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Sample records for quantum confinement vi

  1. Homogeneous linewidth of confined electron-hole-pair states in II-VI quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woggon, U.; Gaponenko, S.; Langbein, W.; Uhrig, A.; Klingshirn, C.

    1993-02-01

    We present results of nanosecond-hole-burning experiments of small CdSe and CdS1-xSex quantum dots embedded in glass at various temperatures. The spectral width of the holes exhibits a complex interplay between excitation conditions and illumination history. Among a great variety of investigated II-VI quantum dots in glasses from various sources, we find, after strong laser illumination, samples showing spectrally narrow holes similar to those reported for quantum dots embedded in organic matrices with interfaces well defined by organic groups. These sharp nonlinear resonances with a halfwidth Γ of only 10 meV at T=20 K allow one to investigate the energetic distance of the lowest hole levels and the temperature dependence of the homogeneous line broadening. The differences in the linewidth in the hole-burning spectra are attributed to changes of interface charge states or interface polarizations under high excitation.

  2. Femtosecond studies of photoinduced electron dynamics in colloidal quantum-confined II-VI semiconductor nanoparticles: CdS, CdSe and CdZnS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberti, Trevor

    A variety of synthetic and spectroscopic techniques have been applied to elucidate photoinduced charge carrier processes in II-VI semiconductor quantum dots. These semiconductor nanoparticles exhibit both size-dependent optical tuning due to the quantum-confinement effect and power-dependent absorption, bleach and emission characteristics. Although the tunable-absorption has been well characterized, the subsequent trapping and recombination processes are still under much investigation and are the subject of this dissertation. Particles with vastly differing surfaces, sizes, energetics and solvents have been characterized using various spectroscopic techniques in unison. The primary technique was transient femtosecond near-IR absorption, which was used to characterize charge carrier processes on the subpicosecond and picosecond time scales. UV-visible spectroscopy was used to characterize the size of the particles. Static fluorescence measurements were used to characterize the surface of the particles and the relative amount of radiative recombination. Nanosecond fluorescence measurements were also used to assist in the assignment of the fast, power-dependent near-IR absorption decay. The research reported here makes two fundamental contributions to the photophysics of semiconductor nanoparticles. First, the power-dependent, few picosecond decay process has primarily been assigned to electron-hole recombination via exciton-exciton annihilation. As the power increases, higher order, Auger processes may also arise. The exciton-exciton annihilation mechanism was primarily deduced based on power-dependent fluorescence measurements which exhibited the formation of short-lived exciton fluorescence at high powers. Secondly, many nanoparticle properties and environments were varied in order to better understand the observed picosecond processes and the effect of variations on these processes. The systems studied ranged from aqueous acidic and basic quantum dots of differing

  3. Einstein's Photoemission from Quantum Confined Superlattices.

    PubMed

    Debbarma, S; Ghatak, K P

    2016-01-01

    This paper is dedicated to the 83th Birthday of Late Professor B. R. Nag, D.Sc., formerly Head of the Departments of Radio Physics and Electronics and Electronic Science of the University of Calcutta, a firm believer of the concept of theoretical minimum of Landau and an internationally well known semiconductor physicist, to whom the second author remains ever grateful as a student and research worker from 1974-2004. In this paper, an attempt is made to study, the Einstein's photoemission (EP) from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum well heavily doped superlattices (QWHDSLs) with graded interfaces in the presence of quantizing magnetic field on the basis of newly formulated electron dispersion relations within the frame work of k · p formalism. The EP from III-V, II-VI, IV-VI, HgTe/CdTe and strained layer quantum wells of heavily doped effective mass superlattices respectively has been presented under magnetic quantization. Besides the said emissions, from the quantum dots of the aforementioned heavily doped SLs have further investigated for the purpose of comparison and complete investigation in the context of EP from quantum confined superlattices. Using appropriate SLs, it appears that the EP increases with increasing surface electron concentration and decreasing film thickness in spiky manners, which are the characteristic features of such quantized hetero structures. Under magnetic quantization, the EP oscillates with inverse quantizing magnetic field due to Shuvnikov-de Haas effect. The EP increases with increasing photo energy in a step-like manner and the numerical values of EP with all the physical variables are totally band structure dependent for all the cases. The most striking features are that the presence of poles in the dispersion relation of the materials in the absence of band tails create the complex energy spectra in the corresponding HD constituent materials of such quantum confined superlattices and effective electron

  4. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-03

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker - henceforth cited as SW - in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell. The

  5. A Review of Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    2009-12-01

    A succinct history of the Confined Atom problem is presented. The hydrogen atom confined to the centre of an impenetrable sphere counts amongst the exactly soluble problems of physics, alongside much more noted exact solutions such as Black Body Radiation and the free Hydrogen atom in absence of any radiation field. It shares with them the disadvantage of being an idealisation, while at the same time encapsulating in a simple way particular aspects of physical reality. The problem was first formulated by Sommerfeld and Welker [1]—henceforth cited as SW—in connection with the behaviour of atoms at very high pressures, and the solution was published on the occasion of Pauli's 60th birthday celebration. At the time, it seemed that there was not much other connection with physical reality beyond a few simple aspects connected to the properties of atoms in solids, for which more appropriate models were soon developed. Thus, confined atoms attracted little attention until the advent of the metallofullerene, which provided the first example of a confined atom with properties quite closely related to those originally considered by SW. Since then, the problem has received much more attention, and many more new features of quantum confinement, quantum compression, the quantum Faraday cage, electronic reorganisation, cavity resonances, etc have been described, which are relevant to real systems. Also, a number of other situations have been uncovered experimentally to which quantum confinement is relevant. Thus, studies of the confined atom are now more numerous, and have been extended both in terms of the models used and the systems to which they can be applied. Connections to thermodynamics are explored through the properties of a confined two-level atom adapted from Einstein's celebrated model, and issues of dynamical screening of electromagnetic radiation by the confining shell are discussed in connection with the Faraday cage produced by a confining conducting shell

  6. CORRELATIONS IN CONFINED QUANTUM PLASMAS

    SciTech Connect

    DUFTY J W

    2012-01-11

    This is the final report for the project 'Correlations in Confined Quantum Plasmas', NSF-DOE Partnership Grant DE FG02 07ER54946, 8/1/2007 - 7/30/2010. The research was performed in collaboration with a group at Christian Albrechts University (CAU), Kiel, Germany. That collaboration, almost 15 years old, was formalized during the past four years under this NSF-DOE Partnership Grant to support graduate students at the two institutions and to facilitate frequent exchange visits. The research was focused on exploring the frontiers of charged particle physics evolving from new experimental access to unusual states associated with confinement. Particular attention was paid to combined effects of quantum mechanics and confinement. A suite of analytical and numerical tools tailored to the specific inquiry has been developed and employed

  7. Atypical quantum confinement effect in silicon nanowires.

    PubMed

    Sorokin, Pavel B; Avramov, Pavel V; Chernozatonskii, Leonid A; Fedorov, Dmitri G; Ovchinnikov, Sergey G

    2008-10-09

    The quantum confinement effect (QCE) of linear junctions of silicon icosahedral quantum dots (IQD) and pentagonal nanowires (PNW) was studied using DFT and semiempirical AM1 methods. The formation of complex IQD/PNW structures leads to the localization of the HOMO and LUMO on different parts of the system and to a pronounced blue shift of the band gap; the typical QCE with a monotonic decrease of the band gap upon the system size breaks down. A simple one-electron one-dimensional Schrodinger equation model is proposed for the description and explanation of the unconventional quantum confinement behavior of silicon IQD/PNW systems. On the basis of the theoretical models, the experimentally discovered deviations from the typical QCE for nanocrystalline silicon are explained.

  8. Quantum Confined Semiconductors for High Efficiency Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor nanostructures, where at least one dimension is small enough to produce quantum confinement effects, provide new pathways for controlling energy flow and therefore have the potential to increase the efficiency of the primary photon-to-free energy conversion step. In this discussion, I will present the current status of research efforts towards utilizing the unique properties of colloidal quantum dots (NCs confined in three dimensions) in prototype solar cells and demonstrate that these unique systems have the potential to bypass the Shockley-Queisser single-junction limit for solar photon conversion. The solar cells are constructed using a low temperature solution based deposition of PbS or PbSe QDs as the absorber layer. Different chemical treatments of the QD layer are employed in order to obtain good electrical communication while maintaining the quantum-confined properties of the QDs. We have characterized the transport and carrier dynamics using a transient absorption, time-resolved THz, and temperature-dependent photoluminescence. I will discuss the interplay between carrier generation, recombination, and mobility within the QD layers. A unique aspect of our devices is that the QDs exhibit multiple exciton generation with an efficiency that is ~ 2 to 3 times greater than the parental bulk semiconductor.

  9. Quantum-confined Stark effects in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, G. W.; Lin, J. Y.; Jiang, H. X.; Chen, Z.

    1995-08-01

    Quantum-confined Stark effects (QCSE) on excitons, i.e., the influence of a uniform electric field on the confined excitons in semiconductor quantum dots (QD's), have been studied by using a numerical matrix-diagonalization scheme. The energy levels and the wave functions of the ground and several excited states of excitons in CdS and CdS1-xSex quantum dots as functions of the size of the quantum dot and the applied electric field have been obtained. The electron and hole distributions and wave function overlap inside the QD's have also been calculated for different QD sizes and electric fields. It is found that the electron and hole wave function overlap decreases under an electric field, which implies an increased exciton recombination lifetime due to QCSE. The energy level redshift and the enhancement of the exciton recombination lifetime are due to the polarization of the electron-hole pair under the applied electric field.

  10. Quantum-confined Stark effect in band-inverted junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Fernández, A.; Domínguez-Adame, F.

    2017-09-01

    Topological phases of matter are often characterized by interface states, which were already known to occur at the boundary of a band-inverted junction in semiconductor heterostructures. In IV-VI compounds such interface states are properly described by a two-band model, predicting the appearance of a Dirac cone in single junctions. We study the quantum-confined Stark effect of interface states due to an electric field perpendicular to a band-inverted junction. We find a closed expression to obtain the interface dispersion relation at any field strength and show that the Dirac cone widens under an applied bias. Thus, the Fermi velocity can be substantially lowered even at moderate fields, paving the way for tunable band-engineered devices based on band-inverted junctions.

  11. Quantum Confinement Effects in Silicon Nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogut, Serdar

    1998-03-01

    Quasiparticle gaps, self-energy corrections, exciton Coulomb energies, and optical gaps in Si quantum dots are calculated from first principles.(S. Öğ)üt, J. R. Chelikowsky, and S. G. Louie, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1770 (1997). The calculations are performed on hydrogen-passivated spherical Si clusters with diameters up to 32 Å ( ~ 1200 Si and H atoms). Such a large ab initio quantum mechanical modeling can be accomplished efficiently using a real space higher-order finite difference pseudopotential method(J. R. Chelikowsky, N. Troullier, and Y. Saad, Phys. Rev. Lett. 72), 1240 (1994) on a massively parallel computational platform (T3E).(A. Stathopoulos, S. Öğ)üt, Y. Saad, J. R. Chelikowsky, and H. Kim, (submitted to IEEE Comput. Sci. Eng.) It is shown that (i) the size-dependent self-energy correction in quantum dots is enhanced substantially compared to bulk, and (ii) quantum confinement and reduced electronic screening result in appreciable excitonic Coulomb energies. Calculated optical gaps are in very good agreement with absorption data from Si nanocrystallites.

  12. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-11-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature.

  13. Using Quantum Confinement to Uniquely Identify Devices

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, J.; Bagci, I. E.; Zawawi, M. A. M.; Sexton, J.; Hulbert, N.; Noori, Y. J.; Young, M. P.; Woodhead, C. S.; Missous, M.; Migliorato, M. A.; Roedig, U.; Young, R. J.

    2015-01-01

    Modern technology unintentionally provides resources that enable the trust of everyday interactions to be undermined. Some authentication schemes address this issue using devices that give a unique output in response to a challenge. These signatures are generated by hard-to-predict physical responses derived from structural characteristics, which lend themselves to two different architectures, known as unique objects (UNOs) and physically unclonable functions (PUFs). The classical design of UNOs and PUFs limits their size and, in some cases, their security. Here we show that quantum confinement lends itself to the provision of unique identities at the nanoscale, by using fluctuations in tunnelling measurements through quantum wells in resonant tunnelling diodes (RTDs). This provides an uncomplicated measurement of identity without conventional resource limitations whilst providing robust security. The confined energy levels are highly sensitive to the specific nanostructure within each RTD, resulting in a distinct tunnelling spectrum for every device, as they contain a unique and unpredictable structure that is presently impossible to clone. This new class of authentication device operates with minimal resources in simple electronic structures above room temperature. PMID:26553435

  14. Electrostatically confined trilayer graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirzakhani, M.; Zarenia, M.; Vasilopoulos, P.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-04-01

    Electrically gating of trilayer graphene (TLG) opens a band gap offering the possibility to electrically engineer TLG quantum dots. We study the energy levels of such quantum dots and investigate their dependence on a perpendicular magnetic field B and different types of stacking of the graphene layers. The dots are modeled as circular and confined by a truncated parabolic potential which can be realized by nanostructured gates or position-dependent doping. The energy spectra exhibit the intervalley symmetry EKe(m ) =-EK'h(m ) for the electron (e ) and hole (h ) states, where m is the angular momentum quantum number and K and K ' label the two valleys. The electron and hole spectra for B =0 are twofold degenerate due to the intervalley symmetry EK(m ) =EK'[-(m +1 ) ] . For both ABC [α =1.5 (1.2) for large (small) R ] and ABA (α =1 ) stackings, the lowest-energy levels show approximately a R-α dependence on the dot radius R in contrast with the 1 /R3 one for ABC-stacked dots with infinite-mass boundary. As functions of the field B , the oscillator strengths for dipole-allowed transitions differ drastically for the two types of stackings.

  15. Quantum confinement in transition metal oxide quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Miri; Lin, Chungwei; Butcher, Matthew; Rodriguez, Cesar; He, Qian; Posadas, Agham B.; Borisevich, Albina Y.; Zollner, Stefan; Demkov, Alexander A.

    2015-05-11

    In this paper, we report on the quantum confinement in SrTiO3 (STO) quantum wells (QWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The QW structure consists of LaAlO3 (LAO) and STO layers grown on LAO substrate. Structures with different QW thicknesses ranging from two to ten unit cells were grown and characterized. Optical properties (complex dielectric function) were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 1.0 eV–6.0 eV at room temperature. We observed that the absorption edge was blue-shifted by approximately 0.39 eV as the STO quantum well thickness was reduced to two unit cells. Finally, this demonstrates that the energy level of the first sub-band can be controlled by the QW thickness in a complex oxide material.

  16. Quantum confinement in transition metal oxide quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Miri; Lin, Chungwei; Butcher, Matthew; Posadas, Agham B.; Demkov, Alexander A.; Rodriguez, Cesar; Zollner, Stefan; He, Qian; Borisevich, Albina Y.

    2015-05-11

    We report on the quantum confinement in SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) quantum wells (QWs) grown by molecular beam epitaxy. The QW structure consists of LaAlO{sub 3} (LAO) and STO layers grown on LAO substrate. Structures with different QW thicknesses ranging from two to ten unit cells were grown and characterized. Optical properties (complex dielectric function) were measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry in the range of 1.0 eV–6.0 eV at room temperature. We observed that the absorption edge was blue-shifted by approximately 0.39 eV as the STO quantum well thickness was reduced to two unit cells. This demonstrates that the energy level of the first sub-band can be controlled by the QW thickness in a complex oxide material.

  17. Quantum chromodynamics near the confinement limit

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, C.

    1985-09-01

    These nine lectures deal at an elementary level with the strong interaction between quarks and its implications for the structure of hadrons. Quarkonium systems are studied as a means for measuring the interquark interaction. This is presumably (part of) the answer a solution to QCD must yield, if it is indeed the correct theory of the strong interactions. Some elements of QCD are reviewed, and metaphors for QCD as a confining theory are introduced. The 1/N expansion is summarized as a way of guessing the consequences of QCD for hadron physics. Lattice gauge theory is developed as a means for going beyond perturbation theory in the solution of QCD. The correspondence between statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, and field theory is made, and simple spin systems are formulated on the lattice. The lattice analog of local gauge invariance is developed, and analytic methods for solving lattice gauge theory are considered. The strong-coupling expansion indicates the existence of a confining phase, and the renormalization group provides a means for recovering the consequences of continuum field theory. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of lattice theories give evidence for the phase structure of gauge theories, yield an estimate for the string tension characterizing the interquark force, and provide an approximate description of the quarkonium potential in encouraging good agreement with what is known from experiment.

  18. Quantum confined Stark effect in Gaussian quantum wells: A tight-binding study

    SciTech Connect

    Ramírez-Morales, A.; Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Vargas, I.

    2014-05-15

    The main characteristics of the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) are studied theoretically in quantum wells of Gaussian profile. The semi-empirical tight-binding model and the Green function formalism are applied in the numerical calculations. A comparison of the QCSE in quantum wells with different kinds of confining potential is presented.

  19. Interlevel cascade transition in electrically confined quantum wire arrays.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Hassani, Iman; Mohseni, Hooman

    2011-09-27

    Vertical stacks of electrically confined quantum wires were demonstrated in devices with large areas. Multiple current plateaus and strong differential conductance oscillations were observed at above liquid nitrogen temperatures because of interlevel cascade transition of carriers. Our simulation results for charge transport, as well as interlevel infrared photoresponse red-shift, due to lateral electric field confinement show good agreement with experimental data.

  20. Understanding quantum confinement in nanowires: basics, applications and possible laws.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, S Noor

    2014-10-22

    A comprehensive investigation of quantum confinement in nanowires has been carried out. Though applied to silicon nanowires (SiNWs), it is general and applicable to all nanowires. Fundamentals and applications of quantum confinement in nanowires and possible laws obeyed by these nanowires, have been investigated. These laws may serve as backbones of nanowire science and technology. The relationship between energy band gap and nanowire diameter has been studied. This relationship appears to be universal. A thorough review indicates that the first principles results for quantum confinement vary widely. The possible cause of this variation has been examined. Surface passivation and surface reconstruction of nanowires have been elucidated. It has been found that quantum confinement owes its origin to surface strain resulting from surface passivation and surface reconstruction and hence thin nanowires may actually be crystalline-core/amorphous-shell (c-Si/a-Si) nanowires. Experimental data available in the literature corroborate with the suggestion. The study also reveals an intrinsic relationship between quantum confinement and the surface amorphicity of nanowires. It demonstrates that surface amorphicity may be an important tool to investigate the electronic, optoelectronic and sensorial properties of quantum-confined nanowires.

  1. Surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2012-06-26

    We investigate the surface depletion induced quantum confinement in CdS nanobelts beyond the quantum confinement regime, where the thickness is much larger than the bulk exciton Bohr radius. From room temperature to 77 K, the emission energy of free exciton A scales linearly versus 1/L(2) when the thickness L is less than 100 nm, while a deviation occurs for those belts thicker than 100 nm due to the reabsorption effect. The 1/L(2) dependence can be explained by the surface depletion induced quantum confinement, which modifies the confinement potential leading to a quasi-square potential well smaller than the geometric thickness of nanobelts, giving rise to the confinement effect to exciton emission beyond the quantum confinement regime. The surface depletion is sensitive to carrier concentration and surface states. As the temperature decreases, the decrease of the electrostatic potential drop in the surface depletion region leads to a weaker confinement due to the decrease of carrier concentration. With a layer of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) passivation, PL spectra exhibit pronounced red shifts due to the decrease of the surface states at room temperature. No shift is found at 10 K both with or without PMMA passivation, suggesting a much weaker depletion field due to the freezing-out of donors.

  2. Properties of II-VI Semiconductors: Bulk Crystals, Epitaxial Films, Quantum Well Structures, and Dilute Magnetic Systems. Materials Research Society Symposium Proceedings. Volume 161

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-21

    quantum well (MQW) structures, which can confine electrons and holes in a two-dimensional well , fabricated by MBE [2] and MOCVD [3]. Despite the...N Pie MA’ FERIA -LS - RESEAR(--’H -)CIFFY VOLUME 161 Properties of 11-VI Semiconductors: Bulk Crystals, Epitaxial Films, Quantum Well Structures...Semiconductors: Bulk Crystals, Epitaxial Films, Quantum Well Structures, and Dilute Magnet;-- Systems :1ity CodeS JLECTE0 Nov 15 1990 SDISTRI:7UTICN SAT EM~

  3. Si quantum dots in silicon nitride: Quantum confinement and defects

    SciTech Connect

    Goncharova, L. V. Karner, V. L.; D'Ortenzio, R.; Chaudhary, S.; Mokry, C. R.; Simpson, P. J.; Nguyen, P. H.

    2015-12-14

    Luminescence of amorphous Si quantum dots (Si QDs) in a hydrogenated silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}:H) matrix was examined over a broad range of stoichiometries from Si{sub 3}N{sub 2.08} to Si{sub 3}N{sub 4.14}, to optimize light emission. Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition was used to deposit hydrogenated SiN{sub x} films with excess Si on Si (001) substrates, with stoichiometry controlled by variation of the gas flow rates of SiH{sub 4} and NH{sub 3} gases. The compositional and optical properties were analyzed by Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, elastic recoil detection, spectroscopic ellipsometry, photoluminescence (PL), time-resolved PL, and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy. Ultraviolet-laser-excited PL spectra show multiple emission bands from 400 nm (3.1 eV) to 850 nm (1.45 eV) for different Si{sub 3}N{sub x} compositions. There is a red-shift of the measured peaks from ∼2.3 eV to ∼1.45 eV as Si content increases, which provides evidence for quantum confinement. Higher N content samples show additional peaks in their PL spectra at higher energies, which we attribute to defects. We observed three different ranges of composition where Tauc band gaps, PL, and PL lifetimes change systematically. There is an interesting interplay of defect luminescence and, possibly, small Si QD luminescence observed in the intermediate range of compositions (∼Si{sub 3}N{sub 3.15}) in which the maximum of light emission is observed.

  4. From Pauli's birthday to 'Confinement Resonances' - a potted history of Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, J. P.

    2013-06-01

    Quantum Confinement is in some sense a new subject. International meetings dedicated to Quantum Confinement have occurred only recently in Mexico City (the first in 2010 and the second, in September 2011). However, at least in principle, the subject has existed since a very long time. Surprisingly perhaps, it lay dormant for many years, for want of suitable experimental examples. However, when one looks carefully at its origin, it turns out to have a long and distinguished history. In fact, the problem of quantum confinement raises a number of very interesting issues concerning boundary conditions in elementary quantum mechanics and how they should be applied to real problems. Some of these issues were missed in the earliest papers, but are implicit in the structure of quantum mechanics, and lead to the notion of Confinement Resonances, the existence of which was predicted theoretically more than ten years ago. Although, for several reasons, these resonances remained elusive for a very long time, they have now been observed experimentally, which puts the whole subject in much better shape and, together with the advent of metallofullerenes, has contributed to its revival.

  5. Imaging electrostatically confined Dirac fermions in graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Juwon; Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jairo, Jr.; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin F.; Kahn, Salman; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Levitov, Leonid S.; Crommie, Michael F.

    2016-11-01

    Electrostatic confinement of charge carriers in graphene is governed by Klein tunnelling, a relativistic quantum process in which particle-hole transmutation leads to unusual anisotropic transmission at p-n junction boundaries. Reflection and transmission at these boundaries affect the quantum interference of electronic waves, enabling the formation of novel quasi-bound states. Here we report the use of scanning tunnelling microscopy to map the electronic structure of Dirac fermions confined in quantum dots defined by circular graphene p-n junctions. The quantum dots were fabricated using a technique involving local manipulation of defect charge within the insulating substrate beneath a graphene monolayer. Inside such graphene quantum dots we observe resonances due to quasi-bound states and directly visualize the quantum interference patterns arising from these states. Outside the quantum dots Dirac fermions exhibit Friedel oscillation-like behaviour. Bolstered by a theoretical model describing relativistic particles in a harmonic oscillator potential, our findings yield insights into the spatial behaviour of electrostatically confined Dirac fermions.

  6. Suppression of Quantum Scattering in Strongly Confined Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, J. I.; Melezhik, V. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2006-11-10

    We demonstrate that scattering of particles strongly interacting in three dimensions (3D) can be suppressed at low energies in a quasi-one-dimensional (1D) confinement. The underlying mechanism is the interference of the s- and p-wave scattering contributions with large s- and p-wave 3D scattering lengths being a necessary prerequisite. This low-dimensional quantum scattering effect might be useful in 'interacting' quasi-1D ultracold atomic gases, guided atom interferometry, and impurity scattering in strongly confined quantum wire-based electronic devices.

  7. Statistical Mechanics of Confined Quantum Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannur, Vishnu M.; Udayanandan, K. M.

    We develop statistical mechanics and thermodynamics of Bose and Fermi systems in relativistic harmonic oscillator (RHO) confining potential, which is applicable in quark gluon plasma (QGP), astrophysics, Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) etc. Detailed study of QGP system is carried out and compared with lattice results. Furthermore, as an application, our equation of state (EoS) of QGP is used to study compact stars like quark star.

  8. Multiparameter deformation theory for quantum confined systems

    SciTech Connect

    Aleixo, A. N. F.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2009-11-15

    We introduce a generalized multiparameter deformation theory applicable to all supersymmetric and shape-invariant systems. Taking particular choices for the deformation factors used in the construction of the deformed ladder operators, we show that we can generalize the one-parameter quantum-deformed harmonic oscillator models and build alternative multiparameter deformed models that are also shape invariant like the primary undeformed system.

  9. Lack of quantum confinement in Ga2O3 nanolayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peelaers, Hartwin; Van de Walle, Chris G.

    2017-08-01

    β -Ga2Ox3 is a wide-band-gap semiconductor with promising applications in transparent electronics and in power devices. β -Ga2O3 has monoclinic crystal symmetry and does not display a layered structured characteristic of 2D materials in the bulk; nevertheless, monolayer-thin Ga2O3 layers can be created. We used first-principles techniques to investigate the structural and electronic properties of these nanolayers. Surprisingly, freestanding films do not exhibit any signs of quantum confinement and exhibit the same electronic structure as bulk material. A detailed examination reveals that this can be attributed to the presence of states that are strongly confined near the surface. When the Ga2O3 layers are embedded in a wider band-gap material such as Al2O3 , the expected effects of quantum confinement can be observed. The effective mass of electrons in all the nanolayers is small, indicating promising device applications.

