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Sample records for quantum computing dna

  1. Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonov, Dorit

    In the last few years, theoretical study of quantum systems serving as computational devices has achieved tremendous progress. We now have strong theoretical evidence that quantum computers, if built, might be used as a dramatically powerful computational tool, capable of performing tasks which seem intractable for classical computers. This review is about to tell the story of theoretical quantum computation. I l out the developing topic of experimental realizations of the model, and neglected other closely related topics which are quantum information and quantum communication. As a result of narrowing the scope of this paper, I hope it has gained the benefit of being an almost self contained introduction to the exciting field of quantum computation. The review begins with background on theoretical computer science, Turing machines and Boolean circuits. In light of these models, I define quantum computers, and discuss the issue of universal quantum gates. Quantum algorithms, including Shor's factorization algorithm and Grover's algorithm for searching databases, are explained. I will devote much attention to understanding what the origins of the quantum computational power are, and what the limits of this power are. Finally, I describe the recent theoretical results which show that quantum computers maintain their complexity power even in the presence of noise, inaccuracies and finite precision. This question cannot be separated from that of quantum complexity because any realistic model will inevitably be subjected to such inaccuracies. I tried to put all results in their context, asking what the implications to other issues in computer science and physics are. In the end of this review, I make these connections explicit by discussing the possible implications of quantum computation on fundamental physical questions such as the transition from quantum to classical physics.

  2. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of quantum dots for molecular computation.

    PubMed

    He, Xuewen; Li, Zhi; Chen, Muzi; Ma, Nan

    2014-12-22

    Despite the widespread use of quantum dots (QDs) for biosensing and bioimaging, QD-based bio-interfaceable and reconfigurable molecular computing systems have not yet been realized. DNA-programmed dynamic assembly of multi-color QDs is presented for the construction of a new class of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based QD computing systems. A complete set of seven elementary logic gates (OR, AND, NOR, NAND, INH, XOR, XNOR) are realized using a series of binary and ternary QD complexes operated by strand displacement reactions. The integration of different logic gates into a half-adder circuit for molecular computation is also demonstrated. This strategy is quite versatile and straightforward for logical operations and would pave the way for QD-biocomputing-based intelligent molecular diagnostics. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    information representation and processing technology, although faster than the wheels and gears of the Charles Babbage computation machine, is still in...the same computational complexity class as the Babbage machine, with bits of information represented by entities which obey classical (non-quantum...nuclear double resonances Charles M Bowden and Jonathan P. Dowling Weapons Sciences Directorate, AMSMI-RD-WS-ST Missile Research, Development, and

  4. Quantum walk computation

    SciTech Connect

    Kendon, Viv

    2014-12-04

    Quantum versions of random walks have diverse applications that are motivating experimental implementations as well as theoretical studies. Recent results showing quantum walks are “universal for quantum computation” relate to algorithms, to be run on quantum computers. We consider whether an experimental implementation of a quantum walk could provide useful computation before we have a universal quantum computer.

  5. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  6. Quantum Computer Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mermin, N. David

    2007-08-01

    Preface; 1. Cbits and Qbits; 2. General features and some simple examples; 3. Breaking RSA encryption with a quantum computer; 4. Searching with a quantum computer; 5. Quantum error correction; 6. Protocols that use just a few Qbits; Appendices; Index.

  7. Interaction of anthraquinone anti-cancer drugs with DNA:Experimental and computational quantum chemical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Otaibi, Jamelah S.; Teesdale Spittle, Paul; El Gogary, Tarek M.

    2017-01-01

    Anthraquinones form the basis of several anticancer drugs. Anthraquinones anticancer drugs carry out their cytotoxic activities through their interaction with DNA, and inhibition of topoisomerase II activity. Anthraquinones (AQ4 and AQ4H) were synthesized and studied along with 1,4-DAAQ by computational and experimental tools. The purpose of this study is to shade more light on mechanism of interaction between anthraquinone DNA affinic agents and different types of DNA. This study will lead to gain of information useful for drug design and development. Molecular structures were optimized using DFT B3LYP/6-31 + G(d). Depending on intramolecular hydrogen bonding interactions two conformers of AQ4 were detected and computed as 25.667 kcal/mol apart. Molecular reactivity of the anthraquinone compounds was explored using global and condensed descriptors (electrophilicity and Fukui functions). Molecular docking studies for the inhibition of CDK2 and DNA binding were carried out to explore the anti cancer potency of these drugs. NMR and UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra of anthraquinones/DNA were investigated at the physiological pH. The interaction of the three anthraquinones (AQ4, AQ4H and 1,4-DAAQ) were studied with three DNA (calf thymus DNA, (Poly[dA].Poly[dT]) and (Poly[dG].Poly[dC]). NMR study shows a qualitative pattern of drug/DNA interaction in terms of band shift and broadening. UV-VIS electronic absorption spectra were employed to measure the affinity constants of drug/DNA binding using Scatchard analysis.

  8. Quantum computing and probability.

    PubMed

    Ferry, David K

    2009-11-25

    Over the past two decades, quantum computing has become a popular and promising approach to trying to solve computationally difficult problems. Missing in many descriptions of quantum computing is just how probability enters into the process. Here, we discuss some simple examples of how uncertainty and probability enter, and how this and the ideas of quantum computing challenge our interpretations of quantum mechanics. It is found that this uncertainty can lead to intrinsic decoherence, and this raises challenges for error correction.

  9. Quantum computing: Quantum advantage deferred

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childs, Andrew M.

    2017-12-01

    A type of optics experiment called a boson sampler could be among the easiest routes to demonstrating the power of quantum computers. But recent work shows that super-classical boson sampling may be a long way off.

  10. Quantum analogue computing.

    PubMed

    Kendon, Vivien M; Nemoto, Kae; Munro, William J

    2010-08-13

    We briefly review what a quantum computer is, what it promises to do for us and why it is so hard to build one. Among the first applications anticipated to bear fruit is the quantum simulation of quantum systems. While most quantum computation is an extension of classical digital computation, quantum simulation differs fundamentally in how the data are encoded in the quantum computer. To perform a quantum simulation, the Hilbert space of the system to be simulated is mapped directly onto the Hilbert space of the (logical) qubits in the quantum computer. This type of direct correspondence is how data are encoded in a classical analogue computer. There is no binary encoding, and increasing precision becomes exponentially costly: an extra bit of precision doubles the size of the computer. This has important consequences for both the precision and error-correction requirements of quantum simulation, and significant open questions remain about its practicality. It also means that the quantum version of analogue computers, continuous-variable quantum computers, becomes an equally efficient architecture for quantum simulation. Lessons from past use of classical analogue computers can help us to build better quantum simulators in future.

  11. Quantum computer games: quantum minesweeper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-07-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical minesweeper the goal of the game is to discover all the mines laid out on a board without triggering them, in the quantum version there are several classical boards in superposition. The goal is to know the exact quantum state, i.e. the precise layout of all the mines in all the superposed classical boards. The player can perform three types of measurement: a classical measurement that probabilistically collapses the superposition; a quantum interaction-free measurement that can detect a mine without triggering it; and an entanglement measurement that provides non-local information. The application of the concepts taught by quantum minesweeper to one-way quantum computing are also presented.

  12. Dissipative quantum computing with open quantum walks

    SciTech Connect

    Sinayskiy, Ilya; Petruccione, Francesco

    An open quantum walk approach to the implementation of a dissipative quantum computing scheme is presented. The formalism is demonstrated for the example of an open quantum walk implementation of a 3 qubit quantum circuit consisting of 10 gates.

  13. Quantum Computing since Democritus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaronson, Scott

    2013-03-01

    1. Atoms and the void; 2. Sets; 3. Gödel, Turing, and friends; 4. Minds and machines; 5. Paleocomplexity; 6. P, NP, and friends; 7. Randomness; 8. Crypto; 9. Quantum; 10. Quantum computing; 11. Penrose; 12. Decoherence and hidden variables; 13. Proofs; 14. How big are quantum states?; 15. Skepticism of quantum computing; 16. Learning; 17. Interactive proofs and more; 18. Fun with the Anthropic Principle; 19. Free will; 20. Time travel; 21. Cosmology and complexity; 22. Ask me anything.

  14. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  15. Adiabatic topological quantum computing

    DOE PAGES

    Cesare, Chris; Landahl, Andrew J.; Bacon, Dave; ...

    2015-07-31

    Topological quantum computing promises error-resistant quantum computation without active error correction. However, there is a worry that during the process of executing quantum gates by braiding anyons around each other, extra anyonic excitations will be created that will disorder the encoded quantum information. Here, we explore this question in detail by studying adiabatic code deformations on Hamiltonians based on topological codes, notably Kitaev’s surface codes and the more recently discovered color codes. We develop protocols that enable universal quantum computing by adiabatic evolution in a way that keeps the energy gap of the system constant with respect to the computationmore » size and introduces only simple local Hamiltonian interactions. This allows one to perform holonomic quantum computing with these topological quantum computing systems. The tools we develop allow one to go beyond numerical simulations and understand these processes analytically.« less

  16. Blind Quantum Signature with Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Shi, Ronghua; Guo, Ying

    2017-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client without quantum abilities to interact with a quantum server to perform a unconditional secure computing protocol, while protecting client's privacy. Motivated by confidentiality of blind quantum computation, a blind quantum signature scheme is designed with laconic structure. Different from the traditional signature schemes, the signing and verifying operations are performed through measurement-based quantum computation. Inputs of blind quantum computation are securely controlled with multi-qubit entangled states. The unique signature of the transmitted message is generated by the signer without leaking information in imperfect channels. Whereas, the receiver can verify the validity of the signature using the quantum matching algorithm. The security is guaranteed by entanglement of quantum system for blind quantum computation. It provides a potential practical application for e-commerce in the cloud computing and first-generation quantum computation.

  17. Defects in Quantum Computers

    DOE PAGES

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H.; ...

    2018-03-14

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system–the quantum Ising chain in transverse field–and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws inmore » the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. Therefore, the number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is imperfect.« less

  18. Defects in Quantum Computers

    SciTech Connect

    Gardas, Bartłomiej; Dziarmaga, Jacek; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    The shift of interest from general purpose quantum computers to adiabatic quantum computing or quantum annealing calls for a broadly applicable and easy to implement test to assess how quantum or adiabatic is a specific hardware. Here we propose such a test based on an exactly solvable many body system–the quantum Ising chain in transverse field–and implement it on the D-Wave machine. An ideal adiabatic quench of the quantum Ising chain should lead to an ordered broken symmetry ground state with all spins aligned in the same direction. An actual quench can be imperfect due to decoherence, noise, flaws inmore » the implemented Hamiltonian, or simply too fast to be adiabatic. Imperfections result in topological defects: Spins change orientation, kinks punctuating ordered sections of the chain. Therefore, the number of such defects quantifies the extent by which the quantum computer misses the ground state, and is imperfect.« less

  19. Quantum Analog Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum analog computing is based upon similarity between mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics and phenomena to be computed. It exploits a dynamical convergence of several competing phenomena to an attractor which can represent an externum of a function, an image, a solution to a system of ODE, or a stochastic process.

  20. Towards topological quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikov, D.; Mironov, A.; Mironov, S.; Morozov, A.; Morozov, An.

    2018-01-01

    Quantum R-matrices, the entangling deformations of non-entangling (classical) permutations, provide a distinguished basis in the space of unitary evolutions and, consequently, a natural choice for a minimal set of basic operations (universal gates) for quantum computation. Yet they play a special role in group theory, integrable systems and modern theory of non-perturbative calculations in quantum field and string theory. Despite recent developments in those fields the idea of topological quantum computing and use of R-matrices, in particular, practically reduce to reinterpretation of standard sets of quantum gates, and subsequently algorithms, in terms of available topological ones. In this paper we summarize a modern view on quantum R-matrix calculus and propose to look at the R-matrices acting in the space of irreducible representations, which are unitary for the real-valued couplings in Chern-Simons theory, as the fundamental set of universal gates for topological quantum computer. Such an approach calls for a more thorough investigation of the relation between topological invariants of knots and quantum algorithms.

  1. Universal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph; Kashefi, Elham

    2012-02-01

    Blind Quantum Computing (BQC) allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for them such that the client's inputs, outputs and computation remain private. Recently we proposed a universal unconditionally secure BQC scheme, based on the conceptual framework of the measurement-based quantum computing model, where the client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits in separable states randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. Here we present a refinement of the scheme which vastly expands the class of quantum circuits which can be directly implemented as a blind computation, by introducing a new class of resource states which we term dotted-complete graph states and expanding the set of single qubit states the client is required to prepare. These two modifications significantly simplify the overall protocol and remove the previously present restriction that only nearest-neighbor circuits could be implemented as blind computations directly. As an added benefit, the refined protocol admits a substantially more intuitive and simplified verification mechanism, allowing the correctness of a blind computation to be verified with arbitrarily small probability of error.

  2. Complexity Bounds for Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-22

    Programs Trustees of Boston University Boston, MA 02215 - Complexity Bounds for Quantum Computation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 18. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...Complexity Bounds for Quantum Comp[utation Report Title ABSTRACT This project focused on upper and lower bounds for quantum computability using constant...classical computation models, particularly emphasizing new examples of where quantum circuits are more powerful than their classical counterparts. A second

  3. Hybrid quantum computing with ancillas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy J.; Kendon, Viv

    2016-10-01

    In the quest to build a practical quantum computer, it is important to use efficient schemes for enacting the elementary quantum operations from which quantum computer programs are constructed. The opposing requirements of well-protected quantum data and fast quantum operations must be balanced to maintain the integrity of the quantum information throughout the computation. One important approach to quantum operations is to use an extra quantum system - an ancilla - to interact with the quantum data register. Ancillas can mediate interactions between separated quantum registers, and by using fresh ancillas for each quantum operation, data integrity can be preserved for longer. This review provides an overview of the basic concepts of the gate model quantum computer architecture, including the different possible forms of information encodings - from base two up to continuous variables - and a more detailed description of how the main types of ancilla-mediated quantum operations provide efficient quantum gates.

  4. Quantum simulations with noisy quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, Jay

    Quantum computing is a new computational paradigm that is expected to lie beyond the standard model of computation. This implies a quantum computer can solve problems that can't be solved by a conventional computer with tractable overhead. To fully harness this power we need a universal fault-tolerant quantum computer. However the overhead in building such a machine is high and a full solution appears to be many years away. Nevertheless, we believe that we can build machines in the near term that cannot be emulated by a conventional computer. It is then interesting to ask what these can be used for. In this talk we will present our advances in simulating complex quantum systems with noisy quantum computers. We will show experimental implementations of this on some small quantum computers.

  5. Quantum Statistical Mechanics on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raedt, H. D.; Hams, A. H.; Michielsen, K.; Miyashita, S.; Saito, K.

    We describe a quantum algorithm to compute the density of states and thermal equilibrium properties of quantum many-body systems. We present results obtained by running this algorithm on a software implementation of a 21-qubit quantum computer for the case of an antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model on triangular lattices of different size.

  6. Ion Trap Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    quantum computer architecture schemes, but there are several problems that will be discussed later. 15 IV. ION TRAPS Wolfgang Paul was the first...famous physics experiment [62]. Wolfgang Paul demonstrated a similar apparatus during his Nobel Prize speech [63]. This device is hyperbolic-parabolic...Although it does not apply to linear traps, it is useful to understand the interaction between the Coulomb force and the repulsive quantum-mechanical Pauli

  7. Quantum Computing Architectural Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Jacob; Simms, Geoffrey; Gyure, Mark

    2006-03-01

    Large scale quantum computers will invariably require scalable architectures in addition to high fidelity gate operations. Quantum computing architectural design (QCAD) addresses the problems of actually implementing fault-tolerant algorithms given physical and architectural constraints beyond those of basic gate-level fidelity. Here we introduce a unified framework for QCAD that enables the scientist to study the impact of varying error correction schemes, architectural parameters including layout and scheduling, and physical operations native to a given architecture. Our software package, aptly named QCAD, provides compilation, manipulation/transformation, multi-paradigm simulation, and visualization tools. We demonstrate various features of the QCAD software package through several examples.

  8. Abstract quantum computing machines and quantum computational logics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiara, Maria Luisa Dalla; Giuntini, Roberto; Sergioli, Giuseppe; Leporini, Roberto

    2016-06-01

    Classical and quantum parallelism are deeply different, although it is sometimes claimed that quantum Turing machines are nothing but special examples of classical probabilistic machines. We introduce the concepts of deterministic state machine, classical probabilistic state machine and quantum state machine. On this basis, we discuss the question: To what extent can quantum state machines be simulated by classical probabilistic state machines? Each state machine is devoted to a single task determined by its program. Real computers, however, behave differently, being able to solve different kinds of problems. This capacity can be modeled, in the quantum case, by the mathematical notion of abstract quantum computing machine, whose different programs determine different quantum state machines. The computations of abstract quantum computing machines can be linguistically described by the formulas of a particular form of quantum logic, termed quantum computational logic.

  9. Adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Adiabatic quantum computing (AQC) started as an approach to solving optimization problems and has evolved into an important universal alternative to the standard circuit model of quantum computing, with deep connections to both classical and quantum complexity theory and condensed matter physics. This review gives an account of the major theoretical developments in the field, while focusing on the closed-system setting. The review is organized around a series of topics that are essential to an understanding of the underlying principles of AQC, its algorithmic accomplishments and limitations, and its scope in the more general setting of computational complexity theory. Several variants are presented of the adiabatic theorem, the cornerstone of AQC, and examples are given of explicit AQC algorithms that exhibit a quantum speedup. An overview of several proofs of the universality of AQC and related Hamiltonian quantum complexity theory is given. Considerable space is devoted to stoquastic AQC, the setting of most AQC work to date, where obstructions to success and their possible resolutions are discussed.

  10. Demonstration of blind quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph F; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-01-20

    Quantum computers, besides offering substantial computational speedups, are also expected to preserve the privacy of a computation. We present an experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing in which the input, computation, and output all remain unknown to the computer. We exploit the conceptual framework of measurement-based quantum computation that enables a client to delegate a computation to a quantum server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms, are demonstrated. The client only needs to be able to prepare and transmit individual photonic qubits. Our demonstration is crucial for unconditionally secure quantum cloud computing and might become a key ingredient for real-life applications, especially when considering the challenges of making powerful quantum computers widely available.

  11. Undergraduate computational physics projects on quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Candela, D.

    2015-08-01

    Computational projects on quantum computing suitable for students in a junior-level quantum mechanics course are described. In these projects students write their own programs to simulate quantum computers. Knowledge is assumed of introductory quantum mechanics through the properties of spin 1/2. Initial, more easily programmed projects treat the basics of quantum computation, quantum gates, and Grover's quantum search algorithm. These are followed by more advanced projects to increase the number of qubits and implement Shor's quantum factoring algorithm. The projects can be run on a typical laptop or desktop computer, using most programming languages. Supplementing resources available elsewhere, the projects are presented here in a self-contained format especially suitable for a short computational module for physics students.

  12. Quantum computers: Definition and implementations

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Delgado, Carlos A.; Kok, Pieter

    The DiVincenzo criteria for implementing a quantum computer have been seminal in focusing both experimental and theoretical research in quantum-information processing. These criteria were formulated specifically for the circuit model of quantum computing. However, several new models for quantum computing (paradigms) have been proposed that do not seem to fit the criteria well. Therefore, the question is what are the general criteria for implementing quantum computers. To this end, a formal operational definition of a quantum computer is introduced. It is then shown that, according to this definition, a device is a quantum computer if it obeys the following criteria:more » Any quantum computer must consist of a quantum memory, with an additional structure that (1) facilitates a controlled quantum evolution of the quantum memory; (2) includes a method for information theoretic cooling of the memory; and (3) provides a readout mechanism for subsets of the quantum memory. The criteria are met when the device is scalable and operates fault tolerantly. We discuss various existing quantum computing paradigms and how they fit within this framework. Finally, we present a decision tree for selecting an avenue toward building a quantum computer. This is intended to help experimentalists determine the most natural paradigm given a particular physical implementation.« less

  13. Quantum Walk Schemes for Universal Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael S.

    Random walks are a powerful tool for the efficient implementation of algorithms in classical computation. Their quantum-mechanical analogues, called quantum walks, hold similar promise. Quantum walks provide a model of quantum computation that has recently been shown to be equivalent in power to the standard circuit model. As in the classical case, quantum walks take place on graphs and can undergo discrete or continuous evolution, though quantum evolution is unitary and therefore deterministic until a measurement is made. This thesis considers the usefulness of continuous-time quantum walks to quantum computation from the perspectives of both their fundamental power under various formulations, and their applicability in practical experiments. In one extant scheme, logical gates are effected by scattering processes. The results of an exhaustive search for single-qubit operations in this model are presented. It is shown that the number of distinct operations increases exponentially with the number of vertices in the scattering graph. A catalogue of all graphs on up to nine vertices that implement single-qubit unitaries at a specific set of momenta is included in an appendix. I develop a novel scheme for universal quantum computation called the discontinuous quantum walk, in which a continuous-time quantum walker takes discrete steps of evolution via perfect quantum state transfer through small 'widget' graphs. The discontinuous quantum-walk scheme requires an exponentially sized graph, as do prior discrete and continuous schemes. To eliminate the inefficient vertex resource requirement, a computation scheme based on multiple discontinuous walkers is presented. In this model, n interacting walkers inhabiting a graph with 2n vertices can implement an arbitrary quantum computation on an input of length n, an exponential savings over previous universal quantum walk schemes. This is the first quantum walk scheme that allows for the application of quantum error correction

  14. Geometrizing adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezakhani, Ali; Kuo, Wan-Jung; Hamma, Alioscia; Lidar, Daniel; Zanardi, Paolo

    2010-03-01

    A time-optimal approach to adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) is formulated. The corresponding natural Riemannian metric is also derived, through which AQC can be understood as the problem of finding a geodesic on the manifold of control parameters. We demonstrate this geometrization through some examples, where we show that it leads to improved performance of AQC, and sheds light on the roles of entanglement and curvature of the control manifold in algorithmic performance. The underlying connection with quantum phase transitions is also explored.

  15. [Interactions of DNA bases with individual water molecules. Molecular mechanics and quantum mechanics computation results vs. experimental data].

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, E; Lino, J; Deriabina, A; Herrera, J N F; Poltev, V I

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate details of the DNA-water interactions we performed the calculations and systemaitic search for minima of interaction energy of the systems consisting of one of DNA bases and one or two water molecules. The results of calculations using two force fields of molecular mechanics (MM) and correlated ab initio method MP2/6-31G(d, p) of quantum mechanics (QM) have been compared with one another and with experimental data. The calculations demonstrated a qualitative agreement between geometry characteristics of the most of local energy minima obtained via different methods. The deepest minima revealed by MM and QM methods correspond to water molecule position between two neighbor hydrophilic centers of the base and to the formation by water molecule of hydrogen bonds with them. Nevertheless, the relative depth of some minima and peculiarities of mutual water-base positions in' these minima depend on the method used. The analysis revealed insignificance of some differences in the results of calculations performed via different methods and the importance of other ones for the description of DNA hydration. The calculations via MM methods enable us to reproduce quantitatively all the experimental data on the enthalpies of complex formation of single water molecule with the set of mono-, di-, and trimethylated bases, as well as on water molecule locations near base hydrophilic atoms in the crystals of DNA duplex fragments, while some of these data cannot be rationalized by QM calculations.

  16. Towards a Quantum Computer?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellac, Michel Le

    2014-11-01

    In everyday life, practically all the information which is processed, exchanged or stored is coded in the form of discrete entities called bits, which take two values only, by convention 0 and 1. With the present technology for computers and optical fibers, bits are carried by electrical currents and electromagnetic waves corresponding to macroscopic fluxes of electrons and photons, and they are stored in memories of various kinds, for example, magnetic memories. Although quantum physics is the basic physics which underlies the operation of a transistor (Chapter 6) or of a laser (Chapter 4), each exchanged or processed bit corresponds to a large number of elementary quantum systems, and its behavior can be described classically due to the strong interaction with the environment (Chapter 9). For about thirty years, physicists have learned to manipulate with great accuracy individual quantum systems: photons, electrons, neutrons, atoms, and so forth, which opens the way to using two-state quantum systems, such as the polarization states of a photon (Chapter 2) or the two energy levels of an atom or an ion (Chapter 4) in order to process, exchange or store information. In § 2.3.2, we used the two polarization states of a photon, vertical (V) and horizontal (H), to represent the values 0 and 1 of a bit and to exchange information. In what follows, it will be convenient to use Dirac's notation (see Appendix A.2.2 for more details), where a vertical polarization state is denoted by |V> or |0> and a horizontal one by |H> or |1>, while a state with arbitrary polarization will be denoted by |ψ>. The polarization states of a photon give one possible realization of a quantum bit, or for short a qubit. Thanks to the properties of quantum physics, quantum computers using qubits, if they ever exist, would outperform classical computers for some specific, but very important, problems. In Sections 8.1 and 8.2, we describe some typical quantum algorithms and, in order to do so

  17. Quantum computing on encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, K. A. G.; Broadbent, A.; Shalm, L. K.; Yan, Z.; Lavoie, J.; Prevedel, R.; Jennewein, T.; Resch, K. J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  18. Quantum computing on encrypted data.

    PubMed

    Fisher, K A G; Broadbent, A; Shalm, L K; Yan, Z; Lavoie, J; Prevedel, R; Jennewein, T; Resch, K J

    2014-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting privacy. Recently, protocols to achieve this on classical computing systems have been found. Here, we present an efficient solution to the quantum analogue of this problem that enables arbitrary quantum computations to be carried out on encrypted quantum data. We prove that an untrusted server can implement a universal set of quantum gates on encrypted quantum bits (qubits) without learning any information about the inputs, while the client, knowing the decryption key, can easily decrypt the results of the computation. We experimentally demonstrate, using single photons and linear optics, the encryption and decryption scheme on a set of gates sufficient for arbitrary quantum computations. As our protocol requires few extra resources compared with other schemes it can be easily incorporated into the design of future quantum servers. These results will play a key role in enabling the development of secure distributed quantum systems.

  19. Decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albash, Tameem; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experiments with increasingly larger numbers of qubits have sparked renewed interest in adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular quantum annealing. A central question that is repeatedly asked is whether quantum features of the evolution can survive over the long time scales used for quantum annealing relative to standard measures of the decoherence time. We reconsider the role of decoherence in adiabatic quantum computation and quantum annealing using the adiabatic quantum master-equation formalism. We restrict ourselves to the weak-coupling and singular-coupling limits, which correspond to decoherence in the energy eigenbasis and in the computational basis, respectively. We demonstrate that decoherence in the instantaneous energy eigenbasis does not necessarily detrimentally affect adiabatic quantum computation, and in particular that a short single-qubit T2 time need not imply adverse consequences for the success of the quantum adiabatic algorithm. We further demonstrate that boundary cancellation methods, designed to improve the fidelity of adiabatic quantum computing in the closed-system setting, remain beneficial in the open-system setting. To address the high computational cost of master-equation simulations, we also demonstrate that a quantum Monte Carlo algorithm that explicitly accounts for a thermal bosonic bath can be used to interpolate between classical and quantum annealing. Our study highlights and clarifies the significantly different role played by decoherence in the adiabatic and circuit models of quantum computing.

  20. Quantum computing with defects.

    PubMed

    Weber, J R; Koehl, W F; Varley, J B; Janotti, A; Buckley, B B; Van de Walle, C G; Awschalom, D D

    2010-05-11

    Identifying and designing physical systems for use as qubits, the basic units of quantum information, are critical steps in the development of a quantum computer. Among the possibilities in the solid state, a defect in diamond known as the nitrogen-vacancy (NV(-1)) center stands out for its robustness--its quantum state can be initialized, manipulated, and measured with high fidelity at room temperature. Here we describe how to systematically identify other deep center defects with similar quantum-mechanical properties. We present a list of physical criteria that these centers and their hosts should meet and explain how these requirements can be used in conjunction with electronic structure theory to intelligently sort through candidate defect systems. To illustrate these points in detail, we compare electronic structure calculations of the NV(-1) center in diamond with those of several deep centers in 4H silicon carbide (SiC). We then discuss the proposed criteria for similar defects in other tetrahedrally coordinated semiconductors.

  1. Open Quantum Walks and Dissipative Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petruccione, Francesco

    2012-02-01

    Open Quantum Walks (OQWs) have been recently introduced as quantum Markov chains on graphs [S. Attal, F. Petruccione, C. Sabot, and I. Sinayskiy, E-print: http://hal.archives-ouvertes.fr/hal-00581553/fr/]. The formulation of the OQWs is exclusively based upon the non-unitary dynamics induced by the environment. It will be shown that OQWs are a very useful tool for the formulation of dissipative quantum computing and quantum state preparation. In particular, it will be shown how to implement single qubit gates and the CNOT gate as OQWs on fully connected graphs. Also, OQWS make possible the dissipative quantum state preparation of arbitrary single qubit states and of all two-qubit Bell states. Finally, it will be shown how to reformulate efficiently a discrete time version of dissipative quantum computing in the language of OQWs.

  2. QPSO-Based Adaptive DNA Computing Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Karakose, Mehmet; Cigdem, Ugur

    2013-01-01

    DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) computing that is a new computation model based on DNA molecules for information storage has been increasingly used for optimization and data analysis in recent years. However, DNA computing algorithm has some limitations in terms of convergence speed, adaptability, and effectiveness. In this paper, a new approach for improvement of DNA computing is proposed. This new approach aims to perform DNA computing algorithm with adaptive parameters towards the desired goal using quantum-behaved particle swarm optimization (QPSO). Some contributions provided by the proposed QPSO based on adaptive DNA computing algorithm are as follows: (1) parameters of population size, crossover rate, maximum number of operations, enzyme and virus mutation rate, and fitness function of DNA computing algorithm are simultaneously tuned for adaptive process, (2) adaptive algorithm is performed using QPSO algorithm for goal-driven progress, faster operation, and flexibility in data, and (3) numerical realization of DNA computing algorithm with proposed approach is implemented in system identification. Two experiments with different systems were carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach with comparative results. Experimental results obtained with Matlab and FPGA demonstrate ability to provide effective optimization, considerable convergence speed, and high accuracy according to DNA computing algorithm. PMID:23935409

  3. Interfacing External Quantum Devices to a Universal Quantum Computer

    PubMed Central

    Lagana, Antonio A.; Lohe, Max A.; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. PMID:22216276

  4. Interfacing external quantum devices to a universal quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lagana, Antonio A; Lohe, Max A; von Smekal, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    We present a scheme to use external quantum devices using the universal quantum computer previously constructed. We thereby show how the universal quantum computer can utilize networked quantum information resources to carry out local computations. Such information may come from specialized quantum devices or even from remote universal quantum computers. We show how to accomplish this by devising universal quantum computer programs that implement well known oracle based quantum algorithms, namely the Deutsch, Deutsch-Jozsa, and the Grover algorithms using external black-box quantum oracle devices. In the process, we demonstrate a method to map existing quantum algorithms onto the universal quantum computer. © 2011 Lagana et al.

  5. Quantum Computing and Second Quantization

    DOE PAGES

    Makaruk, Hanna Ewa

    2017-02-10

    Quantum computers are by their nature many particle quantum systems. Both the many-particle arrangement and being quantum are necessary for the existence of the entangled states, which are responsible for the parallelism of the quantum computers. Second quantization is a very important approximate method of describing such systems. This lecture will present the general idea of the second quantization, and discuss shortly some of the most important formulations of second quantization.

  6. Quantum Computing and Second Quantization

    SciTech Connect

    Makaruk, Hanna Ewa

    Quantum computers are by their nature many particle quantum systems. Both the many-particle arrangement and being quantum are necessary for the existence of the entangled states, which are responsible for the parallelism of the quantum computers. Second quantization is a very important approximate method of describing such systems. This lecture will present the general idea of the second quantization, and discuss shortly some of the most important formulations of second quantization.

  7. Towards quantum chemistry on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Whitfield, J D; Gillett, G G; Goggin, M E; Almeida, M P; Kassal, I; Biamonte, J D; Mohseni, M; Powell, B J; Barbieri, M; Aspuru-Guzik, A; White, A G

    2010-02-01

    Exact first-principles calculations of molecular properties are currently intractable because their computational cost grows exponentially with both the number of atoms and basis set size. A solution is to move to a radically different model of computing by building a quantum computer, which is a device that uses quantum systems themselves to store and process data. Here we report the application of the latest photonic quantum computer technology to calculate properties of the smallest molecular system: the hydrogen molecule in a minimal basis. We calculate the complete energy spectrum to 20 bits of precision and discuss how the technique can be expanded to solve large-scale chemical problems that lie beyond the reach of modern supercomputers. These results represent an early practical step toward a powerful tool with a broad range of quantum-chemical applications.

  8. Intermediate quantum maps for quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraud, O.; Georgeot, B.

    2005-10-01

    We study quantum maps displaying spectral statistics intermediate between Poisson and Wigner-Dyson. It is shown that they can be simulated on a quantum computer with a small number of gates, and efficiently yield information about fidelity decay or spectral statistics. We study their matrix elements and entanglement production and show that they converge with time to distributions which differ from random matrix predictions. A randomized version of these maps can be implemented even more economically and yields pseudorandom operators with original properties, enabling, for example, one to produce fractal random vectors. These algorithms are within reach of present-day quantum computers.

  9. Quantum Nash Equilibria and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fellman, Philip Vos; Post, Jonathan Vos

    In 2004, At the Fifth International Conference on Complex Systems, we drew attention to some remarkable findings by researchers at the Santa Fe Institute (Sato, Farmer and Akiyama, 2001) about hitherto unsuspected complexity in the Nash Equilibrium. As we progressed from these findings about heteroclinic Hamiltonians and chaotic transients hidden within the learning patterns of the simple rock-paper-scissors game to some related findings on the theory of quantum computing, one of the arguments we put forward was just as in the late 1990's a number of new Nash equilibria were discovered in simple bi-matrix games (Shubik and Quint, 1996; Von Stengel, 1997, 2000; and McLennan and Park, 1999) we would begin to see new Nash equilibria discovered as the result of quantum computation. While actual quantum computers remain rather primitive (Toibman, 2004), and the theory of quantum computation seems to be advancing perhaps a bit more slowly than originally expected, there have, nonetheless, been a number of advances in computation and some more radical advances in an allied field, quantum game theory (Huberman and Hogg, 2004) which are quite significant. In the course of this paper we will review a few of these discoveries and illustrate some of the characteristics of these new "Quantum Nash Equilibria". The full text of this research can be found at http://necsi.org/events/iccs6/viewpaper.php?id-234

  10. Visualizing a silicon quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Barry C.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.; Edmundson, Darran; Edmundson, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    Quantum computation is a fast-growing, multi-disciplinary research field. The purpose of a quantum computer is to execute quantum algorithms that efficiently solve computational problems intractable within the existing paradigm of 'classical' computing built on bits and Boolean gates. While collaboration between computer scientists, physicists, chemists, engineers, mathematicians and others is essential to the project's success, traditional disciplinary boundaries can hinder progress and make communicating the aims of quantum computing and future technologies difficult. We have developed a four minute animation as a tool for representing, understanding and communicating a silicon-based solid-state quantum computer to a variety of audiences, either as a stand-alone animation to be used by expert presenters or embedded into a longer movie as short animated sequences. The paper includes a generally applicable recipe for successful scientific animation production.

  11. Simulating chemistry using quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Kassal, Ivan; Whitfield, James D; Perdomo-Ortiz, Alejandro; Yung, Man-Hong; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2011-01-01

    The difficulty of simulating quantum systems, well known to quantum chemists, prompted the idea of quantum computation. One can avoid the steep scaling associated with the exact simulation of increasingly large quantum systems on conventional computers, by mapping the quantum system to another, more controllable one. In this review, we discuss to what extent the ideas in quantum computation, now a well-established field, have been applied to chemical problems. We describe algorithms that achieve significant advantages for the electronic-structure problem, the simulation of chemical dynamics, protein folding, and other tasks. Although theory is still ahead of experiment, we outline recent advances that have led to the first chemical calculations on small quantum information processors.

  12. Biologically important conformational features of DNA as interpreted by quantum mechanics and molecular mechanics computations of its simple fragments.

    PubMed

    Poltev, V; Anisimov, V M; Dominguez, V; Gonzalez, E; Deriabina, A; Garcia, D; Rivas, F; Polteva, N A

    2018-02-01

    Deciphering the mechanism of functioning of DNA as the carrier of genetic information requires identifying inherent factors determining its structure and function. Following this path, our previous DFT studies attributed the origin of unique conformational characteristics of right-handed Watson-Crick duplexes (WCDs) to the conformational profile of deoxydinucleoside monophosphates (dDMPs) serving as the minimal repeating units of DNA strand. According to those findings, the directionality of the sugar-phosphate chain and the characteristic ranges of dihedral angles of energy minima combined with the geometric differences between purines and pyrimidines determine the dependence on base sequence of the three-dimensional (3D) structure of WCDs. This work extends our computational study to complementary deoxydinucleotide-monophosphates (cdDMPs) of non-standard conformation, including those of Z-family, Hoogsteen duplexes, parallel-stranded structures, and duplexes with mispaired bases. For most of these systems, except Z-conformation, computations closely reproduce experimental data within the tolerance of characteristic limits of dihedral parameters for each conformation family. Computation of cdDMPs with Z-conformation reveals that their experimental structures do not correspond to the internal energy minimum. This finding establishes the leading role of external factors in formation of the Z-conformation. Energy minima of cdDMPs of non-Watson-Crick duplexes demonstrate different sequence-dependence features than those known for WCDs. The obtained results provide evidence that the biologically important regularities of 3D structure distinguish WCDs from duplexes having non-Watson-Crick nucleotide pairing.

  13. Counterfactual quantum computation through quantum interrogation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosten, Onur; Rakher, Matthew T.; Barreiro, Julio T.; Peters, Nicholas A.; Kwiat, Paul G.

    2006-02-01

    The logic underlying the coherent nature of quantum information processing often deviates from intuitive reasoning, leading to surprising effects. Counterfactual computation constitutes a striking example: the potential outcome of a quantum computation can be inferred, even if the computer is not run. Relying on similar arguments to interaction-free measurements (or quantum interrogation), counterfactual computation is accomplished by putting the computer in a superposition of `running' and `not running' states, and then interfering the two histories. Conditional on the as-yet-unknown outcome of the computation, it is sometimes possible to counterfactually infer information about the solution. Here we demonstrate counterfactual computation, implementing Grover's search algorithm with an all-optical approach. It was believed that the overall probability of such counterfactual inference is intrinsically limited, so that it could not perform better on average than random guesses. However, using a novel `chained' version of the quantum Zeno effect, we show how to boost the counterfactual inference probability to unity, thereby beating the random guessing limit. Our methods are general and apply to any physical system, as illustrated by a discussion of trapped-ion systems. Finally, we briefly show that, in certain circumstances, counterfactual computation can eliminate errors induced by decoherence.

  14. Quantum Computing: Solving Complex Problems

    ScienceCinema

    DiVincenzo, David

    2018-05-22

    One of the motivating ideas of quantum computation was that there could be a new kind of machine that would solve hard problems in quantum mechanics. There has been significant progress towards the experimental realization of these machines (which I will review), but there are still many questions about how such a machine could solve computational problems of interest in quantum physics. New categorizations of the complexity of computational problems have now been invented to describe quantum simulation. The bad news is that some of these problems are believed to be intractable even on a quantum computer, falling into a quantum analog of the NP class. The good news is that there are many other new classifications of tractability that may apply to several situations of physical interest.

  15. Models of optical quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krovi, Hari

    2017-03-01

    I review some work on models of quantum computing, optical implementations of these models, as well as the associated computational power. In particular, we discuss the circuit model and cluster state implementations using quantum optics with various encodings such as dual rail encoding, Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding, and coherent state encoding. Then we discuss intermediate models of optical computing such as boson sampling and its variants. Finally, we review some recent work in optical implementations of adiabatic quantum computing and analog optical computing. We also provide a brief description of the relevant aspects from complexity theory needed to understand the results surveyed.

  16. Quasicrystals and Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    1997-03-01

    In Quantum (Q) Computing qubits form Q-superpositions for macroscopic times. One scheme for ultra-fast (Q) computing can be based on quasicrystals. Ultrafast processing in Q-coherent structures (and the very existence of durable Q-superpositions) may be 'consequence' of presence of entire manifold of integer arithmetic (A0, aleph-naught of Georg Cantor) at any 4-point of space-time, furthermore, at any point of any multidimensional phase space of (any) N-particle Q-system. The latter, apart from quasicrystals, can include dispersed and/or diluted systems (Berezin, 1994). In such systems such alleged centrepieces of Q-Computing as ability for fast factorization of long integers can be processed by sheer virtue of the fact that entire infinite pattern of prime numbers is instantaneously available as 'free lunch' at any instant/point. Infinitely rich pattern of A0 (including pattern of primes and almost primes) acts as 'independent' physical effect which directly generates Q-dynamics (and physical world) 'out of nothing'. Thus Q-nonlocality can be ultimately based on instantaneous interconnectedness through ever- the-same structure of A0 ('Platonic field' of integers).

  17. Efficient universal blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Giovannetti, Vittorio; Maccone, Lorenzo; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Rudolph, Terry G

    2013-12-06

    We give a cheat sensitive protocol for blind universal quantum computation that is efficient in terms of computational and communication resources: it allows one party to perform an arbitrary computation on a second party's quantum computer without revealing either which computation is performed, or its input and output. The first party's computational capabilities can be extremely limited: she must only be able to create and measure single-qubit superposition states. The second party is not required to use measurement-based quantum computation. The protocol requires the (optimal) exchange of O(Jlog2(N)) single-qubit states, where J is the computational depth and N is the number of qubits needed for the computation.

  18. Toward a superconducting quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers. PMID:20431256

  19. Quantum Optical Implementations of Quantum Computing and Quantum Informatics Protocols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-20

    4, 2005. ) 14. M. 0. Scully, "The EPR Paradox Revisted", AMO Physics Seminar, TAMU Jan. 18, 2005. 15. M. S. Zubairy, "Quantum computing: Cavity QED...the EPR dispersion relation and the average photon number. We have shown that atomic coherence is the key to the development of such a laser. In...PRISM-TAMU Symposium on Quantum Material Science, Princeton University, February 21-22, 2005. ) 21. M. 0. Scully, "From EPR to quantum eraser: The Role

  20. Universal blind quantum computation for hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Bao, Wan-Su; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Zhang, Hai-Long; Wang, Xiang

    2017-08-01

    As progress on the development of building quantum computer continues to advance, first-generation practical quantum computers will be available for ordinary users in the cloud style similar to IBM's Quantum Experience nowadays. Clients can remotely access the quantum servers using some simple devices. In such a situation, it is of prime importance to keep the security of the client's information. Blind quantum computation protocols enable a client with limited quantum technology to delegate her quantum computation to a quantum server without leaking any privacy. To date, blind quantum computation has been considered only for an individual quantum system. However, practical universal quantum computer is likely to be a hybrid system. Here, we take the first step to construct a framework of blind quantum computation for the hybrid system, which provides a more feasible way for scalable blind quantum computation.

  1. Experimental quantum computing without entanglement.

    PubMed

    Lanyon, B P; Barbieri, M; Almeida, M P; White, A G

    2008-11-14

    Deterministic quantum computation with one pure qubit (DQC1) is an efficient model of computation that uses highly mixed states. Unlike pure-state models, its power is not derived from the generation of a large amount of entanglement. Instead it has been proposed that other nonclassical correlations are responsible for the computational speedup, and that these can be captured by the quantum discord. In this Letter we implement DQC1 in an all-optical architecture, and experimentally observe the generated correlations. We find no entanglement, but large amounts of quantum discord-except in three cases where an efficient classical simulation is always possible. Our results show that even fully separable, highly mixed, states can contain intrinsically quantum mechanical correlations and that these could offer a valuable resource for quantum information technologies.

  2. Advanced Materials for Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-28

    with Magnons co-PI: Leszek Malkinski w/ Postdoc Dr. Seong-Gi Min Project Name: Quantum Computing with Magnons 1. Brief Narrative: Quanta of...spinwaves called magnons can be used to exchange quantum information between solid state qubits. The project was driven by the concept of spiwave bus

  3. Complex Instruction Set Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, G. D.; Kim, K. W.; Holton, W. C.

    1998-03-01

    In proposed quantum computers, electromagnetic pulses are used to implement logic gates on quantum bits (qubits). Gates are unitary transformations applied to coherent qubit wavefunctions and a universal computer can be created using a minimal set of gates. By applying many elementary gates in sequence, desired quantum computations can be performed. This reduced instruction set approach to quantum computing (RISC QC) is characterized by serial application of a few basic pulse shapes and a long coherence time. However, the unitary matrix of the overall computation is ultimately a unitary matrix of the same size as any of the elementary matrices. This suggests that we might replace a sequence of reduced instructions with a single complex instruction using an optimally taylored pulse. We refer to this approach as complex instruction set quantum computing (CISC QC). One trades the requirement for long coherence times for the ability to design and generate potentially more complex pulses. We consider a model system of coupled qubits interacting through nearest neighbor coupling and show that CISC QC can reduce the time required to perform quantum computations.

  4. Single-server blind quantum computation with quantum circuit model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Weng, Jian; Li, Xiaochun; Luo, Weiqi; Tan, Xiaoqing; Song, Tingting

    2018-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) enables the client, who has few quantum technologies, to delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has strong quantum computabilities and learns nothing about the client's quantum inputs, outputs and algorithms. In this article, we propose a single-server BQC protocol with quantum circuit model by replacing any quantum gate with the combination of rotation operators. The trap quantum circuits are introduced, together with the combination of rotation operators, such that the server is unknown about quantum algorithms. The client only needs to perform operations X and Z, while the server honestly performs rotation operators.

  5. Quantum Spin Glasses, Annealing and Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Bikas K.; Inoue, Jun-ichi; Tamura, Ryo; Tanaka, Shu

    2017-05-01

    List of tables; List of figures, Preface; 1. Introduction; Part I. Quantum Spin Glass, Annealing and Computation: 2. Classical spin models from ferromagnetic spin systems to spin glasses; 3. Simulated annealing; 4. Quantum spin glass; 5. Quantum dynamics; 6. Quantum annealing; Part II. Additional Notes: 7. Notes on adiabatic quantum computers; 8. Quantum information and quenching dynamics; 9. A brief historical note on the studies of quantum glass, annealing and computation.

  6. Quantum Computation of Fluid Dynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-02-16

    state of the quantum computer’s "memory". With N qubits, the quantum state IT) resides in an exponentially large Hilbert space with 2 N dimensions. A new...size of the Hilbert space in which the entanglement occurs. And to make matters worse, even if a quantum computer was constructed with a large number of...number of qubits "* 2 N is the size of the full Hilbert space "* 2 B is the size of the on-site submanifold, denoted 71 "* B is the size of the

  7. Computational Multiqubit Tunnelling in Programmable Quantum Annealers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-25

    ARTICLE Received 3 Jun 2015 | Accepted 26 Nov 2015 | Published 7 Jan 2016 Computational multiqubit tunnelling in programmable quantum annealers...state itself. Quantum tunnelling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization in quantum annealing. However, computational ...qubit tunnelling plays a computational role in a currently available programmable quantum annealer. We devise a probe for tunnelling, a computational

  8. Computation and Dynamics: Classical and Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisil, Vladimir V.

    2010-05-01

    We discuss classical and quantum computations in terms of corresponding Hamiltonian dynamics. This allows us to introduce quantum computations which involve parallel processing of both: the data and programme instructions. Using mixed quantum-classical dynamics we look for a full cost of computations on quantum computers with classical terminals.

  9. Interferometric Computation Beyond Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garner, Andrew J. P.

    2018-03-01

    There are quantum solutions for computational problems that make use of interference at some stage in the algorithm. These stages can be mapped into the physical setting of a single particle travelling through a many-armed interferometer. There has been recent foundational interest in theories beyond quantum theory. Here, we present a generalized formulation of computation in the context of a many-armed interferometer, and explore how theories can differ from quantum theory and still perform distributed calculations in this set-up. We shall see that quaternionic quantum theory proves a suitable candidate, whereas box-world does not. We also find that a classical hidden variable model first presented by Spekkens (Phys Rev A 75(3): 32100, 2007) can also be used for this type of computation due to the epistemic restriction placed on the hidden variable.

  10. Massively parallel quantum computer simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Raedt, K.; Michielsen, K.; De Raedt, H.; Trieu, B.; Arnold, G.; Richter, M.; Lippert, Th.; Watanabe, H.; Ito, N.

    2007-01-01

    We describe portable software to simulate universal quantum computers on massive parallel computers. We illustrate the use of the simulation software by running various quantum algorithms on different computer architectures, such as a IBM BlueGene/L, a IBM Regatta p690+, a Hitachi SR11000/J1, a Cray X1E, a SGI Altix 3700 and clusters of PCs running Windows XP. We study the performance of the software by simulating quantum computers containing up to 36 qubits, using up to 4096 processors and up to 1 TB of memory. Our results demonstrate that the simulator exhibits nearly ideal scaling as a function of the number of processors and suggest that the simulation software described in this paper may also serve as benchmark for testing high-end parallel computers.

  11. Research progress on quantum informatics and quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yusheng

    2018-03-01

    Quantum informatics is an emerging interdisciplinary subject developed by the combination of quantum mechanics, information science, and computer science in the 1980s. The birth and development of quantum information science has far-reaching significance in science and technology. At present, the application of quantum information technology has become the direction of people’s efforts. The preparation, storage, purification and regulation, transmission, quantum coding and decoding of quantum state have become the hotspot of scientists and technicians, which have a profound impact on the national economy and the people’s livelihood, technology and defense technology. This paper first summarizes the background of quantum information science and quantum computer and the current situation of domestic and foreign research, and then introduces the basic knowledge and basic concepts of quantum computing. Finally, several quantum algorithms are introduced in detail, including Quantum Fourier transform, Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm, Shor’s quantum algorithm, quantum phase estimation.

