridization assays. Designs for multiplexing have been demonstrated, but important challenges remain in the optimization of these systems. In this work, we identify several strategies based on the design of interfacial chemistry for improving sensitivity, obtaining lower limits of detection (LOD) and enabling the regeneration and reuse of solid-phase QD-FRET hybridization assays. FRET-sensitized emission from acceptor dyes associated with hybridization events at immobilized QD donors provides the analytical signal in these assays. The minimization of active sensing area reduces background from QD donor PL and allows the resolution of smaller amounts of acceptor emission, thus lowering the LOD. The association of multiple acceptor dyes with each hybridization event can enhance FRET efficiency, thereby improving sensitivity. Many previous studies have used interfacial protein layers to generate selectivity; however, transient destabilization of these layers is shown to prevent efficient regeneration. To this end, we report a protein-free interfacial chemistry and demonstrate the specific detection of as little as 2 pmol of target, as well as an improved capacity for regeneration.

  20. Exploring Do-It-Yourself Approaches in Computational Quantum Chemistry: The Pedagogical Benefits of the Classical Boys Algorithm

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The ever-increasing impact of molecular quantum calculations over chemical sciences implies a strong and urgent need for the elaboration of proper teaching strategies in university curricula. In such perspective, this paper proposes an extensive project for a student-driven, cooperative, from-scratch implementation of a general Hartree-Fock…

  1. Green Synthesis, Spectrofluorometric Characterization and Antibacterial Activity of Heterocyclic Compound from Chalcone on the Basis of in Vitro and Quantum Chemistry Calculation.

    PubMed

    Khan, Salman A

    2017-02-08

    2-amino-4-(4-bromophenyl)-8-methoxy-5,6-dihydrobenzo[h]quinoline-3-carbonitrile (ABDC) was synthesized by the reaction of (2E)-2-(4 bromobenzylidene) - 6 -methoxy-3,4-dihydronaphthalen-1(2H)-one (Chalcone) with malononitrile and ammonium acetate under microwave irradiation. Chalcone was synthesised by the reaction 4-bromobenzaldehyd, 6-methoxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-naphthalin-1-one under the same condition. Structure of ABDC was conformed by (1)H and (13)C NMR, FT-IR, EI-MS spectral studies and elemental analysis. The electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of ABDC have been studied in solvents of different polarities, and the data were used to study the solvatochromic properties such as excitation coefficient, stokes shift, oscillator strength, transition dipole moment and fluorescence quantum yield. The absorption maximum and fluorescence emission maximum was observed red shift when increase solvent polarity n-Hexane to DMSO. ABDC undergoes solubilization in different micelles and may be used as a probe and quencher to determine the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of CTAB and SDS. The anti-bacterial activity of chalcone and its cyclized product ABDC was tested in vitro by the disk diffusion assay against two Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria was determined with the reference of standard drug Tetracycline. Results showed that the ABDC is better anti-bacterial agent as compared to chalcone. The anti-bacterial activity was further supported by the quantum chemistry calculation.

  2. International Journal of Quantum Chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 26: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods Held in St. Augustine, Florida on 14-21 March 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    Viinikka, Phys . Rev . A 15, 1486 (1977). I 01 L. S. Cederbaum, W. Domcke. J. Schirmer. W. Von Niessen. G. It. F . Diercksen. and W. P. Kraemer, J. (hem. Phys ...Csanak, and H. S. Taylor. Adv. At. Mol. Phvs. 7,287 (1971). f231 F , J. Dyson. Phys . Rev . 75,436 (1949): 75. 1736 (1949). [24] J_ C. Inkson. Man y-Body...161 ( 1982)- f [19] H. Monkhorst, Int. J. Quantum (hem.. Quantumn Chem. S% np, 11, 421 (1977): E. Dalgaard and H. J. Monkhorst. Phys . Rev . A28, 1217

  3. Accelerating quantum chemistry calculations with graphical processing units - toward in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Yohsuke; Ohno, Kazuki; Orita, Masaya; Koga, Ryota; Endo, Toshio; Akiyama, Yutaka; Sekijima, Masakazu

    2013-09-01

    The growing power of central processing units (CPU) has made it possible to use quantum mechanical (QM) calculations for in silico drug discovery. However, limited CPU power makes large-scale in silico screening such as virtual screening with QM calculations a challenge. Recently, general-purpose computing on graphics processing units (GPGPU) has offered an alternative, because of its significantly accelerated computational time over CPU. Here, we review a GPGPU-based supercomputer, TSUBAME2.0, and its promise for next generation in silico drug discovery, in high-density (HD) silico drug discovery.

  4. Quantum hydrodynamics with trajectories: The nonlinear conservation form mixed/discontinuous Galerkin method with applications in chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Michoski, C. Evans, J.A.; Schmitz, P.G.; Vasseur, A.

    2009-12-10

    We present a solution to the conservation form (Eulerian form) of the quantum hydrodynamic equations which arise in chemical dynamics by implementing a mixed/discontinuous Galerkin (MDG) finite element numerical scheme. We show that this methodology is stable, showing good accuracy and a remarkable scale invariance in its solution space. In addition the MDG method is robust, adapting well to various initial-boundary value problems of particular significance in a range of physical and chemical applications. We further show explicitly how to recover the Lagrangian frame (or pathline) solutions.

  5. The use of quantum molecular calculations to guide a genetic algorithm: a way to search for new chemistry.

    PubMed

    Durrant, Marcus C

    2007-01-01

    The process of gene-based molecular evolution has been simulated in silico by using massively parallel density functional theory quantum calculations, coupled with a genetic algorithm, to test for fitness with respect to a target chemical reaction in populations of genetically encoded molecules. The goal of this study was the identification of transition-metal complexes capable of mediating a known reaction, namely the cleavage of N(2) to give the metal nitride. Each complex within the search space was uniquely specified by a nanogene consisting of an eight-digit number. Propagation of an individual nanogene into successive generations was determined by the fitness of its phenotypic molecule to perform the target reaction and new generations were created by recombination and mutation of surviving nanogenes. In its simplest implementation, the quantum-directed genetic algorithm (QDGA) quickly located a local minimum on the evolutionary fitness hypersurface, but proved incapable of progressing towards the global minimum. A strategy for progressing beyond local minima consistent with the Darwinian paradigm by the use of environmental variations coupled with mass extinctions was therefore developed. This allowed for the identification of nitriding complexes that are very closely related to known examples from the chemical literature. Examples of mutations that appear to be beneficial at the genetic level but prove to be harmful at the phenotypic level are described. As well as revealing fundamental aspects of molecular evolution, QDGA appears to be a powerful tool for the identification of lead compounds capable of carrying out a target chemical reaction.

  6. Quantum chemical study of relative reactivities of a series of amines and nitriles - Relevance to prebiotic chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loew, G. H.; Berkowitz, D.; Chang, S.

    1975-01-01

    Using the Iterative Extended Huckel Theory (IEHT) calculations of the electron distribution and orbital energies of a series of thirteen amines, nitriles and amino-nitriles relevant to prebiotic and cosmo-chemistry have been carried out. Ground state properties such as the energy and nature of the highest occupied (HOMO) and lowest empty (LEMO) molecular orbitals, net atomic charges and number of nonbonding electrons have been identified as criteria for correlating the relative nucleophilicity of amine and nitrile nitrogens and the electrophilicity of nitrile and other unsaturated carbon atoms. The results of such correlations can be partially verified by known chemical behavior of these compounds and are used to predict and understand their role in prebiotic organic synthesis.

  7. Polarizabilities of Ba and Ba{sub 2}: Comparison of molecular beam experiments with relativistic quantum chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Schaefer, Sascha; Mehring, Max; Schaefer, Rolf; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2007-11-15

    The dielectric response to an inhomogeneous electric field has been investigated for Ba and Ba{sub 2} within a molecular beam experiment. The ratio of the polarizabilities per atom of Ba{sub 2} and Ba is determined to be 1.30{+-}0.13. The experimental result is compared to a high level ab initio quantum chemical coupled cluster calculation with an energy-consistent scalar relativistic small-core pseudopotential for Ba. For the barium atom a polarizability of 40.82 A{sup 3} is obtained and the isotropic value of the polarizability calculated for Ba{sub 2} is 97.88 A{sup 3}, which is in good agreement with the experimental results, demonstrating that a quantitative understanding of the interaction between two closed-shell heavy element metal atoms has been achieved.

  8. Development of a Polarizable Force Field for Proteins Via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminski, George A.; Stern, Harry A.; Berne, Bruce J.; Friesner, Richard A.; Cao, Yixiang; Murphy, Robert B.; Zhou, Ruhong; Halgren, Thomas A.

    2002-12-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model.

  9. Development of a Polarizable Force Field For Proteins via Ab Initio Quantum Chemistry: First Generation Model and Gas Phase Tests

    PubMed Central

    KAMINSKI, GEORGE A.; STERN, HARRY A.; BERNE, B. J.; FRIESNER, RICHARD A.; CAO, YIXIANG X.; MURPHY, ROBERT B.; ZHOU, RUHONG; HALGREN, THOMAS A.

    2014-01-01

    We present results of developing a methodology suitable for producing molecular mechanics force fields with explicit treatment of electrostatic polarization for proteins and other molecular system of biological interest. The technique allows simulation of realistic-size systems. Employing high-level ab initio data as a target for fitting allows us to avoid the problem of the lack of detailed experimental data. Using the fast and reliable quantum mechanical methods supplies robust fitting data for the resulting parameter sets. As a result, gas-phase many-body effects for dipeptides are captured within the average RMSD of 0.22 kcal/mol from their ab initio values, and conformational energies for the di- and tetrapeptides are reproduced within the average RMSD of 0.43 kcal/mol from their quantum mechanical counterparts. The latter is achieved in part because of application of a novel torsional fitting technique recently developed in our group, which has already been used to greatly improve accuracy of the peptide conformational equilibrium prediction with the OPLS-AA force field.1 Finally, we have employed the newly developed first-generation model in computing gas-phase conformations of real proteins, as well as in molecular dynamics studies of the systems. The results show that, although the overall accuracy is no better than what can be achieved with a fixed-charges model, the methodology produces robust results, permits reasonably low computational cost, and avoids other computational problems typical for polarizable force fields. It can be considered as a solid basis for building a more accurate and complete second-generation model. PMID:12395421

  10. Real-Time Monitoring Surface Chemistry-Dependent In Vivo Behaviors of Protein Nanocages via Encapsulating an NIR-II Ag2S Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Li, Feng; Zhang, Yejun; Zhang, Wenjing; Zhang, Xian-En; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-12-22

    Protein nanocages (PNCs) have been recognized as a promising platform for nanomedicine innovation. Real-time in vivo tracking of PNCs can provide critically important information for the development of PNC-based diagnostics and therapeutics. Here we demonstrate a general strategy for monitoring the behaviors of PNCs in vivo by encapsulating a Ag2S quantum dot (QD) with fluorescence in the second near-infrared window (NIR-II, 1000-1700 nm) inside the PNC, using simian virus 40 (SV40) PNC (PNCSV40) as a model. Benefiting from the high spatiotemporal resolution and deep tissue penetration of NIR-II fluorescence imaging, the dynamic distribution of the PNCSV40 in living mice was tracked in real time with high fidelity, and adopting the PEGylation strategy, surface chemistry-dependent in vivo behaviors of PNCSV40 were clearly revealed. This study represents the first evidence of real-time tracking of the intrinsic behaviors of PNCs in vivo without interference in PNC-host interactions by encapsulating nanoprobes inside. The as-described imaging strategy will facilitate the study of interactions between exogenously introduced PNCs and host body and prompt the development of future protein-based drugs, sensors, and high-efficacy targeted delivery systems.

  11. Prediction of logP for Pt(II) and Pt(IV) complexes: Comparison of statistical and quantum-chemistry based approaches.

    PubMed

    Tetko, Igor V; Varbanov, Hristo P; Galanski, Markus; Talmaciu, Mona; Platts, James A; Ravera, Mauro; Gabano, Elisabetta

    2016-03-01

    The octanol/water partition coefficient, logP, is one of the most important physico-chemical parameters for the development of new metal-based anticancer drugs with improved pharmacokinetic properties. This study addresses an issue with the absence of publicly available models to predict logP of Pt(IV) complexes. Following data collection and subsequent development of models based on 187 complexes from literature, we validate new and previously published models on a new set of 11 Pt(II) and 35 Pt(IV) complexes, which were kept blind during the model development step. The error of the consensus model, 0.65 for Pt(IV) and 0.37 for Pt(II) complexes, indicates its good accuracy of predictions. The lower accuracy for Pt(IV) complexes was attributed to experimental difficulties with logP measurements for some poorly-soluble compounds. This model was developed using general-purpose descriptors such as extended functional groups, molecular fragments and E-state indices. Surprisingly, models based on quantum-chemistry calculations provided lower prediction accuracy. We also found that all the developed models strongly overestimate logP values for the three complexes measured in the presence of DMSO. Considering that DMSO is frequently used as a solvent to store chemicals, its effect should not be overlooked when logP measurements by means of the shake flask method are performed. The final models are freely available at http://ochem.eu/article/76903.

  12. Stacked and H-Bonded Cytosine Dimers. Analysis of the Intermolecular Interaction Energies by Parallel Quantum Chemistry and Polarizable Molecular Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Gresh, Nohad; Sponer, Judit E; Devereux, Mike; Gkionis, Konstantinos; de Courcy, Benoit; Piquemal, Jean-Philip; Sponer, Jiri

    2015-07-30

    Until now, atomistic simulations of DNA and RNA and their complexes have been executed using well calibrated but conceptually simple pair-additive empirical potentials (force fields). Although such simulations provided many valuable results, it is well established that simple force fields also introduce errors into the description, underlying the need for development of alternative anisotropic, polarizable molecular mechanics (APMM) potentials. One of the most abundant forces in all kinds of nucleic acids topologies is base stacking. Intra- and interstrand stacking is assumed to be the most essential factor affecting local conformational variations of B-DNA. However, stacking also contributes to formation of all kinds of noncanonical nucleic acids structures, such as quadruplexes or folded RNAs. The present study focuses on 14 stacked cytosine (Cyt) dimers and the doubly H-bonded dimer. We evaluate the extent to which an APMM procedure, SIBFA, could account quantitatively for the results of high-level quantum chemistry (QC) on the total interaction energies, and the individual energy contributions and their nonisotropic behaviors. Good agreements are found at both uncorrelated HF and correlated DFT and CCSD(T) levels. Resorting in SIBFA to distributed QC multipoles and to an explicit representation of the lone pairs is essential to respectively account for the anisotropies of the Coulomb and of the exchange-repulsion QC contributions.

  13. Host-Guest Chemistry between Perylene Diimide (PDI) Derivatives and 18-Crown-6: Enhancement in Luminescence Quantum Yield and Electrical Conductivity.

    PubMed

    Lasitha, P; Prasad, Edamana

    2016-07-18

    Perylene diimide (PDI) derivatives exhibit a high propensity for aggregation, which causes the aggregation-induced quenching of emission from the system. Host-guest chemistry is one of the best-known methods for preventing aggregation through the encapsulation of guest molecules. Herein we report the use of 18-crown-6 (18-C-6) as a host system to disaggregate suitably substituted PDI derivatives in methanol. 18-C-6 formed complexes with amino-substituted PDIs in methanol, which led to disaggregation and enhanced emission from the systems. Furthermore, the embedding of the PDI⋅18-C-6 complexes in poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) films generated remarkably high emission quantum yields (60-70 %) from the PDI derivatives. More importantly, the host-guest systems were tested for their ability to conduct electricity in PVA films. The electrical conductivities of the self-assembled systems in PVA were measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and the highest conductivity observed was 2.42×10(-5)  S cm(-1) .

  14. Intrinsic Folding Proclivities in Cyclic β-Peptide Building Blocks: Configuration and Heteroatom Effects Analyzed by Conformer-Selective Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Alauddin, Mohammad; Gloaguen, Eric; Brenner, Valérie; Tardivel, Benjamin; Mons, Michel; Zehnacker-Rentien, Anne; Declerck, Valérie; Aitken, David J

    2015-11-09

    This work describes the use of conformer-selective laser spectroscopy following supersonic expansion to probe the local folding proclivities of four-membered ring cyclic β-amino acid building blocks. Emphasis is placed on stereochemical effects as well as on the structural changes induced by the replacement of a carbon atom of the cycle by a nitrogen atom. The amide A IR spectra are obtained and interpreted with the help of quantum chemistry structure calculations. Results provide evidence that the building block with a trans-substituted cyclobutane ring has a predilection to form strong C8 hydrogen bonds. Nitrogen-atom substitution in the ring induces the formation of the hydrazino turn, with a related but distinct hydrogen-bonding network: the structure is best viewed as a bifurcated C8/C5 bond with the N heteroatom lone electron pair playing a significant acceptor role, which supports recent observations on the hydrazino turn structure in solution. Surprisingly, this study shows that the cis-substituted cyclobutane ring derivative also gives rise predominantly to a C8 hydrogen bond, although weaker than in the two former cases, a feature that is not often encountered for this building block.

  15. The role of surface chemistry in determining in vivo biodistribution and toxicity of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan; Han, Songling; Liu, Hongmei; Chen, Xin; Huang, Li; Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2013-11-01

    To examine the effect of surface chemistry and surface charge on in vivo biodistribution and toxicity of CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots (QDs), QDs with positive, negative, or PEG coating are used in this study for in vivo evaluation in a mouse model. The results suggest that QDs coated with cationic polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDDA) preferentially deposit in the lung other than in the liver, while the negative and PEGylated QDs render abundant accumulation in the liver. At higher doses positive QDs with PDDA coating show severe acute toxicity due to pulmonary embolism. Independent of their surface coatings, all QDs cause injuries in specific tissues like liver, spleen, lung, and kidney, after acute and long-term exposure, and the degree of injuries is dominated by their surface properties. For the positively charged QDs, the acute phase toxicity is primarily contributed by the coating material PDDA, while coating on QDs may amplify both in vitro and in vivo toxicity of PDDA. PEGylated QDs display the slightest chronic injuries in the long-term toxicity examination in comparison to positive or negative ones.

  16. Thermodynamic behavior of the binaries 1-butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate with water and alkanols: their interpretation using 1H NMR spectroscopy and quantum-chemistry calculations.

    PubMed

    Vreekamp, Remko; Castellano, Desire; Palomar, José; Ortega, Juan; Espiau, Fernando; Fernández, Luís; Penco, Eduvigis

    2011-07-14

    Here we present experimental data of different properties for a set of binary mixtures composed of water or alkanols (methanol to butanol) with an ionic liquid (IL), butylpyridinium tetrafluoroborate [bpy][BF(4)]. Solubility data (x(IL),T) are presented for each of the mixtures, including water, which is found to have a small interval of compositions in IL, x(IL), with immiscibility. In each case, the upper critical solubility temperature (UCST) is determined and a correlation was observed between the UCST and the nature of the compounds in the mixtures. Miscibility curves establish the composition and temperature intervals where thermodynamic properties of the mixtures, such as enthalpies H(m)(E) and volumes V(m)(E), can be determined. Hence, at 298.15 and 318.15 K these can only be found with the first four alkanols. All mixing properties are correlated with a suitable equation ξ (x(IL),T,Y(m)(E) = 0. An analysis on the influence of the temperature in the properties is shown, likewise a comparison between the results obtained here and those of analogous mixtures, discussing the position of the -CH(3) group in the pyridinic ring. The (1)H NMR spectra are determined to analyze the molecular interactions present, especially those due to hydrogen bonds. Additional information about the molecular interactions and their influence on the mixing properties is obtained by quantum chemistry calculations.

  17. Actions between neonicotinoids and key residues of insect nAChR based on an ab initio quantum chemistry study: hydrogen bonding and cooperative pi-pi interaction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanli; Cheng, Jiagao; Qian, Xuhong; Li, Zhong

    2007-04-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides show selective actions on insect nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR). Two key residues (Trp and Arg/Lys) have been identified as contributing to the neonicotinois binding. To investigate the selective mechanism, a computational model was set up to simulate the interaction between residues (Trp and Arg) of insect nAChR and neonicotinoids by quantum chemistry method. Three analogues of neonicotinoid derivatives without the chloropyridinyl moiety and 3-methyl-indole (3MI), guanidinium (Gua) were used to mimic the neonicotinoids and the side chain of key residues Trp and Arg accordingly. Interaction features of 3MI-analogues, analogues-Gua and 3MI-analogues -Gua complexes were analyzed comparatively. Hydrogen bonding between the nitro group of analogues and Gua was found to be the most important for binding. Moreover, the cooperative pi-pi interaction between analogues and the indole ring, which is strengthened by the existence of Gua, also contributes to the binding. The alternative binding model of neonicotinoids proposed here, although slightly different from others, might be close to the actual.