  10. Quantum confinement in black phosphorus-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupo, Andrew; Meunier, Vincent

    2017-07-01

    The modification of an idealized infinite bulk system by dimensional reduction or structural distortion results in quantum confinement effects (QCEs). For example, dimensional reduction of a black phosphorus structure leads to the realization of few-layer systems, creation of edges and surfaces, nanoribbons, quantum dots, and antidot lattices while structural distortion involves simple bending (including nanotubes) and rippling. Black phosphorus (‘phosphorene’ in the single-layer limit) has been of recent interest due to its relatively large charge carrier mobility and moderate semiconducting band gap, which remains direct irrespective of the number of layers. In this review the state-of-the-art properties of black phosphorus in its dimensionally reduced and structurally distorted forms are discussed, with emphasis on how quantum confinement impacts the material’s properties.

  11. Quantum dots confined in nanoporous alumina membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Xia, Jianfeng; Wang, Jun; Shinar, Joseph; Lin, Zhiqun

    2006-09-01

    CdSe /ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were filled into porous alumina membranes (PAMs) by dip coating. The deposition of QDs induced changes in the refractive index of the PAMs. The amount of absorbed QDs was quantified by fitting the reflection and transmission spectra observed experimentally with one side open and freestanding (i.e., with two sides open) PAMs employed, respectively. The fluorescence of the QDs was found to be retained within the cylindrical nanopores of the PAMs.

  12. Quantum Dots Confined in Nanoporous Alumina Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jun; Xia, Jianfeng; Wang, Jun; Shinar, Joseph; Lin, Zhiqun

    2007-03-01

    Precise control over the dispersion and lateral distribution of quantum dots (QDs) within nanoscopic porous media provides a unique route to manipulate the optical and/or electronic properties of QDs in a very simple and controllable manner for applications related to light emitting, optoelectronic, and sensor devices. Here we filled nanoporous alumina membranes (PAMs) with CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs by dip coating. The deposition of QDs induced changes in the refractive index of PAMs. The amount of absorbed QDs was quantified by fitting the reflection and transmission spectra observed experimentally with one side open and freestanding (i.e., with two sides open) PAMs employed, respectively. The fluorescence of the QDs was found to be retained within the cylindrical nanopores of PAMs.

  13. Proving Nontrivial Topology of Pure Bismuth by Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, S.; Feng, B.; Arita, M.; Takayama, A.; Liu, R.-Y.; Someya, T.; Chen, W.-C.; Iimori, T.; Namatame, H.; Taniguchi, M.; Cheng, C.-M.; Tang, S.-J.; Komori, F.; Kobayashi, K.; Chiang, T.-C.; Matsuda, I.

    2016-12-01

    The topology of pure Bi is controversial because of its very small (˜10 meV ) band gap. Here we perform high-resolution angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy measurements systematically on 14-202 bilayer Bi films. Using high-quality films, we succeed in observing quantized bulk bands with energy separations down to ˜10 meV . Detailed analyses on the phase shift of the confined wave functions precisely determine the surface and bulk electronic structures, which unambiguously show nontrivial topology. The present results not only prove the fundamental property of Bi but also introduce a capability of the quantum-confinement approach.

  14. Quantum confinement and Coulomb blockade in isolated nanodiamond crystallites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolker, Asaf; Saguy, Cecile; Tordjman, Moshe; Kalish, Rafi

    2013-07-01

    We present direct experimental evidence of quantum confinement effects in single isolated nanodiamonds by scanning tunneling spectroscopy. For grains smaller than 4.5 nm, the band gap was found to increase with decreasing nanodiamond size and a well-defined, evenly spaced, 12-peak structure was observed on the conduction band side of the conductance curves. We attribute these peaks to the Coulomb blockade effect, reflecting the 12-fold degeneracy of the first electron-energy level in the confined nanodiamond. The present results shed light on the size dependence of the electronic properties of single nanodiamonds and are of major importance for future nanodiamond-based applications.

  15. Energy Gaps and Interaction Blockade in Confined Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Capelle, K.; Borgh, M.; Kaerkkaeinen, K.; Reimann, S. M.

    2007-07-06

    We investigate universal properties of strongly confined particles that turn out to be dramatically different from what is observed for electrons in atoms and molecules. For a large class of harmonically confined systems, such as small quantum dots and optically trapped atoms, many-body particle addition and removal energies, and energy gaps, are accurately obtained from single-particle eigenvalues. Transport blockade phenomena are related to the derivative discontinuity of the exchange-correlation functional. This implies that they occur very generally, with Coulomb blockade being a particular realization of a more general phenomenon. In particular, we predict a van der Waals blockade in cold atom gases in traps.

  16. Imaging Quantum Confinement in Multiple Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Dillon; Velasco, Jairo; Lee, Juwon; Rodriguez-Nieva, Joaquin; Kahn, Salman; Vo, Phong; Tsai, Hsinzon; Taniguchi, Takashi; Watanabe, Kenji; Zettl, Alex; Wang, Feng; Levitov, Leonid; Crommie, Michael

    Quantum dots provide a useful means for controlling the electronic and spin degrees of freedom of mesoscale and nanoscale materials. Here we demonstrate a new method for fabricating interacting graphene quantum dots that is compatible with electrostatic gating and visualization by way of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Using this new technique we have created and spatially characterized systems of two or more interacting quantum dots. Our results show that it is possible to engineer electronic wave functions in graphene with a high degree of spatial control.

  17. Spectroscopic study of Gd nanostructures quantum confined in Fe corrals

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, R. X.; Sun, L.; Miao, B. F.; ...

    2015-07-10

    Low dimensional nanostructures have attracted attention due to their rich physical properties and potential applications. The essential factor for their functionality is their electronic properties, which can be modified by quantum confinement. Here the electronic states of Gd atom trapped in open Fe corrals on Ag(111) were studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. A single spectroscopic peak above the Fermi level is observed after Gd adatoms are trapped inside Fe corrals, while two peaks appear in empty corrals. The single peak position is close to the higher energy peak of the empty corrals. These findings, attributed to quantum confinement of themore » corrals and Gd structures trapped inside, are supported by tight-binding calculations. As a result, this demonstrates and provides insights into atom trapping in open corrals of various diameters, giving an alternative approach to modify the properties of nano-objects.« less

  18. Spectroscopic study of Gd nanostructures quantum confined in Fe corrals

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, R. X.; Sun, L.; Miao, B. F.; Li, Q. L.; Zheng, C.; Wu, D.; You, B.; Zhang, W.; Han, P.; Bader, S. D.; Zhang, W. Y.; Ding, H. F.

    2015-07-10

    Low dimensional nanostructures have attracted attention due to their rich physical properties and potential applications. The essential factor for their functionality is their electronic properties, which can be modified by quantum confinement. Here the electronic states of Gd atom trapped in open Fe corrals on Ag(111) were studied via scanning tunneling spectroscopy. A single spectroscopic peak above the Fermi level is observed after Gd adatoms are trapped inside Fe corrals, while two peaks appear in empty corrals. The single peak position is close to the higher energy peak of the empty corrals. These findings, attributed to quantum confinement of the corrals and Gd structures trapped inside, are supported by tight-binding calculations. As a result, this demonstrates and provides insights into atom trapping in open corrals of various diameters, giving an alternative approach to modify the properties of nano-objects.

  19. Quantum confinement-induced tunable exciton states in graphene oxide

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon; Zhu, Xi; Lee, Jiyoul; Shin, Hyeon-Jin; Cole, Jacqueline M.; Shin, Taeho; Lee, Jaichan; Lee, Hangil; Su, Haibin

    2013-01-01

    Graphene oxide has recently been considered to be a potential replacement for cadmium-based quantum dots due to its expected high fluorescence. Although previously reported, the origin of the luminescence in graphene oxide is still controversial. Here, we report the presence of core/valence excitons in graphene-based materials, a basic ingredient for optical devices, induced by quantum confinement. Electron confinement in the unreacted graphitic regions of graphene oxide was probed by high resolution X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy and first-principles calculations. Using experiments and simulations, we were able to tune the core/valence exciton energy by manipulating the size of graphitic regions through the degree of oxidation. The binding energy of an exciton in highly oxidized graphene oxide is similar to that in organic electroluminescent materials. These results open the possibility of graphene oxide-based optoelectronic device technology. PMID:23872608

  20. Controlling Carrier Dynamics using Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Beard, Matthew C.; Klimov, Victor I.

    2016-06-01

    The articles included in this special issue of Chemical Physics explore the use of quantum-confined semiconductor nanocrystals to control the flow of energy and/or charge. Colloidal quantum-confined semiconductor nanostructures are an emerging class of functional materials being developed for novel opto-electronic applications. In the last few years numerous examples in the literature have emerged where novel nanostructures have been tailored such as to achieve a specific function thus moving the field from the stage of discovery of novel behaviors to that of control of nanostructure properties. In addition to the internal structure of the NCs their assemblies can be tailored to achieve emergent properties and add additional control parameters that determine the final opto-electronic properties. These principles are explored via variations in shape, size, surface ligands, heterostructuring, morphology, composition, and assemblies and are demonstrated through measurements of excited state processes, such as Auger recombination; photoluminescence; charge separation and charge transport.

  1. Molecular Limits to the Quantum Confinement Model in Diamond Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; van Buuren, T; Dahl, J E; Liu, S E; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Moller, T

    2005-04-07

    The electronic structure of monodisperse, hydrogen-passivated diamond clusters in the gas phase has been studied with x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The data show that the bulk-related unoccupied states do not exhibit any quantum confinement. Additionally, density of states below the bulk absorption edge appears, consisting of features correlated to CH and CH{sub 2} hydrogen surface termination, resulting in an effective red shift of the lowest unoccupied states. The results contradict the commonly used and very successful quantum confinement model for semiconductors which predicts increasing band edge blue shifts with decreasing particle size. Our findings indicate that in the ultimate size limit for nanocrystals a more molecular description is necessary.

  2. Subtle Chemistry of Colloidal, Quantum-Confined Semiconductor Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, B. K.; Luther, J. M.; Beard, M. C.

    2012-06-26

    Nanoscale colloidal semiconductor structures with at least one dimension small enough to experience quantum confinement effects have captured the imagination and attention of scientists interested in controlling various chemical and photophysical processes. Aside from having desirable quantum confinement properties, colloidal nanocrystals are attractive because they are often synthesized in low-temperature, low-cost, and potentially scalable manners using simple benchtop reaction baths. Considerable progress in producing a variety of shapes, compositions, and complex structures has been achieved. However, there are challenges to overcome in order for these novel materials to reach their full potential and become new drivers for commercial applications. The final shape, composition, nanocrystal-ligand structure, and size can depend on a delicate interplay of precursors, surface ligands, and other compounds that may or may not participate in the reaction. In this Perspective, we discuss current efforts toward better understanding how the reactivity of the reagents can be used to produce unique and complex nanostructures.

  3. Quantum Painleve-Calogero correspondence for Painleve VI

    SciTech Connect

    Zabrodin, A.; Zotov, A.

    2012-07-15

    This paper is a continuation of our previous paper where the Painleve-Calogero correspondence has been extended to auxiliary linear problems associated with Painleve equations. We have proved, for the first five equations from the Painleve list, that one of the linear problems can be recast in the form of the non-stationary Schroedinger equation whose Hamiltonian is a natural quantization of the classical Calogero-like Hamiltonian for the corresponding Painleve equation. In the present paper we establish the quantum Painleve-Calogero correspondence for the most general case, the Painleve VI equation. We also show how the desired special gauge and the needed choice of variables can be derived starting from the corresponding Schlesinger system with rational spectral parameter.

  4. Quantum Confined ZnO Nanoparticles: Structural and Optical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, S.; Mishra, A. K.; Das, D.; Mukherjee, S.

    2011-07-01

    Single phase ZnO nanocrystals have been prepared by a wet chemical route. Structure and morphology of prepared ZnO nanocrystals has been investigated with XRD and SEM. The significant role of surfactants in controlling the particle size has been observed with the help of UV-vis spectroscopy. The changes in the UV peak with varied concentration of the surfactants have shown the effect of quantum confinement in the samples. These results have also been corroborated by photoluminescence studies.

  5. Quantum Chromodynamics and Color Confinement (confinement 2000) - Proceedings of the International Symposium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suganuma, H.; Fukushima, M.; Toki, H.

    The Table of Contents for the book is as follows: * Preface * Opening Address * Monopole Condensation and Quark Confinement * Dual QCD, Effective String Theory, and Regge Trajectories * Abelian Dominance and Monopole Condensation * Non-Abelian Stokes Theorem and Quark Confinement in QCD * Infrared Region of QCD and Confining Configurations * BRS Quartet Mechanism for Color Confinement * Color Confinement and Quartet Mechanism * Numerical Tests of the Kugo-Ojima Color Confinement Criterion * Monopoles and Confinement in Lattice QCD * SU(2) Lattice Gauge Theory at T > 0 in a Finite Box with Fixed Holonomy * Confining and Dirac Strings in Gluodynamics * Cooling, Monopoles, and Vortices in SU(2) Lattice Gauge Theory * Quark Confinement Physics from Lattice QCD * An (Almost) Perfect Lattice Action for SU(2) and SU(3) Gluodynamics * Vortices and Confinement in Lattice QCD * P-Vortices, Nexuses and Effects of Gribov Copies in the Center Gauges * Laplacian Center Vortices * Center Vortices at Strong Couplings and All Couplings * Simulations in SO(3) × Z(2) Lattice Gauge Theory * Exciting a Vortex - the Cost of Confinement * Instantons in QCD * Deformation of Instanton in External Color Fields * Field Strength Correlators in the Instanton Liquid * Instanton and Meron Physics in Lattice QCD * The Dual Ginzburg-Landau Theory for Confinement and the Role of Instantons * Lattice QCD for Quarks, Gluons and Hadrons * Hadronic Spectral Functions in QCD * Universality and Chaos in Quantum Field Theories * Lattice QCD Study of Three Quark Potential * Probing the QCD Vacuum with Flavour Singlet Objects : η' on the Lattice * Lattice Studies of Quarks and Gluons * Quarks and Hadrons in QCD * Supersymmetric Nonlinear Sigma Models * Chiral Transition and Baryon-number Susceptibility * Light Quark Masses in QCD * Chiral Symmetry of Baryons and Baryon Resonances * Confinement and Bound States in QCD * Parallel Session * Off-diagonal Gluon Mass Generation and Strong Randomness of Off

  6. Twinned silicon and germanium nanocrystals: Formation, stability and quantum confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Ting; Pi, Xiaodong Ni, Zhenyi; Zhang, Hui; Yang, Deren

    2015-03-15

    Although twins are often observed in Si/Ge nanocrystals (NCs), little theoretical investigation has been carried out to understand this type of important planar defects in Si/Ge NCs. We now study the twinning of Si/Ge NCs in the frame work of density functional theory by representatively considering single-twinned and fivefold-twinned Si/Ge NCs. It is found that the formation of twinned Si/Ge NCs is thermodynamically possible. The effect of twinning on the formation of Si NCs is different from that of Ge NCs. For both Si and Ge NCs twinning enhances their stability. The quantum confinement effect is weakened by twinning for Si NCs. Twinning actually enhances the quantum confinement of Ge NCs when they are small (<136 atoms), while weakening the quantum confinement of Ge NCs as their size is large (>136 atoms). The current results help to better understand the experimental work on twinned Si/Ge NCs and guide the tuning of Si/Ge-NC structures for desired properties.

  7. Colloidal GaAs quantum wires: solution-liquid-solid synthesis and quantum-confinement studies.

    PubMed

    Dong, Angang; Yu, Heng; Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2008-05-07

    Colloidal GaAs quantum wires with diameters of 5-11 nm and narrow diameter distributions (standard deviation = 12-21% of the mean diameter) are grown by two methods based on the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism. Resolved excitonic absorption features arising from GaAs quantum wires are detected, allowing extraction of the size-dependent effective band gaps of the wires. The results allow the first systematic comparison of the size dependences of the effective band gaps in corresponding sets of semiconductor quantum wires and quantum wells. The GaAs quantum wire and well band gaps scale according to the prediction of a simple effective-mass-approximation, particle-in-a-box (EMA-PIB) model, which estimates the kinetic confinement energies of electron-hole pairs in quantum nanostructures of different shapes and confinement dimensionalities.

  8. A Semimetal Nanowire Rectifier: Balancing Quantum Confinement and Surface Electronegativity.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Soares, Alfonso; Greer, James C

    2016-12-14

    For semimetal nanowires with diameters on the order of 10 nm, a semimetal-to-semiconductor transition is observed due to quantum confinement effects. Quantum confinement in a semimetal lifts the degeneracy of the conduction and valence bands in a "zero" gap semimetal or shifts energy levels with a "negative" overlap to form conduction and valence bands. For semimetal nanowires with diameters less than 10 nm, the band gap energy can be significantly larger than the thermal energy at room temperature resulting in a new class of semiconductors suitable for nanoelectronics. As a nanowire's diameter is reduced, its surface-to-volume ratio increases rapidly leading to an increased impact of surface chemistry on its electronic structure. Energy level shifts to states in the vicinity of the Fermi energy with varying surface electronegativity are shown to be comparable in magnitude to quantum confinement effects arising in nanowires with diameters of a few nanometer; these two effects can counteract one another leading to semimetallic behavior at nanowire cross sections at which confinement effects would otherwise dominate. Abruptly changing the surface terminating species along the length of a nanowire can lead to an abrupt change in the surface electronegativity. This can result in the formation of a semimetal-semiconductor junction within a monomaterial nanowire without impurity doping nor requiring the formation of a heterojunction. Using density functional theory in tandem with a Green's function approach to determine electronic structure and charge transport, respectively, current rectification is calculated for such a junction. Current rectification ratios of the order of 10(3)-10(5) are predicted at applied biases as low as 300 mV. It is concluded that rectification can be achieved at essentially molecular length scales with conventional biasing, while rivaling the performance of macroscopic semiconductor diodes.

  9. Quantum tunneling and vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Alexander I.; Anovitz, Lawrence M.; Ehlers, Georg; Mamontov, Eugene; Podlesnyak, Andrey; Prisk, Timothy R.; Seel, Andrew; Reiter, George F.

    2015-03-01

    Vibrational dynamics of ultra-confined water in single crystals beryl, the structure of which contains ~ 5 Å diameter channels along the c-axis was studied with inelastic (INS), quasi-elastic (QENS) and deep inelastic (DINS) neutron scattering. The results reveal significantly anisotropic dynamical behavior of confined water, and show that effective potential experienced by water perpendicular to the channels is significantly softer than along them. The observed 7 peaks in the INS spectra (at energies 0.25 to 15 meV), based on their temperature and momentum transfer dependences, are explained by transitions between the split ground states of water in beryl due to water quantum tunneling between the 6-fold equivalent positions across the channels. DINS study of beryl at T=4.3 K shows narrow, anisotropic water proton momentum distribution with corresponding kinetic energy, EK=95 meV, which is much less than was previously observed in bulk water (~150 meV). We believe that the exceptionally small EK in beryl is a result of water quantum tunneling ∖ delocalization in the nanometer size confinement and weak water-cage interaction. The neutron experiment at ORNL was sponsored by the Sci. User Facilities Div., BES, U.S. DOE. This research was sponsored by the Div. Chemical Sci, Geosciences, and Biosciences, BES, U.S. DOE. The STFC RAL is thanked for access to ISIS neutron facilities.

  10. Confined monopoles induced by quantum effects in dense QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eto, Minoru; Nitta, Muneto; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2011-04-01

    We analytically show that mesonic bound states of confined monopoles appear inside a non-Abelian vortex string in massless three-flavor QCD at large quark chemical potential μ. The orientational modes CP2 in the internal space of a vortex is described by the low-energy effective world-sheet theory. Mesons of confined monopoles are dynamically generated as bound states of kinks by the quantum effects in the effective theory. The mass of monopoles is shown to be an exponentially soft scale M˜Δexp⁡[-c(μ/Δ)2], with the color superconducting gap Δ and some constant c. A possible quark-monopole duality between the hadron phase and the color superconducting phase is also discussed.

  11. Confined quantum time of arrival for the vanishing potential

    SciTech Connect

    Galapon, Eric A.; Caballar, Roland F.; Bahague, Ricardo

    2005-12-15

    We give full account of our recent report in E. A. Galapon, R. Caballar, and R. Bahague, Phys. Rev. Lett. 93, 180406 (2004), where it is shown that formulating the free quantum time of arrival problem in a segment of the real line suggests rephrasing the quantum time of arrival problem to finding a complete set of states that evolve to unitarily arrive at a given point at a definite time. For a spatially confined particle, here it is shown explicitly that the problem admits a solution in the form of an eigenvalue problem of a class of compact and self-adjoint time of arrival operators derived by a quantization of the classical time of arrival. The eigenfunctions of these operators are numerically demonstrated to unitarily arrive at the origin at their respective eigenvalues.

  12. Confinement sensitivity in quantum dot singlet-triplet relaxation.

    PubMed

    Wesslen, Carl; Lindroth, Eva

    2017-09-08

    Spin-orbit mediated phonon relaxation in a two-dimensional quantum dot is investigated using different confining potentials. Elliptical harmonic oscillator and cylindrical well results are compared to each other in the case of a two-electron GaAs quantum dot subjected to a tilted magnetic field. The lowest energy set of two-body singlet and triplet states are calculated including spin-orbit and magnetic effects. These are used to calculate the phonon induced transition rate from the excited triplet to the ground state singlet for magnetic fields up to where the states cross. The roll of the cubic Dresselhaus effect, which is found to be much more important than previously assumed, and the positioning of "spin hot-spots" are discussed and relaxation rates for a few different systems are exhibited. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  13. From quantum confinement to quantum Hall effect in graphene nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guimarães, M. H. D.; Shevtsov, O.; Waintal, X.; van Wees, B. J.

    2012-02-01

    We study the evolution of the two-terminal conductance plateaus with a magnetic field for armchair graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) and graphene nanoconstrictions (GNCs). For GNRs, the conductance plateaus of (2e2)/(h) at zero magnetic field evolve smoothly to the quantum Hall regime, where the plateaus in conductance at even multiples of (2e2)/(h) disappear. It is shown that the relation between the energy and magnetic field does not follow the same behavior as in “bulk” graphene, reflecting the different electronic structure of a GNR. For the nanoconstrictions we show that the conductance plateaus do not have the same sharp behavior in zero magnetic field as in a GNR, which reflects the presence of backscattering in such structures. Our results show good agreement with recent experiments on high-quality graphene nanoconstrictions. The behavior with the magnetic field for a GNC shows some resemblance to the one for a GNR but now depends also on the length of the constriction. By analyzing the evolution of the conductance plateaus in the presence of the magnetic field we can obtain the width of the structures studied and show that this is a powerful experimental technique in the study of the electronic and structural properties of narrow structures.

  14. Elementary framework for cold field emission: Incorporation of quantum-confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2013-12-21

    Although the Fowler-Nordheim (FN) equation serves as the foundation of cold field emission theory, it may not be suitable for predicting the emitted current density (ECD) from emitters with a quantum-confined electron supply. This work presents an analytical framework for treating cold field emission from metals that includes the effects of a quantum-confined electron supply. Within the framework, quantum confinement in emitters is classified into transverse and normal quantum confinement based on the orientation of the confinement relative to the emission direction. The framework is used to generate equations predicting the ECD from rectangular and cylindrical emitter geometries comprised of electron supplies of reduced dimensionality. Transverse quantum confinement of the electron supply leads to a reduction in the total ECD as transverse emitter dimensions decrease and normal quantum confinement results in an oscillatory ECD as a function of the normal quantum well width. Incorporating a geometry-dependent field enhancement factor into the model reveals an optimal transverse well width for which quantum confinement of the electron supply and field enhancement equally affect the ECD and a maximum total ECD for the emitter geometry at a given applied field is obtained. As a result, the FN equation over-predicts the ECD from emitters with transverse dimensions under approximately 5 nm, and in those cases, geometry-specific ECD equations incorporating quantum-confinement effects should be employed instead.

  15. Quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes in MoS{sub 2} quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Gan, Z. X.; Liu, L. Z.; Wu, H. Y.; Hao, Y. L.; Shan, Y.; Wu, X. L. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2015-06-08

    The low quantum yield (∼10{sup −5}) has restricted practical use of photoluminescence (PL) from MoS{sub 2} composed of a few layers, but the quantum confinement effects across two-dimensional planes are believed to be able to boost the PL intensity. In this work, PL from 2 to 9 nm MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) is excluded from the solvent and the absorption and PL spectra are shown to be consistent with the size distribution. PL from MoS{sub 2} QDs is also found to be sensitive to aggregation due to the size effect.

  16. Investigation of quantum confinement behavior of zinc sulphide quantum dots synthesized via various chemical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jose, Meera Sakthivel, T. Chandran, Hrisheekesh T. Nivea, R. Gunasekaran, V.

    2014-10-15

    In this work, undoped and Ag-doped ZnS quantum dots were synthesized using various chemical methods. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), UV-visible spectroscopy and Photoluminescence spectroscopy. Our results revealed that the size of the as-prepared samples range from 1–6 nm in diameter and have a cubic zinc-blende structure. Also, we observed the emission of different wavelength of light from different sized quantum dots of the same material due to quantum confinement effect. The results will be presented in detail and ZnS can be a potential candidate for optical device development and applications.

  17. Experimental Observation of Quantum Confinement in the Conduction Band of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J I; Meulenberg, R W; Hanif, K M; Mattoussi, H; Klepeis, J E; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T

    2006-12-15

    Recent theoretical descriptions as to the magnitude of effect that quantum confinement has on he conduction band (CB) of CdSe quantum dots (QD) have been conflicting. In this manuscript, we experimentally identify quantum confinement effects in the CB of CdSe QDs for the first time. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have unambiguously witnessed the CB minimum shift to higher energy with decreasing particle size and have been able to compare these results to recent theories. Our experiments have been able to identify which theories correctly describe the CB states in CdSe QDs. In particular, our experiments suggest that multiple theories describe the shifts in the CB of CdSe QDs and are not mutually exclusive.