  12. Some foundational aspects of quantum computers and quantum robots.

    SciTech Connect

    Benioff, P.; Physics

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses foundational issues related to quantum computing. The need for a universally valid theory such as quantum mechanics to describe to some extent its own validation is noted. This includes quantum mechanical descriptions of systems that do theoretical calculations (i.e. quantum computers) and systems that perform experiments. Quantum robots interacting with an environment are a small first step in this direction. Quantum robots are described here as mobile quantum systems with on-board quantum computers that interact with environments. Included are discussions on the carrying out of tasks and the division of tasks into computation and action phases. Specificmore » models based on quantum Turing machines are described. Differences and similarities between quantum robots plus environments and quantum computers are discussed.« less

  13. Quantum computation for solving linear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yudong

    Quantum computation is a subject born out of the combination between physics and computer science. It studies how the laws of quantum mechanics can be exploited to perform computations much more efficiently than current computers (termed classical computers as oppose to quantum computers). The thesis starts by introducing ideas from quantum physics and theoretical computer science and based on these ideas, introducing the basic concepts in quantum computing. These introductory discussions are intended for non-specialists to obtain the essential knowledge needed for understanding the new results presented in the subsequent chapters. After introducing the basics of quantum computing, we focus on the recently proposed quantum algorithm for linear systems. The new results include i) special instances of quantum circuits that can be implemented using current experimental resources; ii) detailed quantum algorithms that are suitable for a broader class of linear systems. We show that for some particular problems the quantum algorithm is able to achieve exponential speedup over their classical counterparts.

  14. Computing on quantum shared secrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Yingkai; Tan, Si-Hui; Zhao, Liming; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-11-01

    A (k ,n )-threshold secret-sharing scheme allows for a string to be split into n shares in such a way that any subset of at least k shares suffices to recover the secret string, but such that any subset of at most k -1 shares contains no information about the secret. Quantum secret-sharing schemes extend this idea to the sharing of quantum states. Here we propose a method of performing computation securely on quantum shared secrets. We introduce a (n ,n )-quantum secret sharing scheme together with a set of algorithms that allow quantum circuits to be evaluated securely on the shared secret without the need to decode the secret. We consider a multipartite setting, with each participant holding a share of the secret. We show that if there exists at least one honest participant, no group of dishonest participants can recover any information about the shared secret, independent of their deviations from the algorithm.

  15. Quantum entanglement and quantum information in biological systems (DNA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubač, Ivan; Švec, Miloslav; Wilson, Stephen

    2017-12-01

    Recent studies of DNA show that the hydrogen bonds between given base pairs can be treated as diabatic systems with spin-orbit coupling. For solid state systems strong diabaticity and spin-orbit coupling the possibility of forming Majorana fermions has been discussed. We analyze the hydrogen bonds in the base pairs in DNA from this perspective. Our analysis is based on a quasiparticle supersymmetric transformation which couples electronic and vibrational motion and includes normal coordinates and the corresponding momenta. We define qubits formed by Majorana fermions in the hydrogen bonds and also discuss the entangled states in base pairs. Quantum information and quantum entropy are introduced. In addition to the well-known classical information connected with the DNA base pairs, we also consider quantum information and show that the classical and quantum information are closely connected.

  16. Spin-based quantum computation in multielectron quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xuedong; Das Sarma, S.

    2001-10-01

    In a quantum computer the hardware and software are intrinsically connected because the quantum Hamiltonian (or more precisely its time development) is the code that runs the computer. We demonstrate this subtle and crucial relationship by considering the example of electron-spin-based solid-state quantum computer in semiconductor quantum dots. We show that multielectron quantum dots with one valence electron in the outermost shell do not behave simply as an effective single-spin system unless special conditions are satisfied. Our work compellingly demonstrates that a delicate synergy between theory and experiment (between software and hardware) is essential for constructing a quantum computer.

  17. How to Build a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Barry C.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum computer technology is progressing rapidly with dozens of qubits and hundreds of quantum logic gates now possible. Although current quantum computer technology is distant from being able to solve computational problems beyond the reach of non-quantum computers, experiments have progressed well beyond simply demonstrating the requisite components. We can now operate small quantum logic processors with connected networks of qubits and quantum logic gates, which is a great stride towards functioning quantum computers. This book aims to be accessible to a broad audience with basic knowledge of computers, electronics and physics. The goal is to convey key notions relevant to building quantum computers and to present state-of-the-art quantum-computer research in various media such as trapped ions, superconducting circuits, photonics and beyond.

  18. Quantum Computation: Entangling with the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Commercial applications of quantum computation have become viable due to the rapid progress of the field in the recent years. Efficient quantum algorithms are discovered to cope with the most challenging real-world problems that are too hard for classical computers. Manufactured quantum hardware has reached unprecedented precision and controllability, enabling fault-tolerant quantum computation. Here, I give a brief introduction on what principles in quantum mechanics promise its unparalleled computational power. I will discuss several important quantum algorithms that achieve exponential or polynomial speedup over any classical algorithm. Building a quantum computer is a daunting task, and I will talk about the criteria and various implementations of quantum computers. I conclude the talk with near-future commercial applications of a quantum computer.

  19. ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science

    SciTech Connect

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alan; Van Dam, Wim; Farhi, Edward

    This report details the findings of the DOE ASCR Workshop on Quantum Computing for Science that was organized to assess the viability of quantum computing technologies to meet the computational requirements of the DOE’s science and energy mission, and to identify the potential impact of quantum technologies. The workshop was held on February 17-18, 2015, in Bethesda, MD, to solicit input from members of the quantum computing community. The workshop considered models of quantum computation and programming environments, physical science applications relevant to DOE's science mission as well as quantum simulation, and applied mathematics topics including potential quantum algorithms formore » linear algebra, graph theory, and machine learning. This report summarizes these perspectives into an outlook on the opportunities for quantum computing to impact problems relevant to the DOE’s mission as well as the additional research required to bring quantum computing to the point where it can have such impact.« less

  20. An Early Quantum Computing Proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Stephen Russell; Alexander, Francis Joseph; Barros, Kipton Marcos

    The D-Wave 2X is the third generation of quantum processing created by D-Wave. NASA (with Google and USRA) and Lockheed Martin (with USC), both own D-Wave systems. Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) purchased a D-Wave 2X in November 2015. The D-Wave 2X processor contains (nominally) 1152 quantum bits (or qubits) and is designed to specifically perform quantum annealing, which is a well-known method for finding a global minimum of an optimization problem. This methodology is based on direct execution of a quantum evolution in experimental quantum hardware. While this can be a powerful method for solving particular kinds of problems,more » it also means that the D-Wave 2X processor is not a general computing processor and cannot be programmed to perform a wide variety of tasks. It is a highly specialized processor, well beyond what NNSA currently thinks of as an “advanced architecture.”A D-Wave is best described as a quantum optimizer. That is, it uses quantum superposition to find the lowest energy state of a system by repeated doses of power and settling stages. The D-Wave produces multiple solutions to any suitably formulated problem, one of which is the lowest energy state solution (global minimum). Mapping problems onto the D-Wave requires defining an objective function to be minimized and then encoding that function in the Hamiltonian of the D-Wave system. The quantum annealing method is then used to find the lowest energy configuration of the Hamiltonian using the current D-Wave Two, two-level, quantum processor. This is not always an easy thing to do, and the D-Wave Two has significant limitations that restrict problem sizes that can be run and algorithmic choices that can be made. Furthermore, as more people are exploring this technology, it has become clear that it is very difficult to come up with general approaches to optimization that can both utilize the D-Wave and that can do better than highly developed algorithms on conventional computers

  1. Computing quantum hashing in the model of quantum branching programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablayev, Farid; Ablayev, Marat; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    We investigate the branching program complexity of quantum hashing. We consider a quantum hash function that maps elements of a finite field into quantum states. We require that this function is preimage-resistant and collision-resistant. We consider two complexity measures for Quantum Branching Programs (QBP): a number of qubits and a number of compu-tational steps. We show that the quantum hash function can be computed efficiently. Moreover, we prove that such QBP construction is optimal. That is, we prove lower bounds that match the constructed quantum hash function computation.

  2. Experimental demonstration of blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barz, Stefanie; Kashefi, Elham; Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joe; Zeilinger, Anton; Walther, Philip

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computers are among the most promising applications of quantum-enhanced technologies. Quantum effects such as superposition and entanglement enable computational speed-ups that are unattainable using classical computers. The challenges in realising quantum computers suggest that in the near future, only a few facilities worldwide will be capable of operating such devices. In order to exploit these computers, users would seemingly have to give up their privacy. It was recently shown that this is not the case and that, via the universal blind quantum computation protocol, quantum mechanics provides a way to guarantee that the user's data remain private. Here, we demonstrate the first experimental version of this protocol using polarisation-entangled photonic qubits. We demonstrate various blind one- and two-qubit gate operations as well as blind versions of the Deutsch's and Grover's algorithms. When the technology to build quantum computers becomes available, this will become an important privacy-preserving feature of quantum information processing.

  3. Cluster State Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-12-01

    probability that the desired target gate ATar has been faithfully implemented on the computational modes given a successful measurement of the ancilla...modes: () = �(†)� 2 2(†) , (3) since Tr ( ATar † ATar )=2Mc for a properly normalized target gate. As we are interested...optimization method we have developed maximizes the success probability S for a given target transformation ATar , for given ancilla resources, and for a

  4. Cluster State Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-01

    information of relevance to the transformation. We define the fidelity as the probability that the desired target gate ATar has been faithfully...implemented on the computational modes given a successful measurement of the ancilla modes: 2 , (3) since Tr ( ATar † ATar )=2Mc for a properly normalized...photonic gates The optimization method we have developed maximizes the success probability S for a given target transformation ATar , for given

  5. Quantum chemistry simulation on quantum computers: theories and experiments.

    PubMed

    Lu, Dawei; Xu, Boruo; Xu, Nanyang; Li, Zhaokai; Chen, Hongwei; Peng, Xinhua; Xu, Ruixue; Du, Jiangfeng

    2012-07-14

    It has been claimed that quantum computers can mimic quantum systems efficiently in the polynomial scale. Traditionally, those simulations are carried out numerically on classical computers, which are inevitably confronted with the exponential growth of required resources, with the increasing size of quantum systems. Quantum computers avoid this problem, and thus provide a possible solution for large quantum systems. In this paper, we first discuss the ideas of quantum simulation, the background of quantum simulators, their categories, and the development in both theories and experiments. We then present a brief introduction to quantum chemistry evaluated via classical computers followed by typical procedures of quantum simulation towards quantum chemistry. Reviewed are not only theoretical proposals but also proof-of-principle experimental implementations, via a small quantum computer, which include the evaluation of the static molecular eigenenergy and the simulation of chemical reaction dynamics. Although the experimental development is still behind the theory, we give prospects and suggestions for future experiments. We anticipate that in the near future quantum simulation will become a powerful tool for quantum chemistry over classical computations.

  6. QCE: A Simulator for Quantum Computer Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Kristel; de Raedt, Hans

    2003-09-01

    The Quantum Computer Emulator (QCE) described in this paper consists of a simulator of a generic, general purpose quantum computer and a graphical user interface. The latter is used to control the simulator, to define the hardware of the quantum computer and to debug and execute quantum algorithms. QCE runs in a Windows 98/NT/2000/ME/XP environment. It can be used to validate designs of physically realizable quantum processors and as an interactive educational tool to learn about quantum computers and quantum algorithms. A detailed exposition is given of the implementation of the CNOT and the Toffoli gate, the quantum Fourier transform, Grover's database search algorithm, an order finding algorithm, Shor's algorithm, a three-input adder and a number partitioning algorithm. We also review the results of simulations of an NMR-like quantum computer.

  7. Exploiting Locality in Quantum Computation for Quantum Chemistry.

    PubMed

    McClean, Jarrod R; Babbush, Ryan; Love, Peter J; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-12-18

    Accurate prediction of chemical and material properties from first-principles quantum chemistry is a challenging task on traditional computers. Recent developments in quantum computation offer a route toward highly accurate solutions with polynomial cost; however, this solution still carries a large overhead. In this Perspective, we aim to bring together known results about the locality of physical interactions from quantum chemistry with ideas from quantum computation. We show that the utilization of spatial locality combined with the Bravyi-Kitaev transformation offers an improvement in the scaling of known quantum algorithms for quantum chemistry and provides numerical examples to help illustrate this point. We combine these developments to improve the outlook for the future of quantum chemistry on quantum computers.

  8. Toward a superconducting quantum computer. Harnessing macroscopic quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Jaw-Shen

    2010-01-01

    Intensive research on the construction of superconducting quantum computers has produced numerous important achievements. The quantum bit (qubit), based on the Josephson junction, is at the heart of this research. This macroscopic system has the ability to control quantum coherence. This article reviews the current state of quantum computing as well as its history, and discusses its future. Although progress has been rapid, the field remains beset with unsolved issues, and there are still many new research opportunities open to physicists and engineers.

  9. Quantum Optical Implementations of Current Quantum Computing Paradigms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    Conferences and Proceedings: The results were presented at several conferences. These include: 1. M. O. Scully, " Foundations of Quantum Mechanics ", in...applications have revealed a strong connection between the fundamental aspects of quantum mechanics that governs physical systems and the informational...could be solved in polynomial time using quantum computers. Another set of problems where quantum mechanics can carry out computations substantially

  10. Brain Neurons as Quantum Computers:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bershadskii, A.; Dremencov, E.; Bershadskii, J.; Yadid, G.

    The question: whether quantum coherent states can sustain decoherence, heating and dissipation over time scales comparable to the dynamical timescales of brain neurons, has been actively discussed in the last years. A positive answer on this question is crucial, in particular, for consideration of brain neurons as quantum computers. This discussion was mainly based on theoretical arguments. In the present paper nonlinear statistical properties of the Ventral Tegmental Area (VTA) of genetically depressive limbic brain are studied in vivo on the Flinders Sensitive Line of rats (FSL). VTA plays a key role in the generation of pleasure and in the development of psychological drug addiction. We found that the FSL VTA (dopaminergic) neuron signals exhibit multifractal properties for interspike frequencies on the scales where healthy VTA dopaminergic neurons exhibit bursting activity. For high moments the observed multifractal (generalized dimensions) spectrum coincides with the generalized dimensions spectrum calculated for a spectral measure of a quantum system (so-called kicked Harper model, actively used as a model of quantum chaos). This observation can be considered as a first experimental (in vivo) indication in the favor of the quantum (at least partially) nature of brain neurons activity.

  11. Layered Architectures for Quantum Computers and Quantum Repeaters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Nathan C.

    This chapter examines how to organize quantum computers and repeaters using a systematic framework known as layered architecture, where machine control is organized in layers associated with specialized tasks. The framework is flexible and could be used for analysis and comparison of quantum information systems. To demonstrate the design principles in practice, we develop architectures for quantum computers and quantum repeaters based on optically controlled quantum dots, showing how a myriad of technologies must operate synchronously to achieve fault-tolerance. Optical control makes information processing in this system very fast, scalable to large problem sizes, and extendable to quantum communication.

  12. Unconditionally verifiable blind quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2017-07-01

    Blind quantum computing (BQC) allows a client to have a server carry out a quantum computation for them such that the client's input, output, and computation remain private. A desirable property for any BQC protocol is verification, whereby the client can verify with high probability whether the server has followed the instructions of the protocol or if there has been some deviation resulting in a corrupted output state. A verifiable BQC protocol can be viewed as an interactive proof system leading to consequences for complexity theory. We previously proposed [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, Atlanta, 2009 (IEEE, Piscataway, 2009), p. 517] a universal and unconditionally secure BQC scheme where the client only needs to be able to prepare single qubits in separable states randomly chosen from a finite set and send them to the server, who has the balance of the required quantum computational resources. In this paper we extend that protocol with additional functionality allowing blind computational basis measurements, which we use to construct another verifiable BQC protocol based on a different class of resource states. We rigorously prove that the probability of failing to detect an incorrect output is exponentially small in a security parameter, while resource overhead remains polynomial in this parameter. This resource state allows entangling gates to be performed between arbitrary pairs of logical qubits with only constant overhead. This is a significant improvement on the original scheme, which required that all computations to be performed must first be put into a nearest-neighbor form, incurring linear overhead in the number of qubits. Such an improvement has important consequences for efficiency and fault-tolerance thresholds.

  13. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-18

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  14. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    PubMed Central

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources. PMID:28674011

  15. Elucidating reaction mechanisms on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiher, Markus; Wiebe, Nathan; Svore, Krysta M.; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-07-01

    With rapid recent advances in quantum technology, we are close to the threshold of quantum devices whose computational powers can exceed those of classical supercomputers. Here, we show that a quantum computer can be used to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical computer simulations used to probe these reaction mechanisms, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Our resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. Our results demonstrate that quantum computers will be able to tackle important problems in chemistry without requiring exorbitant resources.

  16. Geometry of discrete quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanson, Andrew J.; Ortiz, Gerardo; Sabry, Amr; Tai, Yu-Tsung

    2013-05-01

    Conventional quantum computing entails a geometry based on the description of an n-qubit state using 2n infinite precision complex numbers denoting a vector in a Hilbert space. Such numbers are in general uncomputable using any real-world resources, and, if we have the idea of physical law as some kind of computational algorithm of the universe, we would be compelled to alter our descriptions of physics to be consistent with computable numbers. Our purpose here is to examine the geometric implications of using finite fields Fp and finite complexified fields \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} (based on primes p congruent to 3 (mod4)) as the basis for computations in a theory of discrete quantum computing, which would therefore become a computable theory. Because the states of a discrete n-qubit system are in principle enumerable, we are able to determine the proportions of entangled and unentangled states. In particular, we extend the Hopf fibration that defines the irreducible state space of conventional continuous n-qubit theories (which is the complex projective space \\mathbf {CP}^{2^{n}-1}) to an analogous discrete geometry in which the Hopf circle for any n is found to be a discrete set of p + 1 points. The tally of unit-length n-qubit states is given, and reduced via the generalized Hopf fibration to \\mathbf {DCP}^{2^{n}-1}, the discrete analogue of the complex projective space, which has p^{2^{n}-1} (p-1)\\,\\prod _{k=1}^{n-1} ( p^{2^{k}}+1) irreducible states. Using a measure of entanglement, the purity, we explore the entanglement features of discrete quantum states and find that the n-qubit states based on the complexified field \\mathbf {F}_{p^2} have pn(p - 1)n unentangled states (the product of the tally for a single qubit) with purity 1, and they have pn + 1(p - 1)(p + 1)n - 1 maximally entangled states with purity zero.

  17. Adiabatic quantum computation along quasienergies

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Atushi; Nemoto, Kae; National Institute of Informatics, 2-1-2 Hitotsubashi, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 101-8430

    2010-02-15

    The parametric deformations of quasienergies and eigenvectors of unitary operators are applied to the design of quantum adiabatic algorithms. The conventional, standard adiabatic quantum computation proceeds along eigenenergies of parameter-dependent Hamiltonians. By contrast, discrete adiabatic computation utilizes adiabatic passage along the quasienergies of parameter-dependent unitary operators. For example, such computation can be realized by a concatenation of parameterized quantum circuits, with an adiabatic though inevitably discrete change of the parameter. A design principle of adiabatic passage along quasienergy was recently proposed: Cheon's quasienergy and eigenspace anholonomies on unitary operators is available to realize anholonomic adiabatic algorithms [A. Tanaka and M.more » Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 160407 (2007)], which compose a nontrivial family of discrete adiabatic algorithms. It is straightforward to port a standard adiabatic algorithm to an anholonomic adiabatic one, except an introduction of a parameter |v>, which is available to adjust the gaps of the quasienergies to control the running time steps. In Grover's database search problem, the costs to prepare |v> for the qualitatively different (i.e., power or exponential) running time steps are shown to be qualitatively different.« less

  18. The Quantum Human Computer (QHC) Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salmani-Nodoushan, Mohammad Ali

    2008-01-01

    This article attempts to suggest the existence of a human computer called Quantum Human Computer (QHC) on the basis of an analogy between human beings and computers. To date, there are two types of computers: Binary and Quantum. The former operates on the basis of binary logic where an object is said to exist in either of the two states of 1 and…

  19. Model of biological quantum logic in DNA.

    PubMed

    Mihelic, F Matthew

    2013-08-02

    The DNA molecule has properties that allow it to act as a quantum logic processor. It has been demonstrated that there is coherent conduction of electrons longitudinally along the DNA molecule through pi stacking interactions of the aromatic nucleotide bases, and it has also been demonstrated that electrons moving longitudinally along the DNA molecule are subject to a very efficient electron spin filtering effect as the helicity of the DNA molecule interacts with the spin of the electron. This means that, in DNA, electrons are coherently conducted along a very efficient spin filter. Coherent electron spin is held in a logically and thermodynamically reversible chiral symmetry between the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers of the deoxyribose moiety in each nucleotide, which enables each nucleotide to function as a quantum gate. The symmetry break that provides for quantum decision in the system is determined by the spin direction of an electron that has an orbital angular momentum that is sufficient to overcome the energy barrier of the double well potential separating the C2-endo and C3-endo enantiomers, and that enantiomeric energy barrier is appropriate to the Landauer limit of the energy necessary to randomize one bit of information.

  20. Energy-efficient quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Joni; Salmilehto, Juha; Möttönen, Mikko

    2017-04-01

    In the near future, one of the major challenges in the realization of large-scale quantum computers operating at low temperatures is the management of harmful heat loads owing to thermal conduction of cabling and dissipation at cryogenic components. This naturally raises the question that what are the fundamental limitations of energy consumption in scalable quantum computing. In this work, we derive the greatest lower bound for the gate error induced by a single application of a bosonic drive mode of given energy. Previously, such an error type has been considered to be inversely proportional to the total driving power, but we show that this limitation can be circumvented by introducing a qubit driving scheme which reuses and corrects drive pulses. Specifically, our method serves to reduce the average energy consumption per gate operation without increasing the average gate error. Thus our work shows that precise, scalable control of quantum systems can, in principle, be implemented without the introduction of excessive heat or decoherence.

  1. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gingrich, Robert M.; Williams, Colin P.

    2004-01-01

    We present a method for designing quantum circuits that perform non-unitary quantum computations on n-qubit states probabilistically, and give analytic expressions for the success probability and fidelity.

  2. Quantum computing: In the 'death zone'?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dam, Wim

    2007-04-01

    An event advertised as the first demonstration of a commercial quantum computer raises the question of how far one can go with a 'do not care' attitude towards imperfections, without losing the quantum advantage.

  3. Function Package for Computing Quantum Resource Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiming

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, we present a function package for to calculate quantum resource measures and dynamics of open systems. Our package includes common operators and operator lists, frequently-used functions for computing quantum entanglement, quantum correlation, quantum coherence, quantum Fisher information and dynamics in noisy environments. We briefly explain the functions of the package and illustrate how to use the package with several typical examples. We expect that this package is a useful tool for future research and education.

  4. Model dynamics for quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakin, Frank

    2017-08-01

    A model master equation suitable for quantum computing dynamics is presented. In an ideal quantum computer (QC), a system of qubits evolves in time unitarily and, by virtue of their entanglement, interfere quantum mechanically to solve otherwise intractable problems. In the real situation, a QC is subject to decoherence and attenuation effects due to interaction with an environment and with possible short-term random disturbances and gate deficiencies. The stability of a QC under such attacks is a key issue for the development of realistic devices. We assume that the influence of the environment can be incorporated by a master equation that includes unitary evolution with gates, supplemented by a Lindblad term. Lindblad operators of various types are explored; namely, steady, pulsed, gate friction, and measurement operators. In the master equation, we use the Lindblad term to describe short time intrusions by random Lindblad pulses. The phenomenological master equation is then extended to include a nonlinear Beretta term that describes the evolution of a closed system with increasing entropy. An external Bath environment is stipulated by a fixed temperature in two different ways. Here we explore the case of a simple one-qubit system in preparation for generalization to multi-qubit, qutrit and hybrid qubit-qutrit systems. This model master equation can be used to test the stability of memory and the efficacy of quantum gates. The properties of such hybrid master equations are explored, with emphasis on the role of thermal equilibrium and entropy constraints. Several significant properties of time-dependent qubit evolution are revealed by this simple study.

  5. Embracing the quantum limit in silicon computing.

    PubMed

    Morton, John J L; McCamey, Dane R; Eriksson, Mark A; Lyon, Stephen A

    2011-11-16

    Quantum computers hold the promise of massive performance enhancements across a range of applications, from cryptography and databases to revolutionary scientific simulation tools. Such computers would make use of the same quantum mechanical phenomena that pose limitations on the continued shrinking of conventional information processing devices. Many of the key requirements for quantum computing differ markedly from those of conventional computers. However, silicon, which plays a central part in conventional information processing, has many properties that make it a superb platform around which to build a quantum computer. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  6. Contextuality supplies the 'magic' for quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Howard, Mark; Wallman, Joel; Veitch, Victor; Emerson, Joseph

    2014-06-19

    Quantum computers promise dramatic advantages over their classical counterparts, but the source of the power in quantum computing has remained elusive. Here we prove a remarkable equivalence between the onset of contextuality and the possibility of universal quantum computation via 'magic state' distillation, which is the leading model for experimentally realizing a fault-tolerant quantum computer. This is a conceptually satisfying link, because contextuality, which precludes a simple 'hidden variable' model of quantum mechanics, provides one of the fundamental characterizations of uniquely quantum phenomena. Furthermore, this connection suggests a unifying paradigm for the resources of quantum information: the non-locality of quantum theory is a particular kind of contextuality, and non-locality is already known to be a critical resource for achieving advantages with quantum communication. In addition to clarifying these fundamental issues, this work advances the resource framework for quantum computation, which has a number of practical applications, such as characterizing the efficiency and trade-offs between distinct theoretical and experimental schemes for achieving robust quantum computation, and putting bounds on the overhead cost for the classical simulation of quantum algorithms.

  7. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3 × 10(-3), which is comparable to that (7.5 × 10(-3)) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10(-3) was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  8. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf–Harrington–Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3×10−3, which is comparable to that (7.5×10−3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10−3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach. PMID:22948818

  9. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-09-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3×10-3, which is comparable to that (7.5×10-3) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10-3 was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  10. Cloud Quantum Computing of an Atomic Nucleus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitrescu, E. F.; McCaskey, A. J.; Hagen, G.; Jansen, G. R.; Morris, T. D.; Papenbrock, T.; Pooser, R. C.; Dean, D. J.; Lougovski, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report a quantum simulation of the deuteron binding energy on quantum processors accessed via cloud servers. We use a Hamiltonian from pionless effective field theory at leading order. We design a low-depth version of the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz, use the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, and compute the binding energy to within a few percent. Our work is the first step towards scalable nuclear structure computations on a quantum processor via the cloud, and it sheds light on how to map scientific computing applications onto nascent quantum devices.

  11. Cloud Quantum Computing of an Atomic Nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, Eugene F.; McCaskey, Alex J.; Hagen, Gaute

    Here, we report a quantum simulation of the deuteron binding energy on quantum processors accessed via cloud servers. We use a Hamiltonian from pionless effective field theory at leading order. We design a low-depth version of the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz, use the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, and compute the binding energy to within a few percent. Our work is the first step towards scalable nuclear structure computations on a quantum processor via the cloud, and it sheds light on how to map scientific computing applications onto nascent quantum devices.

  12. Cloud Quantum Computing of an Atomic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dumitrescu, E F; McCaskey, A J; Hagen, G; Jansen, G R; Morris, T D; Papenbrock, T; Pooser, R C; Dean, D J; Lougovski, P

    2018-05-25

    We report a quantum simulation of the deuteron binding energy on quantum processors accessed via cloud servers. We use a Hamiltonian from pionless effective field theory at leading order. We design a low-depth version of the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz, use the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, and compute the binding energy to within a few percent. Our work is the first step towards scalable nuclear structure computations on a quantum processor via the cloud, and it sheds light on how to map scientific computing applications onto nascent quantum devices.

  13. Cloud Quantum Computing of an Atomic Nucleus

    DOE PAGES

    Dumitrescu, Eugene F.; McCaskey, Alex J.; Hagen, Gaute; ...

    2018-05-23

    Here, we report a quantum simulation of the deuteron binding energy on quantum processors accessed via cloud servers. We use a Hamiltonian from pionless effective field theory at leading order. We design a low-depth version of the unitary coupled-cluster ansatz, use the variational quantum eigensolver algorithm, and compute the binding energy to within a few percent. Our work is the first step towards scalable nuclear structure computations on a quantum processor via the cloud, and it sheds light on how to map scientific computing applications onto nascent quantum devices.

  14. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. QUANTUM COMPUTING: Quantum Entangled Bits Step Closer to IT.

    PubMed

    Zeilinger, A

    2000-07-21

    In contrast to today's computers, quantum computers and information technologies may in future be able to store and transmit information not only in the state "0" or "1," but also in superpositions of the two; information will then be stored and transmitted in entangled quantum states. Zeilinger discusses recent advances toward using this principle for quantum cryptography and highlights studies into the entanglement (or controlled superposition) of several photons, atoms, or ions.

  16. Quantum computing with incoherent resources and quantum jumps.

    PubMed

    Santos, M F; Cunha, M Terra; Chaves, R; Carvalho, A R R

    2012-04-27

    Spontaneous emission and the inelastic scattering of photons are two natural processes usually associated with decoherence and the reduction in the capacity to process quantum information. Here we show that, when suitably detected, these photons are sufficient to build all the fundamental blocks needed to perform quantum computation in the emitting qubits while protecting them from deleterious dissipative effects. We exemplify this by showing how to efficiently prepare graph states for the implementation of measurement-based quantum computation.

  17. Quantum phases with differing computational power.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jian; Gu, Mile; Kwek, Leong Chuan; Santos, Marcelo França; Fan, Heng; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-05-01

    The observation that concepts from quantum information has generated many alternative indicators of quantum phase transitions hints that quantum phase transitions possess operational significance with respect to the processing of quantum information. Yet, studies on whether such transitions lead to quantum phases that differ in their capacity to process information remain limited. Here we show that there exist quantum phase transitions that cause a distinct qualitative change in our ability to simulate certain quantum systems under perturbation of an external field by local operations and classical communication. In particular, we show that in certain quantum phases of the XY model, adiabatic perturbations of the external magnetic field can be simulated by local spin operations, whereas the resulting effect within other phases results in coherent non-local interactions. We discuss the potential implications to adiabatic quantum computation, where a computational advantage exists only when adiabatic perturbation results in coherent multi-body interactions.

  18. Majorana-Based Fermionic Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, T E; Rożek, P; Akhmerov, A R

    2018-06-01

    Because Majorana zero modes store quantum information nonlocally, they are protected from noise, and have been proposed as a building block for a quantum computer. We show how to use the same protection from noise to implement universal fermionic quantum computation. Our architecture requires only two Majorana modes to encode a fermionic quantum degree of freedom, compared to alternative implementations which require a minimum of four Majorana modes for a spin quantum degree of freedom. The fermionic degrees of freedom support both unitary coupled cluster variational quantum eigensolver and quantum phase estimation algorithms, proposed for quantum chemistry simulations. Because we avoid the Jordan-Wigner transformation, our scheme has a lower overhead for implementing both of these algorithms, allowing for simulation of the Trotterized Hubbard Hamiltonian in O(1) time per unitary step. We finally demonstrate magic state distillation in our fermionic architecture, giving a universal set of topologically protected fermionic quantum gates.

  19. Majorana-Based Fermionic Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, T. E.; RoŻek, P.; Akhmerov, A. R.

    2018-06-01

    Because Majorana zero modes store quantum information nonlocally, they are protected from noise, and have been proposed as a building block for a quantum computer. We show how to use the same protection from noise to implement universal fermionic quantum computation. Our architecture requires only two Majorana modes to encode a fermionic quantum degree of freedom, compared to alternative implementations which require a minimum of four Majorana modes for a spin quantum degree of freedom. The fermionic degrees of freedom support both unitary coupled cluster variational quantum eigensolver and quantum phase estimation algorithms, proposed for quantum chemistry simulations. Because we avoid the Jordan-Wigner transformation, our scheme has a lower overhead for implementing both of these algorithms, allowing for simulation of the Trotterized Hubbard Hamiltonian in O (1 ) time per unitary step. We finally demonstrate magic state distillation in our fermionic architecture, giving a universal set of topologically protected fermionic quantum gates.

  20. DOE pushes for useful quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is joining the quest to develop quantum computers, devices that would exploit quantum mechanics to crack problems that overwhelm conventional computers. The initiative comes as Google and other companies race to build a quantum computer that can demonstrate "quantum supremacy" by beating classical computers on a test problem. But reaching that milestone will not mean practical uses are at hand, and the new $40 million DOE effort is intended to spur the development of useful quantum computing algorithms for its work in chemistry, materials science, nuclear physics, and particle physics. With the resources at its 17 national laboratories, DOE could play a key role in developing the machines, researchers say, although finding problems with which quantum computers can help isn't so easy.

  1. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  2. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-01-01

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region. PMID:27189039

  3. Computational quantum-classical boundary of noisy commuting quantum circuits.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Keisuke; Tamate, Shuhei

    2016-05-18

    It is often said that the transition from quantum to classical worlds is caused by decoherence originated from an interaction between a system of interest and its surrounding environment. Here we establish a computational quantum-classical boundary from the viewpoint of classical simulatability of a quantum system under decoherence. Specifically, we consider commuting quantum circuits being subject to decoherence. Or equivalently, we can regard them as measurement-based quantum computation on decohered weighted graph states. To show intractability of classical simulation in the quantum side, we utilize the postselection argument and crucially strengthen it by taking noise effect into account. Classical simulatability in the classical side is also shown constructively by using both separable criteria in a projected-entangled-pair-state picture and the Gottesman-Knill theorem for mixed state Clifford circuits. We found that when each qubit is subject to a single-qubit complete-positive-trace-preserving noise, the computational quantum-classical boundary is sharply given by the noise rate required for the distillability of a magic state. The obtained quantum-classical boundary of noisy quantum dynamics reveals a complexity landscape of controlled quantum systems. This paves a way to an experimentally feasible verification of quantum mechanics in a high complexity limit beyond classically simulatable region.

  4. Thermally assisted adiabatic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Amin, M H S; Love, Peter J; Truncik, C J S

    2008-02-15

    We study the effect of a thermal environment on adiabatic quantum computation using the Bloch-Redfield formalism. We show that in certain cases the environment can enhance the performance in two different ways: (i) by introducing a time scale for thermal mixing near the anticrossing that is smaller than the adiabatic time scale, and (ii) by relaxation after the anticrossing. The former can enhance the scaling of computation when the environment is super-Ohmic, while the latter can only provide a prefactor enhancement. We apply our method to the case of adiabatic Grover search and show that performance better than classical is possible with a super-Ohmic environment, with no a priori knowledge of the energy spectrum.

  5. Some Thoughts Regarding Practical Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoshal, Debabrata; Gomez, Richard; Lanzagorta, Marco; Uhlmann, Jeffrey

    2006-03-01

    Quantum computing has become an important area of research in computer science because of its potential to provide more efficient algorithmic solutions to certain problems than are possible with classical computing. The ability of performing parallel operations over an exponentially large computational space has proved to be the main advantage of the quantum computing model. In this regard, we are particularly interested in the potential applications of quantum computers to enhance real software systems of interest to the defense, industrial, scientific and financial communities. However, while much has been written in popular and scientific literature about the benefits of the quantum computational model, several of the problems associated to the practical implementation of real-life complex software systems in quantum computers are often ignored. In this presentation we will argue that practical quantum computation is not as straightforward as commonly advertised, even if the technological problems associated to the manufacturing and engineering of large-scale quantum registers were solved overnight. We will discuss some of the frequently overlooked difficulties that plague quantum computing in the areas of memories, I/O, addressing schemes, compilers, oracles, approximate information copying, logical debugging, error correction and fault-tolerant computing protocols.

  6. Computing quantum discord is NP-complete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yichen

    2014-03-01

    We study the computational complexity of quantum discord (a measure of quantum correlation beyond entanglement), and prove that computing quantum discord is NP-complete. Therefore, quantum discord is computationally intractable: the running time of any algorithm for computing quantum discord is believed to grow exponentially with the dimension of the Hilbert space so that computing quantum discord in a quantum system of moderate size is not possible in practice. As by-products, some entanglement measures (namely entanglement cost, entanglement of formation, relative entropy of entanglement, squashed entanglement, classical squashed entanglement, conditional entanglement of mutual information, and broadcast regularization of mutual information) and constrained Holevo capacity are NP-hard/NP-complete to compute. These complexity-theoretic results are directly applicable in common randomness distillation, quantum state merging, entanglement distillation, superdense coding, and quantum teleportation; they may offer significant insights into quantum information processing. Moreover, we prove the NP-completeness of two typical problems: linear optimization over classical states and detecting classical states in a convex set, providing evidence that working with classical states is generically computationally intractable.

  7. Resonant transition-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Chen-Fu; Hsieh, Chang-Yu

    2017-05-01

    In this article we assess a novel quantum computation paradigm based on the resonant transition (RT) phenomenon commonly associated with atomic and molecular systems. We thoroughly analyze the intimate connections between the RT-based quantum computation and the well-established adiabatic quantum computation (AQC). Both quantum computing frameworks encode solutions to computational problems in the spectral properties of a Hamiltonian and rely on the quantum dynamics to obtain the desired output state. We discuss how one can adapt any adiabatic quantum algorithm to a corresponding RT version and the two approaches are limited by different aspects of Hamiltonians' spectra. The RT approach provides a compelling alternative to the AQC under various circumstances. To better illustrate the usefulness of the novel framework, we analyze the time complexity of an algorithm for 3-SAT problems and discuss straightforward methods to fine tune its efficiency.

  8. Quantum Computer Games: Schrodinger Cat and Hounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-01-01

    The quantum computer game "Schrodinger cat and hounds" is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. "Schrodinger cat and hounds" demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and…

  9. Disciplines, models, and computers: the path to computational quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lenhard, Johannes

    2014-12-01

    Many disciplines and scientific fields have undergone a computational turn in the past several decades. This paper analyzes this sort of turn by investigating the case of computational quantum chemistry. The main claim is that the transformation from quantum to computational quantum chemistry involved changes in three dimensions. First, on the side of instrumentation, small computers and a networked infrastructure took over the lead from centralized mainframe architecture. Second, a new conception of computational modeling became feasible and assumed a crucial role. And third, the field of computa- tional quantum chemistry became organized in a market-like fashion and this market is much bigger than the number of quantum theory experts. These claims will be substantiated by an investigation of the so-called density functional theory (DFT), the arguably pivotal theory in the turn to computational quantum chemistry around 1990.

  10. Nonlinear optics quantum computing with circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Prabin; Hafezi, Mohammad; Taylor, J M

    2013-02-08

    One approach to quantum information processing is to use photons as quantum bits and rely on linear optical elements for most operations. However, some optical nonlinearity is necessary to enable universal quantum computing. Here, we suggest a circuit-QED approach to nonlinear optics quantum computing in the microwave regime, including a deterministic two-photon phase gate. Our specific example uses a hybrid quantum system comprising a LC resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit to implement a nonlinear coupling. Compared to the self-Kerr nonlinearity, we find that our approach has improved tolerance to noise in the qubit while maintaining fast operation.

  11. Benchmarking gate-based quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michielsen, Kristel; Nocon, Madita; Willsch, Dennis; Jin, Fengping; Lippert, Thomas; De Raedt, Hans

    2017-11-01

    With the advent of public access to small gate-based quantum processors, it becomes necessary to develop a benchmarking methodology such that independent researchers can validate the operation of these processors. We explore the usefulness of a number of simple quantum circuits as benchmarks for gate-based quantum computing devices and show that circuits performing identity operations are very simple, scalable and sensitive to gate errors and are therefore very well suited for this task. We illustrate the procedure by presenting benchmark results for the IBM Quantum Experience, a cloud-based platform for gate-based quantum computing.

  12. Quantum and classical dynamics in adiabatic computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowley, P. J. D.; Äńurić, T.; Vinci, W.; Warburton, P. A.; Green, A. G.

    2014-10-01

    Adiabatic transport provides a powerful way to manipulate quantum states. By preparing a system in a readily initialized state and then slowly changing its Hamiltonian, one may achieve quantum states that would otherwise be inaccessible. Moreover, a judicious choice of final Hamiltonian whose ground state encodes the solution to a problem allows adiabatic transport to be used for universal quantum computation. However, the dephasing effects of the environment limit the quantum correlations that an open system can support and degrade the power of such adiabatic computation. We quantify this effect by allowing the system to evolve over a restricted set of quantum states, providing a link between physically inspired classical optimization algorithms and quantum adiabatic optimization. This perspective allows us to develop benchmarks to bound the quantum correlations harnessed by an adiabatic computation. We apply these to the D-Wave Vesuvius machine with revealing—though inconclusive—results.

  13. Stable Isotopes, Quantum Computing and Consciousness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    2000-10-01

    Recent proposals of quantum computing/computers (QC) based on nuclear spins suggest that consciousness (CON) activity may be related (assisted) to subset of C13 atoms incorporated randomly, or quasirandomly, in neural structures. Consider two DNA chains. Even if they are completely identical chemically (same sequence of codons), patterns of 12C and 13C isotopes in them are different (possible origin of personal individuality). Perhaps it is subsystem of nuclear spins of 13C "sublattice" which forms dynamical system capable of QC and on which CON is "spanned". Some issues related to this hypothesis are: (1) existence of CON-driven positional correlations among C13 atoms, (2) motion (hopping) of C13 via enhanced neutron tunneling, cf. quantum "anti Zeno-effect", (3) possible optimization of concentration of QC-active C13 atoms above their standard isotopic abundance, (4) characteristic time-scales for operation of C13-based QC (perrhaps, broad range of scales), (5) reflection of QC dynamics of C13 on CON, (6) possibility that C13-based QC operates "above" level of "regular" CON (perhaps, Jungian sub/super-CON), (7) isotopicity as connector to universal Library of Patterns ("Platonic World"), (8) self-stabilization of coherence in C13 (sub)system. Some of this questions are, in principle, experimentally addressable through shifting of isotopic abundances.

  14. Geometry of Quantum Computation with Qudits

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Chen, Xiu-Bo; Yang, Yi-Xian; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    The circuit complexity of quantum qubit system evolution as a primitive problem in quantum computation has been discussed widely. We investigate this problem in terms of qudit system. Using the Riemannian geometry the optimal quantum circuits are equivalent to the geodetic evolutions in specially curved parametrization of SU(dn). And the quantum circuit complexity is explicitly dependent of controllable approximation error bound. PMID:24509710

  15. Elucidating Reaction Mechanisms on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, Nathan; Reiher, Markus; Svore, Krysta; Wecker, Dave; Troyer, Matthias

    We show how a quantum computer can be employed to elucidate reaction mechanisms in complex chemical systems, using the open problem of biological nitrogen fixation in nitrogenase as an example. We discuss how quantum computers can augment classical-computer simulations for such problems, to significantly increase their accuracy and enable hitherto intractable simulations. Detailed resource estimates show that, even when taking into account the substantial overhead of quantum error correction, and the need to compile into discrete gate sets, the necessary computations can be performed in reasonable time on small quantum computers. This demonstrates that quantum computers will realistically be able to tackle important problems in chemistry that are both scientifically and economically significant.

  16. Foundations of Quantum Mechanics and Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspect, Alain; Leggett, Anthony; Preskill, John; Durt, Thomas; Pironio, Stefano

    2013-03-01

    I ask the question: What can we infer about the nature and structure of the physical world (a) from experiments already done to test the predictions of quantum mechanics (b) from the assumption that all future experiments will agree with those predictions? I discuss existing and projected experiments related to the two classic paradoxes of quantum mechanics, named respectively for EPR and Schrödinger's Cat, and show in particular that one natural conclusion from both types of experiment implies the abandonment of the concept of macroscopic counterfactual definiteness.

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Computation: Coherent Control Back Action.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Debabrata

    2006-11-22

    Though attractive from scalability aspects, optical approaches to quantum computing are highly prone to decoherence and rapid population loss due to nonradiative processes such as vibrational redistribution. We show that such effects can be reduced by adiabatic coherent control, in which quantum interference between multiple excitation pathways is used to cancel coupling to the unwanted, non-radiative channels. We focus on experimentally demonstrated adiabatic controlled population transfer experiments wherein the details on the coherence aspects are yet to be explored theoretically but are important for quantum computation. Such quantum computing schemes also form a back-action connection to coherent control developments.

  18. Simulated quantum computation of molecular energies.

    PubMed

    Aspuru-Guzik, Alán; Dutoi, Anthony D; Love, Peter J; Head-Gordon, Martin

    2005-09-09

    The calculation time for the energy of atoms and molecules scales exponentially with system size on a classical computer but polynomially using quantum algorithms. We demonstrate that such algorithms can be applied to problems of chemical interest using modest numbers of quantum bits. Calculations of the water and lithium hydride molecular ground-state energies have been carried out on a quantum computer simulator using a recursive phase-estimation algorithm. The recursive algorithm reduces the number of quantum bits required for the readout register from about 20 to 4. Mappings of the molecular wave function to the quantum bits are described. An adiabatic method for the preparation of a good approximate ground-state wave function is described and demonstrated for a stretched hydrogen molecule. The number of quantum bits required scales linearly with the number of basis functions, and the number of gates required grows polynomially with the number of quantum bits.

  19. Performing quantum computing experiments in the cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devitt, Simon J.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum computing technology has reached a second renaissance in the past five years. Increased interest from both the private and public sector combined with extraordinary theoretical and experimental progress has solidified this technology as a major advancement in the 21st century. As anticipated my many, some of the first realizations of quantum computing technology has occured over the cloud, with users logging onto dedicated hardware over the classical internet. Recently, IBM has released the Quantum Experience, which allows users to access a five-qubit quantum processor. In this paper we take advantage of this online availability of actual quantum hardware and present four quantum information experiments. We utilize the IBM chip to realize protocols in quantum error correction, quantum arithmetic, quantum graph theory, and fault-tolerant quantum computation by accessing the device remotely through the cloud. While the results are subject to significant noise, the correct results are returned from the chip. This demonstrates the power of experimental groups opening up their technology to a wider audience and will hopefully allow for the next stage of development in quantum information technology.

  20. Efficient universal quantum channel simulation in IBM's cloud quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Xin, Tao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2018-07-01

    The study of quantum channels is an important field and promises a wide range of applications, because any physical process can be represented as a quantum channel that transforms an initial state into a final state. Inspired by the method of performing non-unitary operators by the linear combination of unitary operations, we proposed a quantum algorithm for the simulation of the universal single-qubit channel, described by a convex combination of "quasi-extreme" channels corresponding to four Kraus operators, and is scalable to arbitrary higher dimension. We demonstrated the whole algorithm experimentally using the universal IBM cloud-based quantum computer and studied the properties of different qubit quantum channels. We illustrated the quantum capacity of the general qubit quantum channels, which quantifies the amount of quantum information that can be protected. The behavior of quantum capacity in different channels revealed which types of noise processes can support information transmission, and which types are too destructive to protect information. There was a general agreement between the theoretical predictions and the experiments, which strongly supports our method. By realizing the arbitrary qubit channel, this work provides a universally- accepted way to explore various properties of quantum channels and novel prospect for quantum communication.

  1. Quantum Computation Using Optically Coupled Quantum Dot Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, Prabhakar; Anantram, M. P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowhury, V. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A solid state model for quantum computation has potential advantages in terms of the ease of fabrication, characterization, and integration. The fundamental requirements for a quantum computer involve the realization of basic processing units (qubits), and a scheme for controlled switching and coupling among the qubits, which enables one to perform controlled operations on qubits. We propose a model for quantum computation based on optically coupled quantum dot arrays, which is computationally similar to the atomic model proposed by Cirac and Zoller. In this model, individual qubits are comprised of two coupled quantum dots, and an array of these basic units is placed in an optical cavity. Switching among the states of the individual units is done by controlled laser pulses via near field interaction using the NSOM technology. Controlled rotations involving two or more qubits are performed via common cavity mode photon. We have calculated critical times, including the spontaneous emission and switching times, and show that they are comparable to the best times projected for other proposed models of quantum computation. We have also shown the feasibility of accessing individual quantum dots using the NSOM technology by calculating the photon density at the tip, and estimating the power necessary to perform the basic controlled operations. We are currently in the process of estimating the decoherence times for this system; however, we have formulated initial arguments which seem to indicate that the decoherence times will be comparable, if not longer, than many other proposed models.

  2. Universal quantum computation with little entanglement.

    PubMed

    Van den Nest, Maarten

    2013-02-08

    We show that universal quantum computation can be achieved in the standard pure-state circuit model while the entanglement entropy of every bipartition is small in each step of the computation. The entanglement entropy required for large-scale quantum computation even tends to zero. Moreover we show that the same conclusion applies to many entanglement measures commonly used in the literature. This includes e.g., the geometric measure, localizable entanglement, multipartite concurrence, squashed entanglement, witness-based measures, and more generally any entanglement measure which is continuous in a certain natural sense. These results demonstrate that many entanglement measures are unsuitable tools to assess the power of quantum computers.

  3. Numerical characteristics of quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyavskiy, A.; Khamitov, K.; Teplov, A.; Voevodin, V.; Voevodin, Vl.

    2016-12-01

    The simulation of quantum circuits is significantly important for the implementation of quantum information technologies. The main difficulty of such modeling is the exponential growth of dimensionality, thus the usage of modern high-performance parallel computations is relevant. As it is well known, arbitrary quantum computation in circuit model can be done by only single- and two-qubit gates, and we analyze the computational structure and properties of the simulation of such gates. We investigate the fact that the unique properties of quantum nature lead to the computational properties of the considered algorithms: the quantum parallelism make the simulation of quantum gates highly parallel, and on the other hand, quantum entanglement leads to the problem of computational locality during simulation. We use the methodology of the AlgoWiki project (algowiki-project.org) to analyze the algorithm. This methodology consists of theoretical (sequential and parallel complexity, macro structure, and visual informational graph) and experimental (locality and memory access, scalability and more specific dynamic characteristics) parts. Experimental part was made by using the petascale Lomonosov supercomputer (Moscow State University, Russia). We show that the simulation of quantum gates is a good base for the research and testing of the development methods for data intense parallel software, and considered methodology of the analysis can be successfully used for the improvement of the algorithms in quantum information science.

  4. Video Encryption and Decryption on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Venegas-Andraca, Salvador E.; Yang, Huamin

    2015-08-01

    A method for video encryption and decryption on quantum computers is proposed based on color information transformations on each frame encoding the content of the encoding the content of the video. The proposed method provides a flexible operation to encrypt quantum video by means of the quantum measurement in order to enhance the security of the video. To validate the proposed approach, a tetris tile-matching puzzle game video is utilized in the experimental simulations. The results obtained suggest that the proposed method enhances the security and speed of quantum video encryption and decryption, both properties required for secure transmission and sharing of video content in quantum communication.

