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Sample records for quantum circuit applications

  1. Superconducting quantum circuits theory and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiuhao

    Superconducting quantum circuit models are widely used to understand superconducting devices. This thesis consists of four studies wherein the superconducting quantum circuit is used to illustrate challenges related to quantum information encoding and processing, quantum simulation, quantum signal detection and amplification. The existence of scalar Aharanov-Bohm phase has been a controversial topic for decades. Scalar AB phase, defined as time integral of electric potential, gives rises to an extra phase factor in wavefunction. We proposed a superconducting quantum Faraday cage to detect temporal interference effect as a consequence of scalar AB phase. Using the superconducting quantum circuit model, the physical system is solved and resulting AB effect is predicted. Further discussion in this chapter shows that treating the experimental apparatus quantum mechanically, spatial scalar AB effect, proposed by Aharanov-Bohm, can't be observed. Either a decoherent interference apparatus is used to observe spatial scalar AB effect, or a quantum Faraday cage is used to observe temporal scalar AB effect. The second study involves protecting a quantum system from losing coherence, which is crucial to any practical quantum computation scheme. We present a theory to encode any qubit, especially superconducting qubits, into a universal quantum degeneracy point (UQDP) where low frequency noise is suppressed significantly. Numerical simulations for superconducting charge qubit using experimental parameters show that its coherence time is prolong by two orders of magnitude using our universal degeneracy point approach. With this improvement, a set of universal quantum gates can be performed at high fidelity without losing too much quantum coherence. Starting in 2004, the use of circuit QED has enabled the manipulation of superconducting qubits with photons. We applied quantum optical approach to model coupled resonators and obtained a four-wave mixing toolbox to operate photons

  2. Quantum-circuit refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Kuan Yen; Partanen, Matti; Lake, Russell E.; Govenius, Joonas; Masuda, Shumpei; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-05-01

    Quantum technology promises revolutionizing applications in information processing, communications, sensing and modelling. However, efficient on-demand cooling of the functional quantum degrees of freedom remains challenging in many solid-state implementations, such as superconducting circuits. Here we demonstrate direct cooling of a superconducting resonator mode using voltage-controllable electron tunnelling in a nanoscale refrigerator. This result is revealed by a decreased electron temperature at a resonator-coupled probe resistor, even for an elevated electron temperature at the refrigerator. Our conclusions are verified by control experiments and by a good quantitative agreement between theory and experimental observations at various operation voltages and bath temperatures. In the future, we aim to remove spurious dissipation introduced by our refrigerator and to decrease the operational temperature. Such an ideal quantum-circuit refrigerator has potential applications in the initialization of quantum electric devices. In the superconducting quantum computer, for example, fast and accurate reset of the quantum memory is needed.

  3. Metamaterials for circuit QED: Quantum simulations and other applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taketani, Bruno G.; Wilhelm, Frank K.

    2014-03-01

    The ability to design periodically structured materials not present in nature provides scientists with new tools, ranging from sub-wavelength imaging to well controlled band structures for wave propagation in photonic crystals. Superconducting metamaterials have been recently proposed to manipulate the density-of-modes of transmission lines [D. J. Egger and F. K. Wilhelm, Phys. Rev. Letters 111, 163601 (2013)]. We further build on these ideas and develop a toolbox for environment manipulation based on nano-structured, periodic, lossless, superconducting circuits. In particular we show that high density of low energy states can be achieved using a superlattice arrangement of left-handed circuit elements. Multimode, ultra-strong coupling of superconducing qubits to such engineered environments thus allow for experimental implementation of quantum simulation of interesting new phenomena as well as for complex quantum state engineering.

  4. Efficient quantum circuit implementation of quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas, B. L.; Wang, J. B.

    2009-05-15

    Quantum walks, being the quantum analog of classical random walks, are expected to provide a fruitful source of quantum algorithms. A few such algorithms have already been developed, including the 'glued trees' algorithm, which provides an exponential speedup over classical methods, relative to a particular quantum oracle. Here, we discuss the possibility of a quantum walk algorithm yielding such an exponential speedup over possible classical algorithms, without the use of an oracle. We provide examples of some highly symmetric graphs on which efficient quantum circuits implementing quantum walks can be constructed and discuss potential applications to quantum search for marked vertices along these graphs.

  5. Quantum channel construction with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Chao; Noh, Kyungjoo; Albert, Victor V.; Krastanov, Stefan; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Jiang, Liang

    2017-04-01

    Quantum channels can describe all transformations allowed by quantum mechanics. We adapt two existing works [S. Lloyd and L. Viola, Phys. Rev. A 65, 010101 (2001), 10.1103/PhysRevA.65.010101 and E. Andersson and D. K. L. Oi, Phys. Rev. A 77, 052104 (2008), 10.1103/PhysRevA.77.052104] to superconducting circuits, featuring a single qubit ancilla with quantum nondemolition readout and adaptive control. This construction is efficient in both ancilla dimension and circuit depth. We point out various applications of quantum channel construction, including system stabilization and quantum error correction, Markovian and exotic channel simulation, implementation of generalized quantum measurements, and more general quantum instruments. Efficient construction of arbitrary quantum channels opens up exciting new possibilities for quantum control, quantum sensing, and information processing tasks.

  6. Parallelizing quantum circuit synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Matteo, Olivia; Mosca, Michele

    2016-03-01

    Quantum circuit synthesis is the process in which an arbitrary unitary operation is decomposed into a sequence of gates from a universal set, typically one which a quantum computer can implement both efficiently and fault-tolerantly. As physical implementations of quantum computers improve, the need is growing for tools that can effectively synthesize components of the circuits and algorithms they will run. Existing algorithms for exact, multi-qubit circuit synthesis scale exponentially in the number of qubits and circuit depth, leaving synthesis intractable for circuits on more than a handful of qubits. Even modest improvements in circuit synthesis procedures may lead to significant advances, pushing forward the boundaries of not only the size of solvable circuit synthesis problems, but also in what can be realized physically as a result of having more efficient circuits. We present a method for quantum circuit synthesis using deterministic walks. Also termed pseudorandom walks, these are walks in which once a starting point is chosen, its path is completely determined. We apply our method to construct a parallel framework for circuit synthesis, and implement one such version performing optimal T-count synthesis over the Clifford+T gate set. We use our software to present examples where parallelization offers a significant speedup on the runtime, as well as directly confirm that the 4-qubit 1-bit full adder has optimal T-count 7 and T-depth 3.

  7. Quantum circuits for cryptanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amento, Brittanney Jaclyn

    Finite fields of the form F2 m play an important role in coding theory and cryptography. We show that the choice of how to represent the elements of these fields can have a significant impact on the resource requirements for quantum arithmetic. In particular, we show how the Gaussian normal basis representations and "ghost-bit basis" representations can be used to implement inverters with a quantum circuit of depth O(mlog(m)). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first construction with subquadratic depth reported in the literature. Our quantum circuit for the computation of multiplicative inverses is based on the Itoh-Tsujii algorithm which exploits the property that, in a normal basis representation, squaring corresponds to a permutation of the coefficients. We give resource estimates for the resulting quantum circuit for inversion over binary fields F2 m based on an elementary gate set that is useful for fault-tolerant implementation. Elliptic curves over finite fields F2 m play a prominent role in modern cryptography. Published quantum algorithms dealing with such curves build on a short Weierstrass form in combination with affine or projective coordinates. In this thesis we show that changing the curve representation allows a substantial reduction in the number of T-gates needed to implement the curve arithmetic. As a tool, we present a quantum circuit for computing multiplicative inverses in F2m in depth O(m log m) using a polynomial basis representation, which may be of independent interest. Finally, we change our focus from the design of circuits which aim at attacking computational assumptions on asymmetric cryptographic algorithms to the design of a circuit attacking a symmetric cryptographic algorithm. We consider a block cipher, SERPENT, and our design of a quantum circuit implementing this cipher to be used for a key attack using Grover's algorithm as in [18]. This quantum circuit is essential for understanding the complexity of Grover's algorithm.

  8. Driven superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yasunobu

    2014-03-01

    Driven nonlinear quantum systems show rich phenomena in various fields of physics. Among them, superconducting quantum circuits have very attractive features such as well-controlled quantum states with design flexibility, strong nonlinearity of Josephson junctions, strong coupling to electromagnetic driving fields, little internal dissipation, and tailored coupling to the electromagnetic environment. We have investigated properties and functionalities of driven superconducting quantum circuits. A transmon qubit coupled to a transmission line shows nearly perfect spatial mode matching between the incident and scattered microwave field in the 1D mode. Dressed states under a driving field are studied there and also in a semi-infinite 1D mode terminated by a resonator containing a flux qubit. An effective Λ-type three-level system is realized under an appropriate driving condition. It allows ``impedance-matched'' perfect absorption of incident probe photons and down conversion into another frequency mode. Finally, the weak signal from the qubit is read out using a Josephson parametric amplifier/oscillator which is another nonlinear circuit driven by a strong pump field. This work was partly supported by the Funding Program for World-Leading Innovative R&D on Science and Technology (FIRST), Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, MEXT KAKENHI ``Quantum Cybernetics,'' and the NICT Commissioned Research.

  9. a Circuit Model of Quantum Cascade Lasers Applicable to both Small and Large Current Drives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, M. K.; Webb, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    In this paper, a circuit model is devised to analyze nonlinear behaviour of quantum cascade lasers. Such nonlinear behavior influences the light output when the laser is driven by currents comparable to the average (DC) current. The simplified 2-level rate equations are first improved. Next, the circuit model is obtained following the approach for interband lasers. The difference between the circuit models of quantum cascade lasers and interband lasers is pointed out. The circuit model is simpler compared to that obtained from a 3-level model. Unlike a circuit model derived earlier from the 2-level model, the present model can handle both small and large current drives.

  10. Circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Lev Samuel

    Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics (cQED), the study of the interaction between superconducting circuits behaving as artificial atoms and 1-dimensional transmission-line resonators, has shown much promise for quantum information processing tasks. For the purposes of quantum computing it is usual to approximate the artificial atoms as 2-level qubits, and much effort has been expended on attempts to isolate these qubits from the environment and to invent ever more sophisticated control and measurement schemes. Rather than focussing on these technological aspects of the field, this thesis investigates the opportunities for using these carefully engineered systems for answering questions of fundamental physics. The low dissipation and small mode volume of the circuits allows easy access to the strong-coupling regime of quantum optics, where one can investigate the interaction of light and matter at the level of single atoms and photons. A signature of strong coupling is the splitting of the cavity transmission peak into a pair of resolvable peaks when a single resonant atom is placed inside the cavity---an effect known as vacuum Rabi splitting. The cQED architecture is ideally suited for going beyond this linear response effect. This thesis shows that increasing the drive power results in two unique nonlinear features in the transmitted heterodyne signal: the supersplitting of each vacuum Rabi peak into a doublet, and the appearance of additional peaks with the characteristic n spacing of the Jaynes-Cummings ladder. These constitute direct evidence for the coupling between the quantized microwave field and the anharmonic spectrum of a superconducting qubit acting as an artificial atom. This thesis also addresses the idea of Bell tests, which are experiments that aim to disprove certain types of classical theories, presenting a proposed method for preparing maximally entangled 3-qubit states via a 'preparation by measurement' scheme using an optimized filter on the time

  11. Automated Design of Quantum Circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P.; Gray, Alexander G.

    2000-01-01

    In order to design a quantum circuit that performs a desired quantum computation, it is necessary to find a decomposition of the unitary matrix that represents that computation in terms of a sequence of quantum gate operations. To date, such designs have either been found by hand or by exhaustive enumeration of all possible circuit topologies. In this paper we propose an automated approach to quantum circuit design using search heuristics based on principles abstracted from evolutionary genetics, i.e. using a genetic programming algorithm adapted specially for this problem. We demonstrate the method on the task of discovering quantum circuit designs for quantum teleportation. We show that to find a given known circuit design (one which was hand-crafted by a human), the method considers roughly an order of magnitude fewer designs than naive enumeration. In addition, the method finds novel circuit designs superior to those previously known.

  12. Small Depth Quantum Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    circuit families and quantum Turing machines”. Theoretical Computer Science, 1-2(276):147–181, 2002. [20] S. Parker and M . B . Plenio . “Efficient...unclassified b . ABSTRACT unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 polynomial-size...xn, b 〉 = |x1, ..., xn, b ⊕ f(x1, . . . , xn)〉 This is just an easy form of simulating any classical function in a reversible manner. If f(x1

  13. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Heeres, Reinier W; Kouwenhoven, Leo P; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  14. Quantum interference in plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heeres, Reinier W.; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.; Zwiller, Valery

    2013-10-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons (plasmons) are a combination of light and a collective oscillation of the free electron plasma at metal/dielectric interfaces. This interaction allows subwavelength confinement of light beyond the diffraction limit inherent to dielectric structures. As a result, the intensity of the electromagnetic field is enhanced, with the possibility to increase the strength of the optical interactions between waveguides, light sources and detectors. Plasmons maintain non-classical photon statistics and preserve entanglement upon transmission through thin, patterned metallic films or weakly confining waveguides. For quantum applications, it is essential that plasmons behave as indistinguishable quantum particles. Here we report on a quantum interference experiment in a nanoscale plasmonic circuit consisting of an on-chip plasmon beamsplitter with integrated superconducting single-photon detectors to allow efficient single plasmon detection. We demonstrate a quantum-mechanical interaction between pairs of indistinguishable surface plasmons by observing Hong-Ou-Mandel (HOM) interference, a hallmark non-classical interference effect that is the basis of linear optics-based quantum computation. Our work shows that it is feasible to shrink quantum optical experiments to the nanoscale and offers a promising route towards subwavelength quantum optical networks.

  15. Multiphoton Interference in Quantum Fourier Transform Circuits and Applications to Quantum Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Zu-En; Li, Yuan; Rohde, Peter P.; Huang, He-Liang; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Dowling, Jonathan P.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-01

    Quantum Fourier transforms (QFTs) have gained increased attention with the rise of quantum walks, boson sampling, and quantum metrology. Here, we present and demonstrate a general technique that simplifies the construction of QFT interferometers using both path and polarization modes. On that basis, we first observe the generalized Hong-Ou-Mandel effect with up to four photons. Furthermore, we directly exploit number-path entanglement generated in these QFT interferometers and demonstrate optical phase supersensitivities deterministically.

  16. Applications of the Fokker-Planck equation in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Matthew; Ginossar, Eran

    2016-10-01

    We study exact solutions of the steady-state behavior of several nonlinear open quantum systems which can be applied to the field of circuit quantum electrodynamics. Using Fokker-Planck equations in the generalized P representation, we investigate the analytical solutions of two fundamental models. First, we solve for the steady-state response of a linear cavity that is coupled to an approximate transmon qubit and use this solution to study both the weak and strong driving regimes, using analytical expressions for the moments of both cavity and transmon fields, along with the Husimi Q function for the transmon. Second, we revist exact solutions of a quantum Duffing oscillator, which is driven both coherently and parametrically while also experiencing decoherence by the loss of single photons and pairs of photons. We use this solution to discuss both stabilization of Schrödinger cat states and the generation of squeezed states in parametric amplifiers, in addition to studying the Q functions of the different phases of the quantum system. The field of superconducting circuits, with its strong nonlinearities and couplings, has provided access to parameter regimes in which returning to these exact quantum optics methods can provide valuable insights.

  17. Efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-07-01

    A major advantage in using Szegedy's formalism over discrete-time and continuous-time quantum walks lies in its ability to define a unitary quantum walk by quantizing a Markov chain on a directed or weighted graph. In this paper, we present a general scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits for Szegedy quantum walks that correspond to classical Markov chains possessing transformational symmetry in the columns of the transition matrix. In particular, the transformational symmetry criteria do not necessarily depend on the sparsity of the transition matrix, so this scheme can be applied to non-sparse Markov chains. Two classes of Markov chains that are amenable to this construction are cyclic permutations and complete bipartite graphs, for which we provide explicit efficient quantum circuit implementations. We also prove that our scheme can be applied to Markov chains formed by a tensor product. We also briefly discuss the implementation of Markov chains based on weighted interdependent networks. In addition, we apply this scheme to construct efficient quantum circuits simulating the Szegedy walks used in the quantum Pagerank algorithm for some classes of non-trivial graphs, providing a necessary tool for experimental demonstration of the quantum Pagerank algorithm.

  18. Quantum RLC circuits: Charge discreteness and resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utreras-Díaz, Constantino A.

    2008-10-01

    In a recent article [C.A. Utreras-Díaz, Phys. Lett. A 372 (2008) 5059], we have advanced a semiclassical theory of quantum circuits with discrete charge and electrical resistance. In this work, we present a few elementary applications of this theory. For the zero resistance inductive circuit, we obtain the Stark ladder energies in yet another way; for the circuit driven by a combination d.c. plus a.c. electromotive force (emf) we generalize earlier results by Chandía et al. [K. Chandía, J.C. Flores, E. Lazo, Phys. Lett. A 359 (2006) 693]. As a second application, we investigate the effect of electrical resistance and charge discreteness, in the resonance conditions of a series RLC quantum circuit.

  19. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits.

    PubMed

    Salmilehto, J; Deppe, F; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2017-02-14

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system.

  20. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-02-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system.

  1. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    PubMed Central

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2017-01-01

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. For realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methods to quantify memory retention in the system. PMID:28195193

  2. Typical Unpreparability of Quantum States with Quantum Circuit Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Mingxing

    2014-04-01

    The quantum entanglement is an interesting resource in quantum information processing, especially in measurement-based quantum computing. However, most quantum states may be too entangled to be prepared efficiently in terms of quantum circuit theory, in that high values of the geometric measure of entanglement preclude states from holding a polynomial quantum preparation circuit. We prove that this phenomenon experiences occurs in a dramatic majority of all states using a novel circuit tree-state correspondence. This work highlights new aspects of the roles both entanglement and quantum circuit theory play for quantum information processing.

  3. Prospects For Quantum Integrated Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bate, R. T.; Frazier, G. A.; Frensley, W. R.; Lee, J. W.; Reed, M. A.

    1987-08-01

    Recent progress in research on resonant tunneling diodes, and on lateral quantization effects in quantum wells renews hope for the development of active unipolar heterojunction devices which incorporate no depletion layers, and hence can be extremely compact in both vertical and lateral dimensions. If such devices meeting the fundamental requirements for ultrahigh density integrated circuits can be developed, and if revolutionary chip architectures which overcome current interconnection limitations can be devised, then a new generation of integrated circuits approaching the ultimate limits of functional density and functional throughput may eventually ensue. Although many of the most challenging problems in this scenario have not yet been addressed, progress is being made in the areas of fabrication and characterization of resonant tunneling devices, simulation of such devices using quantum transport theory, and simulation of nearest-neighbor connected (two-dimensional cellular automaton) architectures. This paper reviews the progress in these areas at Texas Instruments, and discusses the prospects for the future.

  4. Quantum Memristors with Superconducting Circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Salmilehto, J.; Deppe, F.; Di Ventra, M.; ...

    2017-02-14

    Memristors are resistive elements retaining information of their past dynamics. They have garnered substantial interest due to their potential for representing a paradigm change in electronics, information processing and unconventional computing. Given the advent of quantum technologies, a design for a quantum memristor with superconducting circuits may be envisaged. Along these lines, we introduce such a quantum device whose memristive behavior arises from quasiparticle-induced tunneling when supercurrents are cancelled. Here in this paper, for realistic parameters, we find that the relevant hysteretic behavior may be observed using current state-of-the-art measurements of the phase-driven tunneling current. Finally, we develop suitable methodsmore » to quantify memory retention in the system.« less

  5. Atemporal diagrams for quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Griffiths, Robert B.; Wu Shengjun; Yu Li; Cohen, Scott M.

    2006-05-15

    A system of diagrams is introduced that allows the representation of various elements of a quantum circuit, including measurements, in a form which makes no reference to time (hence 'atemporal'). It can be used to relate quantum dynamical properties to those of entangled states (map-state duality), and suggests useful analogies, such as the inverse of an entangled ket. Diagrams clarify the role of channel kets, transition operators, dynamical operators (matrices), and Kraus rank for noisy quantum channels. Positive (semidefinite) operators are represented by diagrams with a symmetry that aids in understanding their connection with completely positive maps. The diagrams are used to analyze standard teleportation and dense coding, and for a careful study of unambiguous (conclusive) teleportation. A simple diagrammatic argument shows that a Kraus rank of 3 is impossible for a one-qubit channel modeled using a one-qubit environment in a mixed state.

  6. Cavity State Reservoir Engineering in Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Eric T.

    Engineered quantum systems are poised to revolutionize information science in the near future. A persistent challenge in applied quantum technology is creating controllable, quantum interactions while preventing information loss to the environment, decoherence. In this thesis, we realize mesoscopic superconducting circuits whose macroscopic collective degrees of freedom, such as voltages and currents, behave quantum mechanically. We couple these mesoscopic devices to microwave cavities forming a cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) architecture comprised entirely of circuit elements. This application of cavity QED is dubbed Circuit QED and is an interdisciplinary field seated at the intersection of electrical engineering, superconductivity, quantum optics, and quantum information science. Two popular methods for taming active quantum systems in the presence of decoherence are discrete feedback conditioned on an ancillary system or quantum reservoir engineering. Quantum reservoir engineering maintains a desired subset of a Hilbert space through a combination of drives and designed entropy evacuation. Circuit QED provides a favorable platform for investigating quantum reservoir engineering proposals. A major advancement of this thesis is the development of a quantum reservoir engineering protocol which maintains the quantum state of a microwave cavity in the presence of decoherence. This thesis synthesizes strongly coupled, coherent devices whose solutions to its driven, dissipative Hamiltonian are predicted a priori. This work lays the foundation for future advancements in cavity centered quantum reservoir engineering protocols realizing hardware efficient circuit QED designs.

  7. Wire recycling for quantum circuit optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paler, Alexandru; Wille, Robert; Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum information processing is expressed using quantum bits (qubits) and quantum gates which are arranged in terms of quantum circuits. Here, each qubit is associated with a quantum circuit wire which is used to conduct the desired operations. Most of the existing quantum circuits allocate a single quantum circuit wire for each qubit and hence introduce significant overhead. In fact, qubits are usually not needed during the entire computation, only between their initialization and measurement. Before and after that, corresponding wires may be used by other qubits. In this work, we propose a solution which exploits this fact in order to optimize the design of quantum circuits with respect to the required wires. To this end, we introduce a representation of the lifetimes of all qubits which is used to analyze the respective need for wires. Based on this analysis, a method is proposed which "recycles" the available wires and, as a result, reduces the size of the resulting circuit. Numerical tests based on established reversible and fault-tolerant quantum circuits confirm that the proposed solution reduces the number of wires by more than 90% compared to unoptimized quantum circuits.

  8. Multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Teresa; Pfaff, Wolfgang; Wang, Chen; Chu, Yiwen; Frunzio, Luigi; Devoret, Michel H.; Schoelkopf, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    As experimental quantum information processing (QIP) rapidly advances, an emerging challenge is to design a scalable architecture that combines various quantum elements into a complex device without compromising their performance. In particular, superconducting quantum circuits have successfully demonstrated many of the requirements for quantum computing, including coherence levels that approach the thresholds for scaling. However, it remains challenging to couple a large number of circuit components through controllable channels while suppressing any other interactions. We propose a hardware platform intended to address these challenges, which combines the advantages of integrated circuit fabrication and the long coherence times achievable in three-dimensional circuit quantum electrodynamics. This multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuit platform provides a path towards the realisation of increasingly complex superconducting devices in pursuit of a scalable quantum computer.

  9. Towards hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, Jérémie J.; Delbecq, Matthieu R.; Bruhat, Laure E.; Dartiailh, Matthieu C.; Desjardins, Matthieu M.; Baillergeau, Matthieu; Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis

    2016-08-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics allows one to study the interaction between light and matter at the most elementary level. The methods developed in this field have taught us how to probe and manipulate individual quantum systems like atoms and superconducting quantum bits with an exquisite accuracy. There is now a strong effort to extend further these methods to other quantum systems, and in particular hybrid quantum dot circuits. This could turn out to be instrumental for a noninvasive study of quantum dot circuits and a realization of scalable spin quantum bit architectures. It could also provide an interesting platform for quantum simulation of simple fermion-boson condensed matter systems. In this short review, we discuss the experimental state of the art for hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics with quantum dots, and we present a simple theoretical modeling of experiments.

  10. Quantum information processing with superconducting circuits: a review.

    PubMed

    Wendin, G

    2017-10-01

    During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

  11. Quantum information processing with superconducting circuits: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendin, G.

    2017-10-01

    During the last ten years, superconducting circuits have passed from being interesting physical devices to becoming contenders for near-future useful and scalable quantum information processing (QIP). Advanced quantum simulation experiments have been shown with up to nine qubits, while a demonstration of quantum supremacy with fifty qubits is anticipated in just a few years. Quantum supremacy means that the quantum system can no longer be simulated by the most powerful classical supercomputers. Integrated classical-quantum computing systems are already emerging that can be used for software development and experimentation, even via web interfaces. Therefore, the time is ripe for describing some of the recent development of superconducting devices, systems and applications. As such, the discussion of superconducting qubits and circuits is limited to devices that are proven useful for current or near future applications. Consequently, the centre of interest is the practical applications of QIP, such as computation and simulation in Physics and Chemistry.

  12. Efficient quantum circuits for Toeplitz and Hankel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahasinghe, A.; Wang, J. B.

    2016-07-01

    Toeplitz and Hankel matrices have been a subject of intense interest in a wide range of science and engineering related applications. In this paper, we show that quantum circuits can efficiently implement sparse or Fourier-sparse Toeplitz and Hankel matrices. This provides an essential ingredient for solving many physical problems with Toeplitz or Hankel symmetry in the quantum setting with deterministic queries.

  13. Efficient quantum circuits for dense circulant and circulant like operators

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    Circulant matrices are an important family of operators, which have a wide range of applications in science and engineering-related fields. They are, in general, non-sparse and non-unitary. In this paper, we present efficient quantum circuits to implement circulant operators using fewer resources and with lower complexity than existing methods. Moreover, our quantum circuits can be readily extended to the implementation of Toeplitz, Hankel and block circulant matrices. Efficient quantum algorithms to implement the inverses and products of circulant operators are also provided, and an example application in solving the equation of motion for cyclic systems is discussed. PMID:28572988

  14. Efficient quantum circuits for dense circulant and circulant like operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, S. S.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-05-01

    Circulant matrices are an important family of operators, which have a wide range of applications in science and engineering-related fields. They are, in general, non-sparse and non-unitary. In this paper, we present efficient quantum circuits to implement circulant operators using fewer resources and with lower complexity than existing methods. Moreover, our quantum circuits can be readily extended to the implementation of Toeplitz, Hankel and block circulant matrices. Efficient quantum algorithms to implement the inverses and products of circulant operators are also provided, and an example application in solving the equation of motion for cyclic systems is discussed.

  15. Multimode circuit quantum electrodynamics with hybrid metamaterial transmission lines.

    PubMed

    Egger, D J; Wilhelm, F K

    2013-10-18

    Quantum transmission lines are central to superconducting and hybrid quantum computing. In this work we show how coupling them to a left-handed transmission line allows circuit QED to reach a new regime: multimode ultrastrong coupling. Out of the many potential applications of this novel device, we discuss the preparation of multipartite entangled states and the simulation of the spin-boson model where a quantum phase transition is reached up to finite size effects.

  16. Circuit design for multi-body interactions in superconducting quantum annealing systems with applications to a scalable architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chancellor, N.; Zohren, S.; Warburton, P. A.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum annealing provides a way of solving optimization problems by encoding them as Ising spin models which are implemented using physical qubits. The solution of the optimization problem then corresponds to the ground state of the system. Quantum tunneling is harnessed to enable the system to move to the ground state in a potentially high non-convex energy landscape. A major difficulty in encoding optimization problems in physical quantum annealing devices is the fact that many real world optimization problems require interactions of higher connectivity, as well as multi-body terms beyond the limitations of the physical hardware. In this work we address the question of how to implement multi-body interactions using hardware which natively only provides two-body interactions. The main result is an efficient circuit design of such multi-body terms using superconducting flux qubits in which effective N-body interactions are implemented using N ancilla qubits and only two inductive couplers. It is then shown how this circuit can be used as the unit cell of a scalable architecture by applying it to a recently proposed embedding technique for constructing an architecture of logical qubits with arbitrary connectivity using physical qubits which have nearest-neighbor four-body interactions. It is further shown that this design is robust to non-linear effects in the coupling loops, as well as mismatches in some of the circuit parameters.

  17. Local Random Quantum Circuits are Approximate Polynomial-Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.; Horodecki, Michał

    2016-09-01

    We prove that local random quantum circuits acting on n qubits composed of O( t 10 n 2) many nearest neighbor two-qubit gates form an approximate unitary t-design. Previously it was unknown whether random quantum circuits were a t-design for any t > 3. The proof is based on an interplay of techniques from quantum many-body theory, representation theory, and the theory of Markov chains. In particular we employ a result of Nachtergaele for lower bounding the spectral gap of frustration-free quantum local Hamiltonians; a quasi-orthogonality property of permutation matrices; a result of Oliveira which extends to the unitary group the path-coupling method for bounding the mixing time of random walks; and a result of Bourgain and Gamburd showing that dense subgroups of the special unitary group, composed of elements with algebraic entries, are ∞-copy tensor-product expanders. We also consider pseudo-randomness properties of local random quantum circuits of small depth and prove that circuits of depth O( t 10 n) constitute a quantum t-copy tensor-product expander. The proof also rests on techniques from quantum many-body theory, in particular on the detectability lemma of Aharonov, Arad, Landau, and Vazirani. We give applications of the results to cryptography, equilibration of closed quantum dynamics, and the generation of topological order. In particular we show the following pseudo-randomness property of generic quantum circuits: Almost every circuit U of size O( n k ) on n qubits cannot be distinguished from a Haar uniform unitary by circuits of size O( n ( k-9)/11) that are given oracle access to U.

  18. Quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmilehto, Juha; Sanz, Mikel; di Ventra, Massimiliano; Solano, Enrique

    Memristors, resistive elements that retain information of their past, have garnered interest due to their paradigm-changing potential in information processing and electronics. The emergent hysteretic behaviour allows for novel architectural applications and has recently been classically demonstrated in a simplified superconducting setup using the phase-dependent conductance in the tunnel-junction-microscopic model. In this contribution, we present a truly quantum model for a memristor constructed using established elements and techniques in superconducting nanoelectronics, and explore the parameters for feasible operation as well as refine the methods for quantifying the memory retention. In particular, the memristive behaviour is shown to arise from quasiparticle-induced tunneling in the full dissipative model and can be observed in the phase-driven tunneling current. The relevant hysteretic behaviour should be observable using current state-of-the-art measurements for detecting quasiparticle excitations. Our theoretical findings constitute the first quantum memristor in a superconducting circuit and act as the starting point for designing further circuit elements that have non-Markovian characteristics The authors acknowledge support from the CCQED EU project and the Finnish Cultural Foundation.

  19. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  20. Classical Ising model test for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Joseph; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2010-07-01

    We exploit a recently constructed mapping between quantum circuits and graphs in order to prove that circuits corresponding to certain planar graphs can be efficiently simulated classically. The proof uses an expression for the Ising model partition function in terms of quadratically signed weight enumerators (QWGTs), which are polynomials that arise naturally in an expansion of quantum circuits in terms of rotations involving Pauli matrices. We combine this expression with a known efficient classical algorithm for the Ising partition function of any planar graph in the absence of an external magnetic field, and the Robertson-Seymour theorem from graph theory. We give as an example a set of quantum circuits with a small number of non-nearest-neighbor gates which admit an efficient classical simulation.

  1. Numerical approach of the quantum circuit theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, J. J. B.; Duarte-Filho, G. C.; Almeida, F. A. G.

    2017-03-01

    In this paper we develop a numerical method based on the quantum circuit theory to approach the coherent electronic transport in a network of quantum dots connected with arbitrary topology. The algorithm was employed in a circuit formed by quantum dots connected each other in a shape of a linear chain (associations in series), and of a ring (associations in series, and in parallel). For both systems we compute two current observables: conductance and shot noise power. We find an excellent agreement between our numerical results and the ones found in the literature. Moreover, we analyze the algorithm efficiency for a chain of quantum dots, where the mean processing time exhibits a linear dependence with the number of quantum dots in the array.

  2. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A; Jeffrey, E; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions. PMID:26153660

  3. Digital quantum simulation of fermionic models with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; García-Álvarez, L.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Solano, E.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-07-01

    One of the key applications of quantum information is simulating nature. Fermions are ubiquitous in nature, appearing in condensed matter systems, chemistry and high energy physics. However, universally simulating their interactions is arguably one of the largest challenges, because of the difficulties arising from anticommutativity. Here we use digital methods to construct the required arbitrary interactions, and perform quantum simulation of up to four fermionic modes with a superconducting quantum circuit. We employ in excess of 300 quantum logic gates, and reach fidelities that are consistent with a simple model of uncorrelated errors. The presented approach is in principle scalable to a larger number of modes, and arbitrary spatial dimensions.

  4. Quantum fully homomorphic encryption scheme based on universal quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Min

    2015-08-01

    Fully homomorphic encryption enables arbitrary computation on encrypted data without decrypting the data. Here it is studied in the context of quantum information processing. Based on universal quantum circuit, we present a quantum fully homomorphic encryption (QFHE) scheme, which permits arbitrary quantum transformation on any encrypted data. The QFHE scheme is proved to be perfectly secure. In the scheme, the decryption key is different from the encryption key; however, the encryption key cannot be revealed. Moreover, the evaluation algorithm of the scheme is independent of the encryption key, so it is suitable for delegated quantum computing between two parties.

  5. One-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Chunwang; Han Yang; Chen Pingxing; Li Chengzu; Zhong Xiaojun

    2010-03-15

    In this Brief Report, we propose a potential scheme to implement one-way quantum computation with circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). Large cluster states of charge qubits can be generated in just one step with a superconducting transmission line resonator (TLR) playing the role of a dispersive coupler. A single-qubit measurement in the arbitrary basis can be implemented using a single electron transistor with the help of one-qubit gates. By examining the main decoherence sources, we show that circuit QED is a promising architecture for one-way quantum computation.

  6. Quantum circuits cannot control unknown operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Mateus; Feix, Adrien; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2014-09-01

    One of the essential building blocks of classical computer programs is the ‘if’ clause, which executes a subroutine depending on the value of a control variable. Similarly, several quantum algorithms rely on applying a unitary operation conditioned on the state of a control system. Here we show that this control cannot be performed by a quantum circuit if the unitary is completely unknown. The task remains impossible even if we allow the control to be done modulo a global phase. However, this no-go theorem does not prevent implementing quantum control of unknown unitaries in practice, as any physical implementation of an unknown unitary provides additional information that makes the control possible. We then argue that one should extend the quantum circuit formalism to capture this possibility in a straightforward way. This is done by allowing unknown unitaries to be applied to subspaces and not only to subsystems.

  7. Quantum circuits for qubit fusion

    DOE PAGES

    Moussa, Jonathan Edward

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we consider four-dimensional qudits as qubit pairs and their qudit Pauli operators as qubit Cli ord operators. This introduces a nesting, C21 C C42 C C23, where Cmn is the nth level of the m-dimensional qudit Cli ord hierarchy. If we can convert between logical qubits and qudits, then qudit Cli ord operators are qubit non-Cli ord operators. Conversion is achieved by qubit fusion and qudit fission using stabilizer circuits that consume a resource state. This resource is a fused qubit stabilizer state with a fault-tolerant state preparation using stabilizer circuits.

  8. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  9. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-18

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  10. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  11. Derandomizing Quantum Circuits with Measurement-Based Unitary Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, Peter S.; Markham, Damian

    2016-05-01

    Entangled multipartite states are resources for universal quantum computation, but they can also give rise to ensembles of unitary transformations, a topic usually studied in the context of random quantum circuits. Using several graph state techniques, we show that these resources can "derandomize" circuit results by sampling the same kinds of ensembles quantum mechanically, analogously to a quantum random number generator. Furthermore, we find simple examples that give rise to new ensembles whose statistical moments exactly match those of the uniformly random distribution over all unitaries up to order t , while foregoing adaptive feedforward entirely. Such ensembles—known as t designs—often cannot be distinguished from the "truly" random ensemble, and so they find use in many applications that require this implied notion of pseudorandomness.

  12. Quantum circuits for qubit fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Moussa, Jonathan Edward

    2015-12-01

    In this article, we consider four-dimensional qudits as qubit pairs and their qudit Pauli operators as qubit Cli ord operators. This introduces a nesting, C21 C C42 C C23, where Cmn is the nth level of the m-dimensional qudit Cli ord hierarchy. If we can convert between logical qubits and qudits, then qudit Cli ord operators are qubit non-Cli ord operators. Conversion is achieved by qubit fusion and qudit fission using stabilizer circuits that consume a resource state. This resource is a fused qubit stabilizer state with a fault-tolerant state preparation using stabilizer circuits.

  13. Quantum entanglement in circuit QED

    SciTech Connect

    Milburn, G. J.; Meaney, Charles

    2008-11-07

    We show that the ground state of a very strongly coupled two level system based on a superconducting island and a microwave cavity field can undergo a morphological change as the coupling strength is increased. This looks like a quantum phase transition and is characterized by the appearance of entanglement between the cavity field and the two level system.

  14. Photonic Integrated Circuits Based on Plasmonics and Quantum Dot Materials: Properties, Compensation of Optical Losses and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thylen, Lars

    2010-03-01

    Nanophotonics and plasmonics have received much attention recently, fuelled by a general interest in nanotechnology but also by rapid advances in integrated photonics, mainly brought about by using silicon, with larger refractive index difference than previously employed [L. Thylen et al, J. Zhejiang Univ. SCIENCE 2006 7(12)]. Plasmonics offers a possibility for devices with field sizes much smaller than the wavelength of light in aa host medium. But the tighter the field confinement, the greater are generally the optical losses, determined by the imaginary part of epsilon. This remains a critical issue. Dissipative losses impede the ubiquitous usefulness of nanophotonics light wave circuits. Recently, optical gain in quantum dots for reducing or compensate losses was analyzed [A Bratkovsky et al, Applied Physics Letters 93, 193106 (2008)]. However, the concomitant effects of the high (but not unreachable) gain required for this are high power dissipation and signal to noise ratio degradation. Power dissipation is primarily due to the losses of the metal structures and Auger recombination in the quantum dots. A general and square chip size independent expression for the information capacity of a lossless (by amplification) plasmonic chip is given, using the allowed values for integrated electronics power dissipation. In conclusion, with amplification and with current understanding, it appears possible to sizewise come close to CMOS dimensions for isolated integrated photonic devices, but not in integration density. This is due to power dissipation in currently employed negative epsilon materials.

  15. Improving the quantum cost of NCT-based reversible circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaser, Rasha; Younes, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2015-04-01

    We describe a scalable protocol for optimizing the quantum cost of the 3-bit reversible circuits built using NCT library. This technique takes into account a group theory approach. The algorithm analyzes the equivalent quantum circuits obtained by decomposing the reversible circuit to its elementary quantum gates and then applies optimization rules to reduce the number of the used elementary quantum gates. We apply the obtained algorithm using different quantum cost metrics that compare favorably with the relevant methods.

  16. Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit.

    PubMed

    Petersson, K D; McFaul, L W; Schroer, M D; Jung, M; Taylor, J M; Houck, A A; Petta, J R

    2012-10-18

    Electron spins trapped in quantum dots have been proposed as basic building blocks of a future quantum processor. Although fast, 180-picosecond, two-quantum-bit (two-qubit) operations can be realized using nearest-neighbour exchange coupling, a scalable, spin-based quantum computing architecture will almost certainly require long-range qubit interactions. Circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) allows spatially separated superconducting qubits to interact via a superconducting microwave cavity that acts as a 'quantum bus', making possible two-qubit entanglement and the implementation of simple quantum algorithms. Here we combine the cQED architecture with spin qubits by coupling an indium arsenide nanowire double quantum dot to a superconducting cavity. The architecture allows us to achieve a charge-cavity coupling rate of about 30 megahertz, consistent with coupling rates obtained in gallium arsenide quantum dots. Furthermore, the strong spin-orbit interaction of indium arsenide allows us to drive spin rotations electrically with a local gate electrode, and the charge-cavity interaction provides a measurement of the resulting spin dynamics. Our results demonstrate how the cQED architecture can be used as a sensitive probe of single-spin physics and that a spin-cavity coupling rate of about one megahertz is feasible, presenting the possibility of long-range spin coupling via superconducting microwave cavities.

  17. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian; GNS theory Group Team

    In between 2 metallic nanopads, adding identical and independent electron transfer paths in parallel increases the electronic effective coupling between the 2 nanopads through the quantum circuit defined by those paths. Measuring this increase of effective coupling using the tunnelling current intensity can lead for example for 2 paths in parallel to the now standard G =G1 +G2 + 2√{G1 .G2 } conductance superposition law (1). This is only valid for the tunnelling regime (2). For large electronic coupling to the nanopads (or at resonance), G can saturate and even decay as a function of the number of parallel paths added in the quantum circuit (3). We provide here the explanation of this phenomenon: the measurement of the effective Rabi oscillation frequency using the current intensity is constrained by the normalization principle of quantum mechanics. This limits the quantum conductance G for example to go when there is only one channel per metallic nanopads. This ef fect has important consequences for the design of Boolean logic gates at the atomic scale using atomic scale or intramolecular circuits. References: This has the financial support by European PAMS project.

  18. Towards quantum thermodynamics in electronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekola, Jukka P.

    2015-02-01

    Electronic circuits operating at sub-kelvin temperatures are attractive candidates for studying classical and quantum thermodynamics: their temperature can be controlled and measured locally with exquisite precision, and they allow experiments with large statistical samples. The availability and rapid development of devices such as quantum dots, single-electron boxes and superconducting qubits only enhance their appeal. But although these systems provide fertile ground for studying heat transport, entropy production and work in the context of quantum mechanics, the field remains in its infancy experimentally. Here, we review some recent experiments on quantum heat transport, fluctuation relations and implementations of Maxwell's demon, revealing the rich physics yet to be fully probed in these systems.

  19. Ultrafast quantum gates in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Romero, G; Ballester, D; Wang, Y M; Scarani, V; Solano, E

    2012-03-23

    We present a method to implement ultrafast two-qubit gates valid for the ultrastrong coupling and deep strong coupling regimes of light-matter interaction, considering state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics technology. Our proposal includes a suitable qubit architecture and is based on a four-step sequential displacement of the intracavity field, operating at a time proportional to the inverse of the resonator frequency. Through ab initio calculations, we show that these quantum gates can be performed at subnanosecond time scales while keeping a fidelity above 99%.

  20. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Strong Measurement Regime of Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053031 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053031 PAPER Quantum Zeno effect in the strongmeasurement regime of circuit quantum ...Keywords: quantumZeno effect, quantum jumps, superconducting qubit, circuit QED, random telegraph signals Abstract Weobserve the quantumZeno effect...where the act ofmeasurement slows the rate of quantum state transitions—in a superconducting qubit using linear circuit quantum electrodynamics readout

  1. Cutoff-Free Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Petrescu, Alexandru; Türeci, Hakan E

    2017-08-18

    Any quantum-confined electronic system coupled to the electromagnetic continuum is subject to radiative decay and renormalization of its energy levels. When coupled to a cavity, these quantities can be strongly modified with respect to their values in vacuum. Generally, this modification can be accurately captured by including only the closest resonant mode of the cavity. In the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, it is, however, found that the radiative decay rates are strongly influenced by far off-resonant modes. A multimode calculation accounting for the infinite set of cavity modes leads to divergences unless a cutoff is imposed. It has so far not been identified what the source of divergence is. We show here that unless gauge invariance is respected, any attempt at the calculation of circuit QED quantities is bound to diverge. We then present a theoretical approach to the calculation of a finite spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift that is free of cutoff.

  2. Cutoff-Free Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekakhlagh, Moein; Petrescu, Alexandru; Türeci, Hakan E.

    2017-08-01

    Any quantum-confined electronic system coupled to the electromagnetic continuum is subject to radiative decay and renormalization of its energy levels. When coupled to a cavity, these quantities can be strongly modified with respect to their values in vacuum. Generally, this modification can be accurately captured by including only the closest resonant mode of the cavity. In the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture, it is, however, found that the radiative decay rates are strongly influenced by far off-resonant modes. A multimode calculation accounting for the infinite set of cavity modes leads to divergences unless a cutoff is imposed. It has so far not been identified what the source of divergence is. We show here that unless gauge invariance is respected, any attempt at the calculation of circuit QED quantities is bound to diverge. We then present a theoretical approach to the calculation of a finite spontaneous emission rate and the Lamb shift that is free of cutoff.

  3. Nonequilibrium Quantum Simulation in Circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, James John

    Superconducting circuits have become a leading architecture for quantum computing and quantum simulation. In particular, the circuit QED framework leverages high coherence qubits and microwave resonators to construct systems realizing quantum optics models with exquisite precision. For example, the Jaynes-Cummings model has been the focus of significant theoretical interest as a means of generating photon-photon interactions. Lattices of such strongly correlated photons are an exciting new test bed for exploring non-equilibrium condensed matter physics such as dissipative phase transitions of light. This thesis covers a series of experiments which establish circuit QED as a powerful tool for exploring condensed matter physics with photons. The first experiment explores the use of ultra high speed arbitrary waveform generators for the direct digital synthesis of complex microwave waveforms. This new technique dramatically simplifies the classical control chain for quantum experiments and enables high bandwidth driving schemes expected to be essential for generating interesting steady-states and dynamical behavior. The last two experiments explore the rich physics of interacting photons, with an emphasis on small systems where a high degree of control is possible. The first experiment realizes a two-site system called the Jaynes-Cummings dimer, which undergoes a self-trapping transition where the strong photon-photon interactions block photon hopping between sites. The observation of this dynamical phase transition and the related dissipation-induced transition are key results of this thesis. The final experiment augments the Jaynes-Cummings dimer by redesigning the circuit to include in-situ control over photon hopping between sites using a tunable coupler. This enables the study of the dimer's localization transition in the steady-state regime.

  4. Dynamic programming algorithms as quantum circuits: symmetric function realization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Dmitri A.

    2004-08-01

    The work starts with a general idea of how to realize a dynamic programming algorithm as a quantum circuit. This realization is not tied to a specific design model, technology or a class of dynamic algorithms, it shows an approach for such synthesis. As an illustration of the efficiency of this approach, the class of all multiple-output symmetric functions is realized in a dynamic programming algorithm manner as a reversible circuit of Toffoli type elements (NOT, CNOT, and Toffoli gates). The garbage and quantum cost (found based on Barenco et al. paper) of the presented implementation are calculated and compared to the costs of previously described reversible synthesis methods. The summary of results of this comparison is as follows. The quantum cost of the proposed method is less than the quantum cost of any other reported systematic approach. The garbage is usually lower, except for comparison with the synthesis methods, whose primary goal is synthesis with theoretically minimal garbage. The presented algorithm application to the symmetric function synthesis results in circuits suitable for quantum technology realizations.

  5. Atomic scale quantum circuits in Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusko, A.; Korkusinski, M.; Saraiva, A.; Delgado, A.; Koiller, B.; Hawrylak, P.

    The atomic scale circuits in Si are now realized by manipulation of dangling bonds on Si surface or incorporating dopant atoms in Si by STM techniques. We describe the electronic properties of these atomic scale quantum dot circuits (QDC) by the extended Hubbard-Kanamori Hamiltonian (HK), including on site Coulomb repulsion (U) and interdot hopping (t) , direct interaction (V) and exchange (J) terms. The interdot terms strongly depend on dopant position (RD) in Si lattice--small changes in RD strongly impact t, Vand J. We study how disorder in RD impacts QDC electronic properties, in particular the interplay of disorder and interactions. With no disorder in RD the energy spectrum (ES) of quantum dot chain at half-filling as a function of U / t (V , J = 0) shows a transition from ES dominated by kinetic energy (U / t < < 1) to ES dominated by Coulomb interactions for U / t > > 1 . The excited states group by single particle energy spacing (Hubbard bands) for weak (strong) interactions. In the weak interaction regime, disorder leads to localization, which strongly affects the electronic properties. We explore the effect of interactions and disorder on HK atomic scale circuits and potential many-body localized phases using Lanczos and Density Matrix Renormalization Group approaches.

  6. A method of extracting operating parameters of a quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sete, Eyob A.; Block, Maxwell; Scheer, Michael; Zanoci, Cris; Vahidpour, Mehrnoosh; Thompson, Dane; Rigetti, Chad

    Rigorous simulation-driven design methods are an essential component of traditional integrated circuit design. We adapt these techniques to the design and development of superconducting quantum integrated circuits by combining classical finite element analysis in the microwave domain with Brune circuit synthesis by Solgun [PhD thesis 2014] and BKD Hamiltonian analysis by Burkard et al. [Phys. Rev. B 69, 064503 (2004)]. Using the Hamiltonian of the quantum circuit, constructed using the synthesized equivalent linear circuit and the nonlinear Josephson junctions' contributions, we extract operating parameters of the quantum circuit such as resonance coupling strength, dispersive shift, qubit anharmonicitiy, and decoherence rates for single-and multi-port quantum circuits. This approach has been experimentally validated and allows the closed-loop iterative simulation-driven development of quantum information processing devices.

  7. Entropy Flow in Near-Critical Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2017-05-01

    Near-critical quantum circuits close to equilibrium are ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers, because their low energy collective excitations evolve reversibly, effectively isolated from microscopic environmental fluctuations by the renormalization group. Entropy flows in near-critical quantum circuits near equilibrium as a locally conserved quantum current, obeying circuit laws analogous to the electric circuit laws. These "Kirchhoff laws" for entropy flow are the fundamental design constraints for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers. A quantum circuit made from a near-critical system (of conventional type) is described by a relativistic 1+1 dimensional relativistic quantum field theory on the circuit. The quantum entropy current near equilibrium is just the energy current divided by the temperature. The universal properties of the energy-momentum tensor constrain the entropy flow characteristics of the circuit components: the entropic conductivity of the quantum wires and the entropic admittance of the quantum circuit junctions. For example, near-critical quantum wires are always resistanceless inductors for entropy. A universal formula is derived for the entropic conductivity: σ S(ω ) = iv2 S/ω T , where ω is the frequency, T the temperature, S the equilibrium entropy density and v the velocity of "light". The thermal conductivity is Re(Tσ S(ω ))=π v2 S δ (ω ). The thermal Drude weight is, universally, v2S. This gives a way to measure the entropy density directly.