  18. Quantum Confinement by Schottky Barriers and its Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, T.-C.

    2005-03-01

    Atomically uniform Pb and Ag films have been successfully grown on Si(111) and Ge(111), respectively, despite a large lattice mismatch in each case. The resulting Schottky barrier at the interface confines the electrons in the film to form quantum well states or subbands. The electronic structure of the film including the ground state wave function can be significantly different from the bulk case, leading to substantial variations in physical properties as a function of film thickness. These variations generally follow a damped oscillatory curve riding on an approximately 1 / 1 N^x . - N^x baseline function, with the exponent x often close to unity. The oscillatory behavior is similar to the shell effect associated with the periodic property variations of elements in the period table. This talk discusses the basic electronic structure of thin metal films as measured by angle-resolved photoemission and the connections to physical properties including the surface energy, thermal stability, density of states, electron-phonon coupling, etc. Quantum size effects can also affect morphological evolution during film growth and heat treatment. The Schottky barrier can be modified by the use of interfactants, and experimental results will be presented to illustrate the utility of this method for quantum control and engineering. In collaboration with M. Upton, D. Ricci, P. Czoschke, L. Basile, S. J. Tang, Hawoong Hong, J. J. Paggel, D.-A. Luh, and T. Miller.

  19. Duality, Confinement and Supersymmetry in Restricted Quantum Chromodynamics (rcd)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rana, J. M. S.

    Electromagnetic duality has been utilized to study the isocolor charge-dyon interactions in Restricted Quantum Chromodynamics (RCD),in terms of current-current correlation (in magnetic gauge)using dielectric and permeability parameters of the associated vacuum. In the state of dyonic superconductivity, it has been shown that the dual propagators behave as 1/k4 (for small k2), which in analogy with superconductivity (dual superconductivity) leads to the confinement of colored fluxes associated with dyonic quarks vide generalized Meissner effect. Based on semi-quantitative analysis of vortex solutions of RCD and by calculating the masses for the massive collective modes of the condensed vacuum, the expressions for the London penetration depth, coherence length and the associated flux energy functions for the type I and type II superconducting media have been obtained. It has further been demonstrated that in the type I medium, vortices tend to coalesce and hence are attractive, while the energy function supports repulsive forces between vortices in the type II superconducting medium. The RCD has been supersymmetrized in N=1 limit and the supersymmetric dyonic solutions have been obtained. In the dyonic background gauge one-loop quantum corrections to the dyonic mass have been calculated and it has been shown that the one-loop quantum corrections lead no change in classical mass of the dyon.

  20. Cathodoluminescence from II-VI quantum well light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikiforov, Alexey Yuriyevich

    The objectives of the present research were to advance understanding of luminescence degradation, defects, and bias-dependent carrier confinement and transport in ZnCd(Mg)Se-based quantum well (QW) LED structures grown by molecular beam epitaxy. Most data were obtained from three LED samples. One was a ZnCdSe QW-based red LED with Au coating on top, and two were ZnCdMgSe QW-based blue LEDs with Au coating or Au dots on top. Optical and carrier confinement properties were characterized by time-resolved and bias-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy and imaging. Electrical behavior was characterized by I-V and electroluminescence (EL) measurements. Both reversible and irreversible effects of bias and electron bombardment on luminescence were observed. Reversible effects were QW CL energy shifts and QW CL intensity changes during bias cycling. No EL was detected from the blue LEDs. Irreversible effects were QW CL decreases for the red LED and QW CL intensity enhancements for the blue LEDs. Reversible effects of bias on CL were simulated using a model incorporating generation and transport of excess carriers, overlap of the electron and hole wave functions, carrier escape, and competition between radiative and nonradiative processes. Ground state energy levels of carriers in the QW heterostructure were calculated in the effective mass and envelope function approximations. Modification of energy levels and wave functions by bias was calculated for both infinite and finite QWs. The finite QW simulations predict the reversible bias-dependent CL intensity behaviors seen experimentally for both red and blue LEDs. The simulations predict qualitatively, but not quantitatively, the reversible photon energy shifts with bias for the red LED. The photon energy shifts for the blue LEDs differed in both direction and magnitude from the simulations. The CL experiments have not established the cause of irreversible intensity decreases observed for the red LED during

  1. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a confined donor in inhomogeneous quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, K.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2011-03-01

    The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility χdia are estimated for a shallow donor confined to move in GaAs-GaAlAs inhomogeneous quantum dots. The calculation was performed within the effective mass approximation and using the variational method. The results show that the binding energy and the diamagnetic susceptibility χdia depend strongly on the core radius and the shell radius. We have demonstrated that there is a critical value of the ratio of the inner radius to the outer radius which may be important for nanofabrication techniques. The binding energy Eb shows a minimum for a critical value of this ratio depending on the value of the outer radius and shows a maximum when the donor is placed at the center of the spherical layer. The diamagnetic susceptibility is more sensitive to variations of the radius for a large spherical layer. The binding energy and diamagnetic susceptibility depend strongly on the donor position.

  2. Quantum Behavior of Water Molecules Confined to Nanocavities in Gemstones.

    PubMed

    Gorshunov, Boris P; Zhukova, Elena S; Torgashev, Victor I; Lebedev, Vladimir V; Shakurov, Gil'man S; Kremer, Reinhard K; Pestrjakov, Efim V; Thomas, Victor G; Fursenko, Dimitry A; Dressel, Martin

    2013-06-20

    When water is confined to nanocavities, its quantum mechanical behavior can be revealed by terahertz spectroscopy. We place H2O molecules in the nanopores of a beryl crystal lattice and observe a rich and highly anisotropic set of absorption lines in the terahertz spectral range. Two bands can be identified, which originate from translational and librational motions of the water molecule isolated within the cage; they correspond to the analogous broad bands in liquid water and ice. In the present case of well-defined and highly symmetric nanocavities, the observed fine structure can be explained by macroscopic tunneling of the H2O molecules within a six-fold potential caused by the interaction of the molecule with the cavity walls.

  3. Confinement-Driven Phase Separation of Quantum Liquid Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisk, T. R.; Pantalei, C.; Kaiser, H.; Sokol, P. E.

    2012-08-01

    We report small-angle neutron scattering studies of liquid helium mixtures confined in Mobil Crystalline Material-41 (MCM-41), a porous silica glass with narrow cylindrical nanopores (d=3.4nm). MCM-41 is an ideal model adsorbent for fundamental studies of gas sorption in porous media because its monodisperse pores are arranged in a 2D triangular lattice. The small-angle scattering consists of a series of diffraction peaks whose intensities are determined by how the imbibed liquid fills the pores. Pure He4 adsorbed in the pores show classic, layer-by-layer film growth as a function of pore filling, leaving the long range symmetry of the system intact. In contrast, the adsorption of He3-He4 mixtures produces a structure incommensurate with the pore lattice. Neither capillary condensation nor preferential adsorption of one helium isotope to the pore walls can provide the symmetry-breaking mechanism. The scattering is consistent with the formation of randomly distributed liquid-liquid microdomains ˜2.3nm in size, providing evidence that confinement in a nanometer scale capillary can drive local phase separation in quantum liquid mixtures.

  4. Manipulating topological-insulator properties using quantum confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotulla, M.; Zülicke, U.

    2017-07-01

    Recent discoveries have spurred the theoretical prediction and experimental realization of novel materials that have topological properties arising from band inversion. Such topological insulators are insulating in the bulk but have conductive surface or edge states. Topological materials show various unusual physical properties and are surmised to enable the creation of exotic Majorana-fermion quasiparticles. How the signatures of topological behavior evolve when the system size is reduced is interesting from both a fundamental and an application-oriented point of view, as such understanding may form the basis for tailoring systems to be in specific topological phases. This work considers the specific case of quantum-well confinement defining two-dimensional layers. Based on the effective-Hamiltonian description of bulk topological insulators, and using a harmonic-oscillator potential as an example for a softer-than-hard-wall confinement, we have studied the interplay of band inversion and size quantization. Our model system provides a useful platform for systematic study of the transition between the normal and topological phases, including the development of band inversion and the formation of massless-Dirac-fermion surface states. The effects of bare size quantization, two-dimensional-subband mixing, and electron-hole asymmetry are disentangled and their respective physical consequences elucidated.

  5. Multiresonant coherent multidimensional spectroscopy of quantum confined nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurs, Lena A.

    2011-12-01

    The research in this thesis has been aimed at defining the capabilities of Coherent Multidimensional Spectroscopy (CMDS) to guide and inform the synthesis and development of quantum confined semiconductors for new solar cell technology. The first triply electronically enhanced four wave mixing (TREE-FWM) CMDS of PbSe quantum dots is presented. The spectra contain useful information regarding the excitonic structure and coupling. The picosecond experiments provide a foundation for further development and extension of the technique to a femtosecond pulse system. The dynamics and charge transfer of interest within and between these materials are largely invisible to the picosecond experiment due to the subpicosecond dephasing of the excited superposition states. Over the course of this work, much was learned about the technicalities of performing CMDS on nanomaterials. Issues of concentration, sample handling, damage threshold, scatter, and stability played significant roles in the interpretation of the data. We conclude that the picosecond CMDS serves as a useful guide for the more versatile femtosecond CMDS under development. Future experiments will have the ability to map out the coherent dynamics important in the charge transfer and separation so integral to successful solar cell design.

  6. Graphene/Si-quantum-dot heterojunction diodes showing high photosensitivity compatible with quantum confinement effect.

    PubMed

    Shin, Dong Hee; Kim, Sung; Kim, Jong Min; Jang, Chan Wook; Kim, Ju Hwan; Lee, Kyeong Won; Kim, Jungkil; Oh, Si Duck; Lee, Dae Hun; Kang, Soo Seok; Kim, Chang Oh; Choi, Suk-Ho; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2015-04-24

    Graphene/Si quantum dot (QD) heterojunction diodes are reported for the first time. The photoresponse, very sensitive to variations in the size of the QDs as well as in the doping concentration of graphene and consistent with the quantum-confinement effect, is remarkably enhanced in the near-ultraviolet range compared to commercially available bulk-Si photodetectors. The photoresponse proves to be dominated by the carriertunneling mechanism. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Influence of confined acoustic phonons on the Radioelectric field in a Quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Do Tuan; Quang Bau, Nguyen

    2015-06-01

    The influence of confined acoustic phonons on the Radioelectric field in a quantum well has been studied in the presence of a linearly polarized electromagnetic wave and a laser radiation. By using the quantum kinetic equation for electrons with confined electrons - confined acoustic phonons interaction, the analytical expression for the Radio electric field is obtained. The formula of the Radio electric field contains the quantum number m characterizing the phonons confinement and comes back to the case of unconfined phonons when m reaches to zero. The dependence of the Radio electric field on the frequency of the laser radiation, in case of confined acoustic phonons, is also achieved by numerical method for a specific quantum well AlGaAs/GaAs/AlGaAs. Results show that the Radio electric field has a peak and reaches saturation as the frequency of the laser radiation increases.

  8. Return of the Quantum Cellular Automata: Episode VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Lincoln D.; Hillberry, Logan E.; Rall, Patrick; Halpern, Nicole Yunger; Bao, Ning; Montangero, Simone

    2016-05-01

    There are now over 150 quantum simulators or analog quantum computers worldwide. Although exploring quantum phase transitions, many-body localization, and the generalized Gibbs ensemble are exciting and worthwhile endeavors, there are totally untapped directions we have not yet pursued. One of these is quantum cellular automata. In the past a principal goal of quantum cellular automata was to reproduce continuum single particle quantum physics such as the Schrodinger or Dirac equation from simple rule sets. Now that we begin to really understand entanglement and many-body quantum physics at a deeper level, quantum cellular automata present new possibilities. We explore several time evolution schemes on simple spin chains leading to high degrees of quantum complexity and nontrivial quantum dynamics. We explain how the 256 known classical elementary cellular automata reduce to just a few exciting quantum cases. Our analysis tools include mutual information based complex networks as well as more familiar quantifiers like sound speed and diffusion rate. Funded by NSF and AFOSR.

  9. Confinement and inhomogeneous broadening effects in the quantum oscillatory magnetization of quantum dot ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, F.; Heedt, S.; Goerke, S.; Ibrahim, A.; Rupprecht, B.; Heyn, Ch; Hardtdegen, H.; Schäpers, Th; Wilde, M. A.; Grundler, D.

    2016-02-01

    We report on the magnetization of ensembles of etched quantum dots with a lateral diameter of 460 nm, which we prepared from InGaAs/InP heterostructures. The quantum dots exhibit 1/B-periodic de-Haas-van-Alphen-type oscillations in the magnetization M(B) for external magnetic fields B  >  2 T, measured by torque magnetometry at 0.3 K. We compare the experimental data to model calculations assuming different confinement potentials and including ensemble broadening effects. The comparison shows that a hard wall potential with an edge depletion width of 100 nm explains the magnetic behavior. Beating patterns induced by Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) as measured in unpatterned and nanopatterned InGaAs/InP heterostructures are not observed for the quantum dots. From our model we predict that signatures of SOI in the magnetization could be observed in larger dots in tilted magnetic fields.

  10. Electrostatically Shielded Quantum Confined Stark Effect Inside Polar Nanostructures

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The effect of electrostatic shielding of the polarization fields in nanostructures at high carrier densities is studied. A simplified analytical model, employing screened, exponentially decaying polarization potentials, localized at the edges of a QW, is introduced for the ES-shielded quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE). Wave function trapping within the Debye-length edge-potential causes blue shifting of energy levels and gradual elimination of the QCSE red-shifting with increasing carrier density. The increase in the e−h wave function overlap and the decrease of the radiative emission time are, however, delayed until the “edge-localization” energy exceeds the peak-voltage of the charged layer. Then the wave function center shifts to the middle of the QW, and behavior becomes similar to that of an unbiased square QW. Our theoretical estimates of the radiative emission time show a complete elimination of the QCSE at doping densities ≥1020 cm−3, in quantitative agreement with experimental measurements. PMID:20596407

  11. Photooxidation and quantum confinement effects in exfoliated black phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Favron, Alexandre; Gaufrès, Etienne; Fossard, Frédéric; Phaneuf-L'Heureux, Anne-Laurence; Tang, Nathalie Y-W; Lévesque, Pierre L; Loiseau, Annick; Leonelli, Richard; Francoeur, Sébastien; Martel, Richard

    2015-08-01

    Thin layers of black phosphorus have recently raised interest owing to their two-dimensional (2D) semiconducting properties, such as tunable direct bandgap and high carrier mobilities. This lamellar crystal of phosphorus atoms can be exfoliated down to monolayer 2D-phosphane (also called phosphorene) using procedures similar to those used for graphene. Probing the properties has, however, been challenged by a fast degradation of the thinnest layers on exposure to ambient conditions. Herein, we investigate this chemistry using in situ Raman and transmission electron spectroscopies. The results highlight a thickness-dependent photoassisted oxidation reaction with oxygen dissolved in adsorbed water. The oxidation kinetics is consistent with a phenomenological model involving electron transfer and quantum confinement as key parameters. A procedure carried out in a glove box is used to prepare mono-, bi- and multilayer 2D-phosphane in their pristine states for further studies on the effect of layer thickness on the Raman modes. Controlled experiments in ambient conditions are shown to lower the A(g)(1)/A(g)(2) intensity ratio for ultrathin layers, a signature of oxidation.

  12. XANES: observation of quantum confinement in the conduction band of colloidal PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, I. N.; Chernyshova, M.; He, X.; Minikayev, R.; Syryanyy, Y.; Derkachova, A.; Derkachov, G.; Stolte, W. C.; Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Reszka, A.; Liang, H.

    2013-04-01

    The presented investigations aimed at development of inexpensive method for synthesized materials suitable for utilization of solar energy. This important issue was addressed by focusing, mainly, on electronic local structure studies with supporting x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of colloidal galena nano-particles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) synthesized using wet chemistry under microwave irradiation. Performed x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed an evidence of quantum confinement for the sample with QDs, where the bottom of the conduction band was shifted to higher energy. The QDs were found to be passivated with oxides at the surface. Existence of sulfate/sulfite and thiosulfate species in pure PbS and QDs, respectively, was identified.

  13. Cadmium selenide quantum wires and the transition from 3D to 2D confinement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Loomis, Richard A; Gibbons, Patrick C; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E

    2003-12-31

    Soluble CdSe quantum wires are prepared by the solution-liquid-solid mechanism, using monodisperse bismith nanoparticles to catalyze wire growth. The quantum wires have micrometer lengths, diameters in the range of 5-20 nm, and diameter distributions of +/-10-20%. Spectroscopically determined wire band gaps compare closely to those calculated by the semiemipirical pseudopotential method, confirming 2D quantum confinement. The diameter dependence of the quantum wire band gaps is compared to that of CdSe quantum dots and rods. Quantum rod band gaps are shown to be delimited by the band gaps of dots and wires of like diameter, for short and long rods, respectively. The experimental data suggest that a length of ca. 30 nm is required for the third dimension of quantum confinement to fully vanish in CdSe rods. That length is about six times the bulk CdSe exciton Bohr radius.

  14. Diamagnetic susceptibility of a hydrogenic donor in a group IV-VI quantum dot-quantum well heterostructure

    SciTech Connect

    Saravanamoorthy, S. N.; Peter, A. John

    2016-05-23

    Electronic properties of a hydrogenic donor impurity in a CdSe/Pb{sub 0.8}Cd{sub 0.2}Se/CdSe quantum dot quantum well system are investigated for various radii of core with shell materials. Confined energies are obtained taking into account the geometrical size of the system and thereby the donor binding energies are found. The diamagnetic susceptibility is estimated for a confined shallow donor in the well system. The results show that the diamagnetic susceptibility strongly depends on core and shell radii and it is more sensitive to variations of the geometrical size of the well material.

  15. Influence of phonon confinement on the optically detected electron-phonon resonance linewidth in quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinh Hien, Nguyen; Dinh, Le; Thanh Lam, Vo; Cong Phong, Tran

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the influence of phonon confinement on the optically detected electrophonon resonance (ODEPR) effect and ODEPR line-width in quantum wells. The obtained numerical result for the GaAs/AlAs quantum well shows that the ODEPR line-widths depend on the well's width and temperature. Besides, in the two cases of confined and bulk phonons, the linewidth (LW) decreases with the increase of well's width and increases with the increase of temperature. Furthermore, in the small range of the well's width, the influence of phonon confinement plays an important role and cannot be neglected in considering the ODEPR line-width.

  16. Molecule-induced quantum confinement in single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hida, Akira; Ishibashi, Koji

    2015-04-01

    A method of fabricating quantum-confined structures with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) has been developed. Scanning tunneling spectroscopy revealed that a parabolic confinement potential appeared when collagen model peptides were attached to both ends of an individual SWNT via the formation of carboxylic anhydrides. On the other hand, the confinement potential was markedly changed by yielding the peptide bonds between the SWNT and the collagen model peptides. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements showed that a type-II quantum dot was produced in the obtained heterostructure.

  17. Metallic tin quantum sheets confined in graphene toward high-efficiency carbon dioxide electroreduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Fengcai; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yongfu; Xu, Jiaqi; Liu, Katong; Liang, Liang; Yao, Tao; Pan, Bicai; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2016-09-01

    Ultrathin metal layers can be highly active carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts, but may also be prone to oxidation. Here we construct a model of graphene confined ultrathin layers of highly reactive metals, taking the synthetic highly reactive tin quantum sheets confined in graphene as an example. The higher electrochemical active area ensures 9 times larger carbon dioxide adsorption capacity relative to bulk tin, while the highly-conductive graphene favours rate-determining electron transfer from carbon dioxide to its radical anion. The lowered tin-tin coordination numbers, revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, enable tin quantum sheets confined in graphene to efficiently stabilize the carbon dioxide radical anion, verified by 0.13 volts lowered potential of hydroxyl ion adsorption compared with bulk tin. Hence, the tin quantum sheets confined in graphene show enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability. This work may provide a promising lead for designing efficient and robust catalysts for electrolytic fuel synthesis.

  18. Advances in low-cost infrared imaging using II-VI colloidal quantum dots (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimpinella, Richard E.; Buurma, Christopher; Ciani, Anthony J.; Grein, Christoph H.; Guyot-Sionnest, Philippe

    2017-02-01

    II-VI colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have made significant technological advances over the past several years, including the world's first demonstration of MWIR imaging using CQD-based focal plane arrays. The ultra-low costs associated with synthesis and device fabrication, as well as compatibility with wafer-level focal plane array fabrication, make CQDs a very promising infrared sensing technology. In addition to the benefit of cost, CQD infrared imagers are photon detectors, capable of high performance and fast response at elevated operating temperatures. By adjusting the colloidal synthesis, II-VI CQD photodetectors have demonstrated photoresponse from SWIR through LWIR. We will discuss our recent progress in the development of low cost infrared focal plane arrays fabricated using II-VI CQDs.

  19. Terahertz Dynamics of Quantum-Confined Electrons in Carbon Nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Lei

    The terahertz (THz) frequency range. 0.1 - 20 THz, exists between the microwave and infrared ranges and contains abundant information on the dynamics of charge and spin carriers in condensed matter systems. Since its advent two decades ago, THz spectroscopy has been extensively used to study a wide range of solid state materials, including typical semiconductors, conducting polymers, insulators, superconductors, and artificially grown structures such as quantum wells. In these systems, electronic and photonic events tend to occur on the time scale of tens to hundreds of femtoseconds, which results in many important excitations, resonances and dynamical phenomena in the THz frequency range. In this dissertation work, we have developed a typical THz time-domain spectroscopy (TDS) system to investigate the THz dynamics of quantum-confined electrons in two important types of carbon nanomaterial: single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and graphene. Polarization dependent THz transmission measurements were conducted on a highly-aligned SWNT film on a sapphire substrate, revealing extremely high anisotropy: virtually no attenuation was observed when the polarization of the THz beam was perpendicular to the nanotube axis, while the THz beam was strongly absorbed when its polarization was parallel to the tube axis. From the measured absorption anisotropy, we calculated the reduced linear dichrosim to be 3, corresponding to a nematic order parameter of 1. These observations are a direct result of the one-dimensional nature of conduction electrons in the nanotubes and at the same time, demonstrate that any misalignment of nanotubes in the film mast have characteristic length scales much smaller than the wavelengths used in these experiments (1.5 mm -- 150 mum). Based on this work, an ideal THz linear polarizer built with parallel stacks of such aligned SWNT films was synthesized, exhibiting a degree of polarization of 99.9% throughout the frequency range 0.2 -- 2.2 THz and a

  20. Confinement in the Bulk, Deconfinement on the Wall: Infrared Equivalence between Compactified QCD and Quantum Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Shao, Hui; Sandvik, Anders W.; Ünsal, Mithat

    2017-09-01

    In a spontaneously dimerized quantum antiferromagnet, spin-1 /2 excitations (spinons) are confined in pairs by strings akin to those confining quarks in non-Abelian gauge theories. The system has multiple degenerate ground states (vacua) and domain walls between regions of different vacua. For two vacua, we demonstrate that spinons on a domain wall are liberated, in a mechanism strikingly similar to domain-wall deconfinement of quarks in variants of quantum chromodynamics. This observation not only establishes a novel phenomenon in quantum magnetism, but also provides a new direct link between particle physics and condensed-matter physics. The analogy opens doors to improving our understanding of particle confinement and deconfinement by computational and experimental studies in quantum magnetism.

  1. Elucidating Quantum Confinement in Graphene Oxide Dots Based On Excitation-Wavelength-Independent Photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Te-Fu; Huang, Wei-Lun; Chung, Chung-Jen; Chiang, I-Ting; Chen, Liang-Che; Chang, Hsin-Yu; Su, Wu-Chou; Cheng, Ching; Chen, Shean-Jen; Teng, Hsisheng

    2016-06-02

    Investigating quantum confinement in graphene under ambient conditions remains a challenge. In this study, we present graphene oxide quantum dots (GOQDs) that show excitation-wavelength-independent photoluminescence. The luminescence color varies from orange-red to blue as the GOQD size is reduced from 8 to 1 nm. The photoluminescence of each GOQD specimen is associated with electron transitions from the antibonding π (π*) to oxygen nonbonding (n-state) orbitals. The observed quantum confinement is ascribed to a size change in the sp(2) domains, which leads to a change in the π*-π gap; the n-state levels remain unaffected by the size change. The electronic properties and mechanisms involved in quantum-confined photoluminescence can serve as the foundation for the application of oxygenated graphene in electronics, photonics, and biology.

  2. Confinement in the Bulk, Deconfinement on the Wall: Infrared Equivalence between Compactified QCD and Quantum Magnets.

    PubMed

    Sulejmanpasic, Tin; Shao, Hui; Sandvik, Anders W; Ünsal, Mithat

    2017-09-01

    In a spontaneously dimerized quantum antiferromagnet, spin-1/2 excitations (spinons) are confined in pairs by strings akin to those confining quarks in non-Abelian gauge theories. The system has multiple degenerate ground states (vacua) and domain walls between regions of different vacua. For two vacua, we demonstrate that spinons on a domain wall are liberated, in a mechanism strikingly similar to domain-wall deconfinement of quarks in variants of quantum chromodynamics. This observation not only establishes a novel phenomenon in quantum magnetism, but also provides a new direct link between particle physics and condensed-matter physics. The analogy opens doors to improving our understanding of particle confinement and deconfinement by computational and experimental studies in quantum magnetism.

  3. Density-Gradient Theory: A Macroscopic Approach to Quantum Confinement and Tunneling in Semiconductor Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    flow of electrons and holes in Germanium and other semiconductors. Bell Syst. Tech. J. 29, 560 (1950) 4. Maxwell, J.C.: On stresses in rarefied gases...especially by the phenomena of quantum confinement and quantum tunneling. The various mathematical descriptions of electron flow in biased semiconductors...patently inappropriate. 1.2 Quantum transport The three main “quantum” behaviors of an electron gas in a semiconductor—all of course well known—that

  4. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Ancona, Mario G.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Yu, Zhiping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction ot the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion of quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  5. Quantum engineering. Confining the state of light to a quantum manifold by engineered two-photon loss.