  5. Experimental Comparison of Two Quantum Computing Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-28

    IN A U G U RA L A RT IC LE CO M PU TE R SC IE N CE S Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures Norbert M. Linkea,b,1, Dmitri...the vast computing power a universal quantumcomputer could offer, several candidate systems are being explored. They have allowed experimental ...existing systems and the role of architecture in quantum computer design . These will be crucial for the realization of more advanced future incarna

  6. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alan C; Sarandy, Marcelo S

    2015-10-29

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts.

  7. Superadiabatic Controlled Evolutions and Universal Quantum Computation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Alan C.; Sarandy, Marcelo S.

    2015-01-01

    Adiabatic state engineering is a powerful technique in quantum information and quantum control. However, its performance is limited by the adiabatic theorem of quantum mechanics. In this scenario, shortcuts to adiabaticity, such as provided by the superadiabatic theory, constitute a valuable tool to speed up the adiabatic quantum behavior. Here, we propose a superadiabatic route to implement universal quantum computation. Our method is based on the realization of piecewise controlled superadiabatic evolutions. Remarkably, they can be obtained by simple time-independent counter-diabatic Hamiltonians. In particular, we discuss the implementation of fast rotation gates and arbitrary n-qubit controlled gates, which can be used to design different sets of universal quantum gates. Concerning the energy cost of the superadiabatic implementation, we show that it is dictated by the quantum speed limit, providing an upper bound for the corresponding adiabatic counterparts. PMID:26511064

  8. Application of Blind Quantum Computation to Two-Party Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Li, Qin; Yu, Fang; Chan, Wai Hong

    2018-03-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client who has only limited quantum power to achieve quantum computation with the help of a remote quantum server and still keep the client's input, output, and algorithm private. Recently, Kashefi and Wallden extended BQC to achieve two-party quantum computation which allows two parties Alice and Bob to perform a joint unitary transform upon their inputs. However, in their protocol Alice has to prepare rotated single qubits and perform Pauli operations, and Bob needs to have a powerful quantum computer. In this work, we also utilize the idea of BQC to put forward an improved two-party quantum computation protocol in which the operations of both Alice and Bob are simplified since Alice only needs to apply Pauli operations and Bob is just required to prepare and encrypt his input qubits.

  9. Application of Blind Quantum Computation to Two-Party Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiyuan; Li, Qin; Yu, Fang; Chan, Wai Hong

    2018-06-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client who has only limited quantum power to achieve quantum computation with the help of a remote quantum server and still keep the client's input, output, and algorithm private. Recently, Kashefi and Wallden extended BQC to achieve two-party quantum computation which allows two parties Alice and Bob to perform a joint unitary transform upon their inputs. However, in their protocol Alice has to prepare rotated single qubits and perform Pauli operations, and Bob needs to have a powerful quantum computer. In this work, we also utilize the idea of BQC to put forward an improved two-party quantum computation protocol in which the operations of both Alice and Bob are simplified since Alice only needs to apply Pauli operations and Bob is just required to prepare and encrypt his input qubits.

  10. Introduction to Quantum Information/Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    SUBTITLE INTRODUCTION TO QUANTUM INFORMATION/COMPUTING 6. AUTHOR( S ) Peter J. Costianes 5. FUNDING NUMBERS C - N/A PE - 62702F PR...concept is an important concept in Quantum Mechanics and will be further applied later in this report. 2.8 Discrete Orthonormal Bases in F. 2.8.1...index i in defining the coordinates of the wavevector. Many quantum systems may be represented by both a continuous and discrete set of bases

  11. Ramsey numbers and adiabatic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Gaitan, Frank; Clark, Lane

    2012-01-06

    The graph-theoretic Ramsey numbers are notoriously difficult to calculate. In fact, for the two-color Ramsey numbers R(m,n) with m, n≥3, only nine are currently known. We present a quantum algorithm for the computation of the Ramsey numbers R(m,n). We show how the computation of R(m,n) can be mapped to a combinatorial optimization problem whose solution can be found using adiabatic quantum evolution. We numerically simulate this adiabatic quantum algorithm and show that it correctly determines the Ramsey numbers R(3,3) and R(2,s) for 5≤s≤7. We then discuss the algorithm's experimental implementation, and close by showing that Ramsey number computation belongs to the quantum complexity class quantum Merlin Arthur.

  12. Materials Frontiers to Empower Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, Antoinette Jane; Sarrao, John Louis; Richardson, Christopher

    This is an exciting time at the nexus of quantum computing and materials research. The materials frontiers described in this report represent a significant advance in electronic materials and our understanding of the interactions between the local material and a manufactured quantum state. Simultaneously, directed efforts to solve materials issues related to quantum computing provide an opportunity to control and probe the fundamental arrangement of matter that will impact all electronic materials. An opportunity exists to extend our understanding of materials functionality from electronic-grade to quantum-grade by achieving a predictive understanding of noise and decoherence in qubits and their originsmore » in materials defects and environmental coupling. Realizing this vision systematically and predictively will be transformative for quantum computing and will represent a qualitative step forward in materials prediction and control.« less

  13. Is the Brain a Quantum Computer?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litt, Abninder; Eliasmith, Chris; Kroon, Frederick W.; Weinstein, Steven; Thagard, Paul

    2006-01-01

    We argue that computation via quantum mechanical processes is irrelevant to explaining how brains produce thought, contrary to the ongoing speculations of many theorists. First, quantum effects do not have the temporal properties required for neural information processing. Second, there are substantial physical obstacles to any organic…

  14. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures

    PubMed Central

    Linke, Norbert M.; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A.; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www.research.ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future. PMID:28325879

  15. Experimental comparison of two quantum computing architectures.

    PubMed

    Linke, Norbert M; Maslov, Dmitri; Roetteler, Martin; Debnath, Shantanu; Figgatt, Caroline; Landsman, Kevin A; Wright, Kenneth; Monroe, Christopher

    2017-03-28

    We run a selection of algorithms on two state-of-the-art 5-qubit quantum computers that are based on different technology platforms. One is a publicly accessible superconducting transmon device (www. ibm.com/ibm-q) with limited connectivity, and the other is a fully connected trapped-ion system. Even though the two systems have different native quantum interactions, both can be programed in a way that is blind to the underlying hardware, thus allowing a comparison of identical quantum algorithms between different physical systems. We show that quantum algorithms and circuits that use more connectivity clearly benefit from a better-connected system of qubits. Although the quantum systems here are not yet large enough to eclipse classical computers, this experiment exposes critical factors of scaling quantum computers, such as qubit connectivity and gate expressivity. In addition, the results suggest that codesigning particular quantum applications with the hardware itself will be paramount in successfully using quantum computers in the future.

  16. Algorithms Bridging Quantum Computation and Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClean, Jarrod Ryan

    The design of new materials and chemicals derived entirely from computation has long been a goal of computational chemistry, and the governing equation whose solution would permit this dream is known. Unfortunately, the exact solution to this equation has been far too expensive and clever approximations fail in critical situations. Quantum computers offer a novel solution to this problem. In this work, we develop not only new algorithms to use quantum computers to study hard problems in chemistry, but also explore how such algorithms can help us to better understand and improve our traditional approaches. In particular, we first introduce a new method, the variational quantum eigensolver, which is designed to maximally utilize the quantum resources available in a device to solve chemical problems. We apply this method in a real quantum photonic device in the lab to study the dissociation of the helium hydride (HeH+) molecule. We also enhance this methodology with architecture specific optimizations on ion trap computers and show how linear-scaling techniques from traditional quantum chemistry can be used to improve the outlook of similar algorithms on quantum computers. We then show how studying quantum algorithms such as these can be used to understand and enhance the development of classical algorithms. In particular we use a tool from adiabatic quantum computation, Feynman's Clock, to develop a new discrete time variational principle and further establish a connection between real-time quantum dynamics and ground state eigenvalue problems. We use these tools to develop two novel parallel-in-time quantum algorithms that outperform competitive algorithms as well as offer new insights into the connection between the fermion sign problem of ground states and the dynamical sign problem of quantum dynamics. Finally we use insights gained in the study of quantum circuits to explore a general notion of sparsity in many-body quantum systems. In particular we use

  17. Iterated Gate Teleportation and Blind Quantum Computation.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Delgado, Carlos A; Fitzsimons, Joseph F

    2015-06-05

    Blind quantum computation allows a user to delegate a computation to an untrusted server while keeping the computation hidden. A number of recent works have sought to establish bounds on the communication requirements necessary to implement blind computation, and a bound based on the no-programming theorem of Nielsen and Chuang has emerged as a natural limiting factor. Here we show that this constraint only holds in limited scenarios, and show how to overcome it using a novel method of iterated gate teleportations. This technique enables drastic reductions in the communication required for distributed quantum protocols, extending beyond the blind computation setting. Applied to blind quantum computation, this technique offers significant efficiency improvements, and in some scenarios offers an exponential reduction in communication requirements.

  18. Braid group representation on quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Aziz, Ryan Kasyfil, E-mail: kasyfilryan@gmail.com; Muchtadi-Alamsyah, Intan, E-mail: ntan@math.itb.ac.id

    2015-09-30

    There are many studies about topological representation of quantum computation recently. One of diagram representation of quantum computation is by using ZX-Calculus. In this paper we will make a diagrammatical scheme of Dense Coding. We also proved that ZX-Calculus diagram of maximally entangle state satisfies Yang-Baxter Equation and therefore, we can construct a Braid Group representation of set of maximally entangle state.

  19. Noise thresholds for optical quantum computers.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Christopher M; Haselgrove, Henry L; Nielsen, Michael A

    2006-01-20

    In this Letter we numerically investigate the fault-tolerant threshold for optical cluster-state quantum computing. We allow both photon loss noise and depolarizing noise (as a general proxy for all local noise), and obtain a threshold region of allowed pairs of values for the two types of noise. Roughly speaking, our results show that scalable optical quantum computing is possible for photon loss probabilities <3 x 10(-3), and for depolarization probabilities <10(-4).

  20. Private quantum computation: an introduction to blind quantum computing and related protocols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-06-01

    Quantum technologies hold the promise of not only faster algorithmic processing of data, via quantum computation, but also of more secure communications, in the form of quantum cryptography. In recent years, a number of protocols have emerged which seek to marry these concepts for the purpose of securing computation rather than communication. These protocols address the task of securely delegating quantum computation to an untrusted device while maintaining the privacy, and in some instances the integrity, of the computation. We present a review of the progress to date in this emerging area.

  1. Irreconcilable difference between quantum walks and adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Thomas G.; Meyer, David A.

    2016-06-01

    Continuous-time quantum walks and adiabatic quantum evolution are two general techniques for quantum computing, both of which are described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolutions by Schrödinger's equation. In the former, the Hamiltonian is fixed, while in the latter, the Hamiltonian varies with time. As a result, their formulations of Grover's algorithm evolve differently through Hilbert space. We show that this difference is fundamental; they cannot be made to evolve along each other's path without introducing structure more powerful than the standard oracle for unstructured search. For an adiabatic quantum evolution to evolve like the quantum walk search algorithm, it must interpolate between three fixed Hamiltonians, one of which is complex and introduces structure that is stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Conversely, for a quantum walk to evolve along the path of the adiabatic search algorithm, it must be a chiral quantum walk on a weighted, directed star graph with structure that is also stronger than the oracle for unstructured search. Thus, the two techniques, although similar in being described by Hamiltonians that govern their evolution, compute by fundamentally irreconcilable means.

  2. Robust dynamical decoupling for quantum computing and quantum memory.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre M; Alvarez, Gonzalo A; Suter, Dieter

    2011-06-17

    Dynamical decoupling (DD) is a popular technique for protecting qubits from the environment. However, unless special care is taken, experimental errors in the control pulses used in this technique can destroy the quantum information instead of preserving it. Here, we investigate techniques for making DD sequences robust against different types of experimental errors while retaining good decoupling efficiency in a fluctuating environment. We present experimental data from solid-state nuclear spin qubits and introduce a new DD sequence that is suitable for quantum computing and quantum memory.

  3. A universal quantum module for quantum communication, computation, and metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanks, Michael; Lo Piparo, Nicolò; Trupke, Michael; Schmiedmayer, Jorg; Munro, William J.; Nemoto, Kae

    2017-08-01

    In this work, we describe a simple module that could be ubiquitous for quantum information based applications. The basic modules comprises a single NV- center in diamond embedded in an optical cavity, where the cavity mediates interactions between photons and the electron spin (enabling entanglement distribution and efficient readout), while the nuclear spins constitutes a long-lived quantum memories capable of storing and processing quantum information. We discuss how a network of connected modules can be used for distributed metrology, communication and computation applications. Finally, we investigate the possible use of alternative diamond centers (SiV/GeV) within the module and illustrate potential advantages.

  4. Acausal measurement-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of by-product operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, by-product operators cannot be avoided. Here we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner, Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing restricting local operations to projective measurements. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the standard causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that if we restrict local operations to projective measurements the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing. We also show that it is possible to consider a causal game whose causal inequality is violated by acausal measurement-based quantum computing.

  5. Superadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in cavity QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bao-Jie; Huang, Zhen-Hua; Xue, Zheng-Yuan; Zhang, Xin-Ding

    2017-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum control is a powerful tool for quantum engineering and a key component in some quantum computation models, where accurate control over the timing of the involved pulses is not needed. However, the adiabatic condition requires that the process be very slow and thus limits its application in quantum computation, where quantum gates are preferred to be fast due to the limited coherent times of the quantum systems. Here, we propose a feasible scheme to implement universal holonomic quantum computation based on non-Abelian geometric phases with superadiabatic quantum control, where the adiabatic manipulation is sped up while retaining its robustness against errors in the timing control. Consolidating the advantages of both strategies, our proposal is thus both robust and fast. The cavity QED system is adopted as a typical example to illustrate the merits where the proposed scheme can be realized in a tripod configuration by appropriately controlling the pulse shapes and their relative strength. To demonstrate the distinct performance of our proposal, we also compare our scheme with the conventional adiabatic strategy.

  6. Quantum plug n’ play: modular computation in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Jayne; Modi, Kavan; Vedral, Vlatko; Gu, Mile

    2018-01-01

    Classical computation is modular. It exploits plug n’ play architectures which allow us to use pre-fabricated circuits without knowing their construction. This bestows advantages such as allowing parts of the computational process to be outsourced, and permitting individual circuit components to be exchanged and upgraded. Here, we introduce a formal framework to describe modularity in the quantum regime. We demonstrate a ‘no-go’ theorem, stipulating that it is not always possible to make use of quantum circuits without knowing their construction. This has significant consequences for quantum algorithms, forcing the circuit implementation of certain quantum algorithms to be rebuilt almost entirely from scratch after incremental changes in the problem—such as changing the number being factored in Shor’s algorithm. We develop a workaround capable of restoring modularity, and apply it to design a modular version of Shor’s algorithm that exhibits increased versatility and reduced complexity. In doing so we pave the way to a realistic framework whereby ‘quantum chips’ and remote servers can be invoked (or assembled) to implement various parts of a more complex quantum computation.

  7. Compressed quantum computation using a remote five-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebenstreit, M.; Alsina, D.; Latorre, J. I.; Kraus, B.

    2017-05-01

    The notion of compressed quantum computation is employed to simulate the Ising interaction of a one-dimensional chain consisting of n qubits using the universal IBM cloud quantum computer running on log2(n ) qubits. The external field parameter that controls the quantum phase transition of this model translates into particular settings of the quantum gates that generate the circuit. We measure the magnetization, which displays the quantum phase transition, on a two-qubit system, which simulates a four-qubit Ising chain, and show its agreement with the theoretical prediction within a certain error. We also discuss the relevant point of how to assess errors when using a cloud quantum computer with a limited amount of runs. As a solution, we propose to use validating circuits, that is, to run independent controlled quantum circuits of similar complexity to the circuit of interest.

  8. Efficient quantum circuits for one-way quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Tanamoto, Tetsufumi; Liu, Yu-Xi; Hu, Xuedong; Nori, Franco

    2009-03-13

    While Ising-type interactions are ideal for implementing controlled phase flip gates in one-way quantum computing, natural interactions between solid-state qubits are most often described by either the XY or the Heisenberg models. We show an efficient way of generating cluster states directly using either the imaginary SWAP (iSWAP) gate for the XY model, or the sqrt[SWAP] gate for the Heisenberg model. Our approach thus makes one-way quantum computing more feasible for solid-state devices.

  9. Reversible Data Hiding Based on DNA Computing

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Biocomputing, especially DNA, computing has got great development. It is widely used in information security. In this paper, a novel algorithm of reversible data hiding based on DNA computing is proposed. Inspired by the algorithm of histogram modification, which is a classical algorithm for reversible data hiding, we combine it with DNA computing to realize this algorithm based on biological technology. Compared with previous results, our experimental results have significantly improved the ER (Embedding Rate). Furthermore, some PSNR (peak signal-to-noise ratios) of test images are also improved. Experimental results show that it is suitable for protecting the copyright of cover image in DNA-based information security. PMID:28280504

  10. Analog Computation by DNA Strand Displacement Circuits.

    PubMed

    Song, Tianqi; Garg, Sudhanshu; Mokhtar, Reem; Bui, Hieu; Reif, John

    2016-08-19

    DNA circuits have been widely used to develop biological computing devices because of their high programmability and versatility. Here, we propose an architecture for the systematic construction of DNA circuits for analog computation based on DNA strand displacement. The elementary gates in our architecture include addition, subtraction, and multiplication gates. The input and output of these gates are analog, which means that they are directly represented by the concentrations of the input and output DNA strands, respectively, without requiring a threshold for converting to Boolean signals. We provide detailed domain designs and kinetic simulations of the gates to demonstrate their expected performance. On the basis of these gates, we describe how DNA circuits to compute polynomial functions of inputs can be built. Using Taylor Series and Newton Iteration methods, functions beyond the scope of polynomials can also be computed by DNA circuits built upon our architecture.

  11. Triple-server blind quantum computation using entanglement swapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Wu, Chunhui; Wen, Zhonghua

    2014-04-01

    Blind quantum computation allows a client who does not have enough quantum resources or technologies to achieve quantum computation on a remote quantum server such that the client's input, output, and algorithm remain unknown to the server. Up to now, single- and double-server blind quantum computation have been considered. In this work, we propose a triple-server blind computation protocol where the client can delegate quantum computation to three quantum servers by the use of entanglement swapping. Furthermore, the three quantum servers can communicate with each other and the client is almost classical since one does not require any quantum computational power, quantum memory, and the ability to prepare any quantum states and only needs to be capable of getting access to quantum channels.

  12. Quantum Heterogeneous Computing for Satellite Positioning Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bass, G.; Kumar, V.; Dulny, J., III

    2016-12-01

    Hard optimization problems occur in many fields of academic study and practical situations. We present results in which quantum heterogeneous computing is used to solve a real-world optimization problem: satellite positioning. Optimization problems like this can scale very rapidly with problem size, and become unsolvable with traditional brute-force methods. Typically, such problems have been approximately solved with heuristic approaches; however, these methods can take a long time to calculate and are not guaranteed to find optimal solutions. Quantum computing offers the possibility of producing significant speed-up and improved solution quality. There are now commercially available quantum annealing (QA) devices that are designed to solve difficult optimization problems. These devices have 1000+ quantum bits, but they have significant hardware size and connectivity limitations. We present a novel heterogeneous computing stack that combines QA and classical machine learning and allows the use of QA on problems larger than the quantum hardware could solve in isolation. We begin by analyzing the satellite positioning problem with a heuristic solver, the genetic algorithm. The classical computer's comparatively large available memory can explore the full problem space and converge to a solution relatively close to the true optimum. The QA device can then evolve directly to the optimal solution within this more limited space. Preliminary experiments, using the Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) algorithm to simulate QA hardware, have produced promising results. Working with problem instances with known global minima, we find a solution within 8% in a matter of seconds, and within 5% in a few minutes. Future studies include replacing QMC with commercially available quantum hardware and exploring more problem sets and model parameters. Our results have important implications for how heterogeneous quantum computing can be used to solve difficult optimization problems in any

  13. Reversibility and measurement in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leãao, J. P.

    1998-03-01

    The relation between computation and measurement at a fundamental physical level is yet to be understood. Rolf Landauer was perhaps the first to stress the strong analogy between these two concepts. His early queries have regained pertinence with the recent efforts to developed realizable models of quantum computers. In this context the irreversibility of quantum measurement appears in conflict with the requirement of reversibility of the overall computation associated with the unitary dynamics of quantum evolution. The latter in turn is responsible for the features of superposition and entanglement which make some quantum algorithms superior to classical ones for the same task in speed and resource demand. In this article we advocate an approach to this question which relies on a model of computation designed to enforce the analogy between the two concepts instead of demarcating them as it has been the case so far. The model is introduced as a symmetrization of the classical Turing machine model and is then carried on to quantum mechanics, first as a an abstract local interaction scheme (symbolic measurement) and finally in a nonlocal noninteractive implementation based on Aharonov-Bohm potentials and modular variables. It is suggested that this implementation leads to the most ubiquitous of quantum algorithms: the Discrete Fourier Transform.

  14. Superimposed Code Theoretic Analysis of DNA Codes and DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    complements of one another and the DNA duplex formed is a Watson - Crick (WC) duplex. However, there are many instances when the formation of non-WC...that the user’s requirements for probe selection are met based on the Watson - Crick probe locality within a target. The second type, called...AFRL-RI-RS-TR-2007-288 Final Technical Report January 2008 SUPERIMPOSED CODE THEORETIC ANALYSIS OF DNA CODES AND DNA COMPUTING

  15. Extending matchgates into universal quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Brod, Daniel J.; Galvao, Ernesto F.

    2011-08-15

    Matchgates are a family of two-qubit gates associated with noninteracting fermions. They are classically simulatable if acting only on nearest neighbors but become universal for quantum computation if we relax this restriction or use swap gates [Jozsa and Miyake, Proc. R. Soc. A 464, 3089 (2008)]. We generalize this result by proving that any nonmatchgate parity-preserving unitary is capable of extending the computational power of matchgates into universal quantum computation. We identify the single local invariant of parity-preserving unitaries responsible for this, and discuss related results in the context of fermionic systems.

  16. Extending matchgates into universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brod, Daniel J.; Galvão, Ernesto F.

    2011-08-01

    Matchgates are a family of two-qubit gates associated with noninteracting fermions. They are classically simulatable if acting only on nearest neighbors but become universal for quantum computation if we relax this restriction or use swap gates [Jozsa and Miyake, Proc. R. Soc. ANATUAS1364-502110.1098/rspa.2008.0189 464, 3089 (2008)]. We generalize this result by proving that any nonmatchgate parity-preserving unitary is capable of extending the computational power of matchgates into universal quantum computation. We identify the single local invariant of parity-preserving unitaries responsible for this, and discuss related results in the context of fermionic systems.

  17. Nanoscale solid-state quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardavan, A.; Austwick, M.; Benjamin, S.C.; Briggs, G.A.D.; Dennis, T.J.S.; Ferguson, A.; Hasko, D.G.; Kanai, M.; Khlobystov, A.N.; Lovett, B.W.; Morley, G.W.; Oliver, R.A.; Pettifor, D.G.; Porfyrakis, K.; Reina, J.H.; Rice, J.H.; Smith, J.D.; Taylor, R.A.; Williams, D.A.; Adelmann, C.; Mariette, H.; Hamers, R.J.

    2003-07-01

    Most experts agree that it is too early to say how quantum computers will eventually be built, and several nanoscale solid-state schemes are being implemented in a range of materials. Nanofabricated quantum dots can be made in designer configurations, with established technology for controlling interactions and for reading out results. Epitaxial quantum dots can be grown in vertical arrays in semiconductors, and ultrafast optical techniques are available for controlling and measuring their excitations. Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be used for molecular self-assembly of endohedral fullerenes, which can embody quantum information in the electron spin. The challenges of individual addressing in such tiny structures could rapidly become intractable with increasing numbers of qubits, but these schemes are amenable to global addressing methods for computation.

  18. Building an adiabatic quantum computer simulation in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Santalla, Silvia N.

    2018-05-01

    We present a didactic introduction to adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) via the explicit construction of a classical simulator of quantum computers. This constitutes a suitable route to introduce several important concepts for advanced undergraduates in physics: quantum many-body systems, quantum phase transitions, disordered systems, spin-glasses, and computational complexity theory.

  19. Blind quantum computation with identity authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qin; Li, Zhulin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu; Liu, Chengdong

    2018-04-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client with relatively few quantum resources or poor quantum technologies to delegate his computational problem to a quantum server such that the client's input, output, and algorithm are kept private. However, all existing BQC protocols focus on correctness verification of quantum computation but neglect authentication of participants' identity which probably leads to man-in-the-middle attacks or denial-of-service attacks. In this work, we use quantum identification to overcome such two kinds of attack for BQC, which will be called QI-BQC. We propose two QI-BQC protocols based on a typical single-server BQC protocol and a double-server BQC protocol. The two protocols can ensure both data integrity and mutual identification between participants with the help of a third trusted party (TTP). In addition, an unjammable public channel between a client and a server which is indispensable in previous BQC protocols is unnecessary, although it is required between TTP and each participant at some instant. Furthermore, the method to achieve identity verification in the presented protocols is general and it can be applied to other similar BQC protocols.

  20. Quantum adiabatic computation and adiabatic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wei Zhaohui; Ying Mingsheng

    2007-08-15

    Recently, quantum adiabatic computation has attracted more and more attention in the literature. It is a novel quantum computation model based on adiabatic approximation, and the analysis of a quantum adiabatic algorithm depends highly on the adiabatic conditions. However, it has been pointed out that the traditional adiabatic conditions are problematic. Thus, results obtained previously should be checked and sufficient adiabatic conditions applicable to adiabatic computation should be proposed. Based on a result of Tong et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 150402 (2007)], we propose a modified adiabatic criterion which is more applicable to the analysis of adiabatic algorithms. Asmore » an example, we prove the validity of the local adiabatic search algorithm by employing our criterion.« less

  1. Quantum-Enhanced Cyber Security: Experimental Computation on Quantum-Encrypted Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-03-02

    AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2017-0020 Quantum-Enhanced Cyber Security: Experimental Computation on Quantum-Encrypted Data Philip Walther UNIVERSITT WIEN Final...REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 15 Oct 2015 to 31 Dec 2016 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Quantum-Enhanced Cyber Security: Experimental Computation...FORM SF 298 Final Report for FA9550-1-6-1-0004 Quantum-enhanced cyber security: Experimental quantum computation with quantum-encrypted data

  2. Quantum computing without wavefunctions: time-dependent density functional theory for universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Tempel, David G; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2012-01-01

    We prove that the theorems of TDDFT can be extended to a class of qubit Hamiltonians that are universal for quantum computation. The theorems of TDDFT applied to universal Hamiltonians imply that single-qubit expectation values can be used as the basic variables in quantum computation and information theory, rather than wavefunctions. From a practical standpoint this opens the possibility of approximating observables of interest in quantum computations directly in terms of single-qubit quantities (i.e. as density functionals). Additionally, we also demonstrate that TDDFT provides an exact prescription for simulating universal Hamiltonians with other universal Hamiltonians that have different, and possibly easier-to-realize two-qubit interactions. This establishes the foundations of TDDFT for quantum computation and opens the possibility of developing density functionals for use in quantum algorithms.

  3. Classical multiparty computation using quantum resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clementi, Marco; Pappa, Anna; Eckstein, Andreas; Walmsley, Ian A.; Kashefi, Elham; Barz, Stefanie

    2017-12-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a way to perform classical multiparty computing among parties with limited computational resources. Our method harnesses quantum resources to increase the computational power of the individual parties. We show how a set of clients restricted to linear classical processing are able to jointly compute a nonlinear multivariable function that lies beyond their individual capabilities. The clients are only allowed to perform classical xor gates and single-qubit gates on quantum states. We also examine the type of security that can be achieved in this limited setting. Finally, we provide a proof-of-concept implementation using photonic qubits that allows four clients to compute a specific example of a multiparty function, the pairwise and.

  4. Topics in linear optical quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glancy, Scott Charles

    This thesis covers several topics in optical quantum computation. A quantum computer is a computational device which is able to manipulate information by performing unitary operations on some physical system whose state can be described as a vector (or mixture of vectors) in a Hilbert space. The basic unit of information, called the qubit, is considered to be a system with two orthogonal states, which are assigned logical values of 0 and 1. Photons make excellent candidates to serve as qubits. They have little interactions with the environment. Many operations can be performed using very simple linear optical devices such as beam splitters and phase shifters. Photons can easily be processed through circuit-like networks. Operations can be performed in very short times. Photons are ideally suited for the long-distance communication of quantum information. The great difficulty in constructing an optical quantum computer is that photons naturally interact weakly with one another. This thesis first gives a brief review of two early approaches to optical quantum computation. It will describe how any discrete unitary operation can be performed using a single photon and a network of beam splitters, and how the Kerr effect can be used to construct a two photon logic gate. Second, this work provides a thorough introduction to the linear optical quantum computer developed by Knill, Laflamme, and Milburn. It then presents this author's results on the reliability of this scheme when implemented using imperfect photon detectors. This author finds that quantum computers of this sort cannot be built using current technology. Third, this dissertation describes a method for constructing a linear optical quantum computer using nearly orthogonal coherent states of light as the qubits. It shows how a universal set of logic operations can be performed, including calculations of the fidelity with which these operations may be accomplished. It discusses methods for reducing and

  5. A surface code quantum computer in silicon

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Charles D.; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J.; House, Matthew G.; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y.; Hollenberg, Lloyd C. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel—posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited. PMID:26601310

  6. A surface code quantum computer in silicon.

    PubMed

    Hill, Charles D; Peretz, Eldad; Hile, Samuel J; House, Matthew G; Fuechsle, Martin; Rogge, Sven; Simmons, Michelle Y; Hollenberg, Lloyd C L

    2015-10-01

    The exceptionally long quantum coherence times of phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubits in silicon, coupled with the proven scalability of silicon-based nano-electronics, make them attractive candidates for large-scale quantum computing. However, the high threshold of topological quantum error correction can only be captured in a two-dimensional array of qubits operating synchronously and in parallel-posing formidable fabrication and control challenges. We present an architecture that addresses these problems through a novel shared-control paradigm that is particularly suited to the natural uniformity of the phosphorus donor nuclear spin qubit states and electronic confinement. The architecture comprises a two-dimensional lattice of donor qubits sandwiched between two vertically separated control layers forming a mutually perpendicular crisscross gate array. Shared-control lines facilitate loading/unloading of single electrons to specific donors, thereby activating multiple qubits in parallel across the array on which the required operations for surface code quantum error correction are carried out by global spin control. The complexities of independent qubit control, wave function engineering, and ad hoc quantum interconnects are explicitly avoided. With many of the basic elements of fabrication and control based on demonstrated techniques and with simulated quantum operation below the surface code error threshold, the architecture represents a new pathway for large-scale quantum information processing in silicon and potentially in other qubit systems where uniformity can be exploited.

  7. Geometric manipulation of trapped ions for quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Duan, L M; Cirac, J I; Zoller, P

    2001-06-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to achieve quantum computation based solely on geometric manipulations of a quantum system. The desired geometric operations are obtained by driving the quantum system to undergo appropriate adiabatic cyclic evolutions. Our implementation of the all-geometric quantum computation is based on laser manipulation of a set of trapped ions. An all-geometric approach, apart from its fundamental interest, offers a possible method for robust quantum computation.

  8. Realizing universal Majorana fermionic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ya-Jie; He, Jing; Kou, Su-Peng

    2014-08-01

    Majorana fermionic quantum computation (MFQC) was proposed by S. B. Bravyi and A. Yu. Kitaev [Ann. Phys. (NY) 298, 210 (2002), 10.1006/aphy.2002.6254], who indicated that a (nontopological) fault-tolerant quantum computer built from Majorana fermions may be more efficient than that built from distinguishable two-state systems. However, until now scientists have not known how to realize a MFQC in a physical system. In this paper we propose a possible realization of MFQC. We find that the end of a line defect of a p-wave superconductor or superfluid in a honeycomb lattice traps a Majorana zero mode, which becomes the starting point of MFQC. Then we show how to manipulate Majorana fermions to perform universal MFQC, which possesses possibilities for high-level local controllability through individually addressing the quantum states of individual constituent elements by using timely cold-atom technology.

  9. The quantum computer game: citizen science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damgaard, Sidse; Mølmer, Klaus; Sherson, Jacob

    2013-05-01

    Progress in the field of quantum computation is hampered by daunting technical challenges. Here we present an alternative approach to solving these by enlisting the aid of computer players around the world. We have previously examined a quantum computation architecture involving ultracold atoms in optical lattices and strongly focused tweezers of light. In The Quantum Computer Game (see http://www.scienceathome.org/), we have encapsulated the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the problem in a graphical user interface allowing for easy user input. Players can then search the parameter space with real-time graphical feedback in a game context with a global high-score that rewards short gate times and robustness to experimental errors. The game which is still in a demo version has so far been tried by several hundred players. Extensions of the approach to other models such as Gross-Pitaevskii and Bose-Hubbard are currently under development. The game has also been incorporated into science education at high-school and university level as an alternative method for teaching quantum mechanics. Initial quantitative evaluation results are very positive. AU Ideas Center for Community Driven Research, CODER.

  10. Towards fault tolerant adiabatic quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Daniel A

    2008-04-25

    I show how to protect adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) against decoherence and certain control errors, using a hybrid methodology involving dynamical decoupling, subsystem and stabilizer codes, and energy gaps. Corresponding error bounds are derived. As an example, I show how to perform decoherence-protected AQC against local noise using at most two-body interactions.

  11. Simulations of Probabilities for Quantum Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, M.

    1996-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that classical probabilities, and in particular, probabilistic Turing machine, can be simulated by combining chaos and non-LIpschitz dynamics, without utilization of any man-made devices (such as random number generators). Self-organizing properties of systems coupling simulated and calculated probabilities and their link to quantum computations are discussed.

  12. Blind quantum computing with weak coherent pulses.

    PubMed

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-18

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ϵ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ϵ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ϵ-blind UBQC for any ϵ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  13. Blind Quantum Computing with Weak Coherent Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunjko, Vedran; Kashefi, Elham; Leverrier, Anthony

    2012-05-01

    The universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) protocol [A. Broadbent, J. Fitzsimons, and E. Kashefi, in Proceedings of the 50th Annual IEEE Symposiumon Foundations of Computer Science (IEEE Computer Society, Los Alamitos, CA, USA, 2009), pp. 517-526.] allows a client to perform quantum computation on a remote server. In an ideal setting, perfect privacy is guaranteed if the client is capable of producing specific, randomly chosen single qubit states. While from a theoretical point of view, this may constitute the lowest possible quantum requirement, from a pragmatic point of view, generation of such states to be sent along long distances can never be achieved perfectly. We introduce the concept of ɛ blindness for UBQC, in analogy to the concept of ɛ security developed for other cryptographic protocols, allowing us to characterize the robustness and security properties of the protocol under possible imperfections. We also present a remote blind single qubit preparation protocol with weak coherent pulses for the client to prepare, in a delegated fashion, quantum states arbitrarily close to perfect random single qubit states. This allows us to efficiently achieve ɛ-blind UBQC for any ɛ>0, even if the channel between the client and the server is arbitrarily lossy.

  14. Hardware for dynamic quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Colm A; Johnson, Blake R; Ristè, Diego; Donovan, Brian; Ohki, Thomas A

    2017-10-01

    We describe the hardware, gateware, and software developed at Raytheon BBN Technologies for dynamic quantum information processing experiments on superconducting qubits. In dynamic experiments, real-time qubit state information is fed back or fed forward within a fraction of the qubits' coherence time to dynamically change the implemented sequence. The hardware presented here covers both control and readout of superconducting qubits. For readout, we created a custom signal processing gateware and software stack on commercial hardware to convert pulses in a heterodyne receiver into qubit state assignments with minimal latency, alongside data taking capability. For control, we developed custom hardware with gateware and software for pulse sequencing and steering information distribution that is capable of arbitrary control flow in a fraction of superconducting qubit coherence times. Both readout and control platforms make extensive use of field programmable gate arrays to enable tailored qubit control systems in a reconfigurable fabric suitable for iterative development.

  15. One-way quantum computing in superconducting circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albarrán-Arriagada, F.; Alvarado Barrios, G.; Sanz, M.; Romero, G.; Lamata, L.; Retamal, J. C.; Solano, E.

    2018-03-01

    We propose a method for the implementation of one-way quantum computing in superconducting circuits. Measurement-based quantum computing is a universal quantum computation paradigm in which an initial cluster state provides the quantum resource, while the iteration of sequential measurements and local rotations encodes the quantum algorithm. Up to now, technical constraints have limited a scalable approach to this quantum computing alternative. The initial cluster state can be generated with available controlled-phase gates, while the quantum algorithm makes use of high-fidelity readout and coherent feedforward. With current technology, we estimate that quantum algorithms with above 20 qubits may be implemented in the path toward quantum supremacy. Moreover, we propose an alternative initial state with properties of maximal persistence and maximal connectedness, reducing the required resources of one-way quantum computing protocols.

  16. Universal Adiabatic Quantum Computing using Double Quantum Dot Charge Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan-Anderson, Ciaran; Jacobson, N. Tobias; Landahl, Andrew

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) provides one path to achieving universal quantum computing in experiment. Computation in the AQC model occurs by starting with an easy to prepare groundstate of some simple Hamiltonian and then adiabatically evolving the Hamiltonian to obtain the groundstate of a final, more complex Hamiltonian. It has been shown that the circuit model can be mapped to AQC Hamiltonians and, thus, AQC can be made universal. Further, these Hamiltonians can be made planar and two-local. We propose using double quantum dot charge qubits (DQDs) to implement such universal AQC Hamiltonians. However, the geometry and restricted set of interactions of DQDs make the application of even these 2-local planar Hamiltonians non-trivial. We present a construction tailored to DQDs to overcome the geometric and interaction contraints and allow for universal AQC. These constraints are dealt with in this construction by making use of perturbation gadgets, which introduce ancillary qubits to mediate interactions. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  17. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing.

    PubMed

    Chamon, C; Mucciolo, E R; Ruckenstein, A E; Yang, Z-C

    2017-05-12

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without 'learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  18. Quantum vertex model for reversible classical computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, C.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Ruckenstein, A. E.; Yang, Z.-C.

    2017-05-01

    Mappings of classical computation onto statistical mechanics models have led to remarkable successes in addressing some complex computational problems. However, such mappings display thermodynamic phase transitions that may prevent reaching solution even for easy problems known to be solvable in polynomial time. Here we map universal reversible classical computations onto a planar vertex model that exhibits no bulk classical thermodynamic phase transition, independent of the computational circuit. Within our approach the solution of the computation is encoded in the ground state of the vertex model and its complexity is reflected in the dynamics of the relaxation of the system to its ground state. We use thermal annealing with and without `learning' to explore typical computational problems. We also construct a mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating an approach to reversible classical computation based on state-of-the-art implementations of quantum annealing.

  19. Entanglement spectroscopy on a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johri, Sonika; Steiger, Damian S.; Troyer, Matthias

    2017-11-01

    We present a quantum algorithm to compute the entanglement spectrum of arbitrary quantum states. The interesting universal part of the entanglement spectrum is typically contained in the largest eigenvalues of the density matrix which can be obtained from the lower Renyi entropies through the Newton-Girard method. Obtaining the p largest eigenvalues (λ1>λ2⋯>λp ) requires a parallel circuit depth of O [p (λ1/λp) p] and O [p log(N )] qubits where up to p copies of the quantum state defined on a Hilbert space of size N are needed as the input. We validate this procedure for the entanglement spectrum of the topologically ordered Laughlin wave function corresponding to the quantum Hall state at filling factor ν =1 /3 . Our scaling analysis exposes the tradeoffs between time and number of qubits for obtaining the entanglement spectrum in the thermodynamic limit using finite-size digital quantum computers. We also illustrate the utility of the second Renyi entropy in predicting a topological phase transition and in extracting the localization length in a many-body localized system.

  20. Efficient quantum computing using coherent photon conversion.

    PubMed

    Langford, N K; Ramelow, S; Prevedel, R; Munro, W J; Milburn, G J; Zeilinger, A

    2011-10-12

    Single photons are excellent quantum information carriers: they were used in the earliest demonstrations of entanglement and in the production of the highest-quality entanglement reported so far. However, current schemes for preparing, processing and measuring them are inefficient. For example, down-conversion provides heralded, but randomly timed, single photons, and linear optics gates are inherently probabilistic. Here we introduce a deterministic process--coherent photon conversion (CPC)--that provides a new way to generate and process complex, multiquanta states for photonic quantum information applications. The technique uses classically pumped nonlinearities to induce coherent oscillations between orthogonal states of multiple quantum excitations. One example of CPC, based on a pumped four-wave-mixing interaction, is shown to yield a single, versatile process that provides a full set of photonic quantum processing tools. This set satisfies the DiVincenzo criteria for a scalable quantum computing architecture, including deterministic multiqubit entanglement gates (based on a novel form of photon-photon interaction), high-quality heralded single- and multiphoton states free from higher-order imperfections, and robust, high-efficiency detection. It can also be used to produce heralded multiphoton entanglement, create optically switchable quantum circuits and implement an improved form of down-conversion with reduced higher-order effects. Such tools are valuable building blocks for many quantum-enabled technologies. Finally, using photonic crystal fibres we experimentally demonstrate quantum correlations arising from a four-colour nonlinear process suitable for CPC and use these measurements to study the feasibility of reaching the deterministic regime with current technology. Our scheme, which is based on interacting bosonic fields, is not restricted to optical systems but could also be implemented in optomechanical, electromechanical and superconducting

  1. Scheme for Quantum Computing Immune to Decoherence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin; Vatan, Farrokh

    2008-01-01

    A constructive scheme has been devised to enable mapping of any quantum computation into a spintronic circuit in which the computation is encoded in a basis that is, in principle, immune to quantum decoherence. The scheme is implemented by an algorithm that utilizes multiple physical spins to encode each logical bit in such a way that collective errors affecting all the physical spins do not disturb the logical bit. The scheme is expected to be of use to experimenters working on spintronic implementations of quantum logic. Spintronic computing devices use quantum-mechanical spins (typically, electron spins) to encode logical bits. Bits thus encoded (denoted qubits) are potentially susceptible to errors caused by noise and decoherence. The traditional model of quantum computation is based partly on the assumption that each qubit is implemented by use of a single two-state quantum system, such as an electron or other spin-1.2 particle. It can be surprisingly difficult to achieve certain gate operations . most notably, those of arbitrary 1-qubit gates . in spintronic hardware according to this model. However, ironically, certain 2-qubit interactions (in particular, spin-spin exchange interactions) can be achieved relatively easily in spintronic hardware. Therefore, it would be fortunate if it were possible to implement any 1-qubit gate by use of a spin-spin exchange interaction. While such a direct representation is not possible, it is possible to achieve an arbitrary 1-qubit gate indirectly by means of a sequence of four spin-spin exchange interactions, which could be implemented by use of four exchange gates. Accordingly, the present scheme provides for mapping any 1-qubit gate in the logical basis into an equivalent sequence of at most four spin-spin exchange interactions in the physical (encoded) basis. The complexity of the mathematical derivation of the scheme from basic quantum principles precludes a description within this article; it must suffice to report

  2. A new software-based architecture for quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Nan; Song, FangMin; Li, Xiangdong

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, we study a reliable architecture of a quantum computer and a new instruction set and machine language for the architecture, which can improve the performance and reduce the cost of the quantum computing. We also try to address some key issues in detail in the software-driven universal quantum computers.

  3. Efficient Online Optimized Quantum Control for Adiabatic Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quiroz, Gregory

    Adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) relies on controlled adiabatic evolution to implement a quantum algorithm. While control evolution can take many forms, properly designed time-optimal control has been shown to be particularly advantageous for AQC. Grover's search algorithm is one such example where analytically-derived time-optimal control leads to improved scaling of the minimum energy gap between the ground state and first excited state and thus, the well-known quadratic quantum speedup. Analytical extensions beyond Grover's search algorithm present a daunting task that requires potentially intractable calculations of energy gaps and a significant degree of model certainty. Here, an in situ quantum control protocol is developed for AQC. The approach is shown to yield controls that approach the analytically-derived time-optimal controls for Grover's search algorithm. In addition, the protocol's convergence rate as a function of iteration number is shown to be essentially independent of system size. Thus, the approach is potentially scalable to many-qubit systems.

  4. Scalable quantum computer architecture with coupled donor-quantum dot qubits

    DOEpatents

    Schenkel, Thomas; Lo, Cheuk Chi; Weis, Christoph; Lyon, Stephen; Tyryshkin, Alexei; Bokor, Jeffrey

    2014-08-26

    A quantum bit computing architecture includes a plurality of single spin memory donor atoms embedded in a semiconductor layer, a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, wherein a first voltage applied across at least one pair of the aligned quantum dot and donor atom controls a donor-quantum dot coupling. A method of performing quantum computing in a scalable architecture quantum computing apparatus includes arranging a pattern of single spin memory donor atoms in a semiconductor layer, forming a plurality of quantum dots arranged with the semiconductor layer and aligned with the donor atoms, applying a first voltage across at least one aligned pair of a quantum dot and donor atom to control a donor-quantum dot coupling, and applying a second voltage between one or more quantum dots to control a Heisenberg exchange J coupling between quantum dots and to cause transport of a single spin polarized electron between quantum dots.

  5. Quantum computing gates via optimal control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atia, Yosi; Elias, Yuval; Mor, Tal; Weinstein, Yossi

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate the use of optimal control to design two entropy-manipulating quantum gates which are more complex than the corresponding, commonly used, gates, such as CNOT and Toffoli (CCNOT): A two-qubit gate called polarization exchange (PE) and a three-qubit gate called polarization compression (COMP) were designed using GRAPE, an optimal control algorithm. Both gates were designed for a three-spin system. Our design provided efficient and robust nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio frequency (RF) pulses for 13C2-trichloroethylene (TCE), our chosen three-spin system. We then experimentally applied these two quantum gates onto TCE at the NMR lab. Such design of these gates and others could be relevant for near-future applications of quantum computing devices.

  6. Universal quantum gates for Single Cooper Pair Box based quantum computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Echternach, P.; Williams, C. P.; Dultz, S. C.; Braunstein, S.; Dowling, J. P.

    2000-01-01

    We describe a method for achieving arbitrary 1-qubit gates and controlled-NOT gates within the context of the Single Cooper Pair Box (SCB) approach to quantum computing. Such gates are sufficient to support universal quantum computation.

  7. QDENSITY—A Mathematica quantum computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Burdis, Joseph M.; Tabakin, Frank

    2009-03-01

    This Mathematica 6.0 package is a simulation of a Quantum Computer. The program provides a modular, instructive approach for generating the basic elements that make up a quantum circuit. The main emphasis is on using the density matrix, although an approach using state vectors is also implemented in the package. The package commands are defined in Qdensity.m which contains the tools needed in quantum circuits, e.g., multiqubit kets, projectors, gates, etc. New version program summaryProgram title: QDENSITY 2.0 Catalogue identifier: ADXH_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXH_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 26 055 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 227 540 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica 6.0 Operating system: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under Microsoft Windows XP, Macintosh OS X, and Linux FC4 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADXH_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 174 (2006) 914 Classification: 4.15 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Offers an alternative, more up to date, implementation Nature of problem: Analysis and design of quantum circuits, quantum algorithms and quantum clusters. Solution method: A Mathematica package is provided which contains commands to create and analyze quantum circuits. Several Mathematica notebooks containing relevant examples: Teleportation, Shor's Algorithm and Grover's search are explained in detail. A tutorial, Tutorial.nb is also enclosed. Reasons for new version: The package has been updated to make it fully compatible with Mathematica 6.0 Summary of revisions: The package has been updated to make it fully compatible with Mathematica 6.0 Running time: Most examples

  8. Non-unitary probabilistic quantum computing circuit and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin P. (Inventor); Gingrich, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A quantum circuit performing quantum computation in a quantum computer. A chosen transformation of an initial n-qubit state is probabilistically obtained. The circuit comprises a unitary quantum operator obtained from a non-unitary quantum operator, operating on an n-qubit state and an ancilla state. When operation on the ancilla state provides a success condition, computation is stopped. When operation on the ancilla state provides a failure condition, computation is performed again on the ancilla state and the n-qubit state obtained in the previous computation, until a success condition is obtained.

  9. Computational and experimental analysis of DNA shuffling

    PubMed Central

    Maheshri, Narendra; Schaffer, David V.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a computational model of DNA shuffling based on the thermodynamics and kinetics of this process. The model independently tracks a representative ensemble of DNA molecules and records their states at every stage of a shuffling reaction. These data can subsequently be analyzed to yield information on any relevant metric, including reassembly efficiency, crossover number, type and distribution, and DNA sequence length distributions. The predictive ability of the model was validated by comparison to three independent sets of experimental data, and analysis of the simulation results led to several unique insights into the DNA shuffling process. We examine a tradeoff between crossover frequency and reassembly efficiency and illustrate the effects of experimental parameters on this relationship. Furthermore, we discuss conditions that promote the formation of useless “junk” DNA sequences or multimeric sequences containing multiple copies of the reassembled product. This model will therefore aid in the design of optimal shuffling reaction conditions. PMID:12626764

  10. Novel systems and methods for quantum communication, quantum computation, and quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorshkov, Alexey Vyacheslavovich

    Precise control over quantum systems can enable the realization of fascinating applications such as powerful computers, secure communication devices, and simulators that can elucidate the physics of complex condensed matter systems. However, the fragility of quantum effects makes it very difficult to harness the power of quantum mechanics. In this thesis, we present novel systems and tools for gaining fundamental insights into the complex quantum world and for bringing practical applications of quantum mechanics closer to reality. We first optimize and show equivalence between a wide range of techniques for storage of photons in atomic ensembles. We describe experiments demonstrating the potential of our optimization algorithms for quantum communication and computation applications. Next, we combine the technique of photon storage with strong atom-atom interactions to propose a robust protocol for implementing the two-qubit photonic phase gate, which is an important ingredient in many quantum computation and communication tasks. In contrast to photon storage, many quantum computation and simulation applications require individual addressing of closely-spaced atoms, ions, quantum dots, or solid state defects. To meet this requirement, we propose a method for coherent optical far-field manipulation of quantum systems with a resolution that is not limited by the wavelength of radiation. While alkali atoms are currently the system of choice for photon storage and many other applications, we develop new methods for quantum information processing and quantum simulation with ultracold alkaline-earth atoms in optical lattices. We show how multiple qubits can be encoded in individual alkaline-earth atoms and harnessed for quantum computing and precision measurements applications. We also demonstrate that alkaline-earth atoms can be used to simulate highly symmetric systems exhibiting spin-orbital interactions and capable of providing valuable insights into strongly

  11. Adiabatic quantum computation in open systems.

    PubMed

    Sarandy, M S; Lidar, D A

    2005-12-16

    We analyze the performance of adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) subject to decoherence. To this end, we introduce an inherently open-systems approach, based on a recent generalization of the adiabatic approximation. In contrast to closed systems, we show that a system may initially be in an adiabatic regime, but then undergo a transition to a regime where adiabaticity breaks down. As a consequence, the success of AQC depends sensitively on the competition between various pertinent rates, giving rise to optimality criteria.