  8. Entropy Flow in Near-Critical Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedan, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Near-critical quantum circuits close to equilibrium are ideal physical systems for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers, because their low energy collective excitations evolve reversibly, effectively isolated from microscopic environmental fluctuations by the renormalization group. Entropy flows in near-critical quantum circuits near equilibrium as a locally conserved quantum current, obeying circuit laws analogous to the electric circuit laws. These "Kirchhoff laws" for entropy flow are the fundamental design constraints for asymptotically large-scale quantum computers. A quantum circuit made from a near-critical system (of conventional type) is described by a relativistic 1+1 dimensional relativistic quantum field theory on the circuit. The quantum entropy current near equilibrium is just the energy current divided by the temperature. The universal properties of the energy-momentum tensor constrain the entropy flow characteristics of the circuit components: the entropic conductivity of the quantum wires and the entropic admittance of the quantum circuit junctions. For example, near-critical quantum wires are always resistanceless inductors for entropy. A universal formula is derived for the entropic conductivity: σ S(ω ) = iv2 S/ω T , where ω is the frequency, T the temperature, {S the equilibrium entropy density and v the velocity of "light". The thermal conductivity is Re(Tσ S(ω ))=π v2 S δ (ω ) . The thermal Drude weight is, universally, v2S . This gives a way to measure the entropy density directly.

  9. Hybrid circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with a micromechanical resonator.

    PubMed

    Pirkkalainen, J-M; Cho, S U; Li, Jian; Paraoanu, G S; Hakonen, P J; Sillanpää, M A

    2013-02-14

    Hybrid quantum systems with inherently distinct degrees of freedom have a key role in many physical phenomena. Well-known examples include cavity quantum electrodynamics, trapped ions, and electrons and phonons in the solid state. In those systems, strong coupling makes the constituents lose their individual character and form dressed states, which represent a collective form of dynamics. As well as having fundamental importance, hybrid systems also have practical applications, notably in the emerging field of quantum information control. A promising approach is to combine long-lived atomic states with the accessible electrical degrees of freedom in superconducting cavities and quantum bits (qubits). Here we integrate circuit cavity quantum electrodynamics with phonons. Apart from coupling to a microwave cavity, our superconducting transmon qubit, consisting of tunnel junctions and a capacitor, interacts with a phonon mode in a micromechanical resonator, and thus acts like an atom coupled to two different cavities. We measure the phonon Stark shift, as well as the splitting of the qubit spectral line into motional sidebands, which feature transitions between the dressed electromechanical states. In the time domain, we observe coherent conversion of qubit excitation to phonons as sideband Rabi oscillations. This is a model system with potential for a quantum interface, which may allow for storage of quantum information in long-lived phonon states, coupling to optical photons or for investigations of strongly coupled quantum systems near the classical limit.

  10. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  11. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Heras, U. Las; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-06-01

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  12. Selective Processing Techniques for Electronics and Opto-Electronic Applications: Quantum-Well Devices and Integrated Optic Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-10

    new technology is to have sufficient control of processing to *- describable by an appropriate elecromagnetic model . build useful devices. For example...3. W aveguide Modulators .................................. 7 B. Integrated Optical Device and Circuit Modeling ... ................... .. 10 C...following categories: A. Integrated Optical Devices and Technology B. Integrated Optical Device and Circuit Modeling C. Cryogenic Etching for Low

  13. Hybrid quantum circuit with implanted erbium ions

    SciTech Connect

    Probst, S.; Rotzinger, H.; Tkalčec, A.; Kukharchyk, N.; Wieck, A. D.; Wünsch, S.; Siegel, M.; Ustinov, A. V.; Bushev, P. A.

    2014-10-20

    We report on hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics experiments with focused ion beam implanted Er{sup 3+} ions in Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} coupled to an array of superconducting lumped element microwave resonators. The Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} crystal is divided into several areas with distinct erbium doping concentrations, each coupled to a separate resonator. The coupling strength is varied from 5 MHz to 18.7 MHz, while the linewidth ranges between 50 MHz and 130 MHz. We confirm the paramagnetic properties of the implanted spin ensemble by evaluating the temperature dependence of the coupling. The efficiency of the implantation process is analyzed and the results are compared to a bulk doped Er:Y{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} sample. We demonstrate the integration of these engineered erbium spin ensembles with superconducting circuits.

  14. Universal programmable quantum circuit schemes to emulate an operator.

    PubMed

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kollias, Giorgos; Kais, Sabre

    2012-12-21

    Unlike fixed designs, programmable circuit designs support an infinite number of operators. The functionality of a programmable circuit can be altered by simply changing the angle values of the rotation gates in the circuit. Here, we present a new quantum circuit design technique resulting in two general programmable circuit schemes. The circuit schemes can be used to simulate any given operator by setting the angle values in the circuit. This provides a fixed circuit design whose angles are determined from the elements of the given matrix-which can be non-unitary-in an efficient way. We also give both the classical and quantum complexity analysis for these circuits and show that the circuits require a few classical computations. For the electronic structure simulation on a quantum computer, one has to perform the following steps: prepare the initial wave function of the system; present the evolution operator U = e(-iHt) for a given atomic and molecular Hamiltonian H in terms of quantum gates array and apply the phase estimation algorithm to find the energy eigenvalues. Thus, in the circuit model of quantum computing for quantum chemistry, a crucial step is presenting the evolution operator for the atomic and molecular Hamiltonians in terms of quantum gate arrays. Since the presented circuit designs are independent from the matrix decomposition techniques and the global optimization processes used to find quantum circuits for a given operator, high accuracy simulations can be done for the unitary propagators of molecular Hamiltonians on quantum computers. As an example, we show how to build the circuit design for the hydrogen molecule.

  15. Circuit quantum electrodynamics with a spin qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersson, Karl

    2013-03-01

    Electron spins in quantum dots have been proposed as the building blocks of a quantum information processor. While both fast one and two qubit operations have been demonstrated, coupling distant spins remains a daunting challenge. In contrast, circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED) has enabled superconducting qubits to be readily coupled over large distances via a superconducting microwave cavity. I will present our recent work aimed at integrating spin qubits with the cQED architecture.[2] Our approach is to use spin qubits formed in strong spin-orbit materials such as InAs nanowires to enable a large effective coupling of the spin to the microwave cavity field. For an InAs nanowire double quantum dot coupled to the superconducting microwave cavity we achieve a charge-cavity coupling rate of ~ 30 MHz. Combining this large charge-cavity coupling rate with electrically driven spin qubit rotations we demonstrate that the cQED architecture can be used a sensitive probe of single spin dynamics. In another experiment, we can apply a source-drain bias to drive current through the double quantum dot and observe gain in the cavity transmission. We additionally measure photon emission from the cavity without any input field applied. Our results suggest that long-range spin coupling via superconducting microwave cavities is feasible and present new avenues for exploring quantum optics on a chip. Research was performed in collaboration with Will McFaul, Michael Schroer, Minkyung Jung, Jake Taylor, Andrew Houck and Jason Petta. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, Army Research Office, and DARPA QuEST.

  16. An efficient quantum circuit analyser on qubits and qudits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J. B.

    2011-10-01

    This paper presents a highly efficient decomposition scheme and its associated Mathematica notebook for the analysis of complicated quantum circuits comprised of single/multiple qubit and qudit quantum gates. In particular, this scheme reduces the evaluation of multiple unitary gate operations with many conditionals to just two matrix additions, regardless of the number of conditionals or gate dimensions. This improves significantly the capability of a quantum circuit analyser implemented in a classical computer. This is also the first efficient quantum circuit analyser to include qudit quantum logic gates.

  17. Quantum Correlation in Circuit QED Under Various Dissipative Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying-Hua, Ji; Yong-Mei, Liu

    2017-02-01

    Dynamical evolutions of quantum correlations in circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit-QED) are investigated under various dissipative modes. The influences of photon number, coupling strength, detuning and relative phase angle on quantum entanglement and quantum discord are compared as well. The results show that quantum discord may be less robust to decoherence than quantum entanglement since the death and revival also appears. Under certain dissipative mode, the decoherence subspace can be formed in circuit-QED due to the cooperative action of vacuum field. Whether a decoherence subspace can be formed not only depends on the form of quantum system but also relates closely to the dissipative mode of environment. One can manipulate decoherence through manipulating the correlation between environments, but the effect depends on the choice of initial quantum states and dissipative modes. Furthermore, we find that proper relative phase of initial quantum state provides one means of suppressing decoherence.

  18. Realization of Microwave Quantum Circuits Using Hybrid Superconducting-Semiconducting Nanowire Josephson Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lange, G.; van Heck, B.; Bruno, A.; van Woerkom, D. J.; Geresdi, A.; Plissard, S. R.; Bakkers, E. P. A. M.; Akhmerov, A. R.; DiCarlo, L.

    2015-09-01

    We report the realization of quantum microwave circuits using hybrid superconductor-semiconductor Josephson elements comprised of InAs nanowires contacted by NbTiN. Capacitively shunted single elements behave as transmon circuits with electrically tunable transition frequencies. Two-element circuits also exhibit transmonlike behavior near zero applied flux but behave as flux qubits at half the flux quantum, where nonsinusoidal current-phase relations in the elements produce a double-well Josephson potential. These hybrid Josephson elements are promising for applications requiring microwave superconducting circuits operating in a magnetic field.

  19. Novel Quaternary Quantum Decoder, Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghparast, Majid; Monfared, Asma Taheri

    2017-05-01

    Multiple valued logic is a promising approach to reduce the width of the reversible or quantum circuits, moreover, quaternary logic is considered as being a good choice for future quantum computing technology hence it is very suitable for the encoded realization of binary logic functions through its grouping of 2-bits together into quaternary values. The Quaternary decoder, multiplexer, and demultiplexer are essential units of quaternary digital systems. In this paper, we have initially designed a quantum realization of the quaternary decoder circuit using quaternary 1-qudit gates and quaternary Muthukrishnan-Stroud gates. Then we have presented quantum realization of quaternary multiplexer and demultiplexer circuits using the constructed quaternary decoder circuit and quaternary controlled Feynman gates. The suggested circuits in this paper have a lower quantum cost and hardware complexity than the existing designs that are currently used in quaternary digital systems. All the scales applied in this paper are based on Nanometric area.

  20. Novel Quaternary Quantum Decoder, Multiplexer and Demultiplexer Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haghparast, Majid; Monfared, Asma Taheri

    2017-02-01

    Multiple valued logic is a promising approach to reduce the width of the reversible or quantum circuits, moreover, quaternary logic is considered as being a good choice for future quantum computing technology hence it is very suitable for the encoded realization of binary logic functions through its grouping of 2-bits together into quaternary values. The Quaternary decoder, multiplexer, and demultiplexer are essential units of quaternary digital systems. In this paper, we have initially designed a quantum realization of the quaternary decoder circuit using quaternary 1-qudit gates and quaternary Muthukrishnan-Stroud gates. Then we have presented quantum realization of quaternary multiplexer and demultiplexer circuits using the constructed quaternary decoder circuit and quaternary controlled Feynman gates. The suggested circuits in this paper have a lower quantum cost and hardware complexity than the existing designs that are currently used in quaternary digital systems. All the scales applied in this paper are based on Nanometric area.

  1. Quantum circuit design for accurate simulation of qudit channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Sanders, Barry C.

    2015-04-01

    We construct a classical algorithm that designs quantum circuits for algorithmic quantum simulation of arbitrary qudit channels on fault-tolerant quantum computers within a pre-specified error tolerance with respect to diamond-norm distance. The classical algorithm is constructed by decomposing a quantum channel into a convex combination of generalized extreme channels by convex optimization of a set of nonlinear coupled algebraïc equations. The resultant circuit is a randomly chosen generalized extreme channel circuit whose run-time is logarithmic with respect to the error tolerance and quadratic with respect to Hilbert space dimension, which requires only a single ancillary qudit plus classical dits.

  2. Quantum game simulator, using the circuit model of quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, Panagiotis; Karafyllidis, Ioannis G.

    2009-10-01

    We present a general two-player quantum game simulator that can simulate any two-player quantum game described by a 2×2 payoff matrix (two strategy games).The user can determine the payoff matrices for both players, their strategies and the amount of entanglement between their initial strategies. The outputs of the simulator are the expected payoffs of each player as a function of the other player's strategy parameters and the amount of entanglement. The simulator also produces contour plots that divide the strategy spaces of the game in regions in which players can get larger payoffs if they choose to use a quantum strategy against any classical one. We also apply the simulator to two well-known quantum games, the Battle of Sexes and the Chicken game. Program summaryProgram title: Quantum Game Simulator (QGS) Catalogue identifier: AEED_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEED_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3416 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 583 553 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Matlab R2008a (C) Computer: Any computer that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Operating system: Any system that can sufficiently run Matlab R2008a Classification: 4.15 Nature of problem: Simulation of two player quantum games described by a payoff matrix. Solution method: The program calculates the matrices that comprise the Eisert setup for quantum games based on the quantum circuit model. There are 5 parameters that can be altered. We define 3 of them as constant. We play the quantum game for all possible values for the other 2 parameters and store the results in a matrix. Unusual features: The software provides an easy way of simulating any two-player quantum games. Running time: Approximately

  3. Quantum Circuit Synthesis using a New Quantum Logic Gate Library of NCV Quantum Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sai; Song, Xiaoyu; Perkowski, Marek; Chen, Hanwu; Zhu, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Since Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT (CV, CV‡) gates are not permutative quantum gates, many existing methods cannot effectively synthesize optimal 3-qubit circuits directly using the NOT, CNOT, Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT quantum gate library (NCV), and the key of effective methods is the mapping of NCV gates to four-valued quantum gates. Firstly, we use NCV gates to create the new quantum logic gate library, which can be directly used to get the solutions with smaller quantum costs efficiently. Further, we present a novel generic method which quickly and directly constructs this new optimal quantum logic gate library using CNOT and Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT gates. Finally, we present several encouraging experiments using these new permutative gates, and give a careful analysis of the method, which introduces a new idea to quantum circuit synthesis.

  4. Quantum Circuit Synthesis using a New Quantum Logic Gate Library of NCV Quantum Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Chen, Sai; Song, Xiaoyu; Perkowski, Marek; Chen, Hanwu; Zhu, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Since Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT (CV, CV‡) gates are not permutative quantum gates, many existing methods cannot effectively synthesize optimal 3-qubit circuits directly using the NOT, CNOT, Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT quantum gate library (NCV), and the key of effective methods is the mapping of NCV gates to four-valued quantum gates. Firstly, we use NCV gates to create the new quantum logic gate library, which can be directly used to get the solutions with smaller quantum costs efficiently. Further, we present a novel generic method which quickly and directly constructs this new optimal quantum logic gate library using CNOT and Controlled-Square-Root-of-NOT gates. Finally, we present several encouraging experiments using these new permutative gates, and give a careful analysis of the method, which introduces a new idea to quantum circuit synthesis.

  5. Quantum Circuit Realization of the Bilinear Interpolation Method for GQIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ri-Gui; Liu, Xingao; Luo, Jia

    2017-09-01

    Quantum image scaling which is significant for advanced quantum image processing is the important branch of the quantum image processing. This paper proposes the quantum algorithm to scale up and scale down quantum images based on bilinear interpolation with integer scaling ratio. First of all the generalized quantum image representation which has been proposed is used to represent a quantum image with arbitrary size H × W. Then, the bilinear interpolation is used to create new pixels in the enlarged images. Based on them, the corresponding circuits of quantum image scaling algorithm are proposed.

  6. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  7. Quantum-information processing with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blais, Alexandre; Gambetta, Jay; Wallraff, A.; Schuster, D. I.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2007-03-01

    We theoretically study single and two-qubit dynamics in the circuit QED architecture. We focus on the current experimental design [Wallraff , Nature (London) 431, 162 (2004); Schuster , Nature (London) 445, 515 (2007)] in which superconducting charge qubits are capacitively coupled to a single high- Q superconducting coplanar resonator. In this system, logical gates are realized by driving the resonator with microwave fields. Advantages of this architecture are that it allows for multiqubit gates between non-nearest qubits and for the realization of gates in parallel, opening the possibility of fault-tolerant quantum computation with superconduting circuits. In this paper, we focus on one- and two-qubit gates that do not require moving away from the charge-degeneracy “sweet spot.” This is advantageous as it helps to increase the qubit dephasing time and does not require modification of the original circuit QED. However, these gates can, in some cases, be slower than those that do not use this constraint. Five types of two-qubit gates are discussed, these include gates based on virtual photons, real excitation of the resonator, and a gate based on the geometric phase. We also point out the importance of selection rules when working at the charge degeneracy point.

  8. Mapping of topological quantum circuits to physical hardware.

    PubMed

    Paler, Alexandru; Devitt, Simon J; Nemoto, Kae; Polian, Ilia

    2014-04-11

    Topological quantum computation is a promising technique to achieve large-scale, error-corrected computation. Quantum hardware is used to create a large, 3-dimensional lattice of entangled qubits while performing computation requires strategic measurement in accordance with a topological circuit specification. The specification is a geometric structure that defines encoded information and fault-tolerant operations. The compilation of a topological circuit is one important aspect of programming a quantum computer, another is the mapping of the topological circuit into the operations performed by the hardware. Each qubit has to be controlled, and measurement results are needed to propagate encoded quantum information from input to output. In this work, we introduce an algorithm for mapping an topological circuit to the operations needed by the physical hardware. We determine the control commands for each qubit in the computer and the relevant measurements that are needed to track information as it moves through the circuit.

  9. Improved Classical Simulation of Quantum Circuits Dominated by Clifford Gates.

    PubMed

    Bravyi, Sergey; Gosset, David

    2016-06-24

    We present a new algorithm for classical simulation of quantum circuits over the Clifford+T gate set. The runtime of the algorithm is polynomial in the number of qubits and the number of Clifford gates in the circuit but exponential in the number of T gates. The exponential scaling is sufficiently mild that the algorithm can be used in practice to simulate medium-sized quantum circuits dominated by Clifford gates. The first demonstrations of fault-tolerant quantum circuits based on 2D topological codes are likely to be dominated by Clifford gates due to a high implementation cost associated with logical T gates. Thus our algorithm may serve as a verification tool for near-term quantum computers which cannot in practice be simulated by other means. To demonstrate the power of the new method, we performed a classical simulation of a hidden shift quantum algorithm with 40 qubits, a few hundred Clifford gates, and nearly 50 T gates.

  10. Quantum computing with Josephson junction circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huizhong

    This work concerns the study of Josephson junction circuits in the context of their usability for quantum computing. The zero-voltage state of a current-biased Josephson junction has a set of metastable quantum energy levels. If a junction is well isolated from its environment, it will be possible to use the two lowest states as a qubit in a quantum computer. I first examine the meaning of isolation theoretically. Using a master equation, I analyzed the effect of dissipation on escape rates and suggested a simple method, population depletion technique, to measure the relaxation time (T1). Using a stochastic Bloch equation to analyze the dependence of microwave resonance peak width on current noise, I found decoherence due to current noise depends on the noise spectrum. For high frequency noise with a cutoff frequency fc much larger than 1/T1, I found decoherence due to noise can be described by a dephasing rate that is proportional to the noise spectral density. However, for low frequency noise such that its cutoff frequency fc is much smaller than 1/T 1, decoherence due to noise depends on the total rms current noise. I then analyze and test a few qubit isolation schemes, including resistive isolation, inductor-capacitor (LC) isolation, half-wavelength resonant isolation and inductor-junction (LJ) isolation. I found the resistive isolation scheme has a severe heating problem. Macroscopic quantum tunneling and energy level quantization were observed in the LC isolated Nb/AlOx/Nb and AL/ALOx/Al junction qubits at 25 mK. Relaxation times of 4--12 ns and spectroscopic coherence times of 1--3 ns were obtained for these LC isolated qubits. I found the half-wavelength isolated junction qubit has a relaxation time of about 20 ns measured by the population-depletion techniques, but no energy levels were observed in this qubit. Experimental results suggest the LJ isolated qubit has a longer relaxation and coherence times than all my previously examined samples. Using a

  11. Fully integrated quantum photonic circuit with an electrically driven light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khasminskaya, Svetlana; Pyatkov, Felix; Słowik, Karolina; Ferrari, Simone; Kahl, Oliver; Kovalyuk, Vadim; Rath, Patrik; Vetter, Andreas; Hennrich, Frank; Kappes, Manfred M.; Gol'Tsman, G.; Korneev, A.; Rockstuhl, Carsten; Krupke, Ralph; Pernice, Wolfram H. P.

    2016-11-01

    Photonic quantum technologies allow quantum phenomena to be exploited in applications such as quantum cryptography, quantum simulation and quantum computation. A key requirement for practical devices is the scalable integration of single-photon sources, detectors and linear optical elements on a common platform. Nanophotonic circuits enable the realization of complex linear optical systems, while non-classical light can be measured with waveguide-integrated detectors. However, reproducible single-photon sources with high brightness and compatibility with photonic devices remain elusive for fully integrated systems. Here, we report the observation of antibunching in the light emitted from an electrically driven carbon nanotube embedded within a photonic quantum circuit. Non-classical light generated on chip is recorded under cryogenic conditions with waveguide-integrated superconducting single-photon detectors, without requiring optical filtering. Because exclusively scalable fabrication and deposition methods are used, our results establish carbon nanotubes as promising nanoscale single-photon emitters for hybrid quantum photonic devices.

  12. Maxwell's Demon Assisted Thermodynamic Cycle in Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, H. T.; Wang, Y. D.; Liu, Yu-Xi; Sun, C. P.; Nori, Franco

    2006-11-01

    We study a new quantum heat engine (QHE), which is assisted by a Maxwell’s demon. The QHE requires three steps: thermalization, quantum measurement, and quantum feedback controlled by the Maxwell demon. We derive the positive-work condition and operation efficiency of this composite QHE. Using controllable superconducting quantum circuits as an example, we show how to construct our QHE. The essential role of the demon is explicitly demonstrated in this macroscopic QHE.

  13. Floating point representations in quantum circuit synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Kliuchnikov, Vadym

    2013-09-01

    We provide a non-deterministic quantum protocol that approximates the single qubit rotations Rx(2ϕ21ϕ22) using Rx(2ϕ1) and Rx(2ϕ2) and a constant number of Clifford and T operations. We then use this method to construct a ‘floating point’ implementation of a small rotation wherein we use the aforementioned method to construct the exponent part of the rotation and also to combine it with a mantissa. This causes the cost of the synthesis to depend more strongly on the relative (rather than absolute) precision required. We analyze the mean and variance of the T-count required to use our techniques and provide new lower bounds for the T-count for ancilla free synthesis of small single-qubit axial rotations. We further show that our techniques can use ancillas to beat these lower bounds with high probability. We also discuss the T-depth of our method and see that the vast majority of the cost of the resultant circuits can be shifted to parallel computation paths.

  14. Quantum interface between an electrical circuit and a single atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, David; Kafri, D.; Woolley, M. J.; Milburn, G. J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2012-06-01

    We show how to bridge the divide between atomic systems and electronic devices by engineering a coupling between the motion of a single ion and the quantised electric field of a resonant circuit. The coupling uses parametric modulation of the circuit capacitance by a MEMS device to bridge the gap in timescales between the ion motion and circuit frequency. Our method can be used to couple the internal state of an ion to the quantised circuit with the same speed as the internal-state coupling between two ions. The parametric driving of the coupling adds negligible decoherence to the system. All the well-known quantum information protocols linking ion internal and motional states can be converted to protocols between circuit photons and ion internal states. Our results enable quantum interfaces between solid state qubits, atomic qubits, and light, and lay the groundwork for a direct quantum connection between electrical and atomic metrology standards.

  15. Quantum circuit for optimal eavesdropping in quantum key distribution using phase-time coding

    SciTech Connect

    Kronberg, D. A.; Molotkov, S. N.

    2010-07-15

    A quantum circuit is constructed for optimal eavesdropping on quantum key distribution proto- cols using phase-time coding, and its physical implementation based on linear and nonlinear fiber-optic components is proposed.

  16. Integrated acoustooptic circuits and applications.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C S

    1992-01-01

    The recent development of titanium-indiffusion proton-exchange (TIPE) microlenses and lens arrays has made possible the construction of a variety of single- and multichannel integrated acoustooptic (AO) and acoustooptic-electrooptic (EO) circuits in LiNbO(3) channel-planar waveguides 0.1x1.0x2.0 cm(3) in size. These hybrid AO and AO-EO circuits can be fabricated through compatible and well-established technologies. The most recent realization of ion-milled microlenses and lens arrays together with the recent development of gigahertz AO Bragg modulators and EO Bragg modulator arrays have also paved the way for construction of similar but monolithic AO and AO-EO GaAs/GaAlAs waveguides of comparable size. Both types of integrated AO and AO-EO circuits suggest versatile applications in communications signal processing, and computing. Efficient and simultaneous excitation of the channel waveguide array using an ion-milled planar microlens array has facilitated the demonstration of some of these applications.

  17. Probabilistic Model of Fault Detection in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Pathak, A.

    Since the introduction of quantum computation, several protocols (such as quantum cryptography, quantum algorithm, quantum teleportation) have established quantum computing as a superior future technology. Each of these processes involves quantum circuits, which are prone to different kinds of faults. Consequently, it is important to verify whether the circuit hardware is defective or not. The systematic procedure to do so is known as fault testing. Normally testing is done by providing a set of valid input states and measuring the corresponding output states and comparing the output states with the expected output states of the perfect (fault less) circuit. This particular set of input vectors are known as test set [6]. If there exists a fault then the next step would be to find the exact location and nature of the defect. This is known as fault localization. A model that explains the logical or functional faults in the circuit is a fault model. Conventional fault models include (i) stuck at faults, (ii) bridge faults, and (iii) delay faults. These fault models have been rigorously studied for conventional irreversible circuit. But with the advent of reversible classical computing and quantum computing it has become important to enlarge the domain of the study on test vectors.

  18. Quantum circuits for OR and AND of ORs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, Howard; Bernstein, Herbert J.; Spector, Lee

    2000-11-01

    We give the first quantum circuit for computing f(0) OR f(1) more reliably than is classically possible with a single evaluation of the function. OR therefore joins XOR (i.e. parity, f(0)⊕f(1)) to give the full set of logical connectives (up to relabelling of inputs and outputs) for which there is quantum speedup.

  19. Characterizing error propagation in quantum circuits: the Isotropic Index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonseca de Oliveira, André L.; Buksman, Efrain; Cohn, Ilan; García López de Lacalle, Jesús

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents a novel index in order to characterize error propagation in quantum circuits by separating the resultant mixed error state in two components: an isotropic component that quantifies the lack of information, and a disalignment component that represents the shift between the current state and the original pure quantum state. The Isotropic Triangle, a graphical representation that fits naturally with the proposed index, is also introduced. Finally, some examples with the analysis of well-known quantum algorithms degradation are given.

  20. Linear nearest neighbor optimization in quantum circuits: a multiobjective perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruffinelli, Daniel; Barán, Benjamín

    2017-09-01

    Several current implementations of quantum circuits rely on the linear nearest neighbor restriction, which only allows interaction between adjacent qubits. Most methods that address the process of converting a generic circuit to an equivalent circuit which satisfies this restriction, minimize the number of additional SWAP gates required by this process. Moreover, most methods which address this problem are designed for 1D circuits. Considering the new and promising proposals for 2D quantum circuits, what we propose is a new perspective on this problem, namely that it can be seen as a multiobjective optimization problem. To test our hypothesis, we developed a multiobjective evolutionary algorithm that solves this problem by considering two objectives: minimizing the size of the 2D grid where the circuit is placed, and minimizing the number of additional SWAP gates. Of the methods designed for 2D circuits, only one considers different grid sizes which are much larger than strictly necessary. Consequently, our algorithm makes considerations which other methods do not make, since it naturally finds the grid which requires fewer SWAP gates for the circuit conversion, whether it is one-dimensional or two-dimensional. Our experimental results indicate that allowing a larger grid size results in fewer additional SWAP gates in about 73% of the tested circuits. Additionally, the average improvement we found when using larger grid sizes is about 30%, while the best improvement over using the smallest possible grid is 63.8%.

  1. Resilience of the quantum Rabi model in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E Manucharyan, Vladimir; Baksic, Alexandre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2017-07-01

    In circuit quantum electrodynamics (circuit QED), an artificial ‘circuit atom’ can couple to a quantized microwave radiation much stronger than its real atomic counterpart. The celebrated quantum Rabi model describes the simplest interaction of a two-level system with a single-mode boson field. When the coupling is large enough, the bare multilevel structure of a realistic circuit atom cannot be ignored even if the circuit is strongly anharmonic. We explored this situation theoretically for flux (fluxonium) and charge (Cooper pair box) type multi-level circuits tuned to their respective flux/charge degeneracy points. We identified which spectral features of the quantum Rabi model survive and which are renormalized for large coupling. Despite significant renormalization of the low-energy spectrum in the fluxonium case, the key quantum Rabi feature—nearly-degenerate vacuum consisting of an atomic state entangled with a multi-photon field—appears in both types of circuits when the coupling is sufficiently large. Like in the quantum Rabi model, for very large couplings the entanglement spectrum is dominated by only two, nearly equal eigenvalues, in spite of the fact that a large number of bare atomic states are actually involved in the atom-resonator ground state. We interpret the emergence of the two-fold degeneracy of the vacuum of both circuits as an environmental suppression of flux/charge tunneling due to their dressing by virtual low-/high-impedance photons in the resonator. For flux tunneling, the dressing is nothing else than the shunting of a Josephson atom with a large capacitance of the resonator. Suppression of charge tunneling is a manifestation of the dynamical Coulomb blockade of transport in tunnel junctions connected to resistive leads.

  2. Design infrastructure for Rapid Single Flux Quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toepfer, Hannes; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Cryoelectronic integrated circuits based on Rapid Single Flux Quantum (RSFQ) technology are promising candidates for realizing systems exhibiting very high performance in combination with very low-power consumption. Like other superconductive logic circuits, they are characterized by a high switching speed. Their unique feature consists in the particular representation of binary information by means of short transient voltage pulses. The development of RSFQ circuits and systems requires a comprehensive design approach, supported by appropriate tools. Within the recent years, a dedicated design infrastructure has been developed in Europe in close association with a foundry for digital RSFQ integrated circuits. As a result, RSFQ technology has matured to such a level that engineering efforts enable the development of integrated circuits. In the contribution, the basic features of the RSFQ circuit design are addressed within the context of technical and infrastructural issues of implementation from a European perspective.

  3. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-06-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  4. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    García-Álvarez, L.; Las Heras, U.; Mezzacapo, A.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.; Lamata, L.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects. PMID:27324814

  5. Quantum chemistry and charge transport in biomolecules with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Las Heras, U; Mezzacapo, A; Sanz, M; Solano, E; Lamata, L

    2016-06-21

    We propose an efficient protocol for digital quantum simulation of quantum chemistry problems and enhanced digital-analog quantum simulation of transport phenomena in biomolecules with superconducting circuits. Along these lines, we optimally digitize fermionic models of molecular structure with single-qubit and two-qubit gates, by means of Trotter-Suzuki decomposition and Jordan-Wigner transformation. Furthermore, we address the modelling of system-environment interactions of biomolecules involving bosonic degrees of freedom with a digital-analog approach. Finally, we consider gate-truncated quantum algorithms to allow the study of environmental effects.

  6. Quantum Interface between an Electrical Circuit and a Single Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kielpinski, D.; Kafri, D.; Woolley, M. J.; Milburn, G. J.; Taylor, J. M.

    2012-03-01

    We show how to bridge the divide between atomic systems and electronic devices by engineering a coupling between the motion of a single ion and the quantized electric field of a resonant circuit. Our method can be used to couple the internal state of an ion to the quantized circuit with the same speed as the internal-state coupling between two ions. All the well-known quantum information protocols linking ion internal and motional states can be converted to protocols between circuit photons and ion internal states. Our results enable quantum interfaces between solid state qubits, atomic qubits, and light, and lay the groundwork for a direct quantum connection between electrical and atomic metrology standards.

  7. Unbiased simulation of near-Clifford quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennink, Ryan S.; Ferragut, Erik M.; Humble, Travis S.; Laska, Jason A.; Nutaro, James J.; Pleszkoch, Mark G.; Pooser, Raphael C.

    2017-06-01

    Modeling and simulation are essential for predicting and verifying the behavior of fabricated quantum circuits, but existing simulation methods are either impractically costly or require an unrealistic simplification of error processes. We present a method of simulating noisy Clifford circuits that is both accurate and practical in experimentally relevant regimes. In particular, the cost is weakly exponential in the size and the degree of non-Cliffordness of the circuit. Our approach is based on the construction of exact representations of quantum channels as quasiprobability distributions over stabilizer operations, which are then sampled, simulated, and weighted to yield unbiased statistical estimates of circuit outputs and other observables. As a demonstration of these techniques, we simulate a Steane [[7,1,3

  8. Unbiased simulation of near-Clifford quantum circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Bennink, Ryan S.; Ferragut, Erik M.; Humble, Travis S.; ...

    2017-06-28

    Modeling and simulation are essential for predicting and verifying the behavior of fabricated quantum circuits, but existing simulation methods are either impractically costly or require an unrealistic simplification of error processes. In this paper, we present a method of simulating noisy Clifford circuits that is both accurate and practical in experimentally relevant regimes. In particular, the cost is weakly exponential in the size and the degree of non-Cliffordness of the circuit. Our approach is based on the construction of exact representations of quantum channels as quasiprobability distributions over stabilizer operations, which are then sampled, simulated, and weighted to yield unbiasedmore » statistical estimates of circuit outputs and other observables. As a demonstration of these techniques, we simulate a Steane [[7,1,3

  9. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases. PMID:26841968

  10. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-02-04

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases.

  11. Implications of electronics constraints for solid-state quantum error correction and quantum circuit failure probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, James E.; Carroll, Malcolm S.; Ganti, Anand; Phillips, Cynthia A.; Landahl, Andrew J.; Gurrieri, Thomas M.; Carr, Robert D.; Stalford, Harold L.; Nielsen, Erik

    2011-08-01

    In this paper we present the impact of classical electronics constraints on a solid-state quantum dot logical qubit architecture. Constraints due to routing density, bandwidth allocation, signal timing and thermally aware placement of classical supporting electronics significantly affect the quantum error correction circuit's error rate (by a factor of ~3-4 in our specific analysis). We analyze one level of a quantum error correction circuit using nine data qubits in a Bacon-Shor code configured as a quantum memory. A hypothetical silicon double quantum dot quantum bit (qubit) is used as the fundamental element. A pessimistic estimate of the error probability of the quantum circuit is calculated using the total number of gates and idle time using a provably optimal schedule for the circuit operations obtained with an integer program methodology. The micro-architecture analysis provides insight about the different ways the electronics impact the circuit performance (e.g. extra idle time in the schedule), which can significantly limit the ultimate performance of any quantum circuit and therefore is a critical foundation for any future larger scale architecture analysis.

  12. Engineering squeezed states of microwave radiation with circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Li Pengbo; Li Fuli

    2011-03-15

    We introduce a squeezed state source for microwave radiation with tunable parameters in circuit quantum electrodynamics. We show that when a superconducting artificial multilevel atom interacting with a transmission line resonator is suitably driven by external classical fields, two-mode squeezed states of the cavity modes can be engineered in a controllable fashion from the vacuum state via adiabatic following of the ground state of the system. This scheme appears to be robust against decoherence and is realizable with present techniques in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  13. Observing the nonequilibrium dynamics of the quantum transverse-field Ising chain in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Viehmann, Oliver; von Delft, Jan; Marquardt, Florian

    2013-01-18

    We show how a quantum Ising spin chain in a time-dependent transverse magnetic field can be simulated and experimentally probed in the framework of circuit QED with current technology. The proposed setup provides a new platform for observing the nonequilibrium dynamics of interacting many-body systems. We calculate its spectrum to offer a guideline for its initial experimental characterization. We demonstrate that quench dynamics and the propagation of localized excitations can be observed with the proposed setup and discuss further possible applications and modifications of this circuit QED quantum simulator.

  14. Entangling distant resonant exchange qubits via circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, Vanita; Taylor, Jacob M.; Tahan, Charles

    Enabling modularity within a quantum information processing device relies on robust entanglement of coherent qubits at macroscopic distances. To address this challenge, we investigate theoretically a hybrid quantum system consisting of spatially separated resonant exchange qubits, defined in three-electron semiconductor triple quantum dots, that are coupled via a superconducting transmission line resonator. By analyzing three specific approaches drawn from circuit quantum electrodynamics and Hartmann-Hahn double resonance techniques for implementing resonator-mediated two-qubit entangling gates in both dispersive and resonant regimes, we show that methods for entangling superconducting qubits map directly to resonant exchange qubits. We also calculate the rate of relaxation via phonons for resonant exchange qubits in silicon triple dots and show that such an implementation is particularly well-suited to achieving the strong coupling regime. Our approach combines the robustness of encoded spin qubits in silicon with the rapid and robust long-range entanglement provided by circuit QED systems.

  15. Quantum Optics with Superconducting Circuits: From Single Photons to Schrodinger Cats

    SciTech Connect

    Schoelkopf, Rob

    2013-01-09

    Over the last decade and a half, superconducting circuits have advanced to the point where we can generate and detect highly-entangled states, and perform universal quantum gates. Meanwhile, the coherence properties of these systems have improved more than 10,000-fold. I will describe recent experiments, such as the latest advance in coherence using a three-dimensional implementation of qubits interacting with microwave cavities, called “3D circuit QED.” The control and strong interactions possible in superconducting circuits make it possible to generate non-classical states of light, including large superpositions known as “Schrodinger cat” states. This field has many interesting prospects both for applications in quantum information processing, and fundamental investigations of the boundary between the macroscopic classical world and the microscopic world of the quantum.

  16. Efficient classical simulation of optical quantum information circuits.

    PubMed

    Bartlett, Stephen D; Sanders, Barry C

    2002-11-11

    We identify a broad class of physical processes in an optical quantum circuit that can be efficiently simulated on a classical computer: this class includes unitary transformations, amplification, noise, and measurements. This simulatability result places powerful constraints on the capability to realize exponential quantum speedups as well as on inducing an optical nonlinear transformation via linear optics, photodetection-based measurement, and classical feedforward of measurement results, optimal cloning, and a wide range of other processes.

  17. Quantum Computer Circuit Analysis and Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    is a first order nonlinear differential matrix equation of the Lax type. This report gives derivations of the Levi-Civita connection, Riemann...computational paths in the )2( nSU manifold. It is a nonlinear first-order differential matrix equation of the same form as the Lax equation for...I. L. Quantum Information and Computation; Cambridge University Press, 2000. 2. Dowling , M. R.; Nielsen, M. A. The Geometry of Quantum

  18. Digital circuits for computer applications: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The innovations in this updated series of compilations dealing with electronic technology represent a carefully selected collection of digital circuits which have direct application in computer oriented systems. In general, the circuits have been selected as representative items of each section and have been included on their merits of having universal applications in digital computers and digital data processing systems. As such, they should have wide appeal to the professional engineer and scientist who encounter the fundamentals of digital techniques in their daily activities. The circuits are grouped as digital logic circuits, analog to digital converters, and counters and shift registers.

  19. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    PubMed Central

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N). PMID:27453262

  20. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N2 power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  1. Parallel Quantum Circuit in a Tunnel Junction.

    PubMed

    Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Dridi, Ghassen; Joachim, Christian

    2016-07-25

    Spectral analysis of 1 and 2-states per line quantum bus are normally sufficient to determine the effective Vab(N) electronic coupling between the emitter and receiver states through the bus as a function of the number N of parallel lines. When Vab(N) is difficult to determine, an Heisenberg-Rabi time dependent quantum exchange process must be triggered through the bus to capture the secular oscillation frequency Ωab(N) between those states. Two different linear and regimes are demonstrated for Ωab(N) as a function of N. When the initial preparation is replaced by coupling of the quantum bus to semi-infinite electrodes, the resulting quantum transduction process is not faithfully following the Ωab(N) variations. Because of the electronic transparency normalisation to unity and of the low pass filter character of this transduction, large Ωab(N) cannot be captured by the tunnel junction. The broadly used concept of electrical contact between a metallic nanopad and a molecular device must be better described as a quantum transduction process. At small coupling and when N is small enough not to compensate for this small coupling, an N(2) power law is preserved for Ωab(N) and for Vab(N).

  2. Multimode circuit optomechanics near the quantum limit

    PubMed Central

    Massel, Francesco; Cho, Sung Un; Pirkkalainen, Juha-Matti; Hakonen, Pertti J.; Heikkilä, Tero T.; Sillanpää, Mika A.

    2012-01-01

    The coupling of distinct systems underlies nearly all physical phenomena. A basic instance is that of interacting harmonic oscillators, giving rise to, for example, the phonon eigenmodes in a lattice. Of particular importance are the interactions in hybrid quantum systems, which can combine the benefits of each part in quantum technologies. Here we investigate a hybrid optomechanical system having three degrees of freedom, consisting of a microwave cavity and two micromechanical beams with closely spaced frequencies around 32 MHz and no direct interaction. We record the first evidence of tripartite optomechanical mixing, implying that the eigenmodes are combinations of one photonic and two phononic modes. We identify an asymmetric dark mode having a long lifetime. Simultaneously, we operate the nearly macroscopic mechanical modes close to the motional quantum ground state, down to 1.8 thermal quanta, achieved by back-action cooling. These results constitute an important advance towards engineering of entangled motional states. PMID:22871806

  3. Multimode circuit optomechanics near the quantum limit.

    PubMed

    Massel, Francesco; Cho, Sung Un; Pirkkalainen, Juha-Matti; Hakonen, Pertti J; Heikkilä, Tero T; Sillanpää, Mika A

    2012-01-01

    The coupling of distinct systems underlies nearly all physical phenomena. A basic instance is that of interacting harmonic oscillators, giving rise to, for example, the phonon eigenmodes in a lattice. Of particular importance are the interactions in hybrid quantum systems, which can combine the benefits of each part in quantum technologies. Here we investigate a hybrid optomechanical system having three degrees of freedom, consisting of a microwave cavity and two micromechanical beams with closely spaced frequencies around 32 MHz and no direct interaction. We record the first evidence of tripartite optomechanical mixing, implying that the eigenmodes are combinations of one photonic and two phononic modes. We identify an asymmetric dark mode having a long lifetime. Simultaneously, we operate the nearly macroscopic mechanical modes close to the motional quantum ground state, down to 1.8 thermal quanta, achieved by back-action cooling. These results constitute an important advance towards engineering of entangled motional states.

  4. Optimal design of two-qubit quantum circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vatan, F.; Williams, C.

    2004-01-01

    In order to demonstrate non-trivial quantum computations experimentally, such as the synthesis of arbitrary entangled states, it will be useful to nderstand how to decompose a desired quantum computation into the shortest possible sequence of one-qubit and two-qubit gates. We contribute to this effort by providing a method to construct an optimal quantum circuit for a general two-qubit gate that requires at most 3 CNOT gates and 15 elementary one qubit gates. We then prove that these constructions are optimal with respect to the family of CNOT, y-rotation, z-rotation, and phase gates.

  5. Synthesis of Arbitrary Quantum Circuits to Topological Assembly.

    PubMed

    Paler, Alexandru; Devitt, Simon J; Fowler, Austin G

    2016-08-02

    Given a quantum algorithm, it is highly nontrivial to devise an efficient sequence of physical gates implementing the algorithm on real hardware and incorporating topological quantum error correction. In this paper, we present a first step towards this goal, focusing on generating correct and simple arrangements of topological structures that correspond to a given quantum circuit and largely neglecting their efficiency. We detail the many challenges that will need to be tackled in the pursuit of efficiency. The software source code can be consulted at https://github.com/alexandrupaler/tqec.

  6. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    You, J Q; Nori, Franco

    2011-06-29

    Superconducting circuits based on Josephson junctions exhibit macroscopic quantum coherence and can behave like artificial atoms. Recent technological advances have made it possible to implement atomic-physics and quantum-optics experiments on a chip using these artificial atoms. This Review presents a brief overview of the progress achieved so far in this rapidly advancing field. We not only discuss phenomena analogous to those in atomic physics and quantum optics with natural atoms, but also highlight those not occurring in natural atoms. In addition, we summarize several prospective directions in this emerging interdisciplinary field.

  7. Synthesis of Arbitrary Quantum Circuits to Topological Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paler, Alexandru; Devitt, Simon J.; Fowler, Austin G.

    2016-08-01

    Given a quantum algorithm, it is highly nontrivial to devise an efficient sequence of physical gates implementing the algorithm on real hardware and incorporating topological quantum error correction. In this paper, we present a first step towards this goal, focusing on generating correct and simple arrangements of topological structures that correspond to a given quantum circuit and largely neglecting their efficiency. We detail the many challenges that will need to be tackled in the pursuit of efficiency. The software source code can be consulted at https://github.com/alexandrupaler/tqec.

  8. Synthesis of Arbitrary Quantum Circuits to Topological Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Paler, Alexandru; Devitt, Simon J.; Fowler, Austin G.

    2016-01-01

    Given a quantum algorithm, it is highly nontrivial to devise an efficient sequence of physical gates implementing the algorithm on real hardware and incorporating topological quantum error correction. In this paper, we present a first step towards this goal, focusing on generating correct and simple arrangements of topological structures that correspond to a given quantum circuit and largely neglecting their efficiency. We detail the many challenges that will need to be tackled in the pursuit of efficiency. The software source code can be consulted at https://github.com/alexandrupaler/tqec. PMID:27481212

  9. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-01-01

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability. PMID:25512676

  10. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Marcos, D.; Widmer, P.; Rico, E.; Hafezi, M.; Rabl, P.; Wiese, U.-J.; Zoller, P.

    2014-12-15

    A quantum simulator of U(1) lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  11. Two-dimensional lattice gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Marcos, D; Widmer, P; Rico, E; Hafezi, M; Rabl, P; Wiese, U-J; Zoller, P

    2014-12-01

    A quantum simulator of [Formula: see text] lattice gauge theories can be implemented with superconducting circuits. This allows the investigation of confined and deconfined phases in quantum link models, and of valence bond solid and spin liquid phases in quantum dimer models. Fractionalized confining strings and the real-time dynamics of quantum phase transitions are accessible as well. Here we show how state-of-the-art superconducting technology allows us to simulate these phenomena in relatively small circuit lattices. By exploiting the strong non-linear couplings between quantized excitations emerging when superconducting qubits are coupled, we show how to engineer gauge invariant Hamiltonians, including ring-exchange and four-body Ising interactions. We demonstrate that, despite decoherence and disorder effects, minimal circuit instances allow us to investigate properties such as the dynamics of electric flux strings, signaling confinement in gauge invariant field theories. The experimental realization of these models in larger superconducting circuits could address open questions beyond current computational capability.

  12. Coupling single emitters to quantum plasmonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Alexander; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, the controlled coupling of single-photon emitters to propagating surface plasmons has been intensely studied, which is fueled by the prospect of a giant photonic nonlinearity on a nanoscaled platform. In this article, we will review the recent progress on coupling single emitters to nanowires towards the construction of a new platform for strong light-matter interaction. The control over such a platform might open new doors for quantum information processing and quantum sensing at the nanoscale and for the study of fundamental physics in the ultrastrong coupling regime.

  13. Methods for Quantum Circuit Design and Simulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK 30 CHAPTER 4: Quantum Algorithms Introduction Richard Feynman suggested the notion of a quantum computer in 1982...pp. 777–780, May 1935. [25] R. P. Feynman , Feynman Lectures on Computation, A. J. Hey and R. W. Allen, Eds. Cam- bridge, MA, USA: Perseus Books, 2000...Frederic T. 7, 49, 99, 100 Chuang, Isaac L. 7, 11, 24, 31, 35, 38, 46 Cirac, J. I. 48 Cleve, Richard 46 Cova, Sergio 9 Cowie, James 48, 49 de Matos, Clovis J

  14. Lasing without inversion in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, M; Utsumi, Y; Golubev, D S; Shnirman, A; Schön, Gerd

    2011-08-26

    We study the photon generation in a transmission line oscillator coupled to a driven qubit in the presence of a dissipative electromagnetic environment. It has been demonstrated previously that a population inversion in the qubit can lead to a lasing state of the oscillator. Here we show that the circuit can also exhibit the effect of "lasing without inversion." It arises since the coupling to the dissipative environment enhances photon emission as compared to absorption, similar to the recoil effect predicted for atomic systems. While the recoil effect is very weak, and so far elusive, the effect described here should be observable with realistic circuits. We analyze the requirements for system parameters and environment. © 2011 American Physical Society

  15. Ancilla-driven instantaneous quantum polynomial time circuit for quantum supremacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Takahashi, Yasuhiro

    2016-12-01

    Instantaneous quantum polynomial time (IQP) is a model of (probably) nonuniversal quantum computation. Since it has been proven that IQP circuits are unlikely to be simulated classically up to a multiplicative error and an error in the l1 norm, IQP is considered as one of the promising classes that demonstrates quantum supremacy. Although IQP circuits can be realized more easily than a universal quantum computer, demonstrating quantum supremacy is still difficult. It is therefore desired to find subclasses of IQP that are easy to implement. In this paper, by imposing some restrictions on IQP, we propose ancilla-driven IQP (ADIQP) as the subclass of commuting quantum computation suitable for many experimental settings. We show that even though ADIQP circuits are strictly weaker than IQP circuits in a sense, they are also hard to simulate classically up to a multiplicative error and an error in the l1 norm. Moreover, the properties of ADIQP make it easy to investigate the verifiability of ADIQP circuits and the difficulties in realizing ADIQP circuits.

  16. Observing Topological Invariants Using Quantum Walks in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flurin, E.; Ramasesh, V. V.; Hacohen-Gourgy, S.; Martin, L. S.; Yao, N. Y.; Siddiqi, I.

    2017-07-01

    The direct measurement of topological invariants in both engineered and naturally occurring quantum materials is a key step in classifying quantum phases of matter. Here, we motivate a toolbox based on time-dependent quantum walks as a method to digitally simulate single-particle topological band structures. Using a superconducting qubit dispersively coupled to a microwave cavity, we implement two classes of split-step quantum walks and directly measure the topological invariant (winding number) associated with each. The measurement relies upon interference between two components of a cavity Schrödinger cat state and highlights a novel refocusing technique, which allows for the direct implementation of a digital version of Bloch oscillations. As the walk is performed in phase space, our scheme can be extended to higher synthetic dimensions by adding additional microwave cavities, whereby superconducting circuit-based simulations can probe topological phases ranging from the quantum-spin Hall effect to the Hopf insulator.