    PubMed

    Leghtas, Z; Touzard, S; Pop, I M; Kou, A; Vlastakis, B; Petrenko, A; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Shankar, S; Hatridge, M J; Reagor, M; Frunzio, L; Schoelkopf, R J; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H

    2015-02-20

    Physical systems usually exhibit quantum behavior, such as superpositions and entanglement, only when they are sufficiently decoupled from a lossy environment. Paradoxically, a specially engineered interaction with the environment can become a resource for the generation and protection of quantum states. This notion can be generalized to the confinement of a system into a manifold of quantum states, consisting of all coherent superpositions of multiple stable steady states. We have confined the state of a superconducting resonator to the quantum manifold spanned by two coherent states of opposite phases and have observed a Schrödinger cat state spontaneously squeeze out of vacuum before decaying into a classical mixture. This experiment points toward robustly encoding quantum information in multidimensional steady-state manifolds. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Quantum Chemical Study of the Water Exchange Mechanism of the Americyl(VI) Aqua Ion.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Alberto; Rotzinger, François P

    2016-11-07

    The water exchange reaction of the americyl(VI) aqua ion was investigated with quantum chemical methods, density functional theory (DFT), and wave function theory (WFT). Associative and dissociative substitution mechanisms were studied, whereby DFT produced inaccurate results for the associative mechanism in contrast to WFT. The Gibbs activation energies (ΔG(‡)) for the dissociative (D) and the associative interchange (Ia) mechanisms, computed with WFT taking into account static and dynamic electron correlation, near-degeneracy, and spin-orbit coupling, are equal within the error limits of the calculations. ΔG(‡) for the water exchange of americyl(VI) via the dissociative mechanism is considerably lower than those for uranyl(VI) and plutonyl(VI) (for which the Ia mechanism is preferred) due to ligand-field effects. On the basis of the present computations, it is not possible to distinguish the Ia from the D mechanism for americyl(VI). In contrast to two other theoretical studies, the dissociative mechanism cannot be ruled out.

  7. Quantum theory of an optical maser. VI - Transient behavior.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Y. K.; Lamb, W. E., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The transient behavior of a laser is discussed using the quantum theory as did Scully and Lamb. The formal solution of the density-matrix equation is expressed in terms of exponentially decaying eigenmodes. Some of the lower decay constants are obtained numerically. The equations for the moments of the density matrix are then derived and solved by a truncation method. The equations of motion are integrated numerically for the case where the average number of photons in a laser cavity has the realistically large value 1.3 x 100,000. An alternative Fokker-Planck-equation approach is discussed.

  8. Large ordered arrays of single photon sources based on II-VI semiconductor colloidal quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Dang, Cuong; Urabe, Hayato; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shouheng; Nurmikko, Arto

    2008-11-24

    In this paper, we developed a novel and efficient method of deterministically organizing colloidal particles on structured surfaces over macroscopic areas. Our approach utilizes integrated solution-based processes of dielectric encapsulation and electrostatic-force-mediated self-assembly, which allow precisely controlled placement of sub-10nm sized particles at single particle resolution. As a specific demonstration, motivated by application to single photon sources, highly ordered 2D arrays of single II-VI semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (QDs) were created by this method. Individually, the QDs display triggered single photon emission at room temperature with characteristic photon antibunching statistics, suggesting a pathway to scalable quantum optical radiative systems.

  9. Unusual quantum confined Stark effect and Aharonov-Bohm oscillations in semiconductor quantum rings with anisotropic effective masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Sousa, G. O.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, Andrey; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of external electric and magnetic fields on the energy spectrum of quantum rings made out of a bidimensional semiconductor material with anisotropic band structures are investigated within the effective-mass model. The interplay between the effective-mass anisotropy and the radial confinement leads to wave functions that are strongly localized at two diametrically opposite regions where the kinetic energy is lowest due to the highest effective mass. We show that this quantum phenomenon has clear consequences on the behavior of the energy states in the presence of applied in-plane electric fields and out-of-plane magnetic fields. In the former, the quantum confined Stark effect is observed with either linear or quadratic shifts, depending on the direction of the applied field. As for the latter, the usual Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are not observed for a circularly symmetric confining potential, however they can be reinstated if an elliptic ring with an appropriate aspect ratio is chosen.

  10. Efficient Multi-Dimensional Simulation of Quantum Confinement Effects in Advanced MOS Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biegel, Bryan A.; Rafferty, Conor S.; Ancona, Mario G.; Yu, Zhi-Ping

    2000-01-01

    We investigate the density-gradient (DG) transport model for efficient multi-dimensional simulation of quantum confinement effects in advanced MOS devices. The formulation of the DG model is described as a quantum correction to the classical drift-diffusion model. Quantum confinement effects are shown to be significant in sub-100nm MOSFETs. In thin-oxide MOS capacitors, quantum effects may reduce gate capacitance by 25% or more. As a result, the inclusion or quantum effects in simulations dramatically improves the match between C-V simulations and measurements for oxide thickness down to 2 nm. Significant quantum corrections also occur in the I-V characteristics of short-channel (30 to 100 nm) n-MOSFETs, with current drive reduced by up to 70%. This effect is shown to result from reduced inversion charge due to quantum confinement of electrons in the channel. Also, subthreshold slope is degraded by 15 to 20 mV/decade with the inclusion of quantum effects via the density-gradient model, and short channel effects (in particular, drain-induced barrier lowering) are noticeably increased.

  11. Quantum behavior of water nano-confined in beryl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Y.; Moreh, R.; Shang, S. L.; Wang, Y.; Liu, Z. K.

    2017-03-01

    The proton mean kinetic energy, Ke(H), of water confined in nanocavities of beryl (Be3Al2Si6O18) at 5 K was obtained by simulating the partial vibrational density of states from density functional theory based first-principles calculations. The result, Ke(H) = 104.4 meV, is in remarkable agreement with the 5 K deep inelastic neutron scattering (DINS) measured value of 105 meV. This is in fact the first successful calculation that reproduces an anomalous DINS value regarding Ke(H) in nano-confined water. The calculation indicates that the vibrational states of the proton of the nano-confined water molecule distribute much differently than in ordinary H2O phases, most probably due to coupling with lattice modes of the hosting beryl nano-cage. These findings may be viewed as a promising step towards the resolution of the DINS controversial measurements on other H2O nano-confining systems, e.g., H2O confined in single and double walled carbon nanotubes.

  12. Optical absorption and refraction index change of a confined exciton in a spherical quantum dot nanostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathan Kumar, K.; John Peter, A.; Lee, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    Electronic energies of an exciton confined in a strained Zn1- x Cd x Se/ZnSe quantum dot have been computed as a function of dot radius with various Cd content. Calculations have been performed using Bessel function as an orthonormal basis for different confinement potentials of barrier height considering the internal electric field induced by the spontaneous and piezoelectric polarizations. The optical absorption coefficients and the refractive index changes between the ground state ( L = 0) and the first excited state ( L = 1) are investigated. It is found that the optical properties in the strained ZnCdSe/ZnSe quantum dot are strongly affected by the confinement potentials and the dot radii. The intensity of the total absorption spectra increases for the transition between higher levels. The obtained optical nonlinearity brings out the fact that it should be considered in calculating the optical properties in low dimensional semiconductors especially in quantum dots.

  13. Spectral properties of a confined nonlinear quantum oscillator in one and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Schulze-Halberg, Axel; Gordon, Christopher R.

    2013-04-15

    We analyze the spectral behaviour of a nonlinear quantum oscillator model under confinement. The underlying potential is given by a harmonic oscillator interaction plus a nonlinear term that can be weakened or strengthened through a parameter. Numerical eigenvalues of the model in one and three dimensions are presented. The asymptotic behaviour of the eigenvalues for confinement relaxation and for vanishing nonlinear term in the potential is investigated. Our findings are compared with existing results.

  14. Transversal confined polar optical phonons in spherical quantum-dot/quantum-well nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Comas, F.; Trallero-Giner, C.; Prado, S. J.; Marques, G. E.; Roca, E.

    2006-02-01

    Confined polar optical phonons are studied in a spherical quantum-dot/quantum-well (QD/QW) nanostructure by using an approach that takes into account the coupling of electromechanical oscillations and is valid in the long-wave limit. This approach was developed a few years ago and provides results beyond the usually applied dielectric continuum approach (DCA), where just the electric aspect of the oscillations is considered. In the present paper we limit ourselves to the study of the so-called uncoupled modes, having a purely transversal character and not involving an electric potential. We display the dispersion curves for the frequencies considering three possible nanostructures, which show different bulk phonon curvatures near the Brillouin zone -point and have been actually grown: ZnS/CdSe, CdSe/CdS and CdS/HgS. A detailed discussion of the results obtained is made, emphasizing the novelties provided by our treatment and the relevance of infrared spectroscopy in the characterization of the geometrical features of the QD/QW nanostructure.

  15. Investigation of magnetic field effects on binding energies in spherical quantum dot with finite confinement potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Çakır, Bekir; Yakar, Yusuf; Özmen, Ayhan

    2017-09-01

    The magnetic effects on the energy states and binding energies of the ground and higher excited states of the spherical quantum dot are studied theoretically for various potential depths. Also, Zeeman transition energies in the case of ΔM = 0, ±1 are carried out. The results show that the energy states and binding energies in small dot radii are insensitive to the increase of magnetic field. In the case of negative m, in the strong confinement region, the binding energy increases as the confinement potential decreases. In the case of positive m, the binding energy decreases with the decrease of the confinement potential.

  16. Quantum confinement of zero-dimensional hybrid organic-inorganic polaritons at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H. S.; Lafosse, X.; Amo, A.; Bouchoule, S.; Bloch, J.; Abdel-Baki, K.; Lauret, J.-S.; Deleporte, E.

    2014-02-24

    We report on the quantum confinement of zero-dimensional polaritons in perovskite-based microcavity at room temperature. Photoluminescence of discrete polaritonic states is observed for polaritons localized in symmetric sphere-like defects which are spontaneously nucleated on the top dielectric Bragg mirror. The linewidth of these confined states is found much sharper (almost one order of magnitude) than that of photonic modes in the perovskite planar microcavity. Our results show the possibility to study organic-inorganic cavity polaritons in confined microstructure and suggest a fabrication method to realize integrated polaritonic devices operating at room temperature.

  17. Role of confinements on the melting of Wigner molecules in quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, Dyuti; Filinov, Alexei V.; Ghosal, Amit; Bonitz, Michael

    2016-03-01

    We explore the stability of a Wigner molecule (WM) formed in confinements with different geometries emulating the role of disorder and analyze the melting (or crossover) of such a system. Building on a recent calculation [D. Bhattacharya, A. Ghosal, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 499 (2013)] that discussed the effects of irregularities on the thermal crossover in classical systems, we expand our studies in the untested territory by including both the effects of quantum fluctuations and of disorder. Our results, using classical and quantum (path integral) Monte Carlo techniques, unfold complementary mechanisms that drive the quantum and thermal crossovers in a WM and show that the symmetry of the confinement plays no significant role in determining the quantum crossover scale n X . This is because the zero-point motion screens the boundary effects within short distances. The phase diagram as a function of thermal and quantum fluctuations determined from independent criteria is unique, and shows "melting" from the WM to both the classical and quantum "liquids". An intriguing signature of weakening liquidity with increasing temperature, T, is found in the extreme quantum regime. The crossover is associated with production of defects. However, these defects appear to play distinct roles in driving the quantum and thermal "melting". Our analyses carry serious implications for a variety of experiments on many-particle systems - semiconductor heterostructure quantum dots, trapped ions, nanoclusters, colloids and complex plasma.

  18. Bioengineered II-VI semiconductor quantum dot-carboxymethylcellulose nanoconjugates as multifunctional fluorescent nanoprobes for bioimaging live cells.

    PubMed

    Mansur, Alexandra A P; Mansur, Herman S; Mansur, Rafael L; de Carvalho, Fernanda G; Carvalho, Sandhra M

    2017-08-19

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are light-emitting ultra-small nanoparticles, which have emerged as a new class of nanoprobes with unique optical properties for bioimaging and biomedical diagnostic. However, to be used for most biomedical applications the biocompatibility and water-solubility are mandatory that can achieved through surface modification forming QD-nanoconjugates. In this study, semiconductor II-VI quantum dots of type MX (M=Cd, Pb, Zn, X=S) were directly synthesized in aqueous media and at room temperature using carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt (CMC) behaving simultaneously as stabilizing and surface biofunctional ligand. These nanoconjugates were extensively characterized using UV-visible spectroscopy, photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and zeta potential. The results demonstrated that the biopolymer was effective on nucleating and stabilizing the colloidal nanocrystals of CdS, ZnS, and PbS with the average diameter ranging from 2.0 to 5.0nm depending on the composition of the semiconductor core, which showed quantum-size confinement effect. These QD/polysaccharide conjugates showed luminescent activity from UV-visible to near-infrared range of the spectra under violet laser excitation. Moreover, the bioassays performed proved that these novel nanoconjugates were biocompatible and behaved as composition-dependent fluorescent nanoprobes for in vitro live cell bioimaging with very promising perspectives to be used in numerous biomedical applications and nanomedicine. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Confinement enhancing barriers for high performance quantum dots-in-a-well infrared detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barve, A. V.; Sengupta, S.; Kim, J. O.; Sharma, Y. D.; Adhikary, S.; Rotter, T. J.; Lee, S. J.; Kim, Y. H.; Krishna, S.

    2011-11-01

    We demonstrate the use of thin AlGaAs barrier layers in the quantum dots in a well heterostructure to enhance the quantum confinement of carriers in the excited energy level, while maintaining high escape probability. This is achieved by controlling the excited state energy between the confinement enhancing (CE) barriers and the continuum level. Responsivity of ˜0.1 A/W, detectivity of 6.5 × 1010 cmHz1/2 W-1 (77 K, 0.6 V, 7.5 µm, f/2), and a factor of 10 improvement over a control sample without the CE barriers have been measured. The effect of changing the quantum well thickness and quantum dot size is also reported.

  20. Sub-monolayer quantum dots in confinement enhanced dots-in-a-well heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sengupta, S.; Kim, J. O.; Barve, A. V.; Adhikary, S.; Sharma, Y. D.; Gautam, N.; Lee, S. J.; Noh, S. K.; Chakrabarti, S.; Krishna, S.

    2012-05-01

    We have investigated optical properties and device performance of sub-monolayer quantum dots infrared photodetector with confinement enhancing (CE) barrier and compared with conventional Stranski-Krastanov quantum dots with a similar design. This quantum dots-in-a-well structure with CE barrier enables higher quantum confinement and increased absorption efficiency due to stronger overlap of wavefunctions between the ground state and the excited state. Normal incidence photoresponse peak is obtained at 7.5 μm with a detectivity of 1.2 × 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1 and responsivity of 0.5 A/W (77 K, 0.4 V, f/2 optics). Using photoluminescence and spectral response measurements, the bandstructure of the samples were deduced semi-empirically.

  1. Effects of quantum confinement in nanoscale superconductors: From electronic density of states to vortex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lingfeng

    Due to quantum confinement, nanoscale superconductivity exhibits richer phenomena than bulk superconductivity. This will allow us to artificially design the electronic properties by changing the size and geometry of the superconductor, leading to the desired control and enhancement of superconductivity. However, the interplay between superconductivity and quantum confinement effect has not been fully understood yet. In this thesis, we theoretically investigated several aspects of nanoscale superconductivity by solving the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations. The topics that are covered range from vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement to the electronic structure in various nano-structures. The density of states (DOS) obtained in this thesis can be compared with results from Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) experiments. In Chapter. 3 and 4, we studied vortex states under the influence of quantum confinement effect. We found that the shape resonances of the order parameter results in an additional contribution to quantum topological confinement - leading to unconventional vortex configurations. Our results reveal a plethora of asymmetric, giant multi-vortex, and vortex-antivortex structures. They are relevant for high-Tc nanograins, confined Bose-Einstein condensates, and graphene fakes with proximity-induced superconductivity. In Chapter. 5, we studied the effect of non-magnetic impurities in superconducting nanowires. We found that: 1) impurities strongly affect the transport properties, 2) the effect is impurity position-dependent, and 3) it exhibits opposite behavior for resonant and off-resonant wire widths due to the sub-band energy spectrum induced by lateral quantum confinement. These effects can be used to manipulate the Josephson current, filter electrons by subband. In Chapter. 6, we investigated the Tomasch effect on the electronic structure in nanoscale superconductors. Here it is the quasiparticle interference effect induced by an

  2. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P.; Belfaqih, Idrus H.; Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-01

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  3. Magnetic-field and quantum confinement asymmetry effects on excitons

    SciTech Connect

    Pereyra, P.; Ulloa, S. E.

    2000-01-15

    A theoretical analysis and calculation of the excitonic states in asymmetric quantum dots is carried out in the presence of magnetic fields. The lack of rotational symmetry, introduced by strains and structural factors, produces splittings of the excitonic states with corresponding consequences on the optical oscillator strengths and polarization dependence. For example, we find that the asymmetry produces Zeeman splittings that are smaller than those for symmetric dots at small fields, which could be used as an additional diagnostic of the geometry of the structure. We focus our calculations on naturally occurring quantum dots due to layer fluctuations in narrow quantum wells. Moreover, we observe that increasing magnetic fields produce an interesting crossover to pure angular momentum states for all the excitonic eigenstates, regardless of the degree of asymmetry of the dots and their size. Explicit calculations of photoluminescence excitation yields are presented and related to the different degrees of freedom of the system. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  4. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to cubic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka P. Belfaqih, Idrus H. Prayitno, T. B.

    2015-09-30

    Carnot cycle consists of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Using analogy in quantum mechanics, these processes can be well explained by replacing variables in classical process with a quantum system. Quantum system which is shown in this paper is a particle that moves under the influence of a cubic potential which is restricted only to the state of the two energy levels. At the end, the efficiency of the system is shown as a function of the width ratio between the initial conditions and the farthest wall while expanding. Furthermore, the system efficiency will be considered 1D and 2D cases. The providing efficiencies are different due to the influence of the degeneration of energy and the degrees of freedom of the system.

  5. The confinement effect in spherical inhomogeneous quantum dots and stability of excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benhaddou, F.; Zorkani, I.; Jorio, A.

    2017-06-01

    We investigate in this work the quantum confinement effect of exciton in spherical inhomogeneous quantum dots IQDs. The spherical core is enveloped by two shells. The inner shell is a semiconductor characterized by a small band-gap. The core and the outer shell are the same semiconductor characterized by a large band-gap. So there is a significant gap-offset creating a deep potential well where the excitons are localized and strongly confined. We have adopted the Ritz variational method to calculate numerically the excitonic ground state energy and its binding energy in the strong, moderate and low confinement regimes. The results show that the Ritz variational method is in good agreement with the perturbation method in strong confinement. There is a double confinement effect and dual control. The calculation checks the effective Rydberg R* at the asymptotic limit of bulk semiconductor when the thickness takes very large values. The excitonic binding energy increases, Thus giving the excitons a high stability even at ambient temperature. These nanosystems are promising in several applications: lighting, detection, biological labeling and quantum computing.

  6. Demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to an InAs quantum dot and a photon.

    PubMed

    Schaibley, J R; Burgers, A P; McCracken, G A; Duan, L-M; Berman, P R; Steel, D G; Bracker, A S; Gammon, D; Sham, L J

    2013-04-19

    The electron spin state of a singly charged semiconductor quantum dot has been shown to form a suitable single qubit for quantum computing architectures with fast gate times. A key challenge in realizing a useful quantum dot quantum computing architecture lies in demonstrating the ability to scale the system to many qubits. In this Letter, we report an all optical experimental demonstration of quantum entanglement between a single electron spin confined to a single charged semiconductor quantum dot and the polarization state of a photon spontaneously emitted from the quantum dot's excited state. We obtain a lower bound on the fidelity of entanglement of 0.59±0.04, which is 84% of the maximum achievable given the timing resolution of available single photon detectors. In future applications, such as measurement-based spin-spin entanglement which does not require sub-nanosecond timing resolution, we estimate that this system would enable near ideal performance. The inferred (usable) entanglement generation rate is 3×10(3) s(-1). This spin-photon entanglement is the first step to a scalable quantum dot quantum computing architecture relying on photon (flying) qubits to mediate entanglement between distant nodes of a quantum dot network.

  7. Size control and quantum confinement in Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals.

    PubMed

    Khare, Ankur; Wills, Andrew W; Ammerman, Lauren M; Norris, David J; Aydil, Eray S

    2011-11-14

    Starting with metal dithiocarbamate complexes, we synthesize colloidal Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS) nanocrystals with diameters ranging from 2 to 7 nm. Structural and Raman scattering data confirm that CZTS is obtained rather than other possible material phases. The optical absorption spectra of nanocrystals with diameters less than 3 nm show a shift to higher energy due to quantum confinement.

  8. Optics of colloidal quantum-confined CdSe nanoscrolls

    SciTech Connect

    Vasiliev, R B; Sokolikova, M S; Vitukhnovskii, A G; Ambrozevich, S A; Selyukov, A S; Lebedev, V S

    2015-09-30

    Nanostructures in the form of 1.2-nm-thick colloidal CdSe nanoplatelets rolled into scrolls are investigated. The morphology of these scrolls is analysed and their basic geometric parameters are determined (diameter 29 nm, longitudinal size 100 – 150 nm) by TEM microscopy. Absorption and photoluminescence spectra of these objects are recorded, and the luminescence decay kinetics is studied. It is shown that the optical properties of CdSe nanoscrolls differ significantly from the properties of CdSe quantum dots and that these nanoscrolls are attractive for nanophotonic devices due to large oscillator strengths of the transition, small widths of excitonic peaks and short luminescence decay times. Nanoscrolls can be used to design hybrid organic–inorganic pure-color LEDs with a high luminescence quantum yield and low operating voltages. (optics and technology of nanostructures)

  9. Quantum confinement of the covalent bond beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation.

    PubMed

    Sarsa, A; Alcaraz-Pelegrina, J M; Le Sech, C; Cruz, S A

    2013-06-20

    Dirichlet boundary conditions with different symmetries, spherical and cylindrical impenetrable surfaces, are imposed on the covalent electron pair of a molecular bond. Accurate results for different observable like energy and interparticle distances are calculated using quantum Monte Carlo methods beyond the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. The spherical confinement induces a raise in the bond energy and shortens the internuclear distances even for a relatively soft confinement. When cylindrical symmetry is considered, similar qualitative behavior is observed though only the electrons are confined. A compression followed by a relaxation process of the confined bond is shown to induce a vibrationally excited state. Finally, a brief qualitative discussion based on a simplified picture of the role of compression/relaxation cycles in enzyme catalysis is given.

  10. Competing ν = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall states in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hailong; Wang, Pengjie; Shan, Pujia; Xiong, Lin; Pfeiffer, Loren N; West, Ken; Kastner, Marc A; Lin, Xi

    2016-11-01

    Some theories predict that the filling factor 5/2 fractional quantum Hall state can exhibit non-Abelian statistics, which makes it a candidate for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. Although the non-Abelian Pfaffian state and its particle-hole conjugate, the anti-Pfaffian state, are the most plausible wave functions for the 5/2 state, there are a number of alternatives with either Abelian or non-Abelian statistics. Recent experiments suggest that the tunneling exponents are more consistent with an Abelian state rather than a non-Abelian state. Here, we present edge-current-tunneling experiments in geometrically confined quantum point contacts, which indicate that Abelian and non-Abelian states compete at filling factor 5/2. Our results are consistent with a transition from an Abelian state to a non-Abelian state in a single quantum point contact when the confinement is tuned. Our observation suggests that there is an intrinsic non-Abelian 5/2 ground state but that the appropriate confinement is necessary to maintain it. This observation is important not only for understanding the physics of the 5/2 state but also for the design of future topological quantum computation devices.

  11. Competing ν = 5/2 fractional quantum Hall states in confined geometry

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hailong; Shan, Pujia; Xiong, Lin; Pfeiffer, Loren N.; West, Ken; Kastner, Marc A.; Lin, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Some theories predict that the filling factor 5/2 fractional quantum Hall state can exhibit non-Abelian statistics, which makes it a candidate for fault-tolerant topological quantum computation. Although the non-Abelian Pfaffian state and its particle-hole conjugate, the anti-Pfaffian state, are the most plausible wave functions for the 5/2 state, there are a number of alternatives with either Abelian or non-Abelian statistics. Recent experiments suggest that the tunneling exponents are more consistent with an Abelian state rather than a non-Abelian state. Here, we present edge-current–tunneling experiments in geometrically confined quantum point contacts, which indicate that Abelian and non-Abelian states compete at filling factor 5/2. Our results are consistent with a transition from an Abelian state to a non-Abelian state in a single quantum point contact when the confinement is tuned. Our observation suggests that there is an intrinsic non-Abelian 5/2 ground state but that the appropriate confinement is necessary to maintain it. This observation is important not only for understanding the physics of the 5/2 state but also for the design of future topological quantum computation devices. PMID:27791162

  12. Design and Synthesis of Antiblinking and Antibleaching Quantum Dots in Multiple Colors via Wave Function Confinement.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hujia; Ma, Junliang; Huang, Lin; Qin, Haiyan; Meng, Renyang; Li, Yang; Peng, Xiaogang

    2016-12-07

    Single-molecular spectroscopy reveals that photoluminescence (PL) of a single quantum dot blinks, randomly switching between bright and dim/dark states under constant photoexcitation, and quantum dots photobleach readily. These facts cast great doubts on potential applications of these promising emitters. After ∼20 years of efforts, synthesis of nonblinking quantum dots is still challenging, with nonblinking quantum dots only available in red-emitting window. Here we report synthesis of nonblinking quantum dots covering most part of the visible window using a new synthetic strategy, i.e., confining the excited-state wave functions of the core/shell quantum dots within the core quantum dot and its inner shells (≤ ∼5 monolayers). For the red-emitting ones, the new synthetic strategy yields nonblinking quantum dots with small sizes (∼8 nm in diameter) and improved nonblinking properties. These new nonblinking quantum dots are found to be antibleaching. Results further imply that the PL blinking and photobleaching of quantum dots are likely related to each other.

  13. Quantum Dot Channel (QDC) FETs with Wraparound II-VI Gate Insulators: Numerical Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, F.; Lingalugari, M.; Kondo, J.; Mirdha, P.; Suarez, E.; Chandy, J.; Heller, E.

    2016-11-01

    This paper presents simulations predicting the feasibility of 9-nm wraparound quantum dot channel (QDC) field-effect transistors (FETs). In particular, II-VI lattice-matched layers which reduce the density of interface states, serving as top (tunnel gate), side, and bottom gate insulators, have been simulated. Quantum simulations show FET operation with voltage swing of ~0.2 V. Incorporation of cladded quantum dots, such as SiO x -Si and GeO x -Ge, under the gate tunnel oxide results in electrical transport in one or more quantum dot layers which form a quantum dot superlattice (QDSL). Long-channel QDC FETs have experimental multistate drain current ( I D)-gate voltage ( V G) and drain current ( I D)-drain voltage ( V D) characteristics, which can be attributed to the manifestation of extremely narrow energy minibands formed in the QDSL. An approach for modeling the multistate I D- V G characteristics is reported. The multistate characteristics of QDC FETs permit design of compact two-bit multivalued logic circuits.