  12. Adiabatic Quantum Computing with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Aaron; Biedermann, Grant; Burns, George; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Johnson, Cort; Kemme, Shanalyn; Landahl, Andrew; Mangan, Michael; Parazzoli, L. Paul; Schwindt, Peter; Armstrong, Darrell

    2012-06-01

    We are developing, both theoretically and experimentally, a neutral atom qubit approach to adiabatic quantum computation. Using our microfabricated diffractive optical elements, we plan to implement an array of optical traps for cesium atoms and use Rydberg-dressed ground states to provide a controlled atom-atom interaction. We will develop this experimental capability to generate a two-qubit adiabatic evolution aimed specifically toward demonstrating the two-qubit quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) routine.

  13. Computational Design of DNA-Binding Proteins.

    PubMed

    Thyme, Summer; Song, Yifan

    2016-01-01

    Predicting the outcome of engineered and naturally occurring sequence perturbations to protein-DNA interfaces requires accurate computational modeling technologies. It has been well established that computational design to accommodate small numbers of DNA target site substitutions is possible. This chapter details the basic method of design used in the Rosetta macromolecular modeling program that has been successfully used to modulate the specificity of DNA-binding proteins. More recently, combining computational design and directed evolution has become a common approach for increasing the success rate of protein engineering projects. The power of such high-throughput screening depends on computational methods producing multiple potential solutions. Therefore, this chapter describes several protocols for increasing the diversity of designed output. Lastly, we describe an approach for building comparative models of protein-DNA complexes in order to utilize information from homologous sequences. These models can be used to explore how nature modulates specificity of protein-DNA interfaces and potentially can even be used as starting templates for further engineering.

  14. Quantum computation with indefinite causal structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araújo, Mateus; Guérin, Philippe Allard; Baumeler, ńmin

    2017-11-01

    One way to study the physical plausibility of closed timelike curves (CTCs) is to examine their computational power. This has been done for Deutschian CTCs (D-CTCs) and postselection CTCs (P-CTCs), with the result that they allow for the efficient solution of problems in PSPACE and PP, respectively. Since these are extremely powerful complexity classes, which are not expected to be solvable in reality, this can be taken as evidence that these models for CTCs are pathological. This problem is closely related to the nonlinearity of this models, which also allows, for example, cloning quantum states, in the case of D-CTCs, or distinguishing nonorthogonal quantum states, in the case of P-CTCs. In contrast, the process matrix formalism allows one to model indefinite causal structures in a linear way, getting rid of these effects and raising the possibility that its computational power is rather tame. In this paper, we show that process matrices correspond to a linear particular case of P-CTCs, and therefore that its computational power is upperbounded by that of PP. We show, furthermore, a family of processes that can violate causal inequalities but nevertheless can be simulated by a causally ordered quantum circuit with only a constant overhead, showing that indefinite causality is not necessarily hard to simulate.

  15. PREFACE: Quantum Information, Communication, Computation and Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Fannes, M.; Floreanini, R.; Petritis, D.

    2007-07-01

    The application of quantum mechanics to information related fields such as communication, computation and cryptography is a fast growing line of research that has been witnessing an outburst of theoretical and experimental results, with possible practical applications. On the one hand, quantum cryptography with its impact on secrecy of transmission is having its first important actual implementations; on the other hand, the recent advances in quantum optics, ion trapping, BEC manipulation, spin and quantum dot technologies allow us to put to direct test a great deal of theoretical ideas and results. These achievements have stimulated a reborn interest in various aspects of quantum mechanics, creating a unique interplay between physics, both theoretical and experimental, mathematics, information theory and computer science. In view of all these developments, it appeared timely to organize a meeting where graduate students and young researchers could be exposed to the fundamentals of the theory, while senior experts could exchange their latest results. The activity was structured as a school followed by a workshop, and took place at The Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and The International School for Advanced Studies (SISSA) in Trieste, Italy, from 12-23 June 2006. The meeting was part of the activity of the Joint European Master Curriculum Development Programme in Quantum Information, Communication, Cryptography and Computation, involving the Universities of Cergy-Pontoise (France), Chania (Greece), Leuven (Belgium), Rennes1 (France) and Trieste (Italy). This special issue of Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical collects 22 contributions from well known experts who took part in the workshop. They summarize the present day status of the research in the manifold aspects of quantum information. The issue is opened by two review articles, the first by G Adesso and F Illuminati discussing entanglement in continuous variable

  16. Universal quantum computation with metaplectic anyons

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Shawn X., E-mail: xingshan@math.ucsb.edu; Wang, Zhenghan, E-mail: zhenghwa@math.ucsb.edu, E-mail: zhenghwa@microsoft.com; Microsoft Research Station Q, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106

    2015-03-15

    We show that braidings of the metaplectic anyons X{sub ϵ} in SO(3){sub 2} = SU(2){sub 4} with their total charge equal to the metaplectic mode Y supplemented with projective measurements of the total charge of two metaplectic anyons are universal for quantum computation. We conjecture that similar universal anyonic computing models can be constructed for all metaplectic anyon systems SO(p){sub 2} for any odd prime p ≥ 5. In order to prove universality, we find new conceptually appealing universal gate sets for qutrits and qupits.

  17. Symmetrically private information retrieval based on blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhiwei; Yu, Jianping; Wang, Ping; Xu, Lingling

    2015-05-01

    Universal blind quantum computation (UBQC) is a new secure quantum computing protocol which allows a user Alice who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology to delegate her computing to a server Bob without leaking any privacy. Using the features of UBQC, we propose a protocol to achieve symmetrically private information retrieval, which allows a quantum limited Alice to query an item from Bob with a fully fledged quantum computer; meanwhile, the privacy of both parties is preserved. The security of our protocol is based on the assumption that malicious Alice has no quantum computer, which avoids the impossibility proof of Lo. For the honest Alice, she is almost classical and only requires minimal quantum resources to carry out the proposed protocol. Therefore, she does not need any expensive laboratory which can maintain the coherence of complicated quantum experimental setups.

  18. Integrated Visible Photonics for Trapped-Ion Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-06-10

    necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Defense. Abstract- A scalable trapped-ion-based quantum - computing architecture requires the... Quantum Computing Dave Kharas, Cheryl Sorace-Agaskar, Suraj Bramhavar, William Loh, Jeremy M. Sage, Paul W. Juodawlkis, and John...coherence times, strong coulomb interactions, and optical addressability, hold great promise for implementation of practical quantum information

  19. Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces.

    PubMed

    Xu, G F; Zhang, J; Tong, D M; Sjöqvist, Erik; Kwek, L C

    2012-10-26

    Quantum computation that combines the coherence stabilization virtues of decoherence-free subspaces and the fault tolerance of geometric holonomic control is of great practical importance. Some schemes of adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces have been proposed in the past few years. However, nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces, which avoids a long run-time requirement but with all the robust advantages, remains an open problem. Here, we demonstrate how to realize nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces. By using only three neighboring physical qubits undergoing collective dephasing to encode one logical qubit, we realize a universal set of quantum gates.

  20. Hybrid architecture for encoded measurement-based quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid scheme for quantum computation that combines the modular structure of elementary building blocks used in the circuit model with the advantages of a measurement-based approach to quantum computation. We show how to construct optimal resource states of minimal size to implement elementary building blocks for encoded quantum computation in a measurement-based way, including states for error correction and encoded gates. The performance of the scheme is determined by the quality of the resource states, where within the considered error model a threshold of the order of 10% local noise per particle for fault-tolerant quantum computation and quantum communication. PMID:24946906

  1. Software Systems for High-performance Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Britt, Keith A

    Quantum computing promises new opportunities for solving hard computational problems, but harnessing this novelty requires breakthrough concepts in the design, operation, and application of computing systems. We define some of the challenges facing the development of quantum computing systems as well as software-based approaches that can be used to overcome these challenges. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we present models for the quantum programming and execution models, the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems, and the realization of software stacks for quantum networking. This leads to a discussion of the role that conventionalmore » computing plays in the quantum paradigm and how some of the current challenges for exascale computing overlap with those facing quantum computing.« less

  2. Quantum annealing versus classical machine learning applied to a simplified computational biology problem

    PubMed Central

    Li, Richard Y.; Di Felice, Rosa; Rohs, Remo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-01-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression, but how these proteins recognize and specifically bind to their DNA targets is still debated. Machine learning models are effective means to reveal interaction mechanisms. Here we studied the ability of a quantum machine learning approach to predict binding specificity. Using simplified datasets of a small number of DNA sequences derived from actual binding affinity experiments, we trained a commercially available quantum annealer to classify and rank transcription factor binding. The results were compared to state-of-the-art classical approaches for the same simplified datasets, including simulated annealing, simulated quantum annealing, multiple linear regression, LASSO, and extreme gradient boosting. Despite technological limitations, we find a slight advantage in classification performance and nearly equal ranking performance using the quantum annealer for these fairly small training data sets. Thus, we propose that quantum annealing might be an effective method to implement machine learning for certain computational biology problems. PMID:29652405

  3. Quantum annealing versus classical machine learning applied to a simplified computational biology problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Richard Y.; Di Felice, Rosa; Rohs, Remo; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2018-03-01

    Transcription factors regulate gene expression, but how these proteins recognize and specifically bind to their DNA targets is still debated. Machine learning models are effective means to reveal interaction mechanisms. Here we studied the ability of a quantum machine learning approach to classify and rank binding affinities. Using simplified data sets of a small number of DNA sequences derived from actual binding affinity experiments, we trained a commercially available quantum annealer to classify and rank transcription factor binding. The results were compared to state-of-the-art classical approaches for the same simplified data sets, including simulated annealing, simulated quantum annealing, multiple linear regression, LASSO, and extreme gradient boosting. Despite technological limitations, we find a slight advantage in classification performance and nearly equal ranking performance using the quantum annealer for these fairly small training data sets. Thus, we propose that quantum annealing might be an effective method to implement machine learning for certain computational biology problems.

  4. Designing, programming, and optimizing a (small) quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svore, Krysta

    In 1982, Richard Feynman proposed to use a computer founded on the laws of quantum physics to simulate physical systems. In the more than thirty years since, quantum computers have shown promise to solve problems in number theory, chemistry, and materials science that would otherwise take longer than the lifetime of the universe to solve on an exascale classical machine. The practical realization of a quantum computer requires understanding and manipulating subtle quantum states while experimentally controlling quantum interference. It also requires an end-to-end software architecture for programming, optimizing, and implementing a quantum algorithm on the quantum device hardware. In this talk, we will introduce recent advances in connecting abstract theory to present-day real-world applications through software. We will highlight recent advancement of quantum algorithms and the challenges in ultimately performing a scalable solution on a quantum device.

  5. Semiquantum key distribution with secure delegated quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qin; Chan, Wai Hong; Zhang, Shengyu

    2016-01-01

    Semiquantum key distribution allows a quantum party to share a random key with a “classical” party who only can prepare and measure qubits in the computational basis or reorder some qubits when he has access to a quantum channel. In this work, we present a protocol where a secret key can be established between a quantum user and an almost classical user who only needs the quantum ability to access quantum channels, by securely delegating quantum computation to a quantum server. We show the proposed protocol is robust even when the delegated quantum server is a powerful adversary, and is experimentally feasible with current technology. As one party of our protocol is the most quantum-resource efficient, it can be more practical and significantly widen the applicability scope of quantum key distribution. PMID:26813384

  6. Quantum computation over the butterfly network

    SciTech Connect

    Soeda, Akihito; Kinjo, Yoshiyuki; Turner, Peter S.

    2011-07-15

    In order to investigate distributed quantum computation under restricted network resources, we introduce a quantum computation task over the butterfly network where both quantum and classical communications are limited. We consider deterministically performing a two-qubit global unitary operation on two unknown inputs given at different nodes, with outputs at two distinct nodes. By using a particular resource setting introduced by M. Hayashi [Phys. Rev. A 76, 040301(R) (2007)], which is capable of performing a swap operation by adding two maximally entangled qubits (ebits) between the two input nodes, we show that unitary operations can be performed without adding any entanglementmore » resource, if and only if the unitary operations are locally unitary equivalent to controlled unitary operations. Our protocol is optimal in the sense that the unitary operations cannot be implemented if we relax the specifications of any of the channels. We also construct protocols for performing controlled traceless unitary operations with a 1-ebit resource and for performing global Clifford operations with a 2-ebit resource.« less

  7. Measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing with quantum input verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Verifiable blind quantum computing is a secure delegated quantum computing where a client with a limited quantum technology delegates her quantum computing to a server who has a universal quantum computer. The client's privacy is protected (blindness), and the correctness of the computation is verifiable by the client despite her limited quantum technology (verifiability). There are mainly two types of protocols for verifiable blind quantum computing: the protocol where the client has only to generate single-qubit states and the protocol where the client needs only the ability of single-qubit measurements. The latter is called the measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing. If the input of the client's quantum computing is a quantum state, whose classical efficient description is not known to the client, there was no way for the measurement-only client to verify the correctness of the input. Here we introduce a protocol of measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing where the correctness of the quantum input is also verifiable.

  8. Flow Ambiguity: A Path Towards Classically Driven Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantri, Atul; Demarie, Tommaso F.; Menicucci, Nicolas C.; Fitzsimons, Joseph F.

    2017-07-01

    Blind quantum computation protocols allow a user to delegate a computation to a remote quantum computer in such a way that the privacy of their computation is preserved, even from the device implementing the computation. To date, such protocols are only known for settings involving at least two quantum devices: either a user with some quantum capabilities and a remote quantum server or two or more entangled but noncommunicating servers. In this work, we take the first step towards the construction of a blind quantum computing protocol with a completely classical client and single quantum server. Specifically, we show how a classical client can exploit the ambiguity in the flow of information in measurement-based quantum computing to construct a protocol for hiding critical aspects of a computation delegated to a remote quantum computer. This ambiguity arises due to the fact that, for a fixed graph, there exist multiple choices of the input and output vertex sets that result in deterministic measurement patterns consistent with the same fixed total ordering of vertices. This allows a classical user, computing only measurement angles, to drive a measurement-based computation performed on a remote device while hiding critical aspects of the computation.

  9. Homomorphic encryption experiments on IBM's cloud quantum computing platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, You-Wei; Li, Tan; Li, Feng-Guang; Du, Yu-Tao; Fu, Xiang-Qun; Zhang, Shuo; Wang, Xiang; Bao, Wan-Su

    2017-02-01

    Quantum computing has undergone rapid development in recent years. Owing to limitations on scalability, personal quantum computers still seem slightly unrealistic in the near future. The first practical quantum computer for ordinary users is likely to be on the cloud. However, the adoption of cloud computing is possible only if security is ensured. Homomorphic encryption is a cryptographic protocol that allows computation to be performed on encrypted data without decrypting them, so it is well suited to cloud computing. Here, we first applied homomorphic encryption on IBM's cloud quantum computer platform. In our experiments, we successfully implemented a quantum algorithm for linear equations while protecting our privacy. This demonstration opens a feasible path to the next stage of development of cloud quantum information technology.

  10. Quantum Vertex Model for Reversible Classical Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamon, Claudio; Mucciolo, Eduardo; Ruckenstein, Andrei; Yang, Zhicheng

    We present a planar vertex model that encodes the result of a universal reversible classical computation in its ground state. The approach involves Boolean variables (spins) placed on links of a two-dimensional lattice, with vertices representing logic gates. Large short-ranged interactions between at most two spins implement the operation of each gate. The lattice is anisotropic with one direction corresponding to computational time, and with transverse boundaries storing the computation's input and output. The model displays no finite temperature phase transitions, including no glass transitions, independent of circuit. The computational complexity is encoded in the scaling of the relaxation rate into the ground state with the system size. We use thermal annealing and a novel and more efficient heuristic \\x9Dannealing with learning to study various computational problems. To explore faster relaxation routes, we construct an explicit mapping of the vertex model into the Chimera architecture of the D-Wave machine, initiating a novel approach to reversible classical computation based on quantum annealing.

  11. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Cesium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hankin, Aaron; Parazzoli, L.; Chou, Chin-Wen; Jau, Yuan-Yu; Burns, George; Young, Amber; Kemme, Shanalyn; Ferdinand, Andrew; Biedermann, Grant; Landahl, Andrew; Ivan H. Deutsch Collaboration; Mark Saffman Collaboration

    2013-05-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC) based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism, thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. University of New Mexico: Ivan H. Deutsch, Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal.

  12. Multi-party Semi-quantum Key Agreement with Delegating Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wen-Jie; Chen, Zhen-Yu; Ji, Sai; Wang, Hai-Bin; Zhang, Jun

    2017-10-01

    A multi-party semi-quantum key agreement (SQKA) protocol based on delegating quantum computation (DQC) model is proposed by taking Bell states as quantum resources. In the proposed protocol, the participants only need the ability of accessing quantum channel and preparing single photons {|0〉, |1〉, |+〉, |-〉}, while the complicated quantum operations, such as the unitary operations and Bell measurement, will be delegated to the remote quantum center. Compared with previous quantum key agreement protocols, this client-server model is more feasible in the early days of the emergence of quantum computers. In order to prevent the attacks from outside eavesdroppers, inner participants and quantum center, two single photon sequences are randomly inserted into Bell states: the first sequence is used to perform the quantum channel detection, while the second is applied to disorder the positions of message qubits, which guarantees the security of the protocol.

  13. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states

    PubMed Central

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J.

    2012-01-01

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems. PMID:22946034

  14. Control aspects of quantum computing using pure and mixed states.

    PubMed

    Schulte-Herbrüggen, Thomas; Marx, Raimund; Fahmy, Amr; Kauffman, Louis; Lomonaco, Samuel; Khaneja, Navin; Glaser, Steffen J

    2012-10-13

    Steering quantum dynamics such that the target states solve classically hard problems is paramount to quantum simulation and computation. And beyond, quantum control is also essential to pave the way to quantum technologies. Here, important control techniques are reviewed and presented in a unified frame covering quantum computational gate synthesis and spectroscopic state transfer alike. We emphasize that it does not matter whether the quantum states of interest are pure or not. While pure states underly the design of quantum circuits, ensemble mixtures of quantum states can be exploited in a more recent class of algorithms: it is illustrated by characterizing the Jones polynomial in order to distinguish between different (classes of) knots. Further applications include Josephson elements, cavity grids, ion traps and nitrogen vacancy centres in scenarios of closed as well as open quantum systems.

  15. Verification for measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-06-01

    Blind quantum computing is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology can delegate her quantum computing to a server without leaking any privacy. It is known that a client who has only a measurement device can perform blind quantum computing [T. Morimae and K. Fujii, Phys. Rev. A 87, 050301(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.050301]. It has been an open problem whether the protocol can enjoy the verification, i.e., the ability of the client to check the correctness of the computing. In this paper, we propose a protocol of verification for the measurement-only blind quantum computing.

  16. Radio-frequency measurement in semiconductor quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, TianYi; Chen, MingBo; Cao, Gang; Li, HaiOu; Xiao, Ming; Guo, GuoPing

    2017-05-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots have attracted wide interest for the potential realization of quantum computation. To realize efficient quantum computation, fast manipulation and the corresponding readout are necessary. In the past few decades, considerable progress of quantum manipulation has been achieved experimentally. To meet the requirements of high-speed readout, radio-frequency (RF) measurement has been developed in recent years, such as RF-QPC (radio-frequency quantum point contact) and RF-DGS (radio-frequency dispersive gate sensor). Here we specifically demonstrate the principle of the radio-frequency reflectometry, then review the development and applications of RF measurement, which provides a feasible way to achieve high-bandwidth readout in quantum coherent control and also enriches the methods to study these artificial mesoscopic quantum systems. Finally, we prospect the future usage of radio-frequency reflectometry in scaling-up of the quantum computing models.

  17. Decoding DNA, RNA and peptides with quantum tunnelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Ventra, Massimiliano; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2016-02-01

    Drugs and treatments could be precisely tailored to an individual patient by extracting their cellular- and molecular-level information. For this approach to be feasible on a global scale, however, information on complete genomes (DNA), transcriptomes (RNA) and proteomes (all proteins) needs to be obtained quickly and at low cost. Quantum mechanical phenomena could potentially be of value here, because the biological information needs to be decoded at an atomic level and quantum tunnelling has recently been shown to be able to differentiate single nucleobases and amino acids in short sequences. Here, we review the different approaches to using quantum tunnelling for sequencing, highlighting the theoretical background to the method and the experimental capabilities demonstrated to date. We also explore the potential advantages of the approach and the technical challenges that must be addressed to deliver practical quantum sequencing devices.

  18. Adiabatic Quantum Computation with Neutral Atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Grant

    2013-03-01

    We are implementing a new platform for adiabatic quantum computation (AQC)[2] based on trapped neutral atoms whose coupling is mediated by the dipole-dipole interactions of Rydberg states. Ground state cesium atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism,[3,4] thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. In collaboration with Lambert Parazzoli, Sandia National Laboratories; Aaron Hankin, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; James Chin-Wen Chou, Yuan-Yu Jau, Peter Schwindt, Cort Johnson, and George Burns, Sandia National Laboratories; Tyler Keating, Krittika Goyal, and Ivan Deutsch, Center for Quantum Information and Control (CQuIC), University of New Mexico; and Andrew Landahl, Sandia National Laboratories. This work was supported by the Laboratory Directed Research and Development program at Sandia National Laboratories

  19. QDENSITY—A Mathematica Quantum Computer simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juliá-Díaz, Bruno; Burdis, Joseph M.; Tabakin, Frank

    2006-06-01

    This Mathematica 5.2 package is a simulation of a Quantum Computer. The program provides a modular, instructive approach for generating the basic elements that make up a quantum circuit. The main emphasis is on using the density matrix, although an approach using state vectors is also implemented in the package. The package commands are defined in Qdensity.m which contains the tools needed in quantum circuits, e.g., multiqubit kets, projectors, gates, etc. Selected examples of the basic commands are presented here and a tutorial notebook, Tutorial.nb is provided with the package (available on our website) that serves as a full guide to the package. Finally, application is made to a variety of relevant cases, including Teleportation, Quantum Fourier transform, Grover's search and Shor's algorithm, in separate notebooks: QFT.nb, Teleportation.nb, Grover.nb and Shor.nb where each algorithm is explained in detail. Finally, two examples of the construction and manipulation of cluster states, which are part of "one way computing" ideas, are included as an additional tool in the notebook Cluster.nb. A Mathematica palette containing most commands in QDENSITY is also included: QDENSpalette.nb. Program summaryTitle of program: QDENSITY Catalogue identifier: ADXH_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXH_v1_0 Program available from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Operating systems: Any which supports Mathematica; tested under Microsoft Windows XP, Macintosh OS X, and Linux FC4 Programming language used: Mathematica 5.2 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 180 581 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 382 Distribution format: tar.gz Method of solution: A Mathematica package is provided which contains commands to create and analyze quantum circuits. Several Mathematica notebooks containing relevant examples: Teleportation, Shor's Algorithm and Grover's search are

  20. STIC: Photonic Quantum Computation through Cavity Assisted Interaction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-28

    PRA ; available as quant-ph/06060791. Report for the grant “Photonic Quantum Computation through Cavity Assisted Interaction” from DTO Luming Duan...cavity •B. Wang, L.-M. Duan, PRA 72 (in press, 2005) Single-photon source Photonic Quantum Computation through Cavity-Assisted Interaction H. Jeff Kimble...interaction [Duan, Wang, Kimble, PRA 05] • “Investigate more efficient methods for combating noise in photonic quantum computation ” • Partial progress

  1. Robust Quantum Computing using Molecules with Switchable Dipole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-15

    REPORT Robust quantum computing using molecules with switchable dipole 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Of the many systems studied to...Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS Ultracold polar molecules, quantum computing , phase gates...From - To) 30-Aug-2006 Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 31-Aug-2009 Robust quantum computing using molecules with

  2. Computational Studies of Strongly Correlated Quantum Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hao

    The study of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems is an outstanding challenge. Highly accurate results are needed for the understanding of practical and fundamental problems in condensed-matter physics, high energy physics, material science, quantum chemistry and so on. Our familiar mean-field or perturbative methods tend to be ineffective. Numerical simulations provide a promising approach for studying such systems. The fundamental difficulty of numerical simulation is that the dimension of the Hilbert space needed to describe interacting systems increases exponentially with the system size. Quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) methods are one of the best approaches to tackle the problem of enormous Hilbert space. They have been highly successful for boson systems and unfrustrated spin models. For systems with fermions, the exchange symmetry in general causes the infamous sign problem, making the statistical noise in the computed results grow exponentially with the system size. This hinders our understanding of interesting physics such as high-temperature superconductivity, metal-insulator phase transition. In this thesis, we present a variety of new developments in the auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) methods, including the incorporation of symmetry in both the trial wave function and the projector, developing the constraint release method, using the force-bias to drastically improve the efficiency in Metropolis framework, identifying and solving the infinite variance problem, and sampling Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov wave function. With these developments, some of the most challenging many-electron problems are now under control. We obtain an exact numerical solution of two-dimensional strongly interacting Fermi atomic gas, determine the ground state properties of the 2D Fermi gas with Rashba spin-orbit coupling, provide benchmark results for the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, and establish that the Hubbard model has a stripe order in the

  3. Comparison of computational methods to model DNA minor groove binders.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Hemant Kumar; Chourasia, Mukesh; Kumar, Devesh; Sastry, G Narahari

    2011-03-28

    There has been a profound interest in designing small molecules that interact in sequence-selective fashion with DNA minor grooves. However, most in silico approaches have not been parametrized for DNA ligand interaction. In this regard, a systematic computational analysis of 57 available PDB structures of noncovalent DNA minor groove binders has been undertaken. The study starts with a rigorous benchmarking of GOLD, GLIDE, CDOCKER, and AUTODOCK docking protocols followed by developing QSSR models and finally molecular dynamics simulations. In GOLD and GLIDE, the orientation of the best score pose is closer to the lowest rmsd pose, and the deviation in the conformation of various poses is also smaller compared to other docking protocols. Efficient QSSR models were developed with constitutional, topological, and quantum chemical descriptors on the basis of B3LYP/6-31G* optimized geometries, and with this ΔT(m) values of 46 ligands were predicted. Molecular dynamics simulations of the 14 DNA-ligand complexes with Amber 8.0 show that the complexes are stable in aqueous conditions and do not undergo noticeable fluctuations during the 5 ns production run, with respect to their initial placement in the minor groove region.

  4. Sampling the potential energy surface of a DNA duplex damaged by a food carcinogen: Force field parameterization by ab initio quantum calculations and conformational searching using molecular mechanics computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiangyang

    1999-07-01

    The heterocyclic amine 2-amino-3-methylimidazo (4, 5-f) quinoline (IQ) is one of a number of carcinogens found in barbecued meat and fish. It induces tumors in mammals and is probably involved in human carcinogenesis, because of great exposure to such food carcinogens. IQ is biochemically activated to a derivative which reacts with DNA to form a covalent adduct. This adduct may deform the DNA and consequently cause a mutation. which may initiate carcinogenesis. To understand this cancer initiating event, it is necessary to obtain atomic resolution structures of the damaged DNA. No such structures are available experimentally due to synthesis difficulties. Therefore, we employ extensive molecular mechanics and dynamics calculations for this purpose. The major IQ-DNA adduct in the specific DNA sequence d(5'G1G2C G3CCA3') - d(5'TGGCGCC3') with IQ modified at G3 is studied. The d(5'G1G2C G3CC3') sequence has recently been shown to be a hot-spot for mutations when IQ modification is at G3. Although this sequence is prone to -2 deletions via a ``slippage mechanism'' even when unmodified, a key question is why IQ increases the mutation frequency of the unmodified DNA by about 104 fold. Is there a structural feature imposed by IQ that is responsible? The molecular mechanics and dynamics program AMBER for nucleic acids with the latest force field was chosen for this work. This force field has been demonstrated to reproduce well the B-DNA structure. However, some parameters, the partial charges, bond lengths and angles, dihedral parameters of the modified residue, are not available in the AMBER database. We parameterized the force field using high level ab initio quantum calculations. We created 800 starting conformations which uniformly sampled in combination at 18° intervals three torsion angles that govern the IQ-DNA orientations, and energy minimized them. The most important structures are abnormal; the IQ damaged guanine is rotated out of its standard B-DNA

  5. Quantum Accelerators for High-performance Computing Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S.; Britt, Keith A.; Mohiyaddin, Fahd A.

    We define some of the programming and system-level challenges facing the application of quantum processing to high-performance computing. Alongside barriers to physical integration, prominent differences in the execution of quantum and conventional programs challenges the intersection of these computational models. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we discuss recent advances in programming and execution models for hybrid quantum-classical computing. We discuss a novel quantum-accelerator framework that uses specialized kernels to offload select workloads while integrating with existing computing infrastructure. We elaborate on the role of the host operating system to manage these unique accelerator resources, themore » prospects for deploying quantum modules, and the requirements placed on the language hierarchy connecting these different system components. We draw on recent advances in the modeling and simulation of quantum computing systems with the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems and the realization of software stacks for controlling quantum devices. Finally, we present simulation results that describe the expected system-level behavior of high-performance computing systems composed from compute nodes with quantum processing units. We describe performance for these hybrid systems in terms of time-to-solution, accuracy, and energy consumption, and we use simple application examples to estimate the performance advantage of quantum acceleration.« less

  6. Parallel Photonic Quantum Computation Assisted by Quantum Dots in One-Side Optical Microcavities

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-01-01

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm. PMID:25030424

  7. Parallel photonic quantum computation assisted by quantum dots in one-side optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Wang, Xiaojun

    2014-07-17

    Universal quantum logic gates are important elements for a quantum computer. In contrast to previous constructions on one degree of freedom (DOF) of quantum systems, we investigate the possibility of parallel quantum computations dependent on two DOFs of photon systems. We construct deterministic hyper-controlled-not (hyper-CNOT) gates operating on the spatial-mode and the polarization DOFs of two-photon or one-photon systems by exploring the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in one-sided optical microcavities. These hyper-CNOT gates show that the quantum states of two DOFs can be viewed as independent qubits without requiring auxiliary DOFs in theory. This result can reduce the quantum resources by half for quantum applications with large qubit systems, such as the quantum Shor algorithm.

  8. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K

    2017-02-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion-based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation-based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error-threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects.

  9. Blueprint for a microwave trapped ion quantum computer

    PubMed Central

    Lekitsch, Bjoern; Weidt, Sebastian; Fowler, Austin G.; Mølmer, Klaus; Devitt, Simon J.; Wunderlich, Christof; Hensinger, Winfried K.

    2017-01-01

    The availability of a universal quantum computer may have a fundamental impact on a vast number of research fields and on society as a whole. An increasingly large scientific and industrial community is working toward the realization of such a device. An arbitrarily large quantum computer may best be constructed using a modular approach. We present a blueprint for a trapped ion–based scalable quantum computer module, making it possible to create a scalable quantum computer architecture based on long-wavelength radiation quantum gates. The modules control all operations as stand-alone units, are constructed using silicon microfabrication techniques, and are within reach of current technology. To perform the required quantum computations, the modules make use of long-wavelength radiation–based quantum gate technology. To scale this microwave quantum computer architecture to a large size, we present a fully scalable design that makes use of ion transport between different modules, thereby allowing arbitrarily many modules to be connected to construct a large-scale device. A high error–threshold surface error correction code can be implemented in the proposed architecture to execute fault-tolerant operations. With appropriate adjustments, the proposed modules are also suitable for alternative trapped ion quantum computer architectures, such as schemes using photonic interconnects. PMID:28164154

  10. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yung, M-H; Casanova, J; Mezzacapo, A; McClean, J; Lamata, L; Aspuru-Guzik, A; Solano, E

    2014-01-07

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology.

  11. Gate sequence for continuous variable one-way quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiaolong; Hao, Shuhong; Deng, Xiaowei; Ma, Lingyu; Wang, Meihong; Jia, Xiaojun; Xie, Changde; Peng, Kunchi

    2013-01-01

    Measurement-based one-way quantum computation using cluster states as resources provides an efficient model to perform computation and information processing of quantum codes. Arbitrary Gaussian quantum computation can be implemented sufficiently by long single-mode and two-mode gate sequences. However, continuous variable gate sequences have not been realized so far due to an absence of cluster states larger than four submodes. Here we present the first continuous variable gate sequence consisting of a single-mode squeezing gate and a two-mode controlled-phase gate based on a six-mode cluster state. The quantum property of this gate sequence is confirmed by the fidelities and the quantum entanglement of two output modes, which depend on both the squeezing and controlled-phase gates. The experiment demonstrates the feasibility of implementing Gaussian quantum computation by means of accessible gate sequences.

  12. Quantum dots–DNA bioconjugates: synthesis to applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles particularly quantum dots (QDs) are interesting alternatives to organic fluorophores for a range of applications such as biosensing, imaging and therapeutics. Addition of a programmable scaffold such as DNA to QDs further expands the scope and applicability of these hybrid nanomaterials in biology. In this review, the most important stages of preparation of QD–DNA conjugates for specific applications in biology are discussed. Special emphasis is laid on (i) the most successful strategies to disperse QDs in aqueous media, (ii) the range of different conjugation with detailed discussion about specific merits and demerits in each case, and (iii) typical applications of these conjugates in the context of biology. PMID:27920898

  13. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  14. Experimental Blind Quantum Computing for a Classical Client.

    PubMed

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Liu, Chang; Su, Zu-En; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Sanders, Barry C; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-04

    To date, blind quantum computing demonstrations require clients to have weak quantum devices. Here we implement a proof-of-principle experiment for completely classical clients. Via classically interacting with two quantum servers that share entanglement, the client accomplishes the task of having the number 15 factorized by servers who are denied information about the computation itself. This concealment is accompanied by a verification protocol that tests servers' honesty and correctness. Our demonstration shows the feasibility of completely classical clients and thus is a key milestone towards secure cloud quantum computing.

  15. Experimental Blind Quantum Computing for a Classical Client

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, He-Liang; Zhao, Qi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Liu, Chang; Su, Zu-En; Wang, Xi-Lin; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Sanders, Barry C.; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2017-08-01

    To date, blind quantum computing demonstrations require clients to have weak quantum devices. Here we implement a proof-of-principle experiment for completely classical clients. Via classically interacting with two quantum servers that share entanglement, the client accomplishes the task of having the number 15 factorized by servers who are denied information about the computation itself. This concealment is accompanied by a verification protocol that tests servers' honesty and correctness. Our demonstration shows the feasibility of completely classical clients and thus is a key milestone towards secure cloud quantum computing.

  16. Quantum Computing in Fock Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    1997-04-01

    Fock space system (FSS) has unfixed number (N) of particles and/or degrees of freedom. In quantum computing (QC) main requirement is sustainability of coherent Q-superpositions. This normally favoured by low noise environment. High excitation/high temperature (T) limit is hence discarded as unfeasible for QC. Conversely, if N is itself a quantized variable, the dimensionality of Hilbert basis for qubits may increase faster (say, N-exponentially) than thermal noise (likely, in powers of N and T). Hence coherency may win over T-randomization. For this type of QC speed (S) of factorization of long integers (with D digits) may increase with D (for 'ordinary' QC speed polynomially decreases with D). This (apparent) paradox rests on non-monotonic bijectivity (cf. Georg Cantor's diagonal counting of rational numbers). This brings entire aleph-null structurality ("Babylonian Library" of infinite informational content of integer field) to superposition determining state of quantum analogue of Turing machine head. Structure of integer infinititude (e.g. distribution of primes) results in direct "Platonic pressure" resembling semi-virtual Casimir efect (presure of cut-off vibrational modes). This "effect", the embodiment of Pythagorean "Number is everything", renders Godelian barrier arbitrary thin and hence FSS-based QC can in principle be unlimitedly efficient (e.g. D/S may tend to zero when D tends to infinity).

  17. Verifiable fault tolerance in measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Keisuke; Hayashi, Masahito

    2017-09-01

    Quantum systems, in general, cannot be simulated efficiently by a classical computer, and hence are useful for solving certain mathematical problems and simulating quantum many-body systems. This also implies, unfortunately, that verification of the output of the quantum systems is not so trivial, since predicting the output is exponentially hard. As another problem, the quantum system is very delicate for noise and thus needs an error correction. Here, we propose a framework for verification of the output of fault-tolerant quantum computation in a measurement-based model. In contrast to existing analyses on fault tolerance, we do not assume any noise model on the resource state, but an arbitrary resource state is tested by using only single-qubit measurements to verify whether or not the output of measurement-based quantum computation on it is correct. Verifiability is equipped by a constant time repetition of the original measurement-based quantum computation in appropriate measurement bases. Since full characterization of quantum noise is exponentially hard for large-scale quantum computing systems, our framework provides an efficient way to practically verify the experimental quantum error correction.

  18. The Brain Is both Neurocomputer and Quantum Computer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hameroff, Stuart R.

    2007-01-01

    In their article, "Is the Brain a Quantum Computer,?" Litt, Eliasmith, Kroon, Weinstein, and Thagard (2006) criticize the Penrose-Hameroff "Orch OR" quantum computational model of consciousness, arguing instead for neurocomputation as an explanation for mental phenomena. Here I clarify and defend Orch OR, show how Orch OR and neurocomputation are…

  19. Holonomic quantum computation in the presence of decoherence.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Guridi, I; Girelli, F; Livine, E

    2005-01-21

    We present a scheme to study non-Abelian adiabatic holonomies for open Markovian systems. As an application of our framework, we analyze the robustness of holonomic quantum computation against decoherence. We pinpoint the sources of error that must be corrected to achieve a geometric implementation of quantum computation completely resilient to Markovian decoherence.

  20. Number Partitioning via Quantum Adiabatic Computation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smelyanskiy, Vadim N.; Toussaint, Udo

    2002-01-01

    We study both analytically and numerically the complexity of the adiabatic quantum evolution algorithm applied to random instances of combinatorial optimization problems. We use as an example the NP-complete set partition problem and obtain an asymptotic expression for the minimal gap separating the ground and exited states of a system during the execution of the algorithm. We show that for computationally hard problem instances the size of the minimal gap scales exponentially with the problem size. This result is in qualitative agreement with the direct numerical simulation of the algorithm for small instances of the set partition problem. We describe the statistical properties of the optimization problem that are responsible for the exponential behavior of the algorithm.

  1. Adiabatic Quantum Computing via the Rydberg Blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Tyler; Goyal, Krittika; Deutsch, Ivan

    2012-06-01

    We study an architecture for implementing adiabatic quantum computation with trapped neutral atoms. Ground state atoms are dressed by laser fields in a manner conditional on the Rydberg blockade mechanism, thereby providing the requisite entangling interactions. As a benchmark we study the performance of a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem whose solution is found in the ground state spin configuration of an Ising-like model. We model a realistic architecture, including the effects of magnetic level structure, with qubits encoded into the clock states of ^133Cs, effective B-fields implemented through microwaves and light shifts, and atom-atom coupling achieved by excitation to a high-lying Rydberg level. Including the fundamental effects of photon scattering we find a high fidelity for the two-qubit implementation.

  2. Ancilla-driven quantum computation for qudits and continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proctor, Timothy; Giulian, Melissa; Korolkova, Natalia; Andersson, Erika; Kendon, Viv

    2017-05-01

    Although qubits are the leading candidate for the basic elements in a quantum computer, there are also a range of reasons to consider using higher-dimensional qudits or quantum continuous variables (QCVs). In this paper, we use a general "quantum variable" formalism to propose a method of quantum computation in which ancillas are used to mediate gates on a well-isolated "quantum memory" register and which may be applied to the setting of qubits, qudits (for d >2 ), or QCVs. More specifically, we present a model in which universal quantum computation may be implemented on a register using only repeated applications of a single fixed two-body ancilla-register interaction gate, ancillas prepared in a single state, and local measurements of these ancillas. In order to maintain determinism in the computation, adaptive measurements via a classical feed forward of measurement outcomes are used, with the method similar to that in measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We show that our model has the same hybrid quantum-classical processing advantages as MBQC, including the power to implement any Clifford circuit in essentially one layer of quantum computation. In some physical settings, high-quality measurements of the ancillas may be highly challenging or not possible, and hence we also present a globally unitary model which replaces the need for measurements of the ancillas with the requirement for ancillas to be prepared in states from a fixed orthonormal basis. Finally, we discuss settings in which these models may be of practical interest.

  3. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, S.; Linke, N. M.; Figgatt, C.; Landsman, K. A.; Wright, K.; Monroe, C.

    2016-08-01

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  4. Demonstration of a small programmable quantum computer with atomic qubits.

    PubMed

    Debnath, S; Linke, N M; Figgatt, C; Landsman, K A; Wright, K; Monroe, C

    2016-08-04

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently than any possible conventional computer. Small quantum algorithms have been demonstrated on multiple quantum computing platforms, many specifically tailored in hardware to implement a particular algorithm or execute a limited number of computational paths. Here we demonstrate a five-qubit trapped-ion quantum computer that can be programmed in software to implement arbitrary quantum algorithms by executing any sequence of universal quantum logic gates. We compile algorithms into a fully connected set of gate operations that are native to the hardware and have a mean fidelity of 98 per cent. Reconfiguring these gate sequences provides the flexibility to implement a variety of algorithms without altering the hardware. As examples, we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms with average success rates of 95 and 90 per cent, respectively. We also perform a coherent quantum Fourier transform on five trapped-ion qubits for phase estimation and period finding with average fidelities of 62 and 84 per cent, respectively. This small quantum computer can be scaled to larger numbers of qubits within a single register, and can be further expanded by connecting several such modules through ion shuttling or photonic quantum channels.

  5. Continuous-variable quantum computing in optical time-frequency modes using quantum memories.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Kolthammer, W Steven; Nunn, Joshua; Barbieri, Marco; Datta, Animesh; Walmsley, Ian A

    2014-09-26

    We develop a scheme for time-frequency encoded continuous-variable cluster-state quantum computing using quantum memories. In particular, we propose a method to produce, manipulate, and measure two-dimensional cluster states in a single spatial mode by exploiting the intrinsic time-frequency selectivity of Raman quantum memories. Time-frequency encoding enables the scheme to be extremely compact, requiring a number of memories that are a linear function of only the number of different frequencies in which the computational state is encoded, independent of its temporal duration. We therefore show that quantum memories can be a powerful component for scalable photonic quantum information processing architectures.

  6. Quantum-enhanced Sensing and Efficient Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-27

    accuracy. The system was used to improve quantum boson sampling tests. 15. SUBJECT TERMS EOARD, Quantum Information Processing, Transition Edge Sensors...quantum  boson  sampling (QBS) problem are reported in Ref. [7]. To substantially  increase the scale of feasible tests, we developed a new variation

  7. Experimental realization of quantum cheque using a five-qubit quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Bikash K.; Banerjee, Anindita; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-12-01

    Quantum cheques could be a forgery-free way to make transaction in a quantum networked banking system with perfect security against any no-signalling adversary. Here, we demonstrate the implementation of quantum cheque, proposed by Moulick and Panigrahi (Quantum Inf Process 15:2475-2486, 2016), using the five-qubit IBM quantum computer. Appropriate single qubit, CNOT and Fredkin gates are used in an optimized configuration. The accuracy of implementation is checked and verified through quantum state tomography by comparing results from the theoretical and experimental density matrices.

  8. Scalable quantum computation scheme based on quantum-actuated nuclear-spin decoherence-free qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Lihong; Rong, Xing; Geng, Jianpei; Shi, Fazhan; Li, Zhaokai; Duan, Changkui; Du, Jiangfeng

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel theoretical scheme of quantum computation. Nuclear spin pairs are utilized to encode decoherence-free (DF) qubits. A nitrogen-vacancy center serves as a quantum actuator to initialize, readout, and quantum control the DF qubits. The realization of CNOT gates between two DF qubits are also presented. Numerical simulations show high fidelities of all these processes. Additionally, we discuss the potential of scalability. Our scheme reduces the challenge of classical interfaces from controlling and observing complex quantum systems down to a simple quantum actuator. It also provides a novel way to handle complex quantum systems.

  9. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding.

    PubMed

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B

    2016-09-02

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  10. Universal Quantum Computing with Arbitrary Continuous-Variable Encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Hoi-Kwan; Plenio, Martin B.

    2016-09-01

    Implementing a qubit quantum computer in continuous-variable systems conventionally requires the engineering of specific interactions according to the encoding basis states. In this work, we present a unified formalism to conduct universal quantum computation with a fixed set of operations but arbitrary encoding. By storing a qubit in the parity of two or four qumodes, all computing processes can be implemented by basis state preparations, continuous-variable exponential-swap operations, and swap tests. Our formalism inherits the advantages that the quantum information is decoupled from collective noise, and logical qubits with different encodings can be brought to interact without decoding. We also propose a possible implementation of the required operations by using interactions that are available in a variety of continuous-variable systems. Our work separates the "hardware" problem of engineering quantum-computing-universal interactions, from the "software" problem of designing encodings for specific purposes. The development of quantum computer architecture could hence be simplified.

  11. Quantum Computation by Optically Coupled Steady Atoms/Quantum-Dots Inside a Quantum Cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pradhan, P.; Wang, K. L.; Roychowdhury, V. P.; Anantram, M. P.; Mor, T.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    We present a model for quantum computation using $n$ steady 3-level atoms kept inside a quantum cavity, or using $n$ quantum-dots (QDs) kept inside a quantum cavity. In this model one external laser is pointed towards all the atoms/QDs, and $n$ pairs of electrodes are addressing the atoms/QDs, so that each atom is addressed by one pair. The energy levels of each atom/QD are controlled by an external Stark field given to the atom/QD by its external pair of electrodes. Transition between two energy levels of an individual atom/ QD are controlled by the voltage on its electrodes, and by the external laser. Interactions between two atoms/ QDs are performed with the additional help of the cavity mode (using on-resonance condition). Laser frequency, cavity frequency, and energy levels are far off-resonance most of the time, and they are brought to the resonance (using the Stark effect) only at the time of operations. Steps for a controlled-NOT gate between any two atoms/QDs have been described for this model. Our model demands some challenging technological efforts, such as manufacturing single-electron QDs inside a cavity. However, it promises big advantages over other existing models which are currently implemented, and might enable a much easier scale-up, to compute with many more qubits.

  12. Experimental magic state distillation for fault-tolerant quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Souza, Alexandre M; Zhang, Jingfu; Ryan, Colm A; Laflamme, Raymond

    2011-01-25

    Any physical quantum device for quantum information processing (QIP) is subject to errors in implementation. In order to be reliable and efficient, quantum computers will need error-correcting or error-avoiding methods. Fault-tolerance achieved through quantum error correction will be an integral part of quantum computers. Of the many methods that have been discovered to implement it, a highly successful approach has been to use transversal gates and specific initial states. A critical element for its implementation is the availability of high-fidelity initial states, such as |0〉 and the 'magic state'. Here, we report an experiment, performed in a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum processor, showing sufficient quantum control to improve the fidelity of imperfect initial magic states by distilling five of them into one with higher fidelity.

  13. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication.

    PubMed

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-21

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics.

  14. Secure Multiparty Quantum Computation for Summation and Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    As a fundamental primitive, Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication can be used to build complex secure protocols for other multiparty computations, specially, numerical computations. However, there is still lack of systematical and efficient quantum methods to compute Secure Multiparty Summation and Multiplication. In this paper, we present a novel and efficient quantum approach to securely compute the summation and multiplication of multiparty private inputs, respectively. Compared to classical solutions, our proposed approach can ensure the unconditional security and the perfect privacy protection based on the physical principle of quantum mechanics. PMID:26792197

  15. Quantum Monte Carlo Endstation for Petascale Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Lubos Mitas

    2011-01-26

    NCSU research group has been focused on accomplising the key goals of this initiative: establishing new generation of quantum Monte Carlo (QMC) computational tools as a part of Endstation petaflop initiative for use at the DOE ORNL computational facilities and for use by computational electronic structure community at large; carrying out high accuracy quantum Monte Carlo demonstration projects in application of these tools to the forefront electronic structure problems in molecular and solid systems; expanding the impact of QMC methods and approaches; explaining and enhancing the impact of these advanced computational approaches. In particular, we have developed quantum Monte Carlomore » code (QWalk, www.qwalk.org) which was significantly expanded and optimized using funds from this support and at present became an actively used tool in the petascale regime by ORNL researchers and beyond. These developments have been built upon efforts undertaken by the PI's group and collaborators over the period of the last decade. The code was optimized and tested extensively on a number of parallel architectures including petaflop ORNL Jaguar machine. We have developed and redesigned a number of code modules such as evaluation of wave functions and orbitals, calculations of pfaffians and introduction of backflow coordinates together with overall organization of the code and random walker distribution over multicore architectures. We have addressed several bottlenecks such as load balancing and verified efficiency and accuracy of the calculations with the other groups of the Endstation team. The QWalk package contains about 50,000 lines of high quality object-oriented C++ and includes also interfaces to data files from other conventional electronic structure codes such as Gamess, Gaussian, Crystal and others. This grant supported PI for one month during summers, a full-time postdoc and partially three graduate students over the period of the grant duration, it has resulted in

  16. Digitized adiabatic quantum computing with a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Barends, R; Shabani, A; Lamata, L; Kelly, J; Mezzacapo, A; Las Heras, U; Babbush, R; Fowler, A G; Campbell, B; Chen, Yu; Chen, Z; Chiaro, B; Dunsworth, A; Jeffrey, E; Lucero, E; Megrant, A; Mutus, J Y; Neeley, M; Neill, C; O'Malley, P J J; Quintana, C; Roushan, P; Sank, D; Vainsencher, A; Wenner, J; White, T C; Solano, E; Neven, H; Martinis, John M

    2016-06-09

    Quantum mechanics can help to solve complex problems in physics and chemistry, provided they can be programmed in a physical device. In adiabatic quantum computing, a system is slowly evolved from the ground state of a simple initial Hamiltonian to a final Hamiltonian that encodes a computational problem. The appeal of this approach lies in the combination of simplicity and generality; in principle, any problem can be encoded. In practice, applications are restricted by limited connectivity, available interactions and noise. A complementary approach is digital quantum computing, which enables the construction of arbitrary interactions and is compatible with error correction, but uses quantum circuit algorithms that are problem-specific. Here we combine the advantages of both approaches by implementing digitized adiabatic quantum computing in a superconducting system. We tomographically probe the system during the digitized evolution and explore the scaling of errors with system size. We then let the full system find the solution to random instances of the one-dimensional Ising problem as well as problem Hamiltonians that involve more complex interactions. This digital quantum simulation of the adiabatic algorithm consists of up to nine qubits and up to 1,000 quantum logic gates. The demonstration of digitized adiabatic quantum computing in the solid state opens a path to synthesizing long-range correlations and solving complex computational problems. When combined with fault-tolerance, our approach becomes a general-purpose algorithm that is scalable.