  18. KiSThelP: a program to predict thermodynamic properties and rate constants from quantum chemistry results.

    PubMed

    Canneaux, Sébastien; Bohr, Frédéric; Henon, Eric

    2014-01-05

    Kinetic and Statistical Thermodynamical Package (KiSThelP) is a cross-platform free open-source program developed to estimate molecular and reaction properties from electronic structure data. To date, three computational chemistry software formats are supported (Gaussian, GAMESS, and NWChem). Some key features are: gas-phase molecular thermodynamic properties (offering hindered rotor treatment), thermal equilibrium constants, transition state theory rate coefficients (transition state theory (TST), variational transition state theory (VTST)) including one-dimensional (1D) tunnelling effects (Wigner, and Eckart) and Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) rate constants, for elementary reactions with well-defined barriers. KiSThelP is intended as a working tool both for the general public and also for more expert users. It provides graphical front-end capabilities designed to facilitate calculations and interpreting results. KiSThelP enables to change input data and simulation parameters directly through the graphical user interface and to visually probe how it affects results. Users can access results in the form of graphs and tables. The graphical tool offers customizing of 2D plots, exporting images and data files. These features make this program also well-suited to support and enhance students learning and can serve as a very attractive courseware, taking the teaching content directly from results in molecular and kinetic modelling.

  19. Support vector machine regression (LS-SVM)--an alternative to artificial neural networks (ANNs) for the analysis of quantum chemistry data?

    PubMed

    Balabin, Roman M; Lomakina, Ekaterina I

    2011-06-28

    A multilayer feed-forward artificial neural network (MLP-ANN) with a single, hidden layer that contains a finite number of neurons can be regarded as a universal non-linear approximator. Today, the ANN method and linear regression (MLR) model are widely used for quantum chemistry (QC) data analysis (e.g., thermochemistry) to improve their accuracy (e.g., Gaussian G2-G4, B3LYP/B3-LYP, X1, or W1 theoretical methods). In this study, an alternative approach based on support vector machines (SVMs) is used, the least squares support vector machine (LS-SVM) regression. It has been applied to ab initio (first principle) and density functional theory (DFT) quantum chemistry data. So, QC + SVM methodology is an alternative to QC + ANN one. The task of the study was to estimate the Møller-Plesset (MPn) or DFT (B3LYP, BLYP, BMK) energies calculated with large basis sets (e.g., 6-311G(3df,3pd)) using smaller ones (6-311G, 6-311G*, 6-311G**) plus molecular descriptors. A molecular set (BRM-208) containing a total of 208 organic molecules was constructed and used for the LS-SVM training, cross-validation, and testing. MP2, MP3, MP4(DQ), MP4(SDQ), and MP4/MP4(SDTQ) ab initio methods were tested. Hartree-Fock (HF/SCF) results were also reported for comparison. Furthermore, constitutional (CD: total number of atoms and mole fractions of different atoms) and quantum-chemical (QD: HOMO-LUMO gap, dipole moment, average polarizability, and quadrupole moment) molecular descriptors were used for the building of the LS-SVM calibration model. Prediction accuracies (MADs) of 1.62 ± 0.51 and 0.85 ± 0.24 kcal mol(-1) (1 kcal mol(-1) = 4.184 kJ mol(-1)) were reached for SVM-based approximations of ab initio and DFT energies, respectively. The LS-SVM model was more accurate than the MLR model. A comparison with the artificial neural network approach shows that the accuracy of the LS-SVM method is similar to the accuracy of ANN. The extrapolation and interpolation results show that LS-SVM is

  20. Nano-design of quantum dot-based photocatalysts for hydrogen generation using advanced surface molecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Noureldine, Dalal; Isimjan, Tayirjan; Lin, Bin; Del Gobbo, Silvano; Abulikemu, Mutalifu; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Anjum, Dalaver H; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-14

    Efficient photocatalytic hydrogen generation in a suspension system requires a sophisticated nano-device that combines a photon absorber with effective redox catalysts. This study demonstrates an innovative molecular linking strategy for fabricating photocatalytic materials that allow effective charge separation of excited carriers, followed by efficient hydrogen evolution. The method for the sequential replacement of ligands with appropriate molecules developed in this study tethers both quantum dots (QDs), as photosensitizers, and metal nanoparticles, as hydrogen evolution catalysts, to TiO2 surfaces in a controlled manner at the nano-level. Combining hydrophobic and hydrophilic interactions on the surface, CdSe-ZnS core-shell QDs and an Au-Pt alloy were attached to TiO2 without overlapping during the synthesis. The resultant nano-photocatalysts achieved substantially high-performance visible-light-driven photocatalysis for hydrogen evolution. All syntheses were conducted at room temperature and in ambient air, providing a promising route for fabricating visible-light-responsive photocatalysts.

  1. Rethinking Undergraduate Physical Chemistry Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    A summary of fundamental changes made to the undergraduate physical chemistry curriculum in the Chemistry Department at Gustavus Adolphus College (beginning in the 2013-2014 academic year) is presented. The yearlong sequence now consists of an introductory semester covering both quantum mechanics and thermodynamics/kinetics, followed by a second…

  2. Formation of Carbon Nanotube Based Gears: Quantum Chemistry and Molecular Mechanics Study of the Electrophilic Addition of o-Benzyne to Fullerenes, Graphene, and Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Considerable progress has been made in recent years in chemical functionalization of fullerene molecules. In some cases, the predominant reaction products are different from those obtained (using the same reactants) from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). One such example is the cycloaddition of o-benzyne to C60. It is well established that benzyne adds across one of the rings in naphthalene, anthracene and other PAHs forming the [2+4] cycloaddition product (benzobicyclo[2.2.2.]-octatriene with naphthalene and triptycene with anthracene). However, Hoke et al demonstrated that the only reaction path for o-benzyne with C60 leads to the [2+2] cycloaddition product in which benzyne adds across one of the interpentagonal bonds (forming a cyclobutene ring in the process). Either reaction product results in a loss of aromaticity and distortion of the PAH or fullerene substrate, and in a loss of strain in the benzyne. It is not clear, however, why different products are preferred in these cases. In the current paper, we consider the stability of benzyne-nanotube adducts and the ability of Brenner's potential energy model to describe the structure and stability of these adducts. The Brenner potential has been widely used for describing diamondoid and graphitic carbon. Recently it has also been used for molecular mechanics and molecular dynamics simulations of fullerenes and nanotubes. However, it has not been tested for the case of functionalized fullerenes (especially with highly strained geometries). We use the Brenner potential for our companion nanogear simulations and believe that it should be calibrated to insure that those simulations are physically reasonable. In the present work, Density Functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to determine the preferred geometric structures and energetics for this calibration. The DFT method is a kind of ab initio quantum chemistry method for determining the electronic structure of molecules. For a given basis set

  3. Role of gamma carboxylated Glu47 in connexin 26 hemichannel regulation by extracellular Ca²⁺: insight from a local quantum chemistry study.

    PubMed

    Zonta, Francesco; Mammano, Fabio; Torsello, Mauro; Fortunati, Nicola; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-02-28

    Connexin hemichannels are regulated by several gating mechanisms, some of which depend critically on the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]e). It is well established that hemichannel activity is inhibited at normal (∼1 mM) [Ca(2+)]e, whereas lowering [Ca(2+)]e to micromolar levels fosters hemichannel opening. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows significant and reversible changes of pore diameter at the extracellular mouth of Cx26 hemichannels exposed to different [Ca(2+)]e, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Analysis of the crystal structure of connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction channels, corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggests that several negatively charged amino acids create a favorable environment for low-affinity Ca(2+) binding within the extracellular vestibule of the Cx26 hemichannel. In particular a highly conserved glutammic acid, found in position 47 in most connexins, is thought to undergo post translational gamma carboxylation (γGlu47), and is thus likely to play an important role in Ca(2+) coordination. γGlu47 may also form salt bridges with two conserved arginines (Arg75 and Arg184 in Cx26), which are considered important in stabilizing the structure of the extracellular region. Using a combination of quantum chemistry methods, we analyzed the interaction between γGlu47, Arg75 and Arg184 in a Cx26 hemichannel model both in the absence and in the presence of Ca(2+). We show that Ca(2+) imparts significant local structural changes and speculate that these modifications may alter the structure of the extracellular loops in Cx26, and may thus account for the mechanism of hemichannel closure in the presence of mM [Ca(2+)]e.

  4. Theoretical investigations of the γ- gauche effect on the 13C chemical shifts produced by oxygen atoms at the γ position by quantum chemistry calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Shinji; Horii, Fumitaka; Kurosu, Hiromichi

    2009-02-01

    The γ- gauche effect on 13C chemical shifts that is produced by the O atoms located at the γ positions has been evaluated by quantum chemistry calculations based on the GAIO-CHF procedure. The γ- gauche effects produced by the O and Cl atoms in n-propanol and n-propyl chloride are found to be, respectively, +1.4 and -0.7 ppm, whereas that due to the C atom in n-butane is -3.0 ppm in good agreement of the values previously calculated. The apparent cause of such a difference in the γ- gauche effect is mainly relatively higher shielding of the CH 3 carbon in the trans conformation for the n-propanol and n-propyl chloride. Extending the n-propanol chain at both ends causes no significant change in the γ- gauche effect produced by the O atom. In 2-butanol and 2-methyl-2-butanol as examples of secondarily and tertiarily substituted compounds, the γ- gauche effects produced by the γ-OH groups are estimated to be -7 to -9 ppm. In addition, the γ- gauche effect due to the C atom is found to increase in n-butane, secondary, and tertiary butanols in this order. The γ- gauche effect produced by the O atom in hydroxyethylcyclohexane is as negligibly small as -0.7 ppm, whereas that produced by the C atom in ethylcyclohexane is about -5 ppm. These results suggest that the γ- gauche effect, including downfield shift, produced by the O atom in a compound greatly depends on its chemical structure, whereas upfield shifts of -3 to -7 ppm are induced in all examined compounds as the γ- gauche effect due to the C atom.

  5. Size distributions and geometries of alkali halide nanoclusters probed using ESI FT-ICR mass spectrometry and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemke, K.; Sadjadi, S.; Seward, T.

    2010-12-01

    The structures and energetic properties of ionic alkali metal halide clusters play a significant role in our understanding of aqueous geochemical processes such as salt dissolution, precipitation and neutralization reactions. Mass spectrometric and quantum chemical studies of such systems offer new opportunities to study the size-dependent evolution of cluster structures, the occurrence of magic number species as well as their fundamental properties. The work here presents new results for the stability, abundance and structure of pure [Na(NaClm)]+ , [K(KCl)m]+ and mixed [Na(NaCl)p(KCl)q]+ metal halide clusters with m<23 and p+q<14, respectively, using ultra-high resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR/MS) in combination with the Gn and CBS-x multistep ab initio methods. Ion-cluster experiments were conducted on a modified 7T Bruker FT-ICR/MS equipped with electrospray ionization (ESI) sources and a custom-designed solvent gas inlet interface. In ESI FT-ICR/MS experiments performed with solutions containing NaCl and KCl salts (1mM; 80/20 CH3CN/H2O), singly and doubly charged salt clusters were generated up to a cluster size of [Na(NaCl)22]+, [K(KCl)17]+ and [K2(KCl)21,23]2+, respectively, including “magic number” clusters that correspond to the completed cluster cuboids with the dimensions 3x3x1 (m=4), 3x3x2+3 (m=10) 3x3x3 (m=13) and 3x3x5 (m=22) (see Figure). On the other hand, no pure clusters except [K(KCl)1-3]+ were generated when alkali halides were electrosprayed from 1mM NaCl/KCl solutions. Instead, mixed [Na(NaCl)p(KCl)q]+ clusters are generated up to p+q=14, which are the largest mixed alkali halide clusters yet generated in mass spectrometric experiments, including a suite of ionic species that are generated via CH3CN fragmentation and charge transfer in [Na(CH3CN)n]+ to yield the clusters [Na(NaCN)(CH3CN)n-1]+. We describe our ESI FT-ICR/MS experiments and discuss ion cluster abundances and extent of clustering

  6. Discovery of a general method of solving the Schrödinger and dirac equations that opens a way to accurately predictive quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hiroshi

    2012-09-18

    Just as Newtonian law governs classical physics, the Schrödinger equation (SE) and the relativistic Dirac equation (DE) rule the world of chemistry. So, if we can solve these equations accurately, we can use computation to predict chemistry precisely. However, for approximately 80 years after the discovery of these equations, chemists believed that they could not solve SE and DE for atoms and molecules that included many electrons. This Account reviews ideas developed over the past decade to further the goal of predictive quantum chemistry. Between 2000 and 2005, I discovered a general method of solving the SE and DE accurately. As a first inspiration, I formulated the structure of the exact wave function of the SE in a compact mathematical form. The explicit inclusion of the exact wave function's structure within the variational space allows for the calculation of the exact wave function as a solution of the variational method. Although this process sounds almost impossible, it is indeed possible, and I have published several formulations and applied them to solve the full configuration interaction (CI) with a very small number of variables. However, when I examined analytical solutions for atoms and molecules, the Hamiltonian integrals in their secular equations diverged. This singularity problem occurred in all atoms and molecules because it originates from the singularity of the Coulomb potential in their Hamiltonians. To overcome this problem, I first introduced the inverse SE and then the scaled SE. The latter simpler idea led to immediate and surprisingly accurate solution for the SEs of the hydrogen atom, helium atom, and hydrogen molecule. The free complement (FC) method, also called the free iterative CI (free ICI) method, was efficient for solving the SEs. In the FC method, the basis functions that span the exact wave function are produced by the Hamiltonian of the system and the zeroth-order wave function. These basis functions are called complement

  7. Integrating Computational Chemistry into a Course in Classical Thermodynamics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martini, Sheridan R.; Hartzell, Cynthia J.

    2015-01-01

    Computational chemistry is commonly addressed in the quantum mechanics course of undergraduate physical chemistry curricula. Since quantum mechanics traditionally follows the thermodynamics course, there is a lack of curricula relating computational chemistry to thermodynamics. A method integrating molecular modeling software into a semester long…

  8. Role of gamma carboxylated Glu47 in connexin 26 hemichannel regulation by extracellular Ca{sup 2+}: Insight from a local quantum chemistry study

    SciTech Connect

    Zonta, Francesco; Mammano, Fabio; Torsello, Mauro; Fortunati, Nicola; Orian, Laura; Polimeno, Antonino

    2014-02-28

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • QM calculations show that Ca{sup 2+} binds to γGlu47 in connexin hemichannels. • Molecular models of increasing size are employed in hybrid DFT calculations. • Ca{sup 2+} binding affects the interaction between γGlu47 and Arg75, Arg184. • Ca{sup 2+} binding alters the structure in a critical region of connexin hemichannels. - Abstract: Connexin hemichannels are regulated by several gating mechanisms, some of which depend critically on the extracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}). It is well established that hemichannel activity is inhibited at normal (∼1 mM) [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, whereas lowering [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e} to micromolar levels fosters hemichannel opening. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows significant and reversible changes of pore diameter at the extracellular mouth of Cx26 hemichannels exposed to different [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub e}, however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Analysis of the crystal structure of connexin 26 (Cx26) gap junction channels, corroborated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, suggests that several negatively charged amino acids create a favorable environment for low-affinity Ca{sup 2+} binding within the extracellular vestibule of the Cx26 hemichannel. In particular a highly conserved glutammic acid, found in position 47 in most connexins, is thought to undergo post translational gamma carboxylation (γGlu47), and is thus likely to play an important role in Ca{sup 2+} coordination. γGlu47 may also form salt bridges with two conserved arginines (Arg75 and Arg184 in Cx26), which are considered important in stabilizing the structure of the extracellular region. Using a combination of quantum chemistry methods, we analyzed the interaction between γGlu47, Arg75 and Arg184 in a Cx26 hemichannel model both in the absence and in the presence of Ca{sup 2+}. We show that Ca{sup 2+} imparts significant local structural changes and speculate

  9. Determining the Quantum Efficiency for Activation of an Organometallic Photoinitiator for Cationic Polymerization: An Experiment for the Physical or Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayes, David M.; Mahar, Maura; Schnabel, R. Chris; Shah, Paras; Lees, Alistair J.; Jakubek, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    We present a new laboratory experiment on the photochemistry of organometallic [eta][superscript 5],[eta][superscript 6]-mixed-sandwich compounds, which is suitable for both the physical chemistry and inorganic chemistry laboratory. Specifically, students use 1,10-phenanthroline to trap the intermediate formed when…

  10. The promise of quantum simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Richard P.; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2015-07-21

    In this study, quantum simulations promise to be one of the primary applications of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history of quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and co-workers, demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggest that quantum simulations of quantum chemistry have a bright future.

  11. The promise of quantum simulation

    DOE PAGES

    Muller, Richard P.; Blume-Kohout, Robin

    2015-07-21

    In this study, quantum simulations promise to be one of the primary applications of quantum computers, should one be constructed. This article briefly summarizes the history of quantum simulation in light of the recent result of Wang and co-workers, demonstrating calculation of the ground and excited states for a HeH+ molecule, and concludes with a discussion of why this and other recent progress in the field suggest that quantum simulations of quantum chemistry have a bright future.

  12. Conjugation of transferrin to azide-modified CdSe/ZnS core-shell quantum dots using cyclooctyne click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Schieber, Christine; Bestetti, Alessandra; Lim, Jet Phey; Ryan, Anneke D; Nguyen, Tich-Lam; Eldridge, Robert; White, Anthony R; Gleeson, Paul A; Donnelly, Paul S; Williams, Spencer J; Mulvaney, Paul

    2012-10-15

    Twinkle twinkle quantum dot: Conjugation of biomolecules to azide-modified quantum dots (QDs) through a bifunctional linker, using strain-promoted azide-alkyne cycloaddition with the QD and a squaramide linkage to the biomolecule (see scheme). Transferrin-conjugated QDs were internalized by transferrin-receptor expressing HeLa cells.

  13. Elementary and brief introduction of hadronic chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2013-10-01

    The discipline, today known as Quantum Chemistry for atomic and subatomic level interactions has no doubt made a significant historical contributions to the society. Despite of its significant achievements, quantum chemistry is also known for its widespread denial of insufficiencies it inherits. An Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures without any quantitative scientific contents. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper-mathematics [1-4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli's mathematics[3-5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6-8]. In the present discussion, we have briefly reviewed the conceptual foundations of Hadronic Chemistry that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  14. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  15. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  16. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  17. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  19. Computational Chemistry Using Modern Electronic Structure Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Stephen; Dines, Trevor J.; Chowdhry, Babur Z.; Withnall, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Various modern electronic structure methods are now days used to teach computational chemistry to undergraduate students. Such quantum calculations can now be easily used even for large size molecules.

  20. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  1. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  2. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  3. From Cathode Rays To Alpha Particles To Quantum of Action: A Rational Reconstruction of Structure of the Atom and Its Implications for Chemistry Textbooks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Niaz, Mansoor

    1998-01-01

    Reports on a study that involves the analysis of chemistry textbooks at the college freshman level to determine the degree to which they address developments in the history and philosophy of science. Twenty-three textbooks were evaluated on eight criteria. Contains 108 references. (DDR)

  4. Bohmian quantum mechanics with quantum trajectories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Yeuncheol

    The quantum trajectory method in the hydrodynamical formulation of Madelung-Bohm-Takabayasi quantum mechanics is an example of showing the cognitive importance of scientific illustrations and metaphors, especially, in this case, in computational quantum chemistry and electrical engineering. The method involves several numerical schemes of solving a set of hydrodynamical equations of motion for probability density fluids, based on the propagation of those probability density trajectories. The quantum trajectory method gives rise to, for example, an authentic quantum electron transport theory of motion to, among others, classically-minded applied scientists who probably have less of a commitment to traditional quantum mechanics. They were not the usual audience of quantum mechanics and simply choose to use a non-Copenhagen type interpretation to their advantage. Thus, the metaphysical issues physicists had a trouble with are not the main concern of the scientists. With the advantages of a visual and illustrative trajectory, the quantum theory of motion by Bohm effectively bridges quantum and classical physics, especially, in the mesoscale domain. Without having an abrupt shift in actions and beliefs from the classical to the quantum world, scientists and engineers are able to enjoy human cognitive capacities extended into the quantum mechanical domain.

  5. A quantum-quantum Metropolis algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-17

    The classical Metropolis sampling method is a cornerstone of many statistical modeling applications that range from physics, chemistry, and biology to economics. This method is particularly suitable for sampling the thermal distributions of classical systems. The challenge of extending this method to the simulation of arbitrary quantum systems is that, in general, eigenstates of quantum Hamiltonians cannot be obtained efficiently with a classical computer. However, this challenge can be overcome by quantum computers. Here, we present a quantum algorithm which fully generalizes the classical Metropolis algorithm to the quantum domain. The meaning of quantum generalization is twofold: The proposed algorithm is not only applicable to both classical and quantum systems, but also offers a quantum speedup relative to the classical counterpart. Furthermore, unlike the classical method of quantum Monte Carlo, this quantum algorithm does not suffer from the negative-sign problem associated with fermionic systems. Applications of this algorithm include the study of low-temperature properties of quantum systems, such as the Hubbard model, and preparing the thermal states of sizable molecules to simulate, for example, chemical reactions at an arbitrary temperature.