  14. Nonlinear quenches of power-law confining traps in quantum critical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Collura, Mario; Karevski, Dragi

    2011-02-15

    We describe the coherent quantum evolution of a quantum many-body system with a time-dependent power-law confining potential. The amplitude of the inhomogeneous potential is driven in time along a nonlinear ramp which crosses a critical point. Using Kibble-Zurek-like scaling arguments we derive general scaling laws for the density of excitations and energy excess generated during the nonlinear sweep of the confining potential. It is shown that, with respect to the sweeping rate, the densities follow algebraic laws with exponents that depend on the space-time properties of the potential and on the scaling dimensions of the densities. We support our scaling predictions with both analytical and numerical results on the Ising quantum chain with an inhomogeneous transverse field varying in time.

  15. Strongly confined excitons in self-assembled InGaAs quantum dot clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creasey, Megan; Li, Xiaoqin; Lee, Jihoon; Wang, Zhiming; Salamo, Gregory

    2011-03-01

    Quantum dot clusters (QDCs) consisting of regular geometric patterns of six InGaAs quantum dots (QD) are grown on a GaAs substrate using a hybrid growth method that combines droplet homoepitaxy and Stranski-Krastonov growth. These novel structures have potential applications as tunable single photon sources, entangled photon sources, or error corrected qubits - devices critical to the fields of secure optical communications and quantum computing We study the photoluminescence arising from a single cluster using both continuous wave and ultrafast spectroscopic techniques with variations in the sample temperature and excitation power. Our results suggest excitons (bound electron-hole pairs) are strongly confined within the individual QDs rather than loosely confined throughout the entire QDC. The work at Texas is supported financially by NSF, ARO, AFOSR, ONR, the Welch Foundation, and the Alfred Sloan Foundation. The work at Arkansas is supported by the NSF.

  16. Vortex anomaly in low-dimensional fermionic condensates: Quantum confinement breaks chirality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yajiang; Shanenko, A. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2014-02-01

    Chiral fermions are responsible for low-temperature properties of vortices in fermionic condensates, both superconducting (charged) and superfluid (neutral). One of the most striking consequences of this fact is that the core of a single-quantum vortex collapses at low temperatures, T →0 (i.e., the Kramer-Pesch effect for superconductors), due to the presence of chiral quasiparticles in the vortex-core region. We show that the situation changes drastically for fermionic condensates confined in quasi-one-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional geometries. Here quantum confinement breaks the chirality of in-core fermions. As a result, instead of the ultimate shrinking, the core of a single-quantum vortex extends at low temperatures, and the condensate profile surprisingly mimics the multiquantum vortex behavior. Our findings are relevant for nanoscale superconductors, such as recent metallic nanoislands on silicon, and also for ultracold superfluid Fermi gases in cigar-shaped and pancake-shaped atomic traps.

  17. Effect of phonon confinement on lattice thermal conductivity of lead Telluride quantum well structure

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath

    2014-04-24

    The paper examines the effect of spatial confinement of acoustic phonons on average group velocity and consequently the lattice thermal conductivity of a free-standing PbTe quantum well structure and their temperature dependence. The average group velocity at 100 Å decreases 30% to the bulk value and falls more rapidly on reducing the width of quantum well. Moreover, the lattice thermal conductivity of 100 Å wide PbTe quantum well with value of 0.60 W/mK shows considerable decrease of 70% compared to it’s bulk value. It is observed that the effect of reduction in well width is less pronounce as temperature increases. This appears mainly due to dominance of umklapp processes over the confinement effects.

  18. Design of cadmium-free colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots exhibiting RGB emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hiroshi; Omata, Takahisa

    2017-04-01

    The size and composition dependence of the optical gap of colloidal alloyed quantum dots (QDs) of Zn(Te1-xSex) and Zn(Te1-xSx) were calculated by the finite-depth-well effective mass approximation method. QDs that exhibited red, green and blue emission were explored to develop cadmium-free II-VI chalcogenide-based QD-phosphors. We considered that highly monodisperse colloidal QDs with diameters of 3-6 nm are easy to synthesize and II-VI semiconductor QDs usually exhibit a Stokes shift ranging between 50 and 150 meV. We showed that Zn(Te1-xSex) QDs with 0.02≤x≤0.68, and 0≤x≤0.06, and 0.66≤x≤0.9 may be expected to exhibit green, and blue emission, respectively. Zn(Te1-xSx) QDs with 0.26≤x≤0.37, 0.01≤x≤0.2 and 0.45≤x≤0.61, 0≤x≤0.02, and 0.63≤x≤0.72, should give red, green and blue emission respectively. On the basis of our calculations, we showed that Zn(Te,Se) and Zn(Te,S) QDs are very promising cadmium-free II-VI chalcogenide semiconductor QD phosphors.

  19. Quantum Confined Semiconductors - In-House Interim Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-01

    such as field-effect transistors [1-3], photodetectors [4-7], light-emitting diodes [8-10], metamaterials [11- 13], and solar cells [14,15]. As a...D., Bartnik, A C., Hyun, B. R , Malliaras, G. G., Hanrath, T. and Wise, F. W., "Bright infrared quantum-dot light-emitting diodes through inter-dot...Klabunde, K. J., "Formation of long-range-ordered nanocrystal superlattices on silicon nitride substrates," J. Phys. Chern. B 105, 3353-3357 (2001

  20. Quantum-Confined and Enhanced Optical Absorption of Colloidal PbS Quantum Dots at Wavelengths with Expected Bulk Behavior.

    PubMed

    Debellis, Doriana; Gigli, Giuseppe; Ten Brinck, Stephanie; Infante, Ivan; Giansante, Carlo

    2017-02-08

    Nowadays it is well-accepted to attribute bulk-like optical absorption properties to colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) at wavelengths above 400 nm. This assumption permits to describe PbS QD light absorption by using bulk optical constants and to determine QD concentration in colloidal solutions from simple spectrophotometric measurements. Here we demonstrate that PbS QDs experience the quantum confinement regime across the entire near UV-vis-NIR spectral range, therefore also between 350 and 400 nm already proposed to be sufficiently far above the band gap to suppress quantum confinement. This effect is particularly relevant for small PbS QDs (with diameter of ≤4 nm) leading to absorption coefficients that largely differ from bulk values (up to ∼40% less). As a result of the broadband quantum confinement and of the high surface-to-volume ratio peculiar of nanocrystals, suitable surface chemical modification of PbS QDs is exploited to achieve a marked, size-dependent enhancement of the absorption coefficients compared to bulk values (up to ∼250%). We provide empirical relations to determine the absorption coefficients at 400 nm of as-synthesized and ligand-exchanged PbS QDs, accounting for the broadband quantum confinement and suggesting a heuristic approach to qualitatively predict the ligand effects on the optical absorption properties of PbS QDs. Our findings go beyond formalisms derived from Maxwell Garnett effective medium theory to describe QD optical properties and permit to spectrophotometrically calculate the concentration of PbS QD solutions avoiding underestimation due to deviations from the bulk. In perspective, we envisage the use of extended π-conjugated ligands bearing electronically active substituents to enhance light-harvesting in QD solids and suggest the inadequacy of the representation of ligands at the QD surface as mere electric dipoles.

  1. Metallic tin quantum sheets confined in graphene toward high-efficiency carbon dioxide electroreduction

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Fengcai; Liu, Wei; Sun, Yongfu; Xu, Jiaqi; Liu, Katong; Liang, Liang; Yao, Tao; Pan, Bicai; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Ultrathin metal layers can be highly active carbon dioxide electroreduction catalysts, but may also be prone to oxidation. Here we construct a model of graphene confined ultrathin layers of highly reactive metals, taking the synthetic highly reactive tin quantum sheets confined in graphene as an example. The higher electrochemical active area ensures 9 times larger carbon dioxide adsorption capacity relative to bulk tin, while the highly-conductive graphene favours rate-determining electron transfer from carbon dioxide to its radical anion. The lowered tin–tin coordination numbers, revealed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, enable tin quantum sheets confined in graphene to efficiently stabilize the carbon dioxide radical anion, verified by 0.13 volts lowered potential of hydroxyl ion adsorption compared with bulk tin. Hence, the tin quantum sheets confined in graphene show enhanced electrocatalytic activity and stability. This work may provide a promising lead for designing efficient and robust catalysts for electrolytic fuel synthesis. PMID:27585984

  2. Confinement-deconfinement transition due to spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum Hall bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Pikulin, D. I.; Silvestrov, P. G.; Hyart, T.

    2016-01-01

    Band-inverted electron-hole bilayers support quantum spin Hall insulator and exciton condensate phases. Interest in quantum spin Hall effect in these systems has recently put them in the spotlight. We investigate such a bilayer in an external magnetic field. We show that the interlayer correlations lead to formation of a helical quantum Hall exciton condensate state. Existence of the counterpropagating edge modes in this system results in formation of a ground state spin-texture not supporting gapless single-particle excitations. The charged edge excitations in a sufficiently narrow Hall bar are confined: a charge on one of the edges always gives rise to an opposite charge on the other edge. Magnetic field and gate voltages allow the control of a confinement-deconfinement transition of charged edge excitations, which can be probed with nonlocal conductance. Confinement-deconfinement transitions are of great interest, not least because of their possible significance in shedding light on the confinement problem of quarks. PMID:26804790

  3. Confinement-deconfinement transition due to spontaneous symmetry breaking in quantum Hall bilayers.

    PubMed

    Pikulin, D I; Silvestrov, P G; Hyart, T

    2016-01-25

    Band-inverted electron-hole bilayers support quantum spin Hall insulator and exciton condensate phases. Interest in quantum spin Hall effect in these systems has recently put them in the spotlight. We investigate such a bilayer in an external magnetic field. We show that the interlayer correlations lead to formation of a helical quantum Hall exciton condensate state. Existence of the counterpropagating edge modes in this system results in formation of a ground state spin-texture not supporting gapless single-particle excitations. The charged edge excitations in a sufficiently narrow Hall bar are confined: a charge on one of the edges always gives rise to an opposite charge on the other edge. Magnetic field and gate voltages allow the control of a confinement-deconfinement transition of charged edge excitations, which can be probed with nonlocal conductance. Confinement-deconfinement transitions are of great interest, not least because of their possible significance in shedding light on the confinement problem of quarks.

  4. A molecule to detect and perturb the confinement of charge carriers in quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Frederick, Matthew T; Amin, Victor A; Cass, Laura C; Weiss, Emily A

    2011-12-14

    This paper describes unprecedented bathochromic shifts (up to 970 meV) of the optical band gaps of CdS, CdSe, and PbS quantum dots (QDs) upon adsorption of an organic ligand, phenyldithiocarbamate (PTC), and the use of PTC to map the quantum confinement of specific charge carriers within the QDs as a function of their radius. For a given QD material and physical radius, R, the magnitude of the increase in apparent excitonic radius (ΔR) upon delocalization by PTC directly reflects the degree of quantum confinement of one or both charge carriers. The plots of ΔR vs R for CdSe and CdS show that exciton delocalization by PTC occurs specifically through the excitonic hole. Furthermore, the plot for CdSe, which spans a range of R over multiple confinement regimes for the hole, identifies the radius (R∼1.9 nm) at which the hole transitions between regimes of strong and intermediate confinement. This demonstration of ligand-induced delocalization of a specific charge carrier is a first step toward eliminating current-limiting resistive interfaces at organic-inorganic junctions within solid-state hybrid devices. Facilitating carrier-specific electronic coupling across heterogeneous interfaces is especially important for nanostructured devices, which comprise a high density of such interfaces.

  5. Quantum mechanical solver for confined heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Verreck, Devin Groeseneken, Guido; Van de Put, Maarten; Sorée, Bart; Magnus, Wim; Verhulst, Anne S.; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Vandenberghe, William G.

    2014-02-07

    Heterostructure tunnel field-effect transistors (HTFET) are promising candidates for low-power applications in future technology nodes, as they are predicted to offer high on-currents, combined with a sub-60 mV/dec subthreshold swing. However, the effects of important quantum mechanical phenomena like size confinement at the heterojunction are not well understood, due to the theoretical and computational difficulties in modeling realistic heterostructures. We therefore present a ballistic quantum transport formalism, combining a novel envelope function approach for semiconductor heterostructures with the multiband quantum transmitting boundary method, which we extend to 2D potentials. We demonstrate an implementation of a 2-band version of the formalism and apply it to study confinement in realistic heterostructure diodes and p-n-i-n HTFETs. For the diodes, both transmission probabilities and current densities are found to decrease with stronger confinement. For the p-n-i-n HTFETs, the improved gate control is found to counteract the deterioration due to confinement.

  6. Influence of the nanoparticles agglomeration state in the quantum-confinement effects: Experimental evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Lorite, I.; Romero, J. J.; Fernandez, J. F.

    2015-03-15

    The agglomeration state facilitates particle-particle interaction which produces important effects in the phonon confinement effects at the nanoscale. A partial phonon transmission between close nanoparticles yields a lower momentum conservation relaxation than in a single isolated nanoparticle. It means a larger red shift and broadening of the Raman modes than the expected ones for Raman quantum confinement effects. This particle-particle interaction can drive to error when Raman responses are used to estimate the size of the nanoscaled materials. In this work different corrections are suggested to overtake this source of error.

  7. Lateral carrier confinement in InGaN quantum-well nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Chentian; Zhang, Chunfeng; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2015-07-15

    We review our studies on lateral carrier diffusion in micro-fabricated samples of InGaN nanorods and their parent quantum wells. The carrier diffusion is observed to be strongly confined in nanorods, as manifested by the reduction in the delayed-rise component of time-resolved photoluminescence traces. We further argue that the confinement of carrier diffusion can be applied to suppress the efficiency droop related to defect state recombination and to assist in the energy transfer between InGaN nanorods and nanocrystal phosphors for color conversion.

  8. Multimode Bose-Hubbard model for quantum dipolar gases in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartarius, Florian; Minguzzi, Anna; Morigi, Giovanna

    2017-06-01

    We theoretically consider ultracold polar molecules in a wave guide. The particles are bosons: They experience a periodic potential due to an optical lattice oriented along the wave guide and are polarized by an electric field orthogonal to the guide axis. The array is mechanically unstable by opening the transverse confinement in the direction orthogonal to the polarizing electric field and can undergo a transition to a double-chain (zigzag) structure. For this geometry we derive a multimode generalized Bose-Hubbard model for determining the quantum phases of the gas at the mechanical instability, taking into account the quantum fluctuations in all directions of space. Our model limits the dimension of the numerically relevant Hilbert subspace by means of an appropriate decomposition of the field operator, which is obtained from a field theoretical model of the linear-zigzag instability. We determine the phase diagrams of small systems using exact diagonalization and find that, even for tight transverse confinement, the aspect ratio between the two transverse trap frequencies controls not only the classical but also the quantum properties of the ground state in a nontrivial way. Convergence tests at the linear-zigzag instability demonstrate that our multimode generalized Bose-Hubbard model can catch the essential features of the quantum phases of dipolar gases in confined geometries with a limited computational effort.

  9. Photoinduced Single- and Multiple- Electron Dynamics Processes Enhanced by Quantum Confinement in Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Dayton Jon; Kryjevski, Andrei; Inerbaev, Talgat M; Kilin, Dmitri S

    2017-03-21

    Methyl-ammonium lead iodide perovskite (MAPbI3) is a promising material for photovoltaic devices. A modification of the MAPbI3 into confined nanostructures is expected to further increase efficiency of solar energy conversion. Photo-excited dynamic processes in a MAPbI3 quantum dot (QD) have been modeled by many-body perturbation theory and nonadiabatic dynamics. A photoexcitation is followed by either exciton cooling (EC), its radiative (RR) or non-radiative recombination (NRR), or multi-exciton generation (MEG) processes. Computed times of these processes fall in the order of MEG < EC < RR < NRR, where MEG is in the order of a few femtoseconds, EC at the picosecond range while RR and NRR are in the order of nanoseconds. Computed timescales indicate which electronic transition pathways can contribute to increase in charge collection efficiency. Simulated mechanism relaxation rates show that quantum confinement promotes MEG in MAPbI3 QDs.

  10. Photoinduced Single- and Multiple-Electron Dynamics Processes Enhanced by Quantum Confinement in Lead Halide Perovskite Quantum Dots

    DOE PAGES

    Vogel, Dayton J.; Kryjevski, Andrei; Inerbaev, Talgat; ...

    2017-03-21

    Methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (MAPbI3) is a promising material for photovoltaic devices. A modification of MAPbI3 into confined nanostructures is expected to further increase efficiency of solar energy conversion. Photoexcited dynamic processes in a MAPbI3 quantum dot (QD) have been modeled by many-body perturbation theory and nonadiabatic dynamics. A photoexcitation is followed by either exciton cooling (EC), its radiative (RR) or nonradiative recombination (NRR), or multiexciton generation (MEG) processes. Computed times of these processes fall in the order of MEG < EC < RR < NRR, where MEG is on the order of a few femtoseconds, EC is in themore » picosecond range, while RR and NRR are on the order of nanoseconds. Computed time scales indicate which electronic transition pathways can contribute to increase in charge collection efficiency. Simulated mechanisms of relaxation and their rates show that quantum confinement promotes MEG in MAPbI3 QDs.« less

  11. Engineering the hole confinement for CdTe-based quantum dot molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kłopotowski, Ł. Wojnar, P.; Kret, S.; Fronc, K.; Wojtowicz, T.; Karczewski, G.

    2015-06-14

    We demonstrate an efficient method to engineer the quantum confinement in a system of two quantum dots grown in a vertical stack. We achieve this by using materials with a different lattice constant for the growth of the outer and inner barriers. We monitor the resulting dot morphology with transmission electron microscopy studies and correlate the results with ensemble quantum dot photoluminescence. Furthermore, we embed the double quantum dots into diode structures and study photoluminescence as a function of bias voltage. We show that in properly engineered structures, it is possible to achieve a resonance of the hole states by tuning the energy levels with electric field. At the resonance, we observe signatures of a formation of a molecular state, hybridized over the two dots.

  12. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods.

    PubMed

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-09-07

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H)--a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.

  13. Self-screening of the quantum confined Stark effect by the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barriers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liu, Wei; Ju, Zhengang; Tiam Tan, Swee; Ji, Yun; Kyaw, Zabu; Zhang, Xueliang; Wang, Liancheng; Wei Sun, Xiao E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org; Volkan Demir, Hilmi E-mail: volkan@stanfordalumni.org

    2014-06-16

    InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown along the polar orientations significantly suffer from the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) caused by the strong polarization induced electric field in the quantum wells, which is a fundamental problem intrinsic to the III-nitrides. Here, we show that the QCSE is self-screened by the polarization induced bulk charges enabled by designing quantum barriers. The InN composition of the InGaN quantum barrier graded along the growth orientation opportunely generates the polarization induced bulk charges in the quantum barrier, which well compensate the polarization induced interface charges, thus avoiding the electric field in the quantum wells. Consequently, the optical output power and the external quantum efficiency are substantially improved for the LEDs. The ability to self-screen the QCSE using polarization induced bulk charges opens up new possibilities for device engineering of III-nitrides not only in LEDs but also in other optoelectronic devices.

  14. Quantum-confined single photon emission at room temperature from SiC tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelletto, Stefania; Bodrog, Zoltán; Magyar, Andrew P.; Gentle, Angus; Gali, Adam; Aharonovich, Igor

    2014-08-01

    Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics.Controlled engineering of isolated solid state quantum systems is one of the most prominent goals in modern nanotechnology. In this letter we demonstrate a previously unknown quantum system namely silicon carbide tetrapods. The tetrapods have a cubic polytype core (3C) and hexagonal polytype legs (4H) - a geometry that creates spontaneous polarization within a single tetrapod. Modeling of the tetrapod structures predicts that a bound exciton should exist at the 3C-4H interface. The simulations are confirmed by the observation of fully polarized and narrowband single photon emission from the tetrapods at room temperature. The single photon emission provides important insights into understanding the quantum confinement effects in non-spherical nanostructures. Our results pave the way to a new class of crystal phase nanomaterials that exhibit single photon emission at room temperature and therefore are suitable for sensing, quantum information and nanophotonics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available

  15. Computer simulation of liquid-vapor coexistence of confined quantum fluids.

    PubMed

    Trejos, Víctor M; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro; Martinez, Alejandro

    2013-11-14

    The liquid-vapor coexistence (LV) of bulk and confined quantum fluids has been studied by Monte Carlo computer simulation for particles interacting via a semiclassical effective pair potential Veff(r) = VLJ + VQ, where VLJ is the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential (LJ) and VQ is the first-order Wigner-Kirkwood (WK-1) quantum potential, that depends on β = 1∕kT and de Boer's quantumness parameter Λ=h/σ√mε, where k and h are the Boltzmann's and Planck's constants, respectively, m is the particle's mass, T is the temperature of the system, and σ and ε are the LJ potential parameters. The non-conformal properties of the system of particles interacting via the effective pair potential Veff(r) are due to Λ, since the LV phase diagram is modified by varying Λ. We found that the WK-1 system gives an accurate description of the LV coexistence for bulk phases of several quantum fluids, obtained by the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method (GEMC). Confinement effects were introduced using the Canonical Ensemble (NVT) to simulate quantum fluids contained within parallel hard walls separated by a distance Lp, within the range 2σ ≤ Lp ≤ 6σ. The critical temperature of the system is reduced by decreasing Lp and increasing Λ, and the liquid-vapor transition is not longer observed for Lp∕σ < 2, in contrast to what has been observed for the classical system.

  16. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Si and Ge Nanocrystals in the Quantum Confinement Regime*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcoxon, J. P.; Newcomer, P. P.; Samara, G. A.

    1997-03-01

    Size-selected, crystalline nanoclusters of Si and Ge down to about 2 nm in size were grown in solution inside inverse micellar cages, purified using high pressure liquid chromatography and their optical properties studied. These properties, which reflect the effects of quantum confinement, differ considerably from those obtained on Si and Ge clusters prepared by other methods. Tailorable, visible (red to blue) room temperature photoluminescence due to both near band edge recombination and surface recombination is observed. The optical absorption spectra of the smaller clusters exhibit structure which provides insight into the electronic structure of these clusters. The present results will be compared with results on Si and Ge clusters in glass matrices and on porous Si and will be discussed in terms of recent models of quantum confinement for these materials *This work was supported by the United States Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC04-94Al85000.

  17. Simulating compact quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atoms: probing confinement and nonperturbative effects.

    PubMed

    Zohar, Erez; Cirac, J Ignacio; Reznik, Benni

    2012-09-21

    Recently, there has been much interest in simulating quantum field theory effects of matter and gauge fields. In a recent work, a method for simulating compact quantum electrodynamics (CQED) using Bose-Einstein condensates has been suggested. We suggest an alternative approach, which relies on single atoms in an optical lattice, carrying 2l + 1 internal levels, which converges rapidly to CQED as l increases. That enables the simulation of CQED in 2 + 1 dimensions in both the weak and the strong coupling regimes, hence, allowing us to probe confinement as well as other nonperturbative effects of the theory. We provide an explicit construction for the case l = 1 which is sufficient for simulating the effect of confinement between two external static charges.

  18. Understanding and tuning the quantum-confinement effect and edge magnetism in zigzag graphene nanoribbon.

    PubMed

    Huang, Liang Feng; Zhang, Guo Ren; Zheng, Xiao Hong; Gong, Peng Lai; Cao, Teng Fei; Zeng, Zhi

    2013-02-06

    The electronic structure of zigzag graphene nanoribbon (ZGNR) is studied using density functional theory. The mechanisms underlying the quantum-confinement effect and edge magnetism in ZGNR are systematically investigated by combining the simulated results and some useful analytic models. The quantum-confinement effect and the inter-edge superexchange interaction can be tuned by varying the ribbon width, and the spin polarization and direct exchange splitting of the edge states can be tuned by varying their electronic occupations. The two edges of ZGNR can be equally or unequally tuned by charge doping or Li adsorption, respectively. The Li adatom has a site-selective adsorption on ZGNR, and it is a nondestructive and memorable approach to effectively modify the edge states in ZGNR. These systematic understanding and effective tuning of ZGNR electronics presented in this work are helpful for further investigation and application of ZGNR and other magnetic graphene systems.

  19. Dielectric confinement influenced screened Coulomb potential for a semiconductor quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonyan, K. H.; Margaryan, N. B.

    2016-01-01

    A formalism of the Thomas-Fermi method has been applied for studying the screening effect due to quasi-one-dimensional electron gas in a semiconductor cylindrical quantum wire embedded in the barrier environment. With taking into account of strongly low dielectric properties of the barrier material, an applicability of the quantum wire effective interaction potential of the confined charge carriers has been revealed. Both screened quasi- one-dimensional interaction potential and effective screening length analytical expressions are derived in the first time. It is shown that in the long wavelength moderate limit dielectric confinement effect enhances strength of the screening potential depending on the both radius of the wire and effective screening length, whereas in the long wavelength strong limit the screening potential solely is determined by barrier environment dielectric properties.

  20. Quantum confinement effect in cheese like silicon nano structure fabricated by metal induced etching

    SciTech Connect

    Saxena, Shailendra K. Sahu, Gayatri; Sagdeo, Pankaj R.; Kumar, Rajesh

    2015-08-28

    Quantum confinement effect has been studied in cheese like silicon nano-structures (Ch-SiNS) fabricated by metal induced chemical etching using different etching times. Scanning electron microscopy is used for the morphological study of these Ch-SiNS. A visible photoluminescence (PL) emission is observed from the samples under UV excitation at room temperature due to quantum confinement effect. The average size of Silicon Nanostructures (SiNS) present in the samples has been estimated by bond polarizability model using Raman Spectroscopy from the red-shift observed from SiNSs as compared to its bulk counterpart. The sizes of SiNS present in the samples decreases as etching time increase from 45 to 75 mintunes.