  17. Large-scale quantum photonic circuits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Nicholas C.; Bunandar, Darius; Pant, Mihir; Steinbrecher, Greg R.; Mower, Jacob; Prabhu, Mihika; Baehr-Jones, Tom; Hochberg, Michael; Englund, Dirk

    2016-08-01

    Quantum information science offers inherently more powerful methods for communication, computation, and precision measurement that take advantage of quantum superposition and entanglement. In recent years, theoretical and experimental advances in quantum computing and simulation with photons have spurred great interest in developing large photonic entangled states that challenge today's classical computers. As experiments have increased in complexity, there has been an increasing need to transition bulk optics experiments to integrated photonics platforms to control more spatial modes with higher fidelity and phase stability. The silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanophotonics platform offers new possibilities for quantum optics, including the integration of bright, nonclassical light sources, based on the large third-order nonlinearity (χ(3)) of silicon, alongside quantum state manipulation circuits with thousands of optical elements, all on a single phase-stable chip. How large do these photonic systems need to be? Recent theoretical work on Boson Sampling suggests that even the problem of sampling from e30 identical photons, having passed through an interferometer of hundreds of modes, becomes challenging for classical computers. While experiments of this size are still challenging, the SOI platform has the required component density to enable low-loss and programmable interferometers for manipulating hundreds of spatial modes. Here, we discuss the SOI nanophotonics platform for quantum photonic circuits with hundreds-to-thousands of optical elements and the associated challenges. We compare SOI to competing technologies in terms of requirements for quantum optical systems. We review recent results on large-scale quantum state evolution circuits and strategies for realizing high-fidelity heralded gates with imperfect, practical systems. Next, we review recent results on silicon photonics-based photon-pair sources and device architectures, and we discuss a path towards

  18. Entangling distant resonant exchange qubits via circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasa, V.; Taylor, J. M.; Tahan, Charles

    2016-11-01

    We investigate a hybrid quantum system consisting of spatially separated resonant exchange qubits, defined in three-electron semiconductor triple quantum dots, that are coupled via a superconducting transmission line resonator. Drawing on methods from circuit quantum electrodynamics and Hartmann-Hahn double resonance techniques, we analyze three specific approaches for implementing resonator-mediated two-qubit entangling gates in both dispersive and resonant regimes of interaction. We calculate entangling gate fidelities as well as the rate of relaxation via phonons for resonant exchange qubits in silicon triple dots and show that such an implementation is particularly well suited to achieving the strong coupling regime. Our approach combines the favorable coherence properties of encoded spin qubits in silicon with the rapid and robust long-range entanglement provided by circuit QED systems.

  19. Relativistic quantum teleportation with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Friis, N; Lee, A R; Truong, K; Sabín, C; Solano, E; Johansson, G; Fuentes, I

    2013-03-15

    We study the effects of relativistic motion on quantum teleportation and propose a realizable experiment where our results can be tested. We compute bounds on the optimal fidelity of teleportation when one of the observers undergoes nonuniform motion for a finite time. The upper bound to the optimal fidelity is degraded due to the observer's motion. However, we discuss how this degradation can be corrected. These effects are observable for experimental parameters that are within reach of cutting-edge superconducting technology.

  20. Hybrid Circuit QED with Double Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petta, Jason

    2014-03-01

    Cavity quantum electrodynamics explores quantum optics at the most basic level of a single photon interacting with a single atom. We have been able to explore cavity QED in a condensed matter system by placing a double quantum dot (DQD) inside of a high quality factor microwave cavity. Our results show that measurements of the cavity field are sensitive to charge and spin dynamics in the DQD.[2,3] We can explore non-equilibrium physics by applying a finite source-drain bias across the DQD, which results in sequential tunneling. Remarkably, we observe a gain as large as 15 in the cavity transmission when the DQD energy level detuning is matched to the cavity frequency. These results will be discussed in the context of single atom lasing.[4] I will also describe recent progress towards reaching the strong-coupling limit in cavity-coupled Si DQDs. In collaboration with Manas Kulkarni, Yinyu Liu, Karl Petersson, George Stehlik, Jacob Taylor, and Hakan Tureci. We acknowledge support from the Sloan and Packard Foundations, ARO, DARPA, and NSF.

  1. CUGatesDensity—Quantum circuit analyser extended to density matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J. B.

    2013-12-01

    CUGatesDensity is an extension of the original quantum circuit analyser CUGates (Loke and Wang, 2011) [7] to provide explicit support for the use of density matrices. The new package enables simulation of quantum circuits involving statistical ensemble of mixed quantum states. Such analysis is of vital importance in dealing with quantum decoherence, measurements, noise and error correction, and fault tolerant computation. Several examples involving mixed state quantum computation are presented to illustrate the use of this package. Catalogue identifier: AEPY_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEPY_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen’s University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 5368 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 143994 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica. Computer: Any computer installed with a copy of Mathematica 6.0 or higher. Operating system: Any system with a copy of Mathematica 6.0 or higher installed. Classification: 4.15. Nature of problem: To simulate arbitrarily complex quantum circuits comprised of single/multiple qubit and qudit quantum gates with mixed state registers. Solution method: A density matrix representation for mixed states and a state vector representation for pure states are used. The construct is based on an irreducible form of matrix decomposition, which allows a highly efficient implementation of general controlled gates with multiple conditionals. Running time: The examples provided in the notebook CUGatesDensity.nb take approximately 30 s to run on a laptop PC.

  2. On-chip single photon filtering and multiplexing in hybrid quantum photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Elshaari, Ali W; Zadeh, Iman Esmaeil; Fognini, Andreas; Reimer, Michael E; Dalacu, Dan; Poole, Philip J; Zwiller, Val; Jöns, Klaus D

    2017-08-30

    Quantum light plays a pivotal role in modern science and future photonic applications. Since the advent of integrated quantum nanophotonics different material platforms based on III-V nanostructures-, colour centers-, and nonlinear waveguides as on-chip light sources have been investigated. Each platform has unique advantages and limitations; however, all implementations face major challenges with filtering of individual quantum states, scalable integration, deterministic multiplexing of selected quantum emitters, and on-chip excitation suppression. Here we overcome all of these challenges with a hybrid and scalable approach, where single III-V quantum emitters are positioned and deterministically integrated in a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible photonic circuit. We demonstrate reconfigurable on-chip single-photon filtering and wavelength division multiplexing with a foot print one million times smaller than similar table-top approaches, while offering excitation suppression of more than 95 dB and efficient routing of single photons over a bandwidth of 40 nm. Our work marks an important step to harvest quantum optical technologies' full potential.Combining different integration platforms on the same chip is currently one of the main challenges for quantum technologies. Here, Elshaari et al. show III-V Quantum Dots embedded in nanowires operating in a CMOS compatible circuit, with controlled on-chip filtering and tunable routing.

  3. Quantum simulation with a boson sampling circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González Olivares, Diego; Peropadre, Borja; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2016-08-01

    In this work we study a system that consists of 2 M matter qubits that interact through a boson sampling circuit, i.e., an M -port interferometer, embedded in two different architectures. We prove that, under the conditions required to derive a master equation, the qubits evolve according to effective bipartite X Y spin Hamiltonians, with or without local and collective dissipation terms. This opens the door to the simulation of any bipartite spin or hard-core boson models and exploring dissipative phase transitions as the competition between coherent and incoherent exchange of excitations. We also show that in the purely dissipative regime this model has a large number of exact and approximate dark states, whose structure and decay rates can be estimated analytically. We finally argue that this system may be used for the adiabatic preparation of boson sampling states encoded in the matter qubits.

  4. Quantum dot rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Sishir; Frost, Thomas; Bhattacharya, Pallab

    2013-05-15

    A rolled-up microtube optoelectronic integrated circuit operating as a phototransceiver is demonstrated. The microtube is made of a InGaAs/GaAs strained bilayer with InAs self-organized quantum dots inserted in the GaAs layer. The phototransceiver consists of an optically pumped microtube laser and a microtube photoconductive detector connected by an a-Si/SiO2 waveguide. The loss in the waveguide and responsivity of the entire phototransceiver circuit are 7.96 dB/cm and 34 mA/W, respectively.

  5. Controlled secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Satyabrata; Roy, Sovik; Chakraborty, Shantanav; Jagadish, Vinayak; Haris, M. K.; Kumar, Atul

    2014-09-01

    We demonstrate the possibility of controlling the success probability of a secret sharing protocol using a quantum cloning circuit. The cloning circuit is used to clone the qubits containing the encoded information and en route to the intended recipients. The success probability of the protocol depends on the cloning parameters used to clone the qubits. We also establish a relation between the concurrence of initially prepared state, entanglement of the mixed state received by the receivers after cloning scheme and the cloning parameters of cloning machine.

  6. Generating three-qubit quantum circuits with neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swaddle, Michael; Noakes, Lyle; Smallbone, Harry; Salter, Liam; Wang, Jingbo

    2017-10-01

    A new method for compiling quantum algorithms is proposed and tested for a three qubit system. The proposed method is to decompose a unitary matrix U, into a product of simpler Uj via a neural network. These Uj can then be decomposed into product of known quantum gates. Key to the effectiveness of this approach is the restriction of the set of training data generated to paths which approximate minimal normal subRiemannian geodesics, as this removes unnecessary redundancy and ensures the products are unique. The two neural networks are shown to work effectively, each individually returning low loss values on validation data after relatively short training periods. The two networks are able to return coefficients that are sufficiently close to the true coefficient values to validate this method as an approach for generating quantum circuits. There is scope for more work in scaling this approach for larger quantum systems.

  7. Physical optimization of quantum error correction circuits with spatially separated quantum dot spins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhu, Ai-Dong; Zhang, Shou

    2013-05-20

    We propose an efficient protocol for optimizing the physical implementation of three-qubit quantum error correction with spatially separated quantum dot spins via virtual-photon-induced process. In the protocol, each quantum dot is trapped in an individual cavity and each two cavities are connected by an optical fiber. We propose the optimal quantum circuits and describe the physical implementation for correcting both the bit flip and phase flip errors by applying a series of one-bit unitary rotation gates and two-bit quantum iSWAP gates that are produced by the long-range interaction between two distributed quantum dot spins mediated by the vacuum fields of the fiber and cavity. The protocol opens promising perspectives for long distance quantum communication and distributed quantum computation networks.

  8. LASER APPLICATIONS AND OTHER TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS: Laser-induced extreme UV radiation sources for manufacturing next-generation integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, V. M.; Vinokhodov, A. Yu; Ivanov, A. S.; Kiryukhin, Yu B.; Mishchenko, V. A.; Prokof'ev, A. V.; Khristoforov, O. B.

    2009-10-01

    The development of high-power discharge sources emitting in the 13.5±0.135-nm spectral band is of current interest because they are promising for applications in industrial EUV (extreme ultraviolet) lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits according to technological precision standards of 22 nm and smaller. The parameters of EUV sources based on a laser-induced discharge in tin vapours between rotating disc electrodes are investigated. The properties of the discharge initiation by laser radiation at different wavelengths are established and the laser pulse parameters providing the maximum energy characteristics of the EUV source are determined. The EUV source developed in the study emits an average power of 276 W in the 13.5±0.135-nm spectral band on conversion to the solid angle 2π sr in the stationary regime at a pulse repetition rate of 3000 Hz.

  9. Advanced active quenching circuit for ultra-fast quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stipčević, Mario; Christensen, Bradley G.; Kwiat, Paul G.; Gauthier, Daniel J.

    2017-09-01

    Commercial photon-counting modules based on actively quenched solid-state avalanche photodiode sensors are used in a wide variety of applications. Manufacturers characterize their detectors by specifying a small set of parameters, such as detection efficiency, dead time, dark counts rate, afterpulsing probability and single-photon arrival-time resolution (jitter). However, they usually do not specify the range of conditions over which these parameters are constant or present a sufficient description of the characterization process. In this work, we perform a few novel tests on two commercial detectors and identify an additional set of imperfections that must be specified to sufficiently characterize their behavior. These include rate-dependence of the dead time and jitter, detection delay shift, and "twilighting." We find that these additional non-ideal behaviors can lead to unexpected effects or strong deterioration of the performance of a system using these devices. We explain their origin by an in-depth analysis of the active quenching process. To mitigate the effects of these imperfections, a custom-built detection system is designed using a novel active quenching circuit. Its performance is compared against two commercial detectors in a fast quantum key distribution system with hyper-entangled photons and a random number generator.

  10. Convergence Rates for Arbitrary Statistical Moments of Random Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Winton G.; Viola, Lorenza

    2010-06-01

    We consider a class of random quantum circuits where at each step a gate from a universal set is applied to a random pair of qubits, and determine how quickly averages of arbitrary finite-degree polynomials in the matrix elements of the resulting unitary converge to Haar measure averages. This is accomplished by mapping the superoperator that describes t order moments on n qubits to a multilevel SU(4t) Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick Hamiltonian. We show that, for arbitrary fixed t, the ground-state manifold is exactly spanned by factorized eigenstates and, under the assumption that a mean-field ansatz accurately describes the low-lying excitations, the spectral gap scales as 1/n in the thermodynamic limit. Our results imply that random quantum circuits yield an efficient implementation of γ approximate unitary t designs.

  11. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  12. Quantum well intermixing for photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Xiaolan

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis, several aspects of GaAsSb/AlSb multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures have been studied. First, it was shown that the GaAsSb MQWs with a direct band gap near 1.5 mum at room temperature could be monolithically integrated with AlGaSb/AlSb or AlGaAsSb/AlAsSb Bragg mirrors, which can be applied to Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Lasers (VCSELs). Secondly, an enhanced photoluminescence from GaAsSb MQWs was reported. The photoluminescence strength increased dramatically with arsenic fraction as conjectured. The peak photoluminescence from GaAs0.31Sb 0.69 was 208 times larger than that from GaSb. Thirdly, the strong photoluminescence from GaAsSb MQWs and the direct nature of the band gap near 1.5 mum at room temperature make the material favorable for intermixing studies. The samples were treated with ion implantation followed by rapid thermal annealing (RTA). A band gap blueshift as large as 198 nm was achieved with a modest ion dose and moderate annealing temperature. Photoluminescence strength for implanted samples generally increased with the annealing temperature. The energy blueshift was attributed to the interdiffusion of both the group III and group V sublattices. Finally, based on the interesting properties of GaAsSb MQWs, including the direct band gap near 1.5 mum, strong photoluminescence, a wide range of wavelength (1300--1500 nm) due to ion implantation-induced quantum well intermixing (QWI), and subpicosecond spin relaxation reported by Hall et al, we proposed to explore the possibilities for ultra-fast optical switching by investigating spin dynamics in semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) containing InGaAs and GaSb MQWs. For circularly polarized pump and probe waves, the numerical simulation on the modal indices showed that the difference between the effective refractive index of the TE and TM modes was quite large, on the order of 0.03, resulting in a significant phase mismatch in a traveling length larger than 28 mum. Thus the

  13. Quantum Approaches to Logic Circuit Synthesis and Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    STATEMENT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. PA#06-445 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14 . ABSTRACT The overall objective of this...i Table of Contents 1. Executive Summary 1 2. Introduction 2 3. Synthesis of Quantum Circuits 14 4...used by the Apply operation with xi = Var( vf ), xj = Var(vg) and xi < xj meaning that that xi precedes xj in the variable ordering. 11

  14. Tomonaga-Luttinger physics in electronic quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Jezouin, S; Albert, M; Parmentier, F D; Anthore, A; Gennser, U; Cavanna, A; Safi, I; Pierre, F

    2013-01-01

    In one-dimensional conductors, interactions result in correlated electronic systems. At low energy, a hallmark signature of the so-called Tomonaga-Luttinger liquids is the universal conductance curve predicted in presence of an impurity. A seemingly different topic is the quantum laws of electricity, when distinct quantum conductors are assembled in a circuit. In particular, the conductances are suppressed at low energy, a phenomenon called dynamical Coulomb blockade. Here we investigate the conductance of mesoscopic circuits constituted by a short single-channel quantum conductor in series with a resistance, and demonstrate a proposed link to Tomonaga-Luttinger physics. We reformulate and establish experimentally a recently derived phenomenological expression for the conductance using a wide range of circuits, including carbon nanotube data obtained elsewhere. By confronting both conductance data and phenomenological expression with the universal Tomonaga-Luttinger conductance curve, we demonstrate experimentally the predicted mapping between dynamical Coulomb blockade and the transport across a Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid with an impurity.

  15. Microwave integrated circuits for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, Regis F.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), which incorporate all the elements of a microwave circuit on a single semiconductor substrate, offer the potential for drastic reductions in circuit weight and volume and increased reliability, all of which make many new concepts in electronic circuitry for space applications feasible, including phased array antennas. NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of MMICs for space applications. The first such circuits targeted for development were an extension of work in hybrid (discrete component) technology in support of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). It focused on power amplifiers, receivers, and switches at ACTS frequencies. More recent work, however, focused on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and emphasizes advanced materials in an effort to enhance efficiency, power handling capability, and frequency of operation or noise figure to meet the requirements of space systems.

  16. Microwave integrated circuits for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonard, Regis F.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    Monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMIC), which incorporate all the elements of a microwave circuit on a single semiconductor substrate, offer the potential for drastic reductions in circuit weight and volume and increased reliability, all of which make many new concepts in electronic circuitry for space applications feasible, including phased array antennas. NASA has undertaken an extensive program aimed at development of MMICs for space applications. The first such circuits targeted for development were an extension of work in hybrid (discrete component) technology in support of the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). It focused on power amplifiers, receivers, and switches at ACTS frequencies. More recent work, however, focused on frequencies appropriate for other NASA programs and emphasizes advanced materials in an effort to enhance efficiency, power handling capability, and frequency of operation or noise figure to meet the requirements of space systems.

  17. Quantum-enhanced accelerometry with a nonlinear electromechanical circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Kurt; Balu, Radhakrishnan; Teufel, John D.

    2017-08-01

    It is known that placing a mechanical oscillator in a superposition of coherent states allows, in theory, a measurement of a linear force whose sensitivity increases with the amplitude of the mechanical oscillations, a uniquely quantum effect. Further, entangled versions of these states across a network of n mechanical oscillators enable a measurement whose sensitivity increases linearly with n , thus improving the classical scaling by √{n }. One of the key challenges in exploiting this effect is processing the signal so that it can be readily measured; linear processing is insufficient. Here we show that a Kerr oscillator will not only create the necessary states, but also perform the required processing, transforming the quantum phase imprinted by the force signal into a shift in amplitude measurable with homodyne detection. This allows us to design a relatively simple quantum electromechanical circuit that can demonstrate the core quantum effect at the heart of this scheme, namely amplitude-dependent force sensitivity. We derive analytic expressions for the performance of the circuit, including thermal mechanical noise and photon loss. We discuss the experimental challenges in implementing the scheme with near-term technology.

  18. Ultrafast quantum computation in ultrastrongly coupled circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yimin; Guo, Chu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng

    2017-03-01

    The latest technological progress of achieving the ultrastrong-coupling regime in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems has greatly promoted the developments of quantum physics, where novel quantum optics phenomena and potential computational benefits have been predicted. Here, we propose a scheme to accelerate the nontrivial two-qubit phase gate in a circuit QED system, where superconducting flux qubits are ultrastrongly coupled to a transmission line resonator (TLR), and two more TLRs are coupled to the ultrastrongly-coupled system for assistant. The nontrivial unconventional geometric phase gate between the two flux qubits is achieved based on close-loop displacements of the three-mode intracavity fields. Moreover, as there are three resonators contributing to the phase accumulation, the requirement of the coupling strength to realize the two-qubit gate can be reduced. Further reduction in the coupling strength to achieve a specific controlled-phase gate can be realized by adding more auxiliary resonators to the ultrastrongly-coupled system through superconducting quantum interference devices. We also present a study of our scheme with realistic parameters considering imperfect controls and noisy environment. Our scheme possesses the merits of ultrafastness and noise-tolerance due to the advantages of geometric phases.

  19. Ultrafast quantum computation in ultrastrongly coupled circuit QED systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Guo, Chu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng

    2017-03-10

    The latest technological progress of achieving the ultrastrong-coupling regime in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems has greatly promoted the developments of quantum physics, where novel quantum optics phenomena and potential computational benefits have been predicted. Here, we propose a scheme to accelerate the nontrivial two-qubit phase gate in a circuit QED system, where superconducting flux qubits are ultrastrongly coupled to a transmission line resonator (TLR), and two more TLRs are coupled to the ultrastrongly-coupled system for assistant. The nontrivial unconventional geometric phase gate between the two flux qubits is achieved based on close-loop displacements of the three-mode intracavity fields. Moreover, as there are three resonators contributing to the phase accumulation, the requirement of the coupling strength to realize the two-qubit gate can be reduced. Further reduction in the coupling strength to achieve a specific controlled-phase gate can be realized by adding more auxiliary resonators to the ultrastrongly-coupled system through superconducting quantum interference devices. We also present a study of our scheme with realistic parameters considering imperfect controls and noisy environment. Our scheme possesses the merits of ultrafastness and noise-tolerance due to the advantages of geometric phases.

  20. Ultrafast quantum computation in ultrastrongly coupled circuit QED systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yimin; Guo, Chu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    The latest technological progress of achieving the ultrastrong-coupling regime in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems has greatly promoted the developments of quantum physics, where novel quantum optics phenomena and potential computational benefits have been predicted. Here, we propose a scheme to accelerate the nontrivial two-qubit phase gate in a circuit QED system, where superconducting flux qubits are ultrastrongly coupled to a transmission line resonator (TLR), and two more TLRs are coupled to the ultrastrongly-coupled system for assistant. The nontrivial unconventional geometric phase gate between the two flux qubits is achieved based on close-loop displacements of the three-mode intracavity fields. Moreover, as there are three resonators contributing to the phase accumulation, the requirement of the coupling strength to realize the two-qubit gate can be reduced. Further reduction in the coupling strength to achieve a specific controlled-phase gate can be realized by adding more auxiliary resonators to the ultrastrongly-coupled system through superconducting quantum interference devices. We also present a study of our scheme with realistic parameters considering imperfect controls and noisy environment. Our scheme possesses the merits of ultrafastness and noise-tolerance due to the advantages of geometric phases. PMID:28281654

  1. A scanning transmon qubit for strong coupling circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Shanks, W E; Underwood, D L; Houck, A A

    2013-01-01

    Like a quantum computer designed for a particular class of problems, a quantum simulator enables quantitative modelling of quantum systems that is computationally intractable with a classical computer. Superconducting circuits have recently been investigated as an alternative system in which microwave photons confined to a lattice of coupled resonators act as the particles under study, with qubits coupled to the resonators producing effective photon-photon interactions. Such a system promises insight into the non-equilibrium physics of interacting bosons, but new tools are needed to understand this complex behaviour. Here we demonstrate the operation of a scanning transmon qubit and propose its use as a local probe of photon number within a superconducting resonator lattice. We map the coupling strength of the qubit to a resonator on a separate chip and show that the system reaches the strong coupling regime over a wide scanning area.

  2. Oscillatory localization of quantum walks analyzed by classical electric circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambainis, Andris; PrÅ«sis, Krišjānis; Vihrovs, JevgÄ`nijs; Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-12-01

    We examine an unexplored quantum phenomenon we call oscillatory localization, where a discrete-time quantum walk with Grover's diffusion coin jumps back and forth between two vertices. We then connect it to the power dissipation of a related electric network. Namely, we show that there are only two kinds of oscillating states, called uniform states and flip states, and that the projection of an arbitrary state onto a flip state is bounded by the power dissipation of an electric circuit. By applying this framework to states along a single edge of a graph, we show that low effective resistance implies oscillatory localization of the quantum walk. This reveals that oscillatory localization occurs on a large variety of regular graphs, including edge-transitive, expander, and high-degree graphs. As a corollary, high edge connectivity also implies localization of these states, since it is closely related to electric resistance.

  3. Applications of hydrocyclones in Bayer circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Patnaik, S.K.; Brahma, R.; Das, P.

    1996-10-01

    Due to its operational simplicity, effectiveness, low space requirement and maintenance cost, hydrocyclones of different sizes and materials of construction are progressively finding more and more applications in the Bayer circuit for producing alumina from bauxite. In alumina refining processes, hydrocyclones are most effectively used in the areas like closed circuit grinding, sand separation, sand washing, removal of residual solid from spent liquor and second stage filtrate to enhance plant productivity, and classification of hydrate particles for product and seed granulometry control.

  4. Ripple Clock Schemes for Quantum-dot Cellular Automata Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purohit, Prafull

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) is an emerging technology for building digital circuits at nano-scale. It is considered as an alternative to widely used complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology because of its key features, which include low power operation, high density and high operating frequency. Unlike conventional logic circuits in which information is transferred by electrical current, QCA operates with the help of coulomb interaction between two adjacent QCA cells. A QCA cell is a set of four quantum-dots that are placed near the corners of a square. Due to the fact that clocking provides power and control of data flow in QCA, it is considered to be the backbone of QCA operation. This thesis presents the design and simulation of a ripple clock scheme and an enhanced ripple clock scheme for QCA circuits. In the past, different clock schemes were proposed and studied which were focused on data flow in particular direction or reducing delay. This proposed thesis will study the design and simulation of new clock schemes which are more realistic for implementation, give a freedom to propagate logic in all directions, suitable for both combinational and sequential circuits and has potential to support testing and reconfiguration up to some extent. A variety of digital circuits including a 2--to--1 multiplexer, a 1--bit memory, an RS latch, a full adder, a 4--bit adder and a 2--to--4 decoder are implemented and simulated using these clock schemes. A 2--to--4 decoder is used to demonstrate the testing capabilities of these clock schemes. All QCA layouts are drawn and simulated in QCADesigner.

  5. Error Sensitivity to Environmental Noise in Quantum Circuits for Chemical State Preparation.

    PubMed

    Sawaya, Nicolas P D; Smelyanskiy, Mikhail; McClean, Jarrod R; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-07-12

    Calculating molecular energies is likely to be one of the first useful applications to achieve quantum supremacy, performing faster on a quantum than a classical computer. However, if future quantum devices are to produce accurate calculations, errors due to environmental noise and algorithmic approximations need to be characterized and reduced. In this study, we use the high performance qHiPSTER software to investigate the effects of environmental noise on the preparation of quantum chemistry states. We simulated 18 16-qubit quantum circuits under environmental noise, each corresponding to a unitary coupled cluster state preparation of a different molecule or molecular configuration. Additionally, we analyze the nature of simple gate errors in noise-free circuits of up to 40 qubits. We find that, in most cases, the Jordan-Wigner (JW) encoding produces smaller errors under a noisy environment as compared to the Bravyi-Kitaev (BK) encoding. For the JW encoding, pure dephasing noise is shown to produce substantially smaller errors than pure relaxation noise of the same magnitude. We report error trends in both molecular energy and electron particle number within a unitary coupled cluster state preparation scheme, against changes in nuclear charge, bond length, number of electrons, noise types, and noise magnitude. These trends may prove to be useful in making algorithmic and hardware-related choices for quantum simulation of molecular energies.

  6. Applications of quantum cloning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  7. Advancing therapeutic applications of synthetic gene circuits.

    PubMed

    Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Chen, William Cw; Lu, Timothy K

    2017-10-01

    Synthetic biology aims to introduce new sense-and-respond capabilities into living cells, which would enable novel therapeutic strategies. The development of regulatory elements, molecular computing devices, and effector screening technologies has enabled researchers to design synthetic gene circuits in many organisms, including mammalian cells. Engineered gene networks, such as closed-loop circuits or Boolean logic gate circuits, can be used to program cells to perform specific functions with spatiotemporal control and restoration of homeostasis in response to the extracellular environment and intracellular signaling. In addition, genetically modified microbes can be designed as local delivery of therapeutic molecules. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in therapeutic applications of synthetic gene circuits, as well as challenges and future opportunities for biomedicine. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Implementing phase-covariant cloning in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Meng-Zheng; Ye, Liu

    2016-10-01

    An efficient scheme is proposed to implement phase-covariant quantum cloning by using a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a microwave cavity resonator in the strong dispersive limit of circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). By solving the master equation numerically, we plot the Wigner function and Poisson distribution of the cavity mode after each operation in the cloning transformation sequence according to two logic circuits proposed. The visualizations of the quasi-probability distribution in phase-space for the cavity mode and the occupation probability distribution in the Fock basis enable us to penetrate the evolution process of cavity mode during the phase-covariant cloning (PCC) transformation. With the help of numerical simulation method, we find out that the present cloning machine is not the isotropic model because its output fidelity depends on the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of the initial input state on the Bloch sphere. The fidelity for the actual output clone of the present scheme is slightly smaller than one in the theoretical case. The simulation results are consistent with the theoretical ones. This further corroborates our scheme based on circuit QED can implement efficiently PCC transformation.

  9. Implementing phase-covariant cloning in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Meng-Zheng; Ye, Liu

    2016-10-15

    An efficient scheme is proposed to implement phase-covariant quantum cloning by using a superconducting transmon qubit coupled to a microwave cavity resonator in the strong dispersive limit of circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED). By solving the master equation numerically, we plot the Wigner function and Poisson distribution of the cavity mode after each operation in the cloning transformation sequence according to two logic circuits proposed. The visualizations of the quasi-probability distribution in phase-space for the cavity mode and the occupation probability distribution in the Fock basis enable us to penetrate the evolution process of cavity mode during the phase-covariant cloning (PCC) transformation. With the help of numerical simulation method, we find out that the present cloning machine is not the isotropic model because its output fidelity depends on the polar angle and the azimuthal angle of the initial input state on the Bloch sphere. The fidelity for the actual output clone of the present scheme is slightly smaller than one in the theoretical case. The simulation results are consistent with the theoretical ones. This further corroborates our scheme based on circuit QED can implement efficiently PCC transformation.

  10. Quantum phases in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Yu, Lixian; Liang, J. -Q; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Circuit QED on a chip has become a powerful platform for simulating complex many-body physics. In this report, we realize a Dicke-Ising model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array. We show that this system exhibits a competition between the collective spin-photon interaction and the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction, and then predict four quantum phases, including: a paramagnetic normal phase, an antiferromagnetic normal phase, a paramagnetic superradiant phase, and an antiferromagnetic superradiant phase. The antiferromagnetic normal phase and the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase are new phases in many-body quantum optics. In the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase, both the antiferromagnetic and superradiant orders can coexist, and thus the system possesses symmetry. Moreover, we find an unconventional photon signature in this phase. In future experiments, these predicted quantum phases could be distinguished by detecting both the mean-photon number and the magnetization. PMID:24522250

  11. Quantum phases in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanwei; Yu, Lixian; Liang, J-Q; Chen, Gang; Jia, Suotang; Nori, Franco

    2014-02-13

    Circuit QED on a chip has become a powerful platform for simulating complex many-body physics. In this report, we realize a Dicke-Ising model with an antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction in circuit QED with a superconducting qubit array. We show that this system exhibits a competition between the collective spin-photon interaction and the antiferromagnetic nearest-neighbor spin-spin interaction, and then predict four quantum phases, including: a paramagnetic normal phase, an antiferromagnetic normal phase, a paramagnetic superradiant phase, and an antiferromagnetic superradiant phase. The antiferromagnetic normal phase and the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase are new phases in many-body quantum optics. In the antiferromagnetic superradiant phase, both the antiferromagnetic and superradiant orders can coexist, and thus the system possesses Z(z)₂ ⊗ Z₂ symmetry. Moreover, we find an unconventional photon signature in this phase. In future experiments, these predicted quantum phases could be distinguished by detecting both the mean-photon number and the magnetization.

  12. Micromachined Integrated Quantum Circuit Containing a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, T.; Chu, Y.; Axline, C.; Pfaff, W.; Blumoff, J. Z.; Chou, K.; Krayzman, L.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.

    2017-04-01

    We present a device demonstrating a lithographically patterned transmon integrated with a micromachined cavity resonator. Our two-cavity, one-qubit device is a multilayer microwave-integrated quantum circuit (MMIQC), comprising a basic unit capable of performing circuit-QED operations. We describe the qubit-cavity coupling mechanism of a specialized geometry using an electric-field picture and a circuit model, and obtain specific system parameters using simulations. Fabrication of the MMIQC includes lithography, etching, and metallic bonding of silicon wafers. Superconducting wafer bonding is a critical capability that is demonstrated by a micromachined storage-cavity lifetime of 34.3 μ s , corresponding to a quality factor of 2 ×106 at single-photon energies. The transmon coherence times are T1=6.4 μ s , and T2echo=11.7 μ s . We measure qubit-cavity dispersive coupling with a rate χq μ/2 π =-1.17 MHz , constituting a Jaynes-Cummings system with an interaction strength g /2 π =49 MHz . With these parameters we are able to demonstrate circuit-QED operations in the strong dispersive regime with ease. Finally, we highlight several improvements and anticipated extensions of the technology to complex MMIQCs.

  13. A voltage biased superconducting quantum interference device bootstrap circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xiaoming; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Huiwu; Wang, Yongliang; Mück, Michael; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Braginski, Alex I.; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2010-06-01

    We present a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) readout circuit operating in the voltage bias mode and called a SQUID bootstrap circuit (SBC). The SBC is an alternative implementation of two existing methods for suppression of room-temperature amplifier noise: additional voltage feedback and current feedback. Two circuit branches are connected in parallel. In the dc SQUID branch, an inductively coupled coil connected in series provides the bias current feedback for enhancing the flux-to-current coefficient. The circuit branch parallel to the dc SQUID branch contains an inductively coupled voltage feedback coil with a shunt resistor in series for suppressing the preamplifier noise current by increasing the dynamic resistance. We show that the SBC effectively reduces the preamplifier noise to below the SQUID intrinsic noise. For a helium-cooled planar SQUID magnetometer with a SQUID inductance of 350 pH, a flux noise of about 3 μΦ0 Hz - 1/2 and a magnetic field resolution of less than 3 fT Hz - 1/2 were obtained. The SBC leads to a convenient direct readout electronics for a dc SQUID with a wider adjustment tolerance than other feedback schemes.

  14. Rabi model as a quantum coherent heat engine: From quantum biology to superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, Ferdi; Hardal, Ali Ü. C.; Müstecaplıoǧlu, Özgür E.

    2015-02-01

    We propose a multilevel quantum heat engine with a working medium described by a generalized Rabi model which consists of a two-level system coupled to a single-mode bosonic field. The model is constructed to be a continuum limit of a quantum biological description of light-harvesting complexes so that it can amplify quantum coherence by a mechanism which is a quantum analog of classical Huygens clocks. The engine operates in a quantum Otto cycle where the working medium is coupled to classical heat baths in the isochoric processes of the four-stroke cycle, while either the coupling strength or the resonance frequency is changed in the adiabatic stages. We found that such an engine can produce work with an efficiency close to the Carnot bound when it operates at low temperatures and in the ultrastrong-coupling regime. The interplay of the effects of quantum coherence and quantum correlations on the engine performance is discussed in terms of second-order coherence, quantum mutual information, and the logarithmic negativity of entanglement. We point out that the proposed quantum Otto engine can be implemented experimentally with modern circuit quantum electrodynamic systems where flux qubits can be coupled ultrastrongly to superconducting transmission-line resonators.

  15. Single-photon transistor in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Neumeier, Lukas; Leib, Martin; Hartmann, Michael J

    2013-08-09

    We introduce a circuit quantum electrodynamical setup for a "single-photon" transistor. In our approach photons propagate in two open transmission lines that are coupled via two interacting transmon qubits. The interaction is such that no photons are exchanged between the two transmission lines but a single photon in one line can completely block or enable the propagation of photons in the other line. High on-off ratios can be achieved for feasible experimental parameters. Our approach is inherently scalable as all photon pulses can have the same pulse shape and carrier frequency such that output signals of one transistor can be input signals for a consecutive transistor.

  16. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Roushan, P; Neill, C; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M; Quintana, C; Leung, N; Fang, M; Barends, R; Campbell, B; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Mutus, J; O'Malley, P J J; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T; Polkovnikov, A; Cleland, A N; Martinis, J M

    2014-11-13

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems.

  17. Observation of topological transitions in interacting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roushan, P.; Neill, C.; Chen, Yu; Kolodrubetz, M.; Quintana, C.; Leung, N.; Fang, M.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T.; Polkovnikov, A.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2014-11-01

    Topology, with its abstract mathematical constructs, often manifests itself in physics and has a pivotal role in our understanding of natural phenomena. Notably, the discovery of topological phases in condensed-matter systems has changed the modern conception of phases of matter. The global nature of topological ordering, however, makes direct experimental probing an outstanding challenge. Present experimental tools are mainly indirect and, as a result, are inadequate for studying the topology of physical systems at a fundamental level. Here we employ the exquisite control afforded by state-of-the-art superconducting quantum circuits to investigate topological properties of various quantum systems. The essence of our approach is to infer geometric curvature by measuring the deflection of quantum trajectories in the curved space of the Hamiltonian. Topological properties are then revealed by integrating the curvature over closed surfaces, a quantum analogue of the Gauss-Bonnet theorem. We benchmark our technique by investigating basic topological concepts of the historically important Haldane model after mapping the momentum space of this condensed-matter model to the parameter space of a single-qubit Hamiltonian. In addition to constructing the topological phase diagram, we are able to visualize the microscopic spin texture of the associated states and their evolution across a topological phase transition. Going beyond non-interacting systems, we demonstrate the power of our method by studying topology in an interacting quantum system. This required a new qubit architecture that allows for simultaneous control over every term in a two-qubit Hamiltonian. By exploring the parameter space of this Hamiltonian, we discover the emergence of an interaction-induced topological phase. Our work establishes a powerful, generalizable experimental platform to study topological phenomena in quantum systems.

  18. Thermocompression bonding technology for multilayer superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McRae, C. R. H.; Béjanin, J. H.; Pagel, Z.; Abdallah, A. O.; McConkey, T. G.; Earnest, C. T.; Rinehart, J. R.; Mariantoni, M.

    2017-09-01

    Extensible quantum computing architectures require a large array of quantum bits operating with low error rates. A quantum processor based on superconducting devices can be scaled up by stacking microchips that perform wiring, shielding, and computational functionalities. In this article, we demonstrate a vacuum thermocompression bonding technology that utilizes thin indium films as a welding agent to attach pairs of lithographically patterned chips. At 10 mK, we find a specific dc bond resistance of 49.2 μΩ cm2. We show good transmission up to 6.8 GHz in a tunnel-capped, bonded device as compared to a similar uncapped device. Finally, we fabricate and measure a set of tunnel-capped superconducting resonators, demonstrating that our bonding technology can be used in quantum computing applications.

  19. Ensembles of physical states and random quantum circuits on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamma, Alioscia; Santra, Siddhartha; Zanardi, Paolo

    2012-11-01

    In this paper we continue and extend the investigations of the ensembles of random physical states introduced in Hamma [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.109.040502 109, 040502 (2012)]. These ensembles are constructed by finite-length random quantum circuits (RQC) acting on the (hyper)edges of an underlying (hyper)graph structure. The latter encodes for the locality structure associated with finite-time quantum evolutions generated by physical, i.e., local, Hamiltonians. Our goal is to analyze physical properties of typical states in these ensembles; in particular here we focus on proxies of quantum entanglement as purity and α-Renyi entropies. The problem is formulated in terms of matrix elements of superoperators which depend on the graph structure, choice of probability measure over the local unitaries, and circuit length. In the α=2 case these superoperators act on a restricted multiqubit space generated by permutation operators associated to the subsets of vertices of the graph. For permutationally invariant interactions the dynamics can be further restricted to an exponentially smaller subspace. We consider different families of RQCs and study their typical entanglement properties for finite time as well as their asymptotic behavior. We find that area law holds in average and that the volume law is a typical property (that is, it holds in average and the fluctuations around the average are vanishing for the large system) of physical states. The area law arises when the evolution time is O(1) with respect to the size L of the system, while the volume law arises as is typical when the evolution time scales like O(L).

  20. Superposition states for quantum nanoelectronic circuits and their nonclassical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2016-09-01

    Quantum properties of a superposition state for a series RLC nanoelectronic circuit are investigated. Two displaced number states of the same amplitude but with opposite phases are considered as components of the superposition state. We have assumed that the capacitance of the system varies with time and a time-dependent power source is exerted on the system. The effects of displacement and a sinusoidal power source on the characteristics of the state are addressed in detail. Depending on the magnitude of the sinusoidal power source, the wave packets that propagate in charge(q)-space are more or less distorted. Provided that the displacement is sufficiently high, distinct interference structures appear in the plot of the time behavior of the probability density whenever the two components of the wave packet meet together. This is strong evidence for the advent of nonclassical properties in the system, that cannot be interpretable by the classical theory. Nonclassicality of a quantum system is not only a beneficial topic for academic interest in itself, but its results can be useful resources for quantum information and computation as well.

  1. Superposition states for quantum nanoelectronic circuits and their nonclassical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2017-09-01

    Quantum properties of a superposition state for a series RLC nanoelectronic circuit are investigated. Two displaced number states of the same amplitude but with opposite phases are considered as components of the superposition state. We have assumed that the capacitance of the system varies with time and a time-dependent power source is exerted on the system. The effects of displacement and a sinusoidal power source on the characteristics of the state are addressed in detail. Depending on the magnitude of the sinusoidal power source, the wave packets that propagate in charge( q)-space are more or less distorted. Provided that the displacement is sufficiently high, distinct interference structures appear in the plot of the time behavior of the probability density whenever the two components of the wave packet meet together. This is strong evidence for the advent of nonclassical properties in the system, that cannot be interpretable by the classical theory. Nonclassicality of a quantum system is not only a beneficial topic for academic interest in itself, but its results can be useful resources for quantum information and computation as well.

  2. Quantum nondemolition photon detection in circuit QED and the quantum Zeno effect

    SciTech Connect

    Helmer, Ferdinand; Marquardt, Florian; Mariantoni, Matteo; Solano, Enrique

    2009-05-15

    We analyze the detection of itinerant photons using a quantum nondemolition measurement. An important example is the dispersive detection of microwave photons in circuit quantum electrodynamics, which can be realized via the nonlinear interaction between photons inside a superconducting transmission line resonator. We show that the back action due to the continuous measurement imposes a limit on the detector efficiency in such a scheme. We illustrate this using a setup where signal photons have to enter a cavity in order to be detected dispersively. In this approach, the measurement signal is the phase shift imparted to an intense beam passing through a second cavity mode. The restrictions on the fidelity are a consequence of the quantum Zeno effect, and we discuss both analytical results and quantum trajectory simulations of the measurement process.

  3. Dissipation in microwave quantum circuits with hybrid nanowire Josephson elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, D.; Ranfagni, A.; Agresti, A.

    2017-04-01

    Recent experiments on hybrid Josephson junctions have made the argument a topical subject. However, a quantity which remains still unknown is the tunneling (or response) time, which is strictly connected to the role that dissipation plays in the dynamics of the complete system. A simple way for evaluating dissipation in microwave circuits, previously developed for describing the dynamics of conventional Josephson junctions, is now presented as suitable for application even to non-conventional junctions. The method is based on a stochastic model, as derived from the telegrapher's equation, and is particularly devoted to the case of junctions loaded by real transmission lines. When the load is constituted by lumped-constant circuits, a connection with the stochastic model is also maintained. The theoretical model demonstrated its ability to analyze both classically-allowed and forbidden processes, and has found a wide field of applicability, namely in all cases in which dissipative effects cannot be ignored.

  4. Quantum circuits and low-degree polynomials over {{{F}}_\\mathsf{2}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montanaro, Ashley

    2017-02-01

    In this work we explore a correspondence between quantum circuits and low-degree polynomials over the finite field {{{F}}2} . Any quantum circuit made up of Hadamard, Z, controlled-Z and controlled-controlled-Z gates gives rise to a degree-3 polynomial over {{{F}}2} such that calculating quantum circuit amplitudes is equivalent to counting zeroes of the corresponding polynomial. We exploit this connection, which is especially clean and simple for this particular gate set, in two directions. First, we give proofs of classical hardness results based on quantum circuit concepts. Second, we find efficient classical simulation algorithms for certain classes of quantum circuits based on efficient algorithms for classes of polynomials.

  5. 20 CFR 416.1485 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 416.1485... Determinations and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 416.1485 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  6. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  7. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  8. 20 CFR 416.1485 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 416.1485... Determinations and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 416.1485 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  9. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  10. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  11. 20 CFR 404.985 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 404.985... and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 404.985 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  12. 20 CFR 416.1485 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 416.1485... Determinations and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 416.1485 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  13. 20 CFR 416.1485 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 416.1485... Determinations and Decisions Court Remand Cases § 416.1485 Application of circuit court law. The procedures which follow apply to administrative determinations or decisions on claims involving the application of circuit...

  14. Compensated current injection circuit, theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fontana, Giorgio

    2003-03-01

    This article presents a detailed description, analysis and example of the practical application of a wide frequency band voltage-to-current converter. The converter is characterized by a combination of positive and negative feedback loops. This feature allows compensation for parasitic impedance connected in parallel with the useful load, which in turn keeps an excitation current flowing through the useful load independent of its impedance. The simplicity of the circuit and its good electrical properties are additional advantages of the scheme.

  15. Quantum walk and potential application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. B.; Douglas, B. L.

    2010-06-01

    Quantum walk represents a generalised version of the well-known classical random walk. Regardless of their apparent connection, the dynamics of quantum walk is often non-intuitive and far deviate from its classical counterpart. However, despite such potentially superior efficiency in quantum walks, it has yet to be applied to problems of practical importance. In this paper, we will give a brief introduction to quantum walks and discuss potential applications.

  16. Complex logic functions implemented with quantum dot bionanophotonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Claussen, Jonathan C; Hildebrandt, Niko; Susumu, Kimihiro; Ancona, Mario G; Medintz, Igor L

    2014-03-26

    We combine quantum dots (QDs) with long-lifetime terbium complexes (Tb), a near-IR Alexa Fluor dye (A647), and self-assembling peptides to demonstrate combinatorial and sequential bionanophotonic logic devices that function by time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET). Upon excitation, the Tb-QD-A647 FRET-complex produces time-dependent photoluminescent signatures from multi-FRET pathways enabled by the capacitor-like behavior of the Tb. The unique photoluminescent signatures are manipulated by ratiometrically varying dye/Tb inputs and collection time. Fluorescent output is converted into Boolean logic states to create complex arithmetic circuits including the half-adder/half-subtractor, 2:1 multiplexer/1:2 demultiplexer, and a 3-digit, 16-combination keypad lock.

  17. Convergence of the multimode quantum Rabi model of circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gely, Mario F.; Parra-Rodriguez, Adrian; Bothner, Daniel; Blanter, Ya. M.; Bosman, Sal J.; Solano, Enrique; Steele, Gary A.

    2017-06-01

    Circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) studies the interaction of artificial atoms, open transmission lines, and electromagnetic resonators fabricated from superconducting electronics. While the theory of an artificial atom coupled to one mode of a resonator is well studied, considering multiple modes leads to divergences which are not well understood. Here, we introduce a first-principles model of a multimode resonator coupled to a Josephson junction atom. Studying the model in the absence of any cutoff, in which the coupling rate to mode number n scales as √{n } for n up to ∞ , we find that quantities such as the Lamb shift do not diverge due to a natural rescaling of the bare atomic parameters that arises directly from the circuit analysis. Introducing a cutoff in the coupling from a nonzero capacitance of the Josephson junction, we provide a physical interpretation of the decoupling of higher modes in the context of circuit analysis. In addition to explaining the convergence of the quantum Rabi model with no cutoff, our work also provides a useful framework for analyzing the ultrastrong coupling regime of a multimode circuit QED.

  18. Diagnostic applications of nucleic acid circuits.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cheulhee; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: While the field of DNA computing and molecular programming was engendered in large measure as a curiosity-driven exercise, it has taken on increasing importance for analytical applications. This is in large measure because of the modularity of DNA circuitry, which can serve as a programmable intermediate between inputs and outputs. These qualities may make nucleic acid circuits useful for making decisions relevant to diagnostic applications. This is especially true given that nucleic acid circuits can potentially directly interact with and be triggered by diagnostic nucleic acids and other analytes. Chemists are, by and large, unaware of many of these advances, and this Account provides a means of touching on what might seem to be an arcane field. We begin by explaining nucleic acid amplification reactions that can lead to signal amplification, such as catalytic hairpin assembly (CHA) and the hybridization chain reaction (HCR). In these circuits, a single-stranded input acts on kinetically trapped substrates via exposed toeholds and strand exchange reactions, refolding the substrates and allowing them to interact with one another. As multiple duplexes (CHA) or concatemers of increasing length (HCR) are generated, there are opportunities to couple these outputs to different analytical modalities, including transduction to fluorescent, electrochemical, and colorimetric signals. Because both amplification and transduction are at their root dependent on the programmability of Waston-Crick base pairing, nucleic acid circuits can be much more readily tuned and adapted to new applications than can many other biomolecular amplifiers. As an example, robust methods for real-time monitoring of isothermal amplification reactions have been developed recently. Beyond amplification, nucleic acid circuits can include logic gates and thresholding components that allow them to be used for analysis and decision making. Scalable and complex DNA circuits (seesaw gates

  19. Radio-Frequency Electronics, Circuits and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagen, Jon B.

    This accessible and comprehensive book provides an introduction to the basic concepts and key circuits of radio frequency systems, covering fundamental principles which apply to all radio devices, from wireless data transceivers on semiconductor chips to high-power broadcast transmitters. Topics covered include filters, amplifiers, oscillators, modulators, low-noise amplifiers, phase-locked loops, and transformers. Applications of radio frequency systems are described in such areas as communications, radio and television broadcasting, radar, and radio astronomy. The book contains many exercises, and assumes only a knowledge of elementary electronics and circuit analysis. It will be an ideal textbook for advanced undergraduate and graduate courses in electrical engineering, as well as an invaluable reference for researchers and professional engineers in this area, or for those moving into the field of wireless communications.

  20. Efficient quantum circuits for continuous-time quantum walks on composite graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, T.; Wang, J. B.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we investigate the simulation of continuous-time quantum walks on specific classes of graphs, for which it is possible to fast-forward the time-evolution operator to achieve constant-time simulation complexity and to perform the simulation exactly, i.e. ε =0 , while maintaining \\text{poly}≤ft(\\text{log}(n)\\right) efficiency. In particular, we discuss two classes of composite graphs, commuting graphs and Cartesian product of graphs, that contain classes of graphs which can be simulated in this fashion. This allows us to identify new families of graphs that we can efficiently simulate in a quantum circuit framework, providing practical and explicit means to explore quantum-walk based algorithms in laboratories.