  6. Integrating Computational Chemistry into the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Lewis E.; Engel, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Relatively few undergraduate physical chemistry programs integrate molecular modeling into their quantum mechanics curriculum owing to concerns about limited access to computational facilities, the cost of software, and concerns about increasing the course material. However, modeling exercises can be integrated into an undergraduate course at a…

  7. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Learning in High School Chemistry: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts--Part 2. Students' Common Errors, Misconceptions and Difficulties in Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaphotis, Georgios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    Part 2 of the findings are presented of a quantitative study (n = 125) on basic quantum chemical concepts taught at twelfth grade (age 17-18 years) in Greece. A paper-and-pencil test of fourteen questions was used that were of two kinds: five questions that tested recall of knowledge or application of algorithmic procedures (type-A questions);…

  8. Using LEDs and Phosphorescent Materials to Teach High School Students Quantum Mechanics: A Guided-Inquiry Laboratory for Introductory High School Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William P.; Trotochaud, Alan; Sherman, Julia; Kazerounian, Kazem; Faraclas, Elias W.

    2009-01-01

    The quantization of electronic energy levels in atoms is foundational to a mechanistic explanation of the periodicity of elemental properties and behavior. This paper presents a hands-on, guided inquiry approach to teaching this concept as part of a broader treatment of quantum mechanics, and as a foundation for an understanding of chemical…

  9. Investigating Quantum Mechanical Tunneling at the Nanoscale via Analogy: Development and Assessment of a Teaching Tool for Upper-Division Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muniz, Marc N.; Oliver-Hoyo, Maria T.

    2014-01-01

    We report a novel educational activity designed to teach quantum mechanical tunneling to upper-division undergraduate students in the context of nanochemistry. The activity is based on a theoretical framework for analogy and is split into three parts that are linked pedagogically through the framework: classical ball-and-ramp system, tunneling…

  10. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Learning in High School Chemistry: The Case of Basic Quantum Chemical Concepts--Part 1. Statistical Analysis of a Quantitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papaphotis, Georgios; Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    Part 1 of the findings are presented of a quantitative study (n = 125) on basic quantum chemical concepts taught in the twelfth grade (age 17-18 years) in Greece. A paper-and-pencil test of fourteen questions was used. The study compared performance in five questions that tested recall of knowledge or application of algorithmic procedures (type-A…

  11. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  12. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  13. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    , in addition, of the pressure, temperature, and velocity. A near term goal of the experimental program should be to confirm the nonlinear effects of sulfur speciation, and if present, to provide an explanation for them. It is also desirable to examine if the particulate matter retains any sulfur. The recommendation is to examine the effects on SOx production of variations in fuel-bound sulfur and aromatic content (which may affect the amount of particulates formed). These experiments should help us to understand if there is a coupling between particulate formation and SO, concentration. Similarly, any coupling with NOx can be examined either by introducing NOx into the combustion air or by using fuel-bound nitrogen. Also of immediate urgency is the need to establish and validate a detailed mechanism for sulfur oxidation/aerosol formation, whose chemistry is concluded to be homogeneous, because there is not enough surface area for heterogeneous effects. It is envisaged that this work will involve both experimental and theoretical programs. The experimental work will require, in addition to the measurements described above, fundamental studies in devices such as flow reactors and shock tubes. Complementing this effort should be modeling and theoretical activities. One impediment to the successful modeling of sulfur oxidation is the lack of reliable data for thermodynamic and transport properties for several species, such as aqueous nitric acid, sulfur oxides, and sulfuric acid. Quantum mechanical calculations are recommended as a convenient means of deriving values for these properties. Such calculations would also help establish rate constants for several important reactions for which experimental measurements are inherently fraught with uncertainty. Efforts to implement sufficiently detailed chemistry into computational fluid dynamic codes should be continued. Zero- and one-dimensional flow models are also useful vehicles for elucidating the minimal set of species and

  14. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  15. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  16. Computing UV/vis spectra using a combined molecular dynamics and quantum chemistry approach: bis-triazin-pyridine (BTP) ligands studied in solution.

    PubMed

    Höfener, Sebastian; Trumm, Michael; Koke, Carsten; Heuser, Johannes; Ekström, Ulf; Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Panak, Petra J

    2016-03-21

    We report a combined computational and experimental study to investigate the UV/vis spectra of 2,6-bis(5,6-dialkyl-1,2,4-triazin-3-yl)pyridine (BTP) ligands in solution. In order to study molecules in solution using theoretical methods, force-field parameters for the ligand-water interaction are adjusted to ab initio quantum chemical calculations. Based on these parameters, molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out from which snapshots are extracted as input to quantum chemical excitation-energy calculations to obtain UV/vis spectra of BTP ligands in solution using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) employing the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA). The range-separated CAM-B3LYP functional is used to avoid large errors for charge-transfer states occurring in the electronic spectra. In order to study environment effects with theoretical methods, the frozen-density embedding scheme is applied. This computational procedure allows to obtain electronic spectra calculated at the (range-separated) DFT level of theory in solution, revealing solvatochromic shifts upon solvation of up to about 0.6 eV. Comparison to experimental data shows a significantly improved agreement compared to vacuum calculations and enables the analysis of relevant excitations for the line shape in solution.

  17. From Model Hamiltonians to ab Initio Hamiltonians and Back Again: Using Single Excitation Quantum Chemistry Methods To Find Multiexciton States in Singlet Fission Materials.

    PubMed

    Mayhall, Nicholas J

    2016-09-13

    Due to the promise of significantly enhanced photovoltaic efficiencies, significant effort has been directed toward understanding and controlling the singlet fission mechanism. Although accurate quantum chemical calculations would provide a detail-rich view of the singlet fission mechanism, this is complicated by the multiexcitonic nature of one of the key intermediates, the (1)(TT) state. Being described as two simultaneous and singlet-coupled triplet excitations on a pair of nearest neighbor monomers, the (1)(TT) state is inherently a multielectronic excitation. This fact renders most single-reference ab initio quantum chemical methods incapable of providing accurate results. This paper serves two purposes: (1) to demonstrate that the multiexciton states in singlet fission materials can be described using a spin-only Hamiltonian and with each monomer treated as a biradical and (2) to propose a very simple procedure for extracting the values for this Hamiltonian from single-reference calculations. Numerical examples are included for a number of different systems, including dimers, trimers, tetramers, and a cluster comprised of seven chromophores.

  18. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  1. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  3. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  4. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  5. Vibronic Transitions in the X-Sr Series (X=Li, Na, K, Rb): on the Accuracy of Nuclear Wavefunctions Derived from Quantum Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Ralf; Pototschnig, Johann V.; Hauser, Andreas W.; Ernst, Wolfgang E.

    2016-06-01

    Research on ultracold molecules has seen a growing interest recently in the context of high-resolution spectroscopy and quantum computation. The preparation of molecules in low vibrational levels of the ground state is experimentally challenging, and typically achieved by population transfer using excited electronic states. On the theoretical side, highly accurate potential energy surfaces are needed for a correct description of processes such as the coherent de-excitation from the highest and therefore weakly bound vibrational levels in the electronic ground state via couplings to electronically excited states. Particularly problematic is the correct description of potential features at large intermolecular distances. Franck-Condon overlap integrals for nuclear wavefunctions in barely bound vibrational states are extremely sensitive to inaccuracies of the potential at long range. In this study, we compare the predictions of common, wavefunction-based ab initio techniques for a known de-excitation mechanism in alkali-alkaline earth dimers. It is the aim to analyze the predictive power of these methods for a preliminary evaluation of potential cooling mechanisms in heteronuclear open shell systems which offer the experimentalist an electric as well as a magnetic handle for manipulation. The series of X-Sr molecules, with X = Li, Na, K and Rb, has been chosen for a direct comparison. Quantum degenerate mixtures of Rb and Sr have already been produced, making this combination very promising for the production of ultracold molecules. B. Pasquiou, A. Bayerle, S. M. Tzanova, S. Stellmer, J. Szczepkowski, M. Parigger, R. Grimm, and F. Schreck, Phys. Rev. A, 2013, 88, 023601

  6. Perspectives on Computational Organic Chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Streitwieser, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    The author reviews how his early love for theoretical organic chemistry led to experimental research and the extended search for quantitative correlations between experiment and quantum calculations. The experimental work led to ion pair acidities of alkali-organic compounds and most recently to equilibria and reactions of lithium and cesium enolates in THF. This chemistry is now being modeled by ab initio calculations. An important consideration is the treatment of solvation in which coordination of the alkali cation with the ether solvent plays a major role. PMID:19518150

  7. Old Wine in New Bottles: Quantum Theory in Historical Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses similarities between chemistry and three central concepts of quantum physics: (1) stationary states; (2) wave functions; and (3) complementarity. Based on these and other similarities, it is indicated that quantum physics is a chemical physics. (JN)

  8. Collaborative Physical Chemistry Projects Involving Computational Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whisnant, David M.; Howe, Jerry J.; Lever, Lisa S.

    2000-02-01

    The physical chemistry classes from three colleges have collaborated on two computational chemistry projects using Quantum CAChe 3.0 and Gaussian 94W running on Pentium II PCs. Online communication by email and the World Wide Web was an important part of the collaboration. In the first project, students used molecular modeling to predict benzene derivatives that might be possible hair dyes. They used PM3 and ZINDO calculations to predict the electronic spectra of the molecules and tested the predicted spectra by comparing some with experimental measurements. They also did literature searches for real hair dyes and possible health effects. In the final phase of the project they proposed a synthetic pathway for one compound. In the second project the students were asked to predict which isomer of a small carbon cluster (C3, C4, or C5) was responsible for a series of IR lines observed in the spectrum of a carbon star. After preliminary PM3 calculations, they used ab initio calculations at the HF/6-31G(d) and MP2/6-31G(d) level to model the molecules and predict their vibrational frequencies and rotational constants. A comparison of the predictions with the experimental spectra suggested that the linear isomer of the C5 molecule was responsible for the lines.

  9. Fragment Assembly Approach Based on Graph/Network Theory with Quantum Chemistry Verifications for Assigning Multidimensional NMR Signals in Metabolite Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kengo; Tsutsumi, Yu; Date, Yasuhiro; Kikuchi, Jun

    2016-04-15

    The abundant observation of chemical fragment information for molecular complexities is a major advantage of biological NMR analysis. Thus, the development of a novel technique for NMR signal assignment and metabolite identification may offer new possibilities for exploring molecular complexities. We propose a new signal assignment approach for metabolite mixtures by assembling H-H, H-C, C-C, and Q-C fragmental information obtained by multidimensional NMR, followed by the application of graph and network theory. High-speed experiments and complete automatic signal assignments were achieved for 12 combined mixtures of (13)C-labeled standards. Application to a (13)C-labeled seaweed extract showed 66 H-C, 60 H-H, 326 C-C, and 28 Q-C correlations, which were successfully assembled to 18 metabolites by the automatic assignment. The validity of automatic assignment was supported by quantum chemical calculations. This new approach can predict entire metabolite structures from peak networks of biological extracts.

  10. Investigation of the azo-hydrazone tautomeric equilibrium in an azo dye involving the naphthalene moiety by UV-vis spectroscopy and quantum chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünal, Arslan; Eren, Bilge; Eren, Erdal

    2013-10-01

    Photophysical properties of the azo-hydrazone tautomerism of Eriochrome Blue Black B (1-(1-hydroxy-2-naphthylazo)-2-naphthol-4-sulphonic acid) in DMF, MeCN and water were investigated using UV-visible spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. The optimized molecular structure parameters, relative energies, mole fractions, electronic absorption spectra and HOMO-LUMO energies for possible stable tautomeric forms of EBB were theoretically calculated by using hybrid density functional theory, (B3LYP) methods with 6-31G(d) basis set level and polarizable continuum model (PCM) for solvation effect. The effects of varying pH-, dye concentration-, solvent-, temperature-, and time-dependences on the UV-vis spectra of Eriochrome Blue Black B were also investigated experimentally. The calculations showed that the dye exhibited acid-base, azo-hydrazone and aggregate equilibria in DMF solution, while the most probably preferred form in MeCN solution was azo form. Thermodynamic parameters of dimerization reaction in DMF solution proved that entropy was the driving force of this reaction.

  11. Extraction Behaviors of Heavy Rare Earths with Organophosphoric Extractants: The Contribution of Extractant Dimer Dissociation, Acid Ionization, and Complexation. A Quantum Chemistry Study.

    PubMed

    Jing, Yu; Chen, Ji; Chen, Li; Su, Wenrou; Liu, Yu; Li, Deqian

    2017-03-30

    Heavy rare earths (HREs), namely Ho(3+), Er(3+), Tm(3+), Yb(3+) and Lu(3+), are rarer and more exceptional than light rare earths, due to the stronger extraction capacity for 100 000 extractions. Therefore, their incomplete stripping and high acidity of stripping become problems for HRE separation by organophosphoric extractants. However, the theories of extractant structure-performance relationship and molecular design method of novel HRE extractants are still not perfect. Beyond the coordination chemistry of the HRE-extracted complex, the extractant dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and complexation behaviors can be crucial to HRE extraction and reactivity of ionic species for understanding and further improving the extraction performance. To address the above issues, three primary fundamental processes, including extractant dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and HRE complexation, were identified and investigated systematically. The intrinsic extraction performances of HRE cations with four acidic organophosphoric extractants (P507, P204, P227 and Cyanex 272) were studied by using relativistic energy-consistent 4f core pseudopotentials, combined with density functional theory and a solvation model. Four acidic organophosphoric extractants have been qualified quantitatively from microscopic structures to chemical properties. It has been found that the Gibbs free energy changes of the overall extraction process (sequence: P204 > P227 > P507 > Cyanex 272) and their differences as a function of HREs (sequence: Ho/Er > Er/Tm > Tm/Yb > Yb/Lu) are in good agreement with the experimental maximum extraction capacities and separation factors. These results could provide an important approach to evaluate HRE extractants by the comprehensive consideration of dimer dissociation, acid ionization, and complexation processes. This paper also demonstrates the importance of the P-O bond, the P-C bond, isomer substituent, and solvation effects on the structure

  12. Chemistry Modeling for Aerothermodynamics and TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dun-You; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Schwenke, David W.; Haliciogiu, Timur; Huo, Winifred

    2004-01-01

    Recent advances in supercomputers and highly scalable quantum chemistry software render computational chemistry methods a viable means of providing chemistry data for aerothermal analysis at a specific level of confidence. Four examples of first principles quantum chemistry calculations will be presented. The study of the highly nonequilibrium rotational distribution of nitrogen molecule from the exchange reaction N + N2 illustrates how chemical reactions can influence the rotational distribution. The reaction C2H + H2 is one example of a radical reaction that occurs during hypersonic entry into a methane containing atmosphere. A study of the etching of Si surface illustrates our approach to surface reactions. A recently developed web accessible database and software tool (DDD) that provides the radiation profile of diatomic molecules is also described.

  13. Chemistry Modeling for Aerothermodynamics and TPS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Dunyou; Stallcop, James R.; Dateo, Christopher e.; Schwenke, David W.; Halicioglu, Timur; Huo, winifred M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in supercomputers and highly scalable quantum chemistry software render computational chemistry methods a viable means of providing chemistry data for aerothermal analysis at a specific level of confidence. Four examples of first principles quantum chemistry calculations will be presented. Study of the highly nonequilibrium rotational distribution of a nitrogen molecule from the exchange reaction N + N2 illustrates how chemical reactions can influence rotational distribution. The reaction C2H + H2 is one example of a radical reaction that occurs during hypersonic entry into an atmosphere containing methane. A study of the etching of a Si surface illustrates our approach to surface reactions. A recently developed web accessible database and software tool (DDD) that provides the radiation profile of diatomic molecules is also described.

  14. Polymer Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Caraccio, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes new technologies in polymer and material chemistry that benefits NASA programs and missions. The topics include: 1) What are Polymers?; 2) History of Polymer Chemistry; 3) Composites/Materials Development at KSC; 4) Why Wiring; 5) Next Generation Wiring Materials; 6) Wire System Materials and Integration; 7) Self-Healing Wire Repair; 8) Smart Wiring Summary; 9) Fire and Polymers; 10) Aerogel Technology; 11) Aerogel Composites; 12) Aerogels for Oil Remediation; 13) KSC's Solution; 14) Chemochromic Hydrogen Sensors; 15) STS-130 and 131 Operations; 16) HyperPigment; 17) Antimicrobial Materials; 18) Conductive Inks Formulations for Multiple Applications; and 19) Testing and Processing Equipment.

  15. Chemistry Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasseur, Guy; Remsberg, Ellis; Purcell, Patrick; Bhatt, Praful; Sage, Karen H.; Brown, Donald E.; Scott, Courtney J.; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Tie, Xue-Xi; Huang, Theresa

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the chemistry component of the model comparison is to assess to what extent differences in the formulation of chemical processes explain the variance between model results. Observed concentrations of chemical compounds are used to estimate to what degree the various models represent realistic situations. For readability, the materials for the chemistry experiment are reported in three separate sections. This section discussed the data used to evaluate the models in their simulation of the source gases and the Nitrogen compounds (NO(y)) and Chlorine compounds (Cl(y)) species.

  16. Ratiometric sensing of metabolites using dual-emitting ZnS:Mn(2+) quantum dots as sole luminophore via surface chemistry design.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenliang; Gong, Suqin; Zhou, Yunlong; Xia, Yunsheng

    2017-04-15

    We herein present an effective and versatile platform for ratiometric sensing of metabolites using intrinsically dual-emitting ZnS:Mn(2+) quantum dots (QDs) as sole reporter. To avoid notoriously non-specific interactions, a special triple-layer "filter screen" around the inorganic QD core is rationally constructed, which is made of oleic acid, cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide and bio-enzymes. In the presence of the analytes, the in-situ enzymatic H2O2 molecules diffuse and pass through the "filter screen" along the molecule interspace, which then reacts with the inorganic core and leads to more dramatically quenching of the Mn(2+) emission. The ratiometric signal readout is so distinct that can be observed by naked eyes (from orange to violet). In contrast, various coexisting bio-molecules, due to larger size, are well prevented from penetrating the filter screen by steric hindrance effect. So, various potential interfering substances do not disturb the assay. Under optimal conditions, five kinds of the corresponding substrates, namely glucose, cholesterol, lactate, xanthine and uric acid are well quantified by the emission intensity ratio of I470/I615, and the linear ranges are 0.1-200µM, 0.1-200µM, 1-200µM, 1-200µM and 1-200µM, respectively. The detection limits can even reach quasi-picomole levels. Because of favorable analytical performances (excellent selectivity, appropriate sensitivity and broad linear range), the proposed system can direct assay the analytes in blood without any sample pre-treatment.

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Presents 12 chemistry notes for British secondary school teachers. Some of these notes are: (1) a simple device for testing pH-meters; (2) portable fume cupboard safety screen; and (3) Mass spectroscopy-analysis of a mass peak. (HM)

  18. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Describes several chemistry projects, including solubility, formula for magnesium oxide, dissociation of dinitrogen tetroxide, use of 1-chloro-2, 4-dinitrobenzene, migration of ions, heats of neutralizations, use of pocket calculators, sonic cleaning, oxidation states of manganese, and cell potentials. Includes an extract from Chemical Age on…

  19. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the alkylation of aniline, the preparation and properties of perbromate, using scrap copper in chemistry instruction, a safe method of burning hydrogen, and the use of an ion-charge model as an alternative to the mole concept in secondary school instruction. (AL)

  20. Confectionary Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Elise Hilf

    1996-01-01

    Presents activities and demonstrations that enable teachers to use various types of confections as tactile experiences to spark chemistry students' interest and generate enthusiasm for learning. Presents uses of candy in teaching about atomic structure, spontaneous nuclear decay, chemical formulas, fractoluminescence, the effect of a molecular…

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Short articles on the kinetics of the hydrogen peroxide-iodide ion reaction, simulation of fluidization catalysis, the use of Newman projection diagrams to represent steric relationships in organic chemistry, the use of synthetic substrates for proteolytic enzyme reactions, and two simple clock reactions"--hydrolysis of halogenoalkanes and…

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and classroom materials/activities. These include: game for teaching ionic formulas; method for balancing equations; description of useful redox series; computer programs (with listings) for water electrolysis simulation and for determining chemical…

  3. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents chemistry experiments, laboratory procedures, demonstrations, and classroom materials/activities. These include: experiments on colloids, processing of uranium ore, action of heat on carbonates; color test for phenols and aromatic amines; solvent properties of non-electrolytes; stereoscopic applications/methods; a valency balance;…

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents procedures, experiments, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and information on a variety of chemistry topics including, for example, inert gases, light-induced reactions, calculators, identification of substituted acetophenones, the elements, analysis of copper minerals, extraction of metallic strontium, equilibrium, halogens, and…

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes some laboratory apparatus, chemistry experiments and demonstrations, such as a Kofler block melting point apparatus, chromatographic investigation of the phosphoric acid, x-ray diffraction, the fountain experiment, endothermic sherbet, the measurement of viscosity, ionization energies and electronic configurations. (GA)

  6. Microscale Chemistry and Green Chemistry: Complementary Pedagogies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Mono M.; Szafran, Zvi; Pike, R. M.

    1999-12-01

    This paper describes the complementary nature of microscale chemistry and green chemistry. Green chemistry emphasizes the concepts of atom economy, source reduction, pathway modification, solvent substitution, and pollution prevention as means of improving the environmental impact of industrial chemistry. Microscale chemistry serves as a tool for incorporating green chemistry ideas across the curriculum in educational institutions. Examples are drawn from microscale laboratory experiments to illustrate the pedagogic connection between the two areas.

  7. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  8. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators.