  17. Quantum computing with acceptor spins in silicon.

    PubMed

    Salfi, Joe; Tong, Mengyang; Rogge, Sven; Culcer, Dimitrie

    2016-06-17

    The states of a boron acceptor near a Si/SiO2 interface, which bind two low-energy Kramers pairs, have exceptional properties for encoding quantum information and, with the aid of strain, both heavy hole and light hole-based spin qubits can be designed. Whereas a light-hole spin qubit was introduced recently (arXiv:1508.04259), here we present analytical and numerical results proving that a heavy-hole spin qubit can be reliably initialised, rotated and entangled by electrical means alone. This is due to strong Rashba-like spin-orbit interaction terms enabled by the interface inversion asymmetry. Single qubit rotations rely on electric-dipole spin resonance (EDSR), which is strongly enhanced by interface-induced spin-orbit terms. Entanglement can be accomplished by Coulomb exchange, coupling to a resonator, or spin-orbit induced dipole-dipole interactions. By analysing the qubit sensitivity to charge noise, we demonstrate that interface-induced spin-orbit terms are responsible for sweet spots in the dephasing time [Formula: see text] as a function of the top gate electric field, which are close to maxima in the EDSR strength, where the EDSR gate has high fidelity. We show that both qubits can be described using the same starting Hamiltonian, and by comparing their properties we show that the complex interplay of bulk and interface-induced spin-orbit terms allows a high degree of electrical control and makes acceptors potential candidates for scalable quantum computation in Si.

  18. Hybrid annealing: Coupling a quantum simulator to a classical computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graß, Tobias; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2017-05-01

    Finding the global minimum in a rugged potential landscape is a computationally hard task, often equivalent to relevant optimization problems. Annealing strategies, either classical or quantum, explore the configuration space by evolving the system under the influence of thermal or quantum fluctuations. The thermal annealing dynamics can rapidly freeze the system into a low-energy configuration, and it can be simulated well on a classical computer, but it easily gets stuck in local minima. Quantum annealing, on the other hand, can be guaranteed to find the true ground state and can be implemented in modern quantum simulators; however, quantum adiabatic schemes become prohibitively slow in the presence of quasidegeneracies. Here, we propose a strategy which combines ideas from simulated annealing and quantum annealing. In such a hybrid algorithm, the outcome of a quantum simulator is processed on a classical device. While the quantum simulator explores the configuration space by repeatedly applying quantum fluctuations and performing projective measurements, the classical computer evaluates each configuration and enforces a lowering of the energy. We have simulated this algorithm for small instances of the random energy model, showing that it potentially outperforms both simulated thermal annealing and adiabatic quantum annealing. It becomes most efficient for problems involving many quasidegenerate ground states.

  19. Self-guaranteed measurement-based quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Hajdušek, Michal

    2018-05-01

    In order to guarantee the output of a quantum computation, we usually assume that the component devices are trusted. However, when the total computation process is large, it is not easy to guarantee the whole system when we have scaling effects, unexpected noise, or unaccounted for correlations between several subsystems. If we do not trust the measurement basis or the prepared entangled state, we do need to be worried about such uncertainties. To this end, we propose a self-guaranteed protocol for verification of quantum computation under the scheme of measurement-based quantum computation where no prior-trusted devices (measurement basis or entangled state) are needed. The approach we present enables the implementation of verifiable quantum computation using the measurement-based model in the context of a particular instance of delegated quantum computation where the server prepares the initial computational resource and sends it to the client, who drives the computation by single-qubit measurements. Applying self-testing procedures, we are able to verify the initial resource as well as the operation of the quantum devices and hence the computation itself. The overhead of our protocol scales with the size of the initial resource state to the power of 4 times the natural logarithm of the initial state's size.

  20. Energy barriers and rates of tautomeric transitions in DNA bases: ab initio quantum chemical study.

    PubMed

    Basu, Soumalee; Majumdar, Rabi; Das, Gourab K; Bhattacharyya, Dhananjay

    2005-12-01

    Tautomeric transitions of DNA bases are proton transfer reactions, which are important in biology. These reactions are involved in spontaneous point mutations of the genetic material. In the present study, intrinsic reaction coordinates (IRC) analyses through ab initio quantum chemical calculations have been carried out for the individual DNA bases A, T, G, C and also A:T and G:C base pairs to estimate the kinetic and thermodynamic barriers using MP2/6-31G** method for tautomeric transitions. Relatively higher values of kinetic barriers (about 50-60 kcal/mol) have been observed for the single bases, indicating that tautomeric alterations of isolated single bases are quite unlikely. On the other hand, relatively lower values of the kinetic barriers (about 20-25 kcal/mol) for the DNA base pairs A:T and G:C clearly suggest that the tautomeric shifts are much more favorable in DNA base pairs than in isolated single bases. The unusual base pairing A':C, T':G, C':A or G':T in the daughter DNA molecule, resulting from a parent DNA molecule with tautomeric shifts, is found to be stable enough to result in a mutation. The transition rate constants for the single DNA bases in addition to the base pairs are also calculated by computing the free energy differences between the transition states and the reactants.

  1. Silicon CMOS architecture for a spin-based quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Veldhorst, M; Eenink, H G J; Yang, C H; Dzurak, A S

    2017-12-15

    Recent advances in quantum error correction codes for fault-tolerant quantum computing and physical realizations of high-fidelity qubits in multiple platforms give promise for the construction of a quantum computer based on millions of interacting qubits. However, the classical-quantum interface remains a nascent field of exploration. Here, we propose an architecture for a silicon-based quantum computer processor based on complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology. We show how a transistor-based control circuit together with charge-storage electrodes can be used to operate a dense and scalable two-dimensional qubit system. The qubits are defined by the spin state of a single electron confined in quantum dots, coupled via exchange interactions, controlled using a microwave cavity, and measured via gate-based dispersive readout. We implement a spin qubit surface code, showing the prospects for universal quantum computation. We discuss the challenges and focus areas that need to be addressed, providing a path for large-scale quantum computing.

  2. Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    probabilistic measurement , so we developed quantum memories and guided-wave implementations of same, demonstrating controlled delay of a heralded single...Second, fundamental scalability requires a method to synchronize protocols based on quantum measurements , which are inherently probabilistic. To meet...AFRL-AFOSR-UK-TR-2016-0007 Scalable Quantum Networks for Distributed Computing and Sensing Ian Walmsley THE UNIVERSITY OF OXFORD Final Report 04/01

  3. Towards scalable quantum communication and computation: Novel approaches and realizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Liang

    Quantum information science involves exploration of fundamental laws of quantum mechanics for information processing tasks. This thesis presents several new approaches towards scalable quantum information processing. First, we consider a hybrid approach to scalable quantum computation, based on an optically connected network of few-qubit quantum registers. Specifically, we develop a novel scheme for scalable quantum computation that is robust against various imperfections. To justify that nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers in diamond can be a promising realization of the few-qubit quantum register, we show how to isolate a few proximal nuclear spins from the rest of the environment and use them for the quantum register. We also demonstrate experimentally that the nuclear spin coherence is only weakly perturbed under optical illumination, which allows us to implement quantum logical operations that use the nuclear spins to assist the repetitive-readout of the electronic spin. Using this technique, we demonstrate more than two-fold improvement in signal-to-noise ratio. Apart from direct application to enhance the sensitivity of the NV-based nano-magnetometer, this experiment represents an important step towards the realization of robust quantum information processors using electronic and nuclear spin qubits. We then study realizations of quantum repeaters for long distance quantum communication. Specifically, we develop an efficient scheme for quantum repeaters based on atomic ensembles. We use dynamic programming to optimize various quantum repeater protocols. In addition, we propose a new protocol of quantum repeater with encoding, which efficiently uses local resources (about 100 qubits) to identify and correct errors, to achieve fast one-way quantum communication over long distances. Finally, we explore quantum systems with topological order. Such systems can exhibit remarkable phenomena such as quasiparticles with anyonic statistics and have been proposed as

  4. An approach to quantum-computational hydrologic inverse analysis

    DOE PAGES

    O'Malley, Daniel

    2018-05-02

    Making predictions about flow and transport in an aquifer requires knowledge of the heterogeneous properties of the aquifer such as permeability. Computational methods for inverse analysis are commonly used to infer these properties from quantities that are more readily observable such as hydraulic head. We present a method for computational inverse analysis that utilizes a type of quantum computer called a quantum annealer. While quantum computing is in an early stage compared to classical computing, we demonstrate that it is sufficiently developed that it can be used to solve certain subsurface flow problems. We utilize a D-Wave 2X quantum annealermore » to solve 1D and 2D hydrologic inverse problems that, while small by modern standards, are similar in size and sometimes larger than hydrologic inverse problems that were solved with early classical computers. Our results and the rapid progress being made with quantum computing hardware indicate that the era of quantum-computational hydrology may not be too far in the future.« less

  5. An approach to quantum-computational hydrologic inverse analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Malley, Daniel

    2018-05-02

    Making predictions about flow and transport in an aquifer requires knowledge of the heterogeneous properties of the aquifer such as permeability. Computational methods for inverse analysis are commonly used to infer these properties from quantities that are more readily observable such as hydraulic head. We present a method for computational inverse analysis that utilizes a type of quantum computer called a quantum annealer. While quantum computing is in an early stage compared to classical computing, we demonstrate that it is sufficiently developed that it can be used to solve certain subsurface flow problems. We utilize a D-Wave 2X quantum annealer to solve 1D and 2D hydrologic inverse problems that, while small by modern standards, are similar in size and sometimes larger than hydrologic inverse problems that were solved with early classical computers. Our results and the rapid progress being made with quantum computing hardware indicate that the era of quantum-computational hydrology may not be too far in the future.

  6. An approach to quantum-computational hydrologic inverse analysis

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Daniel

    Making predictions about flow and transport in an aquifer requires knowledge of the heterogeneous properties of the aquifer such as permeability. Computational methods for inverse analysis are commonly used to infer these properties from quantities that are more readily observable such as hydraulic head. We present a method for computational inverse analysis that utilizes a type of quantum computer called a quantum annealer. While quantum computing is in an early stage compared to classical computing, we demonstrate that it is sufficiently developed that it can be used to solve certain subsurface flow problems. We utilize a D-Wave 2X quantum annealermore » to solve 1D and 2D hydrologic inverse problems that, while small by modern standards, are similar in size and sometimes larger than hydrologic inverse problems that were solved with early classical computers. Our results and the rapid progress being made with quantum computing hardware indicate that the era of quantum-computational hydrology may not be too far in the future.« less

  7. Cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Brandl, M F; van Mourik, M W; Postler, L; Nolf, A; Lakhmanskiy, K; Paiva, R R; Möller, S; Daniilidis, N; Häffner, H; Kaushal, V; Ruster, T; Warschburger, C; Kaufmann, H; Poschinger, U G; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Schindler, P; Monz, T; Blatt, R

    2016-11-01

    We report on the design of a cryogenic setup for trapped ion quantum computing containing a segmented surface electrode trap. The heat shield of our cryostat is designed to attenuate alternating magnetic field noise, resulting in 120 dB reduction of 50 Hz noise along the magnetic field axis. We combine this efficient magnetic shielding with high optical access required for single ion addressing as well as for efficient state detection by placing two lenses each with numerical aperture 0.23 inside the inner heat shield. The cryostat design incorporates vibration isolation to avoid decoherence of optical qubits due to the motion of the cryostat. We measure vibrations of the cryostat of less than ±20 nm over 2 s. In addition to the cryogenic apparatus, we describe the setup required for an operation with 40 Ca + and 88 Sr + ions. The instability of the laser manipulating the optical qubits in 40 Ca + is characterized by yielding a minimum of its Allan deviation of 2.4 ⋅ 10 -15 at 0.33 s. To evaluate the performance of the apparatus, we trapped 40 Ca + ions, obtaining a heating rate of 2.14(16) phonons/s and a Gaussian decay of the Ramsey contrast with a 1/e-time of 18.2(8) ms.

  8. Quantum computing with Majorana fermion codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litinski, Daniel; von Oppen, Felix

    2018-05-01

    We establish a unified framework for Majorana-based fault-tolerant quantum computation with Majorana surface codes and Majorana color codes. All logical Clifford gates are implemented with zero-time overhead. This is done by introducing a protocol for Pauli product measurements with tetrons and hexons which only requires local 4-Majorana parity measurements. An analogous protocol is used in the fault-tolerant setting, where tetrons and hexons are replaced by Majorana surface code patches, and parity measurements are replaced by lattice surgery, still only requiring local few-Majorana parity measurements. To this end, we discuss twist defects in Majorana fermion surface codes and adapt the technique of twist-based lattice surgery to fermionic codes. Moreover, we propose a family of codes that we refer to as Majorana color codes, which are obtained by concatenating Majorana surface codes with small Majorana fermion codes. Majorana surface and color codes can be used to decrease the space overhead and stabilizer weight compared to their bosonic counterparts.

  9. DNA Conjugation and DNA Directed Self-Assembly of Quantum Dots for Nanophotonic Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Anirban

    Colloidal quantum dots (QDs) or semiconductor nanocrystals are often used to describe 2--20 nm solution processed nanoparticles of various semiconductor materials that display quantum confinement effects. Compared to traditional fluorescent organic dyes, QDs provide many advantages. For biological applications it is necessary to develop reliable methods to functionalize QDs with hydrophilic biomolecules so that they may maintain their stability and functionality in physiological conditions. DNA, a molecule that encodes genetic information, is arguably the smartest molecule that nature has ever produced and one of the most explored bio-macromolecules. QDs that are functionalized with DNA can potentially be organized with nanometer precision by DNA directed self-assembly, and the resulting arrangements may facilitate the display of novel optical properties. The goal of this dissertation was to achieve a robust reliable yet simple strategy to link DNA to QDs so that they can be used for DNA directed self assembly by which we can engineer their optical properties. Presented here is a series of studies to achieve this goal. First we demonstrate the aqueous synthesis of colloidal nanocrystal heterostructures consisting of the CdTe core encapsulated by CdS/ZnS or CdSe/ZnS shells using glutathione (GSH), a tripeptide, as the capping ligand. We next employed this shell synthesis strategy to conjugate PS-PO chimeric DNA to QDs at the time of shell synthesis. We synthesized a library of DNA linked QDs emitting from UV to near IR that are very stable in high salt concentrations. These DNA functionalized QDs were further site-specifically organized on DNA origami in desired patterns directed by DNA self-assembly. We further extended our capability to functionalize DNA to real IR emitting CdxPb 1-xTe alloyed QDs, and demonstrated their stability by self-assembling them on DNA origami. The photo-physical properties of the QDs were further engineered by attaching a QD and a gold

  10. Quantum interference in DNA bases probed by graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Heejeong; Seul Kim, Han; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Lee, Dongho; Hoon Kim, Yong; Huh, Nam

    2013-07-01

    Based on first-principles nonequilibrium Green's function calculations, we demonstrate quantum interference (QI) effects on the tunneling conductance of deoxyribonucleic acid bases placed between zigzag graphene nanoribbon electrodes. With the analogy of QI in hydrocarbon ring structures, we hypothesize that QI can be well preserved in the π-π coupling between the carbon-based electrode and a single DNA base. We demonstrate indications of QI, such as destructively interfered anti-resonance or Fano-resonance, that affect the variation of tunneling conductance depending on the orientation of a base. We find that guanine, with a 10-fold higher transverse conductance, can be singled out from the other bases.

  11. Optically Controlled Signal Amplification for DNA Computation.

    PubMed

    Prokup, Alexander; Hemphill, James; Liu, Qingyang; Deiters, Alexander

    2015-10-16

    The hybridization chain reaction (HCR) and fuel-catalyst cycles have been applied to address the problem of signal amplification in DNA-based computation circuits. While they function efficiently, these signal amplifiers cannot be switched ON or OFF quickly and noninvasively. To overcome these limitations, a light-activated initiator strand for the HCR, which enabled fast optical OFF → ON switching, was developed. Similarly, when a light-activated version of the catalyst strand or the inhibitor strand of a fuel-catalyst cycle was applied, the cycle could be optically switched from OFF → ON or ON → OFF, respectively. To move the capabilities of these devices beyond solution-based operations, the components were embedded in agarose gels. Irradiation with customizable light patterns and at different time points demonstrated both spatial and temporal control. The addition of a translator gate enabled a spatially activated signal to travel along a predefined path, akin to a chemical wire. Overall, the addition of small light-cleavable photocaging groups to DNA signal amplification circuits enabled conditional control as well as fast photocontrol of signal amplification.

  12. Secure entanglement distillation for double-server blind quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-07-12

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client, who does not have enough quantum technologies at her disposal, can delegate her quantum computation to a server, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that the server cannot learn anything about the client's input, output, and program. If the client interacts with only a single server, the client has to have some minimum quantum power, such as the ability of emitting randomly rotated single-qubit states or the ability of measuring states. If the client interacts with two servers who share Bell pairs but cannot communicate with each other, the client can be completely classical. For such a double-server scheme, two servers have to share clean Bell pairs, and therefore the entanglement distillation is necessary in a realistic noisy environment. In this Letter, we show that it is possible to perform entanglement distillation in the double-server scheme without degrading the security of blind quantum computing.

  13. Experimental quantum computing to solve systems of linear equations.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Weedbrook, C; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Gu, Mile; Zhu, M-J; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-06-07

    Solving linear systems of equations is ubiquitous in all areas of science and engineering. With rapidly growing data sets, such a task can be intractable for classical computers, as the best known classical algorithms require a time proportional to the number of variables N. A recently proposed quantum algorithm shows that quantum computers could solve linear systems in a time scale of order log(N), giving an exponential speedup over classical computers. Here we realize the simplest instance of this algorithm, solving 2×2 linear equations for various input vectors on a quantum computer. We use four quantum bits and four controlled logic gates to implement every subroutine required, demonstrating the working principle of this algorithm.

  14. Quasi-one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall systems as new platforms for scalable topological quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chui-Zhen; Xie, Ying-Ming; Liu, Jie; Lee, Patrick A.; Law, K. T.

    2018-03-01

    Quantum anomalous Hall insulator/superconductor heterostructures emerged as a competitive platform to realize topological superconductors with chiral Majorana edge states as shown in recent experiments [He et al. Science 357, 294 (2017), 10.1126/science.aag2792]. However, chiral Majorana modes, being extended, cannot be used for topological quantum computation. In this work, we show that quasi-one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall structures exhibit a large topological regime (much larger than the two-dimensional case) which supports localized Majorana zero energy modes. The non-Abelian properties of a cross-shaped quantum anomalous Hall junction is shown explicitly by time-dependent calculations. We believe that the proposed quasi-one-dimensional quantum anomalous Hall structures can be easily fabricated for scalable topological quantum computation.

  15. Computing protein infrared spectroscopy with quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Besley, Nicholas A

    2007-12-15

    Quantum chemistry is a field of science that has undergone unprecedented advances in the last 50 years. From the pioneering work of Boys in the 1950s, quantum chemistry has evolved from being regarded as a specialized and esoteric discipline to a widely used tool that underpins much of the current research in chemistry today. This achievement was recognized with the award of the 1998 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to John Pople and Walter Kohn. As the new millennium unfolds, quantum chemistry stands at the forefront of an exciting new era. Quantitative calculations on systems of the magnitude of proteins are becoming a realistic possibility, an achievement that would have been unimaginable to the early pioneers of quantum chemistry. In this article we will describe ongoing work towards this goal, focusing on the calculation of protein infrared amide bands directly with quantum chemical methods.

  16. Protecting software agents from malicious hosts using quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reisner, John; Donkor, Eric

    2000-07-01

    We evaluate how quantum computing can be applied to security problems for software agents. Agent-based computing, which merges technological advances in artificial intelligence and mobile computing, is a rapidly growing domain, especially in applications such as electronic commerce, network management, information retrieval, and mission planning. System security is one of the more eminent research areas in agent-based computing, and the specific problem of protecting a mobile agent from a potentially hostile host is one of the most difficult of these challenges. In this work, we describe our agent model, and discuss the capabilities and limitations of classical solutions to the malicious host problem. Quantum computing may be extremely helpful in addressing the limitations of classical solutions to this problem. This paper highlights some of the areas where quantum computing could be applied to agent security.

  17. Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-02

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The main goal of the original MUSIQC proposal was to construct and demonstrate a modular and universally- expandable ion...Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 02-06-2016 1-Aug-2010 31-Jan-2016 Final Report: Modular Universal Scalable Ion-trap Quantum Computer The views...P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 Ion trap quantum computation, scalable modular architectures REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11

  18. Quantum dot nanocrystals having guanosine imprinted nanoshell for DNA recognition.

    PubMed

    Diltemiz, Sibel Emir; Say, Ridvan; Büyüktiryaki, Sibel; Hür, Deniz; Denizli, Adil; Ersöz, Arzu

    2008-05-30

    Molecular imprinted polymers (MIPs) as a recognition element for sensors are increasingly of interest and MIP nanoparticles have started to appear in the literature. In this study, we have proposed a novel thiol ligand-capping method with polymerizable methacryloylamido-cysteine (MAC) attached to CdS quantum dots (QDs), reminiscent of a self-assembled monolayer and have reconstructed surface shell by synthetic host polymers based on molecular imprinting method for DNA recognition. In this method, methacryloylamidohistidine-platinium (MAH-Pt(II)) is used as a new metal-chelating monomer via metal coordination-chelation interactions and guanosine templates of DNA. Nanoshell sensors with guanosine templates give a cavity that is selective for guanosine and its analogues. The guanosine can simultaneously chelate to Pt(II) metal ion and fit into the shape-selective cavity. Thus, the interaction between Pt(II) ion and free coordination spheres has an effect on the binding ability of the CdS QD nanosensor. The binding affinity of the guanosine imprinted nanocrystals has investigated by using the Langmuir and Scatchard methods, and experiments have shown the shape-selective cavity formation with O6 and N7 of a guanosine nucleotide (K(a) = 4.841x10(6) mol L(-1)) and a free guanine base (K(a) = 0.894x10(6) mol L(-1)). Additionally, the guanosine template of the nanocrystals is more favored for single stranded DNA compared to double stranded DNA.

  19. Arbitrated Quantum Signature with Hamiltonian Algorithm Based on Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ronghua; Ding, Wanting; Shi, Jinjing

    2018-03-01

    A novel arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) scheme is proposed motivated by the Hamiltonian algorithm (HA) and blind quantum computation (BQC). The generation and verification of signature algorithm is designed based on HA, which enables the scheme to rely less on computational complexity. It is unnecessary to recover original messages when verifying signatures since the blind quantum computation is applied, which can improve the simplicity and operability of our scheme. It is proved that the scheme can be deployed securely, and the extended AQS has some extensive applications in E-payment system, E-government, E-business, etc.

  20. Arbitrated Quantum Signature with Hamiltonian Algorithm Based on Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Ronghua; Ding, Wanting; Shi, Jinjing

    2018-07-01

    A novel arbitrated quantum signature (AQS) scheme is proposed motivated by the Hamiltonian algorithm (HA) and blind quantum computation (BQC). The generation and verification of signature algorithm is designed based on HA, which enables the scheme to rely less on computational complexity. It is unnecessary to recover original messages when verifying signatures since the blind quantum computation is applied, which can improve the simplicity and operability of our scheme. It is proved that the scheme can be deployed securely, and the extended AQS has some extensive applications in E-payment system, E-government, E-business, etc.

  1. Spin Glass a Bridge Between Quantum Computation and Statistical Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohzeki, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    In this chapter, we show two fascinating topics lying between quantum information processing and statistical mechanics. First, we introduce an elaborated technique, the surface code, to prepare the particular quantum state with robustness against decoherence. Interestingly, the theoretical limitation of the surface code, accuracy threshold, to restore the quantum state has a close connection with the problem on the phase transition in a special model known as spin glasses, which is one of the most active researches in statistical mechanics. The phase transition in spin glasses is an intractable problem, since we must strive many-body system with complicated interactions with change of their signs depending on the distance between spins. Fortunately, recent progress in spin-glass theory enables us to predict the precise location of the critical point, at which the phase transition occurs. It means that statistical mechanics is available for revealing one of the most interesting parts in quantum information processing. We show how to import the special tool in statistical mechanics into the problem on the accuracy threshold in quantum computation. Second, we show another interesting technique to employ quantum nature, quantum annealing. The purpose of quantum annealing is to search for the most favored solution of a multivariable function, namely optimization problem. The most typical instance is the traveling salesman problem to find the minimum tour while visiting all the cities. In quantum annealing, we introduce quantum fluctuation to drive a particular system with the artificial Hamiltonian, in which the ground state represents the optimal solution of the specific problem we desire to solve. Induction of the quantum fluctuation gives rise to the quantum tunneling effect, which allows nontrivial hopping from state to state. We then sketch a strategy to control the quantum fluctuation efficiently reaching the ground state. Such a generic framework is called

  2. Ancilla-driven quantum computation for qudits and continuous variables

    DOE PAGES

    Proctor, Timothy; Giulian, Melissa; Korolkova, Natalia; ...

    2017-05-10

    Although qubits are the leading candidate for the basic elements in a quantum computer, there are also a range of reasons to consider using higher-dimensional qudits or quantum continuous variables (QCVs). In this paper, we use a general “quantum variable” formalism to propose a method of quantum computation in which ancillas are used to mediate gates on a well-isolated “quantum memory” register and which may be applied to the setting of qubits, qudits (for d>2), or QCVs. More specifically, we present a model in which universal quantum computation may be implemented on a register using only repeated applications of amore » single fixed two-body ancilla-register interaction gate, ancillas prepared in a single state, and local measurements of these ancillas. In order to maintain determinism in the computation, adaptive measurements via a classical feed forward of measurement outcomes are used, with the method similar to that in measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC). We show that our model has the same hybrid quantum-classical processing advantages as MBQC, including the power to implement any Clifford circuit in essentially one layer of quantum computation. In some physical settings, high-quality measurements of the ancillas may be highly challenging or not possible, and hence we also present a globally unitary model which replaces the need for measurements of the ancillas with the requirement for ancillas to be prepared in states from a fixed orthonormal basis. In conclusion, we discuss settings in which these models may be of practical interest.« less

  3. High-Threshold Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation with Analog Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Kosuke; Tomita, Akihisa; Okamoto, Atsushi; Fujii, Keisuke

    2018-04-01

    To implement fault-tolerant quantum computation with continuous variables, the Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill (GKP) qubit has been recognized as an important technological element. However, it is still challenging to experimentally generate the GKP qubit with the required squeezing level, 14.8 dB, of the existing fault-tolerant quantum computation. To reduce this requirement, we propose a high-threshold fault-tolerant quantum computation with GKP qubits using topologically protected measurement-based quantum computation with the surface code. By harnessing analog information contained in the GKP qubits, we apply analog quantum error correction to the surface code. Furthermore, we develop a method to prevent the squeezing level from decreasing during the construction of the large-scale cluster states for the topologically protected, measurement-based, quantum computation. We numerically show that the required squeezing level can be relaxed to less than 10 dB, which is within the reach of the current experimental technology. Hence, this work can considerably alleviate this experimental requirement and take a step closer to the realization of large-scale quantum computation.

  4. Building logical qubits in a superconducting quantum computing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gambetta, Jay M.; Chow, Jerry M.; Steffen, Matthias

    2017-01-01

    The technological world is in the midst of a quantum computing and quantum information revolution. Since Richard Feynman's famous `plenty of room at the bottom' lecture (Feynman, Engineering and Science23, 22 (1960)), hinting at the notion of novel devices employing quantum mechanics, the quantum information community has taken gigantic strides in understanding the potential applications of a quantum computer and laid the foundational requirements for building one. We believe that the next significant step will be to demonstrate a quantum memory, in which a system of interacting qubits stores an encoded logical qubit state longer than the incorporated parts. Here, we describe the important route towards a logical memory with superconducting qubits, employing a rotated version of the surface code. The current status of technology with regards to interconnected superconducting-qubit networks will be described and near-term areas of focus to improve devices will be identified. Overall, the progress in this exciting field has been astounding, but we are at an important turning point, where it will be critical to incorporate engineering solutions with quantum architectural considerations, laying the foundation towards scalable fault-tolerant quantum computers in the near future.

  5. Exponential rise of dynamical complexity in quantum computing through projections.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel Klaus; Facchi, Paolo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Nakazato, Hiromichi; Pascazio, Saverio; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2014-10-10

    The ability of quantum systems to host exponentially complex dynamics has the potential to revolutionize science and technology. Therefore, much effort has been devoted to developing of protocols for computation, communication and metrology, which exploit this scaling, despite formidable technical difficulties. Here we show that the mere frequent observation of a small part of a quantum system can turn its dynamics from a very simple one into an exponentially complex one, capable of universal quantum computation. After discussing examples, we go on to show that this effect is generally to be expected: almost any quantum dynamics becomes universal once 'observed' as outlined above. Conversely, we show that any complex quantum dynamics can be 'purified' into a simpler one in larger dimensions. We conclude by demonstrating that even local noise can lead to an exponentially complex dynamics.

  6. Automated error correction in IBM quantum computer and explicit generalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Debjit; Agarwal, Pratik; Pandey, Pratyush; Behera, Bikash K.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2018-06-01

    Construction of a fault-tolerant quantum computer remains a challenging problem due to unavoidable noise and fragile quantum states. However, this goal can be achieved by introducing quantum error-correcting codes. Here, we experimentally realize an automated error correction code and demonstrate the nondestructive discrimination of GHZ states in IBM 5-qubit quantum computer. After performing quantum state tomography, we obtain the experimental results with a high fidelity. Finally, we generalize the investigated code for maximally entangled n-qudit case, which could both detect and automatically correct any arbitrary phase-change error, or any phase-flip error, or any bit-flip error, or combined error of all types of error.

  7. Scalable digital hardware for a trapped ion quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Emily; Gaultney, Daniel; Vrijsen, Geert; Adams, Michael; Baek, So-Young; Hudek, Kai; Isabella, Louis; Crain, Stephen; van Rynbach, Andre; Maunz, Peter; Kim, Jungsang

    2016-12-01

    Many of the challenges of scaling quantum computer hardware lie at the interface between the qubits and the classical control signals used to manipulate them. Modular ion trap quantum computer architectures address scalability by constructing individual quantum processors interconnected via a network of quantum communication channels. Successful operation of such quantum hardware requires a fully programmable classical control system capable of frequency stabilizing the continuous wave lasers necessary for loading, cooling, initialization, and detection of the ion qubits, stabilizing the optical frequency combs used to drive logic gate operations on the ion qubits, providing a large number of analog voltage sources to drive the trap electrodes, and a scheme for maintaining phase coherence among all the controllers that manipulate the qubits. In this work, we describe scalable solutions to these hardware development challenges.

  8. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems. PMID:27174302

  9. Quantum Computation Based on Photons with Three Degrees of Freedom.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ming-Xing; Li, Hui-Ran; Lai, Hong; Wang, Xiaojun

    2016-05-13

    Quantum systems are important resources for quantum computer. Different from previous encoding forms using quantum systems with one degree of freedom (DoF) or two DoFs, we investigate the possibility of photon systems encoding with three DoFs consisting of the polarization DoF and two spatial DoFs. By exploring the optical circular birefringence induced by an NV center in a diamond embedded in the photonic crystal cavity, we propose several hybrid controlled-NOT (hybrid CNOT) gates operating on the two-photon or one-photon system. These hybrid CNOT gates show that three DoFs may be encoded as independent qubits without auxiliary DoFs. Our result provides a useful way to reduce quantum simulation resources by exploring complex quantum systems for quantum applications requiring large qubit systems.

  10. Quantum Computing: Selected Internet Resources for Librarians, Researchers, and the Casually Curious

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirasella, Jill

    2009-01-01

    This article presents an annotated selection of the most important and informative Internet resources for learning about quantum computing, finding quantum computing literature, and tracking quantum computing news. All of the quantum computing resources described in this article are freely available, English-language web sites that fall into one…

  11. Computational Role of Tunneling in a Programmable Quantum Annealer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boixo, Sergio; Smelyanskiy, Vadim; Shabani, Alireza; Isakov, Sergei V.; Dykman, Mark; Amin, Mohammad; Mohseni, Masoud; Denchev, Vasil S.; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-01-01

    Quantum tunneling is a phenomenon in which a quantum state tunnels through energy barriers above the energy of the state itself. Tunneling has been hypothesized as an advantageous physical resource for optimization. Here we present the first experimental evidence of a computational role of multiqubit quantum tunneling in the evolution of a programmable quantum annealer. We developed a theoretical model based on a NIBA Quantum Master Equation to describe the multi-qubit dissipative cotunneling effects under the complex noise characteristics of such quantum devices.We start by considering a computational primitive, the simplest non-convex optimization problem consisting of just one global and one local minimum. The quantum evolutions enable tunneling to the global minimum while the corresponding classical paths are trapped in a false minimum. In our study the non-convex potentials are realized by frustrated networks of qubit clusters with strong intra-cluster coupling. We show that the collective effect of the quantum environment is suppressed in the critical phase during the evolution where quantum tunneling decides the right path to solution. In a later stage dissipation facilitates the multiqubit cotunneling leading to the solution state. The predictions of the model accurately describe the experimental data from the D-WaveII quantum annealer at NASA Ames. In our computational primitive the temperature dependence of the probability of success in the quantum model is opposite to that of the classical paths with thermal hopping. Specially, we provide an analysis of an optimization problem with sixteen qubits,demonstrating eight qubit cotunneling that increases success probabilities. Furthermore, we report results for larger problems with up to 200 qubits that contain the primitive as subproblems.

  12. Engineering scalable fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimchi-Schwartz, Mollie; Danna, Rosenberg; Kim, David; Yoder, Jonilyn; Kjaergaard, Morten; Das, Rabindra; Grover, Jeff; Gustavsson, Simon; Oliver, William

    Recent demonstrations of quantum protocols comprising on the order of 5-10 superconducting qubits are foundational to the future development of quantum information processors. A next critical step in the development of resilient quantum processors will be the integration of coherent quantum circuits with a hardware platform that is amenable to extending the system size to hundreds of qubits and beyond. In this talk, we will discuss progress toward integrating coherent superconducting qubits with signal routing via the third dimension. This research was funded in part by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (ODNI), Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity (IARPA) and by the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research & Engineering under Air Force Contract No. FA8721-05-C-0002. The views and conclusions contained herein are those of the authors and should not be interpreted as necessarily representing the official policies or endorsements, either expressed or implied, of ODNI, IARPA, or the US Government.

  13. Oxford ion-trap quantum computing project.

    PubMed

    Lucas, D M; Donald, C J S; Home, J P; McDonnell, M J; Ramos, A; Stacey, D N; Stacey, J-P; Steane, A M; Webster, S C

    2003-07-15

    We describe recent progress in the development of an ion-trap quantum information processor. We discuss the choice of ion species and describe recent experiments on read-out for a ground-state qubit and photoionization trap loading.

  14. Continuous-Variable Instantaneous Quantum Computing is Hard to Sample.

    PubMed

    Douce, T; Markham, D; Kashefi, E; Diamanti, E; Coudreau, T; Milman, P; van Loock, P; Ferrini, G

    2017-02-17

    Instantaneous quantum computing is a subuniversal quantum complexity class, whose circuits have proven to be hard to simulate classically in the discrete-variable realm. We extend this proof to the continuous-variable (CV) domain by using squeezed states and homodyne detection, and by exploring the properties of postselected circuits. In order to treat postselection in CVs, we consider finitely resolved homodyne detectors, corresponding to a realistic scheme based on discrete probability distributions of the measurement outcomes. The unavoidable errors stemming from the use of finitely squeezed states are suppressed through a qubit-into-oscillator Gottesman-Kitaev-Preskill encoding of quantum information, which was previously shown to enable fault-tolerant CV quantum computation. Finally, we show that, in order to render postselected computational classes in CVs meaningful, a logarithmic scaling of the squeezing parameter with the circuit size is necessary, translating into a polynomial scaling of the input energy.

  15. Creating Very True Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Energy Based Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Geurdes, Han; Batle, Josep; Abdalla, Soliman; Farouk, Ahmed; Diep, Do Ngoc

    2018-04-01

    An interpretation of quantum mechanics is discussed. It is assumed that quantum is energy. An algorithm by means of the energy interpretation is discussed. An algorithm, based on the energy interpretation, for fast determining a homogeneous linear function f( x) := s. x = s 1 x 1 + s 2 x 2 + ⋯ + s N x N is proposed. Here x = ( x 1, … , x N ), x j ∈ R and the coefficients s = ( s 1, … , s N ), s j ∈ N. Given the interpolation values (f(1), f(2),...,f(N))=ěc {y}, the unknown coefficients s = (s1(ěc {y}),\\dots , sN(ěc {y})) of the linear function shall be determined, simultaneously. The speed of determining the values is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N. Our method is based on the generalized Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm to qudit systems. Next, by using M parallel quantum systems, M homogeneous linear functions are determined, simultaneously. The speed of obtaining the set of M homogeneous linear functions is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N × M.

  16. Creating Very True Quantum Algorithms for Quantum Energy Based Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Koji; Nakamura, Tadao; Geurdes, Han; Batle, Josep; Abdalla, Soliman; Farouk, Ahmed; Diep, Do Ngoc

    2017-12-01

    An interpretation of quantum mechanics is discussed. It is assumed that quantum is energy. An algorithm by means of the energy interpretation is discussed. An algorithm, based on the energy interpretation, for fast determining a homogeneous linear function f(x) := s.x = s 1 x 1 + s 2 x 2 + ⋯ + s N x N is proposed. Here x = (x 1, … , x N ), x j ∈ R and the coefficients s = (s 1, … , s N ), s j ∈ N. Given the interpolation values (f(1), f(2),...,f(N))=ěc {y}, the unknown coefficients s = (s1(ěc {y}),\\dots , sN(ěc {y})) of the linear function shall be determined, simultaneously. The speed of determining the values is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N. Our method is based on the generalized Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm to qudit systems. Next, by using M parallel quantum systems, M homogeneous linear functions are determined, simultaneously. The speed of obtaining the set of M homogeneous linear functions is shown to outperform the classical case by a factor of N × M.

  17. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  18. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-02-22

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence.

  19. Bifurcation-based adiabatic quantum computation with a nonlinear oscillator network

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of nonlinear systems qualitatively change depending on their parameters, which is called bifurcation. A quantum-mechanical nonlinear oscillator can yield a quantum superposition of two oscillation states, known as a Schrödinger cat state, via quantum adiabatic evolution through its bifurcation point. Here we propose a quantum computer comprising such quantum nonlinear oscillators, instead of quantum bits, to solve hard combinatorial optimization problems. The nonlinear oscillator network finds optimal solutions via quantum adiabatic evolution, where nonlinear terms are increased slowly, in contrast to conventional adiabatic quantum computation or quantum annealing, where quantum fluctuation terms are decreased slowly. As a result of numerical simulations, it is concluded that quantum superposition and quantum fluctuation work effectively to find optimal solutions. It is also notable that the present computer is analogous to neural computers, which are also networks of nonlinear components. Thus, the present scheme will open new possibilities for quantum computation, nonlinear science, and artificial intelligence. PMID:26899997

  20. Blind quantum computation over a collective-noise channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Yuki; Fujii, Keisuke; Ikuta, Rikizo; Yamamoto, Takashi; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) allows a client (Alice), who only possesses relatively poor quantum devices, to delegate universal quantum computation to a server (Bob) in such a way that Bob cannot know Alice's inputs, algorithm, and outputs. The quantum channel between Alice and Bob is noisy, and the loss over the long-distance quantum communication should also be taken into account. Here we propose to use decoherence-free subspace (DFS) to overcome the collective noise in the quantum channel for BQC, which we call DFS-BQC. We propose three variations of DFS-BQC protocols. One of them, a coherent-light-assisted DFS-BQC protocol, allows Alice to faithfully send the signal photons with a probability proportional to a transmission rate of the quantum channel. In all cases, we combine the ideas based on DFS and the Broadbent-Fitzsimons-Kashefi protocol, which is one of the BQC protocols, without degrading unconditional security. The proposed DFS-based schemes are generic and hence can be applied to other BQC protocols where Alice sends quantum states to Bob.

  1. On the 'principle of the quantumness', the quantumness of Relativity, and the computational grand-unification

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro

    2010-05-04

    I will argue that the proposal of establishing operational foundations of Quantum Theory should have top-priority, and that the Lucien Hardy's program on Quantum Gravity should be paralleled by an analogous program on Quantum Field Theory (QFT), which needs to be reformulated, notwithstanding its experimental success. In this paper, after reviewing recently suggested operational 'principles of the quantumness', I address the problem on whether Quantum Theory and Special Relativity are unrelated theories, or instead, if the one implies the other. I show how Special Relativity can be indeed derived from causality of Quantum Theory, within the computational paradigm 'the universemore » is a huge quantum computer', reformulating QFT as a Quantum-Computational Field Theory (QCFT). In QCFT Special Relativity emerges from the fabric of the computational network, which also naturally embeds gauge invariance. In this scheme even the quantization rule and the Planck constant can in principle be derived as emergent from the underlying causal tapestry of space-time. In this way Quantum Theory remains the only theory operating the huge computer of the universe.Is the computational paradigm only a speculative tautology (theory as simulation of reality), or does it have a scientific value? The answer will come from Occam's razor, depending on the mathematical simplicity of QCFT. Here I will just start scratching the surface of QCFT, analyzing simple field theories, including Dirac's. The number of problems and unmotivated recipes that plague QFT strongly motivates us to undertake the QCFT project, since QCFT makes all such problems manifest, and forces a re-foundation of QFT.« less

  2. Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and Simulation of Accounting Principles on Quantum Computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diep, Do Ngoc; Giang, Do Hoang; Van Minh, Nguyen

    2017-06-01

    The paper is devoted to a version of Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination and its applications. In the first part, we construct the Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination (QGJE) Algorithm and estimate the complexity of computation of Reduced Row Echelon Form (RREF) of N × N matrices. The main result asserts that QGJE has computation time is of order 2 N/2. The second part is devoted to a new idea of simulation of accounting by quantum computing. We first expose the actual accounting principles in a pure mathematics language. Then, we simulate the accounting principles on quantum computers. We show that, all accounting actions are exhousted by the described basic actions. The main problems of accounting are reduced to some system of linear equations in the economic model of Leontief. In this simulation, we use our constructed Quantum Gauss-Jordan Elimination to solve the problems and the complexity of quantum computing is a square root order faster than the complexity in classical computing.

  3. Nonunitary quantum computation in the ground space of local Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usher, Naïri; Hoban, Matty J.; Browne, Dan E.

    2017-09-01

    A central result in the study of quantum Hamiltonian complexity is that the k -local Hamiltonian problem is quantum-Merlin-Arthur-complete. In that problem, we must decide if the lowest eigenvalue of a Hamiltonian is bounded below some value, or above another, promised one of these is true. Given the ground state of the Hamiltonian, a quantum computer can determine this question, even if the ground state itself may not be efficiently quantum preparable. Kitaev's proof of QMA-completeness encodes a unitary quantum circuit in QMA into the ground space of a Hamiltonian. However, we now have quantum computing models based on measurement instead of unitary evolution; furthermore, we can use postselected measurement as an additional computational tool. In this work, we generalize Kitaev's construction to allow for nonunitary evolution including postselection. Furthermore, we consider a type of postselection under which the construction is consistent, which we call tame postselection. We consider the computational complexity consequences of this construction and then consider how the probability of an event upon which we are postselecting affects the gap between the ground-state energy and the energy of the first excited state of its corresponding Hamiltonian. We provide numerical evidence that the two are not immediately related by giving a family of circuits where the probability of an event upon which we postselect is exponentially small, but the gap in the energy levels of the Hamiltonian decreases as a polynomial.

  4. From transistor to trapped-ion computers for quantum chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Yung, M.-H.; Casanova, J.; Mezzacapo, A.; McClean, J.; Lamata, L.; Aspuru-Guzik, A.; Solano, E.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few decades, quantum chemistry has progressed through the development of computational methods based on modern digital computers. However, these methods can hardly fulfill the exponentially-growing resource requirements when applied to large quantum systems. As pointed out by Feynman, this restriction is intrinsic to all computational models based on classical physics. Recently, the rapid advancement of trapped-ion technologies has opened new possibilities for quantum control and quantum simulations. Here, we present an efficient toolkit that exploits both the internal and motional degrees of freedom of trapped ions for solving problems in quantum chemistry, including molecular electronic structure, molecular dynamics, and vibronic coupling. We focus on applications that go beyond the capacity of classical computers, but may be realizable on state-of-the-art trapped-ion systems. These results allow us to envision a new paradigm of quantum chemistry that shifts from the current transistor to a near-future trapped-ion-based technology. PMID:24395054

  5. Qudit quantum computation on matrix product states with global symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dongsheng; Stephen, David; Raussendorf, Robert

    Resource states that contain nontrivial symmetry-protected topological order are identified for universal measurement-based quantum computation. Our resource states fall into two classes: one as the qudit generalizations of the qubit cluster state, and the other as the higher-symmetry generalizations of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state, namely, with unitary, orthogonal, or symplectic symmetry. The symmetry in cluster states protects information propagation (identity gate), while the higher symmetry in AKLT-type states enables nontrivial gate computation. This work demonstrates a close connection between measurement-based quantum computation and symmetry-protected topological order.

  6. Qudit quantum computation on matrix product states with global symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Stephen, David T.; Raussendorf, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Resource states that contain nontrivial symmetry-protected topological order are identified for universal single-qudit measurement-based quantum computation. Our resource states fall into two classes: one as the qudit generalizations of the one-dimensional qubit cluster state, and the other as the higher-symmetry generalizations of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state, namely, with unitary, orthogonal, or symplectic symmetry. The symmetry in cluster states protects information propagation (identity gate), while the higher symmetry in AKLT-type states enables nontrivial gate computation. This work demonstrates a close connection between measurement-based quantum computation and symmetry-protected topological order.

  7. Three-Dimensional Wiring for Extensible Quantum Computing: The Quantum Socket

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Béjanin, J. H.; McConkey, T. G.; Rinehart, J. R.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. R. H.; Shiri, D.; Bateman, J. D.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M.; Fowler, A. G.; Mariantoni, M.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum computing architectures are on the verge of scalability, a key requirement for the implementation of a universal quantum computer. The next stage in this quest is the realization of quantum error-correction codes, which will mitigate the impact of faulty quantum information on a quantum computer. Architectures with ten or more quantum bits (qubits) have been realized using trapped ions and superconducting circuits. While these implementations are potentially scalable, true scalability will require systems engineering to combine quantum and classical hardware. One technology demanding imminent efforts is the realization of a suitable wiring method for the control and the measurement of a large number of qubits. In this work, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: the quantum socket. The quantum socket fully exploits the third dimension to connect classical electronics to qubits with higher density and better performance than two-dimensional methods based on wire bonding. The quantum socket is based on spring-mounted microwires—the three-dimensional wires—that push directly on a microfabricated chip, making electrical contact. A small wire cross section (approximately 1 mm), nearly nonmagnetic components, and functionality at low temperatures make the quantum socket ideal for operating solid-state qubits. The wires have a coaxial geometry and operate over a frequency range from dc to 8 GHz, with a contact resistance of approximately 150 m Ω , an impedance mismatch of approximately 10 Ω , and minimal cross talk. As a proof of principle, we fabricate and use a quantum socket to measure high-quality superconducting resonators at a temperature of approximately 10 mK. Quantum error-correction codes such as the surface code will largely benefit from the quantum socket, which will make it possible to address qubits located on a two-dimensional lattice. The present implementation of the socket could be readily extended to accommodate a

  8. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L

    2016-12-14

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks.

  9. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks. PMID:27966528

  10. Entanglement-Based Machine Learning on a Quantum Computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, X.-D.; Wu, D.; Su, Z.-E.; Chen, M.-C.; Wang, X.-L.; Li, Li; Liu, N.-L.; Lu, C.-Y.; Pan, J.-W.

    2015-03-01

    Machine learning, a branch of artificial intelligence, learns from previous experience to optimize performance, which is ubiquitous in various fields such as computer sciences, financial analysis, robotics, and bioinformatics. A challenge is that machine learning with the rapidly growing "big data" could become intractable for classical computers. Recently, quantum machine learning algorithms [Lloyd, Mohseni, and Rebentrost, arXiv.1307.0411] were proposed which could offer an exponential speedup over classical algorithms. Here, we report the first experimental entanglement-based classification of two-, four-, and eight-dimensional vectors to different clusters using a small-scale photonic quantum computer, which are then used to implement supervised and unsupervised machine learning. The results demonstrate the working principle of using quantum computers to manipulate and classify high-dimensional vectors, the core mathematical routine in machine learning. The method can, in principle, be scaled to larger numbers of qubits, and may provide a new route to accelerate machine learning.

  11. Continuous-variable quantum computing on encrypted data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Kevin; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Schäfermeier, Clemens; Gehring, Tobias; Weedbrook, Christian; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2016-12-01

    The ability to perform computations on encrypted data is a powerful tool for protecting a client's privacy, especially in today's era of cloud and distributed computing. In terms of privacy, the best solutions that classical techniques can achieve are unfortunately not unconditionally secure in the sense that they are dependent on a hacker's computational power. Here we theoretically investigate, and experimentally demonstrate with Gaussian displacement and squeezing operations, a quantum solution that achieves the security of a user's privacy using the practical technology of continuous variables. We demonstrate losses of up to 10 km both ways between the client and the server and show that security can still be achieved. Our approach offers a number of practical benefits (from a quantum perspective) that could one day allow the potential widespread adoption of this quantum technology in future cloud-based computing networks.