  1. Quantum coherent phenomena in superconducting circuits and ultracold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Kaushik

    This thesis consists of theoretical studies of superconducting qubits, and trapped bosons and fermions at ultracold temperature. In superconducting qubits I analyze the resonant properties and decoherence behavior of dc SQUID phase qubits, in which one junction acts as a phase qubit and the rest of the device provides isolation from dissipation and noise in the bias lead. Typically qubit states in phase qubits are detected by tunneling it to the voltage state. I propose an alternate non-destructive readout mechanism which relies on the difference in the magnetic flux through the SQUID loop due to state of the qubit. I also study decoherence effects in a dc SQUID phase qubit caused by the isolation circuit. When the frequency of the qubit is at least two times larger than the resonance frequency of the isolation circuit, I find that the decoherence time of the qubit is two orders of magnitude larger than the typical ohmic regime, where the frequency of the qubit is much smaller than the resonance frequency of the isolation circuit. This theory is extended to other similar superconducting quantum devices and has been applied to experiments from the group at the University of Maryland. I also demonstrate, theoretically, vacuum Rabi oscillations, analogous to circuit-QED, in superconducting qubits coupled to an environment with resonance. The result obtained gives an exact analytical expression for coherent oscillation of state between the system (the qubit) and the environment with resonance. Next I investigate ultracold atoms in harmonically confined optical lattices. They exhibit a 'wedding cake structure' of alternating Mott shells with different number of bosons per site. In regions between the Mott shells, a superfluid phase emerges at low temperatures which at higher temperatures becomes a normal Bose liquid. Using finite-temperature quantum field theoretic techniques, I find analytically the properties of the superfluid, Bose liquid, and Mott insulating regions

  2. VLSI circuits and systems for microphotonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachowicz, S.; Rassau, A.; Kim, C.; Lee, S.-M.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes various VLSI systems for microphotonic applications. The first project investigates an optimum phase design implementing a multi phase Opto-ULSI processor for multi-function capable optical networks. This research is oriented around the initial development of an 8 phase Opto-ULSI processor that implements a Beam Steering (BS) Opto-ULSI processor (OUP) for integrated intelligent photonic system (IIPS), while investigating the optimal phase characteristics and developing compensation for the nonlinearity of liquid crystal. The second part provides an insight into realisation of a novel 3-D configurable chip based on "sea-of-pixels" architecture, which is highly suitable for applications in multimedia systems as well as for computation of coefficients for generation of holograms required in optical switches. The paper explores strategies for implementation of distributed primitives for arithmetic processing. This entails optimisation of basic cells that would allow using these primitives as part of a 3-D "sea-of-pixel" configurable processing array. The concept of 3-D Soft-Chip Technology (SCT) entails integration of "Soft-Processing Circuits" with "Soft-Configurable Circuits", which effectively manipulates hardware primitives through vertical integration of control and data. Thus the notion of 3-D Soft-Chip emerges as a new design paradigm for content-rich multimedia, telecommunication and photonic-based networking system applications. Combined with the effective manipulation of configurable hardware arithmetic primitives, highly efficient and powerful soft configurable processing systems can be realized.

  3. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip

    PubMed Central

    Schuck, C.; Guo, X.; Fan, L.; Ma, X.; Poot, M.; Tang, H. X.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips. PMID:26792424

  4. Quantum interference in heterogeneous superconducting-photonic circuits on a silicon chip.

    PubMed

    Schuck, C; Guo, X; Fan, L; Ma, X; Poot, M; Tang, H X

    2016-01-21

    Quantum information processing holds great promise for communicating and computing data efficiently. However, scaling current photonic implementation approaches to larger system size remains an outstanding challenge for realizing disruptive quantum technology. Two main ingredients of quantum information processors are quantum interference and single-photon detectors. Here we develop a hybrid superconducting-photonic circuit system to show how these elements can be combined in a scalable fashion on a silicon chip. We demonstrate the suitability of this approach for integrated quantum optics by interfering and detecting photon pairs directly on the chip with waveguide-coupled single-photon detectors. Using a directional coupler implemented with silicon nitride nanophotonic waveguides, we observe 97% interference visibility when measuring photon statistics with two monolithically integrated superconducting single-photon detectors. The photonic circuit and detector fabrication processes are compatible with standard semiconductor thin-film technology, making it possible to implement more complex and larger scale quantum photonic circuits on silicon chips.

  5. Optimal universal asymmetric covariant quantum cloning circuits for qubit entanglement manipulation

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, Levente; Koniorczyk, Matyas; Adam, Peter; Janszky, Jozsef

    2010-03-15

    We consider the entanglement manipulation capabilities of the universal covariant quantum cloner or quantum processor circuit for quantum bits. We investigate its use for cloning a member of a bipartite or a genuine tripartite entangled state of quantum bits. We find that for bipartite pure entangled states a nontrivial behavior of concurrence appears, while for GHZ entangled states a possibility of the partial extraction of bipartite entanglement can be achieved.

  6. Dynamical Lamb effect versus dissipation in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, A. A.; Shapiro, D. S.; Pogosov, W. V.; Lozovik, Yu. E.

    2016-06-01

    Superconducting circuits provide a new platform for study of nonstationary cavity QED phenomena. An example of such a phenomenon is the dynamical Lamb effect, which is the parametric excitation of an atom due to nonadiabatic modulation of its Lamb shift. This effect was initially introduced for a natural atom in a varying cavity, while we suggest its realization in a superconducting qubit-cavity system with dynamically tunable coupling. In the present paper, we study the interplay between the dynamical Lamb effect and the energy dissipation, which is unavoidable in realistic systems. We find that despite naive expectations, this interplay can lead to unexpected dynamical regimes. One of the most striking results is that photon generation from vacuum can be strongly enhanced due to qubit relaxation, which opens another channel for such a process. We also show that dissipation in the cavity can increase the qubit excited-state population. Our results can be used for experimental observation and investigation of the dynamical Lamb effect and accompanying quantum effects.

  7. Aharonov-Bohm phases in a quantum LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, ChunJun; Yao, Yuan; Zhitnitsky, Ariel R.

    2016-03-01

    We study novel types of contributions to the partition function of the Maxwell system defined on a small compact manifold. These contributions, often not addressed in the perturbative treatment with physical photons, emerge as a result of tunneling transitions between topologically distinct but physically identical vacuum winding states. These new terms give an extra contribution to the Casimir pressure, yet to be measured. We argue that this effect is highly sensitive to a small external electric field, which should be contrasted with the conventional Casimir effect, where the vacuum photons are essentially unaffected by any external field. Furthermore, photons will be emitted from the vacuum in response to a time-dependent electric field, similar to the dynamical Casimir effect in which real particles are radiated from the vacuum due to the time-dependent boundary conditions. We also propose an experimental setup using a quantum LC circuit to detect this novel effect. We expect physical electric charges to appear on the capacitor plates when the system dimension is such that coherent Aharonov-Bohm phases can be maintained over macroscopically large distances.

  8. (DARPA) Quantum-Limited Measurement as a Tool for Entanglement in Superconducting Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-29

    DARPA) QUANTUM-LIMITED MEASUREMENT AS A TOOL FOR ENTANGLEMENT IN SUPERCONDUCTING CIRCUITS ROBERT MCDERMOTT UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN SYSTEM 08/29/2013...state the junction tunnels rapidly to the continuum, producing a large and easily measured classical voltage pulse. With a single junction circuit we...achieve detection efficiencies of order 90%. With a two- junction counter circuit , we have performed a microwave-frequency coincidence counting

  9. Inducing nonclassical lasing via periodic drivings in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; García-Ripoll, Juan José; Porras, Diego

    2014-11-07

    We show how a pair of superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave cavity mode can be used to engineer a single-atom laser that emits light into a nonclassical state. Our scheme relies on the dressing of the qubit-field coupling by periodic modulations of the qubit energy. In the dressed basis, the radiative decay of the first qubit becomes an effective incoherent pumping mechanism that injects energy into the system, hence turning dissipation to our advantage. A second, auxiliary qubit is used to shape the decay within the cavity, in such a way that lasing occurs in a squeezed basis of the cavity mode. We characterize the system both by mean-field theory and exact calculations. Our work may find applications in the generation of squeezing and entanglement in circuit QED, as well as in the study of dissipative few- and many-body phase transitions.

  10. Quantum technology and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Boshier, Malcolm; Berkeland, Dana; Govindan, Tr; Abo - Shaeer, Jamil

    2010-12-10

    Quantum states of matter can be exploited as high performance sensors for measuring time, gravity, rotation, and electromagnetic fields, and quantum states of light provide powerful new tools for imaging and communication. Much attention is being paid to the ultimate limits of this quantum technology. For example, it has already been shown that exotic quantum states can be used to measure or image with higher precision or higher resolution or lower radiated power than any conventional technologies, and proof-of-principle experiments demonstrating measurement precision below the standard quantum limit (shot noise) are just starting to appear. However, quantum technologies have another powerful advantage beyond pure sensing performance that may turn out to be more important in practical applications: the potential for building devices with lower size/weight/power (SWaP) and cost requirements than existing instruments. The organizers of Quantum Technology Applications Workshop (QTAW) have several goals: (1) Bring together sponsors, researchers, engineers and end users to help build a stronger quantum technology community; (2) Identify how quantum systems might improve the performance of practical devices in the near- to mid-term; and (3) Identify applications for which more long term investment is necessary to realize improved performance for realistic applications. To realize these goals, the QTAW II workshop included fifty scientists, engineers, managers and sponsors from academia, national laboratories, government and the private-sector. The agenda included twelve presentations, a panel discussion, several breaks for informal exchanges, and a written survey of participants. Topics included photon sources, optics and detectors, squeezed light, matter waves, atomic clocks and atom magnetometry. Corresponding applications included communication, imaging, optical interferometry, navigation, gravimetry, geodesy, biomagnetism, and explosives detection. Participants

  11. Synthetic mammalian gene circuits for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Ye, Haifeng; Aubel, Dominique; Fussenegger, Martin

    2013-12-01

    Synthetic biology is the science of reassembling cataloged and standardized biological items in a systematic and rational manner to create and engineer functional biological designer devices, systems and organisms with novel and useful, preferably therapeutic functions. Synthetic biology has significantly advanced the design of complex genetic networks that can reprogram metabolic activities in mammalian cells and provide novel therapeutic strategies for future gene-based and cell-based therapies. Synthetic biology-inspired therapeutic strategies provide new opportunities for improving human health in the 21st century. This review covers the most recent synthetic mammalian circuits designed for therapy of diseases such as metabolic disorders, cancer, and immune disorders. We conclude by discussing current challenges and future perspectives for biomedical applications of synthetic mammalian gene networks.

  12. ZENO: a new graphical tool for design and simulation of quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabral, Gustavo E. M.; Lula, Bernardo, Jr.; de Lima, Aercio F.

    2005-05-01

    Current technology for building digital computers is predicted to reach its limit within the next 10 years due to the increasing miniaturization of digital components. By reaching sizes of a few nanometers, electrons stop behaving as particles and start behaving as waves, obeying essentially the principles of Quantum Mechanics, and effects such as interference, superposition and entanglement become dominant. The utilization of those effects allows more that just an evolution of the miniaturization process. It allows for a computational parallelism impossible to be obtained efficiently through classical computational methods or devices. Several algorithms utilizing such effects have been proposed and indicated that Quantum Computation is significantly more efficient at solving certain class of problems than classical computation. Actually, there is not yet any hardware (a quantum computer) able to compute a useful algorithm outside of research labs. A turn-around to that problem is to simulate the behavior of a quantum computer by a classical computer. There are, to this day, a number of quantum computer simulators available which, in general, use the quantum circuit model defined by Deutsch. Just a few of them are universal. We have developed a novel universal quantum circuit simulator, called Zeno, to the design and test of quantum algorithms. Zeno offers a set of features that engulfs most of the features presented by the other existing universal quantum circuit simulators and that also allows it to be used in the design and simulation of quantum channels.

  13. Simple proof of equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and the circuit model.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari; Lidar, Daniel A; Mitchell, Morgan

    2007-08-17

    We prove the equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and quantum computation in the circuit model. An explicit adiabatic computation procedure is given that generates a ground state from which the answer can be extracted. The amount of time needed is evaluated by computing the gap. We show that the procedure is computationally efficient.

  14. Ultraprecise phase manipulation in integrated photonic quantum circuits with generalized directional couplers

    SciTech Connect

    Heilmann, R.; Keil, R.; Gräfe, M.; Nolte, S.; Szameit, A.

    2014-08-11

    We present an innovative approach for ultra-precise phase manipulation in integrated photonic quantum circuits. To this end, we employ generalized directional couplers that utilize a detuning of the propagation constant in optical waveguides by the overlap of adjacent waveguide modes. We demonstrate our findings in experiments with classical as well as quantum light.

  15. Implementing the Quantum von Neumann Architecture with Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariantoni, Matteo; Wang, H.; Yamamoto, T.; Neeley, M.; Bialczak, Radoslaw C.; Chen, Y.; Lenander, M.; Lucero, Erik; O'Connell, A. D.; Sank, D.; Weides, M.; Wenner, J.; Yin, Y.; Zhao, J.; Korotkov, A. N.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2011-10-01

    The von Neumann architecture for a classical computer comprises a central processing unit and a memory holding instructions and data. We demonstrate a quantum central processing unit that exchanges data with a quantum random-access memory integrated on a chip, with instructions stored on a classical computer. We test our quantum machine by executing codes that involve seven quantum elements: Two superconducting qubits coupled through a quantum bus, two quantum memories, and two zeroing registers. Two vital algorithms for quantum computing are demonstrated, the quantum Fourier transform, with 66% process fidelity, and the three-qubit Toffoli-class OR phase gate, with 98% phase fidelity. Our results, in combination especially with longer qubit coherence, illustrate a potentially viable approach to factoring numbers and implementing simple quantum error correction codes.

  16. Quantum Simulation with Circuit-QED Lattices: from Elementary Building Blocks to Many-Body Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu

    Recent experimental and theoretical progress in superconducting circuits and circuit QED (quantum electrodynamics) has helped to develop high-precision techniques to control, manipulate, and detect individual mesoscopic quantum systems. A promising direction is hence to scale up from individual building blocks to form larger-scale quantum many-body systems. Although realizing a scalable fault-tolerant quantum computer still faces major barriers of decoherence and quantum error correction, it is feasible to realize scalable quantum simulators with state-of-the-art technology. From the technological point of view, this could serve as an intermediate stage towards the final goal of a large-scale quantum computer, and could help accumulating experience with the control of quantum systems with a large number of degrees of freedom. From the physical point of view, this opens up a new regime where condensed matter systems can be simulated and studied, here in the context of strongly correlated photons and two-level systems. In this thesis, we mainly focus on two aspects of circuit-QED based quantum simulation. First, we discuss the elementary building blocks of the quantum simulator, in particular a fluxonium circuit coupled to a superconducting resonator. We show the interesting properties of the fluxonium circuit as a qubit, including the unusual structure of its charge matrix elements. We also employ perturbation theory to derive the effective Hamiltonian of the coupled system in the dispersive regime, where qubit and the photon frequencies are detuned. The observables predicted with our theory, including dispersive shifts and Kerr nonlinearity, are compared with data from experiments, such as homodyne transmission and two-tone spectroscopy. These studies also relate to the problem of detection in a circuit-QED quantum simulator. Second, we study many-body physics of circuit-QED lattices, serving as quantum simulators. In particular, we focus on two different

  17. Fault-tolerant, high-level quantum circuits: form, compilation and description

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paler, Alexandru; Polian, Ilia; Nemoto, Kae; Devitt, Simon J.

    2017-06-01

    Fault-tolerant quantum error correction is a necessity for any quantum architecture destined to tackle interesting, large-scale problems. Its theoretical formalism has been well founded for nearly two decades. However, we still do not have an appropriate compiler to produce a fault-tolerant, error-corrected description from a higher-level quantum circuit for state-of the-art hardware models. There are many technical hurdles, including dynamic circuit constructions that occur when constructing fault-tolerant circuits with commonly used error correcting codes. We introduce a package that converts high-level quantum circuits consisting of commonly used gates into a form employing all decompositions and ancillary protocols needed for fault-tolerant error correction. We call this form the (I)initialisation, (C)NOT, (M)measurement form (ICM) and consists of an initialisation layer of qubits into one of four distinct states, a massive, deterministic array of CNOT operations and a series of time-ordered X- or Z-basis measurements. The form allows a more flexible approach towards circuit optimisation. At the same time, the package outputs a standard circuit or a canonical geometric description which is a necessity for operating current state-of-the-art hardware architectures using topological quantum codes.

  18. Fermion-fermion scattering in quantum field theory with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, L; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Lamata, L; Romero, G; Solano, E

    2015-02-20

    We propose an analog-digital quantum simulation of fermion-fermion scattering mediated by a continuum of bosonic modes within a circuit quantum electrodynamics scenario. This quantum technology naturally provides strong coupling of superconducting qubits with a continuum of electromagnetic modes in an open transmission line. In this way, we propose qubits to efficiently simulate fermionic modes via digital techniques, while we consider the continuum complexity of an open transmission line to simulate the continuum complexity of bosonic modes in quantum field theories. Therefore, we believe that the complexity-simulating-complexity concept should become a leading paradigm in any effort towards scalable quantum simulations.

  19. Scalable Quantum Circuit and Control for a Superconducting Surface Code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versluis, R.; Poletto, S.; Khammassi, N.; Tarasinski, B.; Haider, N.; Michalak, D. J.; Bruno, A.; Bertels, K.; DiCarlo, L.

    2017-09-01

    We present a scalable scheme for executing the error-correction cycle of a monolithic surface-code fabric composed of fast-flux-tunable transmon qubits with nearest-neighbor coupling. An eight-qubit unit cell forms the basis for repeating both the quantum hardware and coherent control, enabling spatial multiplexing. This control uses three fixed frequencies for all single-qubit gates and a unique frequency-detuning pattern for each qubit in the cell. By pipelining the interaction and readout steps of ancilla-based X - and Z -type stabilizer measurements, we can engineer detuning patterns that avoid all second-order transmon-transmon interactions except those exploited in controlled-phase gates, regardless of fabric size. Our scheme is applicable to defect-based and planar logical qubits, including lattice surgery.

  20. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We will...

  1. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We will...

  2. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We will...

  3. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We will...

  4. 20 CFR 405.515 - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 405.515 Section 405.515 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW PROCESS FOR ADJUDICATING INITIAL DISABILITY CLAIMS Judicial Review § 405.515 Application of circuit court law. We will...

  5. Experimental investigation of a four-qubit linear-optical quantum logic circuit

    PubMed Central

    Stárek, R.; Mičuda, M.; Miková, M.; Straka, I.; Dušek, M.; Ježek, M.; Fiurášek, J.

    2016-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate and characterize a four-qubit linear-optical quantum logic circuit. Our robust and versatile scheme exploits encoding of two qubits into polarization and path degrees of single photons and involves two crossed inherently stable interferometers. This approach allows us to design a complex quantum logic circuit that combines a genuine four-qubit C3Z gate and several two-qubit and single-qubit gates. The C3Z gate introduces a sign flip if and only if all four qubits are in the computational state |1〉. We verify high-fidelity performance of this central four-qubit gate using Hofmann bounds on quantum gate fidelity and Monte Carlo fidelity sampling. We also experimentally demonstrate that the quantum logic circuit can generate genuine multipartite entanglement and we certify the entanglement with the use of suitably tailored entanglement witnesses. PMID:27647176

  6. Implementation of a quantum controlled-SWAP gate with photonic circuits

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Tanida, Masato; Hofmann, Holger F.; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2017-01-01

    Quantum information science addresses how the processing and transmission of information are affected by uniquely quantum mechanical phenomena. Combination of two-qubit gates has been used to realize quantum circuits, however, scalability is becoming a critical problem. The use of three-qubit gates may simplify the structure of quantum circuits dramatically. Among them, the controlled-SWAP (Fredkin) gates are essential since they can be directly applied to important protocols, e.g., error correction, fingerprinting, and optimal cloning. Here we report a realization of the Fredkin gate for photonic qubits. We achieve a fidelity of 0.85 in the computational basis and an output state fidelity of 0.81 for a 3-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The estimated process fidelity of 0.77 indicates that our Fredkin gate can be applied to various quantum tasks. PMID:28361950

  7. Implementation of a quantum controlled-SWAP gate with photonic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Tanida, Masato; Hofmann, Holger F.; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2017-03-01

    Quantum information science addresses how the processing and transmission of information are affected by uniquely quantum mechanical phenomena. Combination of two-qubit gates has been used to realize quantum circuits, however, scalability is becoming a critical problem. The use of three-qubit gates may simplify the structure of quantum circuits dramatically. Among them, the controlled-SWAP (Fredkin) gates are essential since they can be directly applied to important protocols, e.g., error correction, fingerprinting, and optimal cloning. Here we report a realization of the Fredkin gate for photonic qubits. We achieve a fidelity of 0.85 in the computational basis and an output state fidelity of 0.81 for a 3-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The estimated process fidelity of 0.77 indicates that our Fredkin gate can be applied to various quantum tasks.

  8. Generation of a macroscopic entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tong; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Liu, Jin-Ming; Yang, Chui-Ping; Nori, Franco

    2016-01-01

    W-type entangled states can be used as quantum channels for, e.g., quantum teleportation, quantum dense coding, and quantum key distribution. In this work, we propose a way to generate a macroscopic W-type entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED. The memories considered here are nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles (NVEs), each located in a different cavity. This proposal does not require initially preparing each NVE in a coherent state instead of a ground state, which should significantly reduce its experimental difficulty. For most of the operation time, each cavity remains in a vacuum state, thus decoherence caused by the cavity decay and the unwanted inter-cavity crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, only one external-cavity coupler qubit is needed, which simplifies the circuit. PMID:27562055

  9. Implementation of a quantum controlled-SWAP gate with photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Tanida, Masato; Hofmann, Holger F; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2017-03-31

    Quantum information science addresses how the processing and transmission of information are affected by uniquely quantum mechanical phenomena. Combination of two-qubit gates has been used to realize quantum circuits, however, scalability is becoming a critical problem. The use of three-qubit gates may simplify the structure of quantum circuits dramatically. Among them, the controlled-SWAP (Fredkin) gates are essential since they can be directly applied to important protocols, e.g., error correction, fingerprinting, and optimal cloning. Here we report a realization of the Fredkin gate for photonic qubits. We achieve a fidelity of 0.85 in the computational basis and an output state fidelity of 0.81 for a 3-photon Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The estimated process fidelity of 0.77 indicates that our Fredkin gate can be applied to various quantum tasks.

  10. Generation of a macroscopic entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Liu, Jin-Ming; Yang, Chui-Ping; Nori, Franco

    2016-08-26

    W-type entangled states can be used as quantum channels for, e.g., quantum teleportation, quantum dense coding, and quantum key distribution. In this work, we propose a way to generate a macroscopic W-type entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED. The memories considered here are nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles (NVEs), each located in a different cavity. This proposal does not require initially preparing each NVE in a coherent state instead of a ground state, which should significantly reduce its experimental difficulty. For most of the operation time, each cavity remains in a vacuum state, thus decoherence caused by the cavity decay and the unwanted inter-cavity crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, only one external-cavity coupler qubit is needed, which simplifies the circuit.

  11. Generation of a macroscopic entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tong; Su, Qi-Ping; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Liu, Jin-Ming; Yang, Chui-Ping; Nori, Franco

    2016-08-01

    W-type entangled states can be used as quantum channels for, e.g., quantum teleportation, quantum dense coding, and quantum key distribution. In this work, we propose a way to generate a macroscopic W-type entangled coherent state using quantum memories in circuit QED. The memories considered here are nitrogen-vacancy center ensembles (NVEs), each located in a different cavity. This proposal does not require initially preparing each NVE in a coherent state instead of a ground state, which should significantly reduce its experimental difficulty. For most of the operation time, each cavity remains in a vacuum state, thus decoherence caused by the cavity decay and the unwanted inter-cavity crosstalk are greatly suppressed. Moreover, only one external-cavity coupler qubit is needed, which simplifies the circuit.

  12. Investigation of the open-circuit voltage in solar cells doped with quantum dots

    PubMed Central

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Hoshi, Yusuke; Usami, Noritaka

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) have attracted much attention for use in photovoltaic applications because of their potential for overcoming the limits of conventional single-junction devices. One problem associated with solar cells using QDs is that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) always decreases with the addition of QDs with respect to the reference cell without QDs. Here, we report the investigation of current–voltage characteristics in Ge/Si QD solar cells in the temperature range from 100 to 300 K. We show that even though Voc decreases with increasing temperature, it depends on the nominal Ge thickness, indicating that Voc reduction is primarily caused by a decrease in the bandgap energy of the cell. From photoluminescence decay measurements, we found that rapid carrier extraction from QDs occurred in the solar cells; this process eliminates the quasi-Fermi energy splitting between the QDs and the host semiconductor and causes Voc reduction in QD solar cells. PMID:24067805

  13. High-dimensional quantum key distribution based on multicore fiber using silicon photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yunhong; Bacco, Davide; Dalgaard, Kjeld; Cai, Xinlun; Zhou, Xiaoqi; Rottwitt, Karsten; Oxenløwe, Leif Katsuo

    2017-06-01

    Quantum key distribution provides an efficient means to exchange information in an unconditionally secure way. Historically, quantum key distribution protocols have been based on binary signal formats, such as two polarization states, and the transmitted information efficiency of the quantum key is intrinsically limited to 1 bit/photon. Here we propose and experimentally demonstrate, for the first time, a high-dimensional quantum key distribution protocol based on space division multiplexing in multicore fiber using silicon photonic integrated lightwave circuits. We successfully realized three mutually unbiased bases in a four-dimensional Hilbert space, and achieved low and stable quantum bit error rate well below both the coherent attack and individual attack limits. Compared to previous demonstrations, the use of a multicore fiber in our protocol provides a much more efficient way to create high-dimensional quantum states, and enables breaking the information efficiency limit of traditional quantum key distribution protocols. In addition, the silicon photonic circuits used in our work integrate variable optical attenuators, highly efficient multicore fiber couplers, and Mach-Zehnder interferometers, enabling manipulating high-dimensional quantum states in a compact and stable manner. Our demonstration paves the way to utilize state-of-the-art multicore fibers for noise tolerance high-dimensional quantum key distribution, and boost silicon photonics for high information efficiency quantum communications.

  14. Superconducting quantum circuits at the surface code threshold for fault tolerance.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Kelly, J; Megrant, A; Veitia, A; Sank, D; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Mutus, J; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Neill, C; O'Malley, P; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Korotkov, A N; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2014-04-24

    A quantum computer can solve hard problems, such as prime factoring, database searching and quantum simulation, at the cost of needing to protect fragile quantum states from error. Quantum error correction provides this protection by distributing a logical state among many physical quantum bits (qubits) by means of quantum entanglement. Superconductivity is a useful phenomenon in this regard, because it allows the construction of large quantum circuits and is compatible with microfabrication. For superconducting qubits, the surface code approach to quantum computing is a natural choice for error correction, because it uses only nearest-neighbour coupling and rapidly cycled entangling gates. The gate fidelity requirements are modest: the per-step fidelity threshold is only about 99 per cent. Here we demonstrate a universal set of logic gates in a superconducting multi-qubit processor, achieving an average single-qubit gate fidelity of 99.92 per cent and a two-qubit gate fidelity of up to 99.4 per cent. This places Josephson quantum computing at the fault-tolerance threshold for surface code error correction. Our quantum processor is a first step towards the surface code, using five qubits arranged in a linear array with nearest-neighbour coupling. As a further demonstration, we construct a five-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state using the complete circuit and full set of gates. The results demonstrate that Josephson quantum computing is a high-fidelity technology, with a clear path to scaling up to large-scale, fault-tolerant quantum circuits.

  15. Geometric reduction of dynamical nonlocality in nanoscale quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strambini, E.; Makarenko, K. S.; Abulizi, G.; de Jong, M. P.; van der Wiel, W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocality is a key feature discriminating quantum and classical physics. Quantum-interference phenomena, such as Young’s double slit experiment, are one of the clearest manifestations of nonlocality, recently addressed as dynamical to specify its origin in the quantum equations of motion. It is well known that loss of dynamical nonlocality can occur due to (partial) collapse of the wavefunction due to a measurement, such as which-path detection. However, alternative mechanisms affecting dynamical nonlocality have hardly been considered, although of crucial importance in many schemes for quantum information processing. Here, we present a fundamentally different pathway of losing dynamical nonlocality, demonstrating that the detailed geometry of the detection scheme is crucial to preserve nonlocality. By means of a solid-state quantum-interference experiment we quantify this effect in a diffusive system. We show that interference is not only affected by decoherence, but also by a loss of dynamical nonlocality based on a local reduction of the number of quantum conduction channels of the interferometer. With our measurements and theoretical model we demonstrate that this mechanism is an intrinsic property of quantum dynamics. Understanding the geometrical constraints protecting nonlocality is crucial when designing quantum networks for quantum information processing.

  16. Geometric reduction of dynamical nonlocality in nanoscale quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Strambini, E; Makarenko, K S; Abulizi, G; de Jong, M P; van der Wiel, W G

    2016-01-06

    Nonlocality is a key feature discriminating quantum and classical physics. Quantum-interference phenomena, such as Young's double slit experiment, are one of the clearest manifestations of nonlocality, recently addressed as dynamical to specify its origin in the quantum equations of motion. It is well known that loss of dynamical nonlocality can occur due to (partial) collapse of the wavefunction due to a measurement, such as which-path detection. However, alternative mechanisms affecting dynamical nonlocality have hardly been considered, although of crucial importance in many schemes for quantum information processing. Here, we present a fundamentally different pathway of losing dynamical nonlocality, demonstrating that the detailed geometry of the detection scheme is crucial to preserve nonlocality. By means of a solid-state quantum-interference experiment we quantify this effect in a diffusive system. We show that interference is not only affected by decoherence, but also by a loss of dynamical nonlocality based on a local reduction of the number of quantum conduction channels of the interferometer. With our measurements and theoretical model we demonstrate that this mechanism is an intrinsic property of quantum dynamics. Understanding the geometrical constraints protecting nonlocality is crucial when designing quantum networks for quantum information processing.

  17. Electric circuit networks equivalent to chaotic quantum billiards

    SciTech Connect

    Bulgakov, Evgeny N.; Maksimov, Dmitrii N.; Sadreev, Almas F.

    2005-04-01

    We consider two electric RLC resonance networks that are equivalent to quantum billiards. In a network of inductors grounded by capacitors, the eigenvalues of the quantum billiard correspond to the squared resonant frequencies. In a network of capacitors grounded by inductors, the eigenvalues of the billiard are given by the inverse of the squared resonant frequencies. In both cases, the local voltages play the role of the wave function of the quantum billiard. However, unlike for quantum billiards, there is a heat power because of the resistance of the inductors. In the equivalent chaotic billiards, we derive a distribution of the heat power which describes well the numerical statistics.

  18. Geometric reduction of dynamical nonlocality in nanoscale quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Strambini, E.; Makarenko, K. S.; Abulizi, G.; de Jong, M. P.; van der Wiel, W. G.

    2016-01-01

    Nonlocality is a key feature discriminating quantum and classical physics. Quantum-interference phenomena, such as Young’s double slit experiment, are one of the clearest manifestations of nonlocality, recently addressed as dynamical to specify its origin in the quantum equations of motion. It is well known that loss of dynamical nonlocality can occur due to (partial) collapse of the wavefunction due to a measurement, such as which-path detection. However, alternative mechanisms affecting dynamical nonlocality have hardly been considered, although of crucial importance in many schemes for quantum information processing. Here, we present a fundamentally different pathway of losing dynamical nonlocality, demonstrating that the detailed geometry of the detection scheme is crucial to preserve nonlocality. By means of a solid-state quantum-interference experiment we quantify this effect in a diffusive system. We show that interference is not only affected by decoherence, but also by a loss of dynamical nonlocality based on a local reduction of the number of quantum conduction channels of the interferometer. With our measurements and theoretical model we demonstrate that this mechanism is an intrinsic property of quantum dynamics. Understanding the geometrical constraints protecting nonlocality is crucial when designing quantum networks for quantum information processing. PMID:26732751

  19. Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits: from the Dynamical Casimir effect to Majorana fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2012-02-01

    This talk will present an overview of some of our recent results on atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits. Particular emphasis will be given to photons interacting with qubits, interferometry, the Dynamical Casimir effect, and also studying Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits.[4pt] References available online at our web site:[0pt] J.Q. You, Z.D. Wang, W. Zhang, F. Nori, Manipulating and probing Majorana fermions using superconducting circuits, (2011). Arxiv. J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in a superconducting coplanar waveguide, Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 147003 (2009). [0pt] J.R. Johansson, G. Johansson, C.M. Wilson, F. Nori, Dynamical Casimir effect in superconducting microwave circuits, Phys. Rev. A 82, 052509 (2010). [0pt] C.M. Wilson, G. Johansson, A. Pourkabirian, J.R. Johansson, T. Duty, F. Nori, P. Delsing, Observation of the Dynamical Casimir Effect in a superconducting circuit. Nature, in press (Nov. 2011). P.D. Nation, J.R. Johansson, M.P. Blencowe, F. Nori, Stimulating uncertainty: Amplifying the quantum vacuum with superconducting circuits, Rev. Mod. Phys., in press (2011). [0pt] J.Q. You, F. Nori, Atomic physics and quantum optics using superconducting circuits, Nature 474, 589 (2011). [0pt] S.N. Shevchenko, S. Ashhab, F. Nori, Landau-Zener-Stuckelberg interferometry, Phys. Reports 492, 1 (2010). [0pt] I. Buluta, S. Ashhab, F. Nori. Natural and artificial atoms for quantum computation, Reports on Progress in Physics 74, 104401 (2011). [0pt] I.Buluta, F. Nori, Quantum Simulators, Science 326, 108 (2009). [0pt] L.F. Wei, K. Maruyama, X.B. Wang, J.Q. You, F. Nori, Testing quantum contextuality with macroscopic superconducting circuits, Phys. Rev. B 81, 174513 (2010). [0pt] J.Q. You, X.-F. Shi, X. Hu, F. Nori, Quantum emulation of a spin system with topologically protected ground states using superconducting quantum circuit, Phys. Rev. A 81, 063823 (2010).

  20. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum light–matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories. PMID:27695198

  1. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances.

    PubMed

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G; Humphreys, Peter C; Bustard, Philip J; Acosta, Victor M; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J

    2016-11-12

    Quantum light-matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  2. Quantum memories: emerging applications and recent advances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heshami, Khabat; England, Duncan G.; Humphreys, Peter C.; Bustard, Philip J.; Acosta, Victor M.; Nunn, Joshua; Sussman, Benjamin J.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum light-matter interfaces are at the heart of photonic quantum technologies. Quantum memories for photons, where non-classical states of photons are mapped onto stationary matter states and preserved for subsequent retrieval, are technical realizations enabled by exquisite control over interactions between light and matter. The ability of quantum memories to synchronize probabilistic events makes them a key component in quantum repeaters and quantum computation based on linear optics. This critical feature has motivated many groups to dedicate theoretical and experimental research to develop quantum memory devices. In recent years, exciting new applications, and more advanced developments of quantum memories, have proliferated. In this review, we outline some of the emerging applications of quantum memories in optical signal processing, quantum computation and non-linear optics. We review recent experimental and theoretical developments, and their impacts on more advanced photonic quantum technologies based on quantum memories.

  3. Work fluctuation theorem for a classical circuit coupled to a quantum conductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utsumi, Y.; Golubev, D. S.; Marthaler, M.; Schön, Gerd; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2012-08-01

    We propose a setup for a quantitative test of the quantum fluctuation theorem. It consists of a quantum conductor, driven by an external voltage source, and a classical inductor-capacitor circuit. The work done on the system by the voltage source can be expressed by the classical degrees of freedom of the LC circuit, which are measurable by conventional techniques. In this way, the circuit acts as a classical detector to perform measurements of the quantum conductor. We prove that this definition is consistent with the work fluctuation theorem. The system under consideration is effectively described by a Langevin equation with non-Gaussian white noise. Our analysis extends the proof of the fluctuation theorem to this situation.

  4. High performance protection circuit for power electronics applications

    SciTech Connect

    Tudoran, Cristian D. Dădârlat, Dorin N.; Toşa, Nicoleta; Mişan, Ioan

    2015-12-23

    In this paper we present a high performance protection circuit designed for the power electronics applications where the load currents can increase rapidly and exceed the maximum allowed values, like in the case of high frequency induction heating inverters or high frequency plasma generators. The protection circuit is based on a microcontroller and can be adapted for use on single-phase or three-phase power systems. Its versatility comes from the fact that the circuit can communicate with the protected system, having the role of a “sensor” or it can interrupt the power supply for protection, in this case functioning as an external, independent protection circuit.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of low loss and high inductance Josephson tunnel junction chains for quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabon, Nicholas; Solovyeva, Natalya; Nguyen, Long; Lin, Yen-Hsiang; Manucharyan, Vladimir

    Linear chains of tightly packed Josephson junctions can realize a very high kinetic inductance circuit element, superinductance, with minimal losses. Superinductance is used in a conventional fluxonium qubit, but it has also been put forward as a key element of a fault-tolerant quantum circuits toolbox. We report fabrication and microwave characterization of linear Al/AlOx/Al Josephson tunnel junction chains and discuss their advantages and limitations as superinductors

  6. Basic circuit compilation techniques for an ion-trap quantum machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslov, Dmitri

    2017-02-01

    We study the problem of compilation of quantum algorithms into optimized physical-level circuits executable in a quantum information processing (QIP) experiment based on trapped atomic ions. We report a complete strategy: starting with an algorithm in the form of a quantum computer program, we compile it into a high-level logical circuit that goes through multiple stages of decomposition into progressively lower-level circuits until we reach the physical execution-level specification. We skip the fault-tolerance layer, as it is not within the scope of this work. The different stages are structured so as to best assist with the overall optimization while taking into account numerous optimization criteria, including minimizing the number of expensive two-qubit gates, minimizing the number of less expensive single-qubit gates, optimizing the runtime, minimizing the overall circuit error, and optimizing classical control sequences. Our approach allows a trade-off between circuit runtime and quantum error, as well as to accommodate future changes in the optimization criteria that may likely arise as a result of the anticipated improvements in the physical-level control of the experiment.

  7. A circuit analysis of an in situ tunable radio-frequency quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, T.; Choi, T.; Hellmüller, S.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.; Schön, S.

    2013-08-01

    A detailed analysis of the tunability of a radio-frequency quantum point contact setup using a C - LCR circuit is presented. We calculate how the series capacitance influences resonance frequency and charge-detector resistance for which matching is achieved as well as the voltage and power delivered to the load. Furthermore, we compute the noise contributions in the system and compare our findings with measurements taken with an etched quantum point contact. While our considerations mostly focus on our specific choice of matching circuit, the discussion of the influence of source-to-load power transfer on the signal-to-noise ratio is valid generally.

  8. Silicon photonic transceiver circuit for high-speed polarization-based discrete variable quantum key distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Hong; Long, Christopher M.; DeRose, Christopher T.; Boynton, Nicholas; Urayama, Junji; Camacho, Ryan; Pomerene, Andrew; Starbuck, Andrew L.; Trotter, Douglas C.; Davids, Paul S.; Lentine, Anthony L.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a silicon photonic transceiver circuit for high-speed discrete variable quantum key distribution that employs a common structure for transmit and receive functions. The device is intended for use in polarization-based quantum cryptographic protocols, such as BB84. Our characterization indicates that the circuit can generate the four BB84 states (TE/TM/45°/135° linear polarizations) with >30 dB polarization extinction ratios and gigabit per second modulation speed, and is capable of decoding any polarization bases differing by 90° with high extinction ratios.

  9. Quantum circuit for the proof of the security of quantum key distribution without encryption of error syndrome and noisy processing

    SciTech Connect

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Kato, Go

    2010-02-15

    One of the simplest security proofs of quantum key distribution is based on the so-called complementarity scenario, which involves the complementarity control of an actual protocol and a virtual protocol [M. Koashi, e-print arXiv:0704.3661 (2007)]. The existing virtual protocol has a limitation in classical postprocessing, i.e., the syndrome for the error-correction step has to be encrypted. In this paper, we remove this limitation by constructing a quantum circuit for the virtual protocol. Moreover, our circuit with a shield system gives an intuitive proof of why adding noise to the sifted key increases the bit error rate threshold in the general case in which one of the parties does not possess a qubit. Thus, our circuit bridges the simple proof and the use of wider classes of classical postprocessing.

  10. Quantum circuit for the proof of the security of quantum key distribution without encryption of error syndrome and noisy processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Kato, Go

    2010-02-01

    One of the simplest security proofs of quantum key distribution is based on the so-called complementarity scenario, which involves the complementarity control of an actual protocol and a virtual protocol [M. Koashi, e-print arXiv:0704.3661 (2007)]. The existing virtual protocol has a limitation in classical postprocessing, i.e., the syndrome for the error-correction step has to be encrypted. In this paper, we remove this limitation by constructing a quantum circuit for the virtual protocol. Moreover, our circuit with a shield system gives an intuitive proof of why adding noise to the sifted key increases the bit error rate threshold in the general case in which one of the parties does not possess a qubit. Thus, our circuit bridges the simple proof and the use of wider classes of classical postprocessing.

  11. Designing reversible arithmetic, logic circuit to implement micro-operation in quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Gunajit; Saikia, Navajit

    2016-10-01

    The futuristic computing is desired to be more power full with low-power consumption. That is why quantum computing has been a key area of research for quite some time and is getting more and more attention. Quantum logic being reversible, a significant amount of contributions has been reported on reversible logic in recent times. Reversible circuits are essential parts of quantum computers, and hence their designs are of great importance. In this paper, designs of reversible circuits are proposed using a recently proposed reversible gate for arithmetic and logic operations to implement various micro-operations (simple add and subtract, add with carry, subtract with borrow, transfer, incrementing, decrementing etc., and logic operations like XOR, XNOR, complementing etc.) in a reversible computer like quantum computer. The two new reversible designs proposed here for half adder and full adders are also used in the presented reversible circuits to implement various microoperations. The quantum costs of these designs are comparable. Many of the implemented micro-operations are not seen in previous literatures. The performances of the proposed circuits are compared with existing designs wherever available.

  12. Josephson directional amplifier for quantum measurement of superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Baleegh; Sliwa, Katrina; Shankar, S; Hatridge, Michael; Frunzio, Luigi; Schoelkopf, Robert; Devoret, Michel

    2014-04-25

    We realize a microwave quantum-limited amplifier that is directional and can therefore function without the front circulator needed in many quantum measurements. The amplification takes place in only one direction between the input and output ports. Directionality is achieved by multipump parametric amplification combined with wave interference. We have verified the device noise performances by using it to read out a superconducting qubit and observed quantum jumps. With an improved version of this device, the qubit and preamplifer could be integrated on the same chip.

  13. Deterministic amplification of Schrödinger cat states in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Elliott, Matthew; Oi, Daniel K. L.; Ginossar, Eran; Spiller, Timothy P.

    2016-02-01

    Perfect deterministic amplification of arbitrary quantum states is prohibited by quantum mechanics, but determinism can be achieved by compromising between fidelity and amplification power. We propose a dynamical scheme for deterministically amplifying photonic Schrödinger cat states, which show great promise as a tool for quantum information processing. Our protocol is designed for strongly coupled circuit quantum electrodynamics and utilizes artificial atomic states and external microwave controls to engineer a set of optimal state transfers and achieve high fidelity amplification. We compare analytical results with full simulations of the open, driven Jaynes-Cummings model, using realistic device parameters for state of the art superconducting circuits. Amplification with a fidelity of 0.9 can be achieved for sizable cat states in the presence of cavity and atomic-level decoherence. This tool could be applied to practical continuous-variable information processing for the purification and stabilization of cat states in the presence of photon losses.

  14. Automatic synthesis of quantum circuits for point addition on ordinary binary elliptic curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budhathoki, Parshuram; Steinwandt, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    When designing quantum circuits for Shor's algorithm to solve the discrete logarithm problem, implementing the group arithmetic is a cost-critical task. We introduce a software tool for the automatic generation of addition circuits for ordinary binary elliptic curves, a prominent platform group for digital signatures. The resulting circuits reduce the number of -gates by a factor compared to the best previous construction, without increasing the number of qubits or -depth. The software also optimizes the (CNOT) depth for -linear operations by means of suitable graph colorings.

  15. Switching circuit to improve the frequency modulation difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Saat, N. K.; Dean, P.; Khanna, S. P.; Salih, M.; Linfield, E. H.; Davies, A. G.

    2015-04-24

    We demonstrate new switching circuit for difference-intensity THz quantum cascade laser (QCL) imaging by amplitude modulation and lock in detection. The switching circuit is designed to improve the frequency modulation so that it can stably lock the amplitude modulation of the QCL and the detector output. The combination of a voltage divider and a buffer in switching circuit to quickly switch the amplitude of the QCL biases of 15.8 V and 17.2 V is successfully to increase the frequency modulation up to ∼100 Hz.

  16. Single-flux-quantum logic circuits exploiting collision-based fusion gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asai, T.; Yamada, K.; Amemiya, Y.

    2008-09-01

    We propose a single-flux-quantum (SFQ) logic circuit based on the fusion computing systems--collision-based and reaction-diffusion fusion computers. A fusion computing system consists of regularly arrayed unit cells (fusion gates), where each unit has two input arms and two output arms and is connected to its neighboring cells with the arms. We designed functional SFQ circuits that implemented the fusion computation. The unit cell was able to be made with ten Josephson junctions. Circuit simulation with standard Nb/Al-AlOx/Nb 2.5-kA/cm 2 process parameters showed that the SFQ fusion computing systems could operate at 10 GHz clock.

  17. Transforming quantum operations: Quantum supermaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2008-08-01

    We introduce the concept of quantum supermap, describing the most general transformation that maps an input quantum operation into an output quantum operation. Since quantum operations include as special cases quantum states, effects, and measurements, quantum supermaps describe all possible transformations between elementary quantum objects (quantum systems as well as quantum devices). After giving the axiomatic definition of supermap, we prove a realization theorem, which shows that any supermap can be physically implemented as a simple quantum circuit. Applications to quantum programming, cloning, discrimination, estimation, information-disturbance trade-off, and tomography of channels are outlined.

  18. Quantum circuits for -multiplication with subquadratic gate count

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepley, Shane; Steinwandt, Rainer

    2015-07-01

    One of the most cost-critical operations when applying Shor's algorithm to binary elliptic curves is the underlying field arithmetic. Here, we consider binary fields in polynomial basis representation, targeting especially field sizes as used in elliptic curve cryptography. Building on Karatsuba's algorithm, our software implementation automatically synthesizes a multiplication circuit with the number of -gates being bounded by for any given reduction polynomial of degree . If an irreducible trinomial of degree exists, then a multiplication circuit with a total gate count of is available.

  19. NV-based quantum memories coupled to photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouradian, Sara; Schröder, Tim; Zheng, Jiabao; Lu, Tsung-Ju; Choi, Hyeongrak; Wan, Noel; Walsh, Michael; Bersin, Eric; Englund, Dirk

    2016-09-01

    The negatively charged nitrogen vacancy (NV) center in diamond is a promising solid-state quantum memory. However, developing networks comprising such quantum memories is limited by the fabrication yield of the quantum nodes and the collection efficiency of indistinguishable photons. In this letter, we report on advances on a hybrid quantum system that allows for scalable production of networks, even with low-yield node fabrication. Moreover, an NV center in a simple single mode diamond waveguide is shown in simulation and experiment to couple well to a single mode SiN waveguide with a simple adiabatic taper for optimal mode transfer. In addition, cavity enhancement of the zero phonon line of the NV center with a resonance coupled to the waveguide mode allows a simulated <1800 fold increase in the collection of photon states coherent with the state of the NV center into a single frequency and spatial mode.

  20. Single qudit realization of the Deutsch algorithm using superconducting many-level quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiktenko, E. O.; Fedorov, A. K.; Strakhov, A. A.; Man'ko, V. I.

    2015-07-01

    Design of a large-scale quantum computer has paramount importance for science and technologies. We investigate a scheme for realization of quantum algorithms using noncomposite quantum systems, i.e., systems without subsystems. In this framework, n artificially allocated "subsystems" play a role of qubits in n-qubits quantum algorithms. With focus on two-qubit quantum algorithms, we demonstrate a realization of the universal set of gates using a d = 5 single qudit state. Manipulation with an ancillary level in the systems allows effective implementation of operators from U(4) group via operators from SU(5) group. Using a possible experimental realization of such systems through anharmonic superconducting many-level quantum circuits, we present a blueprint for a single qudit realization of the Deutsch algorithm, which generalizes previously studied realization based on the virtual spin representation (Kessel et al., 2002 [9]).

  1. Scalable Spin-Qubit Circuits with Quantum Dots

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    quantum wires with Rashba spin -orbit interaction” Phys. Stat. Sol. (c) 3, 4317 (2006). 9. B. Trauzettel, Denis V. Bulaev, Daniel Loss, Guido Burkard...Seigo Tarucha, “Dynamical nuclear spin polarization induced by hyperfine mediated singlet-triplet transition in coupled quantum dots” 2007Aspen...used even when the electron temperature exceeds the energy splitting between the states. The spin states are first correlated to different charge

  2. Spin Quantum Bit with Ferromagnetic Contacts for Circuit QED

    SciTech Connect

    Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis

    2010-10-15

    We theoretically propose a scheme for a spin quantum bit based on a double quantum dot contacted to ferromagnetic elements. Interface exchange effects enable an all electric manipulation of the spin and a switchable strong coupling to a superconducting coplanar waveguide cavity. Our setup does not rely on any specific band structure and can in principle be realized with many different types of nanoconductors. This allows us to envision on-chip single spin manipulation and readout using cavity QED techniques.

  3. Spin quantum bit with ferromagnetic contacts for circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Cottet, Audrey; Kontos, Takis

    2010-10-15

    We theoretically propose a scheme for a spin quantum bit based on a double quantum dot contacted to ferromagnetic elements. Interface exchange effects enable an all electric manipulation of the spin and a switchable strong coupling to a superconducting coplanar waveguide cavity. Our setup does not rely on any specific band structure and can in principle be realized with many different types of nanoconductors. This allows us to envision on-chip single spin manipulation and readout using cavity QED techniques.