  9. Polynitrogen Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-24

    4N3, while As(C6H5)4N3 presents a borderline case.23 Theoretical Calculations High-level theoretical studies of nitrogen, oxygen, selenium and...Dixon, D. A.; Christe, K. O., "Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorganic Chemistry, p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012...34Thermochemical Properties of Selenium Fluorides, Oxides, and Oxofluorides," Inorg. Chem., p. 2472, vol. 51, (2012). 26. K. S. Thanthiriwatte, M. Vasiliu

  10. Assessing Advanced High School and Undergraduate Students' Thinking Skills: The Chemistry--From the Nanoscale to Microelectronics Module

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dori, Yehudit Judy; Dangur, Vered; Avargil, Shirly; Peskin, Uri

    2014-01-01

    Chemistry students in Israel have two options for studying chemistry: basic or honors (advanced placement). For instruction in high school honors chemistry courses, we developed a module focusing on abstract topics in quantum mechanics: Chemistry--From the Nanoscale to Microelectronics. The module adopts a visual-conceptual approach, which…

  11. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  12. Intuitive Solution to Quantum Harmonic Oscillator at Infinity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pye, Cory C.

    2004-01-01

    The attempt to develop the laboratory component of a one-semester quantum chemistry course at Saint Mary's University has led to allowing the students to solve a big problem in quantum chemistry. It is done by subdivision into smaller problems that can be independently tackled by a student with a two-year calculus background.

  13. (Pesticide chemistry)

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1990-09-04

    This report summarizes a trip by L. W. Barnthouse of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), to Hamburg, Federal Republic of Germany (FRG), where he participated in the 7th International Congress of Pesticide Chemistry. He chaired a workshop on experimental systems for determining effects of pesticides on nontarget organisms and gave an oral presentation at a symposium on pesticide risk assessment. Before returning to the United States, Dr. Barnthouse visited the Netherlands Institute for Sea Research in Texel, the Netherlands.

  14. Consistent Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2001-11-01

    Quantum mechanics is one of the most fundamental yet difficult subjects in physics. Nonrelativistic quantum theory is presented here in a clear and systematic fashion, integrating Born's probabilistic interpretation with Schrödinger dynamics. Basic quantum principles are illustrated with simple examples requiring no mathematics beyond linear algebra and elementary probability theory. The quantum measurement process is consistently analyzed using fundamental quantum principles without referring to measurement. These same principles are used to resolve several of the paradoxes that have long perplexed physicists, including the double slit and Schrödinger's cat. The consistent histories formalism used here was first introduced by the author, and extended by M. Gell-Mann, J. Hartle and R. Omnès. Essential for researchers yet accessible to advanced undergraduate students in physics, chemistry, mathematics, and computer science, this book is supplementary to standard textbooks. It will also be of interest to physicists and philosophers working on the foundations of quantum mechanics. Comprehensive account Written by one of the main figures in the field Paperback edition of successful work on philosophy of quantum mechanics

  15. Welcome to Quantum Science and Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thew, Rob

    2016-03-01

    Quantum information science and related technologies now involve thousands of researchers worldwide, cutting across physics, chemistry, engineering, bioscience, applied mathematics and computer science, extending from fundamental science to novel applications and industry. This situation defines the scope and mission of Quantum Science and Technology, a new IOP journal serving the interests of this multidisciplinary field by publishing research of the highest quality and impact.

  16. Bond additivity corrections for quantum chemistry methods

    SciTech Connect

    Melius, C.F.; Allendorf, M.D.

    2000-03-23

    New bond additivity correction (BAC) methods have been developed for the G2 method, BAC-G2, as well as for a hybrid density functional theory (DFT) Moller-Plesset (MP)2 method, BAC-hybrid. These BAC methods use a new form of BAC corrections, involving atomic, molecular, and bond-wise additive terms. These terms enable one to treat positive and negative ions as well as neutrals. The BAC-G2 method reduces errors in the G2 method due to nearest-neighbor bonds. The parameters within the BAC-G2 method only depend on atom types. Thus the BAC-G2 method can be used to determine the parameters needed by BAC methods involving lower levels of theory, such as BAC-hybrid and BAC-MP4. The BAC-hybrid method is expected to scale well for large molecules. The BAC-hybrid method uses the differences between the DFT and MP2 predictions as an indication of the method's accuracy, whereas the BAC-G2 method uses its internal methods (G1 and G2MP2) to accomplish this. A statistical analysis of the error in each of the methods is presented on the basis of calculations performed for large sets (more than 120) of molecules.

  17. Simple Perturbation Example for Quantum Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfriend, P. L.

    1985-01-01

    Presents a simple example that illustrates various aspects of the Rayleigh-Schrodinger perturbation theory. The example is a particularly good one because it is straightforward and can be compared with both the exact solution and with experimental data. (JN)

  18. Bohm's Quantum Potential and the Visualization of Molecular Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    David Bohm's ontological interpretation of quantum theory can shed light on otherwise counter-intuitive quantum mechanical phenomena including chemical bonding. In the field of quantum chemistry, Richard Bader has shown that the topology of the Laplacian of the electronic charge density characterizes many features of molecular structure and reactivity. Visual and computational examination suggests that the Laplacian of Bader and the quantum potential of Bohm are morphologically equivalent. It appears that Bohmian mechanics and the quantum potential can make chemistry as clear as they makes physics.

  19. Why Teach Environmental Chemistry?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Marjorie H.

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the importance of teaching environmental chemistry in secondary school science classes, and outlines five examples of environmental chemistry problems that focus on major concepts of chemistry and have critical implications for human survival and well-being. (JR)

  20. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1978-01-01

    This first in a series of articles describing the state of the art of various branches of chemistry reviews inorganic chemistry, including bioinorganic, photochemistry, organometallic, and solid state chemistries. (SL)

  1. Science Update: Inorganic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawls, Rebecca

    1981-01-01

    Describes areas of inorganic chemistry which have changed dramatically in the past year or two, including photochemistry, electrochemistry, organometallic complexes, inorganic reaction theory, and solid state chemistry. (DS)

  2. Perspective: Water cluster mediated atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaida, Veronica

    2011-07-01

    The importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry initiated recent studies with results documenting catalysis, suppression and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical reactions due to hydrogen bonding of reagents with water. Water, even one water molecule in binary complexes, has been shown by quantum chemistry to stabilize the transition state and lower its energy. However, new results underscore the need to evaluate the relative competing rates between reaction and dissipation to elucidate the role of water in chemistry. Water clusters have been used successfully as models for reactions in gas-phase, in aqueous condensed phases and at aqueous surfaces. Opportunities for experimental and theoretical chemical physics to make fundamental new discoveries abound. Work in this field is timely given the importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry.

  3. Perspective: Water cluster mediated atmospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Vaida, Veronica

    2011-07-14

    The importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry initiated recent studies with results documenting catalysis, suppression and anti-catalysis of thermal and photochemical reactions due to hydrogen bonding of reagents with water. Water, even one water molecule in binary complexes, has been shown by quantum chemistry to stabilize the transition state and lower its energy. However, new results underscore the need to evaluate the relative competing rates between reaction and dissipation to elucidate the role of water in chemistry. Water clusters have been used successfully as models for reactions in gas-phase, in aqueous condensed phases and at aqueous surfaces. Opportunities for experimental and theoretical chemical physics to make fundamental new discoveries abound. Work in this field is timely given the importance of water in atmospheric and environmental chemistry.

  4. Chemoinformatics as a Theoretical Chemistry Discipline.

    PubMed

    Varnek, Alexandre; Baskin, Igor I

    2011-01-17

    Here, chemoinformatics is considered as a theoretical chemistry discipline complementary to quantum chemistry and force-field molecular modeling. These three fields are compared with respect to molecular representation, inference mechanisms, basic concepts and application areas. A chemical space, a fundamental concept of chemoinformatics, is considered with respect to complex relations between chemical objects (graphs or descriptor vectors). Statistical Learning Theory, one of the main mathematical approaches in structure-property modeling, is briefly reviewed. Links between chemoinformatics and its "sister" fields - machine learning, chemometrics and bioinformatics are discussed.

  5. Chemistry Rocks: Redox Chemistry as a Geologic Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Mary Sue

    2001-01-01

    Applies chemistry to earth science, uses rocks in chemistry laboratories, and teaches about transition metal chemistry, oxidation states, and oxidation-reduction reactions from firsthand experiences. (YDS)

  6. Scalable Quantum Simulation of Molecular Energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, P. J. J.; Babbush, R.; Kivlichan, I. D.; Romero, J.; McClean, J. R.; Barends, R.; Kelly, J.; Roushan, P.; Tranter, A.; Ding, N.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Coveney, P. V.; Love, P. J.; Neven, H.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Martinis, J. M.

    2016-07-01

    We report the first electronic structure calculation performed on a quantum computer without exponentially costly precompilation. We use a programmable array of superconducting qubits to compute the energy surface of molecular hydrogen using two distinct quantum algorithms. First, we experimentally execute the unitary coupled cluster method using the variational quantum eigensolver. Our efficient implementation predicts the correct dissociation energy to within chemical accuracy of the numerically exact result. Second, we experimentally demonstrate the canonical quantum algorithm for chemistry, which consists of Trotterization and quantum phase estimation. We compare the experimental performance of these approaches to show clear evidence that the variational quantum eigensolver is robust to certain errors. This error tolerance inspires hope that variational quantum simulations of classically intractable molecules may be viable in the near future.

  7. Algorithms versus architectures for computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Partridge, H.; Bauschlicher, C. W., Jr.

    1986-01-01

    The algorithms employed are computationally intensive and, as a result, increased performance (both algorithmic and architectural) is required to improve accuracy and to treat larger molecular systems. Several benchmark quantum chemistry codes are examined on a variety of architectures. While these codes are only a small portion of a typical quantum chemistry library, they illustrate many of the computationally intensive kernels and data manipulation requirements of some applications. Furthermore, understanding the performance of the existing algorithm on present and proposed supercomputers serves as a guide for future programs and algorithm development. The algorithms investigated are: (1) a sparse symmetric matrix vector product; (2) a four index integral transformation; and (3) the calculation of diatomic two electron Slater integrals. The vectorization strategies are examined for these algorithms for both the Cyber 205 and Cray XMP. In addition, multiprocessor implementations of the algorithms are looked at on the Cray XMP and on the MIT static data flow machine proposed by DENNIS.

  8. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  9. A gist of comprehensive review of hadronic chemistry and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tangde, Vijay M.

    2015-03-10

    20{sup th} century theories of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Chemistry are exactly valid only when considered to represent the atomic structures. While considering the more general aspects of atomic combinations these theories fail to explain all the related experimental data from first unadulterated axiomatic principles. According to Quantum Chemistry two valence electrons should repel each other and as such there is no mathematical representation of a strong attractive forces between such valence electrons. In view of these and other insufficiencies of Quantum Chemistry, an Italian-American Scientist Professor Ruggero Maria Santilli during his more than five decades of dedicated and sustained research has denounced the fact that quantum chemistry is mostly based on mere nomenclatures. Professor R M Santilli first formulated the iso-, geno- and hyper- mathematics [1, 2, 3, 4] that helped in understanding numerous diversified problems and removing inadequacies in most of the established and celebrated theories of 20th century physics and chemistry. This involves the isotopic, genotopic, etc. lifting of Lie algebra that generated Lie admissible mathematics to properly describe irreversible processes. The studies on Hadronic Mechanics in general and chemistry in particular based on Santilli’s mathematics[3, 4, 5] for the first time has removed the very fundamental limitations of quantum chemistry [2, 6, 7, 8]. In the present discussion, a comprehensive review of Hadronic Chemistry is presented that imparts the completeness to the Quantum Chemistry via an addition of effects at distances of the order of 1 fm (only) which are assumed to be Non-linear, Non-local, Non-potential, Non-hamiltonian and thus Non-unitary, stepwise successes of Hadronic Chemistry and its application in development of a new chemical species called Magnecules.

  10. Flow chemistry meets advanced functional materials.

    PubMed

    Myers, Rebecca M; Fitzpatrick, Daniel E; Turner, Richard M; Ley, Steven V

    2014-09-22

    Flow chemistry and continuous processing techniques are beginning to have a profound impact on the production of functional materials ranging from quantum dots, nanoparticles and metal organic frameworks to polymers and dyes. These techniques provide robust procedures which not only enable accurate control of the product material's properties but they are also ideally suited to conducting experiments on scale. The modular nature of flow and continuous processing equipment rapidly facilitates reaction optimisation and variation in function of the products.

  11. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  12. Quantum caesium

    SciTech Connect

    Ansoborlo, Eric; Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2015-03-24

    This brief article summarizes the chemistry, history, applications, and hazards of caesium isotopes. The article is written for a general audience and will appear in the "In your element" section of Nature Chemistry.

  13. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  14. Chemistry of the outer planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, Thomas W.

    1992-01-01

    Various aspects were studied of past or present chemistry in the atmospheres of the outer planets and their satellites using lab simulations. Three areas were studied: (1) organic chemistry induced by kinetically hot hydrogen atoms in the region of Jupiter's atmosphere containing the ammonia cirrus clouds; (2) the conversion of NH3 into N2 by plasmas associated with entry of meteors and other objects into the atmosphere of early Titan; and (3) the synthesis of simple hydrocarbons and HCN by lightning in mixtures containing N2, CH4, and NH3 representing the atmospheres of Titan and the outer planets. The results showed that: (1) hot H2 atoms formed from the photodissociation of NH3 in Jupiter's atmosphere could account for some of the atmospheric chemistry in the ammonia cirrus cloud region; (2) the thermalization of hot H2 atoms in atmospheres predominated by molecular H is not as rapid as predicted by elastic collision theory; (3) the net quantum loss of NH3 in the presence of a 200 fold excess of H2 is 0.02, much higher than was expected from the amount of H2 present; (4) the conversion of NH3 into N2 in plasmas associated with infalling meteors is very efficient and rapid, and could account for most of the N2 present on Titan; (5) the yields of C2H2 and HCN from lightning induced chemistry in mixtures of CH4 and N2 is consistent with quenched thermodynamic models of the discharge core; and (6) photolysis induced by the UV light emitted by the gases in the hot plasmas may account for some, if not most, of the excess production of C2H6 and the more complex hydrocarbons.

  15. Advanced fuel chemistry for advanced engines.

    SciTech Connect

    Taatjes, Craig A.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Zador, Judit; Fernandes, Ravi X.; Miller, James A.

    2009-09-01

    Autoignition chemistry is central to predictive modeling of many advanced engine designs that combine high efficiency and low inherent pollutant emissions. This chemistry, and especially its pressure dependence, is poorly known for fuels derived from heavy petroleum and for biofuels, both of which are becoming increasingly prominent in the nation's fuel stream. We have investigated the pressure dependence of key ignition reactions for a series of molecules representative of non-traditional and alternative fuels. These investigations combined experimental characterization of hydroxyl radical production in well-controlled photolytically initiated oxidation and a hybrid modeling strategy that linked detailed quantum chemistry and computational kinetics of critical reactions with rate-equation models of the global chemical system. Comprehensive mechanisms for autoignition generally ignore the pressure dependence of branching fractions in the important alkyl + O{sub 2} reaction systems; however we have demonstrated that pressure-dependent 'formally direct' pathways persist at in-cylinder pressures.

  16. Quantum memristors

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeiffer, P.; Sanz, M.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  17. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  18. Peptide-Decorated Tunable-Fluorescence Graphene Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Sapkota, Bedanga; Benabbas, Abdelkrim; Lin, Hao-Yu Greg; Liang, Wentao; Champion, Paul; Wanunu, Meni

    2017-03-22

    We report here the synthesis of graphene quantum dots with tunable size, surface chemistry, and fluorescence properties. In the size regime 15-35 nm, these quantum dots maintain strong visible light fluorescence (mean quantum yield of 0.64) and a high two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section (6500 Göppert-Mayer units). Furthermore, through noncovalent tailoring of the chemistry of these quantum dots, we obtain water-stable quantum dots. For example, quantum dots with lysine groups bind strongly to DNA in solution and inhibit polymerase-based DNA strand synthesis. Finally, by virtue of their mesoscopic size, the quantum dots exhibit good cell permeability into living epithelial cells, but they do not enter the cell nucleus.

  19. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This chemistry Report from the USSR contains articles mainly on Adsorption, Analytical Chemistry, Biochemistry, Catalysis, Chemical Industry, Coal ... Gasification , Electrochemistry, Fertilizers, Food Technology, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds and Organometallic Compounds.

  20. Chemistry for Potters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denio, Allen A.

    1980-01-01

    Relates pottery making to chemistry by providing chemical information about clay, its origin, composition, properties, and changes that occur during firing; also describes glaze compositions, examples of redox chemistry, salt glazing, crystalline glazes, and problems in toxicity. (CS)

  1. Organometallic Chemistry of Molybdenum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucas, C. Robert; Walsh, Kelly A.

    1987-01-01

    Suggests ways to avoid some of the problems students have learning the principles of organometallic chemistry. Provides a description of an experiment used in a third-year college chemistry laboratory on molybdenum. (TW)

  2. Special Report: Brain Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krassner, Michael B.

    1983-01-01

    Chemical actions in the brain result in cognitive, emotional, neuroendocrine, neuromuscular, and/or neurocirculatory effects. Developments in understanding brain chemistry are discussed, considering among others, neurotransmitter chemistry, neuropeptides, drugs and the brain, antidepressants, and actions of minor tranquilizers. (JN)

  3. Environmental chemistry: Volume A

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1999-08-01

    This is an extensive introduction to environmental chemistry for engineering and chemical professionals. The contents of Volume A include a brief review of basic chemistry prior to coverage of litho, atmo, hydro, pedo, and biospheres.

  4. School Chemistry vs. Chemistry in Research: An Exploratory Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Habraken, Clarisse L.; Buijs, Wim; Borkent, Hens; Ligeon, Willy; Wender, Harry; Meijer, Marijn

    2001-01-01

    Reports on a study exploring why students are not studying chemistry. Three groups of graduating high school students and their chemistry teachers stayed at a research institute working on molecular modeling and wrote essays on school chemistry versus chemistry in research. Concludes that school chemistry does not convey today's chemistry in…

  5. Using the QCPE Holdings in Chemical Education: Molecular Models in the Organic Chemistry Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lipkowitz, Kenny

    1984-01-01

    Discusses a successfully implemented laboratory experiment that compares the strengths and weaknesses of mechanical and computer models. The computer models used are available from the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange (QCPE) at a modest price. (JN)

  6. Learning that Prepares for More Learning: Symbolic Mathematics in Physical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zielinski, Theresa Julia

    2004-01-01

    The well-crafted templates are useful to learn the new concepts of chemistry. The templates focus on pressure-volume work, the Boltzmann distribution, the Gibbs free energy function, intermolecular potentials, the second virial coefficient and quantum mechanical tunneling.

  7. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  8. Green Chemistry and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hjeresen, Dennis L.; Schutt, David L.; Boese, Janet M.

    2000-01-01

    Many students today are profoundly interested in the sustainability of their world. Introduces Green Chemistry and its principles with teaching materials. Green Chemistry is the use of chemistry for pollution prevention and the design of chemical products and processes that are environmentally benign. (ASK)

  9. Teaching School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddington, D. J., Ed.

    This eight-chapter book is intended for use by chemistry teachers, curriculum developers, teacher educators, and other key personnel working in the field of chemical education. The chapters are: (1) "The Changing Face of Chemistry" (J. A. Campbell); (2) "Curriculum Innovation in School Chemistry" (R. B. Ingel and A. M.…

  10. Chemistry and Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Martyn

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Chemistry and Art project developed for secondary students and teachers sponsored by the National Gallery and The Royal Society of Chemistry in the United Kingdom. Discusses aspects of the techniques used in creating five paintings as well as the chemistry involved in their making, deterioration, conservation, and restoration.…

  11. Chemistry as General Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    The efficacy of different science and chemistry courses for science-major and non-major students, and the question of chemistry's contribution to general education are evaluated. Chemistry and science curriculum are too profession- and consumer-oriented, and to overcome this problem, it is advised that all disciplines must incorporate the major…

  12. Mechanisms in Photographic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahyun, M. R. V.

    1974-01-01

    Reviews current research interests in photographic chemistry, involving two proposed models for spectral sensitization of crystal defects and impurities in the photolysis reactivity and the mechanisms of development and complexation. Establishment of photographic chemistry in a chemistry curriculum is recommended. (CC)

  13. Chemistry as General Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tro, Nivaldo J.

    2004-01-01

    Science courses are common in most general education requirements. This paper addresses the role of chemistry classes in meeting these requirements. Chemistry professors have for many years questioned the appropriateness of the standard introductory chemistry course as general education, resulting in the growing popularity of specialized non-majors courses. I suggest that current non-major chemistry courses cover too much consumer chemistry and ignore some of the big contributions of chemistry to human knowledge. Majors chemistry courses, while they prepare students for majoring in science, do not address these issues either. Consequently, chemistry courses are often an ineffective and unpopular way to meet general education science requirements. Part of the reason for this dilemma is the lack of chemists who address the contributions of chemistry to human knowledge in general. I propose that faculty at liberal arts colleges engage in this important task and that non-majors chemistry textbooks incorporate questions and issues that relate chemistry to a broader view of human knowledge. If these things happen, perhaps chemistry courses will become more effective as general education.