  1. Quantum-confined emission and fluorescence blinking of individual exciton complexes in CdSe nanowires.

    PubMed

    Franz, Dennis; Reich, Aina; Strelow, Christian; Wang, Zhe; Kornowski, Andreas; Kipp, Tobias; Mews, Alf

    2014-11-12

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures combine electron mobility in length direction with the possibility of tailoring the physical properties by confinement effects in radial direction. Here we show that thin CdSe quantum nanowires exhibit low-temperature fluorescence spectra with a specific universal structure of several sharp lines. The structure strongly resembles the pattern of bulk spectra but show a diameter-dependent shift due to confinement effects. Also the fluorescence shows a pronounced complex blinking behavior with very different blinking dynamics of different emission lines in one and the same spectrum. Time- and space-resolved optical spectroscopy are combined with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of the very same quantum nanowires to establish a detailed structure-property relationship. Extensive numerical simulations strongly suggest that excitonic complexes involving donor and acceptor sites are the origin of the feature-rich spectra.

  2. Self-Induced Oscillation for Electron-Hole Pair Confined in Quantum Dot

    SciTech Connect

    Tagawa, Tomoki; Tsubaki, Atsushi; Ishizuki, Masamu; Takeda, Kyozaburo

    2011-12-23

    We study the time-dependent (TD) phenomena of the electron-hole or electron-electron pair confined in the square quantum dot (SQD) system by computationally solving TD Schroedinger equation under the unrestricted Hartree-Fock (UHF) approach. A typical vacillation is found both in the electron and hole when the charged pair is strongly confined in the SQD while the charged particles have initially the same orbital symmetry. The FFT analysis elucidates that the transition matrix element due to the coulomb interaction involves the eigen frequency {omega} being equal to the excitation energy when the resonative vacillation appears. Thus, Coulomb potential has a potential to cause the self-induced ''Rabi'' oscillation when the charged-particle pair is confined only in the QD.

  3. Energies and densities of electrons confined in elliptical and ellipsoidal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a droplet of electrons confined within an external harmonic potential well of elliptical or ellipsoidal shape, a geometry commonly encountered in work with semiconductor quantum dots and other nanoscale or mesoscale structures. For droplet sizes exceeding the effective Bohr radius, the dominant contribution to average system parameters in the Thomas-Fermi approximation comes from the potential energy terms, which allows us to derive expressions describing the electron droplet’s shape and dimensions, its density, total and capacitive energy, and chemical potential. The analytical results are in very good agreement with experimental data and numerical calculations, and make it possible to follow the dependence of the properties of the system on its parameters (the total number of electrons, the axial ratios and curvatures of the confinement potential, and the dielectric constant of the material). An interesting feature is that the eccentricity of the electron droplet is not the same as that of its confining potential well.

  4. Quantum-confined biexcitons in Si1-xGex grown on Si(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Kai; Mooney, P. M.; Tilly, L. P.; Chu, J. O.

    1997-05-01

    We report experimental evidence for the existence of three-dimensionally (3D) -confined biexcitons in a strain-relaxed Si0.7Ge0.3 layer grown on a stepwise graded buffer on Si(001) by ultrahigh vacuum chemical vapor deposition. A calculation of the photoluminescence line shape based on a simple model is found to be in good agreement with experiment. From this theoretical fit we deduce a binding energy of 1.55 meV for the 3D-confined biexcitons. This binding energy is larger than the reported value of 1.36 meV for a free biexciton in Si, indicating a quantum-confinement effect.

  5. Energies and densities of electrons confined in elliptical and ellipsoidal quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-09

    Here, we consider a droplet of electrons confined within an external harmonic potential well of elliptical or ellipsoidal shape, a geometry commonly encountered in work with semiconductor quantum dots and other nanoscale or mesoscale structures. For droplet sizes exceeding the effective Bohr radius, the dominant contribution to average system parameters in the Thomas– Fermi approximation comes from the potential energy terms, which allows us to derive expressions describing the electron droplet’s shape and dimensions, its density, total and capacitive energy, and chemical potential. Our analytical results are in very good agreement with experimental data and numerical calculations, and make it possible to follow the dependence of the properties of the system on its parameters (the total number of electrons, the axial ratios and curvatures of the confinement potential, and the dielectric constant of the material). One interesting feature is that the eccentricity of the electron droplet is not the same as that of its confining potential well.

  6. Biexciton in II-VI quantum dots with different localization potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovatenko, A. A.; Semina, M. A.; Rodina, A. V.; Shubina, T. V.

    2017-06-01

    We present a comparative study of the influence of the form of a localization potential on the binding energy of the biexciton in spherically symmetric quantum dots based on II-VI compounds. The proposed criterion for the comparison of potentials of different forms—the box potential, the harmonic oscillator, and the Gaussian potential—is based on the identical localization of charge carriers of the same sign in these potentials. Calculations of the biexciton binding energy have been performed using the variational method within the framework of the kp-perturbation theory taking into account additional polarization terms in the wave functions of the electron and hole subsystems, as well as the complex structure of the valence band. The obtained results have demonstrated that the presence of a smoothly varying finite-height potential in Cd(Zn)Se/ZnSe quantum dots can lead to a more efficient localization in the case of the biexciton in comparison with the exciton, which is of interest for the implementation of fast-acting quantum light emitters.

  7. Third generation photovoltaics based on multiple exciton generation in quantum confined semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Beard, Matthew C; Luther, Joseph M; Semonin, Octavi E; Nozik, Arthur J

    2013-06-18

    Improving the primary photoconversion process in a photovoltaiccell by utilizing the excess energy that is otherwise lost as heat can lead to an increase in the overall power conversion efficiency (PCE). Semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) with at least one dimension small enough to produce quantum confinement effects provide new ways of controlling energy flow not achievable in thin film or bulk semiconductors. Researchers have developed various strategies to incorporate these novel structures into suitable solar conversion systems. Some of these methods could increase the PCE past the Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit of ∼33%, making them viable "third generation photovoltaic" (TGPV) cell architectures. Surpassing the SQ limit for single junction solar cells presents both a scientific and a technological challenge, and the use of semiconductor NCs to enhance the primary photoconversion process offers a promising potential solution. The NCs are synthesized via solution phase chemical reactions producing stable colloidal solutions, where the reaction conditions can be modified to produce a variety of shapes, compositions, and structures. The confinement of the semiconductor NC in one dimension produces quantum films, wells, or discs. Two-dimensional confinement leads to quantum wires or rods (QRs), and quantum dots (QDs) are three-dimensionally confined NCs. The process of multiple exciton generation (MEG) converts a high-energy photon into multiple electron-hole pairs. Although many studies have demonstrated that MEG is enhanced in QDs compared with bulk semiconductors, these studies have either used ultrafast spectroscopy to measure the photon-to-exciton quantum yields (QYs) or theoretical calculations. Implementing MEG in a working solar cell has been an ongoing challenge. In this Account, we discuss the status of MEG research and strategies towards implementing MEG in working solar cells. Recently we showed an external quantum efficiency for photocurrent of greater

  8. Anisotropic quantum confinement effect and electric control of surface states in Dirac semimetal nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xianbo; Yang, Shengyuan A; Liu, Zhengfang; Li, Huili; Zhou, Guanghui

    2015-01-20

    The recent discovery of Dirac semimetals represents a new achievement in our fundamental understanding of topological states of matter. Due to their topological surface states, high mobility, and exotic properties associated with bulk Dirac points, these new materials have attracted significant attention and are believed to hold great promise for fabricating novel topological devices. For nanoscale device applications, effects from finite size usually play an important role. In this report, we theoretically investigate the electronic properties of Dirac semimetal nanostructures. Quantum confinement generally opens a bulk band gap at the Dirac points. We find that confinement along different directions shows strong anisotropic effects. In particular, the gap due to confinement along vertical c-axis shows a periodic modulation, which is absent for confinement along horizontal directions. We demonstrate that the topological surface states could be controlled by lateral electrostatic gating. It is possible to generate Rashba-like spin splitting for the surface states and to shift them relative to the confinement-induced bulk gap. These results will not only facilitate our fundamental understanding of Dirac semimetal nanostructures, but also provide useful guidance for designing all-electrical topological spintronics devices.

  9. Mid-IR photoluminescence and lasing of chromium doped II-VI quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martyshkin, D. V.; Kim, C.; Moskalev, I. S.; Fedorov, V. V.; Mirov, S. B.

    2008-02-01

    Here we report a new method for transition-metal (TM) doped II-VI Quantum Dots (QD) fabrication and first mid-IR (2-3 μm) lasing at 77K of Cr 2+:ZnS QD powder (~ 27 nm grain size). Cr 2+:ZnS nanocrystalline dots (NCDs) were prepared using laser ablation. The mid-IR photoluminescence (PL) and lasing were studied. The dependence of PL spectrum profile on pump energy demonstrated a threshold behavior accompanied by the appearance of a sharp stimulated emission band around 2230 nm. The stimulated emission band is shifted to the longer wavelength with respect to the spontaneous emission and corresponds to the peak of the Cr:ZnS gain spectrum. This was also accompanied by a considerable lifetime shortening.

  10. The role of the interface in germanium quantum dots: when not only size matters for quantum confinement effects.

    PubMed

    Cosentino, S; Mio, A M; Barbagiovanni, E G; Raciti, R; Bahariqushchi, R; Miritello, M; Nicotra, G; Aydinli, A; Spinella, C; Terrasi, A; Mirabella, S

    2015-07-14

    Quantum confinement (QC) typically assumes a sharp interface between a nanostructure and its environment, leading to an abrupt change in the potential for confined electrons and holes. When the interface is not ideally sharp and clean, significant deviations from the QC rule appear and other parameters beyond the nanostructure size play a considerable role. In this work we elucidate the role of the interface on QC in Ge quantum dots (QDs) synthesized by rf-magnetron sputtering or plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Through a detailed electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) analysis we investigated the structural and chemical properties of QD interfaces. PECVD QDs exhibit a sharper interface compared to sputter ones, which also evidences a larger contribution of mixed Ge-oxide states. Such a difference strongly modifies the QC strength, as experimentally verified by light absorption spectroscopy. A large size-tuning of the optical bandgap and an increase in the oscillator strength occur when the interface is sharp. A spatially dependent effective mass (SPDEM) model is employed to account for the interface difference between Ge QDs, pointing out a larger reduction in the exciton effective mass in the sharper interface case. These results add new insights into the role of interfaces on confined systems, and open the route for reliable exploitation of QC effects.

  11. Coherent confinement of plasmonic field in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Hatef, A.; Fortin-Deschenes, Simon; Meunier, Michel

    2013-05-01

    Interaction of a hybrid system consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle (MNP) with a laser beam can replace the intrinsic plasmonic field of the MNP with a coherently normalized field (coherent-plasmonic or CP field). In this paper we show how quantum coherence effects in such a hybrid system can form a coherent barrier (quantum cage) that spatially confines the CP field. This allows us to coherently control the modal volume of this field, making it significantly smaller or larger than that of the intrinsic plasmonic field of the MNP. We investigate the spatial profiles of the CP field and discuss how the field barrier depends on the collective states of the hybrid system.

  12. Mapping the spatial distribution of charge carriers in quantum-confined heterostructures

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Andrew M.; Lane, Lucas A.; Nie, Shuming

    2014-01-01

    Quantum-confined nanostructures are considered ‘artificial atoms’ because the wavefunctions of their charge carriers resemble those of atomic orbitals. For multiple-domain heterostructures, however, carrier wavefunctions are more complex and still not well understood. We have prepared a unique series of cation-exchanged HgxCd1−xTe quantum dots (QDs) and seven epitaxial core–shell QDs and measured their first and second exciton peak oscillator strengths as a function of size and chemical composition. A major finding is that carrier locations can be quantitatively mapped and visualized during shell growth or cation exchange simply using absorption transition strengths. These results reveal that a broad range of quantum heterostructures with different internal structures and band alignments exhibit distinct carrier localization patterns that can be used to further improve the performance of optoelectronic devices and enhance the brightness of QD probes for bioimaging. PMID:25080298

  13. Raman scattering from confined phonons in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bairamov, B. H.; Aydinli, A.; Tanatar, B.; Güven, K.; Gurevich, S.; Mel'tser, B. Ya.; Ivanov, S. V.; Kop'ev, P. S.; Smirnitskii, V. B.; Timofeev, F. N.

    1998-10-01

    We report on photoluminescence and Raman scattering performed at low temperature (T = 10 K) on GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As quantum-well wires with effective wire widths ofL = 100.0 and 10.9 nm prepared by molecular beam epitaxial growth followed by holographic patterning, reactive ion etching, and anodic thinning. We find evidence for the existence of longitudinal optical phonon modes confined to the GaAs quantum wire. The observed frequency at οL10 = 285.6 cm-1forL = 11.0 nm is in good agreement with that calculated on the basis of the dispersive dielectric continuum theory of Enderleinas applied to the GaAs/Al0.3Ga0.7As system. Our results indicate the high crystalline quality of the quantum-well wires fabricated using these techniques.

  14. Coherent confinement of plasmonic field in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle molecules.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, S M; Hatef, A; Fortin-Deschenes, Simon; Meunier, Michel

    2013-05-24

    Interaction of a hybrid system consisting of a semiconductor quantum dot and a metallic nanoparticle (MNP) with a laser beam can replace the intrinsic plasmonic field of the MNP with a coherently normalized field (coherent-plasmonic or CP field). In this paper we show how quantum coherence effects in such a hybrid system can form a coherent barrier (quantum cage) that spatially confines the CP field. This allows us to coherently control the modal volume of this field, making it significantly smaller or larger than that of the intrinsic plasmonic field of the MNP. We investigate the spatial profiles of the CP field and discuss how the field barrier depends on the collective states of the hybrid system.

  15. The surface termination effect on the quantum confinement and electron affinities of 3C-SiC quantum dots: a first-principles study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenkui; Dai, Ying; Yu, Lin; Guo, Meng; Huang, Baibiao; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan

    2012-03-07

    In light of the established differences between the quantum confinement effect and the electron affinities between hydrogen-passivated C and Si quantum dots, we carried out theoretical investigations on SiC quantum dots, with surfaces uniformly terminated by C-H or Si-H bonds, to explore the role of surface terminations on these two aspects. Surprisingly, it was found that the quantum confinement effect is present (or absent) in the highest occupied (or lowest unoccupied) molecular orbital of the SiC quantum dots regardless of their surface terminations. Thus, the quantum confinement effect related to the energy gap observed experimentally (Phys. Rev. Lett., 2005, 94, 026102) is contributed to by the size-dependence of the highest occupied states; the absence of quantum confinement in the lowest unoccupied states is in contrary to the usual belief based on hydrogen-passivated C quantum dots. However, the cause of the absence of the quantum confinement in C nanodots is not transferable to SiC. We propose a model that provides a clear explanation for all findings on the basis of the nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor interactions between the valence atomic p-orbital in the frontier occupied/unoccupied states. We also found that the electron affinities of the SiC quantum dots, which closely depend on the surface environments, are negative for the C-H termination and positive for the Si-H termination. The prediction of negative electron affinities in SiC quantum dots by simple C-H termination indicates a promising application for these materials in electron-emitter devices. Our model predicts that GeC quantum dots with hydrogen passivation exhibit similar features to SiC quantum dots and our study confirms the crucial role that the surface environment plays in these nanoscale systems.

  16. II-VI semiconductor quantum dot quantum wells: a tight-binding study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Conde, J.; Bhattacharjee, A. K.

    2006-05-01

    We have studied the electronic structure, exciton states and optical spectra of spherical semiconductor quantum dot quantum wells (QDQW's) by means of a symmetry-adapted tight-binding (TB) method. We have investigated two classes of QDQW's: CdS/HgS/CdS, based on a CdS core which acts as a barrier, with a thin HgS well layer intercalated between the core and a clad layer of CdS. The second class of QDQW's is based on ZnS cores covered with CdS layers which act in this case as a well. The calculated values of the absorption onset show a good agreement with the experimental data. Large photoluminescence Stokes shifts are also predicted.

  17. Quantum confinement in nonadditive space with a spatially dependent effective mass for Si and Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbagiovanni, E. G.; Filho, R. N. Costa

    2014-09-01

    We calculate the effect of a spatially dependent effective mass (SPDEM) [adapted from Costa Filho et al. (2011)] on an electron and a hole confined in a quantum well (QW). In the work of Costa Filho et al., the translation operator is modified to include an inverse character length scale, γ, which defines the SPDEM. The introduction of γ means that translations are no longer additive. In nonadditive space, we choose a 'skewed' Gaussian confinement potential defined by the replacement x →γ-1 ln(1 + γx) in the usual Gaussian potential. Within the parabolic approximation γ is inversely related to the QW thickness and we obtain analytic solutions to our confinement Hamiltonian. Our calculation yields a reduced dispersion relation for the gap energy (EG) as a function of QW thickness, D :EG D-1, compared to the effective mass approximation: EG D-2. Additionally, nonadditive space contracts the position space metric thus increasing the occupied momentum space and reducing the effective mass, in agreement with the relation: mo*-1 ∝∂2 E / ∂k2. The change in the effective mass is shown to be a function of the confinement potential via a point canonical transformation. Our calculation agrees with experimental measurements of EG for Si and Ge QWs.

  18. First-principle study of quantum confinement effect on small sized silicon quantum dots using density-functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Anas, M. M.; Othman, A. P.; Gopir, G.

    2014-09-03

    Density functional theory (DFT), as a first-principle approach has successfully been implemented to study nanoscale material. Here, DFT by numerical basis-set was used to study the quantum confinement effect as well as electronic properties of silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) in ground state condition. Selection of quantum dot models were studied intensively before choosing the right structure for simulation. Next, the computational result were used to examine and deduce the electronic properties and its density of state (DOS) for 14 spherical Si-QDs ranging in size up to ∼ 2 nm in diameter. The energy gap was also deduced from the HOMO-LUMO results. The atomistic model of each silicon QDs was constructed by repeating its crystal unit cell of face-centered cubic (FCC) structure, and reconstructed until the spherical shape obtained. The core structure shows tetrahedral (T{sub d}) symmetry structure. It was found that the model need to be passivated, and hence it was noticed that the confinement effect was more pronounced. The model was optimized using Quasi-Newton method for each size of Si-QDs to get relaxed structure before it was simulated. In this model the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub xc}) of the electrons was treated by Local Density Approximation (LDA) functional and Perdew-Zunger (PZ) functional.

  19. Fractional Quantum Hall Effect at ν = 1 / 2 in Hole Systems Confined to GaAs Wide Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasdemir, Sukret; Liu, Yang; Graninger, Aurelius; Shayegan, Mansour; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken; Baldwin, Kirk; Winkler, Roland

    2014-03-01

    We observe fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) at the even-denominator Landau level filling factor ν = 1 / 2 in two-dimensional hole systems confined to GaAs quantum wells of width 30 to 50 nm and having bilayer-like charge distributions. The ν = 1 / 2 FQHE is stable when the charge distribution is symmetric and only in a range of intermediate densities, qualitatively similar to what is seen in two-dimensional electron systems confined to approximately twice wider GaAs quantum wells. Despite the complexity of the hole Landau level structure, originating from the coexistence and mixing of the heavy- and light-hole states, we find the hole ν = 1 / 2 FQHE to be consistent with a two-component, Halperin-Laughlin (Ψ331) state. We acknowledge support through the DOE BES (DE-FG02-00-ER45841) for measurements, and the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation (Grant GBMF2719), Keck Foundation, and the NSF (DMR-0904117, DMR-1305691 and MRSEC DMR-0819860) for sample fabrication. Work at Arg.

  20. Quantum confinement effect in 6H-SiC quantum dots observed via plasmon-exciton coupling-induced defect-luminescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xiaoxiao; Zhang, Yumeng; Fan, Baolu; Fan, Jiyang

    2017-03-01

    The quantum confinement effect is one of the crucial physical effects that discriminate a quantum material from its bulk material. It remains a mystery why the 6H-SiC quantum dots (QDs) do not exhibit an obvious quantum confinement effect. We study the photoluminescence of the coupled colloidal system of SiC QDs and Ag nanoparticles. The experimental result in conjunction with the theoretical calculation reveals that there is strong coupling between the localized electron-hole pair in the SiC QD and the localized surface plasmon in the Ag nanoparticle. It results in resonance energy transfer between them and resultant quenching of the blue surface-defect luminescence of the SiC QDs, leading to uncovering of a hidden near-UV emission band. This study shows that this emission band originates from the interband transition of the 6H-SiC QDs and it exhibits a remarkable quantum confinement effect.

  1. Landau quantized dynamics and spectra for group-VI dichalcogenides, including a model quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horing, Norman J. M.

    2017-06-01

    This work is concerned with the derivation of the Green's function for Landau-quantized carriers in the Group-VI dichalcogenides. In the spatially homogeneous case, the Green's function is separated into a Peierls phase factor and a translationally invariant part which is determined in a closed form integral representation involving only elementary functions. The latter is expanded in an eigenfunction series of Laguerre polynomials. These results for the retarded Green's function are presented in both position and momentum representations, and yet another closed form representation is derived in circular coordinates in terms of the Bessel wave function of the second kind (not to be confused with the Bessel function). The case of a quantum wire is also addressed, representing the quantum wire in terms of a model one-dimensional δ (x ) -potential profile. This retarded Green's function for propagation directly along the wire is determined exactly in terms of the corresponding Green's function for the system without the δ (x ) -potential, and the Landau quantized eigenenergy dispersion relation is examined. The thermodynamic Green's function for the dichalcogenide carriers in a normal magnetic field is formulated here in terms of its spectral weight, and its solution is presented in a momentum/integral representation involving only elementary functions, which is subsequently expanded in Laguerre eigenfunctions and presented in both momentum and position representations.

  2. Electrostatically Confined Monolayer Graphene Quantum Dots with Orbital and Valley Splittings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freitag, Nils M.; Chizhova, Larisa A.; Nemes-Incze, Peter; Woods, Colin R.; Gorbachev, Roman V.; Cao, Yang; Geim, Andre K.; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Burgdörfer, Joachim; Libisch, Florian; Morgenstern, Markus

    2016-09-01

    The electrostatic confinement of massless charge carriers is hampered by Klein tunneling. Circumventing this problem in graphene mainly relies on carving out nanostructures or applying electric displacement fields to open a band gap in bilayer graphene. So far, these approaches suffer from edge disorder or insufficiently controlled localization of electrons. Here we realize an alternative strategy in monolayer graphene, by combining a homogeneous magnetic field and electrostatic confinement. Using the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, we induce a confining potential in the Landau gaps of bulk graphene without the need for physical edges. Gating the localized states towards the Fermi energy leads to regular charging sequences with more than 40 Coulomb peaks exhibiting typical addition energies of 7-20 meV. Orbital splittings of 4-10 meV and a valley splitting of about 3 meV for the first orbital state can be deduced. These experimental observations are quantitatively reproduced by tight binding calculations, which include the interactions of the graphene with the aligned hexagonal boron nitride substrate. The demonstrated confinement approach appears suitable to create quantum dots with well-defined wave function properties beyond the reach of traditional techniques.

  3. Electrostatically Confined Monolayer Graphene Quantum Dots with Orbital and Valley Splittings

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The electrostatic confinement of massless charge carriers is hampered by Klein tunneling. Circumventing this problem in graphene mainly relies on carving out nanostructures or applying electric displacement fields to open a band gap in bilayer graphene. So far, these approaches suffer from edge disorder or insufficiently controlled localization of electrons. Here we realize an alternative strategy in monolayer graphene, by combining a homogeneous magnetic field and electrostatic confinement. Using the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope, we induce a confining potential in the Landau gaps of bulk graphene without the need for physical edges. Gating the localized states toward the Fermi energy leads to regular charging sequences with more than 40 Coulomb peaks exhibiting typical addition energies of 7–20 meV. Orbital splittings of 4–10 meV and a valley splitting of about 3 meV for the first orbital state can be deduced. These experimental observations are quantitatively reproduced by tight binding calculations, which include the interactions of the graphene with the aligned hexagonal boron nitride substrate. The demonstrated confinement approach appears suitable to create quantum dots with well-defined wave function properties beyond the reach of traditional techniques. PMID:27466881

  4. Demonstration of Quantum Entanglement between a Single Electron Spin Confined to an InAs Quantum Dot and a Photon

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-04-16

    PACS numbers: 78.67.Hc, 03.65.Ud, 03.67.Lx, 78.47.#p A single electron spin confined to a charged semicon- ductor quantum dot (QD) can effectively serve...maximum observable spin precession rate ( Zeeman splitting). For this QD, that splitting corresponds to a magnetic field of 1.1 T. For each photon...ni ts ) FIG. 1 (color online). (a) The effective four-level system generated when a magnetic field is applied perpendicular to the QD growth axis

  5. Efficient Blue Electroluminescence Using Quantum-Confined Two-Dimensional Perovskites.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sudhir; Jagielski, Jakub; Yakunin, Sergii; Rice, Peter; Chiu, Yu-Cheng; Wang, Mingchao; Nedelcu, Georgian; Kim, Yeongin; Lin, Shangchao; Santos, Elton J G; Kovalenko, Maksym V; Shih, Chih-Jen

    2016-10-03

    Solution-processed hybrid organic-inorganic lead halide perovskites are emerging as one of the most promising candidates for low-cost light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, due to a small exciton binding energy, it is not yet possible to achieve an efficient electroluminescence within the blue wavelength region at room temperature, as is necessary for full-spectrum light sources. Here, we demonstrate efficient blue LEDs based on the colloidal, quantum-confined 2D perovskites, with precisely controlled stacking down to one-unit-cell thickness (n = 1). A variety of low-k organic host compounds are used to disperse the 2D perovskites, effectively creating a matrix of the dielectric quantum wells, which significantly boosts the exciton binding energy by the dielectric confinement effect. Through the Förster resonance energy transfer, the excitons down-convert and recombine radiatively in the 2D perovskites. We report room-temperature pure green (n = 7-10), sky blue (n = 5), pure blue (n = 3), and deep blue (n = 1) electroluminescence, with record-high external quantum efficiencies in the green-to-blue wavelength region.