  12. Milestones toward Majorana-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alicea, Jason

    Experiments on nanowire-based Majorana platforms now appear poised to move beyond the preliminary problem of zero-mode detection and towards loftier goals of realizing non-Abelian statistics and quantum information applications. Using an approach that synthesizes recent materials growth breakthroughs with tools long successfully deployed in quantum-dot research, I will outline a number of relatively modest milestones that progressively bridge the gap between the current state of the art and these grand longer-term challenges. The intermediate Majorana experiments surveyed in this talk should be broadly adaptable to other approaches as well. Supported by the National Science Foundation (DMR-1341822), Institute for Quantum Information and Matter, and Walter Burke Institute at Caltech.

  13. Solid State Quantum Computer in Silicon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-30

    for photonic entanglement ”, Physical Review A 76, 052312 (2007). S.J. Devitt, A.D. Greentree and L.C.L. Hollenberg, “Information free quantum bus for...77, 100501 (2008). S.J. Devitt, A.D. Greentree, R. Ionicioiu, J.L. O’Brien, W.J. Munro and L.C.L. Hollenberg, “ Photonic module: An on-demand resource...656 (2008). M.I. Makin, J.H. Cole, C. Tahan, L.C.L. Hollenberg and A.D. Greentree, “Quantum phase transitions in photonic cavities with two-level

  14. Distinguishing computable mixtures of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, Ignacio H. López; Senno, Gabriel; de la Torre, Gonzalo; Larotonda, Miguel A.; Bendersky, Ariel; Figueira, Santiago; Acín, Antonio

    2018-05-01

    In this article we extend results from our previous work [Bendersky et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 230402 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.116.230402] by providing a protocol to distinguish in finite time and with arbitrarily high success probability any algorithmic mixture of pure states from the maximally mixed state. Moreover, we include an experimental realization, using a modified quantum key distribution setup, where two different random sequences of pure states are prepared; these sequences are indistinguishable according to quantum mechanics, but they become distinguishable when randomness is replaced with pseudorandomness within the experimental preparation process.

  15. Scheme for Entering Binary Data Into a Quantum Computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin

    2005-01-01

    A quantum algorithm provides for the encoding of an exponentially large number of classical data bits by use of a smaller (polynomially large) number of quantum bits (qubits). The development of this algorithm was prompted by the need, heretofore not satisfied, for a means of entering real-world binary data into a quantum computer. The data format provided by this algorithm is suitable for subsequent ultrafast quantum processing of the entered data. Potential applications lie in disciplines (e.g., genomics) in which one needs to search for matches between parts of very long sequences of data. For example, the algorithm could be used to encode the N-bit-long human genome in only log2N qubits. The resulting log2N-qubit state could then be used for subsequent quantum data processing - for example, to perform rapid comparisons of sequences.

  16. Linear optical quantum computing in a single spatial mode.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Peter C; Metcalf, Benjamin J; Spring, Justin B; Moore, Merritt; Jin, Xian-Min; Barbieri, Marco; Kolthammer, W Steven; Walmsley, Ian A

    2013-10-11

    We present a scheme for linear optical quantum computing using time-bin-encoded qubits in a single spatial mode. We show methods for single-qubit operations and heralded controlled-phase (cphase) gates, providing a sufficient set of operations for universal quantum computing with the Knill-Laflamme-Milburn [Nature (London) 409, 46 (2001)] scheme. Our protocol is suited to currently available photonic devices and ideally allows arbitrary numbers of qubits to be encoded in the same spatial mode, demonstrating the potential for time-frequency modes to dramatically increase the quantum information capacity of fixed spatial resources. As a test of our scheme, we demonstrate the first entirely single spatial mode implementation of a two-qubit quantum gate and show its operation with an average fidelity of 0.84±0.07.

  17. Holonomic surface codes for fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiang; Devitt, Simon J.; You, J. Q.; Nori, Franco

    2018-02-01

    Surface codes can protect quantum information stored in qubits from local errors as long as the per-operation error rate is below a certain threshold. Here we propose holonomic surface codes by harnessing the quantum holonomy of the system. In our scheme, the holonomic gates are built via auxiliary qubits rather than the auxiliary levels in multilevel systems used in conventional holonomic quantum computation. The key advantage of our approach is that the auxiliary qubits are in their ground state before and after each gate operation, so they are not involved in the operation cycles of surface codes. This provides an advantageous way to implement surface codes for fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  18. Combining dynamical decoupling with fault-tolerant quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, Hui Khoon; Preskill, John; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2011-07-15

    We study how dynamical decoupling (DD) pulse sequences can improve the reliability of quantum computers. We prove upper bounds on the accuracy of DD-protected quantum gates and derive sufficient conditions for DD-protected gates to outperform unprotected gates. Under suitable conditions, fault-tolerant quantum circuits constructed from DD-protected gates can tolerate stronger noise and have a lower overhead cost than fault-tolerant circuits constructed from unprotected gates. Our accuracy estimates depend on the dynamics of the bath that couples to the quantum computer and can be expressed either in terms of the operator norm of the bath's Hamiltonian or in terms of themore » power spectrum of bath correlations; we explain in particular how the performance of recursively generated concatenated pulse sequences can be analyzed from either viewpoint. Our results apply to Hamiltonian noise models with limited spatial correlations.« less

  19. Quantum-Sequencing: Fast electronic single DNA molecule sequencing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casamada Ribot, Josep; Chatterjee, Anushree; Nagpal, Prashant

    2014-03-01

    A major goal of third-generation sequencing technologies is to develop a fast, reliable, enzyme-free, high-throughput and cost-effective, single-molecule sequencing method. Here, we present the first demonstration of unique ``electronic fingerprint'' of all nucleotides (A, G, T, C), with single-molecule DNA sequencing, using Quantum-tunneling Sequencing (Q-Seq) at room temperature. We show that the electronic state of the nucleobases shift depending on the pH, with most distinct states identified at acidic pH. We also demonstrate identification of single nucleotide modifications (methylation here). Using these unique electronic fingerprints (or tunneling data), we report a partial sequence of beta lactamase (bla) gene, which encodes resistance to beta-lactam antibiotics, with over 95% success rate. These results highlight the potential of Q-Seq as a robust technique for next-generation sequencing.

  20. Quantum computation in the analysis of hyperspectral data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Richard B.; Ghoshal, Debabrata; Jayanna, Anil

    2004-08-01

    Recent research on the topic of quantum computation provides us with some quantum algorithms with higher efficiency and speedup compared to their classical counterparts. In this paper, it is our intent to provide the results of our investigation of several applications of such quantum algorithms - especially the Grover's Search algorithm - in the analysis of Hyperspectral Data. We found many parallels with Grover's method in existing data processing work that make use of classical spectral matching algorithms. Our efforts also included the study of several methods dealing with hyperspectral image analysis work where classical computation methods involving large data sets could be replaced with quantum computation methods. The crux of the problem in computation involving a hyperspectral image data cube is to convert the large amount of data in high dimensional space to real information. Currently, using the classical model, different time consuming methods and steps are necessary to analyze these data including: Animation, Minimum Noise Fraction Transform, Pixel Purity Index algorithm, N-dimensional scatter plot, Identification of Endmember spectra - are such steps. If a quantum model of computation involving hyperspectral image data can be developed and formalized - it is highly likely that information retrieval from hyperspectral image data cubes would be a much easier process and the final information content would be much more meaningful and timely. In this case, dimensionality would not be a curse, but a blessing.

  1. Quantum computation with trapped ions in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Pachos, Jiannis; Walther, Herbert

    2002-10-28

    Two-qubit logical gates are proposed on the basis of two atoms trapped in a cavity setup and commonly addressed by laser fields. Losses in the interaction by spontaneous transitions are efficiently suppressed by employing adiabatic transitions and the quantum Zeno effect. Dynamical and geometrical conditional phase gates are suggested. This method provides fidelity and a success rate of its gates very close to unity. Hence, it is suitable for performing quantum computation.

  2. An Invitation to the Mathematics of Topological Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowell, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    Two-dimensional topological states of matter offer a route to quantum computation that would be topologically protected against the nemesis of the quantum circuit model: decoherence. Research groups in industry, government and academic institutions are pursuing this approach. We give a mathematician's perspective on some of the advantages and challenges of this model, highlighting some recent advances. We then give a short description of how we might extend the theory to three-dimensional materials.

  3. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-02-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gröbner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gröbner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians.

  4. Prime factorization using quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry

    PubMed Central

    Dridi, Raouf; Alghassi, Hedayat

    2017-01-01

    We investigate prime factorization from two perspectives: quantum annealing and computational algebraic geometry, specifically Gröbner bases. We present a novel autonomous algorithm which combines the two approaches and leads to the factorization of all bi-primes up to just over 200000, the largest number factored to date using a quantum processor. We also explain how Gröbner bases can be used to reduce the degree of Hamiltonians. PMID:28220854

  5. Computer studies of multiple-quantum spin dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Murdoch, J.B.

    The excitation and detection of multiple-quantum (MQ) transitions in Fourier transform NMR spectroscopy is an interesting problem in the quantum mechanical dynamics of spin systems as well as an important new technique for investigation of molecular structure. In particular, multiple-quantum spectroscopy can be used to simplify overly complex spectra or to separate the various interactions between a nucleus and its environment. The emphasis of this work is on computer simulation of spin-system evolution to better relate theory and experiment.

  6. Contextuality and Wigner-function negativity in qubit quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raussendorf, Robert; Browne, Dan E.; Delfosse, Nicolas; Okay, Cihan; Bermejo-Vega, Juan

    2017-05-01

    We describe schemes of quantum computation with magic states on qubits for which contextuality and negativity of the Wigner function are necessary resources possessed by the magic states. These schemes satisfy a constraint. Namely, the non-negativity of Wigner functions must be preserved under all available measurement operations. Furthermore, we identify stringent consistency conditions on such computational schemes, revealing the general structure by which negativity of Wigner functions, hardness of classical simulation of the computation, and contextuality are connected.

  7. Contextuality as a Resource for Models of Quantum Computation with Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermejo-Vega, Juan; Delfosse, Nicolas; Browne, Dan E.; Okay, Cihan; Raussendorf, Robert

    2017-09-01

    A central question in quantum computation is to identify the resources that are responsible for quantum speed-up. Quantum contextuality has been recently shown to be a resource for quantum computation with magic states for odd-prime dimensional qudits and two-dimensional systems with real wave functions. The phenomenon of state-independent contextuality poses a priori an obstruction to characterizing the case of regular qubits, the fundamental building block of quantum computation. Here, we establish contextuality of magic states as a necessary resource for a large class of quantum computation schemes on qubits. We illustrate our result with a concrete scheme related to measurement-based quantum computation.

  8. Spin-wave utilization in a quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khitun, A.; Ostroumov, R.; Wang, K. L.

    2001-12-01

    We propose a quantum computer scheme using spin waves for quantum-information exchange. We demonstrate that spin waves in the antiferromagnetic layer grown on silicon may be used to perform single-qubit unitary transformations together with two-qubit operations during the cycle of computation. The most attractive feature of the proposed scheme is the possibility of random access to any qubit and, consequently, the ability to recognize two qubit gates between any two distant qubits. Also, spin waves allow us to eliminate the use of a strong external magnetic field and microwave pulses. By estimate, the proposed scheme has as high as 104 ratio between quantum system coherence time and the time of a single computational step.

  9. Degree of quantum correlation required to speed up a computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Alastair

    2015-12-01

    The one-clean-qubit model of quantum computation (DQC1) efficiently implements a computational task that is not known to have a classical alternative. During the computation, there is never more than a small but finite amount of entanglement present, and it is typically vanishingly small in the system size. In this paper, we demonstrate that there is nothing unexpected hidden within the DQC1 model—Grover's search, when acting on a mixed state, provably exhibits a speedup over classical, with guarantees as to the presence of only vanishingly small amounts of quantum correlations (entanglement and quantum discord)—while arguing that this is not an artifact of the oracle-based construction. We also present some important refinements in the evaluation of how much entanglement may be present in the DQC1 and how the typical entanglement of the system must be evaluated.

  10. Positive Wigner functions render classical simulation of quantum computation efficient.

    PubMed

    Mari, A; Eisert, J

    2012-12-07

    We show that quantum circuits where the initial state and all the following quantum operations can be represented by positive Wigner functions can be classically efficiently simulated. This is true both for continuous-variable as well as discrete variable systems in odd prime dimensions, two cases which will be treated on entirely the same footing. Noting the fact that Clifford and Gaussian operations preserve the positivity of the Wigner function, our result generalizes the Gottesman-Knill theorem. Our algorithm provides a way of sampling from the output distribution of a computation or a simulation, including the efficient sampling from an approximate output distribution in the case of sampling imperfections for initial states, gates, or measurements. In this sense, this work highlights the role of the positive Wigner function as separating classically efficiently simulable systems from those that are potentially universal for quantum computing and simulation, and it emphasizes the role of negativity of the Wigner function as a computational resource.

  11. Exploring quantum computing application to satellite data assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, S.; Zhang, S. Q.

    2015-12-01

    This is an exploring work on potential application of quantum computing to a scientific data optimization problem. On classical computational platforms, the physical domain of a satellite data assimilation problem is represented by a discrete variable transform, and classical minimization algorithms are employed to find optimal solution of the analysis cost function. The computation becomes intensive and time-consuming when the problem involves large number of variables and data. The new quantum computer opens a very different approach both in conceptual programming and in hardware architecture for solving optimization problem. In order to explore if we can utilize the quantum computing machine architecture, we formulate a satellite data assimilation experimental case in the form of quadratic programming optimization problem. We find a transformation of the problem to map it into Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) framework. Binary Wavelet Transform (BWT) will be applied to the data assimilation variables for its invertible decomposition and all calculations in BWT are performed by Boolean operations. The transformed problem will be experimented as to solve for a solution of QUBO instances defined on Chimera graphs of the quantum computer.

  12. A programmable five qubit quantum computer using trapped atomic ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Shantanu

    2017-04-01

    In order to harness the power of quantum information processing, several candidate systems have been investigated, and tailored to demonstrate only specific computations. In my thesis work, we construct a general-purpose multi-qubit device using a linear chain of trapped ion qubits, which in principle can be programmed to run any quantum algorithm. To achieve such flexibility, we develop a pulse shaping technique to realize a set of fully connected two-qubit rotations that entangle arbitrary pairs of qubits using multiple motional modes of the chain. Following a computation architecture, such highly expressive two-qubit gates along with arbitrary single-qubit rotations can be used to compile modular universal logic gates that are effected by targeted optical fields and hence can be reconfigured according to any algorithm circuit programmed in the software. As a demonstration, we run the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithm, and a fully coherent quantum Fourier transform, that we use to solve the `period finding' and `quantum phase estimation' problem. Combining these results with recent demonstrations of quantum fault-tolerance, Grover's search algorithm, and simulation of boson hopping establishes the versatility of such a computation module that can potentially be connected to other modules for future large-scale computations.

  13. Cryptology Management in a Quantum Computing Era

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    HOW IT WORKS (BLACK BOX) ...........................7 1. Schrodinger’s Cat Theory ......................7 2. Multiverse Theory...the macroscopic scale of an animal through the mechanism of a hammer activated by the decay of the radioactive substance. 2. Multiverse Theory...quantum mechanics is the multiverse theory. This theory states that at every decision, the universe splits into multiple copies; the number of copies is

  14. Adiabatic quantum computing with spin qubits hosted by molecules.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Sugisaki, Kenji; Sato, Kazunobu; Toyota, Kazuo; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2015-01-28

    A molecular spin quantum computer (MSQC) requires electron spin qubits, which pulse-based electron spin/magnetic resonance (ESR/MR) techniques can afford to manipulate for implementing quantum gate operations in open shell molecular entities. Importantly, nuclear spins, which are topologically connected, particularly in organic molecular spin systems, are client qubits, while electron spins play a role of bus qubits. Here, we introduce the implementation for an adiabatic quantum algorithm, suggesting the possible utilization of molecular spins with optimized spin structures for MSQCs. We exemplify the utilization of an adiabatic factorization problem of 21, compared with the corresponding nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) case. Two molecular spins are selected: one is a molecular spin composed of three exchange-coupled electrons as electron-only qubits and the other an electron-bus qubit with two client nuclear spin qubits. Their electronic spin structures are well characterized in terms of the quantum mechanical behaviour in the spin Hamiltonian. The implementation of adiabatic quantum computing/computation (AQC) has, for the first time, been achieved by establishing ESR/MR pulse sequences for effective spin Hamiltonians in a fully controlled manner of spin manipulation. The conquered pulse sequences have been compared with the NMR experiments and shown much faster CPU times corresponding to the interaction strength between the spins. Significant differences are shown in rotational operations and pulse intervals for ESR/MR operations. As a result, we suggest the advantages and possible utilization of the time-evolution based AQC approach for molecular spin quantum computers and molecular spin quantum simulators underlain by sophisticated ESR/MR pulsed spin technology.

  15. A Programmable Five Qubit Quantum Computer Using Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Debnath, Shantanu

    Quantum computers can solve certain problems more efficiently compared to conventional classical methods. In the endeavor to build a quantum computer, several competing platforms have emerged that can implement certain quantum algorithms using a few qubits. However, the demonstrations so far have been done usually by tailoring the hardware to meet the requirements of a particular algorithm implemented for a limited number of instances. Although such proof of principal implementations are important to verify the working of algorithms on a physical system, they further need to have the potential to serve as a general purpose quantum computer allowing the flexibility required for running multiple algorithms and be scaled up to host more qubits. Here we demonstrate a small programmable quantum computer based on five trapped atomic ions each of which serves as a qubit. By optically resolving each ion we can individually address them in order to perform a complete set of single-qubit and fully connected two-qubit quantum gates and alsoperform efficient individual qubit measurements. We implement a computation architecture that accepts an algorithm from a user interface in the form of a standard logic gate sequence and decomposes it into fundamental quantum operations that are native to the hardware using a set of compilation instructions that are defined within the software. These operations are then effected through a pattern of laser pulses that perform coherent rotations on targeted qubits in the chain. The architecture implemented in the experiment therefore gives us unprecedented flexibility in the programming of any quantum algorithm while staying blind to the underlying hardware. As a demonstration we implement the Deutsch-Jozsa and Bernstein-Vazirani algorithms on the five-qubit processor and achieve average success rates of 95 and 90 percent, respectively. We also implement a five-qubit coherent quantum Fourier transform and examine its performance in the period

  16. Quantum computation and analysis of Wigner and Husimi functions: toward a quantum image treatment.

    PubMed

    Terraneo, M; Georgeot, B; Shepelyansky, D L

    2005-06-01

    We study the efficiency of quantum algorithms which aim at obtaining phase-space distribution functions of quantum systems. Wigner and Husimi functions are considered. Different quantum algorithms are envisioned to build these functions, and compared with the classical computation. Different procedures to extract more efficiently information from the final wave function of these algorithms are studied, including coarse-grained measurements, amplitude amplification, and measure of wavelet-transformed wave function. The algorithms are analyzed and numerically tested on a complex quantum system showing different behavior depending on parameters: namely, the kicked rotator. The results for the Wigner function show in particular that the use of the quantum wavelet transform gives a polynomial gain over classical computation. For the Husimi distribution, the gain is much larger than for the Wigner function and is larger with the help of amplitude amplification and wavelet transforms. We discuss the generalization of these results to the simulation of other quantum systems. We also apply the same set of techniques to the analysis of real images. The results show that the use of the quantum wavelet transform allows one to lower dramatically the number of measurements needed, but at the cost of a large loss of information.

  17. A DNA sequence analysis package for the IBM personal computer.

    PubMed Central

    Lagrimini, L M; Brentano, S T; Donelson, J E

    1984-01-01

    We present here a collection of DNA sequence analysis programs, called "PC Sequence" (PCS), which are designed to run on the IBM Personal Computer (PC). These programs are written in IBM PC compiled BASIC and take full advantage of the IBM PC's speed, error handling, and graphics capabilities. For a modest initial expense in hardware any laboratory can use these programs to quickly perform computer analysis on DNA sequences. They are written with the novice user in mind and require very little training or previous experience with computers. Also provided are a text editing program for creating and modifying DNA sequence files and a communications program which enables the PC to communicate with and collect information from mainframe computers and DNA sequence databases. PMID:6546433

  18. Quantum computer games: Schrödinger cat and hounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2012-05-01

    The quantum computer game 'Schrödinger cat and hounds' is the quantum extension of the well-known classical game fox and hounds. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. 'Schrödinger cat and hounds' demonstrates the effects of superposition, destructive and constructive interference, measurements and entanglement. More advanced concepts, like particle-wave duality and decoherence, can also be taught using the game as a model. The game that has an optimal solution in the classical version, can have many different solutions and a new balance of powers in the quantum world. Game-aided lectures were given to high-school students which showed that it is a valid and entertaining teaching platform.

  19. QSPIN: A High Level Java API for Quantum Computing Experimentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barth, Tim

    2017-01-01

    QSPIN is a high level Java language API for experimentation in QC models used in the calculation of Ising spin glass ground states and related quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO) problems. The Java API is intended to facilitate research in advanced QC algorithms such as hybrid quantum-classical solvers, automatic selection of constraint and optimization parameters, and techniques for the correction and mitigation of model and solution errors. QSPIN includes high level solver objects tailored to the D-Wave quantum annealing architecture that implement hybrid quantum-classical algorithms [Booth et al.] for solving large problems on small quantum devices, elimination of variables via roof duality, and classical computing optimization methods such as GPU accelerated simulated annealing and tabu search for comparison. A test suite of documented NP-complete applications ranging from graph coloring, covering, and partitioning to integer programming and scheduling are provided to demonstrate current capabilities.

  20. Computational design of co-assembling protein-DNA nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Yun; Yu, Jiun-Yann; Wannier, Timothy M.; Guo, Chin-Lin; Mayo, Stephen L.

    2015-09-01

    Biomolecular self-assemblies are of great interest to nanotechnologists because of their functional versatility and their biocompatibility. Over the past decade, sophisticated single-component nanostructures composed exclusively of nucleic acids, peptides and proteins have been reported, and these nanostructures have been used in a wide range of applications, from drug delivery to molecular computing. Despite these successes, the development of hybrid co-assemblies of nucleic acids and proteins has remained elusive. Here we use computational protein design to create a protein-DNA co-assembling nanomaterial whose assembly is driven via non-covalent interactions. To achieve this, a homodimerization interface is engineered onto the Drosophila Engrailed homeodomain (ENH), allowing the dimerized protein complex to bind to two double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules. By varying the arrangement of protein-binding sites on the dsDNA, an irregular bulk nanoparticle or a nanowire with single-molecule width can be spontaneously formed by mixing the protein and dsDNA building blocks. We characterize the protein-DNA nanowire using fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy and X-ray crystallography, confirming that the nanowire is formed via the proposed mechanism. This work lays the foundation for the development of new classes of protein-DNA hybrid materials. Further applications can be explored by incorporating DNA origami, DNA aptamers and/or peptide epitopes into the protein-DNA framework presented here.

  1. CALL FOR PAPERS: Optical implementation of quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rarity, John; Weinfurter, Harald

    2004-09-01

    A topical issue of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics will be devoted to recent advances in optical implementation of quantum computers. The topics to be covered will include, but are not limited to: bullet Linear optics quantum gates bullet Progress towards nonlinear optics quantum gates bullet Interface between optical qubits and atomic/solid state qubits bullet Novel architectures bullet Single-photon sources and detectors bullet Photonic quantum networks bullet Few-qubit applications The DEADLINE for submission of contributions is 15 January 2005 to allow the topical issue to be published in about October 2005. All contributions will be peer-reviewed in accordance with the normal refereeing procedures and standards of Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics. Submissions should preferably be in either standard LaTeX form or Microsoft Word. Advice on publishing your work in the journal may be found at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb. There are no page charges for publication. The corresponding author of each paper published will receive a complimentary copy of the topical issue. Contributions to the topical issue should preferably be submitted electronically at www.iop.org/journals/authors/jopb or by e-mail to jopb@iop.org. Authors unable to submit online or by e-mail may send hard copy contributions (enclosing the electronic code) to: Dr Claire Bedrock (Publisher), Journal of Optics B: Quantum and Semiclassical Optics, Institute of Physics Publishing, Dirac House, Temple Back, Bristol BS1 6BE, UK. All contributions should be accompanied by a readme file or covering letter, quoting `JOPB Topical Issue - Optical implementation of quantum computers', giving the postal and e-mail addresses for correspondence. Any subsequent change of address should be notified to the publishing office. We look forward to receiving your contribution to this topical issue.

  2. Cross-Talk in Superconducting Transmon Quantum Computing Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abraham, David; Chow, Jerry; Corcoles, Antonio; Rothwell, Mary; Keefe, George; Gambetta, Jay; Steffen, Matthias; IBM Quantum Computing Team

    2013-03-01

    Superconducting transmon quantum computing test structures often exhibit significant undesired cross-talk. For experiments with only a handful of qubits this cross-talk can be quantified and understood, and therefore corrected. As quantum computing circuits become more complex, and thereby contain increasing numbers of qubits and resonators, it becomes more vital that the inadvertent coupling between these elements is minimized. The task of accurately controlling each single qubit to the level of precision required throughout the realization of a quantum algorithm is difficult by itself, but coupled with the need of nulling out leakage signals from neighboring qubits or resonators would quickly become impossible. We discuss an approach to solve this critical problem. We acknowledge support from IARPA under contract W911NF-10-1-0324.

  3. Roads towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Earl T.; Terhal, Barbara M.; Vuillot, Christophe

    2017-09-01

    A practical quantum computer must not merely store information, but also process it. To prevent errors introduced by noise from multiplying and spreading, a fault-tolerant computational architecture is required. Current experiments are taking the first steps toward noise-resilient logical qubits. But to convert these quantum devices from memories to processors, it is necessary to specify how a universal set of gates is performed on them. The leading proposals for doing so, such as magic-state distillation and colour-code techniques, have high resource demands. Alternative schemes, such as those that use high-dimensional quantum codes in a modular architecture, have potential benefits, but need to be explored further.

  4. Roads towards fault-tolerant universal quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Earl T; Terhal, Barbara M; Vuillot, Christophe

    2017-09-13

    A practical quantum computer must not merely store information, but also process it. To prevent errors introduced by noise from multiplying and spreading, a fault-tolerant computational architecture is required. Current experiments are taking the first steps toward noise-resilient logical qubits. But to convert these quantum devices from memories to processors, it is necessary to specify how a universal set of gates is performed on them. The leading proposals for doing so, such as magic-state distillation and colour-code techniques, have high resource demands. Alternative schemes, such as those that use high-dimensional quantum codes in a modular architecture, have potential benefits, but need to be explored further.

  5. Indications for quantum computation requirements from comparative brain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernroider, Gustav; Baer, Wolfgang

    2010-04-01

    Whether or not neuronal signal properties can engage 'non-trivial', i.e. functionally significant, quantum properties, is the subject of an ongoing debate. Here we provide evidence that quantum coherence dynamics can play a functional role in ion conduction mechanism with consequences on the shape and associative character of classical membrane signals. In particular, these new perspectives predict that a specific neuronal topology (e.g. the connectivity pattern of cortical columns in the primate brain) is less important and not really required to explain abilities in perception and sensory-motor integration. Instead, this evidence is suggestive for a decisive role of the number and functional segregation of ion channel proteins that can be engaged in a particular neuronal constellation. We provide evidence from comparative brain studies and estimates of computational capacity behind visual flight functions suggestive for a possible role of quantum computation in biological systems.

  6. Nonadiabatic holonomic quantum computation using Rydberg blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Yi-Hao; Chen, Ye-Hong; Shi, Zhi-Cheng; Huang, Bi-Hua; Song, Jie; Xia, Yan

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme for realizing nonadiabatic holonomic computation assisted by two atoms and the shortcuts to adiabaticity (STA). The blockade effect induced by strong Rydberg-mediated interaction between two Rydberg atoms provides us the possibility to simplify the dynamics of the system, and the STA helps us design pulses for implementing the holonomic computation with high fidelity. Numerical simulations show the scheme is noise immune and decoherence resistant. Therefore, the current scheme may provide some useful perspectives for realizing nonadiabatic holonomic computation.

  7. Estimating the Resources for Quantum Computation with the QuRE Toolbox

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-31

    quantum computing. Quantum Info. Comput., 9(7):666–682, July 2009. [13] M. Saffman, T. G. Walker, and K. Mølmer. Quantum information with rydberg atoms...109(5):735–750, 2011. [24] Aram Harrow , Avinatan Hassidim, and Seth Lloyd. Quantum algorithm for solving linear systems of equations. Phys. Rev

  8. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-27

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  9. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  10. Computational nuclear quantum many-body problem: The UNEDF project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogner, S.; Bulgac, A.; Carlson, J.; Engel, J.; Fann, G.; Furnstahl, R. J.; Gandolfi, S.; Hagen, G.; Horoi, M.; Johnson, C.; Kortelainen, M.; Lusk, E.; Maris, P.; Nam, H.; Navratil, P.; Nazarewicz, W.; Ng, E.; Nobre, G. P. A.; Ormand, E.; Papenbrock, T.; Pei, J.; Pieper, S. C.; Quaglioni, S.; Roche, K. J.; Sarich, J.; Schunck, N.; Sosonkina, M.; Terasaki, J.; Thompson, I.; Vary, J. P.; Wild, S. M.

    2013-10-01

    The UNEDF project was a large-scale collaborative effort that applied high-performance computing to the nuclear quantum many-body problem. The primary focus of the project was on constructing, validating, and applying an optimized nuclear energy density functional, which entailed a wide range of pioneering developments in microscopic nuclear structure and reactions, algorithms, high-performance computing, and uncertainty quantification. UNEDF demonstrated that close associations among nuclear physicists, mathematicians, and computer scientists can lead to novel physics outcomes built on algorithmic innovations and computational developments. This review showcases a wide range of UNEDF science results to illustrate this interplay.

  11. Universal non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces with quantum dots inside a cavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jun; Dong, Ping; Zhou, Jian; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2017-05-01

    A scheme for implementing the non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation in decoherence-free subspaces is proposed with the interactions between a microcavity and quantum dots. A universal set of quantum gates can be constructed on the encoded logical qubits with high fidelities. The current scheme can suppress both local and collective noises, which is very important for achieving universal quantum computation. Discussions about the gate fidelities with the experimental parameters show that our schemes can be implemented in current experimental technology. Therefore, our scenario offers a method for universal and robust solid-state quantum computation.

  12. Quantum computation with cold bosonic atoms in an optical lattice.

    PubMed

    García-Ripoll, Juan José; Cirac, Juan Ignacio

    2003-07-15

    We analyse an implementation of a quantum computer using bosonic atoms in an optical lattice. We show that, even though the number of atoms per site and the tunnelling rate between neighbouring sites is unknown, one may operate a universal set of gates by means of adiabatic passage.

  13. Evaluation of holonomic quantum computation: adiabatic versus nonadiabatic.

    PubMed

    Cen, LiXiang; Li, XinQi; Yan, YiJing; Zheng, HouZhi; Wang, ShunJin

    2003-04-11

    Based on the analytical solution to the time-dependent Schrödinger equations, we evaluate the holonomic quantum computation beyond the adiabatic limit. Besides providing rigorous confirmation of the geometrical prediction of holonomies, the present dynamical resolution offers also a practical means to study the nonadiabaticity induced effects for the universal qubit operations.

  14. Adapting the traveling salesman problem to an adiabatic quantum computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Richard H.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to guide a quantum computer to select an optimal tour for the traveling salesman. This is significant because it opens a rapid solution method for the wide range of applications of the traveling salesman problem, which include vehicle routing, job sequencing and data clustering.

  15. Quantum computing: a prime modality in neurosurgery's future.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Liu, Charles Y; Apuzzo, Michael L J

    2012-11-01

    With each significant development in the field of neurosurgery, our dependence on computers, small and large, has continuously increased. From something as mundane as bipolar cautery to sophisticated intraoperative navigation with real-time magnetic resonance imaging-assisted surgical guidance, both technologies, however simple or complex, require computational processing power to function. The next frontier for neurosurgery involves developing a greater understanding of the brain and furthering our capabilities as surgeons to directly affect brain circuitry and function. This has come in the form of implantable devices that can electronically and nondestructively influence the cortex and nuclei with the purpose of restoring neuronal function and improving quality of life. We are now transitioning from devices that are turned on and left alone, such as vagus nerve stimulators and deep brain stimulators, to "smart" devices that can listen and react to the body as the situation may dictate. The development of quantum computers and their potential to be thousands, if not millions, of times faster than current "classical" computers, will significantly affect the neurosciences, especially the field of neurorehabilitation and neuromodulation. Quantum computers may advance our understanding of the neural code and, in turn, better develop and program implantable neural devices. When quantum computers reach the point where we can actually implant such devices in patients, the possibilities of what can be done to interface and restore neural function will be limitless. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A strand graph semantics for DNA-based computation

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Rasmus L.; Lakin, Matthew R.; Phillips, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    DNA nanotechnology is a promising approach for engineering computation at the nanoscale, with potential applications in biofabrication and intelligent nanomedicine. DNA strand displacement is a general strategy for implementing a broad range of nanoscale computations, including any computation that can be expressed as a chemical reaction network. Modelling and analysis of DNA strand displacement systems is an important part of the design process, prior to experimental realisation. As experimental techniques improve, it is important for modelling languages to keep pace with the complexity of structures that can be realised experimentally. In this paper we present a process calculus for modelling DNA strand displacement computations involving rich secondary structures, including DNA branches and loops. We prove that our calculus is also sufficiently expressive to model previous work on non-branching structures, and propose a mapping from our calculus to a canonical strand graph representation, in which vertices represent DNA strands, ordered sites represent domains, and edges between sites represent bonds between domains. We define interactions between strands by means of strand graph rewriting, and prove the correspondence between the process calculus and strand graph behaviours. Finally, we propose a mapping from strand graphs to an efficient implementation, which we use to perform modelling and simulation of DNA strand displacement systems with rich secondary structure. PMID:27293306

  17. Further Evidence in Support of the Universal Nilpotent Grammatical Computational Paradigm of Quantum Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2010-12-01

    Further evidence is presented in favour of the computational paradigm, conceived and constructed by Rowlands and Diaz, as detailed in Rowlands' book Zero to Infinity (2007) [2], and in particular the authors' paper `The Grammatical Universe: the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement' [1]. The paradigm, which has isomorphic group and algebraic quantum mechanical language interpretations, not only predicts the well-established facts of quantum physics, the periodic table, chemistry / valence and of molecular biology, whose understanding it extends; it also provides an elegant, simple solution to the unresolved quantum measurement problem. In this fundamental paradigm, all the computational constructs / predictions that emerge, follow from the simple fact, that, as in quantum mechanics, the wave function is defined only up to an arbitrary fixed phase. This fixed phase provides a simple physical understanding of the quantum vacuum in quantum field theory, where only relative phases, known to be able to encode 3+1 relativistic space-time geometries, can be measured. It is the arbitrary fixed measurement standard, against which everything that follows is to be measured, even though the standard itself cannot be, since nothing exists against which to measure it. The standard, as an arbitrary fixed reference phase, functions as the holographic basis for a self-organized universal quantum process of emergent novel fermion states of matter where, following each emergence, the arbitrary standard is re-fixed anew so as to provide a complete history / holographic record or hologram of the current fixed past, advancing an unending irreversible evolution, such as is the evidence of our senses. The fermion states, in accord with the Pauli exclusion principle, each correspond to a unique nilpotent symbol in the infinite alphabet (which specifies the grammar in this nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) paradigm); and the alphabet, as Hill and Rowlands

  18. Universal Topological Quantum Computation from a Superconductor-Abelian Quantum Hall Heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mong, Roger S. K.; Clarke, David J.; Alicea, Jason; Lindner, Netanel H.; Fendley, Paul; Nayak, Chetan; Oreg, Yuval; Stern, Ady; Berg, Erez; Shtengel, Kirill; Fisher, Matthew P. A.

    2014-01-01

    Non-Abelian anyons promise to reveal spectacular features of quantum mechanics that could ultimately provide the foundation for a decoherence-free quantum computer. A key breakthrough in the pursuit of these exotic particles originated from Read and Green's observation that the Moore-Read quantum Hall state and a (relatively simple) two-dimensional p+ip superconductor both support so-called Ising non-Abelian anyons. Here, we establish a similar correspondence between the Z3 Read-Rezayi quantum Hall state and a novel two-dimensional superconductor in which charge-2e Cooper pairs are built from fractionalized quasiparticles. In particular, both phases harbor Fibonacci anyons that—unlike Ising anyons—allow for universal topological quantum computation solely through braiding. Using a variant of Teo and Kane's construction of non-Abelian phases from weakly coupled chains, we provide a blueprint for such a superconductor using Abelian quantum Hall states interlaced with an array of superconducting islands. Fibonacci anyons appear as neutral deconfined particles that lead to a twofold ground-state degeneracy on a torus. In contrast to a p+ip superconductor, vortices do not yield additional particle types, yet depending on nonuniversal energetics can serve as a trap for Fibonacci anyons. These results imply that one can, in principle, combine well-understood and widely available phases of matter to realize non-Abelian anyons with universal braid statistics. Numerous future directions are discussed, including speculations on alternative realizations with fewer experimental requirements.

  19. Quantum and semiclassical spin networks: from atomic and molecular physics to quantum computing and gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aquilanti, Vincenzo; Bitencourt, Ana Carla P.; Ferreira, Cristiane da S.; Marzuoli, Annalisa; Ragni, Mirco

    2008-11-01

    The mathematical apparatus of quantum-mechanical angular momentum (re)coupling, developed originally to describe spectroscopic phenomena in atomic, molecular, optical and nuclear physics, is embedded in modern algebraic settings which emphasize the underlying combinatorial aspects. SU(2) recoupling theory, involving Wigner's 3nj symbols, as well as the related problems of their calculations, general properties, asymptotic limits for large entries, nowadays plays a prominent role also in quantum gravity and quantum computing applications. We refer to the ingredients of this theory—and of its extension to other Lie and quantum groups—by using the collective term of 'spin networks'. Recent progress is recorded about the already established connections with the mathematical theory of discrete orthogonal polynomials (the so-called Askey scheme), providing powerful tools based on asymptotic expansions, which correspond on the physical side to various levels of semi-classical limits. These results are useful not only in theoretical molecular physics but also in motivating algorithms for the computationally demanding problems of molecular dynamics and chemical reaction theory, where large angular momenta are typically involved. As for quantum chemistry, applications of these techniques include selection and classification of complete orthogonal basis sets in atomic and molecular problems, either in configuration space (Sturmian orbitals) or in momentum space. In this paper, we list and discuss some aspects of these developments—such as for instance the hyperquantization algorithm—as well as a few applications to quantum gravity and topology, thus providing evidence of a unifying background structure.

  20. Investigation of a Sybr-Green-Based Method to Validate DNA Sequences for DNA Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    OF A SYBR-GREEN-BASED METHOD TO VALIDATE DNA SEQUENCES FOR DNA COMPUTING 6. AUTHOR(S) Wendy Pogozelski, Salvatore Priore, Matthew Bernard ...simulated annealing. Biochemistry, 35, 14077-14089. 15 Pogozelski, W.K., Bernard , M.P. and Macula, A. (2004) DNA code validation using...and Clark, B.F.C. (eds) In RNA Biochemistry and Biotechnology, NATO ASI Series, Kluwer Academic Publishers. Zucker, M. and Stiegler , P. (1981

  1. Efficient free energy calculations of quantum systems through computer simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Alex; Ramirez, Rafael; Herrero, Carlos; Hernandez, Eduardo

    2009-03-01

    In general, the classical limit is assumed in computer simulation calculations of free energy. This approximation, however, is not justifiable for a class of systems in which quantum contributions for the free energy cannot be neglected. The inclusion of quantum effects is important for the determination of reliable phase diagrams of these systems. In this work, we present a new methodology to compute the free energy of many-body quantum systems [1]. This methodology results from the combination of the path integral formulation of statistical mechanics and efficient non-equilibrium methods to estimate free energy, namely, the adiabatic switching and reversible scaling methods. A quantum Einstein crystal is used as a model to show the accuracy and reliability the methodology. This new method is applied to the calculation of solid-liquid coexistence properties of neon. Our findings indicate that quantum contributions to properties such as, melting point, latent heat of fusion, entropy of fusion, and slope of melting line can be up to 10% of the calculated values using the classical approximation. [1] R. M. Ramirez, C. P. Herrero, A. Antonelli, and E. R. Hernández, Journal of Chemical Physics 129, 064110 (2008)

  2. Computing exponentially faster: implementing a non-deterministic universal Turing machine using DNA

    PubMed Central

    Currin, Andrew; Korovin, Konstantin; Ababi, Maria; Roper, Katherine; Kell, Douglas B.; Day, Philip J.

    2017-01-01

    The theory of computer science is based around universal Turing machines (UTMs): abstract machines able to execute all possible algorithms. Modern digital computers are physical embodiments of classical UTMs. For the most important class of problem in computer science, non-deterministic polynomial complete problems, non-deterministic UTMs (NUTMs) are theoretically exponentially faster than both classical UTMs and quantum mechanical UTMs (QUTMs). However, no attempt has previously been made to build an NUTM, and their construction has been regarded as impossible. Here, we demonstrate the first physical design of an NUTM. This design is based on Thue string rewriting systems, and thereby avoids the limitations of most previous DNA computing schemes: all the computation is local (simple edits to strings) so there is no need for communication, and there is no need to order operations. The design exploits DNA's ability to replicate to execute an exponential number of computational paths in P time. Each Thue rewriting step is embodied in a DNA edit implemented using a novel combination of polymerase chain reactions and site-directed mutagenesis. We demonstrate that the design works using both computational modelling and in vitro molecular biology experimentation: the design is thermodynamically favourable, microprogramming can be used to encode arbitrary Thue rules, all classes of Thue rule can be implemented, and non-deterministic rule implementation. In an NUTM, the resource limitation is space, which contrasts with classical UTMs and QUTMs where it is time. This fundamental difference enables an NUTM to trade space for time, which is significant for both theoretical computer science and physics. It is also of practical importance, for to quote Richard Feynman ‘there's plenty of room at the bottom’. This means that a desktop DNA NUTM could potentially utilize more processors than all the electronic computers in the world combined, and thereby outperform the world

  3. Scalable photonic quantum computing assisted by quantum-dot spin in double-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2013-07-29

    We investigate the possibility of achieving scalable photonic quantum computing by the giant optical circular birefringence induced by a quantum-dot spin in a double-sided optical microcavity as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We construct a deterministic controlled-not gate on two photonic qubits by two single-photon input-output processes and the readout on an electron-medium spin confined in an optical resonant microcavity. This idea could be applied to multi-qubit gates on photonic qubits and we give the quantum circuit for a three-photon Toffoli gate. High fidelities and high efficiencies could be achieved when the side leakage to the cavity loss rate is low. It is worth pointing out that our devices work in both the strong and the weak coupling regimes.

  4. Markov chains: computing limit existence and approximations with DNA.

    PubMed

    Cardona, M; Colomer, M A; Conde, J; Miret, J M; Miró, J; Zaragoza, A

    2005-09-01

    We present two algorithms to perform computations over Markov chains. The first one determines whether the sequence of powers of the transition matrix of a Markov chain converges or not to a limit matrix. If it does converge, the second algorithm enables us to estimate this limit. The combination of these algorithms allows the computation of a limit using DNA computing. In this sense, we have encoded the states and the transition probabilities using strands of DNA for generating paths of the Markov chain.

  5. High-performance computing with quantum processing units

    DOE PAGES

    Britt, Keith A.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Humble, Travis S.; ...

    2017-03-01

    The prospects of quantum computing have driven efforts to realize fully functional quantum processing units (QPUs). Recent success in developing proof-of-principle QPUs has prompted the question of how to integrate these emerging processors into modern high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We examine how QPUs can be integrated into current and future HPC system architectures by accounting for func- tional and physical design requirements. We identify two integration pathways that are differentiated by infrastructure constraints on the QPU and the use cases expected for the HPC system. This includes a tight integration that assumes infrastructure bottlenecks can be overcome as well asmore » a loose integration that as- sumes they cannot. We find that the performance of both approaches is likely to depend on the quantum interconnect that serves to entangle multiple QPUs. As a result, we also identify several challenges in assessing QPU performance for HPC, and we consider new metrics that capture the interplay between system architecture and the quantum parallelism underlying computational performance.« less

  6. High-performance computing with quantum processing units

    SciTech Connect

    Britt, Keith A.; Oak Ridge National Lab.; Humble, Travis S.

    The prospects of quantum computing have driven efforts to realize fully functional quantum processing units (QPUs). Recent success in developing proof-of-principle QPUs has prompted the question of how to integrate these emerging processors into modern high-performance computing (HPC) systems. We examine how QPUs can be integrated into current and future HPC system architectures by accounting for func- tional and physical design requirements. We identify two integration pathways that are differentiated by infrastructure constraints on the QPU and the use cases expected for the HPC system. This includes a tight integration that assumes infrastructure bottlenecks can be overcome as well asmore » a loose integration that as- sumes they cannot. We find that the performance of both approaches is likely to depend on the quantum interconnect that serves to entangle multiple QPUs. As a result, we also identify several challenges in assessing QPU performance for HPC, and we consider new metrics that capture the interplay between system architecture and the quantum parallelism underlying computational performance.« less

  7. Perturbative computation in a generalized quantum field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Curado, E. M.; Rego-Monteiro, M. A.

    2002-10-01

    We consider a quantum field theory that creates at any point of the space-time particles described by a q-deformed Heisenberg algebra which is interpreted as a phenomenological quantum theory describing the scattering of spin-0 composed particles. We discuss the generalization of Wick's expansion for this case and we compute perturbatively the scattering 1+2-->1'+2' to second order in the coupling constant. The result we find shows that the structure of a composed particle, described here phenomenologically by the deformed algebraic structure, can modify in a simple but nontrivial way the perturbation expansion for the process under consideration.

  8. Efficient quantum algorithm for computing n-time correlation functions.

    PubMed

    Pedernales, J S; Di Candia, R; Egusquiza, I L; Casanova, J; Solano, E

    2014-07-11

    We propose a method for computing n-time correlation functions of arbitrary spinorial, fermionic, and bosonic operators, consisting of an efficient quantum algorithm that encodes these correlations in an initially added ancillary qubit for probe and control tasks. For spinorial and fermionic systems, the reconstruction of arbitrary n-time correlation functions requires the measurement of two ancilla observables, while for bosonic variables time derivatives of the same observables are needed. Finally, we provide examples applicable to different quantum platforms in the frame of the linear response theory.

  9. Remote entanglement stabilization for modular quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Didier, Nicolas; Shankar, S.; Mirrahimi, M.

    Quantum information processing in a modular architecture requires to distribute and stabilize entanglement in a qubit network. We present autonomous entanglement stabilization protocols between two qubits that are coupled to distant cavities. The cavities coupling is mediated and controlled via a three-wave mixing device that generates either a delocalized mode or a two-mode squeezed state between the remote cavities depending on the pump frequency. Local drives on the qubits and the cavities steer and maintain the system to the desired qubit Bell state. We show that these reservoir-engineering based protocols stabilize entanglement in presence of qubit-cavity asymmetries and losses. Most spectacularly, even a weakly-squeezed state can stabilize a maximally entangled Bell state of two distant qubits through entanglement accumulation. This research was supported by the Agence Nationale de la Recherche under Grant ANR-14-CE26-0018, by Inria's DPEI under the TAQUILLA associated team and by ARO under Grant No. W911NF-14-1-0011.

  10. Computing with a single qubit faster than the computation quantum speed limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinitsyn, Nikolai A.

    2018-02-01

    The possibility to save and process information in fundamentally indistinguishable states is the quantum mechanical resource that is not encountered in classical computing. I demonstrate that, if energy constraints are imposed, this resource can be used to accelerate information-processing without relying on entanglement or any other type of quantum correlations. In fact, there are computational problems that can be solved much faster, in comparison to currently used classical schemes, by saving intermediate information in nonorthogonal states of just a single qubit. There are also error correction strategies that protect such computations.

  11. Semiconductor-inspired design principles for superconducting quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Shim, Yun-Pil; Tahan, Charles

    2016-03-17

    Superconducting circuits offer tremendous design flexibility in the quantum regime culminating most recently in the demonstration of few qubit systems supposedly approaching the threshold for fault-tolerant quantum information processing. Competition in the solid-state comes from semiconductor qubits, where nature has bestowed some very useful properties which can be utilized for spin qubit-based quantum computing. Here we begin to explore how selective design principles deduced from spin-based systems could be used to advance superconducting qubit science. We take an initial step along this path proposing an encoded qubit approach realizable with state-of-the-art tunable Josephson junction qubits. Our results show that this design philosophy holds promise, enables microwave-free control, and offers a pathway to future qubit designs with new capabilities such as with higher fidelity or, perhaps, operation at higher temperature. The approach is also especially suited to qubits on the basis of variable super-semi junctions.

  12. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-08-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks.

  13. Adaptive quantum computation in changing environments using projective simulation

    PubMed Central

    Tiersch, M.; Ganahl, E. J.; Briegel, H. J.

    2015-01-01

    Quantum information processing devices need to be robust and stable against external noise and internal imperfections to ensure correct operation. In a setting of measurement-based quantum computation, we explore how an intelligent agent endowed with a projective simulator can act as controller to adapt measurement directions to an external stray field of unknown magnitude in a fixed direction. We assess the agent’s learning behavior in static and time-varying fields and explore composition strategies in the projective simulator to improve the agent’s performance. We demonstrate the applicability by correcting for stray fields in a measurement-based algorithm for Grover’s search. Thereby, we lay out a path for adaptive controllers based on intelligent agents for quantum information tasks. PMID:26260263

  14. Precision Quantum Control and Error-Suppressing Quantum Firmware for Robust Quantum Computing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-24

    Biercuk, Lorenza Viola. Long-time Low - latency Quantum Memory by Dynamical Decoupling, arXiv:1206.6087v1 (06 2012) L. Viola, G. A. Paz-Silva . A...International Patent Application (PCT/AU2013/000649) D. Hayes, K. Khodjasteh L. Viola, M.J. Biercuk, “Long-time low - latency quantum memory by dynamical...Khodjasteh L. Viola, M.J. Biercuk, University of Sydney A28 Physics Road Sydney NS 2006 Long-time low - latency quantum membory by dynamical decoupling

  15. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-18

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  16. Scalable quantum computing based on stationary spin qubits in coupled quantum dots inside double-sided optical microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hai-Rui; Deng, Fu-Guo

    2014-12-01

    Quantum logic gates are the key elements in quantum computing. Here we investigate the possibility of achieving a scalable and compact quantum computing based on stationary electron-spin qubits, by using the giant optical circular birefringence induced by quantum-dot spins in double-sided optical microcavities as a result of cavity quantum electrodynamics. We design the compact quantum circuits for implementing universal and deterministic quantum gates for electron-spin systems, including the two-qubit CNOT gate and the three-qubit Toffoli gate. They are compact and economic, and they do not require additional electron-spin qubits. Moreover, our devices have good scalability and are attractive as they both are based on solid-state quantum systems and the qubits are stationary. They are feasible with the current experimental technology, and both high fidelity and high efficiency can be achieved when the ratio of the side leakage to the cavity decay is low.