  14. Theoretical Studies of Group IVA and Group IVB Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-13

    perturbation theory reveals that the B+ interaction with H2 is much more repulsive than it is for the other cations. Several studies of excited state ...Approach”, Int. J. Quantum Chem., 111, 3280 (2011). 27. T. Kudo, T. Taketsugu, and M.S. Gordon, “ Ab Initio Molecular Dynamics Study of H2 Formation...important to the Air Force. The theory/code deveopments include advances in ab initio quantum chemistry and dynamics, in the development of the

  15. Principles of Environmental Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hathaway, Ruth A.

    2007-07-01

    Roy M. Harrison, Editor RSC Publishing; ISBN 0854043713; × + 363 pp.; 2006; $69.95 Environmental chemistry is an interdisciplinary science that includes chemistry of the air, water, and soil. Although it may be confused with green chemistry, which deals with potential pollution reduction, environmental chemistry is the scientific study of the chemical and biochemical principles that occur in nature. Therefore, it is the study of the sources, reactions, transport, effects, and fates of chemical species in the air, water, and soil environments, and the effect of human activity on them. Environmental chemistry not only explores each of these environments, but also closely examines the interfaces and boundaries where the environments intersect.

  16. Quantum robots and quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.

    1998-07-01

    Validation of a presumably universal theory, such as quantum mechanics, requires a quantum mechanical description of systems that carry out theoretical calculations and systems that carry out experiments. The description of quantum computers is under active development. No description of systems to carry out experiments has been given. A small step in this direction is taken here by giving a description of quantum robots as mobile systems with on board quantum computers that interact with different environments. Some properties of these systems are discussed. A specific model based on the literature descriptions of quantum Turing machines is presented.

  17. Chapter 15 Elementary Processes in Atmospheric Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maciel, Glauciete S.; Cappelletti, David; Grossi, Gaia; Pirani, Fernando; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    The present article provides an account of recent progress in the use of quantum mechanical tools for understanding structure and processes for systems of relevance in atmospheric chemistry. The focus is on problems triggered by experimental activity in this laboratory on investigations of intermolecular interactions by molecular beam scattering. Regarding the major components of the atmosphere, results are summarized on dimers (N2-N2, O2-O2, N2-O2) where experimental and phenomenogically derived potential energy surfaces have been used to compute quantum mechanically the intermolecular clusters dynamics. Rovibrational levels and wave functions are obtained, for perspective use in atmospheric modelling, specifically of radiative absorption of weakly bound complexes. Further work has involved interactions of paramount importance, those of water, for which state-of-the-art quantum chemical calculations for its complexes with rare gases yield complementary information on the interaction (specifically the anisotropies) with respect to molecular beam scattering experiments that measure essentially the isotropic forces. Similar approaches and results have been pursued and obtained for H2S. Stimulated in part by the interesting problem of large amplitude vibrations, such as the chirality change transitions associated with the torsional motions around OO and SS bonds, a systematic series of quantum chemical studies has been undertaken on systems that play also roles in the photochemistry of the minor components of the atmosphere. They are H2O2, H2S2 and several molecules obtained by substitutions of the hydrogens by alkyl groups or halogens. Quantum chemistry is shown to have reached the stage of resolving many previously controversial features regarding these series of molecules (dipole moment, equilibrium geometries, heights of barriers for torsion), which are crucial for intramolecular dynamics. Quantum dynamics calculations are also performed to compute torsional

  18. Quantum guidebooks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crease, Robert P.

    2012-06-01

    Fresh from his appearance on the latest Physics World podcast, which examined the enduring popularity of books about quantum mechanics, Robert P Crease surveys the many tour guides to the quantum world.

  19. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  20. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; ...

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  1. Quantum Transport.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-08-15

    Notre Dame was concerned with a variety of quantum transport in mesoscopic structures. This research was funded by the Air Force Office of Scientific...Research under Grant No. AFOSR-91-0211. The major issues examined included quantum transport in high magnetic fields and modulated channels, Coulomb...lifetimes in quasi-1D structures, quantum transport experiments in metals, the mesoscopic photovoltaic effect, and new techniques for fabricating quantum structures in semiconductors.

  2. Quantum effects in the understanding of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Hameroff, Stuart R; Craddock, Travis J A; Tuszynski, Jack A

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a historical perspective on the development and application of quantum physics methodology beyond physics, especially in biology and in the area of consciousness studies. Quantum physics provides a conceptual framework for the structural aspects of biological systems and processes via quantum chemistry. In recent years individual biological phenomena such as photosynthesis and bird navigation have been experimentally and theoretically analyzed using quantum methods building conceptual foundations for quantum biology. Since consciousness is attributed to human (and possibly animal) mind, quantum underpinnings of cognitive processes are a logical extension. Several proposals, especially the Orch OR hypothesis, have been put forth in an effort to introduce a scientific basis to the theory of consciousness. At the center of these approaches are microtubules as the substrate on which conscious processes in terms of quantum coherence and entanglement can be built. Additionally, Quantum Metabolism, quantum processes in ion channels and quantum effects in sensory stimulation are discussed in this connection. We discuss the challenges and merits related to quantum consciousness approaches as well as their potential extensions.

  3. Progress towards practical quantum variational algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wecker, Dave; Hastings, Matthew B.; Troyer, Matthias

    2015-10-01

    The preparation of quantum states using short quantum circuits is one of the most promising near-term applications of small quantum computers, especially if the circuit is short enough and the fidelity of gates high enough that it can be executed without quantum error correction. Such quantum state preparation can be used in variational approaches, optimizing parameters in the circuit to minimize the energy of the constructed quantum state for a given problem Hamiltonian. For this purpose we propose a simple-to-implement class of quantum states motivated by adiabatic state preparation. We test its accuracy and determine the required circuit depth for a Hubbard model on ladders with up to 12 sites (24 spin orbitals), and for small molecules. We find that this ansatz converges faster than previously proposed schemes based on unitary coupled clusters. While the required number of measurements is astronomically large for quantum chemistry applications to molecules, applying the variational approach to the Hubbard model (and related models) is found to be far less demanding and potentially practical on small quantum computers. We also discuss another application of quantum state preparation using short quantum circuits, to prepare trial ground states of models faster than using adiabatic state preparation.

  4. Semiempirical and ab initio Calculations of Charged Species Used in the Physical Organic Chemistry Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliom, Richard D.

    1989-01-01

    Concentrates on the semiempirical methods MINDO/3, MNDO, and AMI available in the program AMPAC from the Quantum Chemistry Program Exchange at Indiana University. Uses charged ions in the teaching of computational chemistry. Finds that semiempirical methods are accurate enough for the general use of the bench chemist. (MVL)

  5. Integrating Free Computer Software in Chemistry and Biochemistry Instruction: An International Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cedeno, David L.; Jones, Marjorie A.; Friesen, Jon A.; Wirtz, Mark W.; Rios, Luz Amalia; Ocampo, Gonzalo Taborda

    2010-01-01

    At the Universidad de Caldas, Manizales, Colombia, we used their new computer facilities to introduce chemistry graduate students to biochemical database mining and quantum chemistry calculations using freeware. These hands-on workshops allowed the students a strong introduction to easily accessible software and how to use this software to begin…

  6. Using Computer Visualization Models in High School Chemistry: The Role of Teacher Beliefs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robblee, Karen M.; Garik, Peter; Abegg, Gerald L.; Faux, Russell; Horwitz, Paul

    This paper discusses the role of high school chemistry teachers' beliefs in implementing computer visualization software to teach atomic and molecular structure from a quantum mechanical perspective. The informants in this study were four high school chemistry teachers with comparable academic and professional backgrounds. These teachers received…

  7. Understanding molecular dynamics quantum-state by quantum-state

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrance, W.D.; Moore, C.B.; Petek, H.

    1985-02-22

    It is now possible to resolve completely the initial and final quantum states in chemical processes. Spectra of reactive intermediates, of highly vibrationally excited molecules, and even of molecules in the process of falling apart have been recorded. This information has led to greater understanding of the molecular structure and dynamics of small gas-phase molecules. Many of the concepts and spectroscopic techniques that have been developed will be valuable throughout chemistry.

  8. Quantum cheques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulick, Subhayan Roy; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2016-06-01

    We propose the idea of a quantum cheque scheme, a cryptographic protocol in which any legitimate client of a trusted bank can issue a cheque, that cannot be counterfeited or altered in anyway, and can be verified by a bank or any of its branches. We formally define a quantum cheque and present the first unconditionally secure quantum cheque scheme and show it to be secure against any no-signalling adversary. The proposed quantum cheque scheme can been perceived as the quantum analog of Electronic Data Interchange, as an alternate for current e-Payment Gateways.

  9. Quantum frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Matthew J.

    2014-02-01

    The framework of quantum frames can help unravel some of the interpretive difficulties i the foundation of quantum mechanics. In this paper, I begin by tracing the origins of this concept in Bohr's discussion of quantum theory and his theory of complementarity. Engaging with various interpreters and followers of Bohr, I argue that the correct account of quantum frames must be extended beyond literal space-time reference frames to frames defined by relations between a quantum system and the exosystem or external physical frame, of which measurement contexts are a particularly important example. This approach provides superior solutions to key EPR-type measurement and locality paradoxes.

  10. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  11. New frontiers for quantum gases of polar molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, Steven A.; Covey, Jacob P.; Miecnikowski, Matthew T.; Jin, Deborah S.; Ye, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Compared to atoms, molecules possess additional degrees of freedom that can be exploited in fundamental tests, ultracold chemistry, and engineering new quantum phases in many-body systems. Here, we review the recent progress in creating and manipulating ultracold bialkali molecules to study quantum gases of polar molecules.

  12. Deep learning for computational chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goh, Garrett B; Hodas, Nathan O; Vishnu, Abhinav

    2017-03-08

    The rise and fall of artificial neural networks is well documented in the scientific literature of both computer science and computational chemistry. Yet almost two decades later, we are now seeing a resurgence of interest in deep learning, a machine learning algorithm based on multilayer neural networks. Within the last few years, we have seen the transformative impact of deep learning in many domains, particularly in speech recognition and computer vision, to the extent that the majority of expert practitioners in those field are now regularly eschewing prior established models in favor of deep learning models. In this review, we provide an introductory overview into the theory of deep neural networks and their unique properties that distinguish them from traditional machine learning algorithms used in cheminformatics. By providing an overview of the variety of emerging applications of deep neural networks, we highlight its ubiquity and broad applicability to a wide range of challenges in the field, including quantitative structure activity relationship, virtual screening, protein structure prediction, quantum chemistry, materials design, and property prediction. In reviewing the performance of deep neural networks, we observed a consistent outperformance against non-neural networks state-of-the-art models across disparate research topics, and deep neural network-based models often exceeded the "glass ceiling" expectations of their respective tasks. Coupled with the maturity of GPU-accelerated computing for training deep neural networks and the exponential growth of chemical data on which to train these networks on, we anticipate that deep learning algorithms will be a valuable tool for computational chemistry. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Simulating chemical energies to high precision with fully-scalable quantum algorithms on superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Malley, Peter; Babbush, Ryan; Kivlichan, Ian; Romero, Jhonathan; McClean, Jarrod; Tranter, Andrew; Barends, Rami; Kelly, Julian; Chen, Yu; Chen, Zijun; Jeffrey, Evan; Fowler, Austin; Megrant, Anthony; Mutus, Josh; Neill, Charles; Quintana, Christopher; Roushan, Pedram; Sank, Daniel; Vainsencher, Amit; Wenner, James; White, Theodore; Love, Peter; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Neven, Hartmut; Martinis, John

    Quantum simulations of molecules have the potential to calculate industrially-important chemical parameters beyond the reach of classical methods with relatively modest quantum resources. Recent years have seen dramatic progress both superconducting qubits and quantum chemistry algorithms. Here, we present experimental demonstrations of two fully-scalable algorithms for finding the dissociation energy of hydrogen: the variational quantum eigensolver and iterative phase estimation. This represents the first calculation of a dissociation energy to chemical accuracy with a non-precompiled algorithm. These results show the promise of chemistry as the ``killer app'' for quantum computers, even before the advent of full error-correction.

  14. Demystifying Introductory Chemistry. Part 1: Electron Configurations from Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillespie, Ronald J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Presents suggestions for alternative presentations of some of the material that usually forms part of the introductory chemistry course. Emphasizes development of concepts from experimental results. Discusses electronic configurations and quantum numbers, experimental evidence for electron configurations, deducing the shell model from the periodic…

  15. An Integrated, Statistical Molecular Approach to the Physical Chemistry Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cartier, Stephen F.

    2009-01-01

    As an alternative to the "thermodynamics first" or "quantum first" approaches to the physical chemistry curriculum, the statistical definition of entropy and the Boltzmann distribution are introduced in the first days of the course and the entire two-semester curriculum is then developed from these concepts. Once the tools of statistical mechanics…

  16. Uses (and Abuses) of Models in Teaching Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bent, Henry A.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the nature and role of models in various aspects of the chemistry curriculum, examining the purposes and importance of tangible, linguistic, arithmetical, thermodynamic, and quantum-physical models. Strategies in using models in laboratory work and in lecture demonstrations are also considered. (JN)

  17. Quantum Dots in a Polymer Composite: A Convenient Particle-in-a-Box Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Charles V.; Giffin, Guinevere A.

    2008-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are at the forefront of materials science chemistry with applications in biological imaging and photovoltaic technologies. We have developed a simple laboratory experiment to measure the quantum-dot size from fluorescence spectra. A major roadblock of quantum-dot based exercises is the particle synthesis and handling;…

  18. New insights into martian atmospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boxe, C. S.; Francisco, J. S.; Shia, R.-L.; Yung, Y. L.; Nair, H.; Liang, M.-C.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2014-11-01

    HOx radicals are produced in the martian atmosphere by the photolysis of water vapor and subsequently participate in catalytic cycles that recycle carbon dioxide (CO2) from its photolysis product carbon monoxide (CO), providing a qualitative explanation for the stability of its atmosphere. Balancing CO2 production and loss based on our current understanding of martian gas-phase chemistry has, however, proven to be difficult. The photolysis of O3 produces O(1D), while oxidation of CO produces HOCO radicals, a new member of the HOx family. The O(1D) quantum yield has recently been updated, which quantifies nonzero quantum yields in the Huggins bands. In Earth's atmosphere HOCO is considered to be unimportant since it is quickly removed by abundant oxygen molecules. The smaller amount of O2 in the Mars' atmosphere causes HOCO's lifetime to be longer in Mars' atmosphere than Earth's (3 × 10-5 s to 1.2 days from Mars's surface to 240 km, respectively). Limited kinetic data on reactions involving HOCO prevented consideration of its reactions directly in atmospheric models. Therefore, the impact of HOCO reactions on martian chemistry is currently unknown. Here, we incorporate new literature rate constants for HOCO chemistry and an updated representation of the O(1D) quantum yield in the Caltech/JPL 1-D photochemical model for Mars' atmosphere. Our simulations exemplify perturbations to NOy, HOx, and COx species, ranging from 5% to 50%. The modified O(1D) quantum yield and new HOCO chemistry cause a 10% decrease and a 50% increase in OH and H2O2 total column abundances, respectively. At low altitudes, HOCO production contributes 5% towards CO2 production. Given recent experimentally-obtained branching ratios for the oxidation of CO, HOCO may contribute up to 70% toward the production of NOy, where HOx and NOy species are enhanced up to a factor 3, which has implications for rethinking the fundamental understanding of NOy, HOx, and CO/CO2 cycling on Mars. Two new reaction

  19. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  20. Using Mathematical Software to Introduce Fourier Transforms in Physical Chemistry to Develop Improved Understanding of Their Applications in Analytical Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Tierney C.; Richardson, John N.; Kegerreis, Jeb S.

    2016-01-01

    This manuscript presents an exercise that utilizes mathematical software to explore Fourier transforms in the context of model quantum mechanical systems, thus providing a deeper mathematical understanding of relevant information often introduced and treated as a "black-box" in analytical chemistry courses. The exercise is given to…

  1. Green Chemistry Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolopajlo, Larry

    2017-02-01

    This chapter attempts to show how the practice of chemistry teaching and learning is enriched by the incorporation of green chemistry (GC) into lectures and labs. To support this viewpoint, evidence from a wide range of published papers serve as a cogent argument that GC attracts and engages both science and nonscience students, enhances chemistry content knowledge, and improves the image of the field, while preparing the world for a sustainable future. Published pedagogy associated with green and sustainable chemistry is critically reviewed and discussed.

  2. Connecting Algebra and Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, Sean

    2003-01-01

    Correlates high school chemistry curriculum with high school algebra curriculum and makes the case for an integrated approach to mathematics and science instruction. Focuses on process integration. (DDR)

  3. USSR Report, Chemistry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Industry, Coal Gasification , Electrochemistry, Inorganic Compounds, Nitrogen Compounds, Organophosphorus Compounds, Petroleum Processing Technology, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Polymers and Polymerization and, Radiation Chemistry.

  4. Science Update: Analytical Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worthy, Ward

    1980-01-01

    Briefly discusses new instrumentation in the field of analytical chemistry. Advances in liquid chromatography, photoacoustic spectroscopy, the use of lasers, and mass spectrometry are also discussed. (CS)

  5. Combining Dynamical Decoupling with Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-17

    ar X iv :0 91 1. 32 02 v1 [ qu an t- ph ] 1 7 N ov 2 00 9 Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation Hui Khoon Ng,1...Daniel A. Lidar,2 and John Preskill1 1Institute for Quantum Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125, USA 2Departments...of Chemistry, Electrical Engineering, and Physics, and Center for Quantum Information Science & Technology, University of Southern California, Los

  6. Quantum games as quantum types

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbecque, Yannick

    In this thesis, we present a new model for higher-order quantum programming languages. The proposed model is an adaptation of the probabilistic game semantics developed by Danos and Harmer [DH02]: we expand it with quantum strategies which enable one to represent quantum states and quantum operations. Some of the basic properties of these strategies are established and then used to construct denotational semantics for three quantum programming languages. The first of these languages is a formalisation of the measurement calculus proposed by Danos et al. [DKP07]. The other two are new: they are higher-order quantum programming languages. Previous attempts to define a denotational semantics for higher-order quantum programming languages have failed. We identify some of the key reasons for this and base the design of our higher-order languages on these observations. The game semantics proposed in this thesis is the first denotational semantics for a lambda-calculus equipped with quantum types and with extra operations which allow one to program quantum algorithms. The results presented validate the two different approaches used in the design of these two new higher-order languages: a first one where quantum states are used through references and a second one where they are introduced as constants in the language. The quantum strategies presented in this thesis allow one to understand the constraints that must be imposed on quantum type systems with higher-order types. The most significant constraint is the fact that abstraction over part of the tensor product of many unknown quantum states must not be allowed. Quantum strategies are a new mathematical model which describes the interaction between classical and quantum data using system-environment dialogues. The interactions between the different parts of a quantum system are described using the rich structure generated by composition of strategies. This approach has enough generality to be put in relation with other

  7. Quantum flywheel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Amikam; Diósi, Lajos; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2016-05-01

    In this work we present the concept of a quantum flywheel coupled to a quantum heat engine. The flywheel stores useful work in its energy levels, while additional power is extracted continuously from the device. Generally, the energy exchange between a quantum engine and a quantized work repository is accompanied by heat, which degrades the charging efficiency. Specifically when the quantum harmonic oscillator acts as a work repository, quantum and thermal fluctuations dominate the dynamics. Quantum monitoring and feedback control are applied to the flywheel in order to reach steady state and regulate its operation. To maximize the charging efficiency one needs a balance between the information gained by measuring the system and the information fed back to the system. The dynamics of the flywheel are described by a stochastic master equation that accounts for the engine, the external driving, the measurement, and the feedback operations.

  8. Quantifying Quantumness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, Daniel; Giraud, Olivier; Braun, Peter A.