  6. Computer simulation of liquid-vapor coexistence of confined quantum fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Trejos, Víctor M.; Gil-Villegas, Alejandro Martinez, Alejandro

    2013-11-14

    The liquid-vapor coexistence (LV) of bulk and confined quantum fluids has been studied by Monte Carlo computer simulation for particles interacting via a semiclassical effective pair potential V{sub eff}(r) = V{sub LJ} + V{sub Q}, where V{sub LJ} is the Lennard-Jones 12-6 potential (LJ) and V{sub Q} is the first-order Wigner-Kirkwood (WK-1) quantum potential, that depends on β = 1/kT and de Boer's quantumness parameter Λ=h/σ√(mε), where k and h are the Boltzmann's and Planck's constants, respectively, m is the particle's mass, T is the temperature of the system, and σ and ε are the LJ potential parameters. The non-conformal properties of the system of particles interacting via the effective pair potential V{sub eff}(r) are due to Λ, since the LV phase diagram is modified by varying Λ. We found that the WK-1 system gives an accurate description of the LV coexistence for bulk phases of several quantum fluids, obtained by the Gibbs Ensemble Monte Carlo method (GEMC). Confinement effects were introduced using the Canonical Ensemble (NVT) to simulate quantum fluids contained within parallel hard walls separated by a distance L{sub p}, within the range 2σ ⩽ L{sub p} ⩽ 6σ. The critical temperature of the system is reduced by decreasing L{sub p} and increasing Λ, and the liquid-vapor transition is not longer observed for L{sub p}/σ < 2, in contrast to what has been observed for the classical system.

  7. Wave-function mapping of graphene quantum dots with soft confinement.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, D; Libisch, F; Li, Y; Pauly, C; Geringer, V; Reiter, R; Mashoff, T; Liebmann, M; Burgdörfer, J; Busse, C; Michely, T; Mazzarello, R; Pratzer, M; Morgenstern, M

    2012-01-27

    Using low-temperature scanning tunneling spectroscopy, we map the local density of states of graphene quantum dots supported on Ir(111). Because of a band gap in the projected Ir band structure around the graphene K point, the electronic properties of the QDs are dominantly graphenelike. Indeed, we compare the results favorably with tight binding calculations on the honeycomb lattice based on parameters derived from density functional theory. We find that the interaction with the substrate near the edge of the island gradually opens a gap in the Dirac cone, which implies soft-wall confinement. Interestingly, this confinement results in highly symmetric wave functions. Further influences of the substrate are given by the known moiré potential and a 10% penetration of an Ir surface resonance into the graphene layer.

  8. Quantum confinement: A route to enhance the Curie temperature of Mn doped GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Basudeb; Chandra, Hirak Kumar; Kumari, Poonam; Mahadevan, Priya

    2017-07-01

    The electronic structure of Mn doped GaAs and GaN have been examined within a multiband Hubbard model. By virtue of the positioning of the Mn d states, Mn doped GaAs is found to belong to the p -d metal regime of the Zaanen-Sawatzky-Allen phase diagram and its variants, while Mn doping in GaN belongs to the covalent insulator regime. Their location in the phase diagram also determines how they would behave under quantum confinement which would increase the charge transfer energy. The ferromagnetic stability of Mn doped GaAs, we find, increases with confinement therefore providing a route to higher ferromagnetic transition temperatures.

  9. Evaluation of quantum confinement effect in nanocrystal Si dot layer by Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mizukami, Y; Kosemura, D; Numasawa, Y; Ohshita, Y; Ogura, A

    2012-11-01

    Quantum confinement effect in the nanocrystal-Si (nc-Si) was evaluated by Raman spectroscopy. The nc-Si dot layers were fabricated by the H2 plasma treatment for the nucleation site formation followed by the SiH4 irradiation for the nc-Si growth. Post-oxidation annealing was also performed to improve the crystalline quality. After post-oxidation annealing for 5 or 10 min, the asymmetric broadening on the lower frequency sides in Raman spectra were obtained, which can be attributed to the phonon confinement effect in nc-Si. Furthermore we confirmed that hydrostatic stress of approximately 500 MPa was induced in nc-Si after post-oxidation annealing.

  10. Spectroscopy and dynamics of charge transfer excitons in type-II band aligned quantum confined heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, P. K.; Vasa, P.; Singh, B. P.; Rustagi, K. C.; Bahadur, D.

    2015-05-15

    We illustrate effect of charge transfer (CT) in type-II quantum confined heterostructure by comparing CdSe quantum dots (QDs), CdSe/CdTe heterostructure quantum dots (HQDs) and CdSe/CdTe/CdSe quantum well-quantum dots (QWQDs) heterostructures. CdSe core QDs were synthesized using a kinetic growth method where QD size depends on reaction time. For shell coating we used modified version of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Size of different QDs ∼5 to 7 nm were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Strong red shift from ∼597 to ∼746 nm in photoluminescence (PL) spectra from QDs to QWQDs shows high tunability which is not possible with single constituent semiconductor QDs. PL spectra have been recorded at different temperatures (10K-300K). Room temperature time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for QDs to QWQDs show three exponential radiative decay. The slowest component decay constant in QWQDs comes around eight fold to ∼51 ns as compared to ∼6.5 ns in HQD suggesting new opportunities to tailor the radiative carrier recombination rate of CT excitons.

  11. Spectroscopy and dynamics of charge transfer excitons in type-II band aligned quantum confined heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushavah, Dushyant; Mohapatra, P. K.; Rustagi, K. C.; Bahadur, D.; Vasa, P.; Singh, B. P.

    2015-05-01

    We illustrate effect of charge transfer (CT) in type-II quantum confined heterostructure by comparing CdSe quantum dots (QDs), CdSe/CdTe heterostructure quantum dots (HQDs) and CdSe/CdTe/CdSe quantum well-quantum dots (QWQDs) heterostructures. CdSe core QDs were synthesized using a kinetic growth method where QD size depends on reaction time. For shell coating we used modified version of successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Size of different QDs ˜5 to 7 nm were measured by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Strong red shift from ˜597 to ˜746 nm in photoluminescence (PL) spectra from QDs to QWQDs shows high tunability which is not possible with single constituent semiconductor QDs. PL spectra have been recorded at different temperatures (10K-300K). Room temperature time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) measurements for QDs to QWQDs show three exponential radiative decay. The slowest component decay constant in QWQDs comes around eight fold to ˜51 ns as compared to ˜6.5 ns in HQD suggesting new opportunities to tailor the radiative carrier recombination rate of CT excitons.

  12. Quantum confinement effect of CdSe induced by nanoscale solvothermal reaction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Im, Jeong-Hyuk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-10-21

    We report a novel method, nanoscale solvothermal reaction (NSR), to induce the quantum confinement effect of CdSe on nanostructured TiO(2) by solvothermal route. The time-dependent growth of CdSe is observed in solution at room temperature, which is found to be accomplished instantly by heat-treatment in the presence of solvent at 1 atm. However, no crystal growth occurs upon heat-treatment in the absence of solvent. The nanoscale solvothermal growth of CdSe quantum dot is realized on the nanocrystalline oxide surface, where Cd(NO(3))(2)·4H(2)O and Na(2)SeSO(3) solutions are sequentially spun on nanostructured TiO(2), followed by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 250 °C. Size of CdSe increases from 4.4 nm to 5.3 nm, 8.7 nm and 14.8 nm, which results in decrease in optical band gap from 2.19 eV to, 1.95 eV, 1.74 eV and 1.75 eV with increasing the NSR temperature from 100 °C to 150 °C, 200 °C and 250 °C, respectively, which is indicative of the quantum confinement effect. Thermodynamic studies reveal that increase in the size of CdSe is related to increase in enthalpy, for instance, from 3.77 J mg(-1) for 100 °C to 8.66 J mg(-1) for 200 °C. Quantum confinement effect is further confirmed from the CdSe-sensitized solar cell, where onset wavelength in external quantum efficiency spectra is progressively shifted from 600 nm to 800 nm as the NSR temperature increases, which leads to a significant improvement of power conversion efficiency by a factor of more than four. A high photocurrent density of 13.7 mA cm(-2) is obtained based on CdSe quantum dot grown by NSR at 200 °C.

  13. Quantum confinement effect of CdSe induced by nanoscale solvothermal reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin-Wook; Im, Jeong-Hyuk; Park, Nam-Gyu

    2012-09-01

    We report a novel method, nanoscale solvothermal reaction (NSR), to induce the quantum confinement effect of CdSe on nanostructured TiO2 by solvothermal route. The time-dependent growth of CdSe is observed in solution at room temperature, which is found to be accomplished instantly by heat-treatment in the presence of solvent at 1 atm. However, no crystal growth occurs upon heat-treatment in the absence of solvent. The nanoscale solvothermal growth of CdSe quantum dot is realized on the nanocrystalline oxide surface, where Cd(NO3)2.4H2O and Na2SeSO3 solutions are sequentially spun on nanostructured TiO2, followed by heat-treatment at temperatures ranging from 100 °C to 250 °C. Size of CdSe increases from 4.4 nm to 5.3 nm, 8.7 nm and 14.8 nm, which results in decrease in optical band gap from 2.19 eV to, 1.95 eV, 1.74 eV and 1.75 eV with increasing the NSR temperature from 100 °C to 150 °C, 200 °C and 250 °C, respectively, which is indicative of the quantum confinement effect. Thermodynamic studies reveal that increase in the size of CdSe is related to increase in enthalpy, for instance, from 3.77 J mg-1 for 100 °C to 8.66 J mg-1 for 200 °C. Quantum confinement effect is further confirmed from the CdSe-sensitized solar cell, where onset wavelength in external quantum efficiency spectra is progressively shifted from 600 nm to 800 nm as the NSR temperature increases, which leads to a significant improvement of power conversion efficiency by a factor of more than four. A high photocurrent density of 13.7 mA cm-2 is obtained based on CdSe quantum dot grown by NSR at 200 °C.

  14. Growth of II-VI ZnSe/CdSe nanowires for quantum dot luminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellet-Amalric, E.; Elouneg-Jamroz, M.; Rueda-Fonseca, P.; Bounouar, S.; Hertog, M. Den; Bougerol, C.; André, R.; Genuist, Y.; Poizat, J. P.; Kheng, K.; Cibert, J.; Tatarenko, S.

    2013-09-01

    The growth of gold catalyzed ZnSe nanowires, with CdSe insertions, by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated. In situ reflection high energy electron diffraction and ex-situ transmission electron diffraction reveal that both during, the gold dewetting and the nanowire growth, the gold particles remain always in the solid phase. The nanowire growth proceeds by ledge flow at the gold/nanowire interface as observed ex-situ by the presence of two monolayers high steps at the interface. The nanowire diameters present a high homogeneity corresponding to the low dispersion of the gold droplets. Finally, a rather abrupt interface, of less than 1 nm thick, is observed between the ZnSe barrier and the CdSe quantum dot allowing a high confinement of the excitons. All the above observations are compatible with a Vapor-Solid-Solid growth mode.

  15. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    SciTech Connect

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-30

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  16. Quantum-Carnot engine for particle confined to 2D symmetric potential well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belfaqih, Idrus Husin; Sutantyo, Trengginas Eka Putra; Prayitno, T. B.; Sulaksono, Anto

    2015-09-01

    Carnot model of heat engine is the most efficient cycle consisting of isothermal and adiabatic processes which are reversible. Although ideal gas usually used as a working fluid in the Carnot engine, Bender used quantum particle confined in 1D potential well as a working fluid. In this paper, by following Bender we generalize the situation to 2D symmetric potential well. The efficiency is express as the ratio of the initial length of the system to the final length of the compressed system. The result then is shown that for the same ratio, 2D potential well is more efficient than 1D potential well.

  17. Quantum phase transition of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms confined in an optical superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva-Valencia, J.; Franco, R.; Figueira, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    Using the density matrix renormalization group method, we evaluate the spin and charge gaps of alkaline-earth fermionic atoms in a periodic one-dimensional optical superlattice. The number of delocalized atoms is equal to the lattice size and we consider an antiferromagnetic coupling between delocalized and localized atoms. We found a quantum phase transition from a Kondo insulator spin liquid state without confining potential to a charge-gapped antiferromagnetic state with nonzero potential. For each on-site coupling, there is a critical potential point for which the spin gap vanishes and its value increases linearly with the local interaction.

  18. Luminescence blue-shift of CdSe nanowires beyond the quantum confinement regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Yuan; Liao, Zhi-Min; Bie, Ya-Qing; Wu, Han-Chun; Zhou, Yang-Bo; Fu, Xue-Wen; Yu, Da-Peng

    2011-09-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) properties of individual CdSe nanowires with diameters beyond the quantum confinement regime have been studied. A blue-shift in the PL spectra was observed with decreasing nanowire diameter. We attribute the blue-shift to band-filling effect. Carrier density induced by surface vacancy doping and laser excitation is found to be high enough to meet the criterion of the band-filling effect and increases with decreasing nanowire diameter. Temperature dependent PL analysis and characterizations of a single CdSe nanowire based field-effect transistor were also performed.

  19. Design of Ge/SiGe quantum-confined Stark effect modulators for CMOS compatible photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lever, Leon; Ikonić, Zoran; Valavanis, Alex; Kelsall, Robert W.

    2010-02-01

    A simulation technique for modeling optical absorption in Ge/SiGe multiple quantum well (MQW) heterostructures is described, based on a combined 6 × 6 k • p hole wave-function a one-band effective mass electron wavefunction calculation. Using this model, we employ strain engineering to target a specific applications-oriented wavelength, namely 1310 nm, and arrive at a design for a MQW structure to modulate light at this wavelength. The modal confinement in a proposed device is then found using finite-element modeling, and we estimate the performance of a proposed waveguide-integrated electroabsorption modulator.

  20. Enhanced Quantum Confined Stark Effect in a mesoporous hybrid multifunctional system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gogoi, M.; Deb, P.; Sen, D.; Mazumder, S.; Kostka, A.

    2014-06-01

    Quantum Confined Stark Effect in hybrid of CdTe quantum dot with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in both nonporous and mesoporous silica matrix has been realized. The observed QCSE is due to the local electric field induced by charge dispersion at SiO2/polar solvent interface. Enhanced Stark shift of 89.5 meV is observed in case of mesoporous hybrid structure and the corresponding local electric field has been evaluated as 4.38×104 V/cm. The enhancement is assumed to be caused by greater density of charge in the mesoporous hybrid. The conjugation of superparamagnetic nanoparticles in this tailored hybrid microstructure has not imparted any alteration to the Stark shift, but has added multifunctional attribute. The present study on the local electric field induced enhanced QCSE with wavelength modulation towards red end paves the way of developing magneto-fluorescent hybrid systems for biomedical imaging application.

  1. Distributed Reflector Laser Integrated with Active and Passive Grating Sections Using Lateral Quantum Confinement Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohira, Kazuya; Murayama, Tomonori; Yagi, Hideki; Tamura, Shigeo; Arai, Shigehisa

    2003-08-01

    A new type of distributed reflector (DR) laser, monolithically integrated with wirelike active section and passive distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) section, was realized for the first time by using the lateral quantum confinement effect in quantum-wire structure. As a result, a threshold current density as low as 320 A/cm2 and a strong asymmetric output ratio of the front to the rear facet of 28 were obtained for a 20 μm wide stripe structure. For lower threshold and single-mode operation, a narrow stripe DR laser was fabricated. Threshold current of 7.4 mA and submode suppression ratio (SMSR) of 40 dB at a bias current of 1.2 times the threshold were obtained for a stripe width of 3 μm under room-temperature continuous-wave (RT-CW) condition.

  2. Single Molecule Quantum-Confined Stark Effect Measurements of Semiconductor Nanoparticles at Room Temperature

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We measured the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE) of several types of fluorescent colloidal semiconductor quantum dots and nanorods at the single molecule level at room temperature. These measurements demonstrate the possible utility of these nanoparticles for local electric field (voltage) sensing on the nanoscale. Here we show that charge separation across one (or more) heterostructure interface(s) with type-II band alignment (and the associated induced dipole) is crucial for an enhanced QCSE. To further gain insight into the experimental results, we numerically solved the Schrödinger and Poisson equations under self-consistent field approximation, including dielectric inhomogeneities. Both calculations and experiments suggest that the degree of initial charge separation (and the associated exciton binding energy) determines the magnitude of the QCSE in these structures. PMID:23075136

  3. Fluorescent carbon nano dots from lignite: unveiling the impeccable evidence for quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Kumar Thiyagarajan, Senthil; Raghupathy, Suresh; Palanivel, Dharmalingam; Raji, Kaviyarasan; Ramamurthy, Perumal

    2016-04-28

    Synthesizing nano carbon from its bulk precursors is of recent research interest. In this report, luminescent carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) with tunable particle size and surface functionality are fabricated from lignite using ethylenediamine as the reactive solvent and surface passivating agent via different experimental methods. From the steady-state and time-resolved photophysical studies of these differently sized CNPs, it is unveiled that the energy of the excitons generated after photoexcitation is quantum confined, and it influences the observed photophysical behaviour significantly only when the particle size is less than 10 nm. A larger size of the CNPs and less surface functionalization lead to aggregation, and quenching of the fluorescence. But by dispersing smaller size CNPs in sodium sulfate matrix exhibits fluorescence in the solid state with an absolute fluorescence quantum yield of ∼34%. The prospective application of this hybrid material in sensing and removal of moisture in the atmosphere is illustrated.

  4. Quantum-confined electronic states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Hämäläinen, Sampsa K; Sun, Zhixiang; Boneschanscher, Mark P; Uppstu, Andreas; Ijäs, Mari; Harju, Ari; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniël; Liljeroth, Peter

    2011-12-02

    Despite the enormous interest in the properties of graphene and the potential of graphene nanostructures in electronic applications, the study of quantum-confined states in atomically well-defined graphene nanostructures remains an experimental challenge. Here, we study graphene quantum dots (GQDs) with well-defined edges in the zigzag direction, grown by chemical vapor deposition on an Ir(111) substrate by low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy. We measure the atomic structure and local density of states of individual GQDs as a function of their size and shape in the range from a couple of nanometers up to ca. 20 nm. The results can be quantitatively modeled by a relativistic wave equation and atomistic tight-binding calculations. The observed states are analogous to the solutions of the textbook "particle-in-a-box" problem applied to relativistic massless fermions.

  5. New quantum cascade laser architectures: II-VI quantum cascade emitters, high k-space lasing, and short injectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franz, Kale J.

    Quantum cascade (QC) lasers are today's most capable mid-infrared light sources. With up to watt-level room temperature emission over a broad swath of mid-infrared wavelengths, these tiny semiconductor devices enable a variety of applications and technologies such as ultra-sensitive systems for detecting trace molecules in the vapor phase. The foundation of a QC structure lies in alternating hundreds of wide- and narrow-bandgap semiconductor layers to form a coupled quantum well system. In this way, the laws of quantum mechanics are used to precisely engineer electron transport and create artificial optical transitions. The result is a material with capabilities not found in nature, a truly "designer" material. As a central theme in this thesis, we stress the remarkable flexibility of the quantum cascade---the ability to highly tailor device structure for creative design concepts. The QC idea, in fact, relies on no particular material system for its implementation. While all QC lasers to date have been fabricated from III--V materials such as InGaAs/AlInAs, I detail our preliminary work on ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe---a II--VI materials system---where we have demonstrated electroluminescence. We then further discuss how the inherent QC flexibility can be exploited for new devices that extend QC performance and capabilities. In this regard, we offer the examples of excited state transitions and short injectors. Excited state transitions are an avenue to enhancing optical gain, which is especially needed for longer-wavelength devices where optical losses hinder performance. Likewise, shortening the QC injector length over a conventional QC structure has powerful implications for threshold current, output power, and wall-plug efficiency. In both cases, novel physical effects are discovered. Pumping electrons into highly excited states led to the discovery of high k-space lasing from highly non-equilibrium electron distributions. Shortening QC injector regions allowed us to

  6. Ultrathin Colloidal Quantum Dot Films for Optical Amplification: The Role of Modal Confinement and Heat Dissipation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Weon-Kyu; Lee, Jaesoong; Cho, Kyung-Sang; Roh, Young-Geun

    2017-08-31

    We demonstrate optical pumping lasers based on colloidal quantum dots, with a very thin geometry consisting of a ≈20 nm thick film. Obstacles in ultrasmall laser devices come from the limitation of gain materials and the size of cavities for lasing modes, which requires a minimum thickness of the gain media (typically greater than 50-100 nm). Here we introduce dielectric waveguide structures with a high refractive index, in order to reduce the thickness of quantum dot gain media as well as their threshold energy (≈39 % compared to the original gain medium). Finite-difference time-domain simulations show that the modal confinement factor of thinner quantum dot films can be improved by the presence of an adjacent waveguide layer. We also discuss the possible role of dielectric waveguide layers for efficient heat dissipation during optical pumping. Integrating an extremely thin colloidal quantum dot gain medium into optical waveguides is a promising platform for downscaling on-chip photonic integrated devices, as well as investigating extreme interactions between light and matter such as surface plasmon-photon coupling. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Quantum confinement in amorphous TiO(2) films studied via atomic layer deposition.

    PubMed

    King, David M; Du, Xiaohua; Cavanagh, Andrew S; Weimer, Alan W

    2008-11-05

    Despite the significant recent increase in quantum-based optoelectronics device research, few deposition techniques can reliably create the required functional nanoscale systems. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to study the quantum effects attainable through the use of this ångström-level controlled growth process. Size-dependent quantum confinement has been demonstrated using TiO(2) layers of nanoscale thickness applied to the surfaces of silicon wafers. TiO(2) films were deposited at 100 °C using TiCl(4) and H(2)O(2) in a viscous flow ALD reactor, at a rate of 0.61 Å/cycle. The low-temperature process was utilized to guarantee the amorphous deposition of TiO(2) layers and post-deposition thermal annealing was employed to promote crystallite-size modification. Hydrogen peroxide significantly reduced the residual chlorine that remained from a typical TiCl(4)-H(2)O ALD process at this temperature, down to 1.6%. Spectroscopic ellipsometry was used to quantify the optical properties both below and above the bandgap energy. A central composite design was employed to map the surface response of the film thickness-dependent bandgap shift for the as-deposited case and up to a thermal annealing temperature of 550 °C. The Brus model was used to develop a correlation between the amorphous TiO(2) film thickness and the quantum length to promote equivalent bandgap shifts.

  8. Investigation of II-VI Semiconductor Quantum Dots for Sensitized Solar Cell Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horoz, Sabit

    Semiconductor nanocrystals, also referred to as quantum dots (QDs) which have advantages of low-cost, photostability, high molar extinction coefficients and size-dependent optical properties, have been the focus of great scientific and technological efforts in solar cells development. Due to the multi-electron generation effect, the theoretical maximum efficiency of quantum dots sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) is much higher than that of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Thus QDSSCs have a clear potential to overtake the efficiency of other kinds of solar cells. Doped semiconductor QDs can not only retain nearly all advantages of intrinsic QDs, but also have additional absorption bands for improved efficiency. This approach is particularly important for wide band gap semiconductors, for example, zinc based QDs. Zinc based are desirable candidates as they are inexpensive, earth abundant and nontoxic. When doped, they can cover a broad range of visible spectrum. In my project, I aim at developing novel methods for the preparation of II-VI QDs and investigating the effects of doping on the properties and performances of QDSSCs. Cadmium selenide (CdSe), manganese doped cadmium selenide (Mn:CdSe), and manganese doped zinc sulfide (Mn:ZnS) QDs have been synthesized by laser ablation in water. The structural and luminescent properties of the QDs have been investigated. In addition, QDSSC performances of the samples have been measured using nanowire electrode made of ZnO and Zn2SnO 4. I have also successfully synthesized europium doped zinc sulfide (Eu:ZnS) and manganese doped cadmium sulfide (Mn:CdS) nanoparticles by wet chemical method, and analyzed structural, optical, and magnetic properties as well as the device performance of the nanoparticles.

  9. Probing the nature of chemical bonding in uranyl(VI) complexes with quantum chemical methods.

    PubMed

    Vallet, Valérie; Wahlgren, Ulf; Grenthe, Ingmar

    2012-12-20

    To assess the nature of chemical bonds in uranyl(VI) complexes with Lewis base ligands, such as F(-), Cl(-), OH(-), CO(3)(2-), and O(2)(2-), we have used quantum chemical observables, such as the bond distances, the internal symmetric/asymmetric uranyl stretch frequencies, and the electron density with its topology analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules. This analysis confirms that complex formation induces a weakening of the uranium-axial oxygen bond, reflected by the longer U-O(yl) bond distance and reduced uranyl-stretching frequencies. The strength of the ligand-induced effect increases in the order H(2)O < Cl(-) < F(-) < OH(-) < CO(3)(2-) < O(2)(2-). In-depth analysis reveals that the trend across the series does not always reflect an increasing covalent character of the uranyl-ligand bond. By using a point-charge model for the uranyl tetra-fluoride and tetra-chloride complexes, we show that a significant part of the uranyl bond destabilization arises from purely electrostatic interactions, the remaining part corresponding either to charge-transfer from the negatively charged ligands to the uranyl unit or a covalent interaction. The charge-transfer and the covalent interaction are qualitatively different due to the absence of a charge build up in the uranyl-halide bond region in the latter case. In all the charged complexes, the uranyl-ligand bond is best described as an ionic interaction. However, there are covalent contributions in the very stable peroxide complex and, to some extent, also in the carbonate complex. This study demonstrates that it is possible to describe the nature of chemical bond by observables rather than by ad hoc quantities such as atomic populations or molecular orbitals.

  10. Effect of extended confinement on the structure of edge channels in the quantum anomalous Hall effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Z.; Raikh, M. E.

    2016-09-01

    The Quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect in the films with nontrivial band structure accompanies the ferromagnetic transition in the system of magnetic dopants. Experimentally, the QAH transition manifests itself as a jump in the dependence of longitudinal resistivity on a weak external magnetic field. Microscopically, this jump originates from the emergence of a chiral edge mode on one side of the ferromagnetic transition. We study analytically the effect of an extended confinement on the structure of the edge modes. We employ the simplest model of the extended confinement in the form of a potential step next to the hard wall. It is shown that, unlike the conventional quantum Hall effect, where all edge channels are chiral, in the QAH effect, a complex structure of the boundary leads to nonchiral edge modes which are present on both sides of the ferromagnetic transition. Wave functions of nonchiral modes are different above and below the transition: on the "topological" side, where the chiral edge mode is supported, nonchiral modes are "repelled" from the boundary; i.e., they are much less localized than on the "trivial" side. Thus, the disorder-induced scattering into these modes will boost the extension of the chiral edge mode. The prime experimental manifestation of nonchiral modes is that, by contributing to longitudinal resistance, they smear the QAH transition.