  4. Detecting topological phases of microwave photons in a circuit quantum electrodynamics lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Pu; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Topology is an important degree of freedom in characterising electronic systems. Recently, it also brings new theoretical frontiers and many potential applications in photonics. However, the verification of the topological nature is highly nontrivial in photonic systems, as there is no direct analogue of quantised Hall conductance for bosonic photons. Here we propose a scheme of investigating topological photonics in superconducting quantum circuits by a simple parametric coupling method, the flexibility of which can lead to the effective in situ tunable artificial gauge field for photons on a square lattice. We further study the detection of the topological phases of the photons. Our idea uses the exotic properties of the edge state modes, which result in novel steady states of the lattice under the driving-dissipation competition. Through the pumping and the photon-number measurements of merely few sites, not only the spatial and the spectral characters but also the momentums and even the integer topological quantum numbers with arbitrary values of the edge state modes can be directly probed, which reveal unambiguously the topological nature of photons on the lattice.

  5. Quantum circuit dynamics via path integrals: Is there a classical action for discrete-time paths?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penney, Mark D.; Enshan Koh, Dax; Spekkens, Robert W.

    2017-07-01

    It is straightforward to compute the transition amplitudes of a quantum circuit using the sum-over-paths methodology when the gates in the circuit are balanced, where a balanced gate is one for which all non-zero transition amplitudes are of equal magnitude. Here we consider the question of whether, for such circuits, the relative phases of different discrete-time paths through the configuration space can be defined in terms of a classical action, as they are for continuous-time paths. We show how to do so for certain kinds of quantum circuits, namely, Clifford circuits where the elementary systems are continuous-variable systems or discrete systems of odd-prime dimension. These types of circuit are distinguished by having phase-space representations that serve to define their classical counterparts. For discrete systems, the phase-space coordinates are also discrete variables. We show that for each gate in the generating set, one can associate a symplectomorphism on the phase-space and to each of these one can associate a generating function, defined on two copies of the configuration space. For discrete systems, the latter association is achieved using tools from algebraic geometry. Finally, we show that if the action functional for a discrete-time path through a sequence of gates is defined using the sum of the corresponding generating functions, then it yields the correct relative phases for the path-sum expression. These results are likely to be relevant for quantizing physical theories where time is fundamentally discrete, characterizing the classical limit of discrete-time quantum dynamics, and proving complexity results for quantum circuits.

  6. Statistical analysis of error rate of large-scale single flux quantum logic circuit by considering fluctuation of timing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanashi, Yuki; Masubuchi, Kota; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2016-11-01

    The relationship between the timing margin and the error rate of the large-scale single flux quantum logic circuits is quantitatively investigated to establish a timing design guideline. We observed that the fluctuation in the set-up/hold time of single flux quantum logic gates caused by thermal noises is the most probable origin of the logical error of the large-scale single flux quantum circuit. The appropriate timing margin for stable operation of the large-scale logic circuit is discussed by taking the fluctuation of setup/hold time and the timing jitter in the single flux quantum circuits. As a case study, the dependence of the error rate of the 1-million-bit single flux quantum shift register on the timing margin is statistically analyzed. The result indicates that adjustment of timing margin and the bias voltage is important for stable operation of a large-scale SFQ logic circuit.

  7. Exploring Interacting Quantum Many-Body Systems by Experimentally Creating Continuous Matrix Product States in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, C.; Mlynek, J.; Butscher, J.; Kurpiers, P.; Hammerer, K.; Osborne, T. J.; Wallraff, A.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems such as gases of interacting atoms or electrons is one of the most important challenges in modern condensed matter physics, materials research, and chemistry. Enormous progress has been made in the past decades in developing both classical and quantum approaches to calculate, simulate, and experimentally probe the properties of such systems. In this work, we use a combination of classical and quantum methods to experimentally explore the properties of an interacting quantum gas by creating experimental realizations of continuous matrix product states—a class of states that has proven extremely powerful as a variational ansatz for numerical simulations. By systematically preparing and probing these states using a circuit quantum electrodynamics system, we experimentally determine a good approximation to the ground-state wave function of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian, which describes an interacting Bose gas in one dimension. Since the simulated Hamiltonian is encoded in the measurement observable rather than the controlled quantum system, this approach has the potential to apply to a variety of models including those involving multicomponent interacting fields. Our findings also hint at the possibility of experimentally exploring general properties of matrix product states and entanglement theory. The scheme presented here is applicable to a broad range of systems exploiting strong and tunable light-matter interactions.

  8. Generation of Fock states in a superconducting quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Hofheinz, Max; Weig, E M; Ansmann, M; Bialczak, Radoslaw C; Lucero, Erik; Neeley, M; O'Connell, A D; Wang, H; Martinis, John M; Cleland, A N

    2008-07-17

    Spin systems and harmonic oscillators comprise two archetypes in quantum mechanics. The spin-1/2 system, with two quantum energy levels, is essentially the most nonlinear system found in nature, whereas the harmonic oscillator represents the most linear, with an infinite number of evenly spaced quantum levels. A significant difference between these systems is that a two-level spin can be prepared in an arbitrary quantum state using classical excitations, whereas classical excitations applied to an oscillator generate a coherent state, nearly indistinguishable from a classical state. Quantum behaviour in an oscillator is most obvious in Fock states, which are states with specific numbers of energy quanta, but such states are hard to create. Here we demonstrate the controlled generation of multi-photon Fock states in a solid-state system. We use a superconducting phase qubit, which is a close approximation to a two-level spin system, coupled to a microwave resonator, which acts as a harmonic oscillator, to prepare and analyse pure Fock states with up to six photons. We contrast the Fock states with coherent states generated using classical pulses applied directly to the resonator.

  9. Tunable quantum interference in a 3D integrated circuit

    PubMed Central

    Chaboyer, Zachary; Meany, Thomas; Helt, L. G.; Withford, Michael J.; Steel, M. J.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated photonics promises solutions to questions of stability, complexity, and size in quantum optics. Advances in tunable and non-planar integrated platforms, such as laser-inscribed photonics, continue to bring the realisation of quantum advantages in computation and metrology ever closer, perhaps most easily seen in multi-path interferometry. Here we demonstrate control of two-photon interference in a chip-scale 3D multi-path interferometer, showing a reduced periodicity and enhanced visibility compared to single photon measurements. Observed non-classical visibilities are widely tunable, and explained well by theoretical predictions based on classical measurements. With these predictions we extract Fisher information approaching a theoretical maximum. Our results open a path to quantum enhanced phase measurements. PMID:25915830

  10. Tunable quantum interference in a 3D integrated circuit.

    PubMed

    Chaboyer, Zachary; Meany, Thomas; Helt, L G; Withford, Michael J; Steel, M J

    2015-04-27

    Integrated photonics promises solutions to questions of stability, complexity, and size in quantum optics. Advances in tunable and non-planar integrated platforms, such as laser-inscribed photonics, continue to bring the realisation of quantum advantages in computation and metrology ever closer, perhaps most easily seen in multi-path interferometry. Here we demonstrate control of two-photon interference in a chip-scale 3D multi-path interferometer, showing a reduced periodicity and enhanced visibility compared to single photon measurements. Observed non-classical visibilities are widely tunable, and explained well by theoretical predictions based on classical measurements. With these predictions we extract Fisher information approaching a theoretical maximum. Our results open a path to quantum enhanced phase measurements.

  11. Efficient scheme for hybrid teleportation via entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    2016-01-01

    We propose a deterministic scheme for teleporting an unknown qubit state through continuous-variable entangled states in superconducting circuits. The qubit is a superconducting two-level system and the bipartite quantum channel is a microwave photonic entangled coherent state between two cavities. A Bell-type measurement performed on the hybrid state of solid and photonic states transfers a discrete-variable unknown electronic state to a continuous-variable photonic cat state in a cavity mode. In order to facilitate the implementation of such complex protocols we propose a design for reducing the self-Kerr nonlinearity in the cavity. The teleporation scheme enables quantum information processing operations with circuit-QED based on entangled coherent states. These include state verification and single-qubit operations with entangled coherent states. These are shown to be experimentally feasible with the state of the art superconducting circuits. PMID:27245775

  12. Efficient scheme for hybrid teleportation via entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    2016-06-01

    We propose a deterministic scheme for teleporting an unknown qubit state through continuous-variable entangled states in superconducting circuits. The qubit is a superconducting two-level system and the bipartite quantum channel is a microwave photonic entangled coherent state between two cavities. A Bell-type measurement performed on the hybrid state of solid and photonic states transfers a discrete-variable unknown electronic state to a continuous-variable photonic cat state in a cavity mode. In order to facilitate the implementation of such complex protocols we propose a design for reducing the self-Kerr nonlinearity in the cavity. The teleporation scheme enables quantum information processing operations with circuit-QED based on entangled coherent states. These include state verification and single-qubit operations with entangled coherent states. These are shown to be experimentally feasible with the state of the art superconducting circuits.

  13. Large-scale maximal entanglement and Majorana bound states in coupled circuit quantum electrodynamic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Myung-Joong; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2013-03-01

    We study the effect of ultrastrong cavity-qubit coupling on the low-lying excitations of a chain of coupled circuit quantum electrodynamic (QED) systems. We show that, in the presence of the onsite ultrastrong coupling, the photon hopping between cavities can be mapped to the Ising interaction between the lowest two levels of individual circuit QED of the chain. Based on our mapping, we predict two nearly degenerate ground states whose wave functions involve maximal entanglement between the macroscopic quantum states of the cavities and the states of qubits and identify that they are mathematically equivalent to Majorana bound states. Further, we devise a scheme for the dispersive measurement of the ground states using an additional resonator attached to one end of the circuit QED chain. Finally, we discuss the effects of disorders and local noises on the coherence of the ground states.

  14. Efficient scheme for hybrid teleportation via entangled coherent states in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Jaewoo; Ginossar, Eran

    2016-06-01

    We propose a deterministic scheme for teleporting an unknown qubit state through continuous-variable entangled states in superconducting circuits. The qubit is a superconducting two-level system and the bipartite quantum channel is a microwave photonic entangled coherent state between two cavities. A Bell-type measurement performed on the hybrid state of solid and photonic states transfers a discrete-variable unknown electronic state to a continuous-variable photonic cat state in a cavity mode. In order to facilitate the implementation of such complex protocols we propose a design for reducing the self-Kerr nonlinearity in the cavity. The teleporation scheme enables quantum information processing operations with circuit-QED based on entangled coherent states. These include state verification and single-qubit operations with entangled coherent states. These are shown to be experimentally feasible with the state of the art superconducting circuits.

  15. A nanocryotron comparator can connect single-flux-quantum circuits to conventional electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Qing-Yuan; McCaughan, Adam N.; Dane, Andrew E.; Berggren, Karl K.; Ortlepp, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Integration with conventional electronics offers a straightforward and economical approach to upgrading existing superconducting technologies, such as scaling up superconducting detectors into large arrays and combining single flux quantum (SFQ) digital circuits with semiconductor logic gates and memories. However, direct output signals from superconducting devices (e.g., Josephson junctions) are usually not compatible with the input requirements of conventional devices (e.g., transistors). Here, we demonstrate the use of a single three-terminal superconducting-nanowire device, called the nanocryotron (nTron), as a digital comparator to combine SFQ circuits with mature semiconductor circuits such as complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) circuits. Since SFQ circuits can digitize output signals from general superconducting devices and CMOS circuits can interface existing CMOS-compatible electronics, our results demonstrate the feasibility of a general architecture that uses an nTron as an interface to realize a ‘super-hybrid’ system consisting of superconducting detectors, superconducting quantum electronics, CMOS logic gates and memories, and other conventional electronics.

  16. Circuit QED in a double quantum dot system

    SciTech Connect

    Toida, Hiraku; Nakajima, Takashi; Komiyama, Susumu

    2013-12-04

    Strong coupling peculiar feature is demonstrated in a coupled qubit-resonator system consisting of a GaAs double quantum dot and a coplanar waveguide resonator. Qubit-resonator coupling strength (g and the decoherence rate Γ are directly derived from the experiment, assuring a strong coupling condition (g/Γ ≈ 2)

  17. Transferring arbitrary d-dimensional quantum states of a superconducting transmon qudit in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Su, Qi-Ping; Yang, Jin-Hu; Zhang, Yu; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Liu, Jin-Ming; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2017-08-01

    A qudit (d-level quantum system) has a large Hilbert space and thus can be used to achieve many quantum information and communication tasks. Here, we propose a method to transfer arbitrary d-dimensional quantum states (known or unknown) between two superconducting transmon qudits coupled to a single cavity. The state transfer can be performed by employing resonant interactions only. In addition, quantum states can be deterministically transferred without measurement. Numerical simulations show that high-fidelity transfer of quantum states between two superconducting transmon qudits (d ≤ 5) is feasible with current circuit QED technology. This proposal is quite general and can be applied to accomplish the same task with natural or artificial atoms of a ladder-type level structure coupled to a cavity or resonator.

  18. Full control of quadruple quantum dot circuit charge states in the single electron regime

    SciTech Connect

    Delbecq, M. R. Nakajima, T.; Otsuka, T.; Amaha, S.; Watson, J. D.; Manfra, M. J.; Tarucha, S.

    2014-05-05

    We report the realization of an array of four tunnel coupled quantum dots in the single electron regime, which is the first required step toward a scalable solid state spin qubit architecture. We achieve an efficient tunability of the system but also find out that the conditions to realize spin blockade readout are not as straightforwardly obtained as for double and triple quantum dot circuits. We use a simple capacitive model of the series quadruple quantum dots circuit to investigate its complex charge state diagrams and are able to find the most suitable configurations for future Pauli spin blockade measurements. We then experimentally realize the corresponding charge states with a good agreement to our model.

  19. Towards Evolving Electronic Circuits for Autonomous Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohn, Jason D.; Haith, Gary L.; Colombano, Silvano P.; Stassinopoulos, Dimitris

    2000-01-01

    The relatively new field of Evolvable Hardware studies how simulated evolution can reconfigure, adapt, and design hardware structures in an automated manner. Space applications, especially those requiring autonomy, are potential beneficiaries of evolvable hardware. For example, robotic drilling from a mobile platform requires high-bandwidth controller circuits that are difficult to design. In this paper, we present automated design techniques based on evolutionary search that could potentially be used in such applications. First, we present a method of automatically generating analog circuit designs using evolutionary search and a circuit construction language. Our system allows circuit size (number of devices), circuit topology, and device values to be evolved. Using a parallel genetic algorithm, we present experimental results for five design tasks. Second, we investigate the use of coevolution in automated circuit design. We examine fitness evaluation by comparing the effectiveness of four fitness schedules. The results indicate that solution quality is highest with static and co-evolving fitness schedules as compared to the other two dynamic schedules. We discuss these results and offer two possible explanations for the observed behavior: retention of useful information, and alignment of problem difficulty with circuit proficiency.

  20. The Photon Shell Game and the Quantum von Neumann Architecture with Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariantoni, Matteo

    2012-02-01

    Superconducting quantum circuits have made significant advances over the past decade, allowing more complex and integrated circuits that perform with good fidelity. We have recently implemented a machine comprising seven quantum channels, with three superconducting resonators, two phase qubits, and two zeroing registers. I will explain the design and operation of this machine, first showing how a single microwave photon | 1 > can be prepared in one resonator and coherently transferred between the three resonators. I will also show how more exotic states such as double photon states | 2 > and superposition states | 0 >+ | 1 > can be shuffled among the resonators as well [1]. I will then demonstrate how this machine can be used as the quantum-mechanical analog of the von Neumann computer architecture, which for a classical computer comprises a central processing unit and a memory holding both instructions and data. The quantum version comprises a quantum central processing unit (quCPU) that exchanges data with a quantum random-access memory (quRAM) integrated on one chip, with instructions stored on a classical computer. I will also present a proof-of-concept demonstration of a code that involves all seven quantum elements: (1), Preparing an entangled state in the quCPU, (2), writing it to the quRAM, (3), preparing a second state in the quCPU, (4), zeroing it, and, (5), reading out the first state stored in the quRAM [2]. Finally, I will demonstrate that the quantum von Neumann machine provides one unit cell of a two-dimensional qubit-resonator array that can be used for surface code quantum computing. This will allow the realization of a scalable, fault-tolerant quantum processor with the most forgiving error rates to date. [4pt] [1] M. Mariantoni et al., Nature Physics 7, 287-293 (2011.)[0pt] [2] M. Mariantoni et al., Science 334, 61-65 (2011).

  1. Giant relaxation oscillations in a very strongly hysteretic superconductive quantum interference device ring-tank circuit system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, T. D.; Prance, R. J.; Whiteman, R.; Prance, H.; Everitt, M. J.; Bulsara, A. R.; Ralph, J. F.

    2001-09-01

    In this article, we show that the radio frequency (rf) dynamical characteristics of a very strongly hysteretic superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) ring, coupled to a rf tank circuit resonator, display relaxation oscillations. We demonstrate that the overall form of these characteristics, together with the relaxation oscillations, can be modeled accurately by solving the quasiclassical nonlinear equations of motion for the system. We suggest that in these very strongly hysteretic regimes, SQUID ring-resonator systems may find application in logic and memory devices.

  2. Quantum networks: General theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisio, A.; Chiribella, G.; D'Ariano, G. M.; Perinotti, P.

    2011-06-01

    In this work we present a general mathematical framework to deal with Quantum Networks, i.e. networks resulting from the interconnection of elementary quantum circuits. The cornerstone of our approach is a generalization of the Choi isomorphism that allows one to efficiently represent any given Quantum Network in terms of a single positive operator. Our formalism allows one to face and solve many quantum information processing problems that would be hardly manageable otherwise, the most relevant of which are reviewed in this work: quantum process tomography, quantum cloning and learning of transformations, inversion of a unitary gate, information-disturbance tradeoff in estimating a unitary transformation, cloning and learning of a measurement device.

  3. Superconducting quantum interference device instruments and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagaly, R. L.

    2006-10-01

    Superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) have been a key factor in the development and commercialization of ultrasensitive electric and magnetic measurement systems. In many cases, SQUID instrumentation offers the ability to make measurements where no other methodology is possible. We review the main aspects of designing, fabricating, and operating a number of SQUID measurement systems. While this article is not intended to be an exhaustive review on the principles of SQUID sensors and the underlying concepts behind the Josephson effect, a qualitative description of the operating principles of SQUID sensors and the properties of materials used to fabricate SQUID sensors is presented. The difference between low and high temperature SQUIDs and their suitability for specific applications is discussed. Although SQUID electronics have the capability to operate well above 1MHz, most applications tend to be at lower frequencies. Specific examples of input circuits and detection coil configuration for different applications and environments, along with expected performance, are described. In particular, anticipated signal strength, magnetic field environment (applied field and external noise), and cryogenic requirements are discussed. Finally, a variety of applications with specific examples in the areas of electromagnetic, material property, nondestructive test and evaluation, and geophysical and biomedical measurements are reviewed.

  4. Mobile Learning Based Worked Example in Electric Circuit (WEIEC) Application to Improve the High School Students' Electric Circuits Interpretation Ability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yadiannur, Mitra; Supahar

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to determine the feasibility and effectivity of mobile learning based Worked Example in Electric Circuits (WEIEC) application in improving the high school students' electric circuits interpretation ability on Direct Current Circuits materials. The research method used was a combination of Four-D Models and ADDIE model. The…

  5. Photon-number squeezing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Marthaler, M; Schön, Gerd; Shnirman, Alexander

    2008-10-03

    A superconducting single-electron transistor (SSET) coupled to an anharmonic oscillator, e.g., a Josephson junction-L-C circuit, can drive the latter to a nonequilibrium photon-number distribution. By biasing the SSET at the Josephson quasiparticle cycle, cooling of the oscillator as well as a laserlike enhancement of the photon number can be achieved. Here, we show that the cutoff in the quasiparticle tunneling rate due to the superconducting gap, in combination with the anharmonicity of the oscillator, may create strongly squeezed photon-number distributions. For low dissipation in the oscillator, nearly pure Fock states can be produced.

  6. Robust Josephson-Kondo screening cloud in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyman, Izak; Florens, Serge

    2015-08-01

    We investigate the entanglement properties of a standard circuit-QED setup that consists of a Cooper pair box coupled to a long chain of Josephson junctions. We calculate the static charge polarization at finite distances along the device. Our calculations reveal a deep connection to the Kondo screening cloud, together with robust correlations that are difficult to measure in a condensed matter context. We also find weak sensitivity of these Kondo signatures to the actual parameters and design of the device, demonstrating the universality of the Josephson entanglement cloud.

  7. Emulating Anyonic Fractional Statistical Behavior in a Superconducting Quantum Circuit.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Y P; Xu, D; Wang, P; Song, C; Guo, Q J; Liu, W X; Xu, K; Xia, B X; Lu, C-Y; Han, Siyuan; Pan, Jian-Wei; Wang, H

    2016-09-09

    Anyons are exotic quasiparticles obeying fractional statistics, whose behavior can be emulated in artificially designed spin systems. Here we present an experimental emulation of creating anyonic excitations in a superconducting circuit that consists of four qubits, achieved by dynamically generating the ground and excited states of the toric code model, i.e., four-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states. The anyonic braiding is implemented via single-qubit rotations: a phase shift of π related to braiding, the hallmark of Abelian 1/2 anyons, has been observed through a Ramsey-type interference measurement.

  8. Stamping single wall nanotubes for circuit quantum electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Viennot, J. J. Kontos, T.; Palomo, J.

    2014-03-17

    We report on a dry transfer technique for single wall carbon nanotube devices, which allows to embed them in high finesse microwave cavity. We demonstrate the ground state charge readout and a quality factor of about 3000 down to the single photon regime. This technique allows to make devices such as double quantum dots, which could be instrumental for achieving the strong spin photon coupling. It can easily be extended to generic carbon nanotube based microwave devices.

  9. Design of nanophotonic circuits for autonomous subsystem quantum error correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerckhoff, J.; Pavlichin, D. S.; Chalabi, H.; Mabuchi, H.

    2011-05-01

    We reapply our approach to designing nanophotonic quantum memories in order to formulate an optical network that autonomously protects a single logical qubit against arbitrary single-qubit errors. Emulating the nine-qubit Bacon-Shor subsystem code, the network replaces the traditionally discrete syndrome measurement and correction steps by continuous, time-independent optical interactions and coherent feedback of unitarily processed optical fields.

  10. A Quantum Electrodynamics Kondo Circuit with Orbital and Spin Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiro, Marco; Deng, Guang-Wei; Henriet, Loic; Wei, Da; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Guo, Guang-Can; Le Hur, Karyn; Guo, Guo-Ping

    Recent progress in nanotechnology allows to engineer hybrid mesoscopic devices comprising on chip an artificial atom or quantum dot, capacitively coupled to a microwave (superconducting) resonator and to biased metallic leads. Here, we build such a prototype system where the artificial atom is a graphene double quantum dot (DQD) to probe non-equilibrium aspects of strongly-entangled many body states between light and matter at the nanoscale. Controlling the coupling of the photon field and the charge states of the DQD, we measure the microwave reflection spectrum of the resonator. When the DQD is at the charge degeneracy points, experimental results are consistent with a Kondo impurity model entangling charge, spin and orbital degrees of freedom with the quantum fluctuations of the cavity photon. The light coming out from the resonator reveals the formation of the Kondo or Abrikosov-Suhl resonance at low temperatures. We also explore other routes to investigate nonlinear transport by increasing the microwave power, the bias and gate voltages.

  11. Multi-qubit parity measurement in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiVincenzo, David P.; Solgun, Firat

    2013-07-01

    We present a concept for performing direct parity measurements on three or more qubits in microwave structures with superconducting resonators coupled to Josephson-junction qubits. We write the quantum-eraser conditions that must be fulfilled for the parity measurements as requirements for the scattering phase shift of our microwave structure. We show that these conditions can be fulfilled with present-day devices. We present one particular scheme, implemented with two-dimensional cavity techniques, in which each qubit should be coupled equally to two different microwave cavities. The magnitudes of the couplings that are needed are in the range that has been achieved in current experiments. A quantum calculation indicates that the measurement is optimal if the scattering signal can be measured with near single-photon sensitivity. A comparison with an extension of a related proposal from cavity optics is presented. We present a second scheme, for which a scalable implementation of the four-qubit parities of the surface quantum error correction code can be envisioned. It uses three-dimensional cavity structures, using cavity symmetries to achieve the necessary multiple resonant modes within a single resonant structure.

  12. Photonic-integrated circuits and components using quantum well intermixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Jian Jun; Koteles, Emil S.; Poole, Philip J.; Feng, Yan; Davis, M.; Charbonneau, N. Sylvain; Goldberg, Richard D.; Mitchell, Ian V.

    1996-09-01

    The monolithic integration of optical components with different functionalities on a single semiconductor wafer requires spatially selective control of bandgap energies. We have developed a simple, post-growth technique based on quantum well intermixing using ion implantation and rapid thermal annealing, which allows multiple selective area bandgap tailoring. Waveguide absorption spectra demonstrate that the bandgap energy can be shifted as much as 90 nm without any excess loss. By depositing a SiO2 layer of different thicknesses in different regions as the implantation mask, quantum wells in different sections of a wafer can be intermixed to different degrees in a single implantation and annealing process. It has also been shown that the heavy-hole and light hole states in the quantum wells can become degenerate at a certain degree of intermixing, which allows the fabrication of polarization insensitive optical amplifiers and electro-absorptive switches. The performance of both active (laser, amplifier, modulator) and passive (waveguide) components produced using this technique will be presented.

  13. Commuting quantum circuits and complexity of Ising partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2017-03-01

    Instantaneous quantum polynomial-time (IQP) computation is a class of quantum computation consisting only of commuting two-qubit gates and is not universal. Nevertheless, it has been shown that if there is a classical algorithm that can simulate IQP efficiently, the polynomial hierarchy collapses to the third level, which is highly implausible. However, the origin of the classical intractability is still less understood. Here we establish a relationship between IQP and computational complexity of calculating the imaginary-valued partition functions of Ising models. We apply the established relationship in two opposite directions. One direction is to find subclasses of IQP that are classically efficiently simulatable by using exact solvability of certain types of Ising models. Another direction is applying quantum computational complexity of IQP to investigate (im)possibility of efficient classical approximations of Ising partition functions with imaginary coupling constants. Specifically, we show that a multiplicative approximation of Ising partition functions is #P-hard for almost all imaginary coupling constants even on planar lattices of a bounded degree.

  14. 1998 technology roadmap for integrated circuits used in critical applications

    SciTech Connect

    Dellin, T.A.

    1998-09-01

    Integrated Circuits (ICs) are being extensively used in commercial and government applications that have extreme consequences of failure. The rapid evolution of the commercial microelectronics industry presents serious technical and supplier challenges to this niche critical IC marketplace. This Roadmap was developed in conjunction with the Using ICs in Critical Applications Workshop which was held in Albuquerque, NM, November 11--12, 1997.

  15. Digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits

    PubMed Central

    Lamata, Lucas

    2017-01-01

    We propose a digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits, including Fermi- Bose condensates, biased and pulsed Dicke models, for all regimes of light-matter coupling. We encode these classes of problems in a set of superconducting qubits coupled with a bosonic mode implemented by a transmission line resonator. Via digital-analog techniques, an efficient quantum simulation can be performed in state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms, by suitable decomposition into analog qubit-bosonic blocks and collective single-qubit pulses through digital steps. Moreover, just a single global analog block would be needed during the whole protocol in most of the cases, superimposed with fast periodic pulses to rotate and detune the qubits. Therefore, a large number of digital steps may be attained with this approach, providing a reduced digital error. Additionally, the number of gates per digital step does not grow with the number of qubits, rendering the simulation efficient. This strategy paves the way for the scalable digital-analog quantum simulation of many-body dynamics involving bosonic modes and spin degrees of freedom with superconducting circuits. PMID:28256559

  16. Digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Lamata, Lucas

    2017-03-03

    We propose a digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits, including Fermi- Bose condensates, biased and pulsed Dicke models, for all regimes of light-matter coupling. We encode these classes of problems in a set of superconducting qubits coupled with a bosonic mode implemented by a transmission line resonator. Via digital-analog techniques, an efficient quantum simulation can be performed in state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms, by suitable decomposition into analog qubit-bosonic blocks and collective single-qubit pulses through digital steps. Moreover, just a single global analog block would be needed during the whole protocol in most of the cases, superimposed with fast periodic pulses to rotate and detune the qubits. Therefore, a large number of digital steps may be attained with this approach, providing a reduced digital error. Additionally, the number of gates per digital step does not grow with the number of qubits, rendering the simulation efficient. This strategy paves the way for the scalable digital-analog quantum simulation of many-body dynamics involving bosonic modes and spin degrees of freedom with superconducting circuits.

  17. Flux qubit interaction with rapid single-flux quantum logic circuits: Control and readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klenov, N. V.; Kuznetsov, A. V.; Soloviev, I. I.; Bakurskiy, S. V.; Denisenko, M. V.; Satanin, A. M.

    2017-07-01

    We present the results of an analytical study and numerical simulation of the dynamics of a superconducting three-Josephson-junction (3JJ) flux qubit magnetically coupled with rapid single-flux quantum (RSFQ) logic circuit, which demonstrate the fundamental possibility of implementing the simplest logic operations at picosecond times, as well as rapid non-destructive readout. It is shown that when solving optimization problems, the qubit dynamics can be conveniently interpreted as a precession of the magnetic moment vector around the direction of the magnetic field. In this case, the role of magnetic field components is played by combinations of the Hamiltonian matrix elements, and the role of the magnetic moment is played by the Bloch vector. Features of the 3JJ qubit model are discussed during the analysis of how the qubit is affected by exposure to a short control pulse, as are the similarities between the Bloch and Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations. An analysis of solutions to the Bloch equations made it possible to develop recommendations for the use of readout RSFQ circuits in implementing an optimal interface between the classical and quantum parts of the computer system, as well as to justify the use of single-quantum logic in order to control superconducting quantum circuits on a chip.

  18. Digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, Lucas

    2017-03-01

    We propose a digital-analog quantum simulation of generalized Dicke models with superconducting circuits, including Fermi- Bose condensates, biased and pulsed Dicke models, for all regimes of light-matter coupling. We encode these classes of problems in a set of superconducting qubits coupled with a bosonic mode implemented by a transmission line resonator. Via digital-analog techniques, an efficient quantum simulation can be performed in state-of-the-art circuit quantum electrodynamics platforms, by suitable decomposition into analog qubit-bosonic blocks and collective single-qubit pulses through digital steps. Moreover, just a single global analog block would be needed during the whole protocol in most of the cases, superimposed with fast periodic pulses to rotate and detune the qubits. Therefore, a large number of digital steps may be attained with this approach, providing a reduced digital error. Additionally, the number of gates per digital step does not grow with the number of qubits, rendering the simulation efficient. This strategy paves the way for the scalable digital-analog quantum simulation of many-body dynamics involving bosonic modes and spin degrees of freedom with superconducting circuits.

  19. Near-optimal quantum circuit for Grover's unstructured search using a transverse field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhang; Rieffel, Eleanor G.; Wang, Zhihui

    2017-06-01

    Inspired by a class of algorithms proposed by Farhi et al. (arXiv:1411.4028), namely, the quantum approximate optimization algorithm (QAOA), we present a circuit-based quantum algorithm to search for a needle in a haystack, obtaining the same quadratic speedup achieved by Grover's original algorithm. In our algorithm, the problem Hamiltonian (oracle) and a transverse field are applied alternately to the system in a periodic manner. We introduce a technique, based on spin-coherent states, to analyze the composite unitary in a single period. This composite unitary drives a closed transition between two states that have high degrees of overlap with the initial state and the target state, respectively. The transition rate in our algorithm is of order Θ (1 /√{N }) , and the overlaps are of order Θ (1 ) , yielding a nearly optimal query complexity of T ≃√{N }(π /2 √{2 }) . Our algorithm is a QAOA circuit that demonstrates a quantum advantage with a large number of iterations that is not derived from Trotterization of an adiabatic quantum optimization (AQO) algorithm. It also suggests that the analysis required to understand QAOA circuits involves a very different process from estimating the energy gap of a Hamiltonian in AQO.

  20. Engineering reconfigurable laser-written circuits for practical quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaboyer, Zachary; Stokes, Alex; Steel, M. J.; Withford, Michael J.

    2016-02-01

    We fabricate a series of reconfigurable waveguide interferometers using laser machining techniques and charac- terize them classically. The 3D nature of the ultrafast laser writing technique allows for the fabrication of unique multi-arm interferometers not possible in planar platforms. We demonstrate selectivity between multiple phase shifters in a single interferometer by patterning the chip surface using picosecond laser ablation in a separate step. Microfluidic elements for making practical measurements on-chip are incorporated by machining channels within the substrate to interact with waveguide modes. Our results provide a path toward practical implementation of quantum metrology protocols requiring multiple interferometer arms and tunable phases.

  1. Josephson Parametric Amplification for Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics: Theory and Implementation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-01

    Intuition: Parametric Resonance 8 write this in the canonical form w21(t) = ω 2 0 [1 + h cos(2ωpt)] , (2.3) where h 1. With this form for ω21(t...calculating the cavity response to the classical pump, and afterwards treating the signal as a perturbation. We write the incoming pump (assumed to be...deduce a limit on the performance of linear amplifiers imposed by quantum mechanics. Let us write the quadrature operators of the output (i.e., amplified

  2. Si quantum dot structures and their applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbyna, L.; Torchynska, T.

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents briefly the history of emission study in Si quantum dots (QDs) in the last two decades. Stable light emission of Si QDs and NCs was observed in the spectral ranges: blue, green, orange, red and infrared. These PL bands were attributed to the exciton recombination in Si QDs, to the carrier recombination through defects inside of Si NCs or via oxide related defects at the Si/SiOx interface. The analysis of recombination transitions and the different ways of the emission stimulation in Si QD structures, related to the element variation for the passivation of surface dangling bonds, as well as the plasmon induced emission and rare earth impurity activation, have been presented. The different applications of Si QD structures in quantum electronics, such as: Si QD light emitting diodes, Si QD single union and tandem solar cells, Si QD memory structures, Si QD based one electron devices and double QD structures for spintronics, have been discussed as well. Note the significant worldwide interest directed toward the silicon-based light emission for integrated optoelectronics is related to the complementary metal-oxide semiconductor compatibility and the possibility to be monolithically integrated with very large scale integrated (VLSI) circuits. The different features of poly-, micro- and nanocrystalline silicon for solar cells, that is a mixture of both amorphous and crystalline phases, such as the silicon NCs or QDs embedded in a α-Si:H matrix, as well as the thin film 2-cell or 3-cell tandem solar cells based on Si QD structures have been discussed as well. Silicon NC based structures for non-volatile memory purposes, the recent studies of Si QD base single electron devices and the single electron occupation of QDs as an important component to the measurement and manipulation of spins in quantum information processing have been analyzed as well.

  3. Quantum circuit theory and measurements on Y-Ba-Cu-O grain-boundary weak-link bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How, H.; Jiang, H.; Widom, A.; Vittoria, C.

    1994-01-01

    The quantum system associated with a resistor-shunted weak-link junction circuit may be described in terms of a single Lagrangian. In this representation the degrees of freedom internal to the dissipative energy of the resistor can be systematically separated from the Hamiltonian formulation of the circuit. This allows us to solve the quantum states of the junction while the effects of the resistor on the circuit are included as a Lagrangian multiplier. In this manner the effects of the measuring apparatus or resistor on the quantum state of the junction may be calculable. The calculations are in very good agreement with experiments.

  4. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications.

    PubMed

    Noriega, J R; García-Delgado, L A; Gómez-Fuentes, R; García-Juárez, A

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  5. Low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noriega, J. R.; García-Delgado, L. A.; Gómez-Fuentes, R.; García-Juárez, A.

    2016-09-01

    A low power RF amplifier circuit for ion trap applications is presented and described. The amplifier is based on a class-D half-bridge amplifier with a voltage mirror driver. The RF amplifier is composed of an RF class-D amplifier, an envelope modulator to ramp up the RF voltage during the ion analysis stage, a detector or amplitude demodulation circuit for sensing the output signal amplitude, and a feedback amplifier that linearizes the steady state output of the amplifier. The RF frequency is set by a crystal oscillator and the series resonant circuit is tuned to the oscillator frequency. The resonant circuit components have been chosen, in this case, to operate at 1 MHz. In testings, the class-D stage operated at a maximum of 78 mW at 1.1356 MHz producing 225 V peak.

  6. LEC GaAs for integrated circuit applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, C. G.; Chen, R. T.; Homes, D. E.; Asbeck, P. M.; Elliott, K. R.; Fairman, R. D.; Oliver, J. D.

    1984-01-01

    Recent developments in liquid encapsulated Czochralski techniques for the growth of semiinsulating GaAs for integrated circuit applications have resulted in significant improvements in the quality and quantity of GaAs material suitable for device processing. The emergence of high performance GaAs integrated circuit technologies has accelerated the demand for high quality, large diameter semiinsulating GaAs substrates. The new device technologies, including digital integrated circuits, monolithic microwave integrated circuits and charge coupled devices have largely adopted direct ion implantation for the formation of doped layers. Ion implantation lends itself to good uniformity and reproducibility, high yield and low cost; however, this technique also places stringent demands on the quality of the semiinsulating GaAs substrates. Although significant progress was made in developing a viable planar ion implantation technology, the variability and poor quality of GaAs substrates have hindered progress in process development.

  7. Exploring the quantum critical behaviour in a driven Tavis-Cummings circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, M.; Zhong, Y. P.; Liu, T.; Yan, L. L.; Yang, W. L.; Twamley, J.; Wang, H.

    2015-05-01

    Quantum phase transitions play an important role in many-body systems and have been a research focus in conventional condensed-matter physics over the past few decades. Artificial atoms, such as superconducting qubits that can be individually manipulated, provide a new paradigm of realising and exploring quantum phase transitions by engineering an on-chip quantum simulator. Here we demonstrate experimentally the quantum critical behaviour in a highly controllable superconducting circuit, consisting of four qubits coupled to a common resonator mode. By off-resonantly driving the system to renormalize the critical spin-field coupling strength, we have observed a four-qubit nonequilibrium quantum phase transition in a dynamical manner; that is, we sweep the critical coupling strength over time and monitor the four-qubit scaled moments for a signature of a structural change of the system's eigenstates. Our observation of the nonequilibrium quantum phase transition, which is in good agreement with the driven Tavis-Cummings theory under decoherence, offers new experimental approaches towards exploring quantum phase transition-related science, such as scaling behaviours, parity breaking and long-range quantum correlations.

  8. Exploring the quantum critical behaviour in a driven Tavis-Cummings circuit.

    PubMed

    Feng, M; Zhong, Y P; Liu, T; Yan, L L; Yang, W L; Twamley, J; Wang, H

    2015-05-14

    Quantum phase transitions play an important role in many-body systems and have been a research focus in conventional condensed-matter physics over the past few decades. Artificial atoms, such as superconducting qubits that can be individually manipulated, provide a new paradigm of realising and exploring quantum phase transitions by engineering an on-chip quantum simulator. Here we demonstrate experimentally the quantum critical behaviour in a highly controllable superconducting circuit, consisting of four qubits coupled to a common resonator mode. By off-resonantly driving the system to renormalize the critical spin-field coupling strength, we have observed a four-qubit nonequilibrium quantum phase transition in a dynamical manner; that is, we sweep the critical coupling strength over time and monitor the four-qubit scaled moments for a signature of a structural change of the system's eigenstates. Our observation of the nonequilibrium quantum phase transition, which is in good agreement with the driven Tavis-Cummings theory under decoherence, offers new experimental approaches towards exploring quantum phase transition-related science, such as scaling behaviours, parity breaking and long-range quantum correlations.

  9. Exploring the quantum critical behaviour in a driven Tavis–Cummings circuit

    PubMed Central

    Feng, M.; Zhong, Y.P.; Liu, T.; Yan, L.L.; Yang, W.L.; Twamley, J.; Wang, H.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum phase transitions play an important role in many-body systems and have been a research focus in conventional condensed-matter physics over the past few decades. Artificial atoms, such as superconducting qubits that can be individually manipulated, provide a new paradigm of realising and exploring quantum phase transitions by engineering an on-chip quantum simulator. Here we demonstrate experimentally the quantum critical behaviour in a highly controllable superconducting circuit, consisting of four qubits coupled to a common resonator mode. By off-resonantly driving the system to renormalize the critical spin-field coupling strength, we have observed a four-qubit nonequilibrium quantum phase transition in a dynamical manner; that is, we sweep the critical coupling strength over time and monitor the four-qubit scaled moments for a signature of a structural change of the system's eigenstates. Our observation of the nonequilibrium quantum phase transition, which is in good agreement with the driven Tavis–Cummings theory under decoherence, offers new experimental approaches towards exploring quantum phase transition-related science, such as scaling behaviours, parity breaking and long-range quantum correlations. PMID:25971985

  10. Equivalent circuit-level model and improvement of terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhou; Shaobin Liu; Jie Wu; Xiaoliu Zhang; Wu Tang

    2014-04-28

    An equivalent circuit-level model of terahertz (THz) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) is developed by using rate equations. This model can be employed to investigate the characteristics of THz QCLs accurately and to improve their design. We use the circuit-level model to analyse a new active structure, which can improve the performance of THz QCLs by means of enhancing carrier injection. The simulation result shows that THz QCLs with the new active structure have a much higher performance compared with conventional THz QCLs. The high-performance THz QCLs are expected to be operated at higher temperatures. (lasers)

  11. Efficient transfer of an arbitrary qutrit state in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tong; Xiong, Shao-Jie; Cao, Xiao-Zhi; Su, Qi-Ping; Yang, Chui-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Compared with a qubit, a qutrit (i.e., three-level quantum system) has a larger Hilbert space and thus can be used to encode more information in quantum information processing and communication. Here, we propose a method to transfer an arbitrary quantum state between two flux qutrits coupled to two resonators. This scheme is simple because it only requires two basic operations. The state-transfer operation can be performed fast because only resonant interactions are used. Numerical simulations show that the high-fidelity transfer of quantum states between the two qutrits is feasible with current circuit-QED technology. This scheme is quite general and can be applied to accomplish the same task for other solid-state qutrits coupled to resonators.

  12. Few-electron quantum dot circuit with integrated charge read out

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elzerman, J. M.; Hanson, R.; Greidanus, J. S.; Willems van Beveren, L. H.; de Franceschi, S.; Vandersypen, L. M.; Tarucha, S.; Kouwenhoven, L. P.

    2003-04-01

    We report on the realization of a few-electron double quantum dot defined in a two-dimensional electron gas by means of surface gates on top of a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure. Two quantum point contacts are placed in the vicinity of the double quantum dot and serve as charge detectors. These enable determination of the number of conduction electrons on each dot. This number can be reduced to zero, while still allowing transport measurements through the double dot. Microwave radiation is used to pump an electron from one dot to the other by absorption of a single photon. The experiments demonstrate that this quantum dot circuit can serve as a good starting point for a scalable spin-qubit system.

  13. Theory of quantum-circuit refrigeration by photon-assisted electron tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silveri, Matti; Grabert, Hermann; Masuda, Shumpei; Tan, Kuan Yen; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-09-01

    We focus on a recently experimentally realized scenario of normal-metal-insulator-superconductor tunnel junctions coupled to a superconducting resonator. We develop a first-principles theory to describe the effect of photon-assisted electron tunneling on the quantum state of the resonator. Our results are in very good quantitative agreement with the previous experiments on refrigeration and heating of the resonator using the photon-assisted tunneling, thus providing a stringent verification of the developed theory. Importantly, our results provide simple analytical estimates of the voltage-tunable coupling strength and temperature of the thermal reservoir formed by the photon-assisted tunneling. Consequently, they are used to introduce optimization principles for initialization of quantum devices using such a quantum-circuit refrigerator. Thanks to the first-principles nature of our approach, extension of the theory to the full spectrum of quantum electric devices seems plausible.

  14. Small slot waveguide rings for on-chip quantum optical circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, Nir; Türschmann, Pierre; Haakh, Harald R.; Martin-Cano, Diego; Götzinger, Stephan; Sandoghdar, Vahid

    2017-03-01

    Nanophotonic interfaces between single emitters and light promise to enable new quantum optical technologies. Here, we use a combination of finite element simulations and analytic quantum theory to investigate the interaction of various quantum emitters with slot-waveguide rings. We predict that for rings with radii as small as 1.44 $\\mu$m (Q = 27,900), near-unity emitter-waveguide coupling efficiencies and emission enhancements on the order of 1300 can be achieved. By tuning the ring geometry or introducing losses, we show that realistic emitter-ring systems can be made to be either weakly or strongly coupled, so that we can observe Rabi oscillations in the decay dynamics even for micron-sized rings. Moreover, we demonstrate that slot waveguide rings can be used to directionally couple emission, again with near-unity efficiency. Our results pave the way for integrated solid-state quantum circuits involving various emitters.

  15. High-fidelity quantum state evolution in imperfect photonic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mower, Jacob; Harris, Nicholas C.; Steinbrecher, Gregory R.; Lahini, Yoav; Englund, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    We propose and analyze the design of a programmable photonic integrated circuit for high-fidelity quantum computation and simulation. We demonstrate that the reconfigurability of our design allows us to overcome two major impediments to quantum optics on a chip: it removes the need for a full fabrication cycle for each experiment and allows for compensation of fabrication errors using numerical optimization techniques. Under a pessimistic fabrication model for the silicon-on-insulator process, we demonstrate a dramatic fidelity improvement for the linear optics controlled-not and controlled-phase gates and, showing the scalability of this approach, the iterative phase estimation algorithm built from individually optimized gates. We also propose and simulate an experiment that the programmability of our system would enable: a statistically robust study of the evolution of entangled photons in disordered quantum walks. Overall, our results suggest that existing fabrication processes are sufficient to build a quantum photonic processor capable of high-fidelity operation.

  16. Printed circuits and their applications: Which way forward?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cantatore, E.

    2015-09-01

    The continuous advancements in printed electronics make nowadays feasible the design of printed circuits which enable meaningful applications. Examples include ultra-low cost sensors embedded in food packaging, large-area sensing surfaces and biomedical assays. This paper offers an overview of state-of-the-art digital and analog circuit blocks, manufactured with a printed complementary organic TFT technology. An analog to digital converter and an RFID tag implemented exploiting these building blocks are also described. The main remaining drawbacks of the printed technology described are identified, and new approaches to further improve the state of the art, enabling more innovative applications are discussed.

  17. A Novel Implementation of Efficient Algorithms for Quantum Circuit Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeller, Luke

    In this project, we design and develop a computer program to effectively approximate arbitrary quantum gates using the discrete set of Clifford Gates together with the T gate (π/8 gate). Employing recent results from Mosca et. al. and Giles and Selinger, we implement a decomposition scheme that outputs a sequence of Clifford, T, and Tt gates that approximate the input to within a specified error range ɛ. Specifically, the given gate is first rounded to an element of Z[1/2, i] with a precision determined by ɛ, and then exact synthesis is employed to produce the resulting gate. It is known that this procedure is optimal in approximating an arbitrary single qubit gate. Our program, written in Matlab and Python, can complete both approximate and exact synthesis of qubits. It can be used to assist in the experimental implementation of an arbitrary fault-tolerant single qubit gate, for which direct implementation isn't feasible.

  18. Quantum Bayesian rule for weak measurements of qubits in superconducting circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peiyue; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2014-12-01

    Compared with the quantum trajectory equation (QTE), the quantum Bayesian approach has the advantage of being more efficient to infer a quantum state under monitoring, based on the integrated output of measurements. For weak measurement of qubits in circuit quantum electrodynamics (cQED), properly accounting for the measurement backaction effects within the Bayesian framework is an important problem of current interest. Elegant work towards this task was carried out by Korotkov in ‘bad-cavity’ and weak-response limits (Korotkov 2011 Quantum Bayesian approach to circuit QED measurement (arXiv:1111.4016)). In the present work, based on insights from the cavity-field states (dynamics) and the help of an effective QTE, we generalize the results of Korotkov to more general system parameters. The obtained Bayesian rule is in full agreement with Korotkov's result in limiting cases and as well holds satisfactory accuracy in non-limiting cases in comparison with the QTE simulations. We expect the proposed Bayesian rule to be useful for future cQED measurement and control experiments.

  19. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I.

    2016-11-01

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. The intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields.

  20. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    DOE PAGES

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-11-21

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. In conclusion, the intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields.

  1. Scalable quantum computing model in the circuit-QED lattice with circulator function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Mun Dae; Kim, Jaewan

    2017-08-01

    We propose a model for a scalable quantum computing in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. In the Kagome lattice of qubits, three qubits are connected to each other through a superconducting three-junction flux qubit at the vertices of the lattice. By controlling one of the three-Josephson-junction energies of the intervening flux qubit, we can achieve the circulator function that couples arbitrary pair of two qubits among three. This selective coupling enables the interaction between two nearest neighbor qubits in the Kagome lattice, and further the two-qubit gate operation between any pair of qubits in the whole lattice by performing consecutive nearest neighbor two-qubit gates.

  2. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-01-01

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. The intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields. PMID:27869230

  3. A graph-theoretical representation of multiphoton resonance processes in superconducting quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Jooya, Hossein Z.; Reihani, Kamran; Chu, Shih-I

    2016-11-21

    We propose a graph-theoretical formalism to study generic circuit quantum electrodynamics systems consisting of a two level qubit coupled with a single-mode resonator in arbitrary coupling strength regimes beyond rotating-wave approximation. We define colored-weighted graphs, and introduce different products between them to investigate the dynamics of superconducting qubits in transverse, longitudinal, and bidirectional coupling schemes. The intuitive and predictive picture provided by this method, and the simplicity of the mathematical construction, are demonstrated with some numerical studies of the multiphoton resonance processes and quantum interference phenomena for the superconducting qubit systems driven by intense ac fields.

  4. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit, part I: Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamata, L.; Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J. Y.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, John M.

    Adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) is a general-purpose optimization algorithm that in contrast to circuit-model quantum algorithms can be applied to a large set of computational problems. An analog physical realization of AQC has certain limitations that we propose can be overcome by a gate-model equivalence of the AQC. In this talk we discuss the hardware advantages of digitized AQC in particular arbitrary interactions, precision, and coherence. We could experimentally realize the principles of digitized AQC on a chain of nine qubits, and highlight the physics of adiabatic evolutions as well as the Kibble-Zurek mechanism.