    2010-03-01

    We introduce and study a measure of ``quantumness'' of a quantum state based on its Hilbert-Schmidt distance from the set of classical states. ``Classical states'' were defined earlier as states for which a positive P-function exists, i.e. they are mixtures of coherent states [1]. We study invariance properties of the measure, upper bounds, and its relation to entanglement measures. We evaluate the quantumness of a number of physically interesting states and show that for any physical system in thermal equilibrium there is a finite critical temperature above which quantumness vanishes. We then use the measure for identifying the ``most quantum'' states. Such states are expected to be potentially most useful for quantum information theoretical applications. We find these states explicitly for low-dimensional spin-systems, and show that they possess beautiful, highly symmetric Majorana representations. [4pt] [1] Classicality of spin states, Olivier Giraud, Petr Braun, and Daniel Braun, Phys. Rev. A 78, 042112 (2008)

  9. Quantum Metaphotonics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-24

    This included optimizing the MBE growth conditions of a near-surface quantum wells with emission around 1500nm and fabrication of arrays of various...antennas and near-surface quantum-confined structures. This included optimizing the molecular beam epitaxy growth conditions of a near-surface quantum...due to the single process epitaxial growth , increases the interaction. Low densities of indium islands have been shown to increase the

  10. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  11. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Part I. Nanostructure Design and Structural Properties of Epitaxially Grown Quantum Dots and Nanowires: 1. Growth of III/V semiconductor quantum dots C. Schneider, S. Hofling and A. Forchel; 2. Single semiconductor quantum dots in nanowires: growth, optics, and devices M. E. Reimer, N. Akopian, M. Barkelid, G. Bulgarini, R. Heeres, M. Hocevar, B. J. Witek, E. Bakkers and V. Zwiller; 3. Atomic scale analysis of self-assembled quantum dots by cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and atom probe tomography J. G. Keizer and P. M. Koenraad; Part II. Manipulation of Individual Quantum States in Quantum Dots Using Optical Techniques: 4. Studies of the hole spin in self-assembled quantum dots using optical techniques B. D. Gerardot and R. J. Warburton; 5. Resonance fluorescence from a single quantum dot A. N. Vamivakas, C. Matthiesen, Y. Zhao, C.-Y. Lu and M. Atature; 6. Coherent control of quantum dot excitons using ultra-fast optical techniques A. J. Ramsay and A. M. Fox; 7. Optical probing of holes in quantum dot molecules: structure, symmetry, and spin M. F. Doty and J. I. Climente; Part III. Optical Properties of Quantum Dots in Photonic Cavities and Plasmon-Coupled Dots: 8. Deterministic light-matter coupling using single quantum dots P. Senellart; 9. Quantum dots in photonic crystal cavities A. Faraon, D. Englund, I. Fushman, A. Majumdar and J. Vukovic; 10. Photon statistics in quantum dot micropillar emission M. Asmann and M. Bayer; 11. Nanoplasmonics with colloidal quantum dots V. Temnov and U. Woggon; Part IV. Quantum Dot Nano-Laboratory: Magnetic Ions and Nuclear Spins in a Dot: 12. Dynamics and optical control of an individual Mn spin in a quantum dot L. Besombes, C. Le Gall, H. Boukari and H. Mariette; 13. Optical spectroscopy of InAs/GaAs quantum dots doped with a single Mn atom O. Krebs and A. Lemaitre; 14. Nuclear spin effects in quantum dot optics B. Urbaszek, B. Eble, T. Amand and X. Marie; Part V. Electron Transport in Quantum Dots Fabricated by

  12. Quantum chemical studies of estrogenic compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantum chemical methods are potent tools to provide information on the chemical structure and electronic properties of organic molecules. Modern computational chemistry methods have provided a great deal of insight into the binding of estrogenic compounds to estrogenic receptors (ER), an important ...

  13. Bioorganic and bioinorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Constable, Edwin C; Housecroft, Catherine E; Creus, Marc; Gademann, Karl; Giese, Bernd; Ward, Thomas R; Woggon, Wolf D; Chougnet, Antoinette

    2010-01-01

    The interdisciplinary projects in bioinorganic and bioorganic chemistry of the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel led to the preparation of new systems that mimic biologically important processes and to the discovery of compounds from natural sources which are very promising with respect to medical applications. The advances in these areas are reported here.

  14. Coupled Phenomena in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matsubara, Akira; Nomura, Kazuo

    1979-01-01

    Various phenomena in chemistry and biology can be understood through Gibbs energy utilization. Some common phenomena in chemistry are explained including neutralization, hydrolysis, oxidation and reaction, simultaneous dissociation equilibrium of two weak acids, and common ion effect on solubility. (Author/SA)

  15. Chemistry and Philosophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theobald, D. W.

    1970-01-01

    In the second article of a series, the author discusses some of the interactions between chemistry and philosophy. Evaluates chemistry's role within the scientific enterprise. Traces the rise and fall of the logical atom and argues for a new way of looking at science as an educational instrument. (RR)

  16. Chemistry from Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harding, Jan; Donaldson, Jim

    1986-01-01

    Describes the "Chemistry from Issues" project at Chelsea College. Provides the background information, rationale, and overall structure of a proposed course about the importance of chemistry to common culture. Outlines one module about the British steel industry that has been taught at King's College. (TW)

  17. Infrared Lasers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Phillip

    1982-01-01

    Selected infrared laser chemistry topics are discussed including carbon dioxide lasers, infrared quanta and molecules, laser-induced chemistry, structural isomerization (laser purification, sensitized reactions, and dielectric breakdown), and fundamental principles of laser isotope separation, focusing on uranium isotope separation. (JN)

  18. Chemistry in Microfluidic Channels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chia, Matthew C.; Sweeney, Christina M.; Odom, Teri W.

    2011-01-01

    General chemistry introduces principles such as acid-base chemistry, mixing, and precipitation that are usually demonstrated in bulk solutions. In this laboratory experiment, we describe how chemical reactions can be performed in a microfluidic channel to show advanced concepts such as laminar fluid flow and controlled precipitation. Three sets of…

  19. Pre-Tech Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida Junior Coll., Jacksonville.

    This course guide is designed to aid chemistry instructors in teaching the skills and knowledge needed by those students planning to take junior college chemistry and is composed of 11 terminal performance objectives, with intermediate performance objectives and sample criterion measures. Suggestions for related laboratory activities are also…

  20. Brushing Up on Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trantow, Ashley

    2002-01-01

    Presents an activity designed for use during National Chemistry Week 2002 with the theme "Chemistry Keeps Us Clean". Allows students to discover more about a cleaning product they use everyday. Students make their own toothpaste and compare its properties with those of commercial toothpaste. (MM)

  1. Movies in Chemistry Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Le Marechal, Jean-Francois

    2010-01-01

    This article reviews numerous studies on chemistry movies. Movies, or moving pictures, are important elements of multimedia and signify a privileged or motivating means of presenting knowledge. Studies on chemistry movies show that the first movie productions in this field were devoted to university lectures or documentaries. Shorter movies were…

  2. Chemistry of Moth Repellents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    An effective way to teach chemistry is to examine the substances used in daily life from a pedagogical viewpoint, from the overlap of science, technology, and society (STS). A study aims to engage students in the topic of moth repellents and to encourage them to investigate the chemistry in this familiar product using a set of questions.

  3. Mathematics and Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henson, R.; Stumbles, A.

    1977-01-01

    The relationship between mathematics and chemistry has been changing rapidly in recent years. Some chemistry teachers have experienced difficulties in their teaching with the introduction of modern mathematics in the schools. Some suggestions for reinforcing the concepts and language of modern mathematics are put forth. (Author/MA)

  4. Organic Chemistry Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradt, Steve

    1998-01-01

    Student-led workshops are helping undergraduate students learn from each other as they tackle organic chemistry. Each week, small groups brainstorm tough problems in sessions guided by upper-class students who have taken and passed the course. Debating and discussing chemistry problems with peers engages students with the material and boosts…

  5. Undergraduate Chemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bretz, Stacey Lowery; Fay, Michael; Bruck, Laura B.; Towns, Marcy H.

    2013-01-01

    Forty chemistry faculty from American Chemical Society-approved departments were interviewed to determine their goals for undergraduate chemistry laboratory. Faculty were stratified by type of institution, departmental success with regard to National Science Foundation funding for laboratory reform, and level of laboratory course. Interview…

  6. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    2014-12-04

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  7. Biosynthetic inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi

    2006-08-25

    Inorganic chemistry and biology can benefit greatly from each other. Although synthetic and physical inorganic chemistry have been greatly successful in clarifying the role of metal ions in biological systems, the time may now be right to utilize biological systems to advance coordination chemistry. One such example is the use of small, stable, easy-to-make, and well-characterized proteins as ligands to synthesize novel inorganic compounds. This biosynthetic inorganic chemistry is possible thanks to a number of developments in biology. This review summarizes the progress in the synthesis of close models of complex metalloproteins, followed by a description of recent advances in using the approach for making novel compounds that are unprecedented in either inorganic chemistry or biology. The focus is mainly on synthetic "tricks" learned from biology, as well as novel structures and insights obtained. The advantages and disadvantages of this biosynthetic approach are discussed.

  8. Recent computational chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Taku

    2015-12-31

    Now we can investigate quantum phenomena for the real materials and molecules, and can design functional materials by computation, due to the previous developments of quantum theory and calculation methods. As there still exist the limit and problem in theory, the cooperation between theory and computation is getting more important to clarify the unknown quantum mechanism, and discover more efficient functional materials. It would be next-generation standard. Finally, our theoretical methodology for boundary solid is introduced.

  9. Low Temperature Chemistry with Trapped Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marler, Joan

    2015-05-01

    At temperatures 5 orders of magnitude less than room temperature individual ions and ensembles of ions can be studied and manipulated with an unprecedented level of control. To achieve these temperatures ions are isolated in an rf-trap and laser-cooled to temperatures in which their internal states can be measured, set and switched at the individual ion level. Since the earliest days of ion trapping, scientists have appropriated these traps to perform experiments in fields as diverse as fundamental particle physics, anti-matter science, quantum information science, condensed matter, and chemistry. At Clemson near term experiments include following state to state chemical reactions, studying chemistry relevant to astrophysical systems and performing highly accurate measurements of carbon containing organic systems. Additional experiments will explore beyond the standard model physics using Highly Charged Ions (HCIs) from the Clemson EBIT which have been subsequently trapped in an ion trap.

  10. Inclusion chemistry in periodic mesoporous hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Moller, K.; Bein, T.

    1998-10-01

    This review provides an overview of different aspects of inclusion chemistry in ordered mesoporous host materials such as MCM-41 or MCM-48 (Mobil codes). A rich field of inclusion chemistry has been explored in this context, including sorption, ion exchange, inhibition followed by reduction, grafting of reactive metal alkoxides, halides, etc., grafting of silane coupling agents (sometimes followed by subsequent reactions), grafting of reactive metal complexes, and polymerization in the channels. Finally, co-condensation of reactive species during the mesopore synthesis is a method to incorporate functionality into the walls of the channel system. Important applications of these modified and functionalized systems are heterogeneous catalysis and photocatalysis involving bulky grated catalysts and/or the conversion of large substrates. Other potential applications include ion exchange and separations, removal of heavy metals, chromatography, stabilization of quantum wires, stabilization of dyes, and polymer composites.

  11. Art in Chemistry; Chemistry in Art.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    High school teachers are often challenged to motivate students who have little or no interest in a subject and are bored with traditional instruction. This unique book is designed to help educators make chemistry classes more interesting and links art curriculum to practical applications, integrating the two subjects through scores of hands-on…

  12. Korean Kimchi Chemistry: A Multicultural Chemistry Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murfin, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Connecting science with different cultures is one way to interest students in science, to relate science to their lives, and at the same time to broaden their horizons in a variety of ways. In the lesson described here, students make kimchi, a delicious and popular Korean dish that can be used to explore many important chemistry concepts,…

  13. EVOLVING FROM GREEN CHEMISTRY TO SUSTAINABLE CHEMISTRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The twelve principles of green chemistry provide a foundation and pathway which allows researchers to incorporate greenness into existing reactions or when developing new technologies. Research from our laboratory has adopted many of these principles and utlizes them as a major c...

  14. Environmental chemistry. 5th edition

    SciTech Connect

    Manahan, S.E. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-01-01

    This book is organized around several major sections: aquatic Chemistry, atmospheric chemistry, the geosphere and hazardous wastes, toxicological chemistry, and resources and energy. Specific topics discussed in the book include a general introduction to environment chemistry, basic principles of aquatic chemistry, water pollution and water treatment, the essential role of microorganisms in aquatic chemical phenomena, atmospheric chemistry, a discussion of major threats to the global atmosphere (particularly greenhouse gases and ozone-depleting chemicals), the geosphere and hazardous substances, soil chemistry, and the nature and sources of hazardous wastes. The environmental chemistry of hazardous wastes, their treatment, minimization, and recycling, and the effects of these hazardous substances in also presented.

  15. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications. PMID:27217831

  16. Click Chemistry-Mediated Nanosensors for Biochemical Assays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiping; Xianyu, Yunlei; Wu, Jing; Yin, Binfeng; Jiang, Xingyu

    2016-01-01

    Click chemistry combined with functional nanoparticles have drawn increasing attention in biochemical assays because they are promising in developing biosensors with effective signal transformation/amplification and straightforward signal readout for clinical diagnostic assays. In this review, we focus on the latest advances of biochemical assays based on Cu (I)-catalyzed 1, 3-dipolar cycloaddition of azides and alkynes (CuAAC)-mediated nanosensors, as well as the functionalization of nanoprobes based on click chemistry. Nanoprobes including gold nanoparticles, quantum dots, magnetic nanoparticles and carbon nanomaterials are covered. We discuss the advantages of click chemistry-mediated nanosensors for biochemical assays, and give perspectives on the development of click chemistry-mediated approaches for clinical diagnosis and other biomedical applications.

  17. Quantum Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abrams, D.; Williams, C.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis describes several new quantum algorithms. These include a polynomial time algorithm that uses a quantum fast Fourier transform to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a Hamiltonian operator, and that can be applied in cases for which all know classical algorithms require exponential time.

  18. Quantum metrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, H.; Kok, P.; Dowling, J. P.

    2002-01-01

    This paper addresses the formal equivalence between the Mach-Zehnder interferometer, the Ramsey spectroscope, and a specific quantum logical gate. Based on this equivalence we introduce the quantum Rosetta Stone, and we describe a projective measurement scheme for generating the desired correlations between the interferometric input states in order to achieve Heisenberg-limited sensitivity.

  19. Quantum Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2004-11-01

    Financial mathematics is currently almost completely dominated by stochastic calculus. Presenting a completely independent approach, this book applies the mathematical and conceptual formalism of quantum mechanics and quantum field theory (with particular emphasis on the path integral) to the theory of options and to the modeling of interest rates. Many new results, accordingly, emerge from the author's perspective.

  20. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv

    2010-12-01

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line), we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunnelling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear in the number of steps down to zero as the percolation probability decreases towards the critical point. This provides an example of fractional scaling in quantum-walk dynamics.

  1. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department`s moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  2. Moderator Chemistry Program

    SciTech Connect

    Dewitt, L.V.; Gibbs, A.; Lambert, D.P.; Bohrer, S.R.; Fanning, R.L.; Houston, M.W.; Stinson, S.L.; Deible, R.W.; Abdel-Khalik, S.I.

    1990-11-01

    Over the past fifteen months, the Systems Chemistry Group of the Reactor Engineering Department has undertaken a comprehensive study of the Department's moderator chemistry program at Savannah River Site (SRS). An internal review was developed to formalize and document this program. Objectives were as outlined in a mission statement and action plan. In addition to the mission statement and action plan, nine separate task reports have been issued during the course of this study. Each of these task reports is included in this document as a chapter. This document is an organized compilation of the individual reports issued by the Systems Chemistry Group in assessment of SRS moderator chemistry to determine if there were significant gaps in the program as ft existed in October, 1989. While these reviews found no significant gaps in that mode of operation, or any items that adversely affected safety, items were identified that could be improved. Many of the items have already been dear with or are in the process of completion under this Moderator Chemistry Program and other Reactor Restart programs. A complete list of the items of improvement found under this assessment is found in Chapter 9, along with a proposed time table for correcting remaining items that can be improved for the chemistry program of SRS reactors. An additional external review of the moderator chemistry processes, recommendations, and responses to/from the Reactor Corrosion Mitigation Committee is included as Appendix to this compilation.

  3. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    1995-04-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  4. Quantum Chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casati, Giulio; Chirikov, Boris

    2006-11-01

    Preface; Acknowledgments; Introduction: 1. The legacy of chaos in quantum mechanics G. Casati and B. V. Chirikov; Part I. Classical Chaos and Quantum Localization: 2. Stochastic behaviour of a quantum pendulum under a periodic perturbation G. Casati, B. V. Chirikov, F. M. Izrailev and J. Ford; 3. Quantum dynamics of a nonintegrable system D. R. Grempel, R. E. Prange and S. E. Fishman; 4. Excitation of molecular rotation by periodic microwave pulses. A testing ground for Anderson localization R. Blümel, S. Fishman and U. Smilansky; 5. Localization of diffusive excitation in multi-level systems D. K. Shepelyansky; 6. Classical and quantum chaos for a kicked top F. Haake, M. Kus and R. Scharf; 7. Self-similarity in quantum dynamics L. E. Reichl and L. Haoming; 8. Time irreversibility of classically chaotic quantum dynamics K. Ikeda; 9. Effect of noise on time-dependent quantum chaos E. Ott, T. M. Antonsen Jr and J. D. Hanson; 10. Dynamical localization, dissipation and noise R. F. Graham; 11. Maximum entropy models and quantum transmission in disordered systems J.-L. Pichard and M. Sanquer; 12. Solid state 'atoms' in intense oscillating fields M. S. Sherwin; Part II. Atoms in Strong Fields: 13. Localization of classically chaotic diffusion for hydrogen atoms in microwave fields J. E. Bayfield, G. Casati, I. Guarneri and D. W. Sokol; 14. Inhibition of quantum transport due to 'scars' of unstable periodic orbits R. V. Jensen, M. M. Sanders, M. Saraceno and B. Sundaram; 15. Rubidium Rydberg atoms in strong fields G. Benson, G. Raithel and H. Walther; 16. Diamagnetic Rydberg atom: confrontation of calculated and observed spectra C.-H. Iu, G. R. Welch, M. M. Kash, D. Kleppner, D. Delande and J. C. Gay; 17. Semiclassical approximation for the quantum states of a hydrogen atom in a magnetic field near the ionization limit M. Y. Kuchiev and O. P. Sushkov; 18. The semiclassical helium atom D. Wintgen, K. Richter and G. Tanner; 19. Stretched helium: a model for quantum chaos

  5. Fluorine in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Swallow, Steven

    2015-01-01

    Since its first use in the steroid field in the late 1950s, the use of fluorine in medicinal chemistry has become commonplace, with the small electronegative fluorine atom being a key part of the medicinal chemist's repertoire of substitutions used to modulate all aspects of molecular properties including potency, physical chemistry and pharmacokinetics. This review will highlight the special nature of fluorine, drawing from a survey of marketed fluorinated pharmaceuticals and the medicinal chemistry literature, to illustrate key concepts exploited by medicinal chemists in their attempts to optimize drug molecules. Some of the potential pitfalls in the use of fluorine will also be highlighted.

  6. Frontiers in analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Amato, I.

    1988-12-15

    Doing more with less was the modus operandi of R. Buckminster Fuller, the late science genius, and inventor of such things as the geodesic dome. In late September, chemists described their own version of this maxim--learning more chemistry from less material and in less time--in a symposium titled Frontiers in Analytical Chemistry at the 196th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society in Los Angeles. Symposium organizer Allen J. Bard of the University of Texas at Austin assembled six speakers, himself among them, to survey pretty widely different areas of analytical chemistry.

  7. Chemistry in Novae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawlings, J. M. C.; Williams, D. A.

    It is shown that the 5 μm excess, which is attributed to CO in the ejecta of novae, can be modelled chemically. The principle problems involved in the modelling are: (1) the high ejecta temperature (≡104K), (2) the extremely high UV flux, and (3) the marginal self-shielding capability of H2. The authors find that the condition of H2 self-shielding alone is sufficient to allow rapid chemistry to proceed. Time-dependent chemistry calculations indicate that the chemistry is steered by the physics of the system.

  8. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, M.; McGuyer, B. H.; Apfelbeck, F.; Lee, C.-H.; Majewska, I.; Moszynski, R.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2016-07-01

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold 88Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  9. Photodissociation of ultracold diatomic strontium molecules with quantum state control.

    PubMed

    McDonald, M; McGuyer, B H; Apfelbeck, F; Lee, C-H; Majewska, I; Moszynski, R; Zelevinsky, T

    2016-07-07

    Chemical reactions at ultracold temperatures are expected to be dominated by quantum mechanical effects. Although progress towards ultracold chemistry has been made through atomic photoassociation, Feshbach resonances and bimolecular collisions, these approaches have been limited by imperfect quantum state selectivity. In particular, attaining complete control of the ground or excited continuum quantum states has remained a challenge. Here we achieve this control using photodissociation, an approach that encodes a wealth of information in the angular distribution of outgoing fragments. By photodissociating ultracold (88)Sr2 molecules with full control of the low-energy continuum, we access the quantum regime of ultracold chemistry, observing resonant and nonresonant barrier tunnelling, matter-wave interference of reaction products and forbidden reaction pathways. Our results illustrate the failure of the traditional quasiclassical model of photodissociation and instead are accurately described by a quantum mechanical model. The experimental ability to produce well-defined quantum continuum states at low energies will enable high-precision studies of long-range molecular potentials for which accurate quantum chemistry models are unavailable, and may serve as a source of entangled states and coherent matter waves for a wide range of experiments in quantum optics.

  10. Solving the quantum brachistochrone equation through differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Chenglong; Wilde, Mark; Dowling, Jonathan; Wang, Xiaoting

    2016-05-01

    The ability of generating a particular quantum state, or model a physical quantum device by exploring quantum state transfer, is important in many applications such as quantum chemistry, quantum information processing, quantum metrology and cooling. Due to the environmental noise, a quantum device suffers from decoherence causing information loss. Hence, completing the state-generation task in a time-optimal way can be considered as a straightforward method to reduce decoherence. For a quantum system whose Hamiltonian has a fixed type and a finite energy bandwidth, it has been found that the time-optimal quantum evolution can be characterized by the quantum brachistochrone equation. In addition, the brachistochrone curve is found to have a geometric interpretation: it is the limit of a one-parameter family of geodesics on a sub-Riemannian model. Such geodesic-brachistochrone connection provides an efficient numerical method to solve the quantum brachistochrone equation. In this work, we will demonstrate this numerical method by studying the time-optimal state-generating problem on a given quantum spin system. We also find that the Pareto weighted-sum optimization turns out to be a simple but efficient method in solving the quantum time-optimal problems. We would like to acknowledge support from NSF under Award No. CCF-1350397.