  17. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W. H.; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F.

    2016-04-01

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. ‘Gamification’—the application of game elements in a non-game context—is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond.

  18. Exploring the quantum speed limit with computer games.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Jens Jakob W H; Pedersen, Mads Kock; Munch, Michael; Haikka, Pinja; Jensen, Jesper Halkjær; Planke, Tilo; Andreasen, Morten Ginnerup; Gajdacz, Miroslav; Mølmer, Klaus; Lieberoth, Andreas; Sherson, Jacob F

    2016-04-14

    Humans routinely solve problems of immense computational complexity by intuitively forming simple, low-dimensional heuristic strategies. Citizen science (or crowd sourcing) is a way of exploiting this ability by presenting scientific research problems to non-experts. 'Gamification'--the application of game elements in a non-game context--is an effective tool with which to enable citizen scientists to provide solutions to research problems. The citizen science games Foldit, EteRNA and EyeWire have been used successfully to study protein and RNA folding and neuron mapping, but so far gamification has not been applied to problems in quantum physics. Here we report on Quantum Moves, an online platform gamifying optimization problems in quantum physics. We show that human players are able to find solutions to difficult problems associated with the task of quantum computing. Players succeed where purely numerical optimization fails, and analyses of their solutions provide insights into the problem of optimization of a more profound and general nature. Using player strategies, we have thus developed a few-parameter heuristic optimization method that efficiently outperforms the most prominent established numerical methods. The numerical complexity associated with time-optimal solutions increases for shorter process durations. To understand this better, we produced a low-dimensional rendering of the optimization landscape. This rendering reveals why traditional optimization methods fail near the quantum speed limit (that is, the shortest process duration with perfect fidelity). Combined analyses of optimization landscapes and heuristic solution strategies may benefit wider classes of optimization problems in quantum physics and beyond.

  19. High performance transcription factor-DNA docking with GPU computing

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein-DNA docking is a very challenging problem in structural bioinformatics and has important implications in a number of applications, such as structure-based prediction of transcription factor binding sites and rational drug design. Protein-DNA docking is very computational demanding due to the high cost of energy calculation and the statistical nature of conformational sampling algorithms. More importantly, experiments show that the docking quality depends on the coverage of the conformational sampling space. It is therefore desirable to accelerate the computation of the docking algorithm, not only to reduce computing time, but also to improve docking quality. Methods In an attempt to accelerate the sampling process and to improve the docking performance, we developed a graphics processing unit (GPU)-based protein-DNA docking algorithm. The algorithm employs a potential-based energy function to describe the binding affinity of a protein-DNA pair, and integrates Monte-Carlo simulation and a simulated annealing method to search through the conformational space. Algorithmic techniques were developed to improve the computation efficiency and scalability on GPU-based high performance computing systems. Results The effectiveness of our approach is tested on a non-redundant set of 75 TF-DNA complexes and a newly developed TF-DNA docking benchmark. We demonstrated that the GPU-based docking algorithm can significantly accelerate the simulation process and thereby improving the chance of finding near-native TF-DNA complex structures. This study also suggests that further improvement in protein-DNA docking research would require efforts from two integral aspects: improvement in computation efficiency and energy function design. Conclusions We present a high performance computing approach for improving the prediction accuracy of protein-DNA docking. The GPU-based docking algorithm accelerates the search of the conformational space and thus increases the

  20. Simple proof of equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and the circuit model.

    PubMed

    Mizel, Ari; Lidar, Daniel A; Mitchell, Morgan

    2007-08-17

    We prove the equivalence between adiabatic quantum computation and quantum computation in the circuit model. An explicit adiabatic computation procedure is given that generates a ground state from which the answer can be extracted. The amount of time needed is evaluated by computing the gap. We show that the procedure is computationally efficient.

  1. Effect of correlated decay on fault-tolerant quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemberger, B.; Yavuz, D. D.

    2017-12-01

    We analyze noise in the circuit model of quantum computers when the qubits are coupled to a common bosonic bath and discuss the possible failure of scalability of quantum computation. Specifically, we investigate correlated (super-radiant) decay between the qubit energy levels from a two- or three-dimensional array of qubits without imposing any restrictions on the size of the sample. We first show that regardless of how the spacing between the qubits compares with the emission wavelength, correlated decay produces errors outside the applicability of the threshold theorem. This is because the sum of the norms of the two-body interaction Hamiltonians (which can be viewed as the upper bound on the single-qubit error) that decoheres each qubit scales with the total number of qubits and is unbounded. We then discuss two related results: (1) We show that the actual error (instead of the upper bound) on each qubit scales with the number of qubits. As a result, in the limit of large number of qubits in the computer, N →∞ , correlated decay causes each qubit in the computer to decohere in ever shorter time scales. (2) We find the complete eigenvalue spectrum of the exchange Hamiltonian that causes correlated decay in the same limit. We show that the spread of the eigenvalue distribution grows faster with N compared to the spectrum of the unperturbed system Hamiltonian. As a result, as N →∞ , quantum evolution becomes completely dominated by the noise due to correlated decay. These results argue that scalable quantum computing may not be possible in the circuit model in a two- or three- dimensional geometry when the qubits are coupled to a common bosonic bath.

  2. Computationally Efficient Nonlinear Bell Inequalities for Quantum Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ming-Xing

    2018-04-01

    The correlations in quantum networks have attracted strong interest with new types of violations of the locality. The standard Bell inequalities cannot characterize the multipartite correlations that are generated by multiple sources. The main problem is that no computationally efficient method is available for constructing useful Bell inequalities for general quantum networks. In this work, we show a significant improvement by presenting new, explicit Bell-type inequalities for general networks including cyclic networks. These nonlinear inequalities are related to the matching problem of an equivalent unweighted bipartite graph that allows constructing a polynomial-time algorithm. For the quantum resources consisting of bipartite entangled pure states and generalized Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states, we prove the generic nonmultilocality of quantum networks with multiple independent observers using new Bell inequalities. The violations are maximal with respect to the presented Tsirelson's bound for Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen states and GHZ states. Moreover, these violations hold for Werner states or some general noisy states. Our results suggest that the presented Bell inequalities can be used to characterize experimental quantum networks.

  3. Quantum Computational Universality of the 2D Cai-Miyake-D"ur-Briegel Quantum State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Raussendorf, Robert; Kwek, Leong Chuan

    2012-02-01

    Universal quantum computation can be achieved by simply performing single-qubit measurements on a highly entangled resource state, such as cluster states. Cai, Miyake, D"ur, and Briegel recently constructed a ground state of a two-dimensional quantum magnet by combining multiple Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki quasichains of mixed spin-3/2 and spin-1/2 entities and by mapping pairs of neighboring spin-1/2 particles to individual spin-3/2 particles [Phys. Rev. A 82, 052309 (2010)]. They showed that this state enables universal quantum computation by constructing single- and two-qubit universal gates. Here, we give an alternative understanding of how this state gives rise to universal measurement-based quantum computation: by local operations, each quasichain can be converted to a one-dimensional cluster state and entangling gates between two neighboring logical qubits can be implemented by single-spin measurements. Furthermore, a two-dimensional cluster state can be distilled from the Cai-Miyake-D"ur-Briegel state.

  4. Higher-order methods for simulations on quantum computers

    SciTech Connect

    Sornborger, A.T.; Stewart, E.D.

    1999-09-01

    To implement many-qubit gates for use in quantum simulations on quantum computers efficiently, we develop and present methods reexpressing exp[[minus]i(H[sub 1]+H[sub 2]+[center dot][center dot][center dot])[Delta]t] as a product of factors exp[[minus]iH[sub 1][Delta]t], exp[[minus]iH[sub 2][Delta]t],[hor ellipsis], which is accurate to third or fourth order in [Delta]t. The methods we derive are an extended form of the symplectic method, and can also be used for an integration of classical Hamiltonians on classical computers. We derive both integral and irrational methods, and find the most efficient methods in both cases. [copyright] [ital 1999] [ital The American Physical Society

  5. Error suppression for Hamiltonian quantum computing in Markovian environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marvian, Milad; Lidar, Daniel A.

    2017-03-01

    Hamiltonian quantum computing, such as the adiabatic and holonomic models, can be protected against decoherence using an encoding into stabilizer subspace codes for error detection and the addition of energy penalty terms. This method has been widely studied since it was first introduced by Jordan, Farhi, and Shor (JFS) in the context of adiabatic quantum computing. Here, we extend the original result to general Markovian environments, not necessarily in Lindblad form. We show that the main conclusion of the original JFS study holds under these general circumstances: Assuming a physically reasonable bath model, it is possible to suppress the initial decay out of the encoded ground state with an energy penalty strength that grows only logarithmically in the system size, at a fixed temperature.

  6. Direct Synthesis of Microwave Waveforms for Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raftery, James; Vrajitoarea, Andrei; Zhang, Gengyan; Leng, Zhaoqi; Srinivasan, Srikanth; Houck, Andrew

    Current state of the art quantum computing experiments in the microwave regime use control pulses generated by modulating microwave tones with baseband signals generated by an arbitrary waveform generator (AWG). Recent advances in digital analog conversion technology have made it possible to directly synthesize arbitrary microwave pulses with sampling rates of 65 gigasamples per second (GSa/s) or higher. These new ultra-wide bandwidth AWG's could dramatically simplify the classical control chain for quantum computing experiments, presenting potential cost savings and reducing the number of components that need to be carefully calibrated. Here we use a Keysight M8195A AWG to study the viability of such a simplified scheme, demonstrating randomized benchmarking of a superconducting qubit with high fidelity.

  7. Applications of Atomic Systems in Quantum Simulation, Quantum Computation and Topological Phases of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shengtao

    The ability to precisely and coherently control atomic systems has improved dramatically in the last two decades, driving remarkable advancements in quantum computation and simulation. In recent years, atomic and atom-like systems have also been served as a platform to study topological phases of matter and non-equilibrium many-body physics. Integrated with rapid theoretical progress, the employment of these systems is expanding the realm of our understanding on a range of physical phenomena. In this dissertation, I draw on state-of-the-art experimental technology to develop several new ideas for controlling and applying atomic systems. In the first part of this dissertation, we propose several novel schemes to realize, detect, and probe topological phases in atomic and atom-like systems. We first theoretically study the intriguing properties of Hopf insulators, a peculiar type of topological insulators beyond the standard classification paradigm of topological phases. Using a solid-state quantum simulator, we report the first experimental observation of Hopf insulators. We demonstrate the Hopf fibration with fascinating topological links in the experiment, showing clear signals of topological phase transitions for the underlying Hamiltonian. Next, we propose a feasible experimental scheme to realize the chiral topological insulator in three dimensions. They are a type of topological insulators protected by the chiral symmetry and have thus far remained unobserved in experiment. We then introduce a method to directly measure topological invariants in cold-atom experiments. This detection scheme is general and applicable to probe of different topological insulators in any spatial dimension. In another study, we theoretically discover a new type of topological gapless rings, dubbed a Weyl exceptional ring, in three-dimensional dissipative cold atomic systems. In the second part of this dissertation, we focus on the application of atomic systems in quantum computation

  8. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  9. Numerical simulation of NQR/NMR: Applications in quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Possa, Denimar; Gaudio, Anderson C; Freitas, Jair C C

    2011-04-01

    A numerical simulation program able to simulate nuclear quadrupole resonance (NQR) as well as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments is presented, written using the Mathematica package, aiming especially applications in quantum computing. The program makes use of the interaction picture to compute the effect of the relevant nuclear spin interactions, without any assumption about the relative size of each interaction. This makes the program flexible and versatile, being useful in a wide range of experimental situations, going from NQR (at zero or under small applied magnetic field) to high-field NMR experiments. Some conditions specifically required for quantum computing applications are implemented in the program, such as the possibility of use of elliptically polarized radiofrequency and the inclusion of first- and second-order terms in the average Hamiltonian expansion. A number of examples dealing with simple NQR and quadrupole-perturbed NMR experiments are presented, along with the proposal of experiments to create quantum pseudopure states and logic gates using NQR. The program and the various application examples are freely available through the link http://www.profanderson.net/files/nmr_nqr.php. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Quantum field theory and coalgebraic logic in theoretical computer science.

    PubMed

    Basti, Gianfranco; Capolupo, Antonio; Vitiello, Giuseppe

    2017-11-01

    We suggest that in the framework of the Category Theory it is possible to demonstrate the mathematical and logical dual equivalence between the category of the q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the category of the q-deformed Hopf Algebras in quantum field theory (QFT), interpreted as a thermal field theory. Each pair algebra-coalgebra characterizes a QFT system and its mirroring thermal bath, respectively, so to model dissipative quantum systems in far-from-equilibrium conditions, with an evident significance also for biological sciences. Our study is in fact inspired by applications to neuroscience where the brain memory capacity, for instance, has been modeled by using the QFT unitarily inequivalent representations. The q-deformed Hopf Coalgebras and the q-deformed Hopf Algebras constitute two dual categories because characterized by the same functor T, related with the Bogoliubov transform, and by its contravariant application T op , respectively. The q-deformation parameter is related to the Bogoliubov angle, and it is effectively a thermal parameter. Therefore, the different values of q identify univocally, and label the vacua appearing in the foliation process of the quantum vacuum. This means that, in the framework of Universal Coalgebra, as general theory of dynamic and computing systems ("labelled state-transition systems"), the so labelled infinitely many quantum vacua can be interpreted as the Final Coalgebra of an "Infinite State Black-Box Machine". All this opens the way to the possibility of designing a new class of universal quantum computing architectures based on this coalgebraic QFT formulation, as its ability of naturally generating a Fibonacci progression demonstrates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. DNA nanosensor based on biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhao Sheng; Shan, Xiao Yue; Chai, Lu Jing; Ma, Juan Juan; Chen, Jian Rong; Feng, Hui

    2014-10-15

    An ultrasensitive nanosensor based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between biocompatible graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes for DNA detection was reported. We take advantage of good biocompatibility and strong fluorescence of graphene quantum dots, base pairing specificity of DNA and unique fluorescence resonance energy transfer between graphene quantum dots and carbon nanotubes to achieve the analysis of low concentrations of DNA. Graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield up to 0.20 were prepared and served as the fluorophore of DNA probe. FRET process between graphene quantum dots-labeled probe and oxidized carbon nanotubes is easily achieved due to their efficient self-assembly through specific π-π interaction. This nanosensor can distinguish complementary and mismatched nucleic acid sequences with high sensitivity and good reproducibility. The detection method based on this nanosensor possesses a broad linear span of up to 133.0 nM and ultralow detection limit of 0.4 nM. The constructed nanosensor is expected to be highly biocompatible because of all its components with excellent biocompatibility. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Error regions in quantum state tomography: computational complexity caused by geometry of quantum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suess, Daniel; Rudnicki, Łukasz; maciel, Thiago O.; Gross, David

    2017-09-01

    The outcomes of quantum mechanical measurements are inherently random. It is therefore necessary to develop stringent methods for quantifying the degree of statistical uncertainty about the results of quantum experiments. For the particularly relevant task of quantum state tomography, it has been shown that a significant reduction in uncertainty can be achieved by taking the positivity of quantum states into account. However—the large number of partial results and heuristics notwithstanding—no efficient general algorithm is known that produces an optimal uncertainty region from experimental data, while making use of the prior constraint of positivity. Here, we provide a precise formulation of this problem and show that the general case is NP-hard. Our result leaves room for the existence of efficient approximate solutions, and therefore does not in itself imply that the practical task of quantum uncertainty quantification is intractable. However, it does show that there exists a non-trivial trade-off between optimality and computational efficiency for error regions. We prove two versions of the result: one for frequentist and one for Bayesian statistics.

  13. Novel schemes for measurement-based quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Gross, D; Eisert, J

    2007-06-01

    We establish a framework which allows one to construct novel schemes for measurement-based quantum computation. The technique develops tools from many-body physics-based on finitely correlated or projected entangled pair states-to go beyond the cluster-state based one-way computer. We identify resource states radically different from the cluster state, in that they exhibit nonvanishing correlations, can be prepared using nonmaximally entangling gates, or have very different local entanglement properties. In the computational models, randomness is compensated in a different manner. It is shown that there exist resource states which are locally arbitrarily close to a pure state. We comment on the possibility of tailoring computational models to specific physical systems.

  14. Magnetic resonance force microscopy quantum computer with tellurium donors in silicon.

    PubMed

    Berman, G P; Doolen, G D; Hammel, P C; Tsifrinovich, V I

    2001-03-26

    We propose a magnetic resonance force microscopy (MRFM)-based nuclear spin quantum computer using tellurium impurities in silicon. This approach to quantum computing combines well-developed silicon technology and expected advances in MRFM. Our proposal does not use electrostatic gates to realize quantum logic operations.

  15. Ultrafast quantum computation in ultrastrongly coupled circuit QED systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yimin; Guo, Chu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng

    2017-03-10

    The latest technological progress of achieving the ultrastrong-coupling regime in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems has greatly promoted the developments of quantum physics, where novel quantum optics phenomena and potential computational benefits have been predicted. Here, we propose a scheme to accelerate the nontrivial two-qubit phase gate in a circuit QED system, where superconducting flux qubits are ultrastrongly coupled to a transmission line resonator (TLR), and two more TLRs are coupled to the ultrastrongly-coupled system for assistant. The nontrivial unconventional geometric phase gate between the two flux qubits is achieved based on close-loop displacements of the three-mode intracavity fields. Moreover, as there are three resonators contributing to the phase accumulation, the requirement of the coupling strength to realize the two-qubit gate can be reduced. Further reduction in the coupling strength to achieve a specific controlled-phase gate can be realized by adding more auxiliary resonators to the ultrastrongly-coupled system through superconducting quantum interference devices. We also present a study of our scheme with realistic parameters considering imperfect controls and noisy environment. Our scheme possesses the merits of ultrafastness and noise-tolerance due to the advantages of geometric phases.

  16. Ultrafast quantum computation in ultrastrongly coupled circuit QED systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yimin; Guo, Chu; Zhang, Guo-Qiang; Wang, Gangcheng; Wu, Chunfeng

    2017-01-01

    The latest technological progress of achieving the ultrastrong-coupling regime in circuit quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems has greatly promoted the developments of quantum physics, where novel quantum optics phenomena and potential computational benefits have been predicted. Here, we propose a scheme to accelerate the nontrivial two-qubit phase gate in a circuit QED system, where superconducting flux qubits are ultrastrongly coupled to a transmission line resonator (TLR), and two more TLRs are coupled to the ultrastrongly-coupled system for assistant. The nontrivial unconventional geometric phase gate between the two flux qubits is achieved based on close-loop displacements of the three-mode intracavity fields. Moreover, as there are three resonators contributing to the phase accumulation, the requirement of the coupling strength to realize the two-qubit gate can be reduced. Further reduction in the coupling strength to achieve a specific controlled-phase gate can be realized by adding more auxiliary resonators to the ultrastrongly-coupled system through superconducting quantum interference devices. We also present a study of our scheme with realistic parameters considering imperfect controls and noisy environment. Our scheme possesses the merits of ultrafastness and noise-tolerance due to the advantages of geometric phases. PMID:28281654

  17. A scalable quantum computer with ions in an array of microtraps

    PubMed

    Cirac; Zoller

    2000-04-06

    Quantum computers require the storage of quantum information in a set of two-level systems (called qubits), the processing of this information using quantum gates and a means of final readout. So far, only a few systems have been identified as potentially viable quantum computer models--accurate quantum control of the coherent evolution is required in order to realize gate operations, while at the same time decoherence must be avoided. Examples include quantum optical systems (such as those utilizing trapped ions or neutral atoms, cavity quantum electrodynamics and nuclear magnetic resonance) and solid state systems (using nuclear spins, quantum dots and Josephson junctions). The most advanced candidates are the quantum optical and nuclear magnetic resonance systems, and we expect that they will allow quantum computing with about ten qubits within the next few years. This is still far from the numbers required for useful applications: for example, the factorization of a 200-digit number requires about 3,500 qubits, rising to 100,000 if error correction is implemented. Scalability of proposed quantum computer architectures to many qubits is thus of central importance. Here we propose a model for an ion trap quantum computer that combines scalability (a feature usually associated with solid state proposals) with the advantages of quantum optical systems (in particular, quantum control and long decoherence times).

  18. A spatially localized architecture for fast and modular DNA computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Gourab; Dalchau, Neil; Muscat, Richard A.; Phillips, Andrew; Seelig, Georg

    2017-09-01

    Cells use spatial constraints to control and accelerate the flow of information in enzyme cascades and signalling networks. Synthetic silicon-based circuitry similarly relies on spatial constraints to process information. Here, we show that spatial organization can be a similarly powerful design principle for overcoming limitations of speed and modularity in engineered molecular circuits. We create logic gates and signal transmission lines by spatially arranging reactive DNA hairpins on a DNA origami. Signal propagation is demonstrated across transmission lines of different lengths and orientations and logic gates are modularly combined into circuits that establish the universality of our approach. Because reactions preferentially occur between neighbours, identical DNA hairpins can be reused across circuits. Co-localization of circuit elements decreases computation time from hours to minutes compared to circuits with diffusible components. Detailed computational models enable predictive circuit design. We anticipate our approach will motivate using spatial constraints for future molecular control circuit designs.

  19. Majorana fermion surface code for universal quantum computation

    DOE PAGES

    Vijay, Sagar; Hsieh, Timothy H.; Fu, Liang

    2015-12-10

    In this study, we introduce an exactly solvable model of interacting Majorana fermions realizing Z 2 topological order with a Z 2 fermion parity grading and lattice symmetries permuting the three fundamental anyon types. We propose a concrete physical realization by utilizing quantum phase slips in an array of Josephson-coupled mesoscopic topological superconductors, which can be implemented in a wide range of solid-state systems, including topological insulators, nanowires, or two-dimensional electron gases, proximitized by s-wave superconductors. Our model finds a natural application as a Majorana fermion surface code for universal quantum computation, with a single-step stabilizer measurement requiring no physicalmore » ancilla qubits, increased error tolerance, and simpler logical gates than a surface code with bosonic physical qubits. We thoroughly discuss protocols for stabilizer measurements, encoding and manipulating logical qubits, and gate implementations.« less

  20. Universal quantum computation using all-optical hybrid encoding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Qi; Cheng, Liu-Yong; Wang, Hong-Fu; Zhang, Shou

    2015-04-01

    By employing displacement operations, single-photon subtractions, and weak cross-Kerr nonlinearity, we propose an alternative way of implementing several universal quantum logical gates for all-optical hybrid qubits encoded in both single-photon polarization state and coherent state. Since these schemes can be straightforwardly implemented only using local operations without teleportation procedure, therefore, less physical resources and simpler operations are required than the existing schemes. With the help of displacement operations, a large phase shift of the coherent state can be obtained via currently available tiny cross-Kerr nonlinearity. Thus, all of these schemes are nearly deterministic and feasible under current technology conditions, which makes them suitable for large-scale quantum computing. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61465013, 11465020, and 11264042).

  1. Nonuniform code concatenation for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikahd, Eesa; Sedighi, Mehdi; Saheb Zamani, Morteza

    2017-09-01

    Using transversal gates is a straightforward and efficient technique for fault-tolerant quantum computing. Since transversal gates alone cannot be computationally universal, they must be combined with other approaches such as magic state distillation, code switching, or code concatenation to achieve universality. In this paper we propose an alternative approach for universal fault-tolerant quantum computing, mainly based on the code concatenation approach proposed in [T. Jochym-O'Connor and R. Laflamme, Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 010505 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.010505], but in a nonuniform fashion. The proposed approach is described based on nonuniform concatenation of the 7-qubit Steane code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, as well as the 5-qubit code with the 15-qubit Reed-Muller code, which lead to two 49-qubit and 47-qubit codes, respectively. These codes can correct any arbitrary single physical error with the ability to perform a universal set of fault-tolerant gates, without using magic state distillation.

  2. Quantum computation with realistic magic-state factories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Gorman, Joe; Campbell, Earl T.

    2017-03-01

    Leading approaches to fault-tolerant quantum computation dedicate a significant portion of the hardware to computational factories that churn out high-fidelity ancillas called magic states. Consequently, efficient and realistic factory design is of paramount importance. Here we present the most detailed resource assessment to date of magic-state factories within a surface code quantum computer, along the way introducing a number of techniques. We show that the block codes of Bravyi and Haah [Phys. Rev. A 86, 052329 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevA.86.052329] have been systematically undervalued; we track correlated errors both numerically and analytically, providing fidelity estimates without appeal to the union bound. We also introduce a subsystem code realization of these protocols with constant time and low ancilla cost. Additionally, we confirm that magic-state factories have space-time costs that scale as a constant factor of surface code costs. We find that the magic-state factory required for postclassical factoring can be as small as 6.3 million data qubits, ignoring ancilla qubits, assuming 10-4 error gates and the availability of long-range interactions.

  3. Topological quantum computation of the Dold-Thom functor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ospina, Juan

    2014-05-01

    A possible topological quantum computation of the Dold-Thom functor is presented. The method that will be used is the following: a) Certain 1+1-topological quantum field theories valued in symmetric bimonoidal categories are converted into stable homotopical data, using a machinery recently introduced by Elmendorf and Mandell; b) we exploit, in this framework, two recent results (independent of each other) on refinements of Khovanov homology: our refinement into a module over the connective k-theory spectrum and a stronger result by Lipshitz and Sarkar refining Khovanov homology into a stable homotopy type; c) starting from the Khovanov homotopy the Dold-Thom functor is constructed; d) the full construction is formulated as a topological quantum algorithm. It is conjectured that the Jones polynomial can be described as the analytical index of certain Dirac operator defined in the context of the Khovanov homotopy using the Dold-Thom functor. As a line for future research is interesting to study the corresponding supersymmetric model for which the Khovanov-Dirac operator plays the role of a supercharge.

  4. Rigidity of quantum steering and one-sided device-independent verifiable quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheorghiu, Alexandru; Wallden, Petros; Kashefi, Elham

    2017-02-01

    The relationship between correlations and entanglement has played a major role in understanding quantum theory since the work of Einstein et al (1935 Phys. Rev. 47 777-80). Tsirelson proved that Bell states, shared among two parties, when measured suitably, achieve the maximum non-local correlations allowed by quantum mechanics (Cirel’son 1980 Lett. Math. Phys. 4 93-100). Conversely, Reichardt et al showed that observing the maximal correlation value over a sequence of repeated measurements, implies that the underlying quantum state is close to a tensor product of maximally entangled states and, moreover, that it is measured according to an ideal strategy (Reichardt et al 2013 Nature 496 456-60). However, this strong rigidity result comes at a high price, requiring a large number of entangled pairs to be tested. In this paper, we present a significant improvement in terms of the overhead by instead considering quantum steering where the device of the one side is trusted. We first demonstrate a robust one-sided device-independent version of self-testing, which characterises the shared state and measurement operators of two parties up to a certain bound. We show that this bound is optimal up to constant factors and we generalise the results for the most general attacks. This leads us to a rigidity theorem for maximal steering correlations. As a key application we give a one-sided device-independent protocol for verifiable delegated quantum computation, and compare it to other existing protocols, to highlight the cost of trust assumptions. Finally, we show that under reasonable assumptions, the states shared in order to run a certain type of verification protocol must be unitarily equivalent to perfect Bell states.

  5. Towards computational improvement of DNA database indexing and short DNA query searching.

    PubMed

    Stojanov, Done; Koceski, Sašo; Mileva, Aleksandra; Koceska, Nataša; Bande, Cveta Martinovska

    2014-09-03

    In order to facilitate and speed up the search of massive DNA databases, the database is indexed at the beginning, employing a mapping function. By searching through the indexed data structure, exact query hits can be identified. If the database is searched against an annotated DNA query, such as a known promoter consensus sequence, then the starting locations and the number of potential genes can be determined. This is particularly relevant if unannotated DNA sequences have to be functionally annotated. However, indexing a massive DNA database and searching an indexed data structure with millions of entries is a time-demanding process. In this paper, we propose a fast DNA database indexing and searching approach, identifying all query hits in the database, without having to examine all entries in the indexed data structure, limiting the maximum length of a query that can be searched against the database. By applying the proposed indexing equation, the whole human genome could be indexed in 10 hours on a personal computer, under the assumption that there is enough RAM to store the indexed data structure. Analysing the methodology proposed by Reneker, we observed that hits at starting positions [Formula: see text] are not reported, if the database is searched against a query shorter than [Formula: see text] nucleotides, such that [Formula: see text] is the length of the DNA database words being mapped and [Formula: see text] is the length of the query. A solution of this drawback is also presented.

  6. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S.

    2015-11-01

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  7. Exponential vanishing of the ground-state gap of the quantum random energy model via adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Adame, J.; Warzel, S., E-mail: warzel@ma.tum.de

    In this note, we use ideas of Farhi et al. [Int. J. Quantum. Inf. 6, 503 (2008) and Quantum Inf. Comput. 11, 840 (2011)] who link a lower bound on the run time of their quantum adiabatic search algorithm to an upper bound on the energy gap above the ground-state of the generators of this algorithm. We apply these ideas to the quantum random energy model (QREM). Our main result is a simple proof of the conjectured exponential vanishing of the energy gap of the QREM.

  8. Further Evidence in Support of the Universal Nilpotent Grammatical Computational Paradigm of Quantum Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Marcer, Peter J.; Rowlands, Peter

    2010-12-22

    Further evidence is presented in favour of the computational paradigm, conceived and constructed by Rowlands and Diaz, as detailed in Rowlands' book Zero to Infinity (2007), and in particular the authors' paper 'The Grammatical Universe: the Laws of Thermodynamics and Quantum Entanglement'. The paradigm, which has isomorphic group and algebraic quantum mechanical language interpretations, not only predicts the well-established facts of quantum physics, the periodic table, chemistry / valence and of molecular biology, whose understanding it extends; it also provides an elegant, simple solution to the unresolved quantum measurement problem. In this fundamental paradigm, all the computational constructs / predictionsmore » that emerge, follow from the simple fact, that, as in quantum mechanics, the wave function is defined only up to an arbitrary fixed phase. This fixed phase provides a simple physical understanding of the quantum vacuum in quantum field theory, where only relative phases, known to be able to encode 3+1 relativistic space-time geometries, can be measured. It is the arbitrary fixed measurement standard, against which everything that follows is to be measured, even though the standard itself cannot be, since nothing exists against which to measure it. The standard, as an arbitrary fixed reference phase, functions as the holographic basis for a self-organized universal quantum process of emergent novel fermion states of matter where, following each emergence, the arbitrary standard is re-fixed anew so as to provide a complete history / holographic record or hologram of the current fixed past, advancing an unending irreversible evolution, such as is the evidence of our senses. The fermion states, in accord with the Pauli exclusion principle, each correspond to a unique nilpotent symbol in the infinite alphabet (which specifies the grammar in this nilpotent universal computational rewrite system (NUCRS) paradigm); and the alphabet, as Hill and Rowlands

  9. Functionalization of quantum rods with oligonucleotides for programmable assembly with DNA origami

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doane, Tennyson L.; Alam, Rabeka; Maye, Mathew M.

    2015-02-01

    The DNA-mediated self-assembly of CdSe/CdS quantum rods (QRs) onto DNA origami is described. Two QR types with unique optical emission and high polarization were synthesized, and then functionalized with oligonucleotides (ssDNA) using a novel protection-deprotection approach, which harnessed ssDNA's tailorable rigidity and denaturation temperature to increase DNA coverage by reducing non-specific coordination and wrapping. The QR assembly was programmable, and occurred at two different assembly zones that had capture strands in parallel alignment. QRs with different optical properties were assembled, opening up future studies on orientation dependent QR FRET. The QR-origami conjugates could be purified via gel electrophoresis and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Assembly yields, QR stoichiometry and orientation, as well as energy transfer implications were studied in light of QR distances, origami flexibility, and conditions.The DNA-mediated self-assembly of CdSe/CdS quantum rods (QRs) onto DNA origami is described. Two QR types with unique optical emission and high polarization were synthesized, and then functionalized with oligonucleotides (ssDNA) using a novel protection-deprotection approach, which harnessed ssDNA's tailorable rigidity and denaturation temperature to increase DNA coverage by reducing non-specific coordination and wrapping. The QR assembly was programmable, and occurred at two different assembly zones that had capture strands in parallel alignment. QRs with different optical properties were assembled, opening up future studies on orientation dependent QR FRET. The QR-origami conjugates could be purified via gel electrophoresis and sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. Assembly yields, QR stoichiometry and orientation, as well as energy transfer implications were studied in light of QR distances, origami flexibility, and conditions. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental conditions, DNA origami blueprint and

  10. A novel quantum scheme for secure two-party distance computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhen-wan; Shi, Run-hua; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2017-12-01

    Secure multiparty computational geometry is an essential field of secure multiparty computation, which computes a computation geometric problem without revealing any private information of each party. Secure two-party distance computation is a primitive of secure multiparty computational geometry, which computes the distance between two points without revealing each point's location information (i.e., coordinate). Secure two-party distance computation has potential applications with high secure requirements in military, business, engineering and so on. In this paper, we present a quantum solution to secure two-party distance computation by subtly using quantum private query. Compared to the classical related protocols, our quantum protocol can ensure higher security and better privacy protection because of the physical principle of quantum mechanics.

  11. Ultrasensitive quantum dots-based DNA detection and hybridization kinetics analysis with evanescent wave biosensing platform.

    PubMed

    Long, Feng; Wu, Shuxu; He, Miao; Tong, Tiezheng; Shi, Hanchang

    2011-01-15

    Ultrasensitive DNA detection was achieved using a new biosensing platform based on quantum dots (QDs) and total internal reflection fluorescence, which featured an exceptional detection limit of 3.2 amol of bound target DNA. The reusable sensor surface was produced by covalently immobilizing streptavidin onto a self-assembled alkanethiol monolayer of fiber optic probe through a heterobifunctional reagent. Streptavidin served as a versatile binding element for biotinylated single-strand DNA (ssDNA). The ssDNA-coated fiber probe was evaluated as a nucleic acid biosensor through a DNA-DNA hybridization assay for a 30-mer ssDNA, which were the segments of the uidA gene of Escherichia coli and labeled by QDs using avidin-biotin interaction. Several negative control tests revealed the absence of significant non-specific binding. It also showed that bound target DNA could easily be eluted from the sensor surface using SDS solution (pH 1.9) without any significant loss of performance after more than 30 assay cycles. A quantitative measurement of DNA binding kinetics was achieved with high accuracy, indicating an association rate of 1.38×10(6) M(-1) s(-1) and a dissociation rate of 4.67×10(-3) s(-1). The proposed biosensing platform provides a simple, cheap, fast, and robust solution for many potential applications including clinical diagnosis, pathology, and genetics. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, P; Dunston, G; Lindesay, J

    2016-02-21

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme's displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations-a possible signature of quantum entanglement-may be explained by such a mechanism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. How quantum entanglement in DNA synchronizes double-strand breakage by type II restriction endonucleases

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, P.; Dunston, G.; Lindesay, J.

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic quantum effects in living systems have been studied widely in pursuit of fundamental explanations for biological energy transport and sensing. While it is known that type II endonucleases, the largest class of restriction enzymes, induce DNA double-strand breaks by attacking phosphodiester bonds, the mechanism by which simultaneous cutting is coordinated between the catalytic centers remains unclear. We propose a quantum mechanical model for collective electronic behavior in the DNA helix, where dipole-dipole oscillations are quantized through boundary conditions imposed by the enzyme. Zero-point modes of coherent oscillations would provide the energy required for double-strand breakage. Such quanta may be preserved in the presence of thermal noise by the enzyme’s displacement of water surrounding the DNA recognition sequence. The enzyme thus serves as a decoherence shield. Palindromic mirror symmetry of the enzyme-DNA complex should conserve parity, because symmetric bond-breaking ceases when the symmetry of the complex is violated or when physiological parameters are perturbed from optima. Persistent correlations in DNA across longer spatial separations—a possible signature of quantum entanglement—may be explained by such a mechanism. PMID:26682627

  14. Adiabatic quantum computation with neutral atoms via the Rydberg blockade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Krittika; Deutsch, Ivan

    2011-05-01

    We study a trapped-neutral-atom implementation of the adiabatic model of quantum computation whereby the Hamiltonian of a set of interacting qubits is changed adiabatically so that its ground state evolves to the desired output of the algorithm. We employ the ``Rydberg blockade interaction,'' which previously has been used to implement two-qubit entangling gates in the quantum circuit model. Here it is employed via off-resonant virtual dressing of the excited levels, so that atoms always remain in the ground state. The resulting dressed-Rydberg interaction is insensitive to the distance between the atoms within a certain blockade radius, making this process robust to temperature and vibrational fluctuations. Single qubit interactions are implemented with global microwaves and atoms are locally addressed with light shifts. With these ingredients, we study a protocol to implement the two-qubit Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problem. We model atom trapping, addressing, coherent evolution, and decoherence. We also explore collective control of the many-atom system and generalize the QUBO problem to multiple qubits. We study a trapped-neutral-atom implementation of the adiabatic model of quantum computation whereby the Hamiltonian of a set of interacting qubits is changed adiabatically so that its ground state evolves to the desired output of the algorithm. We employ the ``Rydberg blockade interaction,'' which previously has been used to implement two-qubit entangling gates in the quantum circuit model. Here it is employed via off-resonant virtual dressing of the excited levels, so that atoms always remain in the ground state. The resulting dressed-Rydberg interaction is insensitive to the distance between the atoms within a certain blockade radius, making this process robust to temperature and vibrational fluctuations. Single qubit interactions are implemented with global microwaves and atoms are locally addressed with light shifts. With these

  15. Data Assimilation on a Quantum Annealing Computer: Feasibility and Scalability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nearing, G. S.; Halem, M.; Chapman, D. R.; Pelissier, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Data assimilation is one of the ubiquitous and computationally hard problems in the Earth Sciences. In particular, ensemble-based methods require a large number of model evaluations to estimate the prior probability density over system states, and variational methods require adjoint calculations and iteration to locate the maximum a posteriori solution in the presence of nonlinear models and observation operators. Quantum annealing computers (QAC) like the new D-Wave housed at the NASA Ames Research Center can be used for optimization and sampling, and therefore offers a new possibility for efficiently solving hard data assimilation problems. Coding on the QAC is not straightforward: a problem must be posed as a Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) and mapped to a spherical Chimera graph. We have developed a method for compiling nonlinear 4D-Var problems on the D-Wave that consists of five steps: Emulating the nonlinear model and/or observation function using radial basis functions (RBF) or Chebyshev polynomials. Truncating a Taylor series around each RBF kernel. Reducing the Taylor polynomial to a quadratic using ancilla gadgets. Mapping the real-valued quadratic to a fixed-precision binary quadratic. Mapping the fully coupled binary quadratic to a partially coupled spherical Chimera graph using ancilla gadgets. At present the D-Wave contains 512 qbits (with 1024 and 2048 qbit machines due in the next two years); this machine size allows us to estimate only 3 state variables at each satellite overpass. However, QAC's solve optimization problems using a physical (quantum) system, and therefore do not require iterations or calculation of model adjoints. This has the potential to revolutionize our ability to efficiently perform variational data assimilation, as the size of these computers grows in the coming years.

  16. Quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics: an approach for computing dynamically averaged vibrational spectra including critical nuclear quantum effects.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Isaiah; Iyengar, Srinivasan S

    2007-10-18

    We have introduced a computational methodology to study vibrational spectroscopy in clusters inclusive of critical nuclear quantum effects. This approach is based on the recently developed quantum wavepacket ab initio molecular dynamics method that combines quantum wavepacket dynamics with ab initio molecular dynamics. The computational efficiency of the dynamical procedure is drastically improved (by several orders of magnitude) through the utilization of wavelet-based techniques combined with the previously introduced time-dependent deterministic sampling procedure measure to achieve stable, picosecond length, quantum-classical dynamics of electrons and nuclei in clusters. The dynamical information is employed to construct a novel cumulative flux/velocity correlation function, where the wavepacket flux from the quantized particle is combined with classical nuclear velocities to obtain the vibrational density of states. The approach is demonstrated by computing the vibrational density of states of [Cl-H-Cl]-, inclusive of critical quantum nuclear effects, and our results are in good agreement with experiment. A general hierarchical procedure is also provided, based on electronic structure harmonic frequencies, classical ab initio molecular dynamics, computation of nuclear quantum-mechanical eigenstates, and employing quantum wavepacket ab initio dynamics to understand vibrational spectroscopy in hydrogen-bonded clusters that display large degrees of anharmonicities.

  17. Tunable graphene quantum point contact transistor for DNA detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    Girdhar, Anuj; Sathe, Chaitanya; Schulten, Klaus; Leburton, Jean-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    A graphene membrane conductor containing a nanopore in a quantum point contact (QPC) geometry is a promising candidate to sense, and potentially sequence, DNA molecules translocating through the nanopore. Within this geometry, the shape, size, and position of the nanopore as well as the edge configuration influences the membrane conductance caused by the electrostatic interaction between the DNA nucleotides and the nanopore edge. It is shown that the graphene conductance variations resulting from DNA translocation can be enhanced by choosing a particular geometry as well as by modulating the graphene Fermi energy, which demonstrates the ability to detect conformational transformations of a double-stranded DNA, as well as the passage of individual base pairs of a single-stranded DNA molecule through the nanopore. PMID:25765702

  18. Polarizable Force Field for DNA Based on the Classical Drude Oscillator: I. Refinement Using Quantum Mechanical Base Stacking and Conformational Energetics.

    PubMed

    Lemkul, Justin A; MacKerell, Alexander D

    2017-05-09

    Empirical force fields seek to relate the configuration of a set of atoms to its energy, thus yielding the forces governing its dynamics, using classical physics rather than more expensive quantum mechanical calculations that are computationally intractable for large systems. Most force fields used to simulate biomolecular systems use fixed atomic partial charges, neglecting the influence of electronic polarization, instead making use of a mean-field approximation that may not be transferable across environments. Recent hardware and software developments make polarizable simulations feasible, and to this end, polarizable force fields represent the next generation of molecular dynamics simulation technology. In this work, we describe the refinement of a polarizable force field for DNA based on the classical Drude oscillator model by targeting quantum mechanical interaction energies and conformational energy profiles of model compounds necessary to build a complete DNA force field. The parametrization strategy employed in the present work seeks to correct weak base stacking in A- and B-DNA and the unwinding of Z-DNA observed in the previous version of the force field, called Drude-2013. Refinement of base nonbonded terms and reparametrization of dihedral terms in the glycosidic linkage, deoxyribofuranose rings, and important backbone torsions resulted in improved agreement with quantum mechanical potential energy surfaces. Notably, we expand on previous efforts by explicitly including Z-DNA conformational energetics in the refinement.

  19. Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states-based blind quantum computation with entanglement concentration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Weng, Jian; Lu, Wei; Li, Xiaochun; Luo, Weiqi; Tan, Xiaoqing

    2017-09-11

    In blind quantum computation (BQC) protocol, the quantum computability of servers are complicated and powerful, while the clients are not. It is still a challenge for clients to delegate quantum computation to servers and keep the clients' inputs, outputs and algorithms private. Unfortunately, quantum channel noise is unavoidable in the practical transmission. In this paper, a novel BQC protocol based on maximally entangled Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states is proposed which doesn't need a trusted center. The protocol includes a client and two servers, where the client only needs to own quantum channels with two servers who have full-advantage quantum computers. Two servers perform entanglement concentration used to remove the noise, where the success probability can almost reach 100% in theory. But they learn nothing in the process of concentration because of the no-signaling principle, so this BQC protocol is secure and feasible.

  20. Quantum transport modelling of silicon nanobeams using heterogeneous computing scheme

    SciTech Connect

    Harb, M., E-mail: harbm@physics.mcgill.ca; Michaud-Rioux, V., E-mail: vincentm@physics.mcgill.ca; Guo, H., E-mail: guo@physics.mcgill.ca

    We report the development of a powerful method for quantum transport calculations of nanowire/nanobeam structures with large cross sectional area. Our approach to quantum transport is based on Green's functions and tight-binding potentials. A linear algebraic formulation allows us to harness the massively parallel nature of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and our implementation is based on a heterogeneous parallel computing scheme with traditional processors and GPUs working together. Using our software tool, the electronic and quantum transport properties of silicon nanobeams with a realistic cross sectional area of ∼22.7 nm{sup 2} and a length of ∼81.5 nm—comprising 105 000 Si atoms and 24 000more » passivating H atoms in the scattering region—are investigated. The method also allows us to perform significant averaging over impurity configurations—all possible configurations were considered in the case of single impurities. Finally, the effect of the position and number of vacancy defects on the transport properties was considered. It is found that the configurations with the vacancies lying closer to the local density of states (LDOS) maxima have lower transmission functions than the configurations with the vacancies located at LDOS minima or far away from LDOS maxima, suggesting both a qualitative method to tune or estimate optimal impurity configurations as well as a physical picture that accounts for device variability. Finally, we provide performance benchmarks for structures as large as ∼42.5 nm{sup 2} cross section and ∼81.5 nm length.« less

  1. Universal computing by DNA origami robots in a living animal

    PubMed Central

    Levner, Daniel; Ittah, Shmulik; Abu-Horowitz, Almogit; Bachelet, Ido

    2014-01-01

    Biological systems are collections of discrete molecular objects that move around and collide with each other. Cells carry out elaborate processes by precisely controlling these collisions, but developing artificial machines that can interface with and control such interactions remains a significant challenge. DNA is a natural substrate for computing and has been used to implement a diverse set of mathematical problems1-3, logic circuits4-6 and robotics7-9. The molecule also naturally interfaces with living systems, and different forms of DNA-based biocomputing have previously been demonstrated10-13. Here we show that DNA origami14-16 can be used to fabricate nanoscale robots that are capable of dynamically interacting with each other17-18 in a living animal. The interactions generate logical outputs, which are relayed to switch molecular payloads on or off. As a proof-of-principle, we use the system to create architectures that emulate various logic gates (AND, OR, XOR, NAND, NOT, CNOT, and a half adder). Following an ex vivo prototyping phase, we successfully employed the DNA origami robots in living cockroaches (Blaberus discoidalis) to control a molecule that targets the cells of the animal. PMID:24705510

  2. DNA profiles, computer searches, and the Fourth Amendment.

    PubMed

    Kimel, Catherine W

    2013-01-01

    Pursuant to federal statutes and to laws in all fifty states, the United States government has assembled a database containing the DNA profiles of over eleven million citizens. Without judicial authorization, the government searches each of these profiles one-hundred thousand times every day, seeking to link database subjects to crimes they are not suspected of committing. Yet, courts and scholars that have addressed DNA databasing have focused their attention almost exclusively on the constitutionality of the government's seizure of the biological samples from which the profiles are generated. This Note fills a gap in the scholarship by examining the Fourth Amendment problems that arise when the government searches its vast DNA database. This Note argues that each attempt to match two DNA profiles constitutes a Fourth Amendment search because each attempted match infringes upon database subjects' expectations of privacy in their biological relationships and physical movements. The Note further argues that database searches are unreasonable as they are currently conducted, and it suggests an adaptation of computer-search procedures to remedy the constitutional deficiency.

  3. Enhanced fault-tolerant quantum computing in d-level systems.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Earl T

    2014-12-05

    Error-correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transversal non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for d-level qudit systems with prime d. The codes use n=d-1 qudits and can detect up to ∼d/3 errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation known as magic-state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing d.

  4. Fault-tolerant quantum computation with nondeterministic entangling gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auger, James M.; Anwar, Hussain; Gimeno-Segovia, Mercedes; Stace, Thomas M.; Browne, Dan E.

    2018-03-01

    Performing entangling gates between physical qubits is necessary for building a large-scale universal quantum computer, but in some physical implementations—for example, those that are based on linear optics or networks of ion traps—entangling gates can only be implemented probabilistically. In this work, we study the fault-tolerant performance of a topological cluster state scheme with local nondeterministic entanglement generation, where failed entangling gates (which correspond to bonds on the lattice representation of the cluster state) lead to a defective three-dimensional lattice with missing bonds. We present two approaches for dealing with missing bonds; the first is a nonadaptive scheme that requires no additional quantum processing, and the second is an adaptive scheme in which qubits can be measured in an alternative basis to effectively remove them from the lattice, hence eliminating their damaging effect and leading to better threshold performance. We find that a fault-tolerance threshold can still be observed with a bond-loss rate of 6.5% for the nonadaptive scheme, and a bond-loss rate as high as 14.5% for the adaptive scheme.