  5. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit, part II: Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barends, R.; Shabani, A.; Lamata, L.; Kelly, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; Las Heras, U.; Babbush, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Lucero, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Solano, E.; Neven, H.; Martinis, J.

    A major challenge in quantum computing is to solve general problems with limited physical hardware. We implement digitized adiabatic quantum computing, combining the generality of the adiabatic algorithm with the universality of the digital approach, using a superconducting circuit with nine qubits. We probe the adiabatic evolutions, explore the scaling of errors with system size, and quantify the success of the algorithm for random spin problems. We find that the system can approximate the solutions to both frustrated Ising problems and non-stoquastic problem Hamiltonians with a performance that is comparable.

  6. Fundamental operation of single-flux-quantum circuits using coplanar-type high-Tc SQUIDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuke, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Utagawa, Tadashi; Enomoto, Youichi

    1996-11-01

    We have fabricated coplanar type dc SQUIDs using NdBa2Cu3Oy superconducting thin films and operated fundamental single-flux-quantum (SFQ) circuits. The Josephson junctions were made by the narrow-focused ion beam irradiation technique. For a 145 μm wide and 10 μm long logic SQUID having a critical current of 105 μA and an inductive parameter (βL) of 28, a store and a restore of the flux quantum have been demonstrated at temperatures of 4.2-30 K. These operations were performed with an input pulsewidth of 5 ns (5 ns was the shortest input pulse width available from our function generating equipment). These results show experimentally the possibility of high speed operation in all high-Tc superconducting digital circuits.

  7. Minimized open-circuit voltage reduction in GaAs/InGaAs quantum well solar cells with bandgap-engineered graded quantum well depths

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaohan; Dasika, Vaishno D.; Li, Ping-Chun; Ji, Li; Bank, Seth R.; Yu, Edward T.

    2014-09-22

    The use of InGaAs quantum wells with composition graded across the intrinsic region to increase open-circuit voltage in p-i-n GaAs/InGaAs quantum well solar cells is demonstrated and analyzed. By engineering the band-edge energy profile to reduce photo-generated carrier concentration in the quantum wells at high forward bias, simultaneous increases in both open-circuit voltage and short-circuit current density are achieved, compared to those for a structure with the same average In concentration, but constant rather than graded quantum well composition across the intrinsic region. This approach is combined with light trapping to further increase short-circuit current density.

  8. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-01-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system’s path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system’s behavior depends not only on the measuring device’s configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment. PMID:28508079

  9. A twofold quantum delayed-choice experiment in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ke; Xu, Yuan; Wang, Weiting; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Roy, Tanay; Kundu, Suman; Chand, Madhavi; Ranadive, Arpit; Vijay, Rajamani; Song, Yipu; Duan, Luming; Sun, Luyan

    2017-05-01

    Wave-particle complementarity lies at the heart of quantum mechanics. To illustrate this mysterious feature, Wheeler proposed the delayed-choice experiment, where a quantum system manifests the wave- or particle-like attribute, depending on the experimental arrangement, which is made after the system has entered the interferometer. In recent quantum delayed-choice experiments, these two complementary behaviors were simultaneously observed with a quantum interferometer in a superposition of being closed and open. We suggest and implement a conceptually different quantum delayed-choice experiment by introducing a which-path detector (WPD) that can simultaneously record and neglect the system's path information, but where the interferometer itself is classical. Our experiment is realized with a superconducting circuit, where a cavity acts as the WPD for an interfering qubit. Using this setup, we implement the first twofold delayed-choice experiment, which demonstrates that the system's behavior depends not only on the measuring device's configuration that can be chosen even after the system has been detected but also on whether we a posteriori erase or mark the which-path information, the latter of which cannot be revealed by previous quantum delayed-choice experiments. Our results represent the first demonstration of both counterintuitive features with the same experimental setup, significantly extending the concept of quantum delayed-choice experiment.

  10. Nanofabrication for On-Chip Optical Levitation, Atom-Trapping, and Superconducting Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norte, Richard Alexander

    a final value of Qm = 5.8(1.1) x 105, representing more than an order of magnitude improvement over the conventional limits of SiO2 for a pendulum geometry. Our technique may enable new opportunities for mechanical sensing and facilitate observations of quantum behavior in this class of mechanical systems. We then give a detailed overview of the techniques used to produce high-aspect-ratio nanostructures with applications in a wide range of quantum optics experiments. The ability to fabricate such nanodevices with high precision opens the door to a vast array of experiments which integrate macroscopic optical setups with lithographically engineered nanodevices. Coupled with atom-trapping experiments in the Kimble Lab, we use these techniques to realize a new waveguide chip designed to address ultra-cold atoms along lithographically patterned nanobeams which have large atom-photon coupling and near 4pi Steradian optical access for cooling and trapping atoms. We describe a fully integrated and scalable design where cold atoms are spatially overlapped with the nanostring cavities in order to observe a resonant optical depth of d0 ≈ 0.15. The nanodevice illuminates new possibilities for integrating atoms into photonic circuits and engineering quantum states of atoms and light on a microscopic scale. We then describe our work with superconducting microwave resonators coupled to a phononic cavity towards the goal of building an integrated device for quantum-limited microwave-to-optical wavelength conversion. We give an overview of our characterizations of several types of substrates for fabricating a low-loss high-frequency electromechanical system. We describe our electromechanical system fabricated on a SiN membrane which consists of a 12 GHz superconducting LC resonator coupled capacitively to the high frequency localized modes of a phononic nanobeam. Using our suspended membrane geometry we isolate our system from substrates with significant loss tangents

  11. Block-Z X Z synthesis of an arbitrary quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vos, A.; De Baerdemacker, S.

    2016-11-01

    Given an arbitrary 2w×2w unitary matrix U , a powerful matrix decomposition can be applied, leading to four different syntheses of a w -qubit quantum circuit performing the unitary transformation. The demonstration is based on a recent theorem by H. Führ and Z. Rzeszotnik [Linear Algebra Its Appl. 484, 86 (2015), 10.1016/j.laa.2015.06.019] generalizing the scaling of single-bit unitary gates (w =1 ) to gates with arbitrary value of w . The synthesized circuit consists of controlled one-qubit gates, such as negator gates and phasor gates. Interestingly, the approach reduces to a known synthesis method for classical logic circuits consisting of controlled not gates in the case that U is a permutation matrix.

  12. GaAs IMPATT diodes for microstrip circuit applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisseman, W. R.; Tserng, H. Q.; Shaw, D. W.; Mcquiddy, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    GaAs IMPATT diodes with plated heat sinks are shown to be particularly well suited for microstrip circuit applications. Details of materials growth and device fabrication procedures are given, and experimental results are presented for a GaAs IMPATT microstrip oscillator operating at X band.

  13. GaAs IMPATT diodes for microstrip circuit applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wisseman, W. R.; Tserng, H. Q.; Shaw, D. W.; Mcquiddy, D. N.

    1972-01-01

    GaAs IMPATT diodes with plated heat sinks are shown to be particularly well suited for microstrip circuit applications. Details of materials growth and device fabrication procedures are given, and experimental results are presented for a GaAs IMPATT microstrip oscillator operating at X band.

  14. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-05-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  15. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L; Wang, Jingbo B; Matthews, Jonathan C F

    2016-05-05

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor.

  16. Efficient quantum walk on a quantum processor

    PubMed Central

    Qiang, Xiaogang; Loke, Thomas; Montanaro, Ashley; Aungskunsiri, Kanin; Zhou, Xiaoqi; O'Brien, Jeremy L.; Wang, Jingbo B.; Matthews, Jonathan C. F.

    2016-01-01

    The random walk formalism is used across a wide range of applications, from modelling share prices to predicting population genetics. Likewise, quantum walks have shown much potential as a framework for developing new quantum algorithms. Here we present explicit efficient quantum circuits for implementing continuous-time quantum walks on the circulant class of graphs. These circuits allow us to sample from the output probability distributions of quantum walks on circulant graphs efficiently. We also show that solving the same sampling problem for arbitrary circulant quantum circuits is intractable for a classical computer, assuming conjectures from computational complexity theory. This is a new link between continuous-time quantum walks and computational complexity theory and it indicates a family of tasks that could ultimately demonstrate quantum supremacy over classical computers. As a proof of principle, we experimentally implement the proposed quantum circuit on an example circulant graph using a two-qubit photonics quantum processor. PMID:27146471

  17. Circuit quantum electrodynamics simulator of flat band physics in a Lieb lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zi-He; Wang, Yan-Pu; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Gao, Jin-Hua; Wu, Ying

    2016-06-01

    The concept of flat band plays an important role in strongly correlated many-body physics. However, the demonstration of the flat band physics is highly nontrivial due to intrinsic limitations in conventional condensed-matter materials. Here we propose a circuit quantum electrodynamics simulator of the two-dimensional (2D) Lieb lattice exhibiting a flat middle band. By exploiting the parametric conversion method, we design a photonic Lieb lattice with in situ tunable hopping strengths in a 2D array of coupled superconducting transmissionline resonators. Moreover, the flexibility of our proposal enables the incorporation of both the artificial gauge field and the strong photon-photon interaction in a time- and site-resolved manner. To unambiguously demonstrate the synthesized flat band, we further investigate the observation of the flat band localization of microwave photons through the pumping and the steady-state measurements of only a few sites on the lattice. Requiring only current level of technique and being robust against imperfections in realistic circuits, our scheme can be readily tested in experiment and may pave a new way towards the realization of exotic photonic quantum Hall fluids including anomalous quantum Hall effect and bosonic fractional quantum Hall effect without magnetic field.

  18. Universal adiabatic quantum computation via the space-time circuit-to-Hamiltonian construction.

    PubMed

    Gosset, David; Terhal, Barbara M; Vershynina, Anna

    2015-04-10

    We show how to perform universal adiabatic quantum computation using a Hamiltonian which describes a set of particles with local interactions on a two-dimensional grid. A single parameter in the Hamiltonian is adiabatically changed as a function of time to simulate the quantum circuit. We bound the eigenvalue gap above the unique ground state by mapping our model onto the ferromagnetic XXZ chain with kink boundary conditions; the gap of this spin chain was computed exactly by Koma and Nachtergaele using its q-deformed version of SU(2) symmetry. We also discuss a related time-independent Hamiltonian which was shown by Janzing to be capable of universal computation. We observe that in the limit of large system size, the time evolution is equivalent to the exactly solvable quantum walk on Young's lattice.

  19. Controllable high-fidelity quantum state transfer and entanglement generation in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Xu-Chen; Mei, Feng; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a scheme to realize controllable quantum state transfer and entanglement generation among transmon qubits in the typical circuit QED setup based on adiabatic passage. Through designing the time-dependent driven pulses applied on the transmon qubits, we find that fast quantum sate transfer can be achieved between arbitrary two qubits and quantum entanglement among the qubits also can also be engineered. Furthermore, we numerically analyzed the influence of the decoherence on our scheme with the current experimental accessible systematical parameters. The result shows that our scheme is very robust against both the cavity decay and qubit relaxation, the fidelities of the state transfer and entanglement preparation process could be very high. In addition, our scheme is also shown to be insensitive to the inhomogeneous of qubit-resonator coupling strengths. PMID:26804326

  20. Fast resonator reset in circuit QED using open quantum system optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutin, Samuel; Andersen, Christian Kraglund; Venkatraman, Jayameenakshi; Blais, Alexandre

    Practical implementations of quantum information processing requires repetitive qubit readout. In circuit QED, where readout is performed using a resonator dispersively coupled to the qubits, the measurement repetition rate is limited by the resonator reset time. This reset is usually performed passively by waiting several resonator decay times. Alternatively, it was recently shown that a simple pulse sequence allows to decrease the reset time to twice the resonator decay time. In this work, we show how to further optimize the ring-down pulse sequence by using optimal control theory for open quantum systems. Using a new implementation of the open GRAPE algorithm that is well suited to large Hilbert spaces, we find active resonator reset procedures that are faster than a single resonator decay time. Simple quantum speed limits for this kind of active reset processes will be discussed

  1. Controllable high-fidelity quantum state transfer and entanglement generation in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Xu, Peng; Yang, Xu-Chen; Mei, Feng; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-01-25

    We propose a scheme to realize controllable quantum state transfer and entanglement generation among transmon qubits in the typical circuit QED setup based on adiabatic passage. Through designing the time-dependent driven pulses applied on the transmon qubits, we find that fast quantum sate transfer can be achieved between arbitrary two qubits and quantum entanglement among the qubits also can also be engineered. Furthermore, we numerically analyzed the influence of the decoherence on our scheme with the current experimental accessible systematical parameters. The result shows that our scheme is very robust against both the cavity decay and qubit relaxation, the fidelities of the state transfer and entanglement preparation process could be very high. In addition, our scheme is also shown to be insensitive to the inhomogeneous of qubit-resonator coupling strengths.

  2. Quantum groups: Geometry and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Chong -Sun

    1996-05-13

    The main theme of this thesis is a study of the geometry of quantum groups and quantum spaces, with the hope that they will be useful for the construction of quantum field theory with quantum group symmetry. The main tool used is the Faddeev-Reshetikhin-Takhtajan description of quantum groups. A few content-rich examples of quantum complex spaces with quantum group symmetry are treated in details. In chapter 1, the author reviews some of the basic concepts and notions for Hopf algebras and other background materials. In chapter 2, he studies the vector fields of quantum groups. A compact realization of these vector fields as pseudodifferential operators acting on the linear quantum spaces is given. In chapter 3, he describes the quantum sphere as a complex quantum manifold by means of a quantum stereographic projection. A covariant calculus is introduced. An interesting property of this calculus is the existence of a one-form realization of the exterior differential operator. The concept of a braided comodule is introduced and a braided algebra of quantum spheres is constructed. In chapter 4, the author considers the more general higher dimensional quantum complex projective spaces and the quantum Grassman manifolds. Differential calculus, integration and braiding can be introduced as in the one dimensional case. Finally, in chapter 5, he studies the framework of quantum principal bundle and construct the q-deformed Dirac monopole as a quantum principal bundle with a quantum sphere as the base and a U(1) with non-commutative calculus as the fiber. The first Chern class can be introduced and integrated to give the monopole charge.

  3. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns. PMID:25787147

  4. Fast universal quantum gates on microwave photons with all-resonance operations in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Hua, Ming; Tao, Ming-Jie; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2015-03-19

    Stark shift on a superconducting qubit in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) has been used to construct universal quantum entangling gates on superconducting resonators in previous works. It is a second-order coupling effect between the resonator and the qubit in the dispersive regime, which leads to a slow state-selective rotation on the qubit. Here, we present two proposals to construct the fast universal quantum gates on superconducting resonators in a microwave-photon quantum processor composed of multiple superconducting resonators coupled to a superconducting transmon qutrit, that is, the controlled-phase (c-phase) gate on two microwave-photon resonators and the controlled-controlled phase (cc-phase) gates on three resonators, resorting to quantum resonance operations, without any drive field. Compared with previous works, our universal quantum gates have the higher fidelities and shorter operation times in theory. The numerical simulation shows that the fidelity of our c-phase gate is 99.57% within about 38.1 ns and that of our cc-phase gate is 99.25% within about 73.3 ns.

  5. Applications of carbon nanotubes on integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min

    The microelectronics technology falls within the boundaries of that definition. Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a promising alternative material for the future nanoelectronics. Owing to the unique properties of CNTs and the maturity of CMOS IC technology, the integration of the two technologies will take advantages of both. In this work, we demonstrate a new local silicon-gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNFET) by combining the in situ CNT growth technology and the SOI technology. The proposed CNFET structure has realized individual device operation, batch fabrication, low parasitics and better compatibility to the CMOS process at the same time. The configuration proposes a feasible approach to integrate the CNTs to CMOS platform for the first time, which makes CNT a step closer to application. The CNFETs show advanced DC characteristics. The ambipolar conductance and the scaling effect of the CNFETs have been analyzed based on the SB modulated conductance mechanism. Investigation of radio-frequency (RF) characteristics of CNTs is essential for their application. RF transmission characteristics of the semiconducting and metallic CNTs are investigated to the frequency of 12 GHz using the full two-port S-parameter methodology for the first time. Without the effect of the parasitics, the signal transmission capability of the CNTs maintains at a constant level and shows no degeneration even at a high frequency of 12 GHz. An empirical RLC element model has been proposed to fit the RF response of the CNT array. Capacitive contact is reported between the CNTs and the metal electrodes. We also explore the high-frequency properties of the local silicon-gate CNFET as an active device by measuring its S parameters using a common-source configuration. In addition, we demonstrate the application of CNT as via/contact filler to solve the problems of copper vias used in ICs nowadays. We have optimized the fabrication process for the CNT via integration. The CNT vias with

  6. GQ corrections in the circuit theory of quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnano, G.; Nazarov, Yu. V.

    2006-09-01

    We develop a finite-element technique that allows one to evaluate correction of the order of GQ to various transport characteristics of arbitrary nanostructures. Common examples of such corrections are the weak-localization effect on conductance and universal conductance fluctuations. Our approach, however, is not restricted to conductance only. It allows one in the same manner to evaluate corrections to the noise characteristics, superconducting properties, strongly nonequilibrium transport, and transmission distribution. To enable such functionality, we consider Green’s functions of arbitrary matrix structure. We derive a finite-element technique from Cooperon and diffuson ladders for these Green’s functions. The derivation is supplemented with application examples. Those include transitions between ensembles and the Aharonov-Bohm effect.

  7. Measures and applications of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Quantum information theory is built upon the realisation that quantum resources like coherence and entanglement can be exploited for novel or enhanced ways of transmitting and manipulating information, such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, and quantum computing. We now know that there is potentially much more than entanglement behind the power of quantum information processing. There exist more general forms of non-classical correlations, stemming from fundamental principles such as the necessary disturbance induced by a local measurement, or the persistence of quantum coherence in all possible local bases. These signatures can be identified and are resilient in almost all quantum states, and have been linked to the enhanced performance of certain quantum protocols over classical ones in noisy conditions. Their presence represents, among other things, one of the most essential manifestations of quantumness in cooperative systems, from the subatomic to the macroscopic domain. In this work we give an overview of the current quest for a proper understanding and characterisation of the frontier between classical and quantum correlations (QCs) in composite states. We focus on various approaches to define and quantify general QCs, based on different yet interlinked physical perspectives, and comment on the operational significance of the ensuing measures for quantum technology tasks such as information encoding, distribution, discrimination and metrology. We then provide a broader outlook of a few applications in which quantumness beyond entanglement looks fit to play a key role.

  8. Chopper Circuits Developed for EV Drive Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuruta, Yukinori; Kawamura, Atsuo

    In this paper, the technical stream on a high efficiency and high frequency chopper for the automotive industry, new energy and energy conservation technology field is surveyed. QRAS (Quasi-resonant Regenerating Active Snubber) and SAZZ (Snubber Assisted Zero Voltage and Zero Current Transition) topologies aimed for the electric vehicle (EV) drive application are proposed. 25kHz-8kW QRAS, 100kHz-8kW SAZZ choppers and 50kHz-25kW bilateral SAZZ-1 chopper are constructed and tested under rating conditions. It is verified that SAZZ topology retains high efficiency even at the increased operating frequency of 100kHz. It is shown that high efficiency can be realized at high operating frequency even in high power converters by QRAS and newly proposed SAZZ soft switching topologies.

  9. Understanding degenerate ground states of a protected quantum circuit in the presence of disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempster, Joshua M.; Fu, Bo; Ferguson, David G.; Schuster, D. I.; Koch, Jens

    2014-09-01

    A recent theoretical proposal suggests that a simple circuit utilizing two superinductors may produce a qubit with ground-state degeneracy [Brooks, Phys. Rev. A 87, 052306 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.052306]. We perform a full circuit analysis along with exact diagonalization of the circuit Hamiltonian to elucidate the nature of the spectrum and low-lying wave functions of this 0-π device. We show that the ground-state degeneracy is robust to disorder in charge, flux, and critical current as well as insensitive to modest variations in the circuit parameters. Our treatment is nonperturbative, provides access to excited states and matrix elements, and is immediately applicable also to intermediate parameter regimes of experimental interest.

  10. Design and test of component circuits of an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Johnson noise thermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Takahiro; Maezawa, Masaaki; Urano, Chiharu

    2015-11-01

    We present design and testing of a pseudo-random number generator (PRNG) and a variable pulse number multiplier (VPNM) which are digital circuit subsystems in an integrated quantum voltage noise source for Jonson noise thermometry. Well-defined, calculable pseudo-random patterns of single flux quantum pulses are synthesized with the PRNG and multiplied digitally with the VPNM. The circuit implementation on rapid single flux quantum technology required practical circuit scales and bias currents, 279 junctions and 33 mA for the PRNG, and 1677 junctions and 218 mA for the VPNM. We confirmed the circuit operation with sufficiently wide margins, 80-120%, with respect to the designed bias currents.

  11. Controllable microwave three-wave mixing via a single three-level superconducting quantum circuit

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu-xi; Sun, Hui-Chen; Peng, Z. H.; Miranowicz, Adam; Tsai, J. S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Three-wave mixing in second-order nonlinear optical processes cannot occur in atomic systems due to the electric-dipole selection rules. In contrast, we demonstrate that second-order nonlinear processes can occur in a superconducting quantum circuit (i.e., a superconducting artificial atom) when the inversion symmetry of the potential energy is broken by simply changing the applied magnetic flux. In particular, we show that difference- and sum-frequencies (and second harmonics) can be generated in the microwave regime in a controllable manner by using a single three-level superconducting flux quantum circuit (SFQC). For our proposed parameters, the frequency tunability of this circuit can be achieved in the range of about 17 GHz for the sum-frequency generation, and around 42 GHz (or 26 GHz) for the difference-frequency generation. Our proposal provides a simple method to generate second-order nonlinear processes within current experimental parameters of SFQCs. PMID:25487352

  12. Controllable microwave three-wave mixing via a single three-level superconducting quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-xi; Sun, Hui-Chen; Peng, Z H; Miranowicz, Adam; Tsai, J S; Nori, Franco

    2014-12-09

    Three-wave mixing in second-order nonlinear optical processes cannot occur in atomic systems due to the electric-dipole selection rules. In contrast, we demonstrate that second-order nonlinear processes can occur in a superconducting quantum circuit (i.e., a superconducting artificial atom) when the inversion symmetry of the potential energy is broken by simply changing the applied magnetic flux. In particular, we show that difference- and sum-frequencies (and second harmonics) can be generated in the microwave regime in a controllable manner by using a single three-level superconducting flux quantum circuit (SFQC). For our proposed parameters, the frequency tunability of this circuit can be achieved in the range of about 17 GHz for the sum-frequency generation, and around 42 GHz (or 26 GHz) for the difference-frequency generation. Our proposal provides a simple method to generate second-order nonlinear processes within current experimental parameters of SFQCs.

  13. Strong coupling of a single photon to a superconducting qubit using circuit quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Wallraff, A; Schuster, D I; Blais, A; Frunzio, L; Huang, R- S; Majer, J; Kumar, S; Girvin, S M; Schoelkopf, R J

    2004-09-09

    The interaction of matter and light is one of the fundamental processes occurring in nature, and its most elementary form is realized when a single atom interacts with a single photon. Reaching this regime has been a major focus of research in atomic physics and quantum optics for several decades and has generated the field of cavity quantum electrodynamics. Here we perform an experiment in which a superconducting two-level system, playing the role of an artificial atom, is coupled to an on-chip cavity consisting of a superconducting transmission line resonator. We show that the strong coupling regime can be attained in a solid-state system, and we experimentally observe the coherent interaction of a superconducting two-level system with a single microwave photon. The concept of circuit quantum electrodynamics opens many new possibilities for studying the strong interaction of light and matter. This system can also be exploited for quantum information processing and quantum communication and may lead to new approaches for single photon generation and detection.

  14. Entanglement distribution schemes employing coherent photon-to-spin conversion in semiconductor quantum dot circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudreau, Louis; Bogan, Alex; Korkusinski, Marek; Studenikin, Sergei; Austing, D. Guy; Sachrajda, Andrew S.

    2017-09-01

    Long distance entanglement distribution is an important problem for quantum information technologies to solve. Current optical schemes are known to have fundamental limitations. A coherent photon-to-spin interface built with quantum dots (QDs) in a direct bandgap semiconductor can provide a solution for efficient entanglement distribution. QD circuits offer integrated spin processing for full Bell state measurement (BSM) analysis and spin quantum memory. Crucially the photo-generated spins can be heralded by non-destructive charge detection techniques. We review current schemes to transfer a polarization-encoded state or a time-bin-encoded state of a photon to the state of a spin in a QD. The spin may be that of an electron or that of a hole. We describe adaptations of the original schemes to employ heavy holes which have a number of attractive properties including a g-factor that is tunable to zero for QDs in an appropriately oriented external magnetic field. We also introduce simple throughput scaling models to demonstrate the potential performance advantage of full BSM capability in a QD scheme, even when the quantum memory is imperfect, over optical schemes relying on linear optical elements and ensemble quantum memories.

  15. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits.

    PubMed

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-15

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T_{1} and T_{2} using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  16. Hardware-Efficient and Fully Autonomous Quantum Error Correction in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapit, Eliot

    2016-04-01

    Superconducting qubits are among the most promising platforms for building a quantum computer. However, individual qubit coherence times are not far past the scalability threshold for quantum error correction, meaning that millions of physical devices would be required to construct a useful quantum computer. Consequently, further increases in coherence time are very desirable. In this Letter, we blueprint a simple circuit consisting of two transmon qubits and two additional lossy qubits or resonators, which is passively protected against all single-qubit quantum error channels through a combination of continuous driving and engineered dissipation. Photon losses are rapidly corrected through two-photon drive fields implemented with driven superconducting quantum interference device couplings, and dephasing from random potential fluctuations is heavily suppressed by the drive fields used to implement the multiqubit Hamiltonian. Comparing our theoretical model to published noise estimates from recent experiments on flux and transmon qubits, we find that logical state coherence could be improved by a factor of 40 or more compared to the individual qubit T1 and T2 using this technique. We thus demonstrate that there is substantial headroom for improving the coherence of modern superconducting qubits with a fairly modest increase in device complexity.

  17. [Flexible print circuit technology application in biomedical engineering].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lihua; Cao, Yi; Zheng, Xiaolin

    2013-06-01

    Flexible print circuit (FPC) technology has been widely applied in variety of electric circuits with high precision due to its advantages, such as low-cost, high specific fabrication ability, and good flexibility, etc. Recently, this technology has also been used in biomedical engineering, especially in the development of microfluidic chip and microelectrode array. The high specific fabrication can help making microelectrode and other micro-structure equipment. And good flexibility allows the micro devices based on FPC technique to be easily packaged with other parts. In addition, it also reduces the damage of microelectrodes to the tissue. In this paper, the application of FPC technology in biomedical engineering is introduced. Moreover, the important parameters of FPC technique and the development trend of prosperous applications is also discussed.

  18. Accurate reliability analysis method for quantum-dot cellular automata circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Huanqing; Cai, Li; Wang, Sen; Liu, Xiaoqiang; Yang, Xiaokuo

    2015-10-01

    Probabilistic transfer matrix (PTM) is a widely used model in the reliability research of circuits. However, PTM model cannot reflect the impact of input signals on reliability, so it does not completely conform to the mechanism of the novel field-coupled nanoelectronic device which is called quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA). It is difficult to get accurate results when PTM model is used to analyze the reliability of QCA circuits. To solve this problem, we present the fault tree models of QCA fundamental devices according to different input signals. After that, the binary decision diagram (BDD) is used to quantitatively investigate the reliability of two QCA XOR gates depending on the presented models. By employing the fault tree models, the impact of input signals on reliability can be identified clearly and the crucial components of a circuit can be found out precisely based on the importance values (IVs) of components. So this method is contributive to the construction of reliable QCA circuits.

  19. 20 CFR 410.670c - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 410.670c..., Administrative Review, Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.670c Application of circuit... involving the application of circuit court law. (a) The Administration will apply a holding in a United...

  20. 20 CFR 410.670c - Application of circuit court law.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application of circuit court law. 410.670c..., Administrative Review, Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.670c Application of circuit... involving the application of circuit court law. (a) The Administration will apply a holding in a United...

  1. Integrated optical circuits and components: Design and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcheson, Lynn D.

    This book focuses on the practical aspects of designing, fabricating, and testing integrated optical circuits and devices, covering concepts, theory, design criteria, materials, and applications. Device performance limits are explained, and a guide is given to fabricating lithium niobate and gallium arsenide devices. Techniques for integrating optics with electronics on a single substrate are demonstrated. New and novel developments are reviewed, and prospects for the future of this technology are considered.

  2. Realization of a new permutative gate library using controlled-kth-root-of-NOT quantum gates for exact minimization of quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhiqiang; Song, Xiaoyu; Perkowski, Marek; Chen, Hanwu; Feng, Xiaoxia

    2014-10-01

    Since non-permutative quantum gates have more complex rules than permutative quantum gates, it is very hard to synthesize quantum logic circuits using non-permutative quantum gates, such as controlled-square-root-of-NOT gates (CV/CV+ gates). In the efficient synthesis algorithm, direct use of quantum non-permutative gates should be avoided. Rather, the key method is to use quantum gates to create new permutative quantum gates that then replace non-permutative quantum gates. This method assumes the library of quantum gate primitives are constructed so as to have the lowest possible quantum cost. In this paper, we first propose some new CV/CV+-like gates, i.e. controlled-kth-root-of-NOT gates where k = 2,4,8,…, and give all corresponding matrixes. Further, we also present a novel generic method to quickly and directly construct this new optimal quantum logic gate library using CNOT and these non-permutative quantum gates. Our method introduces new means to find permutative quantum gates with lower quantum cost.

  3. Local random quantum circuits: Ensemble completely positive maps and swap algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Zanardi, Paolo

    2014-08-15

    We define different classes of local random quantum circuits (L-RQC) and show that (a) statistical properties of L-RQC are encoded into an associated family of completely positive maps and (b) average purity dynamics can be described by the action of these maps on operator algebras of permutations (swap algebras). An exactly solvable one-dimensional case is analyzed to illustrate the power of the swap algebra formalism. More in general, we prove short time area-law bounds on average purity for uncorrelated L-RQC and infinite time results for both the uncorrelated and correlated cases.

  4. Local random quantum circuits: Ensemble completely positive maps and swap algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanardi, Paolo

    2014-08-01

    We define different classes of local random quantum circuits (L-RQC) and show that (a) statistical properties of L-RQC are encoded into an associated family of completely positive maps and (b) average purity dynamics can be described by the action of these maps on operator algebras of permutations (swap algebras). An exactly solvable one-dimensional case is analyzed to illustrate the power of the swap algebra formalism. More in general, we prove short time area-law bounds on average purity for uncorrelated L-RQC and infinite time results for both the uncorrelated and correlated cases.

  5. Characterization and reduction of microfabrication-induced decoherence in superconducting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintana, C. M.; Megrant, A.; Chen, Z.; Dunsworth, A.; Chiaro, B.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Hoi, I.-C.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J. Y.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2014-08-01

    Many superconducting qubits are highly sensitive to dielectric loss, making the fabrication of coherent quantum circuits challenging. To elucidate this issue, we characterize the interfaces and surfaces of superconducting coplanar waveguide resonators and study the associated microwave loss. We show that contamination induced by traditional qubit lift-off processing is particularly detrimental to quality factors without proper substrate cleaning, while roughness plays at most a small role. Aggressive surface treatment is shown to damage the crystalline substrate and degrade resonator quality. We also introduce methods to characterize and remove ultra-thin resist residue, providing a way to quantify and minimize remnant sources of loss on device surfaces.

  6. Quantum resistor-capacitor circuit with Majorana fermion modes in a chiral topological superconductor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minchul; Choi, Mahn-Soo

    2014-08-15

    We investigate the mesoscopic resistor-capacitor circuit consisting of a quantum dot coupled to spatially separated Majorana fermion modes in a chiral topological superconductor. We find substantially enhanced relaxation resistance due to the nature of Majorana fermions, which are their own antiparticles and are composed of particle and hole excitations in the same abundance. Further, if only a single Majorana mode is involved, the zero-frequency relaxation resistance is completely suppressed due to a destructive interference. As a result, the Majorana mode opens an exotic dissipative channel on a superconductor which is typically regarded as dissipationless due to its finite superconducting gap.

  7. Equivalence between classical and quantum dynamics. Neutral kaons and electric circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Caruso, M. Fanchiotti, H.; Canal, C.A. Garcia

    2011-10-15

    An equivalence between the Schroedinger dynamics of a quantum system with a finite number of basis states and a classical dynamics is presented. The equivalence is an isomorphism that connects in univocal way both dynamical systems. We treat the particular case of neutral kaons and found a class of electric networks uniquely related to the kaon system finding the complete map between the matrix elements of the effective Hamiltonian of kaons and those elements of the classical dynamics of the networks. As a consequence, the relevant {epsilon} parameter that measures CP violation in the kaon system is completely determined in terms of network parameters. - Highlights: > We provide a formal equivalence between classical and quantum dynamics. > We make use of the decomplexification concept. > Neutral kaon systems can be represented by electric circuits. > CP symmetry violation can be taken into account by non-reciprocity. > Non-reciprocity is represented by gyrators.

  8. Gain-assisted optical bistability and multistability in superconducting phase quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amini Sabegh, Z.; Maleki, M. A.; Mahmoudi, M.

    2017-02-01

    We study the absorption and optical bistability (OB) behavior of the superconducting phase quantum circuits in the four-level cascade and closed-loop configurations. It is shown that the OB is established in both configurations and it can be controlled by the intensity and frequency of applied fluxes. It is also demonstrated that the gain-assisted OB is generated in both configurations and can switch to the gain-assisted optical multistability (OM) only by changing the relative phase of applied fluxes in closed-loop quantum system. It is worth noting that the several significant output fluxes with negligible inputs can be seen in bistable behavior of the closed-loop configuration due to the nonlinear processing.

  9. High open circuit voltages of solar cells based on quantum dot and dye hybrid-sensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yujie; Zhao, Wanyu; Chen, Jingkuo; Li, Huayang; Fu, Wuyou E-mail: fuwy56@163.com; Sun, Guang; Cao, Jianliang; Zhang, Zhanying; Bala, Hari E-mail: fuwy56@163.com

    2014-01-06

    A type of solar cell based on quantum dot (QD) and dye hybrid-sensitized mesoporous TiO{sub 2} film electrode was designed and reported. The electrode was consisted of a TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle (NP) thin film layer sensitized with CdS quantum dot (QD) and an amorphous TiO{sub 2} coated TiO{sub 2} NP thin film layer that sensitized with C106 dye. The amorphous TiO{sub 2} layer was obtained by TiCl{sub 4} post-treatment to improve the properties of solar cells. Research showed that the solar cells fabricated with as-prepared hybrid-sensitized electrode exhibited excellent photovoltaic performances and a fairly high open circuit voltage of 796 mV was achieved.

  10. Out-of-equilibrium charge dynamics in a hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viennot, J. J.; Delbecq, M. R.; Dartiailh, M. C.; Cottet, A.; Kontos, T.

    2014-04-01

    The recent development of hybrid circuit quantum electrodynamics allows one to study how cavity photons interact with a system driven out of equilibrium by fermionic reservoirs. We study here one of the simplest combination: a double quantum dot coupled to a single mode of the electromagnetic field. We are able to couple resonantly the charge levels of a carbon-nanotube-based double dot to cavity photons. We perform a microwave readout of the charge states of this system, which allows us to unveil features of the out-of-equilibrium charge dynamics, otherwise invisible in the DC current. We extract the relaxation rate, dephasing rate, and photon number of the hybrid system using a theory based on a master equation technique. These findings open the path for manipulating other degrees of freedom, e.g., the spin and/or the valley in nanotube-based double dots using microwave light.

  11. Coupling molecular spin centers to microwave planar resonators: towards integration of molecular qubits in quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Bonizzoni, C; Ghirri, A; Bader, K; van Slageren, J; Perfetti, M; Sorace, L; Lan, Y; Fuhr, O; Ruben, M; Affronte, M

    2016-11-14

    We present spectroscopic measurements looking for the coherent coupling between molecular magnetic centers and microwave photons. The aim is to find the optimal conditions and the best molecular features to achieve the quantum strong coupling regime, for which coherent dynamics of hybrid photon-spin states take place. To this end, we used a high critical temperature YBCO superconducting planar resonator working at 7.7 GHz and at low temperatures to investigate three molecular mononuclear coordination compounds, namely (PPh4)2[Cu(mnt)2] (where mnt(2-) = maleonitriledithiolate), [ErPc2](-)TBA(+) (where pc(2-) is the phtalocyaninato and TBA(+) is the tetra-n-butylammonium cation) and Dy(trensal) (where H3trensal = 2,2',2''-tris(salicylideneimino)triethylamine). Although the strong coupling regime was not achieved in these preliminary experiments, the results provided several hints on how to design molecular magnetic centers to be integrated into hybrid quantum circuits.

  12. Rapid single-flux-quantum circuits for low noise mK operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intiso, Samuel; Pekola, Jukka; Savin, Alexander; Devyatov, Ygor; Kidiyarova-Shevchenko, Anna

    2006-05-01

    Rapid single-flux-quantum (RSFQ) technology has been proposed as control electronics for superconducting quantum bits because of the material and working temperature compatibility. In this work, we consider practical aspects of RSFQ circuit design for low noise low power operation. At the working temperature of 20 mK and operational frequency of 2 GHz, dissipated power per junction is reduced to 25 pW by using 6 µA critical current junctions available at the Hypres and VTT low Jc fabrication process. To limit phonon temperature to 30 mK, a maximum of 40 junctions can be placed on a 5 mm × 5 mm chip. Electron temperature in resistive shunts of Josephson junctions is minimized by use of cooling fins, giving minimum electron temperatures of about 150 mK for the Hypres process and 70 mK for the VTT process.

  13. Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana lasing in circuit quantum electrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neilinger, P.; Shevchenko, S. N.; Bogár, J.; Rehák, M.; Oelsner, G.; Karpov, D. S.; Hübner, U.; Astafiev, O.; Grajcar, M.; Il'ichev, E.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate amplification (and attenuation) of a probe signal by a driven two-level quantum system in the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana regime by means of an experiment, in which a superconducting qubit was strongly coupled to a microwave cavity, in a conventional arrangement of circuit quantum electrodynamics. Two different types of flux qubit, specifically a conventional Josephson junctions qubit and a phase-slip qubit, show similar results, namely, lasing at the working points where amplification takes place. The experimental data are explained by the interaction of the probe signal with Rabi-like oscillations. The latter are created by constructive interference of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana (LZSM) transitions during the driving period of the qubit. A detailed description of the occurrence of these oscillations and a comparison of obtained data with both analytic and numerical calculations are given.

  14. Protected quantum computation with multiple resonators in ultrastrong coupling circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Nataf, Pierre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2011-11-04

    We investigate theoretically the dynamical behavior of a qubit obtained with the two ground eigenstates of an ultrastrong coupling circuit-QED system consisting of a finite number of Josephson fluxonium atoms inductively coupled to a transmission line resonator. We show a universal set of quantum gates by using multiple transmission line resonators (each resonator represents a single qubit). We discuss the intrinsic "anisotropic" nature of noise sources for fluxonium artificial atoms. Through a master equation treatment with colored noise and many-level dynamics, we prove that, for a general class of anisotropic noise sources, the coherence time of the qubit and the fidelity of the quantum operations can be dramatically improved in an optimal regime of ultrastrong coupling, where the ground state is an entangled photonic "cat" state.

  15. Hybrid quantum magnetism in circuit QED: from spin-photon waves to many-body spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kurcz, Andreas; Bermudez, Alejandro; García-Ripoll, Juan José

    2014-05-09

    We introduce a model of quantum magnetism induced by the nonperturbative exchange of microwave photons between distant superconducting qubits. By interconnecting qubits and cavities, we obtain a spin-boson lattice model that exhibits a quantum phase transition where both qubits and cavities spontaneously polarize. We present a many-body ansatz that captures this phenomenon all the way, from a the perturbative dispersive regime where photons can be traced out, to the nonperturbative ultrastrong coupling regime where photons must be treated on the same footing as qubits. Our ansatz also reproduces the low-energy excitations, which are described by hybridized spin-photon quasiparticles, and can be probed spectroscopically from transmission experiments in circuit QED, as shown by simulating a possible experiment by matrix-product-state methods.

  16. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    PubMed Central

    Rosenthal, Sandra J.; Chang, Jerry C.; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James R.; Tomlinson, Ian D.

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, sizetunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots. PMID:21276935

  17. Biocompatible Quantum Dots for Biological Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenthal, Sandra; Chang, Jerry; Kovtun, Oleg; McBride, James; Tomlinson, Ian

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots are quickly becoming a critical diagnostic tool for discerning cellular function at the molecular level. Their high brightness, long-lasting, size-tunable, and narrow luminescence set them apart from conventional fluorescence dyes. Quantum dots are being developed for a variety of biologically oriented applications, including fluorescent assays for drug discovery, disease detection, single protein tracking, and intracellular reporting. This review introduces the science behind quantum dots and describes how they are made biologically compatible. Several applications are also included, illustrating strategies toward target specificity, and are followed by a discussion on the limitations of quantum dot approaches. The article is concluded with a look at the future direction of quantum dots.

  18. Few-Electron Ultrastrong Light-Matter Coupling in a Quantum LC Circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Yanko; Sirtori, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    The phenomenon of ultrastrong light-matter interaction of a two-dimensional electron gas within a lumped element electronic circuit resonator is explored. The gas is coupled through the oscillating electric field of the capacitor, and in the limit of very small capacitor volumes, the total number of electrons of the system can be reduced to only a few. One of the peculiar features of our quantum mechanical system is that its Hamiltonian evolves from the fermionic Rabi model to the bosonic Hopfield model for light-matter coupling as the number of electrons is increased. We show that the Dicke states, introduced to describe the atomic super-radiance, are the natural base to describe the crossover between the two models. Furthermore, we illustrate how the ultrastrong coupling regime in the system and the associated antiresonant terms of the quantum Hamiltonian have a fundamentally different impact in the fermionic and bosonic cases. In the intermediate regime, our system behaves like a multilevel quantum bit with nonharmonic energy spacing, owing to the particle-particle interactions. Such a system can be inserted into a technological semiconductor platform, thus opening interesting perspectives for electronic devices where the readout of quantum electrodynamical properties is obtained via the measure of a DC current.

  19. Exact stabilization of entangled states in finite time by dissipative quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Peter D.; Ticozzi, Francesco; Viola, Lorenza

    2017-07-01

    Open quantum systems evolving according to discrete-time dynamics are capable, unlike continuous-time counterparts, to converge to a stable equilibrium in finite time with zero error. We consider dissipative quantum circuits consisting of sequences of quantum channels subject to specified quasi-locality constraints, and determine conditions under which stabilization of a pure multipartite entangled state of interest may be exactly achieved in finite time. Special emphasis is devoted to characterizing scenarios where finite-time stabilization may be achieved robustly with respect to the order of the applied quantum maps, as suitable for unsupervised control architectures. We show that if a decomposition of the physical Hilbert space into virtual subsystems is found, which is compatible with the locality constraint and relative to which the target state factorizes, then robust stabilization may be achieved by independently cooling each component. We further show that if the same condition holds for a scalable class of pure states, a continuous-time quasi-local Markov semigroup ensuring rapid mixing can be obtained. Somewhat surprisingly, we find that the commutativity of the canonical parent Hamiltonian one may associate to the target state does not directly relate to its finite-time stabilizability properties, although in all cases where we can guarantee robust stabilization, a (possibly noncanonical) commuting parent Hamiltonian may be found. Aside from graph states, quantum states amenable to finite-time robust stabilization include a class of universal resource states displaying two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological order, along with tensor network states obtained by generalizing a construction due to Bravyi and Vyalyi [Quantum Inf. Comput. 5, 187 (2005)]. Extensions to representative classes of mixed graph-product and thermal states are also discussed.

  20. Quantum metrology and its application in biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2016-02-01

    Quantum metrology provides a route to overcome practical limits in sensing devices. It holds particular relevance to biology, where sensitivity and resolution constraints restrict applications both in fundamental biophysics and in medicine. Here, we review quantum metrology from this biological context, focusing on optical techniques due to their particular relevance for biological imaging, sensing, and stimulation. Our understanding of quantum mechanics has already enabled important applications in biology, including positron emission tomography (PET) with entangled photons, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using nuclear magnetic resonance, and bio-magnetic imaging with superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). In quantum metrology an even greater range of applications arise from the ability to not just understand, but to engineer, coherence and correlations at the quantum level. In the past few years, quite dramatic progress has been seen in applying these ideas into biological systems. Capabilities that have been demonstrated include enhanced sensitivity and resolution, immunity to imaging artefacts and technical noise, and characterization of the biological response to light at the single-photon level. New quantum measurement techniques offer even greater promise, raising the prospect for improved multi-photon microscopy and magnetic imaging, among many other possible applications. Realization of this potential will require cross-disciplinary input from researchers in both biology and quantum physics. In this review we seek to communicate the developments of quantum metrology in a way that is accessible to biologists and biophysicists, while providing sufficient details to allow the interested reader to obtain a solid understanding of the field. We further seek to introduce quantum physicists to some of the central challenges of optical measurements in biological science. We hope that this will aid in bridging the communication gap that exists

  1. Millimeter-wave and optoelectronic applications of heterostructure integrated circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pavlidis, Dimitris

    1991-01-01

    The properties are reviewed of heterostructure devices for microwave-monolithic-integrated circuits (MMICs) and optoelectronic integrated circuits (OICs). Specific devices examined include lattice-matched and pseudomorphic InAlAs/InGaAs high-electron mobility transistors (HEMTs), mixer/multiplier diodes, and heterojunction bipolar transistors (HBTs) developed with a number of materials. MMICs are reviewed that can be employed for amplification, mixing, and signal generation, and receiver/transmitter applications are set forth for OICs based on GaAs and InP heterostructure designs. HEMTs, HBTs, and junction-FETs can be utilized in combination with PIN, MSM, and laser diodes to develop novel communication systems based on technologies that combine microwave and photonic capabilities.

  2. Verifiable Quantum Encryption and its Practical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-hua

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel verifiable quantum encryption scheme, in which a sender encrypts a classical plaintext into a quantum ciphertext, such that only a specified receiver can decrypt the ciphertext and further get the plaintext. This scheme can not only ensure the unconditional security of the plaintext, but can also verify the validness of the plaintext. In addition, we consider its practical applications with key reuse and further present a practical application protocol for secure two-party quantum scalar product.

  3. Verifiable Quantum Encryption and its Practical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-hua

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we present a novel verifiable quantum encryption scheme, in which a sender encrypts a classical plaintext into a quantum ciphertext, such that only a specified receiver can decrypt the ciphertext and further get the plaintext. This scheme can not only ensure the unconditional security of the plaintext, but can also verify the validness of the plaintext. In addition, we consider its practical applications with key reuse and further present a practical application protocol for secure two-party quantum scalar product.

  4. Circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture for gate-defined quantum dots in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, X.; Cady, J. V.; Zajac, D. M.; Stehlik, J.; Edge, L. F.; Petta, J. R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a hybrid device architecture where the charge states in a double quantum dot (DQD) formed in a Si/SiGe heterostructure are read out using an on-chip superconducting microwave cavity. A quality factor Q = 5400 is achieved by selectively etching away regions of the quantum well and by reducing photon losses through low-pass filtering of the gate bias lines. Homodyne measurements of the cavity transmission reveal DQD charge stability diagrams and a charge-cavity coupling rate g c / 2 π = 23 MHz. These measurements indicate that electrons trapped in a Si DQD can be effectively coupled to microwave photons, potentially enabling coherent electron-photon interactions in silicon.

  5. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage of PbS Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Woojun; Boercker, Janice E.; Lumb, Matthew P.; Placencia, Diogenes; Foos, Edward E.; Tischler, Joseph G.

    2013-07-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) show great promise toward improving solar cell efficiencies through the use of quantum confinement to tune absorbance across the solar spectrum and enable multi-exciton generation. Despite this remarkable potential for high photocurrent generation, the achievable open-circuit voltage (Voc) is fundamentally limited due to non-radiative recombination processes in QD solar cells. Here we report the highest open-circuit voltages to date for colloidal QD based solar cells under one sun illumination. This Voc of 692 +/- 7 mV for 1.4 eV PbS QDs is a result of improved passivation of the defective QD surface, demonstrating as a function of the QD bandgap (Eg). Comparing experimental Voc variation with the theoretical upper-limit obtained from one diode modeling of the cells with different Eg, these results clearly demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity for improvement of Voc to values greater than 1 V by using smaller QDs in QD solar cells.

  6. Enhanced open-circuit voltage of PbS nanocrystal quantum dot solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Woojun; Boercker, Janice E; Lumb, Matthew P; Placencia, Diogenes; Foos, Edward E; Tischler, Joseph G

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) show great promise toward improving solar cell efficiencies through the use of quantum confinement to tune absorbance across the solar spectrum and enable multi-exciton generation. Despite this remarkable potential for high photocurrent generation, the achievable open-circuit voltage (Voc) is fundamentally limited due to non-radiative recombination processes in QD solar cells. Here we report the highest open-circuit voltages to date for colloidal QD based solar cells under one sun illumination. This Voc of 692 ± 7 mV for 1.4 eV PbS QDs is a result of improved passivation of the defective QD surface, demonstrating Voc(mV)=553Eg/q-59 as a function of the QD bandgap (Eg). Comparing experimental Voc variation with the theoretical upper-limit obtained from one diode modeling of the cells with different Eg, these results clearly demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity for improvement of Voc to values greater than 1 V by using smaller QDs in QD solar cells.