  11. Water Chemistry: Seeking Information

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delfino, Joseph J.

    1977-01-01

    A survey of the available literature in water chemistry is presented. Materials surveyed include: texts, reference books, bibliographic resources, journals, American Chemical Society publications, proceedings, unpublished articles, and reports. (BT)

  12. Uncertainty in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menger, Fredric M

    2010-09-01

    It might come as a disappointment to some chemists, but just as there are uncertainties in physics and mathematics, there are some chemistry questions we may never know the answer to either, suggests Fredric M. Menger.

  13. Frontiers in Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joyce, Robert M., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    This article describes recent progress in chemical synthesis which depends on comparable advances in other areas of chemistry. Analysis and theories of chemical structure and reactions are determinants in progress in chemical synthesis and are described also. (Author/SA)

  14. Chemistry and Detective Fiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labianca, Dominick A.; Reeves, William J.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an interdisciplinary program consisting of two courses. The first course deals with the chemistry of drugs and poisons; the second course focuses on fictional works in which these drugs and poisons are central to the plots. (SK)

  15. Environmental Bioinorganic Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ochiai, Ei-Ichiro

    1974-01-01

    Discusses some important aspects of bioinorganic chemistry, including interactions of organisms with metallic and nonmetallic elements and compounds. Indicates that many environmental problems are created by human exploitation of nature and technologies if studied from a bioinorganic chemical viewpoint. (CC)

  16. Chemistry for Kids.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sato, Sanae; Majoros, Bela

    1988-01-01

    Reports two methods for interesting children in chemistry. Describes a method for producing large soap bubbles and films for study. Examines the use of simple stories to explain common chemical concepts with example given. Lists titles of available stories. (ML)

  17. Magnetism in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brookes, R. W.; McFadyen, W. D.

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the technical aspects of paramagnetism and an electrostatic model called Crystal Field Theory (CFT), very often used in the case of transition metal compounds. Suggests that this discussion be included as an option for college chemistry courses. (MLH)

  18. Chemistry for Nonscientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weil, Thomas A.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the case of DDT which can be introduced to nonscience students in a chemistry course, including the development of DDT, problems associated with its adverse effects, and curtailment of its use in our environments. (CC)

  19. Chemistry with a Peel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; Larsen, Eric

    1997-01-01

    Presents experiments that introduce natural product chemistry into high school classrooms. In the laboratory activities, students isolate and analyze the oil in orange peels. Students also perform a steam distillation and learn about terpenes. (DDR)

  20. Supplemental instruction in chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundeberg, Mary A.

    This study was designed to measure some effects of supplemental instruction in chemistry. Supplemental instruction is a peer-led cooperative learning program that encourages students to develop conceptual understanding by articulating both understandings and misconceptions in a think-aloud fashion. Supplemental instruction was offered three hours weekly outside of class and lab time for students in four classes of General Organic and Biological Chemistry. Over a two-year period 108 students volunteered to participate in this program; 45 students did not participate. As measured by final grades in chemistry and responses to a questionnaire, supplemental instruction was effective in increasing students' achievement in chemistry. Further research is needed to determine the in-depth effects of supplemental instruction on students' learning, problem solving, and self-esteem.

  1. Indicators: Soil Chemistry

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The chemical makeup of the soil can provide information on wetland condition, wetland water quality and services being provided by the wetland ecosystem. Analyzing soil chemistry reveals if the soil is contaminated with a toxic chemical or heavy metal.

  2. General Chemistry for Engineers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kybett, B. D.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between molecular structure, intermolecular forces, and tensile strengths of a polymer and suggests that this is a logical way to introduce polymers into a general chemistry course. (Author/JN)

  3. Microfluidics in inorganic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Abou-Hassan, Ali; Sandre, Olivier; Cabuil, Valérie

    2010-08-23

    The application of microfluidics in chemistry has gained significant importance in the recent years. Miniaturized chemistry platforms provide controlled fluid transport, rapid chemical reactions, and cost-saving advantages over conventional reactors. The advantages of microfluidics have been clearly established in the field of analytical and bioanalytical sciences and in the field of organic synthesis. It is less true in the field of inorganic chemistry and materials science; however in inorganic chemistry it has mostly been used for the separation and selective extraction of metal ions. Microfluidics has been used in materials science mainly for the improvement of nanoparticle synthesis, namely metal, metal oxide, and semiconductor nanoparticles. Microfluidic devices can also be used for the formulation of more advanced and sophisticated inorganic materials or hybrids.

  4. Molecular Structures of N,N'-Dimethylbenzimidazoline-2-germylene and -stannylene in Solution and in Solid State by Means of Optical (Raman and UV-vis) Spectroscopy and Quantum Chemistry Methods.

    PubMed

    Aysin, R R; Leites, L A; Bukalov, S S; Zabula, A V; West, R

    2016-05-16

    X-ray data obtained for germylene 1 evidence its monomeric structure, unlike that of stannylene 2, which had been shown previously to form a coordination dimer. Raman spectra of solid and liquid 1 are identical, whereas the Raman spectra of solid 2 and its solution 2a differ significantly. The spectrum of 2 is complicated and contains the lines corresponding to N → Sn coordination bonds forming a dimer. The spectrum of 2a is simpler and close to that of monomeric 1, thus pointing to the rupture of the dimer in solution. The UV-vis spectrum of solid 2 exhibits a band corresponding to a transition involving the N → Sn coordination bonds. Quantum theory of atoms in molecules data estimate the energy of this bond as ∼19 kcal/mol. The aromaticity of 1 and 2 with their 10 π-electron systems including divalent Ge or Sn atoms is confirmed by negative nucleus-independent chemical shift values.

  5. Quantum Computers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-04

    1227–1230 (2009). 31. Olmschenk, S. et al. Quantum teleportation between distant matter qubits. Science 323, 486–489 (2009). 32. Dür, W., Briegel, H...REVIEWS Quantum computers T. D. Ladd1{, F. Jelezko2, R. Laflamme3,4,5, Y. Nakamura6,7, C. Monroe8,9 & J. L. O’Brien10 Over the past several decades... quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing

  6. Impact of surface chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-01

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas–solid, liquid–solid, and solid–solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized. PMID:20880833

  7. EPA Environmental Chemistry Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Chemistry Laboratory (ECL) is a national program laboratory specializing in residue chemistry analysis under the jurisdiction of the EPA's Office of Pesticide Programs in Washington, D.C. At Stennis Space Center, the laboratory's work supports many federal anti-pollution laws. The laboratory analyzes environmental and human samples to determine the presence and amount of agricultural chemicals and related substances. Pictured, ECL chemists analyze environmental and human samples for the presence of pesticides and other pollutants.

  8. Impact of surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Li, Yimin

    2011-01-18

    The applications of molecular surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalyst technology, semiconductor-based technology, medical technology, anticorrosion and lubricant technology, and nanotechnology are highlighted in this perspective. The evolution of surface chemistry at the molecular level is reviewed, and the key roles of surface instrumentation developments for in situ studies of the gas-solid, liquid-solid, and solid-solid interfaces under reaction conditions are emphasized.

  9. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A; Jeffrey, E; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions. PMID:26153660

  10. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-07-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions.

  11. Quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Ladd, T D; Jelezko, F; Laflamme, R; Nakamura, Y; Monroe, C; O'Brien, J L

    2010-03-04

    Over the past several decades, quantum information science has emerged to seek answers to the question: can we gain some advantage by storing, transmitting and processing information encoded in systems that exhibit unique quantum properties? Today it is understood that the answer is yes, and many research groups around the world are working towards the highly ambitious technological goal of building a quantum computer, which would dramatically improve computational power for particular tasks. A number of physical systems, spanning much of modern physics, are being developed for quantum computation. However, it remains unclear which technology, if any, will ultimately prove successful. Here we describe the latest developments for each of the leading approaches and explain the major challenges for the future.

  12. Quantum Locality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stapp, Henry P.

    2012-05-01

    Robert Griffiths has recently addressed, within the framework of a `consistent quantum theory' that he has developed, the issue of whether, as is often claimed, quantum mechanics entails a need for faster-than-light transfers of information over long distances. He argues that the putative proofs of this property that involve hidden variables include in their premises some essentially classical-physics-type assumptions that are not entailed by the precepts of quantum mechanics. Thus whatever is proved is not a feature of quantum mechanics, but is a property of a theory that tries to combine quantum theory with quasi-classical features that go beyond what is entailed by quantum theory itself. One cannot logically prove properties of a system by establishing, instead, properties of a system modified by adding properties alien to the original system. Hence Griffiths' rejection of hidden-variable-based proofs is logically warranted. Griffiths mentions the existence of a certain alternative proof that does not involve hidden variables, and that uses only macroscopically described observable properties. He notes that he had examined in his book proofs of this general kind, and concluded that they provide no evidence for nonlocal influences. But he did not examine the particular proof that he cites. An examination of that particular proof by the method specified by his `consistent quantum theory' shows that the cited proof is valid within that restrictive version of quantum theory. An added section responds to Griffiths' reply, which cites general possibilities of ambiguities that might make what is to be proved ill-defined, and hence render the pertinent `consistent framework' ill defined. But the vagaries that he cites do not upset the proof in question, which, both by its physical formulation and by explicit identification, specify the framework to be used. Griffiths confirms the validity of the proof insofar as that pertinent framework is used. The section also shows

  13. Plasticity and Kinky Chemistry of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Dzegilenko, Fedor

    2000-01-01

    Since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have been the subject of intense research interest based on early predictions of their unique mechanical, electronic, and chemical properties. Materials with the predicted unique properties of carbon nanotubes are of great interest for use in future generations of aerospace vehicles. For their structural properties, carbon nanotubes could be used as reinforcing fibers in ultralight multifunctional composites. For their electronic properties, carbon nanotubes offer the potential of very high-speed, low-power computing elements, high-density data storage, and unique sensors. In a continuing effort to model and predict the properties of carbon nanotubes, Ames accomplished three significant results during FY99. First, accurate values of the nanomechanics and plasticity of carbon nanotubes based on quantum molecular dynamics simulations were computed. Second, the concept of mechanical deformation catalyzed-kinky-chemistry as a means to control local chemistry of nanotubes was discovered. Third, the ease of nano-indentation of silicon surfaces with carbon nanotubes was established. The elastic response and plastic failure mechanisms of single-wall nanotubes were investigated by means of quantum molecular dynamics simulations.

  14. Quantum technology: the second quantum revolution.

    PubMed

    Dowling, Jonathan P; Milburn, Gerard J

    2003-08-15

    We are currently in the midst of a second quantum revolution. The first quantum revolution gave us new rules that govern physical reality. The second quantum revolution will take these rules and use them to develop new technologies. In this review we discuss the principles upon which quantum technology is based and the tools required to develop it. We discuss a number of examples of research programs that could deliver quantum technologies in coming decades including: quantum information technology, quantum electromechanical systems, coherent quantum electronics, quantum optics and coherent matter technology.

  15. Quantum correlations and distinguishability of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spehner, Dominique

    2014-07-01

    A survey of various concepts in quantum information is given, with a main emphasis on the distinguishability of quantum states and quantum correlations. Covered topics include generalized and least square measurements, state discrimination, quantum relative entropies, the Bures distance on the set of quantum states, the quantum Fisher information, the quantum Chernoff bound, bipartite entanglement, the quantum discord, and geometrical measures of quantum correlations. The article is intended both for physicists interested not only by collections of results but also by the mathematical methods justifying them, and for mathematicians looking for an up-to-date introductory course on these subjects, which are mainly developed in the physics literature.

  16. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Commins, Eugene D.

    2014-10-01

    Preface; 1. Introduction; 2. Mathematical preliminaries; 3. The rules of quantum mechanics; 4. The connection between the fundamental rules and wave mechanics; 5. Further illustrations of the rules of quantum mechanics; 6. Further developments in one-dimensional wave mechanics; 7. The theory of angular momentum; 8. Wave mechanics in three dimensions: hydrogenic atoms; 9. Time-independent approximations for bound state problems; 10. Applications of static perturbation theory; 11. Identical particles; 12. Atomic structure; 13. Molecules; 14. The stability of matter; 15. Photons; 16. Interaction of non-relativistic charged particles and radiation; 17. Further topics in perturbation theory; 18. Scattering; 19. Special relativity and quantum mechanics: the Klein-Gordon equation; 20. The Dirac equation; 21. Interaction of a relativistic spin 1/2 particle with an external electromagnetic field; 22. The Dirac field; 23. Interaction between relativistic electrons, positrons, and photons; 24. The quantum mechanics of weak interactions; 25. The quantum measurement problem; Appendix A: useful inequalities for quantum mechanics; Appendix B: Bell's inequality; Appendix C: spin of the photon: vector spherical waves; Works cited; Bibliography; Index.

  17. Chemistry of the superheavy elements.

    PubMed

    Schädel, Matthias

    2015-03-13

    The quest for superheavy elements (SHEs) is driven by the desire to find and explore one of the extreme limits of existence of matter. These elements exist solely due to their nuclear shell stabilization. All 15 presently 'known' SHEs (11 are officially 'discovered' and named) up to element 118 are short-lived and are man-made atom-at-a-time in heavy ion induced nuclear reactions. They are identical to the transactinide elements located in the seventh period of the periodic table beginning with rutherfordium (element 104), dubnium (element 105) and seaborgium (element 106) in groups 4, 5 and 6, respectively. Their chemical properties are often surprising and unexpected from simple extrapolations. After hassium (element 108), chemistry has now reached copernicium (element 112) and flerovium (element 114). For the later ones, the focus is on questions of their metallic or possibly noble gas-like character originating from interplay of most pronounced relativistic effects and electron-shell effects. SHEs provide unique opportunities to get insights into the influence of strong relativistic effects on the atomic electrons and to probe 'relativistically' influenced chemical properties and the architecture of the periodic table at its farthest reach. In addition, they establish a test bench to challenge the validity and predictive power of modern fully relativistic quantum chemical models.

  18. Magnetic polyoxometalates: from molecular magnetism to molecular spintronics and quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro

    2012-11-21

    In this review we discuss the relevance of polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry to provide model objects in molecular magnetism. We present several potential applications in nanomagnetism, in particular, in molecular spintronics and quantum computing.

  19. Quantum Particles From Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görnitz, T.; Schomäcker, U.

    2012-08-01

    Many problems in modern physics demonstrate that for a fundamental entity a more general conception than quantum particles or quantum fields are necessary. These concepts cannot explain the phenomena of dark energy or the mind-body-interaction. Instead of any kind of "small elementary building bricks", the Protyposis, an abstract and absolute quantum information, free of special denotation and open for some purport, gives the solution in the search for a fundamental substance. However, as long as at least relativistic particles are not constructed from the Protyposis, such an idea would remain in the range of natural philosophy. Therefore, the construction of relativistic particles without and with rest mass from quantum information is shown.

  20. Unusual case of desmotropy. Combined spectroscopy (¹H-¹⁴N NQDR) and quantum chemistry (periodic hybrid DFT/QTAIM and Hirshfeld surface-based) study of solid dacarbazine (anti-neoplastic).

    PubMed

    Latosińska, Jolanta Natalia; Latosińska, Magdalena; Seliger, Janez; Žagar, Veselko; Burchardt, Dorota V; Derwich, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Antineoplastic chemo-therapeutic drug 5-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazenyl)imidazole-4-carboxamide (Dacarbazine, DTIC), has been studied experimentally in solid state by ¹H-¹⁴N NQDR double resonance at 295 K and theoretically by the Density Functional Theory (DFT)/Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules (QTAIM) and Hirshfeld surfaces analysis. Only one set of eighteen resonance frequencies was found in the experiment. This indicates the presence of six inequivalent nitrogen sites: -N(CH₃), -NH₂, -NH- and three -N= (of which one is a ring, two are from triazene) in the DTIC molecule. This contradicts the X-ray data which revealed the multiplication of nitrogen sites due to unusual desmotropism. The averaging of NQR frequencies caused by the fast in NQR time-scale exchange of protons in a double-well potential combined with the oscillations of twisted supramolecular synthons was proposed as a potential mechanism responsible for this apparent contradiction. An effective improvement in the quality of the spectrum reproduction was achieved when the calculations were performed assuming the periodic boundary conditions, BLYP functional, the DNP basis set and taking the 3×3×3 k-point separation. The ordering of the nitrogen sites according to the increasing quadrupole coupling constant (QCC): N(3)

  1. Chemistry in the News: 1998 Nobel Prizes in Chemistry and Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jennifer B.

    1999-01-01

    The Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to Walter Kohn (University of California at Santa Barbara) for his development of the density-functional theory and to John A. Pople (Northwestern University at Evanston, Illinois) for his development of computational methods in quantum chemistry. The Nobel Assembly at the Karolinska Institute has awarded the 1998 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine jointly to Robert F. Fuchgott (State University of New York Health Science Center at Brooklyn), Louis J. Ignarro (University of California at Los Angeles), and Ferid Murad (University of Texas Medical School at Houston) for identifying nitric oxide as a key biological signaling molecule in the cardiovascular system.

  2. Technetium Chemistry in HLW

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, Nancy J.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Xia Yuanxian

    2005-06-06

    Tc contamination is found within the DOE complex at those sites whose mission involved extraction of plutonium from irradiated uranium fuel or isotopic enrichment of uranium. At the Hanford Site, chemical separations and extraction processes generated large amounts of high level and transuranic wastes that are currently stored in underground tanks. The waste from these extraction processes is currently stored in underground High Level Waste (HLW) tanks. However, the chemistry of the HLW in any given tank is greatly complicated by repeated efforts to reduce volume and recover isotopes. These processes ultimately resulted in mixing of waste streams from different processes. As a result, the chemistry and the fate of Tc in HLW tanks are not well understood. This lack of understanding has been made evident in the failed efforts to leach Tc from sludge and to remove Tc from supernatants prior to immobilization. Although recent interest in Tc chemistry has shifted from pretreatment chemistry to waste residuals, both needs are served by a fundamental understanding of Tc chemistry.

  3. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements. PMID:27713928

  4. Quantum optical rotatory dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tischler, Nora; Krenn, Mario; Fickler, Robert; Vidal, Xavier; Zeilinger, Anton; Molina-Terriza, Gabriel

    2016-10-01

    The phenomenon of molecular optical activity manifests itself as the rotation of the plane of linear polarization when light passes through chiral media. Measurements of optical activity and its wavelength dependence, that is, optical rotatory dispersion, can reveal information about intricate properties of molecules, such as the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms comprising a molecule. Given a limited probe power, quantum metrology offers the possibility of outperforming classical measurements. This has particular appeal when samples may be damaged by high power, which is a potential concern for chiroptical studies. We present the first experiment in which multiwavelength polarization-entangled photon pairs are used to measure the optical activity and optical rotatory dispersion exhibited by a solution of chiral molecules. Our work paves the way for quantum-enhanced measurements of chirality, with potential applications in chemistry, biology, materials science, and the pharmaceutical industry. The scheme that we use for probing wavelength dependence not only allows one to surpass the information extracted per photon in a classical measurement but also can be used for more general differential measurements.

  5. Introduction to Quantum Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.

    2005-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses the problem of efficiently simulating the evolution of a quantum system. The contents include: 1) Quantum Simulation; 2) Extracting Answers from Quantum Simulations; 3) Quantum Fourier Transform; 4) Eigenvalue Estimation; 5) Fermionic Simulations.

  6. Quantum Transmemetic Intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piotrowski, Edward W.; Sładkowski, Jan

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * A Quantum Model of Free Will * Quantum Acquisition of Knowledge * Thinking as a Quantum Algorithm * Counterfactual Measurement as a Model of Intuition * Quantum Modification of Freud's Model of Consciousness * Conclusion * Acknowledgements * References

  7. Quantum Physics for Beginners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strand, J.

    1981-01-01

    Suggests a new approach for teaching secondary school quantum physics. Reviews traditional approaches and presents some characteristics of the three-part "Quantum Physics for Beginners" project, including: quantum physics, quantum mechanics, and a short historical survey. (SK)

  8. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  9. Uranium triamidoamine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Benedict M; Liddle, Stephen T

    2015-07-07

    Triamidoamine (Tren) complexes of the p- and d-block elements have been well-studied, and they display a diverse array of chemistry of academic, industrial and biological significance. Such in-depth investigations are not as widespread for Tren complexes of uranium, despite the general drive to better understand the chemical behaviour of uranium by virtue of its fundamental position within the nuclear sector. However, the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes is characterised by the ability to stabilise otherwise reactive, multiply bonded main group donor atom ligands, construct uranium-metal bonds, promote small molecule activation, and support single molecule magnetism, all of which exploit the steric, electronic, thermodynamic and kinetic features of the Tren ligand system. This Feature Article presents a current account of the chemistry of Tren-uranium complexes.