  5. Long-range energy transfer in self-assembled quantum dot-DNA cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodman, Samuel M.; Siu, Albert; Singh, Vivek; Nagpal, Prashant

    2015-11-01

    The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient transport of energy across QD-DNA thin films.The size-dependent energy bandgaps of semiconductor nanocrystals or quantum dots (QDs) can be utilized in converting broadband incident radiation efficiently into electric current by cascade energy transfer (ET) between layers of different sized quantum dots, followed by charge dissociation and transport in the bottom layer. Self-assembling such cascade structures with angstrom-scale spatial precision is important for building realistic devices, and DNA-based QD self-assembly can provide an important alternative. Here we show long-range Dexter energy transfer in QD-DNA self-assembled single constructs and ensemble devices. Using photoluminescence, scanning tunneling spectroscopy, current-sensing AFM measurements in single QD-DNA cascade constructs, and temperature-dependent ensemble devices using TiO2 nanotubes, we show that Dexter energy transfer, likely mediated by the exciton-shelves formed in these QD-DNA self-assembled structures, can be used for efficient

  6. Comprehensive Materials and Morphologies Study of Ion Traps (COMMIT) for Scalable Quantum Computation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-21

    the photoelectric effect. The typical shortest wavelengths needed for ion traps range from 194 nm for Hg+ to 493 nm for Ba +, corresponding to 6.4-2.5...REPORT Comprehensive Materials and Morphologies Study of Ion Traps (COMMIT) for scalable Quantum Computation - Final Report 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...CLASSIFICATION OF: Trapped ion systems, are extremely promising for large-scale quantum computation, but face a vexing problem, with motional quantum

  7. Two dimensional electron systems for solid state quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Sumit

    Two dimensional electron systems based on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are extremely useful in various scientific investigations of recent times including the search for quantum computational schemes. Although significant strides have been made over the past few years to realize solid state qubits on GaAs/AlGaAs 2DEGs, there are numerous factors limiting the progress. We attempt to identify factors that have material and design-specific origin and develop ways to overcome them. The thesis is divided in two broad segments. In the first segment we describe the realization of a new field-effect induced two dimensional electron system on GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure where the novel device-design is expected to suppress the level of charge noise present in the device. Modulation-doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructures are utilized extensively in the study of quantum transport in nanostructures, but charge fluctuations associated with remote ionized dopants often produce deleterious effects. Electric field-induced carrier systems offer an attractive alternative if certain challenges can be overcome. We demonstrate a field-effect transistor in which the active channel is locally devoid of modulation-doping, but silicon dopant atoms are retained in the ohmic contact region to facilitate low-resistance contacts. A high quality two-dimensional electron gas is induced by a field-effect that is tunable over a density range of 6.5x10 10cm-2 to 2.6x1011cm-2 . Device design, fabrication, and low temperature (T=0.3K) characterization results are discussed. The demonstrated device-design overcomes several existing limitations in the fabrication of field-induced 2DEGs and might find utility in hosting nanostructures required for making spin qubits. The second broad segment describes our effort to correlate transport parameters measured at T=0.3K to the strength of the fractional quantum Hall state observed at nu=5/2 in the second Landau level of high-mobility GaAs/AlGaAs two dimensional

  8. High-speed linear optics quantum computing using active feed-forward.

    PubMed

    Prevedel, Robert; Walther, Philip; Tiefenbacher, Felix; Böhi, Pascal; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-01-04

    As information carriers in quantum computing, photonic qubits have the advantage of undergoing negligible decoherence. However, the absence of any significant photon-photon interaction is problematic for the realization of non-trivial two-qubit gates. One solution is to introduce an effective nonlinearity by measurements resulting in probabilistic gate operations. In one-way quantum computation, the random quantum measurement error can be overcome by applying a feed-forward technique, such that the future measurement basis depends on earlier measurement results. This technique is crucial for achieving deterministic quantum computation once a cluster state (the highly entangled multiparticle state on which one-way quantum computation is based) is prepared. Here we realize a concatenated scheme of measurement and active feed-forward in a one-way quantum computing experiment. We demonstrate that, for a perfect cluster state and no photon loss, our quantum computation scheme would operate with good fidelity and that our feed-forward components function with very high speed and low error for detected photons. With present technology, the individual computational step (in our case the individual feed-forward cycle) can be operated in less than 150 ns using electro-optical modulators. This is an important result for the future development of one-way quantum computers, whose large-scale implementation will depend on advances in the production and detection of the required highly entangled cluster states.

  9. Quantum mechanical calculations related to ionization and charge transfer in DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cauët, E.; Valiev, M.; Weare, J. H.; Liévin, J.

    2012-07-01

    Ionization and charge migration in DNA play crucial roles in mechanisms of DNA damage caused by ionizing radiation, oxidizing agents and photo-irradiation. Therefore, an evaluation of the ionization properties of the DNA bases is central to the full interpretation and understanding of the elementary reactive processes that occur at the molecular level during the initial exposure and afterwards. Ab initio quantum mechanical (QM) methods have been successful in providing highly accurate evaluations of key parameters, such as ionization energies (IE) of DNA bases. Hence, in this study, we performed high-level QM calculations to characterize the molecular energy levels and potential energy surfaces, which shed light on ionization and charge migration between DNA bases. In particular, we examined the IEs of guanine, the most easily oxidized base, isolated and embedded in base clusters, and investigated the mechanism of charge migration over two and three stacked guanines. The IE of guanine in the human telomere sequence has also been evaluated. We report a simple molecular orbital analysis to explain how modifications in the base sequence are expected to change the efficiency of the sequence as a hole trap. Finally, the application of a hybrid approach combining quantum mechanics with molecular mechanics brings an interesting discussion as to how the native aqueous DNA environment affects the IE threshold of nucleobases.

  10. What Can Quantum Optics Say about Computational Complexity Theory?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahimi-Keshari, Saleh; Lund, Austin P.; Ralph, Timothy C.

    2015-02-01

    Considering the problem of sampling from the output photon-counting probability distribution of a linear-optical network for input Gaussian states, we obtain results that are of interest from both quantum theory and the computational complexity theory point of view. We derive a general formula for calculating the output probabilities, and by considering input thermal states, we show that the output probabilities are proportional to permanents of positive-semidefinite Hermitian matrices. It is believed that approximating permanents of complex matrices in general is a #P-hard problem. However, we show that these permanents can be approximated with an algorithm in the BPPNP complexity class, as there exists an efficient classical algorithm for sampling from the output probability distribution. We further consider input squeezed-vacuum states and discuss the complexity of sampling from the probability distribution at the output.

  11. Differential geometric treewidth estimation in adiabatic quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chi; Jonckheere, Edmond; Brun, Todd

    2016-10-01

    The D-Wave adiabatic quantum computing platform is designed to solve a particular class of problems—the Quadratic Unconstrained Binary Optimization (QUBO) problems. Due to the particular "Chimera" physical architecture of the D-Wave chip, the logical problem graph at hand needs an extra process called minor embedding in order to be solvable on the D-Wave architecture. The latter problem is itself NP-hard. In this paper, we propose a novel polynomial-time approximation to the closely related treewidth based on the differential geometric concept of Ollivier-Ricci curvature. The latter runs in polynomial time and thus could significantly reduce the overall complexity of determining whether a QUBO problem is minor embeddable, and thus solvable on the D-Wave architecture.

  12. Universal quantum computation with temporal-mode bilayer square lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, Rafael N.; Yokoyama, Shota; Furusawa, Akira; Menicucci, Nicolas C.

    2018-03-01

    We propose an experimental design for universal continuous-variable quantum computation that incorporates recent innovations in linear-optics-based continuous-variable cluster state generation and cubic-phase gate teleportation. The first ingredient is a protocol for generating the bilayer-square-lattice cluster state (a universal resource state) with temporal modes of light. With this state, measurement-based implementation of Gaussian unitary gates requires only homodyne detection. Second, we describe a measurement device that implements an adaptive cubic-phase gate, up to a random phase-space displacement. It requires a two-step sequence of homodyne measurements and consumes a (non-Gaussian) cubic-phase state.

  13. Adiabatic pipelining: a key to ternary computing with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Pečar, P; Ramšak, A; Zimic, N; Mraz, M; Lebar Bajec, I

    2008-12-10

    The quantum-dot cellular automaton (QCA), a processing platform based on interacting quantum dots, was introduced by Lent in the mid-1990s. What followed was an exhilarating period with the development of the line, the functionally complete set of logic functions, as well as more complex processing structures, however all in the realm of binary logic. Regardless of these achievements, it has to be acknowledged that the use of binary logic is in computing systems mainly the end result of the technological limitations, which the designers had to cope with in the early days of their design. The first advancement of QCAs to multi-valued (ternary) processing was performed by Lebar Bajec et al, with the argument that processing platforms of the future should not disregard the clear advantages of multi-valued logic. Some of the elementary ternary QCAs, necessary for the construction of more complex processing entities, however, lead to a remarkable increase in size when compared to their binary counterparts. This somewhat negates the advantages gained by entering the ternary computing domain. As it turned out, even the binary QCA had its initial hiccups, which have been solved by the introduction of adiabatic switching and the application of adiabatic pipeline approaches. We present here a study that introduces adiabatic switching into the ternary QCA and employs the adiabatic pipeline approach to successfully solve the issues of elementary ternary QCAs. What is more, the ternary QCAs presented here are sizewise comparable to binary QCAs. This in our view might serve towards their faster adoption.

  14. Specific detection of the cleavage activity of mycobacterial enzymes using a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jepsen, Morten Leth; Harmsen, Charlotte; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Nagaraja, Valakunja; Knudsen, Birgitta R.; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2015-12-01

    We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes.We present a quantum dot based DNA nanosensor specifically targeting the cleavage step in the reaction cycle of the essential DNA-modifying enzyme, mycobacterial topoisomerase I. The design takes advantages of the unique photophysical properties of quantum dots to generate visible fluorescence recovery upon specific cleavage by mycobacterial topoisomerase I. This report, for the first time, demonstrates the possibility to quantify the cleavage activity of the mycobacterial enzyme without the pre-processing sample purification or post-processing signal amplification. The cleavage induced signal response has also proven reliable in biological matrices, such as whole cell extracts prepared from Escherichia coli and human Caco-2 cells. It is expected that the assay may contribute to the clinical diagnostics of bacterial diseases, as well as the evaluation of treatment outcomes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Characterization of the QD-based DNA Nanosensor. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06326d

  15. Research on Quantum Authentication Methods for the Secure Access Control Among Three Elements of Cloud Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Yumin; Xiao, Shufen; Ma, Hongyang; Chen, Libo

    2016-12-01

    Cloud computing and big data have become the developing engine of current information technology (IT) as a result of the rapid development of IT. However, security protection has become increasingly important for cloud computing and big data, and has become a problem that must be solved to develop cloud computing. The theft of identity authentication information remains a serious threat to the security of cloud computing. In this process, attackers intrude into cloud computing services through identity authentication information, thereby threatening the security of data from multiple perspectives. Therefore, this study proposes a model for cloud computing protection and management based on quantum authentication, introduces the principle of quantum authentication, and deduces the quantum authentication process. In theory, quantum authentication technology can be applied in cloud computing for security protection. This technology cannot be cloned; thus, it is more secure and reliable than classical methods.

  16. Two-spectral Yang-Baxter operators in topological quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, William F.

    2011-05-01

    One of the current trends in quantum computing is the application of algebraic topological methods in the design of new algorithms and quantum computers, giving rise to topological quantum computing. One of the tools used in it is the Yang-Baxter equation whose solutions are interpreted as universal quantum gates. Lately, more general Yang-Baxter equations have been investigated, making progress as two-spectral equations and Yang-Baxter systems. This paper intends to apply these new findings to the field of topological quantum computation, more specifically, the proposition of the two-spectral Yang-Baxter operators as universal quantum gates for 2 qubits and 2 qutrits systems, obtaining 4x4 and 9x9 matrices respectively, and further elaboration of the corresponding Hamiltonian by the use of computer algebra software Mathematica® and its Qucalc package. In addition, possible physical systems to which the Yang-Baxter operators obtained can be applied are considered. In the present work it is demonstrated the utility of the Yang-Baxter equation to generate universal quantum gates and the power of computer algebra to design them; it is expected that these mathematical studies contribute to the further development of quantum computers

  17. Mathematical Theory of Generalized Duality Quantum Computers Acting on Vector-States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Huai-Xin; Long, Gui-Lu; Guo, Zhi-Hua; Chen, Zheng-Li

    2013-06-01

    Following the idea of duality quantum computation, a generalized duality quantum computer (GDQC) acting on vector-states is defined as a tuple consisting of a generalized quantum wave divider (GQWD) and a finite number of unitary operators as well as a generalized quantum wave combiner (GQWC). It is proved that the GQWD and GQWC of a GDQC are an isometry and a co-isometry, respectively, and mutually dual. It is also proved that every GDQC gives a contraction, called a generalized duality quantum gate (GDQG). A classification of GDQCs is given and the properties of GDQGs are discussed. Some applications are obtained, including two orthogonal duality quantum computer algorithms for unsorted database search and an understanding of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  18. Contagious error sources would need time travel to prevent quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalai, Gil; Kuperberg, Greg

    2015-08-01

    We consider an error model for quantum computing that consists of "contagious quantum germs" that can infect every output qubit when at least one input qubit is infected. Once a germ actively causes error, it continues to cause error indefinitely for every qubit it infects, with arbitrary quantum entanglement and correlation. Although this error model looks much worse than quasi-independent error, we show that it reduces to quasi-independent error with the technique of quantum teleportation. The construction, which was previously described by Knill, is that every quantum circuit can be converted to a mixed circuit with bounded quantum depth. We also consider the restriction of bounded quantum depth from the point of view of quantum complexity classes.

  19. DNA bubble dynamics as a quantum Coulomb problem.

    PubMed

    Fogedby, Hans C; Metzler, Ralf

    2007-02-16

    We study the dynamics of denaturation bubbles in double-stranded DNA. Demonstrating that the associated Fokker-Planck equation is equivalent to a Coulomb problem, we derive expressions for the bubble survival distribution W(t). Below Tm, W(t) is associated with the continuum of scattering states of the repulsive Coulomb potential. At Tm, the Coulomb potential vanishes and W(t) assumes a power-law tail with nontrivial dynamic exponents: the critical exponent of the entropy loss factor may cause a finite mean lifetime. Above Tm (attractive potential), the long-time dynamics is controlled by the lowest bound state. Correlations and finite size effects are discussed.

  20. Multi-server blind quantum computation over collective-noise channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Min; Liu, Lin; Song, Xiuli

    2018-03-01

    Blind quantum computation (BQC) enables ordinary clients to securely outsource their computation task to costly quantum servers. Besides two essential properties, namely correctness and blindness, practical BQC protocols also should make clients as classical as possible and tolerate faults from nonideal quantum channel. In this paper, using logical Bell states as quantum resource, we propose multi-server BQC protocols over collective-dephasing noise channel and collective-rotation noise channel, respectively. The proposed protocols permit completely or almost classical client, meet the correctness and blindness requirements of BQC protocol, and are typically practical BQC protocols.

  1. Quantum computational complexity, Einstein's equations and accelerated expansion of the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Xian-Hui; Wang, Bin

    2018-02-01

    We study the relation between quantum computational complexity and general relativity. The quantum computational complexity is proposed to be quantified by the shortest length of geodesic quantum curves. We examine the complexity/volume duality in a geodesic causal ball in the framework of Fermi normal coordinates and derive the full non-linear Einstein equation. Using insights from the complexity/action duality, we argue that the accelerated expansion of the universe could be driven by the quantum complexity and free from coincidence and fine-tunning problems.

  2. Qubits and quantum Hamiltonian computing performances for operating a digital Boolean 1/2-adder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dridi, Ghassen; Faizy Namarvar, Omid; Joachim, Christian

    2018-04-01

    Quantum Boolean (1 + 1) digits 1/2-adders are designed with 3 qubits for the quantum computing (Qubits) and 4 quantum states for the quantum Hamiltonian computing (QHC) approaches. Detailed analytical solutions are provided to analyse the time operation of those different 1/2-adder gates. QHC is more robust to noise than Qubits and requires about the same amount of energy for running its 1/2-adder logical operations. QHC is faster in time than Qubits but its logical output measurement takes longer.

  3. Using CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dots to detect DNA and damage to DNA

    PubMed Central

    Moulick, Amitava; Milosavljevic, Vedran; Vlachova, Jana; Podgajny, Robert; Hynek, David; Kopel, Pavel; Adam, Vojtech

    2017-01-01

    CdTe/ZnSe core/shell quantum dot (QD), one of the strongest and most highly luminescent nanoparticles, was directly synthesized in an aqueous medium to study its individual interactions with important nucleobases (adenine, guanine, cytosine, and thymine) in detail. The results obtained from the optical analyses indicated that the interactions of the QDs with different nucleobases were different, which reflected in different fluorescent emission maxima and intensities. The difference in the interaction was found due to the different chemical behavior and different sizes of the formed nanoconjugates. An electrochemical study also confirmed that the purines and pyrimidines show different interactions with the core/shell QDs. Based on these phenomena, a novel QD-based method is developed to detect the presence of the DNA, damage to DNA, and mutation. The QDs were successfully applied very easily to detect any change in the sequence (mutation) of DNA. The QDs also showed their ability to detect DNAs directly from the extracts of human cancer (PC3) and normal (PNT1A) cells (detection limit of 500 pM of DNA), which indicates the possibilities to use this easy assay technique to confirm the presence of living organisms in extreme environments. PMID:28243089

  4. No-go theorem for passive single-rail linear optical quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lian-Ao; Walther, Philip; Lidar, Daniel A

    2013-01-01

    Photonic quantum systems are among the most promising architectures for quantum computers. It is well known that for dual-rail photons effective non-linearities and near-deterministic non-trivial two-qubit gates can be achieved via the measurement process and by introducing ancillary photons. While in principle this opens a legitimate path to scalable linear optical quantum computing, the technical requirements are still very challenging and thus other optical encodings are being actively investigated. One of the alternatives is to use single-rail encoded photons, where entangled states can be deterministically generated. Here we prove that even for such systems universal optical quantum computing using only passive optical elements such as beam splitters and phase shifters is not possible. This no-go theorem proves that photon bunching cannot be passively suppressed even when extra ancilla modes and arbitrary number of photons are used. Our result provides useful guidance for the design of optical quantum computers.

  5. Universal measurement-based quantum computation in two-dimensional symmetry-protected topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Tzu-Chieh; Huang, Ching-Yu

    2017-09-01

    Recent progress in the characterization of gapped quantum phases has also triggered the search for a universal resource for quantum computation in symmetric gapped phases. Prior works in one dimension suggest that it is a feature more common than previously thought, in that nontrivial one-dimensional symmetry-protected topological (SPT) phases provide quantum computational power characterized by the algebraic structure defining these phases. Progress in two and higher dimensions so far has been limited to special fixed points. Here we provide two families of two-dimensional Z2 symmetric wave functions such that there exists a finite region of the parameter in the SPT phases that supports universal quantum computation. The quantum computational power appears to lose its universality at the boundary between the SPT and the symmetry-breaking phases.

  6. Quantum And Relativistic Protocols For Secure Multi-Party Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Roger

    2009-11-01

    After a general introduction, the thesis is divided into four parts. In the first, we discuss the task of coin tossing, principally in order to highlight the effect different physical theories have on security in a straightforward manner, but, also, to introduce a new protocol for non-relativistic strong coin tossing. This protocol matches the security of the best protocol known to date while using a conceptually different approach to achieve the task. In the second part variable bias coin tossing is introduced. This is a variant of coin tossing in which one party secretly chooses one of two biased coins to toss. It is shown that this can be achieved with unconditional security for a specified range of biases, and with cheat-evident security for any bias. We also discuss two further protocols which are conjectured to be unconditionally secure for any bias. The third section looks at other two-party secure computations for which, prior to our work, protocols and no-go theorems were unknown. We introduce a general model for such computations, and show that, within this model, a wide range of functions are impossible to compute securely. We give explicit cheating attacks for such functions. In the final chapter we discuss the task of expanding a private random string, while dropping the usual assumption that the protocol's user trusts her devices. Instead we assume that all quantum devices are supplied by an arbitrarily malicious adversary. We give two protocols that we conjecture securely perform this task. The first allows a private random string to be expanded by a finite amount, while the second generates an arbitrarily large expansion of such a string.

  7. Direct electrochemical stripping detection of cystic-fibrosis-related DNA linked through cadmium sulfide quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Sergio; Merkoçi, Arben

    2009-02-01

    Electrochemical detection of a cadmium sulfide quantum dots (CdS QDs)-DNA complex connected to paramagnetic microbeads (MB) was performed without the need for chemical dissolving. The method is based on dropping 20 µl of CdS QD-DNA-MB suspension on the surface of a screen-printed electrode. It is followed by magnetic collection on the surface of the working electrode and electrochemical detection using square-wave voltammetry (SWV), giving a well-shaped and sensitive analytical signal. A cystic-fibrosis-related DNA sequence was sandwiched between the two DNA probes. One DNA probe is linked via biotin-streptavidin bonding with MB and the other one via thiol groups with the CdS QD used as tags. Nonspecific signals of DNA were minimized using a blocking agent and the results obtained were successfully employed in a model DNA sensor with an interest in future applications in the clinical field. The developed nanoparticle biosensing system may offer numerous opportunities in other fields where fast, low cost and efficient detection of small volume samples is required.

  8. A Novel Computational Method for Detecting DNA Methylation Sites with DNA Sequence Information and Physicochemical Properties.

    PubMed

    Pan, Gaofeng; Jiang, Limin; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2018-02-08

    DNA methylation is an important biochemical process, and it has a close connection with many types of cancer. Research about DNA methylation can help us to understand the regulation mechanism and epigenetic reprogramming. Therefore, it becomes very important to recognize the methylation sites in the DNA sequence. In the past several decades, many computational methods-especially machine learning methods-have been developed since the high-throughout sequencing technology became widely used in research and industry. In order to accurately identify whether or not a nucleotide residue is methylated under the specific DNA sequence context, we propose a novel method that overcomes the shortcomings of previous methods for predicting methylation sites. We use k -gram, multivariate mutual information, discrete wavelet transform, and pseudo amino acid composition to extract features, and train a sparse Bayesian learning model to do DNA methylation prediction. Five criteria-area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC), Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC), accuracy (ACC), sensitivity (SN), and specificity-are used to evaluate the prediction results of our method. On the benchmark dataset, we could reach 0.8632 on AUC, 0.8017 on ACC, 0.5558 on MCC, and 0.7268 on SN. Additionally, the best results on two scBS-seq profiled mouse embryonic stem cells datasets were 0.8896 and 0.9511 by AUC, respectively. When compared with other outstanding methods, our method surpassed them on the accuracy of prediction. The improvement of AUC by our method compared to other methods was at least 0.0399 . For the convenience of other researchers, our code has been uploaded to a file hosting service, and can be downloaded from: https://figshare.com/s/0697b692d802861282d3.

  9. Holographic description of a quantum black hole on a computer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Ishiki, Goro; Nishimura, Jun

    2014-05-01

    Black holes have been predicted to radiate particles and eventually evaporate, which has led to the information loss paradox and implies that the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics may be violated. Superstring theory, a consistent theory of quantum gravity, provides a possible solution to the paradox if evaporating black holes can actually be described in terms of standard quantum mechanical systems, as conjectured from the theory. Here, we test this conjecture by calculating the mass of a black hole in the corresponding quantum mechanical system numerically. Our results agree well with the prediction from gravity theory, including the leading quantum gravity correction. Our ability to simulate black holes offers the potential to further explore the yet mysterious nature of quantum gravity through well-established quantum mechanics.

  10. Holographic description of a quantum black hole on a computer.

    PubMed

    Hanada, Masanori; Hyakutake, Yoshifumi; Ishiki, Goro; Nishimura, Jun

    2014-05-23

    Black holes have been predicted to radiate particles and eventually evaporate, which has led to the information loss paradox and implies that the fundamental laws of quantum mechanics may be violated. Superstring theory, a consistent theory of quantum gravity, provides a possible solution to the paradox if evaporating black holes can actually be described in terms of standard quantum mechanical systems, as conjectured from the theory. Here, we test this conjecture by calculating the mass of a black hole in the corresponding quantum mechanical system numerically. Our results agree well with the prediction from gravity theory, including the leading quantum gravity correction. Our ability to simulate black holes offers the potential to further explore the yet mysterious nature of quantum gravity through well-established quantum mechanics. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  11. 21st International Conference on DNA Computing and Molecular Programming: 8.1 Biochemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    include information storage and biological applications of DNA systems, biomolecular chemical reaction networks, applications of self -assembled DNA...nanostructures, tile self -assembly and computation, principles and models of self -assembly, and strand displacement and biomolecular circuits. The fund

  12. Shor's factoring algorithm and modern cryptography. An illustration of the capabilities inherent in quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerjuoy, Edward

    2005-06-01

    The security of messages encoded via the widely used RSA public key encryption system rests on the enormous computational effort required to find the prime factors of a large number N using classical (conventional) computers. In 1994 Peter Shor showed that for sufficiently large N, a quantum computer could perform the factoring with much less computational effort. This paper endeavors to explain, in a fashion comprehensible to the nonexpert, the RSA encryption protocol; the various quantum computer manipulations constituting the Shor algorithm; how the Shor algorithm performs the factoring; and the precise sense in which a quantum computer employing Shor's algorithm can be said to accomplish the factoring of very large numbers with less computational effort than a classical computer. It is made apparent that factoring N generally requires many successive runs of the algorithm. Our analysis reveals that the probability of achieving a successful factorization on a single run is about twice as large as commonly quoted in the literature.

  13. A space-efficient quantum computer simulator suitable for high-speed FPGA implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Michael P.; Oniciuc, Liviu; Meyer-Baese, Uwe H.; Chiorescu, Irinel

    2009-05-01

    Conventional vector-based simulators for quantum computers are quite limited in the size of the quantum circuits they can handle, due to the worst-case exponential growth of even sparse representations of the full quantum state vector as a function of the number of quantum operations applied. However, this exponential-space requirement can be avoided by using general space-time tradeoffs long known to complexity theorists, which can be appropriately optimized for this particular problem in a way that also illustrates some interesting reformulations of quantum mechanics. In this paper, we describe the design and empirical space/time complexity measurements of a working software prototype of a quantum computer simulator that avoids excessive space requirements. Due to its space-efficiency, this design is well-suited to embedding in single-chip environments, permitting especially fast execution that avoids access latencies to main memory. We plan to prototype our design on a standard FPGA development board.

  14. Continuous-variable geometric phase and its manipulation for quantum computation in a superconducting circuit.

    PubMed

    Song, Chao; Zheng, Shi-Biao; Zhang, Pengfei; Xu, Kai; Zhang, Libo; Guo, Qiujiang; Liu, Wuxin; Xu, Da; Deng, Hui; Huang, Keqiang; Zheng, Dongning; Zhu, Xiaobo; Wang, H

    2017-10-20

    Geometric phase, associated with holonomy transformation in quantum state space, is an important quantum-mechanical effect. Besides fundamental interest, this effect has practical applications, among which geometric quantum computation is a paradigm, where quantum logic operations are realized through geometric phase manipulation that has some intrinsic noise-resilient advantages and may enable simplified implementation of multi-qubit gates compared to the dynamical approach. Here we report observation of a continuous-variable geometric phase and demonstrate a quantum gate protocol based on this phase in a superconducting circuit, where five qubits are controllably coupled to a resonator. Our geometric approach allows for one-step implementation of n-qubit controlled-phase gates, which represents a remarkable advantage compared to gate decomposition methods, where the number of required steps dramatically increases with n. Following this approach, we realize these gates with n up to 4, verifying the high efficiency of this geometric manipulation for quantum computation.

  15. Carrier mobility in double-helix DNA and RNA: A quantum chemistry study with Marcus-Hush theory.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Sun, Lei; Shi, Qi; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Weiqiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2016-12-21

    Charge mobilities of six DNAs and RNAs have been computed using quantum chemistry calculation combined with the Marcus-Hush theory. Based on this simulation model, we obtained quite reasonable results when compared with the experiment, and the obtained charge mobility strongly depends on the molecular reorganization and electronic coupling. Besides, we find that hole mobilities are larger than electron mobilities no matter in DNAs or in RNAs, and the hole mobility of 2L8I can reach 1.09 × 10 -1 cm 2 V -1 s -1 which can be applied in the molecular wire. The findings also show that our theoretical model can be regarded as a promising candidate for screening DNA- and RNA-based molecular electronic devices.

  16. Carrier mobility in double-helix DNA and RNA: A quantum chemistry study with Marcus-Hush theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao; Sun, Lei; Shi, Qi; Deng, Kaiming; Deng, Weiqiao; Lu, Ruifeng

    2016-12-01

    Charge mobilities of six DNAs and RNAs have been computed using quantum chemistry calculation combined with the Marcus-Hush theory. Based on this simulation model, we obtained quite reasonable results when compared with the experiment, and the obtained charge mobility strongly depends on the molecular reorganization and electronic coupling. Besides, we find that hole mobilities are larger than electron mobilities no matter in DNAs or in RNAs, and the hole mobility of 2L8I can reach 1.09 × 10-1 cm2 V-1 s-1 which can be applied in the molecular wire. The findings also show that our theoretical model can be regarded as a promising candidate for screening DNA- and RNA-based molecular electronic devices.

  17. Near-Infrared Ag2S Quantum Dots-Based DNA Logic Gate Platform for miRNA Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Miao, Peng; Tang, Yuguo; Wang, Bidou; Meng, Fanyu

    2016-08-02

    Dysregulation of miRNA expression is correlated with the development and progression of many diseases. These miRNAs are regarded as promising biomarkers. However, it is challenging to measure these low abundant molecules without employing time-consuming radioactive labeling or complex amplification strategies. Here, we present a DNA logic gate platform for miRNA diagnostics with fluorescence outputs from near-infrared (NIR) Ag2S quantum dots (QDs). Carefully designed toehold exchange-mediated strand displacements with different miRNA inputs occur on a solid-state interface, which control QDs release from solid-state interface to solution, responding to multiplex information on initial miRNAs. Excellent fluorescence emission properties of NIR Ag2S QDs certify the great prospect for amplification-free and sensitive miRNA assay. We demonstrate the potential of this platform by achieving femtomolar level miRNA analysis and the versatility of a series of logic circuits computation.

  18. Quantum Chemistry on Quantum Computers: A Polynomial-Time Quantum Algorithm for Constructing the Wave Functions of Open-Shell Molecules.

    PubMed

    Sugisaki, Kenji; Yamamoto, Satoru; Nakazawa, Shigeaki; Toyota, Kazuo; Sato, Kazunobu; Shiomi, Daisuke; Takui, Takeji

    2016-08-18

    Quantum computers are capable to efficiently perform full configuration interaction (FCI) calculations of atoms and molecules by using the quantum phase estimation (QPE) algorithm. Because the success probability of the QPE depends on the overlap between approximate and exact wave functions, efficient methods to prepare accurate initial guess wave functions enough to have sufficiently large overlap with the exact ones are highly desired. Here, we propose a quantum algorithm to construct the wave function consisting of one configuration state function, which is suitable for the initial guess wave function in QPE-based FCI calculations of open-shell molecules, based on the addition theorem of angular momentum. The proposed quantum algorithm enables us to prepare the wave function consisting of an exponential number of Slater determinants only by a polynomial number of quantum operations.

  19. Fault-tolerant linear optical quantum computing with small-amplitude coherent States.

    PubMed

    Lund, A P; Ralph, T C; Haselgrove, H L

    2008-01-25

    Quantum computing using two coherent states as a qubit basis is a proposed alternative architecture with lower overheads but has been questioned as a practical way of performing quantum computing due to the fragility of diagonal states with large coherent amplitudes. We show that using error correction only small amplitudes (alpha>1.2) are required for fault-tolerant quantum computing. We study fault tolerance under the effects of small amplitudes and loss using a Monte Carlo simulation. The first encoding level resources are orders of magnitude lower than the best single photon scheme.

  20. Possible 6-qubit NMR quantum computer device material; simulator of the NMR line width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashi, K.; Kitazawa, H.; Shimizu, T.; Goto, A.; Eguchi, S.; Ohki, S.

    2002-12-01

    For an NMR quantum computer, splitting of an NMR spectrum must be larger than a line width. In order to find a best device material for a solid-state NMR quantum computer, we have made a simulation program to calculate the NMR line width due to the nuclear dipole field by the 2nd moment method. The program utilizes the lattice information prepared by commercial software to draw a crystal structure. By applying this program, we can estimate the NMR line width due to the nuclear dipole field without measurements and find a candidate material for a 6-qubit solid-state NMR quantum computer device.

  1. Computational method and system for modeling, analyzing, and optimizing DNA amplification and synthesis

    DOEpatents

    Vandersall, Jennifer A.; Gardner, Shea N.; Clague, David S.

    2010-05-04

    A computational method and computer-based system of modeling DNA synthesis for the design and interpretation of PCR amplification, parallel DNA synthesis, and microarray chip analysis. The method and system include modules that address the bioinformatics, kinetics, and thermodynamics of DNA amplification and synthesis. Specifically, the steps of DNA selection, as well as the kinetics and thermodynamics of DNA hybridization and extensions, are addressed, which enable the optimization of the processing and the prediction of the products as a function of DNA sequence, mixing protocol, time, temperature and concentration of species.

  2. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-01-01

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation. PMID:25511387

  3. Step-by-step magic state encoding for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Goto, Hayato

    2014-12-16

    Quantum error correction allows one to make quantum computers fault-tolerant against unavoidable errors due to decoherence and imperfect physical gate operations. However, the fault-tolerant quantum computation requires impractically large computational resources for useful applications. This is a current major obstacle to the realization of a quantum computer. In particular, magic state distillation, which is a standard approach to universality, consumes the most resources in fault-tolerant quantum computation. For the resource problem, here we propose step-by-step magic state encoding for concatenated quantum codes, where magic states are encoded step by step from the physical level to the logical one. To manage errors during the encoding, we carefully use error detection. Since the sizes of intermediate codes are small, it is expected that the resource overheads will become lower than previous approaches based on the distillation at the logical level. Our simulation results suggest that the resource requirements for a logical magic state will become comparable to those for a single logical controlled-NOT gate. Thus, the present method opens a new possibility for efficient fault-tolerant quantum computation.

  4. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ^{(2)} Interactions.

    PubMed

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2018-04-20

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized-using only linear optics and χ^{(2)} (three-wave mixing) interactions-in any (n+1)-dimensional qudit basis of the n-pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ^{(2)} Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u(3) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ^{(2)} interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ^{(2)} interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  5. A role for ion implantation in quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamieson, David N.; Prawer, Steven; Andrienko, Igor; Brett, David A.; Millar, Victoria

    2001-04-01

    We propose to create arrays of phosphorus atoms in silicon for quantum computing using ion implantation. Since the implantation of the ions is essentially random, the yield of usefully spaced atoms is low and therefore some method of registering the passage of a single ion is required. This can be accomplished by implantation of the ions through a thin surface layer consisting of resist. Changes to the chemical and/or electrical properties of the resist will be used to mark the site of the buried ion. For chemical changes, the latent damage will be developed and the atomic force microscope (AFM) used to image the changes in topography. Alternatively, changes in electrical properties (which obviate the need for post-irradiation chemical etching) will be used to register the passage of the ion using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), the surface current imaging mode of the AFM. We address the central issue of the contrast created by the passage of a single ion through resist layers of PMMA and C 60.

  6. Qudit-Basis Universal Quantum Computation Using χ(2 ) Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Murphy Yuezhen; Chuang, Isaac L.; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2018-04-01

    We prove that universal quantum computation can be realized—using only linear optics and χ(2 ) (three-wave mixing) interactions—in any (n +1 )-dimensional qudit basis of the n -pump-photon subspace. First, we exhibit a strictly universal gate set for the qubit basis in the one-pump-photon subspace. Next, we demonstrate qutrit-basis universality by proving that χ(2 ) Hamiltonians and photon-number operators generate the full u (3 ) Lie algebra in the two-pump-photon subspace, and showing how the qutrit controlled-Z gate can be implemented with only linear optics and χ(2 ) interactions. We then use proof by induction to obtain our general qudit result. Our induction proof relies on coherent photon injection or subtraction, a technique enabled by χ(2 ) interaction between the encoding modes and ancillary modes. Finally, we show that coherent photon injection is more than a conceptual tool, in that it offers a route to preparing high-photon-number Fock states from single-photon Fock states.

  7. Black hole based quantum computing in labs and in the sky

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia; Panchenko, Mischa

    2016-08-01

    Analyzing some well established facts, we give a model-independent parameterization of black hole quantum computing in terms of a set of macro and micro quantities and their relations. These include the relations between the extraordinarily-small energy gap of black hole qubits and important time-scales of information-processing, such as, scrambling time and Page's time. We then show, confirming and extending previous results, that other systems of nature with identical quantum informatics features are attractive Bose-Einstein systems at the critical point of quantum phase transition. Here we establish a complete isomorphy between the quantum computational properties of these two systems. In particular, we show that the quantum hair of a critical condensate is strikingly similar to the quantum hair of a black hole. Irrespectively whether one takes the similarity between the two systems as a remarkable coincidence or as a sign of a deeper underlying connection, the following is evident. Black holes are not unique in their way of quantum information processing and we can manufacture black hole based quantum computers in labs by taking advantage of quantum criticality.

  8. Quantum dot-loaded monofunctionalized DNA icosahedra for single-particle tracking of endocytic pathways.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Dhiraj; Arumugam, Senthil; Nasilowski, Michel; Joshi, Himanshu; Wunder, Christian; Chambon, Valérie; Prakash, Ved; Grazon, Chloé; Nadal, Brice; Maiti, Prabal K; Johannes, Ludger; Dubertret, Benoit; Krishnan, Yamuna

    2016-12-01

    Functionalization of quantum dots (QDs) with a single biomolecular tag using traditional approaches in bulk solution has met with limited success. DNA polyhedra consist of an internal void bounded by a well-defined three-dimensional structured surface. The void can house cargo and the surface can be functionalized with stoichiometric and spatial precision. Here, we show that monofunctionalized QDs can be realized by encapsulating QDs inside DNA icosahedra and functionalizing the DNA shell with an endocytic ligand. We deployed the DNA-encapsulated QDs for real-time imaging of three different endocytic ligands-folic acid, galectin-3 (Gal3) and the Shiga toxin B-subunit (STxB). Single-particle tracking of Gal3- or STxB-functionalized QD-loaded DNA icosahedra allows us to monitor compartmental dynamics along endocytic pathways. These DNA-encapsulated QDs, which bear a unique stoichiometry of endocytic ligands, represent a new class of molecular probes for quantitative imaging of endocytic receptor dynamics.

  9. Computational fishing of new DNA methyltransferase inhibitors from natural products.

    PubMed

    Maldonado-Rojas, Wilson; Olivero-Verbel, Jesus; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani

    2015-07-01

    DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTis) have become an alternative for cancer therapies. However, only two DNMTis have been approved as anticancer drugs, although with some restrictions. Natural products (NPs) are a promising source of drugs. In order to find NPs with novel chemotypes as DNMTis, 47 compounds with known activity against these enzymes were used to build a LDA-based QSAR model for active/inactive molecules (93% accuracy) based on molecular descriptors. This classifier was employed to identify potential DNMTis on 800 NPs from NatProd Collection. 447 selected compounds were docked on two human DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) structures (PDB codes: 3SWR and 2QRV) using AutoDock Vina and Surflex-Dock, prioritizing according to their score values, contact patterns at 4 Å and molecular diversity. Six consensus NPs were identified as virtual hits against DNMTs, including 9,10-dihydro-12-hydroxygambogic, phloridzin, 2',4'-dihydroxychalcone 4'-glucoside, daunorubicin, pyrromycin and centaurein. This method is an innovative computational strategy for identifying DNMTis, useful in the identification of potent and selective anticancer drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Protected quantum computing: interleaving gate operations with dynamical decoupling sequences.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingfu; Souza, Alexandre M; Brandao, Frederico Dias; Suter, Dieter

    2014-02-07

    Implementing precise operations on quantum systems is one of the biggest challenges for building quantum devices in a noisy environment. Dynamical decoupling attenuates the destructive effect of the environmental noise, but so far, it has been used primarily in the context of quantum memories. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a general scheme for combining dynamical decoupling with quantum logical gate operations using the example of an electron-spin qubit of a single nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond. We achieve process fidelities >98% for gate times that are 2 orders of magnitude longer than the unprotected dephasing time T2.

  11. Highly Parallel Computing Architectures by using Arrays of Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA): Opportunities, Challenges, and Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fijany, Amir; Toomarian, Benny N.

    2000-01-01

    There has been significant improvement in the performance of VLSI devices, in terms of size, power consumption, and speed, in recent years and this trend may also continue for some near future. However, it is a well known fact that there are major obstacles, i.e., physical limitation of feature size reduction and ever increasing cost of foundry, that would prevent the long term continuation of this trend. This has motivated the exploration of some fundamentally new technologies that are not dependent on the conventional feature size approach. Such technologies are expected to enable scaling to continue to the ultimate level, i.e., molecular and atomistic size. Quantum computing, quantum dot-based computing, DNA based computing, biologically inspired computing, etc., are examples of such new technologies. In particular, quantum-dots based computing by using Quantum-dot Cellular Automata (QCA) has recently been intensely investigated as a promising new technology capable of offering significant improvement over conventional VLSI in terms of reduction of feature size (and hence increase in integration level), reduction of power consumption, and increase of switching speed. Quantum dot-based computing and memory in general and QCA specifically, are intriguing to NASA due to their high packing density (10(exp 11) - 10(exp 12) per square cm ) and low power consumption (no transfer of current) and potentially higher radiation tolerant. Under Revolutionary Computing Technology (RTC) Program at the NASA/JPL Center for Integrated Space Microelectronics (CISM), we have been investigating the potential applications of QCA for the space program. To this end, exploiting the intrinsic features of QCA, we have designed novel QCA-based circuits for co-planner (i.e., single layer) and compact implementation of a class of data permutation matrices, a class of interconnection networks, and a bit-serial processor. Building upon these circuits, we have developed novel algorithms and QCA

  12. Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets by integrating dual-color graphene quantum dot nanoprobes and carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhaosheng; Shan, Xiaoyue; Chai, Lujing; Chen, Jianrong; Feng, Hui

    2014-12-01

    Simultaneous detection of multiple DNA targets was achieved based on a biocompatible graphene quantum dots (GQDs) and carbon nanotubes (CNTs) platform through spontaneous assembly between dual-color GQD-based probes and CNTs and subsequently self-recognition between DNA probes and targets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Computation of the asymptotic states of modulated open quantum systems with a numerically exact realization of the quantum trajectory method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volokitin, V.; Liniov, A.; Meyerov, I.; Hartmann, M.; Ivanchenko, M.; Hänggi, P.; Denisov, S.

    2017-11-01

    Quantum systems out of equilibrium are presently a subject of active research, both in theoretical and experimental domains. In this work, we consider time-periodically modulated quantum systems that are in contact with a stationary environment. Within the framework of a quantum master equation, the asymptotic states of such systems are described by time-periodic density operators. Resolution of these operators constitutes a nontrivial computational task. Approaches based on spectral and iterative methods are restricted to systems with the dimension of the hosting Hilbert space dim H =N ≲300 , while the direct long-time numerical integration of the master equation becomes increasingly problematic for N ≳400 , especially when the coupling to the environment is weak. To go beyond this limit, we use the quantum trajectory method, which unravels the master equation for the density operator into a set of stochastic processes for wave functions. The asymptotic density matrix is calculated by performing a statistical sampling over the ensemble of quantum trajectories, preceded by a long transient propagation. We follow the ideology of event-driven programming and construct a new algorithmic realization of the method. The algorithm is computationally efficient, allowing for long "leaps" forward in time. It is also numerically exact, in the sense that, being given the list of uniformly distributed (on the unit interval) random numbers, {η1,η2,...,ηn} , one could propagate a quantum trajectory (with ηi's as norm thresholds) in a numerically exact way. By using a scalable N -particle quantum model, we demonstrate that the algorithm allows us to resolve the asymptotic density operator of the model system with N =2000 states on a regular-size computer cluster, thus reaching the scale on which numerical studies of modulated Hamiltonian systems are currently performed.

  14. Computation of the asymptotic states of modulated open quantum systems with a numerically exact realization of the quantum trajectory method.

    PubMed

    Volokitin, V; Liniov, A; Meyerov, I; Hartmann, M; Ivanchenko, M; Hänggi, P; Denisov, S

    2017-11-01

    Quantum systems out of equilibrium are presently a subject of active research, both in theoretical and experimental domains. In this work, we consider time-periodically modulated quantum systems that are in contact with a stationary environment. Within the framework of a quantum master equation, the asymptotic states of such systems are described by time-periodic density operators. Resolution of these operators constitutes a nontrivial computational task. Approaches based on spectral and iterative methods are restricted to systems with the dimension of the hosting Hilbert space dimH=N≲300, while the direct long-time numerical integration of the master equation becomes increasingly problematic for N≳400, especially when the coupling to the environment is weak. To go beyond this limit, we use the quantum trajectory method, which unravels the master equation for the density operator into a set of stochastic processes for wave functions. The asymptotic density matrix is calculated by performing a statistical sampling over the ensemble of quantum trajectories, preceded by a long transient propagation. We follow the ideology of event-driven programming and construct a new algorithmic realization of the method. The algorithm is computationally efficient, allowing for long "leaps" forward in time. It is also numerically exact, in the sense that, being given the list of uniformly distributed (on the unit interval) random numbers, {η_{1},η_{2},...,η_{n}}, one could propagate a quantum trajectory (with η_{i}'s as norm thresholds) in a numerically exact way. By using a scalable N-particle quantum model, we demonstrate that the algorithm allows us to resolve the asymptotic density operator of the model system with N=2000 states on a regular-size computer cluster, thus reaching the scale on which numerical studies of modulated Hamiltonian systems are currently performed.

  15. Magnetic polyoxometalates: from molecular magnetism to molecular spintronics and quantum computing.

    PubMed

    Clemente-Juan, Juan M; Coronado, Eugenio; Gaita-Ariño, Alejandro

    2012-11-21

    In this review we discuss the relevance of polyoxometalate (POM) chemistry to provide model objects in molecular magnetism. We present several potential applications in nanomagnetism, in particular, in molecular spintronics and quantum computing.

  16. Electron-Phonon Systems on a Universal Quantum Computer

    SciTech Connect

    Macridin, Alexandru; Spentzouris, Panagiotis; Amundson, James

    We present an algorithm that extends existing quantum algorithms forsimulating fermion systems in quantum chemistry and condensed matter physics toinclude phonons. The phonon degrees of freedom are represented with exponentialaccuracy on a truncated Hilbert space with a size that increases linearly withthe cutoff of the maximum phonon number. The additional number of qubitsrequired by the presence of phonons scales linearly with the size of thesystem. The additional circuit depth is constant for systems with finite-rangeelectron-phonon and phonon-phonon interactions and linear for long-rangeelectron-phonon interactions. Our algorithm for a Holstein polaron problem wasimplemented on an Atos Quantum Learning Machine (QLM) quantum simulatoremployingmore » the Quantum Phase Estimation method. The energy and the phonon numberdistribution of the polaron state agree with exact diagonalization results forweak, intermediate and strong electron-phonon coupling regimes.« less

  17. Superconducting resonators as beam splitters for linear-optics quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Chirolli, Luca; Burkard, Guido; Kumar, Shwetank; Divincenzo, David P

    2010-06-11

    We propose and analyze a technique for producing a beam-splitting quantum gate between two modes of a ring-resonator superconducting cavity. The cavity has two integrated superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) that are modulated by applying an external magnetic field. The gate is accomplished by applying a radio frequency pulse to one of the SQUIDs at the difference of the two mode frequencies. Departures from perfect beam splitting only arise from corrections to the rotating wave approximation; an exact calculation gives a fidelity of >0.9992. Our construction completes the toolkit for linear-optics quantum computing in circuit quantum electrodynamics.

  18. The mathematics of a quantum Hamiltonian computing half adder Boolean logic gate.

    PubMed

    Dridi, G; Julien, R; Hliwa, M; Joachim, C

    2015-08-28

    The mathematics behind the quantum Hamiltonian computing (QHC) approach of designing Boolean logic gates with a quantum system are given. Using the quantum eigenvalue repulsion effect, the QHC AND, NAND, OR, NOR, XOR, and NXOR Hamiltonian Boolean matrices are constructed. This is applied to the construction of a QHC half adder Hamiltonian matrix requiring only six quantum states to fullfil a half Boolean logical truth table. The QHC design rules open a nano-architectronic way of constructing Boolean logic gates inside a single molecule or atom by atom at the surface of a passivated semi-conductor.

  19. Highly sensitive detection of DNA methylation levels by using a quantum dot-based FRET method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yunfei; Zhang, Honglian; Liu, Fangming; Wu, Zhenhua; Lu, Shaohua; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong; Zhong, Xinhua; Mao, Hongju

    2015-10-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR amplification for the incorporation of Alexa Fluor-647 (A647) fluorophores. DNA methylation levels can be detected qualitatively through gel analysis and quantitatively by the signal amplification from QDs to A647 during FRET. Furthermore, the methylation levels of three tumor suppressor genes, PCDHGB6, HOXA9 and RASSF1A, in 20 lung adenocarcinoma and 20 corresponding adjacent nontumorous tissue (NT) samples were measured to verify the feasibility of the QD-based FRET method and a high sensitivity for cancer detection (up to 90%) was achieved. Our QD-based FRET method is a convenient, continuous and high-throughput method, and is expected to be an alternative for detecting DNA methylation as a biomarker for certain human cancers.DNA methylation is the most frequently studied epigenetic modification that is strongly involved in genomic stability and cellular plasticity. Aberrant changes in DNA methylation status are ubiquitous in human cancer and the detection of these changes can be informative for cancer diagnosis. Herein, we reported a facile quantum dot-based (QD-based) fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) technique for the detection of DNA methylation. The method relies on methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes for the differential digestion of genomic DNA based on its methylation status. Digested DNA is then subjected to PCR

  20. Assessing the Progress of Trapped-Ion Processors Towards Fault-Tolerant Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bermudez, A.; Xu, X.; Nigmatullin, R.; O'Gorman, J.; Negnevitsky, V.; Schindler, P.; Monz, T.; Poschinger, U. G.; Hempel, C.; Home, J.; Schmidt-Kaler, F.; Biercuk, M.; Blatt, R.; Benjamin, S.; Müller, M.

    2017-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of the progress of small prototype quantum processors towards fault-tolerant quantum computation is a problem of current interest in experimental and theoretical quantum information science. We introduce a necessary and fair criterion for quantum error correction (QEC), which must be achieved in the development of these quantum processors before their sizes are sufficiently big to consider the well-known QEC threshold. We apply this criterion to benchmark the ongoing effort in implementing QEC with topological color codes using trapped-ion quantum processors and, more importantly, to guide the future hardware developments that will be required in order to demonstrate beneficial QEC with small topological quantum codes. In doing so, we present a thorough description of a realistic trapped-ion toolbox for QEC and a physically motivated error model that goes beyond standard simplifications in the QEC literature. We focus on laser-based quantum gates realized in two-species trapped-ion crystals in high-optical aperture segmented traps. Our large-scale numerical analysis shows that, with the foreseen technological improvements described here, this platform is a very promising candidate for fault-tolerant quantum computation.