  7. Molecular quantum-dot cellular automata--from molecular structure to circuit dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yuhui; Lent, Craig

    2008-03-01

    Quantum-dot cellular automata (QCA) [1] provides a transistor-less paradigm for molecular electronics. In the QCA approach, binary information is stored in the charge configuration of single cells, and transferred via Coulomb coupling between neighboring cells. Single-molecule QCA cells can be realized by using as quantum dots the localized states of mixed-valence complexes. Several candidate QCA molecules have been synthesized and shown to have the required field-induced switching properties [2]. We report progress towards a hierarchic dynamic theory of QCA circuits. We use ab initio techniques to calculate the relevant molecular electronic structure, and extract parameters for a simpler Hamiltonian to describe switching behavior. We then apply a coherence vector formalism to model interaction with the thermal environment and generate a circuit-dynamic description. [1] C. S. Lent, P. D. Tougaw, W. Porod, and G. H. Bernstein, Nanotechnology, vol. 4, pp. 49, 1993. [2] H. Qi, S. Sharma, Z. Li, G. L. Snider, A. O. Orlov, C. S. Lent, and T. P. Fehlner, J.Am.Chem.Soc., vol. 125, pp. 15250, 2003.

  8. Enhanced Open-Circuit Voltage of PbS Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Woojun; Boercker, Janice E.; Lumb, Matthew P.; Placencia, Diogenes; Foos, Edward E.; Tischler, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Nanocrystal quantum dots (QD) show great promise toward improving solar cell efficiencies through the use of quantum confinement to tune absorbance across the solar spectrum and enable multi-exciton generation. Despite this remarkable potential for high photocurrent generation, the achievable open-circuit voltage (Voc) is fundamentally limited due to non-radiative recombination processes in QD solar cells. Here we report the highest open-circuit voltages to date for colloidal QD based solar cells under one sun illumination. This Voc of 692 ± 7 mV for 1.4 eV PbS QDs is a result of improved passivation of the defective QD surface, demonstrating as a function of the QD bandgap (Eg). Comparing experimental Voc variation with the theoretical upper-limit obtained from one diode modeling of the cells with different Eg, these results clearly demonstrate that there is a tremendous opportunity for improvement of Voc to values greater than 1 V by using smaller QDs in QD solar cells. PMID:23868514

  9. Kitaev honeycomb tensor networks: Exact unitary circuits and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmoll, Philipp; Orús, Román

    2017-01-01

    The Kitaev honeycomb model is a paradigm of exactly solvable models, showing nontrivial physical properties such as topological quantum order, Abelian and non-Abelian anyons, and chirality. Its solution is one of the most beautiful examples of the interplay of different mathematical techniques in condensed matter physics. In this paper, we show how to derive a tensor network (TN) description of the eigenstates of this spin-1/2 model in the thermodynamic limit, and in particular for its ground state. In our setting, eigenstates are naturally encoded by an exact 3d TN structure made of fermionic unitary operators, corresponding to the unitary quantum circuit building up the many-body quantum state. In our derivation we review how the different "solution ingredients" of the Kitaev honeycomb model can be accounted for in the TN language, namely, Jordan-Wigner transformation, braidings of Majorana modes, fermionic Fourier transformation, and Bogoliubov transformation. The TN built in this way allows for a clear understanding of several properties of the model. In particular, we show how the fidelity diagram is straightforward both at zero temperature and at finite temperature in the vortex-free sector. We also show how the properties of two-point correlation functions follow easily. Finally, we also discuss the pros and cons of contracting of our 3d TN down to a 2d projected entangled pair state (PEPS) with finite bond dimension. The results in this paper can be extended to generalizations of the Kitaev model, e.g., to other lattices, spins, and dimensions.

  10. Quantum Walks: Theory, Application, and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, Albert Thomas

    The quantum walk is a method for conceptualizing and designing quantum computing algorithms and it comes in two forms: the continuous-time and discrete-time quantum walk. The thesis is organized into three parts, each of which looks to develop the concept and uses of the quantum walk. The first part is the theory of the quantum walk. This includes definitions and considerations for the various incarnations of the discrete-time quantum walk and a discussion on the general method for connecting the continuous-time and discrete-time versions. As a result, it is shown that most versions of the discrete-time quantum walk can be put into a general form and this can be used to simulate any continuous-time quantum walk. The second part uses these results for a hypothetical application. The application presented is a search algorithm that appears to scale in the time for completion independent of the size of the search space. This behavior is then elaborated upon and shown to have general qualitative agreement with simulations to within the approximations that are made. The third part introduces a method of implementation. Given a universal quantum computer, the method is discussed and shown to simulate an arbitrary discrete-time quantum walk. Some of the benefits of this method are that half the unitary evolution can be achieved without the use of any gates and there may be some possibility for error detection. The three parts combined suggest a possible experiment, given a quantum computing scheme of sufficient robustness.

  11. Integral Battery Power Limiting Circuit for Intrinsically Safe Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Bradley M.; Blalock, Norman N.

    2010-01-01

    A circuit topology has been designed to guarantee the output of intrinsically safe power for the operation of electrical devices in a hazardous environment. This design uses a MOSFET (metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) as a switch to connect and disconnect power to a load. A test current is provided through a separate path to the load for monitoring by a comparator against a preset threshold level. The circuit is configured so that the test current will detect a fault in the load and open the switch before the main current can respond. The main current passes through the switch and then an inductor. When a fault occurs in the load, the current through the inductor cannot change immediately, but the voltage drops immediately to safe levels. The comparator detects this drop and opens the switch before the current in the inductor has a chance to respond. This circuit protects both the current and voltage from exceeding safe levels. Typically, this type of protection is accomplished by a fuse or a circuit breaker, but in order for a fuse or a circuit breaker to blow or trip, the current must exceed the safe levels momentarily, which may be just enough time to ignite anything in a hazardous environment. To prevent this from happening, a fuse is typically current-limited by the addition of the resistor to keep the current within safe levels while the fuse reacts. The use of a resistor is acceptable for non-battery applications where the wasted energy and voltage drop across the resistor can be tolerated. The use of the switch and inductor minimizes the wasted energy. For example, a circuit runs from a 3.6-V battery that must be current-limited to 200 mA. If the circuit normally draws 10 mA, then an 18-ohm resistor would drop 180 mV during normal operation, while a typical switch (0.02 ohm) and inductor (0.97 ohm) would only drop 9.9 mV. From a power standpoint, the current-limiting resistor protection circuit wastes about 18 times more power than the

  12. Theory of two-dimensional macroscopic quantum tunneling in a Josephson junction coupled with an LC circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Shiro; Kato, Takeo; Bauch, Thilo

    2009-03-01

    We investigate classical thermal activation (TA) and macroscopic quantum tunneling (MQT) for a Josephson junction coupled with an LC circuit theoretically. The TA and MQT escape rate are calculated analytically by taking into account the two-dimensional nature of the classical and quantum phase dynamics. We find that the MQT escape rate is largely suppressed by the coupling to the LC circuit. On the other hand, this coupling gives rise to slight reduction of the TA escape rate. These results are relevant for the interpretation of a recent experiment on the MQT and TA phenomena in grain boundary YBCO Josephson junctions.

  13. Geometric Hamiltonian quantum mechanics and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, Davide

    2016-08-01

    Adopting a geometric point of view on Quantum Mechanics is an intriguing idea since, we know that geometric methods are very powerful in Classical Mechanics then, we can try to use them to study quantum systems. In this paper, we summarize the construction of a general prescription to set up a well-defined and self-consistent geometric Hamiltonian formulation of finite-dimensional quantum theories, where phase space is given by the Hilbert projective space (as Kähler manifold), in the spirit of celebrated works of Kibble, Ashtekar and others. Within geometric Hamiltonian formulation quantum observables are represented by phase space functions, quantum states are described by Liouville densities (phase space probability densities), and Schrödinger dynamics is induced by a Hamiltonian flow on the projective space. We construct the star-product of this phase space formulation and some applications of geometric picture are discussed.

  14. Evaluating charge noise acting on semiconductor quantum dots in the circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Stockklauser, A.; Jarausch, D.-D.; Frey, T.; Reichl, C.; Wegscheider, W.; Wallraff, A.; Ensslin, K.; Ihn, T.

    2014-08-11

    We evaluate the charge noise acting on a GaAs/GaAlAs based semiconductor double quantum dot dipole-coupled to the voltage oscillations of a superconducting transmission line resonator. The in-phase (I) and the quadrature (Q) components of the microwave tone transmitted through the resonator are sensitive to charging events in the surrounding environment of the double dot with an optimum sensitivity of 8.5×10{sup −5} e/√(Hz). A low frequency 1/f type noise spectrum combined with a white noise level of 6.6×10{sup −6} e{sup 2}/Hz above 1 Hz is extracted, consistent with previous results obtained with quantum point contact charge detectors on similar heterostructures. The slope of the 1/f noise allows to extract a lower bound for the double-dot charge qubit dephasing rate which we compare to the one extracted from a Jaynes-Cummings Hamiltonian approach. The two rates are found to be similar emphasizing that charge noise is the main source of dephasing in our system.

  15. Squeezing effects applied in nonclassical superposition states for quantum nanoelectronic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jeong Ryeol

    2017-06-01

    Quantum characteristics of a driven series RLC nanoelectronic circuit whose capacitance varies with time are studied using an invariant operator method together with a unitary transformation approach. In particular, squeezing effects and nonclassical properties of a superposition state composed of two displaced squeezed number states of equal amplitude, but 180° out of phase, are investigated in detail. We applied our developments to a solvable specific case obtained from a suitable choice of time-dependent parameters. The pattern of mechanical oscillation of the amount of charges stored in the capacitor, which are initially displaced, has exhibited more or less distortion due to the influence of the time-varying parameters of the system. We have analyzed squeezing effects of the system from diverse different angles and such effects are illustrated for better understanding. It has been confirmed that the degree of squeezing is not constant, but varies with time depending on specific situations. We have found that quantum interference occurs whenever the two components of the superposition meet together during the time evolution of the probability density. This outcome signifies the appearance of nonclassical features of the system. Nonclassicality of dynamical systems can be a potential resource necessary for realizing quantum information technique. Indeed, such nonclassical features of superposition states are expected to play a key role in upcoming information science which has attracted renewed attention recently.

  16. Quantum kernel applications in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lulu; Massa, Lou

    2012-07-01

    Progress in the quantum mechanics of biological molecules is being driven by computational advances. The notion of quantum kernels can be introduced to simplify the formalism of quantum mechanics, making it especially suitable for parallel computation of very large biological molecules. The essential idea is to mathematically break large biological molecules into smaller kernels that are calculationally tractable, and then to represent the full molecule by a summation over the kernels. The accuracy of the kernel energy method (KEM) is shown by systematic application to a great variety of molecular types found in biology. These include peptides, proteins, DNA and RNA. Examples are given that explore the KEM across a variety of chemical models, and to the outer limits of energy accuracy and molecular size. KEM represents an advance in quantum biology applicable to problems in medicine and drug design.

  17. Colloquium: Quantum fluctuation relations: Foundations and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele; Hänggi, Peter; Talkner, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Two fundamental ingredients play a decisive role in the foundation of fluctuation relations: the principle of microreversibility and the fact that thermal equilibrium is described by the Gibbs canonical ensemble. Building on these two pillars the reader is guided through a self-contained exposition of the theory and applications of quantum fluctuation relations. These are exact results that constitute the fulcrum of the recent development of nonequilibrium thermodynamics beyond the linear response regime. The material is organized in a way that emphasizes the historical connection between quantum fluctuation relations and (non)linear response theory. A number of fundamental issues are clarified which were not completely settled in the prior literature. The main focus is on (i) work fluctuation relations for transiently driven closed or open quantum systems, and (ii) on fluctuation relations for heat and matter exchange in quantum transport settings. Recently performed and proposed experimental applications are presented and discussed.

  18. Transient recovery voltage considerations in the application of medium voltage circuit breakers

    SciTech Connect

    Swindler, D.L.; Schwartz, P.; Hamer, P.S.; Lambert, S.R.

    1995-12-31

    Medium Voltage Circuit Breakers can fail to interrupt 3-phase fault currents when power systems have Transient Recovery Voltage (TRV) characteristics which exceed the rating of the circuit breaker. This paper examines the application of 13.8kV generation and load switchgear for an oil refinery in which circuit parameters as originally designed would have exceeded the 13.8kV circuit breakers TRV ratings had corrective measures not been taken. This paper illustrates this case and discusses the basis of TRV, how TRV is assessed, and alternative actions taken to bring circuits to within the 13.8 kV circuit breaker ratings.

  19. A quantum galvanometer with high-energy resolution based on a superconducting interferometer circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Bakhtin, P.A.; Makhov, V.I.; Masalov, V.V.; Sretenskii, V.N.; Tyablikov, A.V.; Vasenkov, A.A.

    1985-07-01

    The authors make a comprehensive analysis of principles of constructing measurement systems based on the superconducting quantum interferometer (SQUID) implemented in integrated form. They note trends of promising applications for galvanometric measurement systems. They describe the two types of SQUID, one-junction and two junction. They analyze the processing and formation of superconducting ion chemical signals and structures. And they present their results in a series of charts and diagrams. They conclude that quantum galvanometry using superconducting microcircuits allows one to propose new experimental studies in microelectronics, the techniques of high-precision measurements, and equipment for metrological work.

  20. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-06-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four.

  1. Autonomous quantum refrigerator in a circuit QED architecture based on a Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofer, Patrick P.; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Silva, Ralph; Huber, Marcus; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-12-01

    An implementation of a small quantum absorption refrigerator in a circuit QED architecture is proposed. The setup consists of three harmonic oscillators coupled to a Josephson junction. The refrigerator is autonomous in the sense that it does not require any external control for cooling, but only thermal contact between the oscillators and heat baths at different temperatures. In addition, the setup features a built-in switch, which allows the cooling to be turned on and off. If timing control is available, this enables the possibility for coherence-enhanced cooling. Finally, we show that significant cooling can be achieved with experimentally realistic parameters and that our setup should be within reach of current technology.

  2. One-step quantum phase gate in the ultrastrong coupling regime of circuit QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xuexin; Liu, Xin; Liao, Qinghong; Zhou, Keya; Liu, Shutian

    2017-09-01

    In a previous publication (Phys Rev Lett 108: 120501, 2012), Romero et al. proposed an ultrastrong coupling circuit QED system that can implement a two-qubit quantum phase gate with four controlling pulses. Based on this architecture, we demonstrate that an ultrafast two-qubit phase gate can also be realized with only one oscillation and lower coupling strengths. In our operation scheme, two identical qubits evolve synchronously under a single pulse with a duration determined by a specific coupling strength. The phase gate can also be obtained periodically. The influences of parameter fluctuations are estimated. We demonstrate that the fidelities can be greater than 99% if the parameter fluctuations are controlled within 5%.

  3. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D. L.

    2016-01-01

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four. PMID:27272401

  4. Graph states of prime-power dimension from generalized CNOT quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Zhou, D L

    2016-06-07

    We construct multipartite graph states whose dimension is the power of a prime number. This is realized by the finite field, as well as the generalized controlled-NOT quantum circuit acting on two qudits. We propose the standard form of graph states up to local unitary transformations and particle permutations. The form greatly simplifies the classification of graph states as we illustrate up to five qudits. We also show that some graph states are multipartite maximally entangled states in the sense that any bipartition of the system produces a bipartite maximally entangled state. We further prove that 4-partite maximally entangled states exist when the dimension is an odd number at least three or a multiple of four.

  5. An approach to optimization of the superconducting quantum interference device bootstrap circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guofeng; Zhang, Yi; Dong, Hui; Krause, Hans-Joachim; Xie, Xiaoming; Braginski, Alex I.; Offenhäusser, Andreas; Jiang, Mianheng

    2011-06-01

    Recently, we demonstrated and analysed the superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) bootstrap circuit (SBC). It is a direct readout scheme for dc SQUID in the voltage bias mode, permitting one to suppress the preamplifier noise. The SBC enables us to control the two key parameters of a voltage-biased SQUID: the flux-to-current transfer coefficient and the dynamic resistance. The flux-to-current, I-Φ, characteristics of SBC are made asymmetric by introducing the additional current feedback. Depending upon the choice of the working point, this feedback can be positive (working point W2 on the steeper I-Φ slope) or negative (W1 on the less steep slope). The dynamic resistance is controlled by the additional voltage feedback. In our publications to date we presented only the SBC operation at W2, while in this paper we demonstrate operation at W1 and show that also in this regime the preamplifier noise suppression is possible. We used a liquid-helium-cooled Nb SQUID with a loop inductance of 350 pH and attained white flux noise of 2.5 µΦ0 Hz - 1/2 both at W2 and at W1. In the latter case, the linear flux range exceeded one half-flux quantum Φ0. This large linear range should lead to a significantly improved stability and slew rate of the system and also make the tolerable spread in circuit parameters much wider than in all SQUID direct readout schemes known to date. Consequently, operation in this regime opens a new path to possible SBC optimization.

  6. Projected Dipole Moments of Individual Two-Level Defects Extracted Using Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Sarabi, B; Ramanayaka, A N; Burin, A L; Wellstood, F C; Osborn, K D

    2016-04-22

    Material-based two-level systems (TLSs), appearing as defects in low-temperature devices including superconducting qubits and photon detectors, are difficult to characterize. In this study we apply a uniform dc electric field across a film to tune the energies of TLSs within. The film is embedded in a superconducting resonator such that it forms a circuit quantum electrodynamical system. The energy of individual TLSs is observed as a function of the known tuning field. By studying TLSs for which we can determine the tunneling energy, the actual p_{z}, dipole moments projected along the uniform field direction, are individually obtained. A distribution is created with 60 p_{z}. We describe the distribution using a model with two dipole moment magnitudes, and a fit yields the corresponding values p=p_{1}=2.8±0.2  D and p=p_{2}=8.3±0.4  D. For a strong-coupled TLS the vacuum-Rabi splitting can be obtained with p_{z} and tunneling energy. This allows a measurement of the circuit's zero-point electric-field fluctuations, in a method that does not need the electric-field volume.

  7. Ab initio quantum chemistry: Methodology and applications

    PubMed Central

    Friesner, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    This Perspective provides an overview of state-of-the-art ab initio quantum chemical methodology and applications. The methods that are discussed include coupled cluster theory, localized second-order Moller–Plesset perturbation theory, multireference perturbation approaches, and density functional theory. The accuracy of each approach for key chemical properties is summarized, and the computational performance is analyzed, emphasizing significant advances in algorithms and implementation over the past decade. Incorporation of a condensed-phase environment by means of mixed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanics or self-consistent reaction field techniques, is presented. A wide range of illustrative applications, focusing on materials science and biology, are discussed briefly. PMID:15870212

  8. Implementation of Basic and Universal Gates In a single Circuit Based On Quantum-dot Cellular Automata Using Multi-Layer Crossbar Wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmik, Dhrubajyoti; Saha, Apu Kr; Dutta, Paramartha; Nandi, Supratim

    2017-08-01

    Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) is one of the most substitutes developing nanotechnologies for electronic circuits, as a result of lower force utilization, higher speed and smaller size in correlation with CMOS innovation. The essential devices, a Quantum-dot cell can be utilized to logic gates and wires. As it is the key building block on nanotechnology circuits. By applying simple gates, the hardware requirements for a QCA circuit can be decreased and circuits can be less complex as far as level, delay and cell check. This article exhibits an unobtrusive methodology for actualizing novel upgraded simple and universal gates, which can be connected to outline numerous variations of complex QCA circuits. Proposed gates are straightforward in structure and capable as far as implementing any digital circuits. The main aim is to build all basic and universal gates in a simple circuit with and without crossbar-wire. Simulation results and physical relations affirm its handiness in actualizing each advanced circuit.

  9. Advanced polymer systems for optoelectronic integrated circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eldada, Louay A.; Stengel, Kelly M. T.; Shacklette, Lawrence W.; Norwood, Robert A.; Xu, Chengzeng; Wu, Chengjiu; Yardley, James T.

    1997-01-01

    An advanced versatile low-cost polymeric waveguide technology is proposed for optoelectronic integrated circuit applications. We have developed high-performance organic polymeric materials that can be readily made into both multimode and single-mode optical waveguide structures of controlled numerical aperture (NA) and geometry. These materials are formed from highly crosslinked acrylate monomers with specific linkages that determine properties such as flexibility, toughness, loss, and stability against yellowing and humidity. These monomers are intermiscible, providing for precise adjustment of the refractive index from 1.30 to 1.60. Waveguides are formed photolithographically, with the liquid monomer mixture polymerizing upon illumination in the UV via either mask exposure or laser direct-writing. A wide range of rigid and flexible substrates can be used, including glass, quartz, oxidized silicon, glass-filled epoxy printed circuit board substrate, and flexible polyimide film. We discuss the use of these materials on chips and on multi-chip modules (MCMs), specifically in transceivers where we adaptively produced waveguides on vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs) embedded in transmitter MCMs and on high- speed photodetector chips in receiver MCMs. Light coupling from and to chips is achieved by cutting 45 degree mirrors using excimer laser ablation. The fabrication of our polymeric structures directly on the modules provides for stability, ruggedness, and hermeticity in packaging.

  10. Realizing and characterizing chiral photon flow in a circuit quantum electrodynamics necklace.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Pu; Wang, Wei; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Wu, Ying

    2015-02-10

    Gauge theory plays the central role in modern physics. Here we propose a scheme of implementing artificial Abelian gauge fields via the parametric conversion method in a necklace of superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs) coupled by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The motivation is to synthesize an extremely strong effective magnetic field for charge-neutral bosons which can hardly be achieved in conventional solid-state systems. The dynamic modulations of the SQUIDs can induce effective magnetic fields for the microwave photons in the TLR necklace through the generation of the nontrivial hopping phases of the photon hopping between neighboring TLRs. To demonstrate the synthetic magnetic field, we study the realization and detection of the chiral photon flow dynamics in this architecture under the influence of decoherence. Taking the advantages of its simplicity and flexibility, this parametric scheme is feasible with state-of-the-art technology and may pave an alternative way for investigating the gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits. We further propose a quantitative measure for the chiral property of the photon flow. Beyond the level of qualitative description, the dependence of the chiral flow on external pumping parameters and cavity decay is characterized.

  11. Realizing and characterizing chiral photon flow in a circuit quantum electrodynamics necklace

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan-Pu; Wang, Wei; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Wu, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Gauge theory plays the central role in modern physics. Here we propose a scheme of implementing artificial Abelian gauge fields via the parametric conversion method in a necklace of superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs) coupled by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The motivation is to synthesize an extremely strong effective magnetic field for charge-neutral bosons which can hardly be achieved in conventional solid-state systems. The dynamic modulations of the SQUIDs can induce effective magnetic fields for the microwave photons in the TLR necklace through the generation of the nontrivial hopping phases of the photon hopping between neighboring TLRs. To demonstrate the synthetic magnetic field, we study the realization and detection of the chiral photon flow dynamics in this architecture under the influence of decoherence. Taking the advantages of its simplicity and flexibility, this parametric scheme is feasible with state-of-the-art technology and may pave an alternative way for investigating the gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits. We further propose a quantitative measure for the chiral property of the photon flow. Beyond the level of qualitative description, the dependence of the chiral flow on external pumping parameters and cavity decay is characterized. PMID:25666884

  12. Realizing and characterizing chiral photon flow in a circuit quantum electrodynamics necklace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Pu; Wang, Wei; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Yang, Wan-Li; Hu, Yong; Wu, Ying

    2015-02-01

    Gauge theory plays the central role in modern physics. Here we propose a scheme of implementing artificial Abelian gauge fields via the parametric conversion method in a necklace of superconducting transmission line resonators (TLRs) coupled by superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). The motivation is to synthesize an extremely strong effective magnetic field for charge-neutral bosons which can hardly be achieved in conventional solid-state systems. The dynamic modulations of the SQUIDs can induce effective magnetic fields for the microwave photons in the TLR necklace through the generation of the nontrivial hopping phases of the photon hopping between neighboring TLRs. To demonstrate the synthetic magnetic field, we study the realization and detection of the chiral photon flow dynamics in this architecture under the influence of decoherence. Taking the advantages of its simplicity and flexibility, this parametric scheme is feasible with state-of-the-art technology and may pave an alternative way for investigating the gauge theories with superconducting quantum circuits. We further propose a quantitative measure for the chiral property of the photon flow. Beyond the level of qualitative description, the dependence of the chiral flow on external pumping parameters and cavity decay is characterized.

  13. Quantum key distribution network for multiple applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajima, A.; Kondoh, T.; Ochi, T.; Fujiwara, M.; Yoshino, K.; Iizuka, H.; Sakamoto, T.; Tomita, A.; Shimamura, E.; Asami, S.; Sasaki, M.

    2017-09-01

    The fundamental architecture and functions of secure key management in a quantum key distribution (QKD) network with enhanced universal interfaces for smooth key sharing between arbitrary two nodes and enabling multiple secure communication applications are proposed. The proposed architecture consists of three layers: a quantum layer, key management layer and key supply layer. We explain the functions of each layer, the key formats in each layer and the key lifecycle for enabling a practical QKD network. A quantum key distribution-advanced encryption standard (QKD-AES) hybrid system and an encrypted smartphone system were developed as secure communication applications on our QKD network. The validity and usefulness of these systems were demonstrated on the Tokyo QKD Network testbed.

  14. Integrated superconducting detectors on semiconductors for quantum optics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaniber, M.; Flassig, F.; Reithmaier, G.; Gross, R.; Finley, J. J.

    2016-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum photonic circuits can be used to efficiently generate, manipulate, route and exploit nonclassical states of light for distributed photon-based quantum information technologies. In this article, we review our recent achievements on the growth, nanofabrication and integration of high-quality, superconducting niobium nitride thin films on optically active, semiconducting GaAs substrates and their patterning to realize highly efficient and ultra-fast superconducting detectors on semiconductor nanomaterials containing quantum dots. Our state-of-the-art detectors reach external detection quantum efficiencies up to 20 % for ~4 nm thin films and single-photon timing resolutions <72 ps. We discuss the integration of such detectors into quantum dot-loaded, semiconductor ridge waveguides, resulting in the on-chip, time-resolved detection of quantum dot luminescence. Furthermore, a prototype quantum optical circuit is demonstrated that enabled the on-chip generation of resonance fluorescence from an individual InGaAs quantum dot, with a linewidth <15 μeV displaced by 1 mm from the superconducting detector on the very same semiconductor chip. Thus, all key components required for prototype quantum photonic circuits with sources, optical components and detectors on the same chip are reported.

  15. Hybrid planar lightwave circuits for defense and aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hua; Bidnyk, Serge; Yang, Shiquan; Balakrishnan, Ashok; Pearson, Matt; O'Keefe, Sean

    2010-04-01

    We present innovations in Planar Lightwave Circuits (PLCs) that make them ideally suited for use in advanced defense and aerospace applications. We discuss PLCs that contain no micro-optic components, no moving parts, pose no spark or fire hazard, are extremely small and lightweight, and are capable of transporting and processing a range of optical signals with exceptionally high performance. This PLC platform is designed for on-chip integration of active components such as lasers and detectors, along with transimpedance amplifiers and other electronics. These active components are hybridly integrated with our silica-on-silicon PLCs using fully-automated robotics and image recognition technology. This PLC approach has been successfully applied to the design and fabrication of multi-channel transceivers for aerospace applications. The chips contain hybrid DFB lasers and high-efficiency detectors, each capable of running over 10 Gb/s, with mixed digital and analog traffic multiplexed to a single optical fiber. This highlyintegrated functionality is combined onto a silicon chip smaller than 4 x 10 mm, weighing < 5 grams. These chip-based transceivers have been measured to withstand harsh g-forces, including sinusoidal vibrations with amplitude of 20 g acceleration, followed by mechanical shock of 500 g acceleration. The components operate over a wide range of temperatures, with no device failures after extreme temperature cycling through a range of > 125 degC, and more than 2,000 hours operating at 95 degC ambient air temperature. We believe that these recent advancements in planar lightwave circuits are poised to revolutionize optical communications and interconnects in the aerospace and defense industries.

  16. Reversibility conditions for quantum channels and their applications

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, M E

    2013-08-31

    Conditions for a quantum channel (noncommutative Markov operator) to be reversible with respect to complete families of quantum states with bounded rank are obtained. A description of all quantum channels reversible with respect to a given (orthogonal or nonorthogonal) complete family of pure states is given. Some applications in quantum information theory are considered. Bibliography: 20 titles.

  17. Terahertz imaging technique and application in large scale integrated circuit failure inspection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Zhi-gang; Yao, Jian-quan; Jia, Chun-rong; Xu, De-gang; Bing, Pi-bin; Yang, Peng-fei; Zheng, Yi-bo

    2010-11-01

    Terahertz ray, as a new style optic source, usually means the electromagnetic whose frequencies lies in between 0.1THz~10THz, the waveband region of the electromagnetic spectrum lies in the gap between microwaves and infrared ray. With the development of laser techniques, quantum trap techniques and compound semiconductor techniques, many new terahertz techniques have been pioneered, motivated in part by the vast range of possible applications for terahertz imaging, sensing, and spectroscopy. THz imaging technique was introduced, and THz imaging can give us not only the density picture but also the phase information within frequency domain. Consequently, images of suspicious objects such as concealed metallic or metal weapons are much sharper and more readily identified when imaged with THz imaging scanners. On the base of these, the application of THz imaging in nondestructive examination, more concretely in large scale circuit failure inspection was illuminated, and the important techniques of this application were introduced, also future prospects were discussed. With the development of correlative technology of THz, we can draw a conclusion that THz imaging technology will have nice application foreground.

  18. Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Biomedicial Applications

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Lijia; Gao, Yanfang; Yan, Feng

    2011-01-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are nanometre-scale crystals, which have unique photophysical properties, such as size-dependent optical properties, high fluorescence quantum yields, and excellent stability against photobleaching. These properties enable QDs as the promising optical labels for the biological applications, such as multiplexed analysis of immunocomplexes or DNA hybridization processes, cell sorting and tracing, in vivo imaging and diagnostics in biomedicine. Meanwhile, QDs can be used as labels for the electrochemical detection of DNA or proteins. This article reviews the synthesis and toxicity of QDs and their optical and electrochemical bioanalytical applications. Especially the application of QDs in biomedicine such as delivering, cell targeting and imaging for cancer research, and in vivo photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancer are briefly discussed. PMID:22247690

  19. Mathematical modelling of fractional order circuit elements and bioimpedance applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreles, Miguel Angel; Lainez, Rafael

    2017-05-01

    In this work a classical derivation of fractional order circuits models is presented. Generalised constitutive equations in terms of fractional Riemann-Liouville derivatives are introduced in the Maxwell's equations for each circuit element. Next the Kirchhoff voltage law is applied in a RCL circuit configuration. It is shown that from basic properties of Fractional Calculus, a fractional differential equation model with Caputo derivatives is obtained. Thus standard initial conditions apply. Finally, models for bioimpedance are revisited.

  20. Intersubband device applications of nitride quantum structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiella, Roberto; Driscoll, Kristina; Li, Yan; Liao, Yitao; Bhattacharyya, Anirban; Thomidis, Christos; Zhou, Lin; Smith, David J.; Bellotti, Enrico; Moustakas, Theodore D.

    2010-01-01

    Nitride semiconductor quantum structures feature some unique properties for intersubband device development, including a record large conduction-band offset that allows extending the operating wavelength to the near-infrared spectral region, and large optical phonon energies that are advantageous for the development of THz devices. In this paper we review our recent work aimed at the demonstration of novel intersubband device functionalities using these materials. In particular, we have developed ultrafast all-optical switching devices operating at fiber-optic communication wavelengths, based on intersubband cross-absorption saturation in GaN/AlN quantum-well waveguides. Strong self-phase modulation of ultrafast optical pulses has also been measured in these waveguides, revealing a large intersubband refractive-index nonlinearity which is also promising for all-optical switching applications. Furthermore, we have demonstrated optically pumped intersubband light emission from GaN/AlN quantum wells at the record short wavelength of about 2 μm. Finally, we have used a rigorous Monte Carlo model to show that GaN/AlGaN quantum wells are promising for the development of THz quantum cascade lasers capable in principle of operation without cryogenic cooling.

  1. Application of telecom planar lightwave circuits for homeland security sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veldhuis, Gert J.; Elders, Job; van Weerden, Harm; Amersfoort, Martin

    2004-03-01

    Over the past decade, a massive effort has been made in the development of planar lightwave circuits (PLCs) for application in optical telecommunications. Major advances have been made, on both the technological and functional performance front. Highly sophisticated software tools that are used to tailor designs to required functional performance support these developments. In addition extensive know-how in the field of packaging, testing, and failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA) has been built up in the struggle for meeting the stringent Telcordia requirements that apply to telecom products. As an example, silica-on-silicon is now a mature technology available at several industrial foundries around the world, where, on the performance front, the arrayed-waveguide grating (AWG) has evolved into an off-the-shelf product. The field of optical chemical-biological (CB) sensors for homeland security application can greatly benefit from the advances as described above. In this paper we discuss the currently available technologies, device concepts, and modeling tools that have emerged from the telecommunications arena and that can effectively be applied to the field of homeland security. Using this profound telecom knowledge base, standard telecom components can readily be tailored for detecting CB agents. Designs for telecom components aim at complete isolation from the environment to exclude impact of environmental parameters on optical performance. For sensing applications, the optical path must be exposed to the measurand, in this area additional development is required beyond what has already been achieved in telecom development. We have tackled this problem, and are now in a position to apply standard telecom components for CB sensing. As an example, the application of an AWG as a refractometer is demonstrated, and its performance evaluated.

  2. A quantum-well inversion channel heterostructure as a multifunctional component for optoelectronic integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sargood, Stephen K.; Taylor, Geoffrey W.; Claisse, Paul R.; Vang, Timothy; Cooke, Paul; Docter, Daniel P.; Kiely, Philip A.; Burrus, Charles A., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to an approach to optoelectronic integration employing a universal heterostructure with a single GaAs quantum-well active region. The fabrication technology was developed for GHz bandwidth applications by using ion implantation techniques for interdevice electrical isolation and surface planarization, and reactive ion-etching to realize a self-aligned transistor-based heterostructure. The design, fabrication, and characterization of various heterostructures are discussed in the light of optoelectronic integration and the implementation of ion implantation disordering to realize low-loss self-aligned waveguides for on-chip signal routing. The ultimate performance of the devices using a GaAs quantum well is considered, as well as the development of this technology for improved performance using strained InGaAs wells.

  3. Particle-hole symmetry and Luttinger liquids in a quantum Hall circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roddaro, Stefano

    2006-03-01

    I shall present recent experimental results on edge-state transport through quantum point contacts in the quantum Hall (QH) regime. Finite-bias backscattering measurements between edge channels at filling factor ν=1 will be presented at different temperatures. Transport through the constriction displays a non-linear Luttinger-like behavior even in the integer QH regime in contrast with the linear tunneling predicted for integer edge states [1,2]. Both zero-bias enhancement and suppression of the inter-edge tunneling will be shown in a controllable way as a function of gate bias [2,3,4]. The observed evolution is connected to the local charge depletion in the constriction region and offers new insight into the link between QH charge-conjugation and Luttinger liquid description of edge channels [2]. I shall discuss the relevance of these experimental results in the context of the dynamics of the highly-correlated edge channels in the fractional QH regime [5]. Finally I shall demonstrate how charge-conjugation can be exploited in the design of new QH circuits where the transport properties of the hole component of a partially filled Landau level can be directly addressed. [1] X.-G. Wen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 62, 2206 (1990); P. Fendley et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 3005 (1995). [2] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, L. N. Pfeiffer, K. W. West, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 156804 (2005). [3] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, G. Biasiol, L. Sorba., Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 046801 (2004). [4] S. Roddaro, V. Pellegrini, F. Beltram, G. Biasiol, L. Sorba, R. Raimondi, G. Vignale, Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 046805 (2003). [5] A. M. Chang, Rev. Mod. Phys. 75, 1449 (2003).

  4. Single-photon-driven high-order sideband transitions in an ultrastrongly coupled circuit-quantum-electrodynamics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Wang, Yimin; Li, Tiefu; Tian, Lin; Qiu, Yueyin; Inomata, Kunihiro; Yoshihara, Fumiki; Han, Siyuan; Nori, Franco; Tsai, J. S.; You, J. Q.

    2017-07-01

    We report the experimental observation of high-order sideband transitions at the single-photon level in a quantum circuit system of a flux qubit ultrastrongly coupled to a coplanar waveguide resonator. With the coupling strength reaching 10% of the resonator's fundamental frequency, we obtain clear signatures of higher order red-sideband and first-order blue-sideband transitions, which are mainly due to the ultrastrong Rabi coupling. Our observation advances the understanding of ultrastrongly coupled systems and paves the way to study high-order processes in the quantum Rabi model at the single-photon level.

  5. Direct Identification of Dilute Surface Spins on Al2 O3 : Origin of Flux Noise in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Graaf, S. E.; Adamyan, A. A.; Lindström, T.; Erts, D.; Kubatkin, S. E.; Tzalenchuk, A. Ya.; Danilov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An on-chip electron spin resonance technique is applied to reveal the nature and origin of surface spins on Al2 O3 . We measure a spin density of 2.2 ×1 017 spins/m2 , attributed to physisorbed atomic hydrogen and S =1 /2 electron spin states on the surface. This is direct evidence for the nature of spins responsible for flux noise in quantum circuits, which has been an issue of interest for several decades. Our findings open up a new approach to the identification and controlled reduction of paramagnetic sources of noise and decoherence in superconducting quantum devices.

  6. Charge Number Dependence of the Dephasing Rates of a Graphene Double Quantum Dot in a Circuit QED Architecture.

    PubMed

    Deng, Guang-Wei; Wei, Da; Johansson, J R; Zhang, Miao-Lei; Li, Shu-Xiao; Li, Hai-Ou; Cao, Gang; Xiao, Ming; Tu, Tao; Guo, Guang-Can; Jiang, Hong-Wen; Nori, Franco; Guo, Guo-Ping

    2015-09-18

    We use an on-chip superconducting resonator as a sensitive meter to probe the properties of graphene double quantum dots at microwave frequencies. Specifically, we investigate the charge dephasing rates in a circuit quantum electrodynamics architecture. The dephasing rates strongly depend on the number of charges in the dots, and the variation has a period of four charges, over an extended range of charge numbers. Although the exact mechanism of this fourfold periodicity in dephasing rates is an open problem, our observations hint at the fourfold degeneracy expected in graphene from its spin and valley degrees of freedom.

  7. Design of beam steering electronic circuits for medical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safar, Mohammad A. A. A.

    This thesis deals with the theory and design of a hemispherical antenna array circuit that is capable to operate in the intermediate zones. By doing that, this array can be used in Hyperthermia Treatment for Brain Cancer in which the aim is to noninvasively focus the fields at microwave frequencies to the location of the tumor cells in the brain. Another possible application of the array is to offer an alternative means of sustaining Deep Brain Stimulation other than using the traditional (surgical) approach. The new noninvasive technique is accomplished by the use of a hemispherical antenna array placed on the human's head. The array uses a new beamforming technique that achieves 3 dimensional beamforming or focusing of the magnetic field of antennas to desired points in the brain to achieve either cell death by temperature rise (Hyperthermia Application) or to cause brain stimulation and hopefully alleviate the affects of Parkinson's Disease (Deep Brain Stimulation). The main obstacle in this design was that the far field approximation that is usually used when designing antenna arrays does not apply in this case since the hemispherical array is in close proximity to where the magnetic field is desired to be focused. The antenna array problem is approached as a boundary-valued problem with the human head being modeled as a three layered hemisphere. The exact expressions for electromagnetic fields are derived. Health issues such as electric field exposure and specific absorption rate (SAR) are considered. After developing the main antenna and beamforming theory, a neural network is designed to accomplish the beamforming technique used. The radio-frequency (RF) transmitter was designed to transmit the fields at a frequency of 1.8 GHz. The antenna array can also be used as a receiver. The antenna and beamforming theory is presented. A new reception technique is shown which enables the array to receive multiple magnetic field sources from within the hemispherical

  8. Quantum Mechanics - Fundamentals and Applications to Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jasprit

    1996-10-01

    Explore the relationship between quantum mechanics and information-age applications This volume takes an altogether unique approach to quantum mechanics. Providing an in-depth exposition of quantum mechanics fundamentals, it shows how these concepts are applied to most of today's information technologies, whether they are electronic devices or materials. No other text makes this critical, essential leap from theory to real-world applications. The book's lively discussion of the mathematics involved fits right in with contemporary multidisciplinary trends in education: Once the basic formulation has been derived in a given chapter, the connection to important technological problems is summarily described. The many helpful features include * Twenty-eight application-oriented sections that focus on lasers, transistors, magnetic memories, superconductors, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), and other important technology-driving materials and devices * One hundred solved examples, with an emphasis on numerical results and the connection between the physics and its applications * End-of-chapter problems that ground the student in both fundamental and applied concepts * Numerous figures and tables to clarify the various topics and provide a global view of the problems under discussion * Over two hundred illustrations to highlight problems and text A book for the information age, Quantum Mechanics: Fundamentals and Applications to Technology promises to become a standard in departments of electrical engineering, applied physics, and materials science, as well as physics. It is an excellent text for senior undergraduate and graduate students, and a helpful reference for practicing scientists, engineers, and chemists in the semiconductor and electronic industries.

  9. New microwave excitation signal generating circuit for quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium Cs133

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, A. A.; Davydov, V. V.

    2016-03-01

    In this work the study, design, development and experimental results of a new microwave excitation signal generating circuit are presented. New design of this circuit is based on the method of direct digital synthesis. The results of theoretical calculations and experimental researches show that the new design not only has a high precision, but also has an improvement in the spectral characteristics of the output signal. Range of generated output frequencies is expanded, that leads to the possibility of detuning the frequency of the neighboring resonance of spectral line and adjust the C-field in quantum frequency standard. Experimental research of the metrological characteristics of the quantum frequency standard on the atoms of caesium with a new functional unit showed an improvement in the daily frequency stability.

  10. Practical applications of digital integrated circuits. Part 3: Practical sequential theory and synchronous circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Here, the 7400 line of transistor to transistor logic (TTL) devices is emphasized almost exclusively where hardware is concerned. However, it should be noted that the logic theory contained herein applies to all hardware. Discussed here are synchronous binary UP counters, synchronous DOWN and UP/DOWN counters, integrated circuit counters, shift registers, sequential techniques, and designing sequential counting machines.

  11. Displacing, squeezing, and time evolution of quantum states for nanoelectronic circuits

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The time behavior of DSN (displaced squeezed number state) for a two-dimensional electronic circuit composed of nanoscale elements is investigated using unitary transformation approach. The original Hamiltonian of the system is somewhat complicated. However, through unitary transformation, the Hamiltonian became very simple enough that we can easily treat it. By executing inverse transformation for the wave function obtained in the transformed system, we derived the exact wave function associated to the DSN in the original system. The time evolution of the DSN is described in detail, and its corresponding probability density is illustrated. We confirmed that the probability density oscillates with time like that of a classical state. There are two factors that drive the probability density to oscillate: One is the initial amplitude of complementary functions, and the other is the external power source. The oscillation associated with the initial amplitude gradually disappears with time due to the dissipation raised by resistances of the system. These analyses exactly coincide with those obtained from classical state. The characteristics of quantum fluctuations and uncertainty relations for charges and currents are also addressed. PMID:23320631

  12. Saturation behaviour of colloidal PbSe quantum dot exciton emission coupled into silicon photonic circuits.

    PubMed

    Foell, Charles A; Schelew, Ellen; Qiao, Haijun; Abel, Keith A; Hughes, Stephen; van Veggel, Frank C J M; Young, Jeff F

    2012-05-07

    We report coupling of the excitonic photon emission from photoexcited PbSe colloidal quantum dots (QDs) into an optical circuit that was fabricated in a silicon-on-insulator wafer using a CMOS-compatible process. The coupling between excitons and sub-μm sized silicon channel waveguides was mediated by a photonic crystal microcavity. The intensity of the coupled light saturates rapidly with the optical excitation power. The saturation behaviour was quantitatively studied using an isolated photonic crystal cavity with PbSe QDs site-selectively located at the cavity mode antinode position. Saturation occurs when a few μW of continuous wave HeNe pump power excites the QDs with a Gaussian spot size of 2 μm. By comparing the results with a master equation analysis that rigorously accounts for the complex dielectric environment of the QD excitons, the saturation is attributed to ground state depletion due to a non-radiative exciton decay channel with a trap state lifetime ~ 3 μs.

  13. Compact chromium oxide thin film resistors for use in nanoscale quantum circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, C. R.; Fenton, J. C.; Constantino, N. G. N.; Warburton, P. A.

    2014-12-14

    We report on the electrical characterisation of a series of thin amorphous chromium oxide (CrO{sub x}) films, grown by dc sputtering, to evaluate their suitability for use as on-chip resistors in nanoelectronics. By increasing the level of oxygen doping, the room-temperature sheet resistance of the CrO{sub x} films was varied from 28 Ω/◻ to 32.6 kΩ/◻. The variation in resistance with cooling to 4.2 K in liquid helium was investigated; the sheet resistance at 4.2 K varied with composition from 65 Ω/◻ to above 20 GΩ/◻. All of the films measured displayed linear current–voltage characteristics at all measured temperatures. For on-chip devices for quantum phase-slip measurements using niobium–silicon nanowires, interfaces between niobium–silicon and chromium oxide are required. We also characterised the contact resistance for one CrO{sub x} composition at an interface with niobium–silicon. We found that a gold intermediate layer is favourable: the specific contact resistivity of chromium-oxide-to-gold interfaces was 0.14 mΩcm{sup 2}, much lower than the value for direct CrO{sub x} to niobium–silicon contact. We conclude that these chromium oxide films are suitable for use in nanoscale circuits as high-value resistors, with resistivity tunable by oxygen content.

  14. Applications of quantum entropy to statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Martz, H.F.

    1994-07-01

    This paper develops two generalizations of the maximum entropy (ME) principle. First, Shannon classical entropy is replaced by von Neumann quantum entropy to yield a broader class of information divergences (or penalty functions) for statistics applications. Negative relative quantum entropy enforces convexity, positivity, non-local extensivity and prior correlations such as smoothness. This enables the extension of ME methods from their traditional domain of ill-posed in-verse problems to new applications such as non-parametric density estimation. Second, given a choice of information divergence, a combination of ME and Bayes rule is used to assign both prior and posterior probabilities. Hyperparameters are interpreted as Lagrange multipliers enforcing constraints. Conservation principles are proposed to act statistical regularization and other hyperparameters, such as conservation of information and smoothness. ME provides an alternative to heirarchical Bayes methods.

  15. Applications of Maxent to quantum Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect

    Silver, R.N.; Sivia, D.S.; Gubernatis, J.E. ); Jarrell, M. . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    We consider the application of maximum entropy methods to the analysis of data produced by computer simulations. The focus is the calculation of the dynamical properties of quantum many-body systems by Monte Carlo methods, which is termed the Analytical Continuation Problem.'' For the Anderson model of dilute magnetic impurities in metals, we obtain spectral functions and transport coefficients which obey Kondo Universality.'' 24 refs., 7 figs.

  16. CNFET-based voltage rectifier circuit for biomedical implantable applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Yonggen; Qian, Libo; Xia, Yinshui

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNFET) shows lower threshold voltage and smaller leakage current in comparison to its CMOS counterpart. In this paper, two kinds of CNFET-based rectifiers, full-wave rectifiers and voltage doubler rectifiers are presented for biomedical implantable applications. Based on the standard 32 nm CNFET model, the electrical performance of CNFET rectifiers is analyzed and compared. Simulation results show the voltage conversion efficiency (VCE) and power conversion efficiency (PCE) achieve 70.82% and 72.49% for CNFET full-wave rectifiers and 56.60% and 61.17% for CNFET voltage double rectifiers at typical 1.0 V input voltage excitation, which are higher than that of CMOS design. Moreover, considering the controllable property of CNFET threshold voltage, the effect of various design parameters on the electrical performance is investigated. It is observed that the VCE and PCE of CNFET rectifier increase with increasing CNT diameter and number of tubes. The proposed results would provide some guidelines for design and optimization of CNFET-based rectifier circuits. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 61131001, 61404077, 61571248), the Science and Technology Fund of Zhejiang Province (No. 2015C31090), the Natural Science Foundation of Ningbo (No. 2014A610147), State Key Laboratory of ASIC & System (No. 2015KF006) and the K. C. Wong Magna Fund in Ningbo University.

  17. No-go theorem for superradiant quantum phase transitions in cavity QED and counter-example in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Nataf, Pierre; Ciuti, Cristiano

    2010-09-07

    In cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), the interaction between an atomic transition and the cavity field is measured by the vacuum Rabi frequency Ω(0). The analogous term 'circuit QED' has been introduced for Josephson junctions, because superconducting circuits behave as artificial atoms coupled to the bosonic field of a resonator. In the regime with Ω(0) comparable with the two-level transition frequency, 'superradiant' quantum phase transitions for the cavity vacuum have been predicted, for example, within the Dicke model. In this study, we prove that if the time-independent light-matter Hamiltonian is considered, a superradiant quantum critical point is forbidden for electric dipole atomic transitions because of the oscillator strength sum rule. In circuit QED, the analogous of the electric dipole coupling is the capacitive coupling, and such no-go property can be circumvented by Cooper pair boxes capacitively coupled to a resonator, because of their peculiar Hilbert space topology and a violation of the corresponding sum rule.

  18. Efficient quantum optical state engineering and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Kevin T.

    Over a century after the modern prediction of the existence of individual particles of light by Albert Einstein, a reliable source of this simple quantum state of one photon does not exist. While common light sources such as a light bulb, LED, or laser can produce a pulse of light with an average of one photon, there is (currently) no way of knowing the number of photons in that pulse without first absorbing (and thereby destroying) them. Spontaneous parametric down-conversion, a process in which one high-energy photon splits into two lower-energy photons, allows us to prepare a single-photon state by detecting one of the photons, which then heralds the existence of its twin. This process has been the workhorse of quantum optics, allowing demonstrations of a myriad of quantum processes and protocols, such as entanglement, cryptography, superdense coding, teleportation, and simple quantum computing demonstrations. All of these processes would benefit from better engineering of the underlying down-conversion process, but despite significant effort (both theoretical and experimental), optimization of this process is ongoing. The focus of this work is to optimize certain aspects of a down-conversion source, and then use this tool in novel experiments not otherwise feasible. Specifically, the goal is to optimize the heralding efficiency of the down-conversion photons, i.e., the probability that if one photon is detected, the other photon is also detected. This source is then applied to two experiments (a single-photon source, and a quantum cryptography implementation), and the detailed theory of an additional application (a source of Fock states and path-entangled states, called N00N states) is discussed, along with some other possible applications.