  10. Quantum hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubota, Makoto; Kobayashi, Michikazu; Takeuchi, Hiromitsu

    2013-01-01

    Quantum hydrodynamics in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) has been recently one of the most important topics in low temperature physics. In these systems, a macroscopic wave function (order parameter) appears because of Bose-Einstein condensation, which creates quantized vortices. Turbulence consisting of quantized vortices is called quantum turbulence (QT). The study of quantized vortices and QT has increased in intensity for two reasons. The first is that recent studies of QT are considerably advanced over older studies, which were chiefly limited to thermal counterflow in 4He, which has no analog with classical traditional turbulence, whereas new studies on QT are focused on a comparison between QT and classical turbulence. The second reason is the realization of atomic BECs in 1995, for which modern optical techniques enable the direct control and visualization of the condensate and can even change the interaction; such direct control is impossible in other quantum condensates like superfluid helium and superconductors. Our group has made many important theoretical and numerical contributions to the field of quantum hydrodynamics of both superfluid helium and atomic BECs. In this article, we review some of the important topics in detail. The topics of quantum hydrodynamics are diverse, so we have not attempted to cover all these topics in this article. We also ensure that the scope of this article does not overlap with our recent review article (arXiv:1004.5458), “Quantized vortices in superfluid helium and atomic Bose-Einstein condensates”, and other review articles.

  11. EDITORIAL: Special issue on quantum control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, Stefano; Man'ko, Vladimir I.; Wiseman, Howard M.

    2005-10-01

    Controlling the dynamics or measurement of quantum systems via the manipulation of external parameters is a most important phenomenon that lies at the heart of several fields including atomic and optical physics, molecular chemistry and quantum information. As quantum technologies have matured, a host of practical applications of quantum control have been realized in quantum optics, cavity QED, atomic spin ensembles, ion trapping, and Bose--Einstein condensation. As a result, quantum control theory is a rapidly growing research field. The aim of this special issue is to give an idea of the present status of research in quantum control, and to stimulate further activity. The papers chosen cover a great variety of ideas in this field. To aid the reader, we have divided the papers into four broad sections: quantum filtering and feedback control; open-loop control; quantum information applications; optical and related applications. Of course there are many papers that cross the boundaries between the categories we have identified, so we encourage readers to peruse the whole issue. While some may quibble with our classification scheme, we think it will be useful, especially to those who are new to the area. In each section the papers are ordered by date of submission. The first section is on quantum filtering and feedback control. Quantum filtering means determining estimates for some (or all) observables of the system from classical measurement results obtained gradually over time from the output of the quantum system. The conditioned quantum state is one way to generate such estimates. This filtering of the measurement results is useful for feedback control (also known as closed-loop control), because those estimates can be used as the basis for varying the external control parameters. This section begins with a review article (the one exception to the ordering of papers by submission date). The second section is on open-loop control in the broad sense. This is

  12. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, USSR: Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    This report contains foreign media information from the USSR concerning analytical chemistry, electrochemistry, environmental chemistry, inorganic compounds, organophosphorous compounds, polymers (rubber) and radiation chemistry.

  13. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  14. Density functional theory across chemistry, physics and biology.

    PubMed

    van Mourik, Tanja; Bühl, Michael; Gaigeot, Marie-Pierre

    2014-03-13

    The past decades have seen density functional theory (DFT) evolve from a rising star in computational quantum chemistry to one of its major players. This Theme Issue, which comes half a century after the publication of the Hohenberg-Kohn theorems that laid the foundations of modern DFT, reviews progress and challenges in present-day DFT research. Rather than trying to be comprehensive, this Theme Issue attempts to give a flavour of selected aspects of DFT.

  15. Chemistry in cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  16. Chemistry of Transactinides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kratz, J. V.

    In this chapter, the chemical properties of the man-made transactinide elements rutherfordium, Rf (element 104), dubnium, Db (element 105), seaborgium, Sg (element 106), bohrium, Bh (element 107), hassium, Hs (element 108), and copernicium, Cn (element 112) are reviewed, and prospects for chemical characterizations of even heavier elements are discussed. The experimental methods to perform rapid chemical separations on the time scale of seconds are presented and comments are given on the special situation with the transactinides where chemistry has to be studied with single atoms. It follows a description of theoretical predictions and selected experimental results on the chemistry of elements 104 through 108, and element 112.

  17. Chemistry WebBook

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 69 NIST Chemistry WebBook (Web, free access)   The NIST Chemistry WebBook contains: Thermochemical data for over 7000 organic and small inorganic compounds; thermochemistry data for over 8000 reactions; IR spectra for over 16,000 compounds; mass spectra for over 33,000 compounds; UV/Vis spectra for over 1600 compounds; electronic and vibrational spectra for over 5000 compounds; constants of diatomic molecules(spectroscopic data) for over 600 compounds; ion energetics data for over 16,000 compounds; thermophysical property data for 74 fluids.

  18. Chemistry of atmospheres.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wayne, R. P.

    Atmospheric chemistry has been the focus of much research activity in recent years. Like its predecessor, this new edition lays down the principles of atmospheric chemistry and provides the necessary background for more detailed study. New developments are covered, including the startling discovery of the "Antarctic ozone hole", and the increasingly rapid changes in the composition of the Earth's atmosphere, apparently a result of man's activities. Information gathered by the Voyager 2 and other space missions, which have provided a new understanding of the atmospheres of planets other than our own, is also discussed.

  19. Principles of Chemistry (by Michael Munowitz)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovac, Reviewed By Jeffrey

    2000-05-01

    At a time when almost all general chemistry textbooks seem to have become commodities designed by marketing departments to offend no one, it is refreshing to find a book with a unique perspective. Michael Munowitz has written what I can only describe as a delightful chemistry book, full of conceptual insight, that uses a novel and interesting pedagogic strategy. This is a book that has much to recommend it. This is the best-written general chemistry book I have ever read. An editor with whom I have worked recently remarked that he felt his job was to help authors make their writing sing. Well, the writing in Principles of Chemistry sings with the full, rich harmonies and creative inventiveness of the King's Singers or Chanticleer. Here is the first sentence of the introduction: "Central to any understanding of the physical world is one discovery of paramount importance, a truth disarmingly simple yet profound in its implications: matter is not continuous." This is prose to be savored and celebrated. Principles of Chemistry has a distinct perspective on chemistry: the perspective of the physical chemist. The focus is on simplicity, what is common about molecules and reactions; begin with the microscopic and build bridges to the macroscopic. The author's perspective is clear from the organization of the book. After three rather broad introductory chapters, there are four chapters that develop the quantum mechanical theory of atoms and molecules, including a strong treatment of molecular orbital theory. Unlike many books, Principles of Chemistry presents the molecular orbital approach first and introduces valence bond theory later only as an approximation for dealing with more complicated molecules. The usual chapters on descriptive inorganic chemistry are absent (though there is an excellent chapter on organic and biological molecules and reactions as well as one on transition metal complexes). Instead, descriptive chemistry is integrated into the development of

  20. Quantum turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrbek, L.

    2011-12-01

    We review physical properties of quantum fluids He II and 3He-B, where quantum turbulence (QT) has been studied experimentally. Basic properties of QT in these working fluids are discussed within the phenomenological two-fluid model introduced by Landau. We consider counterflows in which the normal and superfluid components flow against each other, as well as co-flows in which the direction of the two fluids is the same. We pay special attention to the important case of zero temperature limit, where QT represents an interesting and probably the simplest prototype of three-dimensional turbulence in fluids. Experimental techniques to explore QT such as second sound attenuation, Andreev reflection, NMR, ion propagation are briefly introduced and results of various experiments on so-called Vinen QT and Kolmogorov QT both in He II and 3He are discussed, emphasizing similarities and differences between classical and quantum turbulence.

  1. Quantum dice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sassoli de Bianchi, Massimiliano

    2013-09-01

    In a letter to Born, Einstein wrote [42]: "Quantum mechanics is certainly imposing. But an inner voice tells me that it is not yet the real thing. The theory says a lot, but does not really bring us any closer to the secret of the 'old one.' I, at any rate, am convinced that He does not throw dice." In this paper we take seriously Einstein's famous metaphor, and show that we can gain considerable insight into quantum mechanics by doing something as simple as rolling dice. More precisely, we show how to perform measurements on a single die, to create typical quantum interference effects, and how to connect (entangle) two identical dice, to maximally violate Bell's inequality.

  2. Quantum Spring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chao-Jun; Li, Xin-Zhou

    In this paper, we will give a short review on quantum spring, which is a Casimir effect from the helix boundary condition that proposed in our earlier works. The Casimir force parallel to the axis of the helix behaves very much like the force on a spring that obeys the Hooke's law when the ratio r of the pitch to the circumference of the helix is small, but in this case, the force comes from a quantum effect, so we would like to call it quantum spring. On the other hand, the force perpendicular to the axis decreases monotonously with the increasing of the ratio r. Both forces are attractive and their behaviors are the same in two and three dimensions.

  3. Chiral quantum dot based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govan, Joseph; Loudon, Alexander; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.; Gun'ko, Yurii

    2014-05-01

    Recently, the use of stereospecific chiral stabilising molecules has also opened another avenue of interest in the area of quantum dot (QD) research. The main goal of our research is to develop new types of technologically important quantum dot materials containing chiral defects, study their properties and explore their applications. The utilisation of chiral penicillamine stabilisers allowed the preparation of new water soluble white emitting CdS quantum nanostructures which demonstrated circular dichroism in the band-edge region of the spectrum. It was also demonstrated that all three types of QDs (D-, L-, and Rac penicillamine stabilised) show very broad emission bands between 400 and 700 nm due to defects or trap states on the surfaces of the nanocrystals. In this work the chiral CdS based quantum nanostructures have also been doped by copper metal ions and new chiral penicilamine stabilized CuS nanoparticles have been prepared and investigated. It was found that copper doping had a strong effect at low levels in the synthesis of chiral CdS nanostructures. We expect that this research will open new horizons in the chemistry of chiral nanomaterials and their application in biotechnology, sensing and asymmetric synthesis.

  4. Highly fluorescent magnetic quantum dotprobe with superior colloidal stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basiruddin, Sk; Saha, Arindam; Sarkar, Rupa; Majumder, Moumita; Jana, Nikhil R.

    2010-12-01

    A magnetic quantum dot (MQD) based cellular nanoprobe, composed of a magnetic oxidenanoparticle component and a quantum dot component, has been synthesized and used for both imaging and separation. The successful synthesis is based on a reverse micelle based polyacrylate coating in the presence of component nanoparticles, followed by their functionalization viaconjugation chemistry.A magnetic quantum dot (MQD) based cellular nanoprobe, composed of a magnetic oxidenanoparticle component and a quantum dot component, has been synthesized and used for both imaging and separation. The successful synthesis is based on a reverse micelle based polyacrylate coating in the presence of component nanoparticles, followed by their functionalization viaconjugation chemistry. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Details of the experimental procedure, MQD characterization via magnetic measurements, EDX, TEM, FTIR, fluorescamine test and control celllabeling data. See DOI: 10.1039/c0nr00501k

  5. A variational eigenvalue solver on a photonic quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Peruzzo, Alberto; McClean, Jarrod; Shadbolt, Peter; Yung, Man-Hong; Zhou, Xiao-Qi; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; O'Brien, Jeremy L

    2014-07-23

    Quantum computers promise to efficiently solve important problems that are intractable on a conventional computer. For quantum systems, where the physical dimension grows exponentially, finding the eigenvalues of certain operators is one such intractable problem and remains a fundamental challenge. The quantum phase estimation algorithm efficiently finds the eigenvalue of a given eigenvector but requires fully coherent evolution. Here we present an alternative approach that greatly reduces the requirements for coherent evolution and combine this method with a new approach to state preparation based on ansätze and classical optimization. We implement the algorithm by combining a highly reconfigurable photonic quantum processor with a conventional computer. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of this approach with an example from quantum chemistry--calculating the ground-state molecular energy for He-H(+). The proposed approach drastically reduces the coherence time requirements, enhancing the potential of quantum resources available today and in the near future.

  6. Quantum Finance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baaquie, Belal E.

    2007-09-01

    Foreword; Preface; Acknowledgements; 1. Synopsis; Part I. Fundamental Concepts of Finance: 2. Introduction to finance; 3. Derivative securities; Part II. Systems with Finite Number of Degrees of Freedom: 4. Hamiltonians and stock options; 5. Path integrals and stock options; 6. Stochastic interest rates' Hamiltonians and path integrals; Part III. Quantum Field Theory of Interest Rates Models: 7. Quantum field theory of forward interest rates; 8. Empirical forward interest rates and field theory models; 9. Field theory of Treasury Bonds' derivatives and hedging; 10. Field theory Hamiltonian of forward interest rates; 11. Conclusions; Appendix A: mathematical background; Brief glossary of financial terms; Brief glossary of physics terms; List of main symbols; References; Index.

  7. Quantum Foam

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln, Don

    2014-10-24

    The laws of quantum mechanics and relativity are quite perplexing however it is when the two theories are merged that things get really confusing. This combined theory predicts that empty space isn’t empty at all – it’s a seething and bubbling cauldron of matter and antimatter particles springing into existence before disappearing back into nothingness. Scientists call this complicated state of affairs “quantum foam.” In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln discusses this mind-bending idea and sketches some of the experiments that have convinced scientists that this crazy prediction is actually true.

  8. Quantum Uniqueness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sych, Denis; Leuchs, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Classical physics allows for the existence of pairs of absolutely identical systems. Pairwise application of identical measurements to each of those systems always leads to exactly alike results irrespectively of the choice of measurements. Here we ask a question how the picture looks like in the quantum domain. Surprisingly, we get a counterintuitive outcome. Pairwise application of identical (but a priori unknown) measurements cannot always lead to exactly alike results. We interpret this as quantum uniqueness—a feature that has no classical analog.

  9. Chemistry related to semiconductor growth involving organometallics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husk, G. R.; Jones, K. A.; Paur, R. J.; Prater, J. T.

    1990-05-01

    OMVPE (OrganoMetallic Vapor-Phase Epitaxy) technology requirements for III-V compounds and chemistry related to semiconductor growth involving organometallics are discussed. The following subject areas are covered: semiconductor device requirements; Army II-VI deposition program/MOMBE (Metal Organic Molecular Beam Epitaxy) for IR detector applications; epitaxial growth of III-V's and II-VI's using organometallics; electrical device requirements; environmental and safety issues in MOVPE; quantum chemistry of vapor phase; carbon doping and selective epitaxy (tailoring growth chemistry in MOVPE); TBA/TBP precursors in GaAs and InP MOCVD; single source precursors for III-V OMCVD (OrganoMetallic Chemical Vapor Deposition) growth; alternate sources for MOMBE of AlGaAs; mechanism of incorporation of impurities and analysis of carbon contamination; growth on nonplanar and patterned substrates; CBE growth mechanisms; TriMethylamine Alane (a new robust precursor for MOMBE growth of AlGaAs); real-time determinations of OMCVD growth kinetics on GaAs by reflectance-difference spectroscopy; photoreflectance measurements; growth and doping mechanisms for HgCdTe; photoassisted CBE (Chemical Beam Epitaxy) of CdTe and HgCdTe alloys; in-situ analysis of ZnSe growth by OMCVD using X-ray scattering; biodegradation of GaAs IC chips and wafers; detailed models of compound semiconductor growth by MOCVD; gas phase probes of GaAs cluster chemistry; photodecomposition of organometallic compounds at 193 nm; manufacturing issues in MOCVD compound semiconductor technology.

  10. Organic Chemistry Self Instructional Package 1: Review of General Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zdravkovich, V.

    This booklet is one of a series of 17 developed at Prince George's Community College, Largo, Maryland. It provides an individualized, self-paced undergraduate organic chemistry instruction module designed to augment any course in organic chemistry but particularly those taught using the text "Organic Chemistry" by Morrison and Boyd. The…

  11. Connected Chemistry--Incorporating Interactive Simulations into the Chemistry Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stieff, Mike; Wilensky, Uri

    2003-01-01

    Describes a novel modeling and simulation package and assesses its impact on students' understanding of chemistry. Connected Chemistry was implemented inside the NetLogo modeling environment. Using Connected Chemistry, students employed problem -solving techniques characterized by stronger attempts at conceptual understanding and logical…

  12. Chemistry: Experiments, Demonstrations and Other Activities Suggested for Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Secondary Curriculum Development.

    This publication is a handbook used in conjunction with the course of study in chemistry developed through the New York State Education Department and The University of the State of New York. It contains experiments, demonstrations, and other activities for a chemistry course. Areas covered include the science of chemistry, the atomic structure of…

  13. Is Chemistry Attractive for Pupils? Czech Pupils' Perception of Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kubiatko, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Chemistry is an important subject due to understanding the composition and structure of the things around us. The main aim of the study was to find out the perception of chemistry by lower secondary school pupils. The partial aims were to find out the influence of gender, year of study and favorite subject on the perception of chemistry. The…

  14. Turkish Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Beliefs about Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boz, Yezdan; Uzuntiryaki, Esen

    2006-01-01

    In order to study the beliefs of Turkish prospective chemistry teachers about teaching chemistry, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 12 prospective teachers. Analysis of the interviews revealed that most of the prospective teachers held intermediate (transition between constructivist and traditional) beliefs about chemistry teaching.…

  15. Emphasizing Mineral Chemistry in an Analytical Chemistry Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Jeffrey G.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes an analytical chemistry unit in the second year of the chemistry degree course at Curtin University that was designed to reflect the numerous employment opportunities for chemistry graduates in the mineral processing industries and private analytical laboratories. Presents the lecture syllabus, the laboratory course description, and…

  16. Top Down Chemistry Versus Bottom up Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Witt, Adolf N.

    2016-06-01

    The idea of interstellar top down chemistry (TDC), in which molecules are produced from decomposition of larger molecules and dust in contrast to ordinary bottom up chemistry (BUC) in which molecules are produced synthetically from smaller molecules and atoms in the ISM, has been proposed in the chemistry of PAH and carbon chain molecules both for diffusea,c and dense cloudsb,d. A simple and natural idea, it must have occurred to many people and has been in the air for sometime. The validity of this hypothesis is apparent for diffuse clouds in view of the observed low abundance of small molecules and its rapid decrease with molecular size on the one hand and the high column densities of large carbon molecules demonstrated by the many intense diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) on the other. Recent identification of C60^+ as the carrier of 5 near infrared DIBs with a high column density of 2×1013 cm-2 by Maier and others confirms the TDC. This means that the large molecules and dust produced in the high density high temperature environment of circumstellar envelopes are sufficiently stable to survive decompositions due to stellar UV radiaiton, cosmic rays, C-shocks etc. for a long time (≥ 10^7 year) of their migration to diffuse clouds and seems to disagree with the consensus in the field of interstellar grains. The stability of molecules and aggregates in the diffuse interstellar medium will be discussed. Duley, W. W. 2006, Faraday Discuss. 133, 415 Zhen,J., Castellanos, P., Paardekooper, D. M., Linnartz, H., Tielens, A. G. G. M. 2014, ApJL, 797, L30 Huang, J., Oka, T. 2015, Mol. Phys. 113, 2159 Guzmán, V. V., Pety, J., Goicoechea, J. R., Gerin, M., Roueff, E., Gratier, P., Öberg, K. I. 2015, ApJL, 800, L33 L. Ziurys has sent us many papers beginning Ziurys, L. M. 2006, PNAS 103, 12274 indicating she had long been a proponent of the idea. Campbell, E. K., Holz, M., Maier, J. P., Gerlich, D., Walker, G. A. H., Bohlender, D, 2016, ApJ, in press Draine, B. T. 2003

  17. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  18. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2016-12-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  19. Electron quantum optics as quantum signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roussel, B.; Cabart, C.; Fève, G.; Thibierge, E.; Degiovanni, P.

    2017-03-01

    The recent developments of electron quantum optics in quantum Hall edge channels have given us new ways to probe the behavior of electrons in quantum conductors. It has brought new quantities called electronic coherences under the spotlight. In this paper, we explore the relations between electron quantum optics and signal processing through a global review of the various methods for accessing single- and two-electron coherences in electron quantum optics. We interpret electron quantum optics interference experiments as analog signal processing converting quantum signals into experimentally observable quantities such as current averages and correlations. This point of view also gives us a procedure to obtain quantum information quantities from electron quantum optics coherences. We illustrate these ideas by discussing two mode entanglement in electron quantum optics. We also sketch how signal processing ideas may open new perspectives for representing electronic coherences in quantum conductors and understand the properties of the underlying many-body electronic state.

  20. Quantum memory for images: A quantum hologram

    SciTech Connect

    Vasilyev, Denis V.; Sokolov, Ivan V.; Polzik, Eugene S.

    2008-02-15

    Matter-light quantum interface and quantum memory for light are important ingredients of quantum information protocols, such as quantum networks, distributed quantum computation, etc. [P. Zoller et al., Eur. Phys. J. D 36, 203 (2005)]. In this paper we present a spatially multimode scheme for quantum memory for light, which we call a quantum hologram. Our approach uses a multiatom ensemble which has been shown to be efficient for a single spatial mode quantum memory. Due to the multiatom nature of the ensemble and to the optical parallelism it is capable of storing many spatial modes, a feature critical for the present proposal. A quantum hologram with the fidelity exceeding that of classical hologram will be able to store quantum features of an image, such as multimode superposition and entangled quantum states, something that a standard hologram is unable to achieve.