  19. Short Circuit Analysis of Induction Machines Wind Power Application

    SciTech Connect

    Starke, Michael R; Smith, Travis M; Howard, Dustin; Harley, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    he short circuit behavior of Type I (fixed speed) wind turbine-generators is analyzed in this paper to aid in the protection coordination of wind plants of this type. A simple network consisting of one wind turbine-generator is analyzed for two network faults: a three phase short circuit and a phase A to ground fault. Electromagnetic transient simulations and sequence network calculations are compared for the two fault scenarios. It is found that traditional sequence network calculations give accurate results for the short circuit currents in the balanced fault case, but are inaccurate for the un-faulted phases in the unbalanced fault case. The time-current behavior of the fundamental frequency component of the short circuit currents for both fault cases are described, and found to differ significantly in the unbalanced and balanced fault cases

  20. Interfacing spins in an InGaAs quantum dot to a semiconductor waveguide circuit using emitted photons.

    PubMed

    Luxmoore, I J; Wasley, N A; Ramsay, A J; Thijssen, A C T; Oulton, R; Hugues, M; Kasture, S; Achanta, V G; Fox, A M; Skolnick, M S

    2013-01-18

    An in-plane spin-photon interface is essential for the integration of quantum dot spins with optical circuits. The optical dipole of a quantum dot lies in the plane and the spin is optically accessed via circularly polarized selection rules. Hence, a single waveguide, which can transport only one in-plane linear polarization component, cannot communicate the spin state between two points on a chip. To overcome this issue, we introduce a spin-photon interface based on two orthogonal waveguides, where the polarization emitted by a quantum dot is mapped to a path-encoded photon. We demonstrate operation by deducing the spin using the interference of in-plane photons. A second device directly maps right and left circular polarizations to antiparallel waveguides, surprising for a nonchiral structure but consistent with an off-center dot.

  1. Development of integrated thermionic circuits for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccormick, J. B.; Wilde, D.; Depp, S.; Hamilton, D. J.; Kerwin, W.; Derouin, C.; Roybal, L.; Wooley, R.

    1981-01-01

    Integrated thermionic circuits (ITC) capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500 C are studied. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits were successfully operated in 5000 C environments for extended periods. It is suggested that ITC's may become an important technology for high temperature instrumentation and control systems in geothermal and other high temperature environments.

  2. Development of thermionic integrated circuits for applications in hostile environments

    SciTech Connect

    McCormik, J.B.; Lynn, D.K.; Wilde, D.; Cowan, R.; Hamilton, D.J.; Kerwin, W.; Dooley, R.

    1984-04-10

    This report describes a class of devices known as thermionic integrated circuits (TICs) that are capable of extended operation in ambient temperatures up to 500/sup 0/C and in high radiation environments. The evolution of the TIC concept is discussed. A set of practical design and performance equations is demonstrated. Recent experimental results are discussed in which both devices and simple circuits have successfully operated in 500/sup 0/C environments for extended periods of time.

  3. Y-Ba-Cu-O superconducting/GaAs semiconducting hybrid circuits for microwave applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Toncich, S. S.; Chorey, C. M.; Rohrer, N. J.; Valco, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    A two pole superconducting bandpass filter was combined with a packaged GaAs low noise amplifier, and a superconducting X-band oscillator was designed, fabricated, and tested. Both circuits were compared to normal metal circuits at 77K. The results of these experiments, technical issues, and potential applications are presented.

  4. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking

    PubMed Central

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W.; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-01-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography. PMID:28168219

  5. High-dimensional quantum cloning and applications to quantum hacking.

    PubMed

    Bouchard, Frédéric; Fickler, Robert; Boyd, Robert W; Karimi, Ebrahim

    2017-02-01

    Attempts at cloning a quantum system result in the introduction of imperfections in the state of the copies. This is a consequence of the no-cloning theorem, which is a fundamental law of quantum physics and the backbone of security for quantum communications. Although perfect copies are prohibited, a quantum state may be copied with maximal accuracy via various optimal cloning schemes. Optimal quantum cloning, which lies at the border of the physical limit imposed by the no-signaling theorem and the Heisenberg uncertainty principle, has been experimentally realized for low-dimensional photonic states. However, an increase in the dimensionality of quantum systems is greatly beneficial to quantum computation and communication protocols. Nonetheless, no experimental demonstration of optimal cloning machines has hitherto been shown for high-dimensional quantum systems. We perform optimal cloning of high-dimensional photonic states by means of the symmetrization method. We show the universality of our technique by conducting cloning of numerous arbitrary input states and fully characterize our cloning machine by performing quantum state tomography on cloned photons. In addition, a cloning attack on a Bennett and Brassard (BB84) quantum key distribution protocol is experimentally demonstrated to reveal the robustness of high-dimensional states in quantum cryptography.

  6. Silicon quantum dots for biological applications.

    PubMed

    Chinnathambi, Shanmugavel; Chen, Song; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Hanagata, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles (or quantum dots, QDs) exhibit unique optical and electronic properties such as size-controlled fluorescence, high quantum yields, and stability against photobleaching. These properties allow QDs to be used as optical labels for multiplexed imaging and in drug delivery detection systems. Luminescent silicon QDs and surface-modified silicon QDs have also been developed as potential minimally toxic fluorescent probes for bioapplications. Silicon, a well-known power electronic semiconductor material, is considered an extremely biocompatible material, in particular with respect to blood. This review article summarizes existing knowledge related to and recent research progress made in the methods for synthesizing silicon QDs, as well as their optical properties and surface-modification processes. In addition, drug delivery systems and in vitro and in vivo imaging applications that use silicon QDs are also discussed.

  7. Chemical application of diffusion quantum Monte Carlo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, P. J.; Lester, W. A., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    The diffusion quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) method gives a stochastic solution to the Schroedinger equation. This approach is receiving increasing attention in chemical applications as a result of its high accuracy. However, reducing statistical uncertainty remains a priority because chemical effects are often obtained as small differences of large numbers. As an example, the single-triplet splitting of the energy of the methylene molecule CH sub 2 is given. The QMC algorithm was implemented on the CYBER 205, first as a direct transcription of the algorithm running on the VAX 11/780, and second by explicitly writing vector code for all loops longer than a crossover length C. The speed of the codes relative to one another as a function of C, and relative to the VAX, are discussed. The computational time dependence obtained versus the number of basis functions is discussed and this is compared with that obtained from traditional quantum chemistry codes and that obtained from traditional computer architectures.

  8. Solution-processed colloidal lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information processing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bose, Ranojoy

    In this thesis, we study solution-processed lead sulfide quantum dots for near-infrared quantum information and communication applications. Quantum dots processed through synthetic routes and colloidally suspended in solution offer far-reaching device application possibilities that are unparalelled in traditional self-assembled quantum dots. Lead sulfide quantum dots are especially promising for near-infrared quantum optics due to their optical emission at the wavelengths of fiber-optic communications (1.3--1.5 microm). The broad absorption spectrum of these quantum dots can be used for solar light-harvesting applications, to which end the results of Chapter 2---where we study Forster resonance energy transfer in quantum dot solids---provide remarkable insights into photon emission from quantum-dot based solar cells. In subsequent chapters, we explore quantum-dot photonic crystal applications, where exciton-photon interactions in the cavity environment remarkably allow for the emission of indistinguishable single photons that are important for distribution of high-security quantum keys---being highly sensitive to 'eavesdropping'. Particularly, the suggestion of the solution-processed QED system is novel compared to traditional self-assembled systems, and as we will discuss, offer integration and processing capabilities that are unprecedented, and perform well at wavelength ranges where standard QED systems scale poorly. The results of chapters 3--6 are therefore significant in the general field of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  9. Semiconductor Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cells Based on Ferricyanide/Ferrocyanide Redox Electrolyte Reaching an Open Circuit Photovoltage of 0.8 V.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Rosemarie M; Makuta, Satoshi; Yonezu, Shota; Andrews, John; Tachibana, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-08

    Semiconductor quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) have rapidly been developed, and their efficiency has recently exceeded 9%. Their performances have mainly been achieved by focusing on improving short circuit photocurrent employing polysulfide electrolytes. However, the increase of open circuit photovoltage (VOC) cannot be expected with QDSSCs based on the polysulfide electrolytes owing to their relatively negative redox potential (around -0.65 V vs Ag/AgCl). Here, we demonstrate enhancement of the open circuit voltage by employing an alternative electrolyte, ferricyanide/ferrocyanide redox couple. The solar cell performance was optimized by investigating the influence of ferricyanide and ferrocyanide concentration on their interfacial charge transfer and transport kinetics. The optimized ferricyanide/ferrocyanide species concentrations (0.01/0.2 M) result in solar energy conversion efficiency of 2% with VOC of 0.8 V. Since the potential difference between the TiO2 conduction band edge at pH 7 and the electrolyte redox potential is about 0.79 V, although the conduction band edge shifts negatively under the negative bias application into the TiO2 electrode, the solar cell with the optimized electrolyte composition has nearly reached the theoretical maximum voltage. This study suggests a promising method to optimize an electrolyte composition for maximizing solar energy conversion efficiency.

  10. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  11. Micropower circuits for bidirectional wireless telemetry in neural recording applications.

    PubMed

    Neihart, Nathan M; Harrison, Reid R

    2005-11-01

    State-of-the art neural recording systems require electronics allowing for transcutaneous, bidirectional data transfer. As these circuits will be implanted near the brain, they must be small and low power. We have developed micropower integrated circuits for recovering clock and data signals over a transcutaneous power link. The data recovery circuit produces a digital data signal from an ac power waveform that has been amplitude modulated. We have also developed an FM transmitter with the lowest power dissipation reported for biosignal telemetry. The FM transmitter consists of a low-noise biopotential amplifier and a voltage controlled oscillator used to transmit amplified neural signals at a frequency near 433 MHz. All circuits were fabricated in a standard 0.5-microm CMOS VLSI process. The resulting chip is powered through a wireless inductive link. The power consumption of the clock and data recovery circuits is measured to be 129 microW; the power consumption of the transmitter is measured to be 465 microW when using an external surface mount inductor. Using a parasitic antenna less than 2 mm long, a received power level was measured to be -59.73 dBm at a distance of one meter.

  12. Supersymmetric quantum mechanics and its applications

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, C.V.

    2004-12-23

    The Hamiltonian in Supersymmetric Quantum Mechanics is defined in terms of charges that obey the same algebra as that of the generators of supersymmetry in field theory. The consequences of this symmetry for the spectra of the component parts that constitute the supersymmetric system are explored. The implications of supersymmetry for the solutions of the Schroedinger equation, the Dirac equation, the inverse scattering theory and the multi-soliton solutions of the KdV equation are examined. Applications to scattering problems in Nuclear Physics with specific reference to singular potentials which arise from considerations of supersymmetry will be discussed.

  13. Quantum Device Applications of Mesoscopic Superconductivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakonen, P. J.

    2006-08-01

    A brief account is given on the possibilities of mesoscopic superconductivity in low-noise amplifier and detector applications. In particular, three devices will be described: 1) Bloch oscillating transistor (BOT), 2) Inductively-read superconducting Cooper pair transistor (L-SET), and 3) Quantum capacitive phase detector (C-SET). The BOT is a low-noise current amplifier while the L-SET and C-SET act as ultra-sensitive charge and phase detectors, respectively. The basic operating principles and the main characteristics of these devices will be reviewed and discussed.

  14. Designing quantum-information-processing superconducting qubit circuits that exhibit lasing and other atomic-physics-like phenomena on a chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nori, Franco

    2008-03-01

    Superconducting (SC) circuits can behave like atoms making transitions between a few energy levels. Such circuits can test quantum mechanics at macroscopic scales and be used to conduct atomic-physics experiments on a silicon chip. This talk overviews a few of our theoretical studies on SC circuits and quantum information processing (QIP) including: SC qubits for single photon generation and for lasing; controllable couplings among qubits; how to increase the coherence time of qubits using a capacitor in parallel to one of the qubit junctions; hybrid circuits involving both charge and flux qubits; testing Bell's inequality in SC circuits; generation of GHZ states; quantum tomography in SC circuits; preparation of macroscopic quantum superposition states of a cavity field via coupling to a SC qubit; generation of nonclassical photon states using a SC qubit in a microcavity; scalable quantum computing with SC qubits; and information processing with SC qubits in a microwave field. Controllable couplings between qubits can be achieved either directly or indirectly. This can be done with and without coupler circuits, and with and without data-buses like EM fields in cavities (e.g., we will describe both the variable-frequency magnetic flux approach and also a generalized double-resonance approach that we introduced). It is also possible to ``turn a quantum bug into a feature'' by using microscopic defects as qubits, and the macroscopic junction as a controller of it. We have also studied ways to implement radically different approaches to QIP by using ``cluster states'' in SC circuits. For a general overview of this field, see, J.Q. You and F. Nori, Phys. Today 58 (11), 42 (2005)

  15. Memory-Based Structured Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    phase switching technique," Electronics Letters, vol. 37, no. 14, pp. 875-877, Jul 2001. [10] W. Dally and B. Towles , Principles and Practices of...and A. Alvandpour, "A six-port 57gb/s double-pumped nonblocking router core," VLSI Circuits, 2005. Digest of Technical Papers . 2005 Symposium on, pp

  16. Characteristic spectra of circuit quantum electrodynamics systems from the ultrastrong- to the deep-strong-coupling regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshihara, F.; Fuse, T.; Ashhab, S.; Kakuyanagi, K.; Saito, S.; Semba, K.

    2017-05-01

    We report on spectra of circuit-quantum-electrodynamics (QED) systems in an intermediate regime that lies between the ultrastrong- and the deep-strong-coupling regimes, which have been reported previously in the literature. Our experimental results, along with numerical simulations, demonstrate that as the coupling strength increases, the spectrum of a circuit-QED system undergoes multiple qualitative transformations, such that several coupling regimes are identified, each with its own unique spectral features. The different spectral transformations can be related to crossings between energy level differences and to changes in the symmetries of the energy eigenstates. These results allow us to use qualitative spectral features to infer certain properties and parameters of the system.

  17. Translating non-trivial algorithms from the circuit model to the measurement-based quantum computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, P. M.; Lott, G. E.; Fanto, M. L.

    2015-11-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a circuit model algorithm as measurement-based quantum computing algorithm via a large discrete cluster state constructed sequentially, from qubits implemented as single photons. We describe a large optical discrete graph state capable of searching logical 4 and 8 element lists as an example. To do so we have developed several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of the evolution of discrete cluster states and graph state equations. We describe the cluster state as a sequence of repeated entanglement and measurement steps using a small number of single photons for each step. These prescriptions can be generalized to implement any logical circuit model operation with appropriate single-photon measurements and feed forward error corrections. Such a cluster state is not guaranteed to be optimal (i.e. minimum number of photons, measurements, run time).

  18. Translating non-trivial algorithms from the circuit model to the measurement-based quantum computing model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, A. Matthew; Alsing, P. M.; Lott, G. E.; Fanto, M. L.

    2015-06-01

    We provide a set of prescriptions for implementing a circuit model algorithm as measurement-based quantum computing algorithm via a large discrete cluster state constructed sequentially, from qubits implemented as single photons. We describe a large optical discrete graph state capable of searching logical 4 and 8 element lists as an example. To do so we have developed several prescriptions based on analytic evaluation of the evolution of discrete cluster states and graph state equations. We describe the cluster state as a sequence of repeated entanglement and measurement steps using a small number of single photons for each step. These prescriptions can be generalized to implement any logical circuit model operation with appropriate single-photon measurements and feed forward error corrections. Such a cluster state is not guaranteed to be optimal (i.e. minimum number of photons, measurements, run time).

  19. Circuit-quantum electrodynamics with direct magnetic coupling to single-atom spin qubits in isotopically enriched {sup 28}Si

    SciTech Connect

    Tosi, Guilherme Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Morello, Andrea; Huebl, Hans

    2014-08-15

    Recent advances in silicon nanofabrication have allowed the manipulation of spin qubits that are extremely isolated from noise sources, being therefore the semiconductor equivalent of single atoms in vacuum. We investigate the possibility of directly coupling an electron spin qubit to a superconducting resonator magnetic vacuum field. By using resonators modified to increase the vacuum magnetic field at the qubit location, and isotopically purified {sup 28}Si substrates, it is possible to achieve coupling rates faster than the single spin dephasing. This opens up new avenues for circuit-quantum electrodynamics with spins, and provides a pathway for dispersive read-out of spin qubits via superconducting resonators.

  20. Circuit-quantum electrodynamics with direct magnetic coupling to single-atom spin qubits in isotopically enriched 28Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Guilherme; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.; Huebl, Hans; Morello, Andrea

    2014-08-01

    Recent advances in silicon nanofabrication have allowed the manipulation of spin qubits that are extremely isolated from noise sources, being therefore the semiconductor equivalent of single atoms in vacuum. We investigate the possibility of directly coupling an electron spin qubit to a superconducting resonator magnetic vacuum field. By using resonators modified to increase the vacuum magnetic field at the qubit location, and isotopically purified 28Si substrates, it is possible to achieve coupling rates faster than the single spin dephasing. This opens up new avenues for circuit-quantum electrodynamics with spins, and provides a pathway for dispersive read-out of spin qubits via superconducting resonators.

  1. Simulation study of Ge/Si heterostructure solar cells yielding improved open-circuit voltage and quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayagaki, Takeshi; Kishimoto, Yuko; Hoshi, Yusuke; Takahashi, Isao; Usami, Noritaka

    2014-11-01

    The performance of crystalline Si solar cells with type-II Ge/Si heterostructures is numerically investigated using a simple p-Si/Si1-xGex/n-Si model with carrier recombination at the Si1-xGex layer. From an analysis of the open-circuit voltage (Voc), we find that carrier recombination at the Si1-xGex layer dominates the solar cell performance, and further suppression of this behavior is therefore the key to improving Voc. Furthermore, we discuss the device structure required to improve Voc and the quantum efficiency and find that the thin p-Si layer should be located on the front side to improve quantum efficiency in the visible region.

  2. Quantum temporal imaging: application of a time lens to quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patera, G.; Shi, J.; Horoshko, D. B.; Kolobov, M. I.

    2017-05-01

    We consider application of a temporal imaging system, based on the sum-frequency generation (SFG), to a nonclassical, squeezed optical temporal waveform. We analyze restrictions on the pump and the phase-matching condition in the summing crystal, which are necessary for preserving the quantum features of the initial waveform. We show that modification of the notion of the field of view (FOV) in the quantum case is necessary, and that the quantum FOV is much narrower than the classical one for the same temporal imaging system. These results are important for temporal stretching and compressing of squeezed fields, which are used in quantum-enhanced metrology and quantum communications.

  3. Quantum Dots and Their Multimodal Applications: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Bera, Debasis; Qian, Lei; Tseng, Teng-Kuan; Holloway, Paul H.

    2010-01-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots, whose particle sizes are in the nanometer range, have very unusual properties. The quantum dots have band gaps that depend in a complicated fashion upon a number of factors, described in the article. Processing-structure-properties-performance relationships are reviewed for compound semiconducting quantum dots. Various methods for synthesizing these quantum dots are discussed, as well as their resulting properties. Quantum states and confinement of their excitons may shift their optical absorption and emission energies. Such effects are important for tuning their luminescence stimulated by photons (photoluminescence) or electric field (electroluminescence). In this article, decoupling of quantum effects on excitation and emission are described, along with the use of quantum dots as sensitizers in phosphors. In addition, we reviewed the multimodal applications of quantum dots, including in electroluminescence device, solar cell and biological imaging.

  4. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMIC's to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMIC's is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  5. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMICs to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMICs is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  6. Signal Digitizer and Cross-Correlation Application Specific Integrated Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baranauskas, Dalius (Inventor); Baranauskas, Gytis (Inventor); Zelenin, Denis (Inventor); Kangaslahti, Pekka (Inventor); Tanner, Alan B. (Inventor); Lim, Boon H. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    According to one embodiment, a cross-correlator comprises a plurality of analog front ends (AFEs), a cross-correlation circuit and a data serializer. Each of the AFEs comprises a variable gain amplifier (VGA) and a corresponding analog-to-digital converter (ADC) in which the VGA receives and modifies a unique analog signal associates with a measured analog radio frequency (RF) signal and the ADC produces digital data associated with the modified analog signal. Communicatively coupled to the AFEs, the cross-correlation circuit performs a cross-correlation operation on the digital data produced from different measured analog RF signals. The data serializer is communicatively coupled to the summing and cross-correlating matrix and continuously outputs a prescribed amount of the correlated digital data.

  7. Packaging printed circuit boards: A production application of interactive graphics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrill, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The structure and use of an Interactive Graphics Packaging Program (IGPP), conceived to apply computer graphics to the design of packaging electronic circuits onto printed circuit boards (PCB), were described. The intent was to combine the data storage and manipulative power of the computer with the imaginative, intuitive power of a human designer. The hardware includes a CDC 6400 computer and two CDC 777 terminals with CRT screens, light pens, and keyboards. The program is written in FORTRAN 4 extended with the exception of a few functions coded in COMPASS (assembly language). The IGPP performs four major functions for the designer: (1) data input and display, (2) component placement (automatic or manual), (3) conductor path routing (automatic or manual), and (4) data output. The most complex PCB packaged to date measured 16.5 cm by 19 cm and contained 380 components, two layers of ground planes and four layers of conductors mixed with ground planes.

  8. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMICs to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMICs is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  9. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-01-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMIC's to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMIC's is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  10. Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit (MMIC) technology for space communications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, Denis J.; Bhasin, Kul B.; Romanofsky, Robert R.

    1987-10-01

    Future communications satellites are likely to use gallium arsenide (GaAs) monolithic microwave integrated-circuit (MMIC) technology in most, if not all, communications payload subsystems. Multiple-scanning-beam antenna systems are expected to use GaAs MMIC's to increase functional capability, to reduce volume, weight, and cost, and to greatly improve system reliability. RF and IF matrix switch technology based on GaAs MMIC's is also being developed for these reasons. MMIC technology, including gigabit-rate GaAs digital integrated circuits, offers substantial advantages in power consumption and weight over silicon technologies for high-throughput, on-board baseband processor systems. For the more distant future pseudomorphic indium gallium arsenide (InGaAs) and other advanced III-V materials offer the possibility of MMIC subsystems well up into the millimeter wavelength region. All of these technology elements are in NASA's MMIC program. Their status is reviewed.

  11. Design and application of cotranscriptional non-enzymatic RNA circuits and signal transducers

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleic acid circuits are finding increasing real-life applications in diagnostics and synthetic biology. Although DNA has been the main operator in most nucleic acid circuits, transcriptionally produced RNA circuits could provide powerful alternatives for reagent production and their use in cells. Towards these goals, we have implemented a particular nucleic acid circuit, catalytic hairpin assembly, using RNA for both information storage and processing. Our results demonstrated that the design principles developed for DNA circuits could be readily translated to engineering RNA circuits that operated with similar kinetics and sensitivities of detection. Not only could purified RNA hairpins perform amplification reactions but RNA hairpins transcribed in vitro also mediated amplification, even without purification. Moreover, we could read the results of the non-enzymatic amplification reactions using a fluorescent RNA aptamer ‘Spinach’ that was engineered to undergo sequence-specific conformational changes. These advances were applied to the end-point and real-time detection of the isothermal strand displacement amplification reaction that produces single-stranded DNAs as part of its amplification cycle. We were also able to readily engineer gate structures with RNA similar to those that have previously formed the basis of DNA circuit computations. Taken together, these results validate an entirely new chemistry for the implementation of nucleic acid circuits. PMID:24493736

  12. Design and application of cotranscriptional non-enzymatic RNA circuits and signal transducers.

    PubMed

    Bhadra, Sanchita; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-04-01

    Nucleic acid circuits are finding increasing real-life applications in diagnostics and synthetic biology. Although DNA has been the main operator in most nucleic acid circuits, transcriptionally produced RNA circuits could provide powerful alternatives for reagent production and their use in cells. Towards these goals, we have implemented a particular nucleic acid circuit, catalytic hairpin assembly, using RNA for both information storage and processing. Our results demonstrated that the design principles developed for DNA circuits could be readily translated to engineering RNA circuits that operated with similar kinetics and sensitivities of detection. Not only could purified RNA hairpins perform amplification reactions but RNA hairpins transcribed in vitro also mediated amplification, even without purification. Moreover, we could read the results of the non-enzymatic amplification reactions using a fluorescent RNA aptamer 'Spinach' that was engineered to undergo sequence-specific conformational changes. These advances were applied to the end-point and real-time detection of the isothermal strand displacement amplification reaction that produces single-stranded DNAs as part of its amplification cycle. We were also able to readily engineer gate structures with RNA similar to those that have previously formed the basis of DNA circuit computations. Taken together, these results validate an entirely new chemistry for the implementation of nucleic acid circuits.

  13. Integrating Optogenetic and Pharmacological Approaches to Study Neural Circuit Function: Current Applications and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Alex O.

    2013-01-01

    Optogenetic strategies to control genetically distinct populations of neurons with light have been rapidly evolving and widely adopted by the neuroscience community as one of the most important tool sets to study neural circuit function. Although optogenetics have already reshaped neuroscience by allowing for more precise control of circuit function compared with traditional techniques, current limitations of these approaches should be considered. Here, we discuss several strategies that combine optogenetic and contemporary pharmacological techniques to further increase the specificity of neural circuit manipulation. We also discuss recent advances that allow for the selective modulation of cellular function and gene expression with light. In addition, we outline a novel application of optogenetic circuit analysis for causally addressing the role of pathway-specific neural activity in mediating alterations in postsynaptic transcriptional processing in genetically defined neurons. By determining how optogenetic activation of specific neural circuits causally contributes to alterations in gene expression in a high-throughput fashion, novel biologic targets for future pharmacological intervention may be uncovered. Lastly, extending this experimental pipeline to selectively target pharmacotherapies to genetically defined neuronal populations or circuits will not only provide more selective control of neural circuits, but also may lead to the development of neural circuit specific pharmacological therapeutics. PMID:23319548

  14. Electrical Devices and Circuits for Low Temperature Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammond, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Overton, E.; Elbuluk, M.

    2003-01-01

    The environmental temperature in many NASA missions, such as deep space probes and outer planetary exploration, is significantly below the range for which conventional commercial-off-the-shelf electronics is designed. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of such deep space missions carry a large number of radioisotope or other heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronic devices and circuits capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the harsh environment of deep space but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development cost as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior in the electrical and thermal properties of some semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. An on-going research and development program on low temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of efficient electrical systems and circuits capable of surviving and exploiting the advantages of low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house component testing will also be discussed. On-going research activities that are being performed in collaboration with various organizations will also be presented.

  15. Silicon quantum dots for optical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jeslin J.

    Luminescent silicon quantum dots (SiQDs) are emerging as attractive materials for optoelectronic devices, third generation photovoltaics, and bioimaging. Their applicability in the real world is contingent on their optical properties and long-term environmental stability; and in biological applications, factors such as water solubility and toxicity must also be taken into consideration. The aforementioned properties are highly dependent on the QDs' surface chemistry. In this work, SiQDs were engineered for the respective applications using liquid-phase and gas-phase functionalization techniques. Preliminary work in luminescent downshifting for photovoltaic systems are also reported. Highly luminescent SiQDs were fabricated by grafting unsaturated hydrocarbons onto the surface of hydrogen-terminated SiQDs via thermal and photochemical hydrosilylation. An industrially attractive, all gas-phase, nonthermal plasma synthesis, passivation (aided by photochemical reactions), and deposition process was also developed to reduce solvent waste. With photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQYs) nearing 60 %, the alkyl-terminated QDs are attractive materials for optical applications. The functionalized SiQDs also exhibited enhanced thermal stability as compared to their unfunctionalized counterparts, and the photochemically-hydrosilylated QDs further displayed photostability under UV irradiation. These environmentally-stable SiQDs were used as luminescent downshifting layers in photovoltaic systems, which led to enhancements in the blue photoresponse of heterojunction solar cells. Furthermore, the QD films demonstrated antireflective properties, improving the coupling efficiency of sunlight into the cell. For biological applications, oxide, amine, or hydroxyl groups were grafted onto the surface to create water-soluble SiQDs. Luminescent, water-soluble SiQDs were produced in by microplasma treating the QDs in water. Stable QYs exceeding 50 % were obtained. Radical-based and

  16. Quantum Endpoint Detection Based on QRDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Han; Song, Yan

    2017-10-01

    Speech recognition technology is widely used in many applications for man - machine interaction. To face more and more speech data, the computation of speech processing needs new approaches. The quantum computation is one of emerging computation technology and has been seen as useful computation model. So we focus on the basic operation of speech recognition processing, the voice activity detection, to present quantum endpoint detection algorithm. In order to achieve this algorithm, the n-bits quantum comparator circuit is given firstly. Then based on QRDA(Quantum Representation of Digital Audio), a quantum endpoint detection algorithm is presented. These quantum circuits could efficient process the audio data in quantum computer.

  17. Quantum Endpoint Detection Based on QRDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Han; Song, Yan

    2017-08-01

    Speech recognition technology is widely used in many applications for man - machine interaction. To face more and more speech data, the computation of speech processing needs new approaches. The quantum computation is one of emerging computation technology and has been seen as useful computation model. So we focus on the basic operation of speech recognition processing, the voice activity detection, to present quantum endpoint detection algorithm. In order to achieve this algorithm, the n-bits quantum comparator circuit is given firstly. Then based on QRDA(Quantum Representation of Digital Audio), a quantum endpoint detection algorithm is presented. These quantum circuits could efficient process the audio data in quantum computer.

  18. Design of a universal logic block for fault-tolerant realization of any logic operation in trapped-ion quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudarzi, H.; Dousti, M. J.; Shafaei, A.; Pedram, M.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents a physical mapping tool for quantum circuits, which generates the optimal universal logic block (ULB) that can, on average, perform any logical fault-tolerant (FT) quantum operations with the minimum latency. The operation scheduling, placement, and qubit routing problems tackled by the quantum physical mapper are highly dependent on one another. More precisely, the scheduling solution affects the quality of the achievable placement solution due to resource pressures that may be created as a result of operation scheduling, whereas the operation placement and qubit routing solutions influence the scheduling solution due to resulting distances between predecessor and current operations, which in turn determines routing latencies. The proposed flow for the quantum physical mapper captures these dependencies by applying (1) a loose scheduling step, which transforms an initial quantum data flow graph into one that explicitly captures the no-cloning theorem of the quantum computing and then performs instruction scheduling based on a modified force-directed scheduling approach to minimize the resource contention and quantum circuit latency, (2) a placement step, which uses timing-driven instruction placement to minimize the approximate routing latencies while making iterative calls to the aforesaid force-directed scheduler to correct scheduling levels of quantum operations as needed, and (3) a routing step that finds dynamic values of routing latencies for the qubits. In addition to the quantum physical mapper, an approach is presented to determine the single best ULB size for a target quantum circuit by examining the latency of different FT quantum operations mapped onto different ULB sizes and using information about the occurrence frequency of operations on critical paths of the target quantum algorithm to weigh these latencies. Experimental results show an average latency reduction of about 40 % compared to previous work.

  19. Quantum technology: from research to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Ranade, Kedar S.; Anton, Christian; Arndt, Markus; Aspelmeyer, Markus; Bayer, Manfred; Berg, Gunnar; Calarco, Tommaso; Fuchs, Harald; Giacobino, Elisabeth; Grassl, Markus; Hänggi, Peter; Heckl, Wolfgang M.; Hertel, Ingolf-Volker; Huelga, Susana; Jelezko, Fedor; Keimer, Bernhard; Kotthaus, Jörg P.; Leuchs, Gerd; Lütkenhaus, Norbert; Maurer, Ueli; Pfau, Tilman; Plenio, Martin B.; Rasel, Ernst Maria; Renn, Ortwin; Silberhorn, Christine; Schiedmayer, Jörg; Schmitt-Landsiedel, Doris; Schönhammer, Kurt; Ustinov, Alexey; Walther, Philip; Weinfurter, Harald; Welzl, Emo; Wiesendanger, Roland; Wolf, Stefan; Zeilinger, Anton; Zoller, Peter

    2016-05-01

    The term quantum physics refers to the phenomena and characteristics of atomic and subatomic systems which cannot be explained by classical physics. Quantum physics has had a long tradition in Germany, going back nearly 100 years. Quantum physics is the foundation of many modern technologies. The first generation of quantum technology provides the basis for key areas such as semiconductor and laser technology. The "new" quantum technology, based on influencing individual quantum systems, has been the subject of research for about the last 20 years. Quantum technology has great economic potential due to its extensive research programs conducted in specialized quantum technology centres throughout the world. To be a viable and active participant in the economic potential of this field, the research infrastructure in Germany should be improved to facilitate more investigations in quantum technology research.

  20. Efficient, High-Speed, Monolithic Optoelectronic Circuits Using Quantum- Confined Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    quantum - wells , and L is the effective cavity length of the DBR laser measured between the equivalent reflection planes of the multielement mirrors...waveguide structures can be formed Once the implant is annealed, the mirror layers as well as the quantum - well active region intermixes . The I-V...summarize our progress in the materials and processing as well as the device areas. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Semiconductor lasers, quantum -wire lasers

  1. Zinc sulfide quantum dots for photocatalytic and sensing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander A.; Leonov, Andrei A.; Zhuikova, Elena I.; Postnova, Irina V.; Voznesenskiy, Sergey S.

    2017-09-01

    Herein, we report the photocatalytic and sensing applications of pure and Mn-doped ZnS quantum dots. The quantum dots were prepared by a chemical precipitation in an aqueous solution in the presence of glutathione as a stabilizing agent. The synthesized quantum dots were used as effective photocatalyst for the degradation of methylene blue dye. Interestingly, fully degradation of methylene blue dye was achieved in 5 min using pure ZnS quantum dots. Further, the synthesized quantum dots were used as efficient sensing element for methane fluorescent sensor. Interfering studies confirmed that the developed sensor possesses very good sensitivity and selectivity towards methane.

  2. Benchmarking a quantum teleportation protocol in superconducting circuits using tomography and an entanglement witness.

    PubMed

    Baur, M; Fedorov, A; Steffen, L; Filipp, S; da Silva, M P; Wallraff, A

    2012-01-27

    Teleportation of a quantum state may be used for distributing entanglement between distant qubits in quantum communication and for quantum computation. Here we demonstrate the implementation of a teleportation protocol, up to the single-shot measurement step, with superconducting qubits coupled to a microwave resonator. Using full quantum state tomography and evaluating an entanglement witness, we show that the protocol generates a genuine tripartite entangled state of all three qubits. Calculating the projection of the measured density matrix onto the basis states of two qubits allows us to reconstruct the teleported state. Repeating this procedure for a complete set of input states we find an average output state fidelity of 86%.

  3. High temperature superconducting thin film microwave circuits: Fabrication, characterization, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhasin, K. B.; Warner, J. D.; Romanofsky, R. R.; Heinen, V. O.; Chorey, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    Epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 films were grown on several microwave substrates. Surface resistance and penetration depth measurements were performed to determine the quality of these films. Here the properties of these films on key microwave substrates are described. The fabrication and characterization of a microwave ring resonator circuit to determine transmission line losses are presented. Lower losses than those observed in gold resonator circuits were observed at temperatures lower than critical transition temperature. Based on these results, potential applications of microwave superconducting circuits such as filters, resonators, oscillators, phase shifters, and antenna elements in space communication systems are identified.

  4. Quantum cryptography and applications in the optical fiber network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuhui

    2005-09-01

    Quantum cryptography, as part of quantum information and communications, can provide absolute security for information transmission because it is established on the fundamental laws of quantum theory, such as the principle of uncertainty, No-cloning theorem and quantum entanglement. In this thesis research, a novel scheme to implement quantum key distribution based on multiphoton entanglement with a new protocol is proposed. Its advantages are: a larger information capacity can be obtained with a longer transmission distance and the detection of multiple photons is easier than that of a single photon. The security and attacks pertaining to such a system are also studied. Next, a quantum key distribution over wavelength division multiplexed (WDM) optical fiber networks is realized. Quantum key distribution in networks is a long-standing problem for practical applications. Here we combine quantum cryptography and WDM to solve this problem because WDM technology is universally deployed in the current and next generation fiber networks. The ultimate target is to deploy quantum key distribution over commercial networks. The problems arising from the networks are also studied in this part. Then quantum key distribution in multi-access networks using wavelength routing technology is investigated in this research. For the first time, quantum cryptography for multiple individually targeted users has been successfully implemented in sharp contrast to that using the indiscriminating broadcasting structure. It overcomes the shortcoming that every user in the network can acquire the quantum key signals intended to be exchanged between only two users. Furthermore, a more efficient scheme of quantum key distribution is adopted, hence resulting in a higher key rate. Lastly, a quantum random number generator based on quantum optics has been experimentally demonstrated. This device is a key component for quantum key distribution as it can create truly random numbers, which is an

  5. Quantum Cascade Lasers Modulation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luzhansky, Edward

    The mid-wave IR (MWIR) spectral band, extending from 3 to 5 microns, is considered to be a low loss atmospheric window. There are several spectral sub-bands with relatively low atmospheric attenuation in this region making it popular for various commercial and military applications. Relatively low thermal and solar background emissions, effective penetration through the natural and anthropogenic obscurants and eye safety add to the long list of advantages of MWIR wavelengths. Quantum Cascade Lasers are compact semiconductor devices capable of operating in MWIR spectrum. They are based on inter-subband transitions in a multiple-quantum-well (QW) hetero-structure, designed by means of band-structure engineering. The inter-subband nature of the optical transition has several key advantages. First, the emission wavelength is primarily a function of the QW thickness. This characteristic allows choosing well-understood and reliable semiconductors for the generation of light in a wavelength range of interest. Second, a cascade process in which tens of photons are generated per injected electron. This cascading process is behind the intrinsic high-power capabilities of QCLs. This dissertation is focused on modulation properties of Quantum Cascade Lasers. Both amplitude and phase/frequency modulations were studied including modulation bandwidth, modulation efficiency and chirp linearity. Research was consisted of the two major parts. In the first part we describe the theory of frequency modulation (FM) response of Distributed Feedback Quantum Cascade Lasers (DFB QCL). It includes cascading effect on the QCL's maximum modulation frequency. The "gain levering" effect for the maximum FM response of the two section QCLs was studied as well. In the second part of research we concentrated on the Pulse Position Amplitude Modulation of a single section QCL. The low complexity, low size, weight and power Mid-Wavelength Infra-Red optical communications transceiver concept is

  6. Acquisition of an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator for Quantum Information Science with Superconducting Circuits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-23

    wiring and microwave components for a wide variety of low-temperature microwave measurements of superconducting devices. As described in the original...years. (a) (b) Figure 2: (a) Optical micrograph of Nb thin-film metamaterial circuit. (b) Low-temperature measurement of microwave transmission S21(f) of...measurements on the new ADR for this project have involved measuring the current-voltage characteristics of SFQ-driver circuits with and without microwave

  7. Mixed application MMIC technologies - Progress in combining RF, digital and photonic circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swirhun, S.; Bendett, M.; Sokolov, V.; Bauhahn, P.; Sullivan, C.; Mactaggart, R.; Mukherjee, S.; Hibbs-Brenner, M.; Mondal, J.

    1991-01-01

    Approaches for future 'mixed application' monolithic integrated circuits (ICs) employing optical receive/transmit, RF amplification and modulation and digital control functions are discussed. We focus on compatibility of the photonic component fabrication with conventional RF and digital IC technologies. Recent progress at Honeywell in integrating several parts of the desired RF/digital/photonic circuit integration suite required for construction of a future millimeter-wave optically-controlled phased-array element are illustrated.

  8. Metamaterial-Based Patch Antennas and Adaptive Rectifying Circuits for High Power Rectenna Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    FUNDING NUMBERS Metamaterial-based Patch Antennas and Adaptive Rectifying Circuits for High N00014-04-1-0320 Power Rectenna Applications 6. AUTHOR(S...CODE Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. The efforts of this project considered two technological aspects of rectennas systems. One...technology that was emphasized power-adaptive rectifying circuits (PARCs). If a rectenna system is to be integrated into an autonomous vehicle system

  9. Optoelectronic Applications of Colloidal Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhiping; Zhang, Nanzhu; Brenneman, Kimber; Wu, Tsai Chin; Jung, Hyeson; Biswas, Sushmita; Sen, Banani; Reinhardt, Kitt; Liao, Sicheng; Stroscio, Michael A.; Dutta, Mitra

    This chapter highlights recent optoelectronic applications of colloidal quantum dots (QDs). In recent years, many colloidal QD-based optoelectronic devices, and device concepts have been proposed and studied. Many of these device concepts build on traditional optoelectronic device concepts. Increasingly, many new optoelectronic device concepts have been based on the use of biomolecule QD complexes. In this chapter, both types of structures are discussed. Special emphasis is placed on new optoelectronic device concepts that incorporate DNA-based aptamers in biomolecule QD complexes. Not only are the extensions of traditional devices and concepts realizable, such as QD-based photo detectors, displays, photoluminescent and photovoltaic devices, light-emitting diodes (LEDs), photovoltaic devices, and solar cells, but new devices concepts such a biomolecule-based molecular sensors possible. This chapter highlights a number of such novel QD-based devices and device concepts.

  10. Epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor two-dimensional systems: platforms for quantum circuits (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Javad

    2016-10-01

    Theory suggests that the interface between a one-dimensional semiconductor (Sm) with strong spin-orbit coupling and a superconductor (S) hosts Majorana modes with nontrivial topological properties. A key challenge in fabrication of such hybrid devices is forming highly transparent contacts between the active electrons in the semiconductor and the superconducting metal. Recently, it has been shown that a near perfect interface and a highly transparent contact can be achieved using epitaxial growth of aluminum on InAs nanowires. In this work, we present the first two-dimensional epitaxial superconductor-semiconductor material system that can serve as a platform for topological superconductivity. We show that our material system, Al-InAs, satisfies all the requirements necessary to reach into the topological superconducting regime by individual characterization of the semiconductor two dimensional electron system, superconductivity of Al and performance of S-Sm-S junctions. This exciting development might lead to a number of useful applications ranging from spintronics to quantum computing.

  11. In Vivo Application of Optogenetics for Neural Circuit Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Optogenetics combines optical and genetic methods to rapidly and reversibly control neural activities or other cellular functions. Using genetic methods, specific cells or anatomical pathways can be sensitized to light through exogenous expression of microbial light activated opsin proteins. Using optical methods, opsin expressing cells can be rapidly and reversibly controlled by pulses of light of specific wavelength. With the high spatial temporal precision, optogenetic tools have enabled new ways to probe the causal role of specific cells in neural computation and behavior. Here, we overview the current state of the technology, and provide a brief introduction to the practical considerations in applying optogenetics in vivo to analyze neural circuit functions. PMID:22896801

  12. Postselection technique for quantum channels with applications to quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Christandl, Matthias; König, Robert; Renner, Renato

    2009-01-16

    We propose a general method for studying properties of quantum channels acting on an n-partite system, whose action is invariant under permutations of the subsystems. Our main result is that, in order to prove that a certain property holds for an arbitrary input, it is sufficient to consider the case where the input is a particular de Finetti-type state, i.e., a state which consists of n identical and independent copies of an (unknown) state on a single subsystem. Our technique can be applied to the analysis of information-theoretic problems. For example, in quantum cryptography, we get a simple proof for the fact that security of a discrete-variable quantum key distribution protocol against collective attacks implies security of the protocol against the most general attacks. The resulting security bounds are tighter than previously known bounds obtained with help of the exponential de Finetti theorem.

  13. Weak Quantum Theory: Formal Framework and Selected Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Atmanspacher, Harald; Filk, Thomas; Roemer, Hartmann

    2006-01-04

    Two key concepts of quantum theory, complementarity and entanglement, are considered with respect to their significance in and beyond physics. An axiomatically formalized, weak version of quantum theory, more general than the ordinary quantum theory of physical systems, is described. Its mathematical structure generalizes the algebraic approach to ordinary quantum theory. The crucial formal feature leading to complementarity and entanglement is the non-commutativity of observables.The ordinary Hilbert space quantum mechanics can be recovered by stepwise adding the necessary features. This provides a hierarchy of formal frameworks of decreasing generality and increasing specificity. Two concrete applications, more specific than weak quantum theory and more general than ordinary quantum theory, are discussed: (i) complementarity and entanglement in classical dynamical systems, and (ii) complementarity and entanglement in the bistable perception of ambiguous stimuli.

  14. State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit.

    PubMed

    Kelly, J; Barends, R; Fowler, A G; Megrant, A; Jeffrey, E; White, T C; Sank, D; Mutus, J Y; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Hoi, I-C; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; Cleland, A N; Martinis, John M

    2015-03-05

    Quantum computing becomes viable when a quantum state can be protected from environment-induced error. If quantum bits (qubits) are sufficiently reliable, errors are sparse and quantum error correction (QEC) is capable of identifying and correcting them. Adding more qubits improves the preservation of states by guaranteeing that increasingly larger clusters of errors will not cause logical failure-a key requirement for large-scale systems. Using QEC to extend the qubit lifetime remains one of the outstanding experimental challenges in quantum computing. Here we report the protection of classical states from environmental bit-flip errors and demonstrate the suppression of these errors with increasing system size. We use a linear array of nine qubits, which is a natural step towards the two-dimensional surface code QEC scheme, and track errors as they occur by repeatedly performing projective quantum non-demolition parity measurements. Relative to a single physical qubit, we reduce the failure rate in retrieving an input state by a factor of 2.7 when using five of our nine qubits and by a factor of 8.5 when using all nine qubits after eight cycles. Additionally, we tomographically verify preservation of the non-classical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The successful suppression of environment-induced errors will motivate further research into the many challenges associated with building a large-scale superconducting quantum computer.

  15. Giant photon gain in large-scale quantum dot-circuit QED systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Kulkarni, Manas; Mukamel, Shaul; Segal, Dvira

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by recent experiments on the generation of coherent light in engineered hybrid quantum systems, we investigate gain in a microwave photonic cavity coupled to quantum dot structures and develop concrete directions for achieving a giant amplification in photon transmission. We propose two architectures for scaling up the electronic gain medium: (i) N -double quantum dot systems and (ii) M -quantum dots arranged in series akin to a quantum cascade laser setup. In both setups, the fermionic reservoirs are voltage biased, and the quantum dots are coupled to a single-mode cavity. Optical amplification is explained based on a sum rule for the transmission function, and it is determined by an intricate competition between two different processes: charge-density response in the gain medium and cavity losses to input and output ports. The same design principle is also responsible for the corresponding giant amplification in other photonic observables, mean photon number, and emission spectrum, thereby realizing a quantum device that behaves as a giant microwave amplifier.

  16. State preservation by repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Fowler, A. G.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T. C.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J. Y.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Roushan, P.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum computing becomes viable when a quantum state can be protected from environment-induced error. If quantum bits (qubits) are sufficiently reliable, errors are sparse and quantum error correction (QEC) is capable of identifying and correcting them. Adding more qubits improves the preservation of states by guaranteeing that increasingly larger clusters of errors will not cause logical failure--a key requirement for large-scale systems. Using QEC to extend the qubit lifetime remains one of the outstanding experimental challenges in quantum computing. Here we report the protection of classical states from environmental bit-flip errors and demonstrate the suppression of these errors with increasing system size. We use a linear array of nine qubits, which is a natural step towards the two-dimensional surface code QEC scheme, and track errors as they occur by repeatedly performing projective quantum non-demolition parity measurements. Relative to a single physical qubit, we reduce the failure rate in retrieving an input state by a factor of 2.7 when using five of our nine qubits and by a factor of 8.5 when using all nine qubits after eight cycles. Additionally, we tomographically verify preservation of the non-classical Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger state. The successful suppression of environment-induced errors will motivate further research into the many challenges associated with building a large-scale superconducting quantum computer.

  17. Field testing of overcurrent trip units for low voltage circuit breakers used in DC applications

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, E.L.; Funk, D.L.

    1994-08-01

    This Tech Note investigates and provides recommendations for field testing the overcurrent trip units of low voltage circuit breakers used in direct current (DC) applications. Although industry guidance is available for field testing low voltage circuit breakers in alternating current (AC) applications, guidance for testing breakers used in DC circuits is virtually nonexistent. Fault theory and breaker operating principles are discussed at a depth necessary to technically substantiate recommended practices contained in this Tech Note. The response of low voltage circuit breaker overcurrent trip units to AC and DC current is compared to facilitate an understanding of the issues and concerns surrounding overcurrent test methods for low voltage circuit breakers used in dc applications. The applicability of this information to a test program for DC system breakers is described in detail. This Tech Note addresses whether or not overcurrent test results obtained using UAC current are representative of a breaker`s performance under DC conditions. This document demonstrates that technically valid test results can be obtained using either AC or DC test methods. The final recommendations presented favor AC testing over DC testing based on familiarity with the test method and economic considerations; however, it is stressed that either test method can yield technically acceptable results. The potential benefits and limitations of each test method, AC or DC, should be understood thoroughly before selecting a test method or interpreting test results.

  18. Modeling and simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor and its circuit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Saini, Dinesh Kumar; Agarwal, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Sajal; Khosla, Mamta; Raj, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    The carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) is modelled for circuit application. The model is based on the transport mechanism and it directly relates the transport mechanism with the chirality. Also, it does not consider self consistent equations and thus is used to develop the HSPICE compatible circuit model. For validation of the model, it is applied to the top gate CNTFET structure and the MATLAB simulation results are compared with the simulations of a similar structure created in NanoTCAD ViDES. For demonstrating the circuit compatibility of the model, two circuits viz. inverter and SRAM are designed and simulated in HSPICE. Finally, SRAM performance metrics are compared with those of device simulations from Nano TCAD ViDES.

  19. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-01-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle. PMID:24201454

  20. Plasmonic nanopatch array for optical integrated circuit applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Shi-Wei; Nie, Zai-Ping

    2013-11-01

    Future plasmonic integrated circuits with the capability of extremely high-speed data processing at optical frequencies will be dominated by the efficient optical emission (excitation) from (of) plasmonic waveguides. Towards this goal, plasmonic nanoantennas, currently a hot topic in the field of plasmonics, have potential to bridge the mismatch between the wave vector of free-space photonics and that of the guided plasmonics. To manipulate light at will, plasmonic nanoantenna arrays will definitely be more efficient than isolated nanoantennas. In this article, the concepts of microwave antenna arrays are applied to efficiently convert plasmonic waves in the plasmonic waveguides into free-space optical waves or vice versa. The proposed plasmonic nanoantenna array, with nanopatch antennas and a coupled wedge plasmon waveguide, can also act as an efficient spectrometer to project different wavelengths into different directions, or as a spatial filter to absorb a specific wavelength at a specified incident angle.