  11. Real-Time Reciprocal Space Mapping of Nano-Islands Induced by Quantum Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Hawoong; Gray, Aaron; Chiang, T.-C.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of quantum confinement have been observed pronouncedly in the island morphology of Pb thin films. The evolution of these nano-islands on Si (111)-(7 × 7) and sapphire (001) surfaces has been studied with a new X-ray diffraction method. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to collect two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D, respectively) maps of the surface X-ray diffraction in real time. Large ranges of the reflectivity curves, with rocking curves at every point on the reflectivity curves, could be measured continuously in a relatively short amount of time. The abundance of information from 2-D k-space maps reveals clear changes in the growth modes of these thin Pb films. With the 3-D extension of this method, it was possible to observe the ordering of the islands. The islands maintain a nearly uniform interisland distance but lack any angular correlation. The interisland ordering is correlated well with the development of "magic" island heights caused by quantum confinement.

  12. Real time reciprocal space mapping of nano-islands induced by quantum confinment.

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, H.; Gray, A.; Chiang, T. C.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of quantum confinement have been observed pronouncedly in the island morphology of Pb thin films. The evolution of these nano-islands on Si (111)-(7 x 7) and sapphire (001) surfaces has been studied with a new X-ray diffraction method. A charge-coupled device (CCD) camera was used to collect two- and three-dimensional (2-D and 3-D, respectively) maps of the surface X-ray diffraction in real time. Large ranges of the reflectivity curves, with rocking curves at every point on the reflectivity curves, could be measured continuously in a relatively short amount of time. The abundance of information from 2-D k-space maps reveals clear changes in the growth modes of these thin Pb films. With the 3-D extension of this method, it was possible to observe the ordering of the islands. The islands maintain a nearly uniform interisland distance but lack any angular correlation. The interisland ordering is correlated well with the development of 'magic' island heights caused by quantum confinement.

  13. Absence of quantum confinement effects in the photoluminescence of Si3N4-embedded Si nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiller, D.; Zelenina, A.; Gutsch, S.; Dyakov, S. A.; López-Conesa, L.; López-Vidrier, J.; Estradé, S.; Peiró, F.; Garrido, B.; Valenta, J.; Kořínek, M.; Trojánek, F.; Malý, P.; Schnabel, M.; Weiss, C.; Janz, S.; Zacharias, M.

    2014-05-01

    Superlattices of Si-rich silicon nitride and Si3N4 are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and, subsequently, annealed at 1150 °C to form size-controlled Si nanocrystals (Si NCs) embedded in amorphous Si3N4. Despite well defined structural properties, photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) reveals inconsistencies with the typically applied model of quantum confined excitons in nitride-embedded Si NCs. Time-resolved PL measurements demonstrate 105 times faster time-constants than typical for the indirect band structure of Si NCs. Furthermore, a pure Si3N4 reference sample exhibits a similar PL peak as the Si NC samples. The origin of this luminescence is discussed in detail on the basis of radiative defects and Si3N4 band tail states in combination with optical absorption measurements. The apparent absence of PL from the Si NCs is explained conclusively using electron spin resonance data from the Si/Si3N4 interface defect literature. In addition, the role of Si3N4 valence band tail states as potential hole traps is discussed. Most strikingly, the PL peak blueshift with decreasing NC size, which is often observed in literature and typically attributed to quantum confinement (QC), is identified as optical artifact by transfer matrix method simulations of the PL spectra. Finally, criteria for a critical examination of a potential QC-related origin of the PL from Si3N4-embedded Si NCs are suggested.

  14. Atomic layer deposition of quantum-confined ZnO nanostructures.

    PubMed

    King, David M; Johnson, Samantha I; Li, Jianhua; Du, Xiaohua; Liang, Xinhua; Weimer, Alan W

    2009-05-13

    The modulation of optoelectronic properties, such as the bandgap of a pure-component semiconductor material, is a useful ability that can be achieved by few techniques. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) was used here to experimentally demonstrate the ability to deposit films that exhibit quantum confinement on three-dimensional surfaces. Polycrystalline ZnO films ranging from approximately 1.5 to 15 nm in thickness were deposited via ALD using diethylzinc and hydrogen peroxide at 100 degrees C. Conformal, pinhole-free films were deposited on Si wafers and on nanosized spherical SiO(2) particles using an augmented central composite design strategy. Powder x-ray diffraction was used to measure the crystallite size of the films and monitor size evolution on the basis of the number of ALD cycles and thermal annealing post-treatments. The absorbance of the ZnO films on Si wafers and SiO(2) particles was measured using spectroscopic ellipsometry and diffuse transmittance techniques, respectively. Post-deposition annealing steps increased the crystallite size of the films, independently of the coating thickness. The ZnO bandgap was increasingly blue-shifted for films of decreasing crystallite size, approaching +0.3 eV at dimensions of 2-3 nm. The nonlinear bandgap response correlated well with the Brus model. This work represents an experimental demonstration of quantum confinement using ALD on two- and three-dimensional substrates.

  15. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  16. Maximal Wavelength of Confined Quarks and Gluons and Properties of Quantum Chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Shrock, Robert; /YITP, Stony Brook

    2008-08-01

    Because quarks and gluons are confined within hadrons, they have a maximum wavelength of order the confinement scale. Propagators, normally calculated for free quarks and gluons using Dyson-Schwinger equations, are modified by bound-state effects in close analogy to the calculation of the Lamb shift in atomic physics. Because of confinement, the effective quantum chromodynamic coupling stays finite in the infrared. The quark condensate which arises from spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in the bound state Dyson-Schwinger equation is the expectation value of the operator {bar q}q evaluated in the background of the fields of the other hadronic constituents, in contrast to a true vacuum expectation value. Thus quark and gluon condensates reside within hadrons. The effects of instantons are also modified. We discuss the implications of the maximum quark and gluon wavelength for phenomena such as deep inelastic scattering and annihilation, the decay of heavy quarkonia, jets, and dimensional counting rules for exclusive reactions. We also discuss implications for the zero-temperature phase structure of a vectorial SU(N) gauge theory with a variable number N{sub f} of massless fermions.

  17. Energies and densities of electrons confined in elliptical and ellipsoidal quantum dots

    DOE PAGES

    Halder, Avik; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2016-08-09

    Here, we consider a droplet of electrons confined within an external harmonic potential well of elliptical or ellipsoidal shape, a geometry commonly encountered in work with semiconductor quantum dots and other nanoscale or mesoscale structures. For droplet sizes exceeding the effective Bohr radius, the dominant contribution to average system parameters in the Thomas– Fermi approximation comes from the potential energy terms, which allows us to derive expressions describing the electron droplet’s shape and dimensions, its density, total and capacitive energy, and chemical potential. Our analytical results are in very good agreement with experimental data and numerical calculations, and make itmore » possible to follow the dependence of the properties of the system on its parameters (the total number of electrons, the axial ratios and curvatures of the confinement potential, and the dielectric constant of the material). One interesting feature is that the eccentricity of the electron droplet is not the same as that of its confining potential well.« less

  18. Carrier confinement in Ge/Si quantum dots grown with an intermediate ultrathin oxide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuryliuk, V.; Korotchenkov, O.; Cantarero, A.

    2012-02-01

    We present computational results for strain effects on charge carrier confinement in GexSi1-x quantum dots (QDs) grown on an oxidized Si surface. The strain and free carrier probability density distributions are obtained using the continuum elasticity theory and the effective-mass approximation implemented by a finite-element modeling scheme. Using realistic parameters and conditions for hemisphere and pyramid QDs, it is pointed out that an uncapped hemisphere dot deposited on the Si surface with an intermediate ultrathin oxide layer offers advantageous electron-hole separation distances with respect to a square-based pyramid grown directly on Si. The enhanced separation is associated with a larger electron localization depth in the Si substrate for uncapped hemisphere dots. Thus, for dot diameters smaller than 15-20 nm and surface density of the dots (nQD) ranging from about 1010 to 1012 cm-2, the localization depth may be enhanced from about 8 nm for a pyramid to 38 nm for a hemisphere dot. We find that the effect in a hemisphere dot is very sensitive to the dot density and size, whereas the localization depth is not significantly affected by the variation of the Ge fraction x in GexSi1-x and the aspect ratio of the dot. We also calculate the effect of the fixed oxide charge (Qox) with densities ranging from 10-9 to 10-7 C/cm2 for 10-Ωcm p-type Si wafers on the carrier confinement. Although the confinement potential can be strongly perturbed by the charge at nQD less than ≈4×1011 cm-2, it is not very sensitive to the value of Qox at higher nQD. Since, to our knowledge, there are no data on carrier confinement for Ge QDs deposited on oxidized Si surfaces, these results might be applicable to functional devices utilizing separated electrons and holes such as photovoltaic devices, spin transistors, and quantum computing components. The use of hemisphere QDs placed on oxidized Si rather than pyramid dots grown on bare Si may help to confine charge carriers deeper

  19. Room temperature and high responsivity short wavelength II-VI quantum well infrared photodetector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravikumar, Arvind P.; Chen, Guopeng; Zhao, Kuaile; Tian, Yue; Prucnal, Paul; Tamargo, Maria C.; Gmachl, Claire F.; Shen, Aidong

    2013-04-01

    We report the experimental demonstration of a room temperature, high responsivity, short wavelength II-VI Zn0.51Cd0.49Se/Zn0.29Cd0.26Mg0.45Se based quantum well infrared photodetector operating between 3 and 5 μm. Spectral response was observed up to room temperature with a cut off wavelength of 5 μm at 280 K. Measurements with a calibrated blackbody source yielded a peak responsivity of over 30 A/W at 280 K and an applied bias of -3 V. The dark current limited peak detectivity at 80 K and 280 K were measured to be 2 × 109 cm √Hz/W and 4 × 107 cm √Hz/W, respectively. These results are consistent with theoretical calculations that predict a maximum detectivity of the order of 107 cm √Hz/W at room temperature for typical carrier lifetimes and optimized doping levels.

  20. Magnetization studies of II-VI semiconductor columnar quantum dots with type-II band alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eginligil, M.; Sellers, I. R.; McCombe, B. D.; Chou, W.-C.; Kuskovsky, I. L.

    2009-03-01

    We report SQUID magnetization measurements of MBE-grown type-II, II-VI semiconductor quantum dot (QD) samples, with and without Mn incorporation. In all samples, the easy axis is out-of-plane, possibly due to columnar QD formation that arises from strain interaction between adjacent thin dot-containing layers. In addition, both types of QDs display a non-zero spontaneous magnetic ordering at 300 K. One set of samples consists of five-layers of (Zn,Mn)Te/ZnSe with a nominal (Zn,Mn)Te thickness of 3 nm, and ZnSe spacer thickness of 5 nm and 20 nm. These magnetic QD samples show magnetization vs. temperature behavior that can be interpreted in terms of two independent FM phases characterized by transition temperatures TC1 < TC2. A sample containing no Mn consists of 130 ZnTe/ZnSe layers, which forms Zn(Se,Te) QD layers separated by ZnSe spacers. Evidence of ferromagnetism is also seen in this structure, but the spontaneous magnetization is much weaker. For this sample only one phase is seen with TC above 300 K. Results will be discussed in terms of magneto-polaronic effects and defect-level induced ferromagnetism.

  1. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-01

    Semiconducting quantum dots - more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms - are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement - or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) - in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level transitions are seen

  2. Magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots: Influence of the dot-size, confining potential, and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-12-15

    Semiconducting quantum dots – more fancifully dubbed artificial atoms – are quasi-zero dimensional, tiny, man-made systems with charge carriers completely confined in all three dimensions. The scientific quest behind the synthesis of quantum dots is to create and control future electronic and optical nanostructures engineered through tailoring size, shape, and composition. The complete confinement – or the lack of any degree of freedom for the electrons (and/or holes) – in quantum dots limits the exploration of spatially localized elementary excitations such as plasmons to direct rather than reciprocal space. Here we embark on a thorough investigation of the magneto-optical absorption in semiconducting spherical quantum dots characterized by a confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. This is done within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation that enables us to derive and discuss the full Dyson equation that takes proper account of the Coulomb interactions. As an application of our theoretical strategy, we compute various single-particle and many-particle phenomena such as the Fock-Darwin spectrum; Fermi energy; magneto-optical transitions; probability distribution; and the magneto-optical absorption in the quantum dots. It is observed that the role of an applied magnetic field on the absorption spectrum is comparable to that of a confining potential. Increasing (decreasing) the strength of the magnetic field or the confining potential is found to be analogous to shrinking (expanding) the size of the quantum dots: resulting into a blue (red) shift in the absorption spectrum. The Fermi energy diminishes with both increasing magnetic-field and dot-size; and exhibits saw-tooth-like oscillations at large values of field or dot-size. Unlike laterally confined quantum dots, both (upper and lower) magneto-optical transitions survive even in the extreme instances. However, the intra-Landau level

  3. Charge Carrier Dynamics of Quantum Confined Semiconductor Nanoparticles Analyzed via Transient Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibert, Arthur Joseph, III

    Semiconductor nanoparticles are tiny crystalline structures (typically range from 1 - 100 nm) whose shape in many cases can be dictated through tailored chemical synthesis with atomic scale precision. The small size of these nanoparticles often results in quantum confinement (spatial confinement of wave functions), which imparts the ability to manipulate band-gap energies thus allowing them to be optimally engineered for different applications (i.e., photovoltaics, photocatalysis, imaging). However, charge carriers excited within these nanoparticles are often involved in many different processes: trapping, trap migration, Auger recombination, non-radiative relaxation, radiative relaxation, oxidation / reduction, or multiple exciton generation. Broadband ultrafast transient absorption laser spectroscopy is used to spectrally resolve the fate of excited charge carriers in both wavelength and time, providing insight as to what synthetic developments or operating conditions will be necessary to optimize their efficiency for certain applications. This thesis outlines the effort of resolving the dynamics of excited charge carriers for several Cd and Si based nanoparticle systems using this experimental technique. The thesis is organized into five chapters and two appendices as indicated below. Chapter 1 provides a brief introduction to the photophysics of semiconductor nanoparticles. It begins by defining what nanoparticles, semiconductors, charge carriers, and quantum confinement are. From there it details how the study of charge carrier dynamics within nanoparticles can lead to increased efficiency in applications such as photocatalysis. Finally, the experimental methodology associated with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy is introduced and its power in mapping charge carrier dynamics is established. Chapter 2 (JPCC, 19647, 2011) introduces the first of the studied samples: water-solubilized 2D CdSe nanoribbons (NRs), which were synthesized in the Osterloh

  4. Interface control of electronic and optical properties in IV-VI and II-VI core/shell colloidal quantum dots: a review.

    PubMed

    Jang, Youngjin; Shapiro, Arthur; Isarov, Maya; Rubin-Brusilovski, Anna; Safran, Aron; Budniak, Adam K; Horani, Faris; Dehnel, Joanna; Sashchiuk, Aldona; Lifshitz, Efrat

    2017-01-17

    Semiconductor colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) have attracted vast scientific and technological interest throughout the past three decades, due to the unique tuneability of their optoelectronic properties by variation of size and composition. However, the nanoscale size brings about a large surface-to-bulk volume ratio, where exterior surfaces have a pronounced influence on the chemical stability and on the physical properties of the semiconductor. Therefore, numerous approaches have been developed to gain efficient surface passivation, including a coverage by organic or inorganic molecular surfactants as well as the formation of core/shell heterostructures (a semiconductor core epitaxially covered by another semiconductor shell). This review focuses on special designs of core/shell heterostructures from the IV-VI and II-VI semiconductor compounds, and on synthetic approaches and characterization of the optical properties. Experimental observations revealed the formation of core/shell structures with type-I or quasi-type-II band alignment between the core and shell constituents. Theoretical calculations of the electronic band structures, which were also confirmed by experimental work, exposed surplus electronic tuning (beyond the radial diameter) with adaptation of the composition and control of the interface properties. The studies also considered strain effects that are created between two different semiconductors. It was disclosed experimentally and theoretically that the strain can be released via the formation of alloys at the core-shell interface. Overall, the core/shell and core/alloyed-shell heterostructures showed enhancement in luminescence quantum efficiency with respect to that of pure cores, extended lifetime, uniformity in size and in many cases good chemical sustainability under ambient conditions.

  5. Encapsulation of highly confined CdSe quantum dots for defect free luminescence and improved stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumari, Asha; Singh, Ragini Raj

    2017-05-01

    This is the first report on the generation of trap states and their effective elimination in highly confined CdSe quantum dots in order to obtain enhanced and stable optical properties prepared by aqueous route. Surface plays an important role in optical properties of quantum dots (QDs) and surface modification of quantum dots can improve optical properties. In present work luminescent CdSe QDs were prepared using 2-Mercaptoethanol (2-ME) as stabilizing agent and encapsulated by polymer. Different concentrations of 2-ME were used to tune the emission spectra with respect to their reduced size. Addition of 2-ME to CdSe QDs enhances the trap emission and quenching band edge emission due to (i) increased surface to volume ratio and; (ii) presence of high concentration of sulfide ions as confirmed from EDX analysis as sulfide ions possesses the hole scavenging characteristics. Polymer encapsulation of QDs was carried out to make them stable and to improve their optical properties. Even though there are previous reports addressing the improved optical properties by polymer encapsulation and silica encapsulation but experimentally it has not been reported yet experimentally. In this work we have synthesized and characterized water soluble polymer encapsulated QDs and proved the facts experimentally. Photoluminescence spectroscopy clearly reveals the role of polymer encapsulation in boosting the optical properties of CdSe QDs. FTIR spectra validate the presence of biocompatible functional groups on CdSe4/PEG (Polymer encapsulated QDs).

  6. Quantum confinement in semiconductor nanofilms: Optical spectra and multiple exciton generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khmelinskii, Igor; Makarov, Vladimir I.

    2016-04-01

    We report optical absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectra of Si and SnO2 nanocrystalline films in the UV-vis-NIR range, featuring discrete bands resulting from transverse quantum confinement, observed in the optical spectra of nanofilms for the first time ever. The film thickness ranged from 3.9 to 12.2 nm, depending on the material. The results are interpreted within the particle-in-a-box model, with infinite walls. The calculated values of the effective electron mass are independent on the film thickness and equal to 0.17mo (Si) and 0.21mo (SnO2), with mo the mass of the free electron. The second calculated model parameter, the quantum number n of the HOMO (valence band), was also thickness-independent: 8.00 (Si) and 7.00 (SnO2). The transitions observed in absorption all start at the level n and correspond to Δn = 1, 2, 3, …. The photoluminescence bands exhibit large Stokes shifts, shifting to higher energies with increased excitation energy. In effect, nanolayers of Si, an indirect-gap semiconductor, behave as a direct-gap semiconductor, as regards the transverse-quantized level system. A prototype Si-SnO2 nanofilm photovoltaic cell demonstrated photoelectron quantum yields achieving 2.5, showing clear evidence of multiple exciton generation, for the first time ever in a working nanofilm device.

  7. Galilean Invariance in Confined Quantum Systems: Implications for Spectral Gaps, Superfluid Flow, and Periodic Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sütő, András

    2014-03-01

    Galilean invariance leaves its imprint on the energy spectrum and eigenstates of N quantum particles, bosons, or fermions, confined in a bounded domain. It endows the spectrum with a recurrent structure, which in capillaries or elongated traps of length L and cross-section area s⊥ leads to spectral gaps n2h2s⊥ρ/(2mL) at wave numbers 2nπs⊥ρ, where ρ is the number density and m is the particle mass. In zero temperature superfluids, in toroidal geometries, it causes the quantization of the flow velocity with the quantum h/(mL) or that of the circulation along the toroid with the known quantum h/m. Adding a "friction" potential, which breaks Galilean invariance, the Hamiltonian can have a superfluid ground state at low flow velocities but not above a critical velocity, which may be different from the velocity of sound. In the limit of infinite N and L, if N/L=s⊥ρ is kept fixed, translation invariance is broken, and the center of mass has a periodic distribution, while superfluidity persists at low flow velocities. This conclusion holds for the Lieb-Liniger model.

  8. Excited states and quantum confinement in room temperature few nanometre scale silicon single electron transistors.

    PubMed

    Durrani, Zahid A K; Jones, Mervyn E; Wang, Chen; Liu, Dixi; Griffiths, Jonathan

    2017-03-24

    Single nanometre scale quantum dots (QDs) have significant potential for many 'beyond CMOS' nanoelectronics and quantum computation applications. The fabrication and measurement of few nanometre silicon point-contact QD single-electron transistors are reported, which both operate at room temperature (RT) and are fabricated using standard processes. By combining thin silicon-on-insulator wafers, specific device geometry, and controlled oxidation, <10 nm nanoscale point-contact channels are defined. In this limit of the point-contact approach, ultra-small, few nanometre scale QDs are formed, enabling RT measurement of the full QD characteristics, including excited states to be made. A remarkably large QD electron addition energy ∼0.8 eV, and a quantum confinement energy ∼0.3 eV, are observed, implying a QD only ∼1.6 nm in size. In measurements of 19 RT devices, the extracted QD radius lies within a narrow band, from 0.8 to 2.35 nm, emphasising the single-nanometre scale of the QDs. These results demonstrate that with careful control, 'beyond CMOS' RT QD transistors can be produced using current 'conventional' semiconductor device fabrication techniques.

  9. Excited states and quantum confinement in room temperature few nanometre scale silicon single electron transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durrani, Zahid A. K.; Jones, Mervyn E.; Wang, Chen; Liu, Dixi; Griffiths, Jonathan

    2017-03-01

    Single nanometre scale quantum dots (QDs) have significant potential for many ‘beyond CMOS’ nanoelectronics and quantum computation applications. The fabrication and measurement of few nanometre silicon point-contact QD single-electron transistors are reported, which both operate at room temperature (RT) and are fabricated using standard processes. By combining thin silicon-on-insulator wafers, specific device geometry, and controlled oxidation, <10 nm nanoscale point-contact channels are defined. In this limit of the point-contact approach, ultra-small, few nanometre scale QDs are formed, enabling RT measurement of the full QD characteristics, including excited states to be made. A remarkably large QD electron addition energy ∼0.8 eV, and a quantum confinement energy ∼0.3 eV, are observed, implying a QD only ∼1.6 nm in size. In measurements of 19 RT devices, the extracted QD radius lies within a narrow band, from 0.8 to 2.35 nm, emphasising the single-nanometre scale of the QDs. These results demonstrate that with careful control, ‘beyond CMOS’ RT QD transistors can be produced using current ‘conventional’ semiconductor device fabrication techniques.

  10. Interplay between Coulomb interaction and quantum-confined Stark-effect in polar and nonpolar wurtzite InN/GaN quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Stefan; Schuh, Kolja; Marquardt, Oliver; Hickel, Tilmann; Neugebauer, Jörg; Jahnke, Frank; Czycholl, Gerd

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we systematically analyze the electronic structures of polar and nonpolar wurtzite-InN/GaN quantum dots and their modification due to the quantum-confined Stark effect caused by intrinsic fields. This is achieved by combining continuum elasticity theory with an effective-bond orbital model to describe the elastic and single-particle electronic properties in these nitride systems. Based on these results, a many-body treatment is used to determine optical absorption spectra. The efficiency of optical transitions depends on the interplay between the Coulomb interaction and the quantum-confined Stark effect. We introduce an effective confinement potential which represents the electronic structure under the influence of the intrinsic polarization fields and calculate the needed strength of Coulomb interaction to diminish the separation of electrons and holes.

  11. Quantum confinement of a hydrogenic donor in a double quantum well: Through diamagnetic susceptibility

    SciTech Connect

    Vignesh, G.; Nithiananthi, P.

    2015-06-24

    Diamagnetic susceptibility of a randomly distributed donor in a GaAs/Al{sub 0.3}Ga{sub 0.7}As Double Quantum Well has been calculated in its ground state as a function of barrier and well width. It is shown that the modification in the barrier and well dimension significantly influences the dimensional character of the donor through modulating the subband distribution and in turn the localization of the donor. The effect of barrier and well thickness on the interparticle distance has also been observed. Interestingly it opens up the possibility of tuning the susceptibility and monitoring the tunnel coupling among the wells.

  12. Probing quantum confinement at the atomic scale with optically detected nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempf, James G.

    2001-09-01

    Near-band-gap circularly polarized excitation in III-V semiconductors provides spin-polarized electrons that transfer spin order to lattice nuclei via fluctuations in the contact hyperfine interaction. This process of optical nuclear polarization and the complementary technique of optical detection of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) provide extreme sensitivity enhancement and spatial selectivity in structured samples, enabling collection of NMR spectra from samples such as single quantum wells or dots containing as few as ˜105 nuclei. Combining these advances with novel techniques for high spectral resolution, we have probed quantum-confined electronic states near the interface of a single epitaxially grown Al1-x As/GaAs (x = 0.36) heterojunction. Using a novel strategy that we refer to as POWER (p&barbelow;erturbations o&barbelow;bserved w&barbelow;ith e&barbelow;nhanced ṟesolution) NMR, multiple-pulse time suspension is synchronized with bandgap optical irradiation to reveal spectra of effective spin Hamiltonians that are differences between those of the occupied and unoccupied photoexcited electronic state. The underlying NMR linewidth is reduced by three orders of magnitude in these experiments, enabling resolution of an asymmetric line shape due to light-induced hyperfine interactions. The results are successfully fit with the coherent nuclear spin evolution and relaxation theoretically expected for sites distributed over the volume of an electronic excitation weakly localized at a point defect. This analysis establishes a one-to-one relationship, which can be used to follow nuclear spin diffusion, between optical Knight shift and the radial position of lattice nuclei. We have also introduced POWER NMR techniques to characterize the change in electric field associated with cycling from light-on to light-off states via a linear quadrupole Stark effect (LQSE) of the nuclear spins. Simulations of these NMR spectra in terms of the radial electric fields of

  13. Quantum propagation and confinement in 1D systems using the transfer-matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pujol, Olivier; Carles, Robert; Pérez, José-Philippe

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this article is to provide some Matlab scripts to the teaching community in quantum physics. The scripts are based on the transfer-matrix formalism and offer a very efficient and versatile tool to solve problems of a physical object (electron, proton, neutron, etc) with one-dimensional (1D) stationary potential energy. Resonant tunnelling through a multiple-barrier or confinement in wells of various shapes is particularly analysed. The results are quantitatively discussed with semiconductor heterostructures, harmonic and anharmonic molecular vibrations, or neutrons in a gravity field. Scripts and other examples (hydrogen-like ions and transmission by a smooth variation of potential energy) are available freely at http://www-loa.univ-lille1.fr/˜pujol in three languages: English, French and Spanish.

  14. Quantum electrodynamics in 2 + 1 dimensions, confinement, and the stability of U(1) spin liquids.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Flavio S; Kleinert, Hagen

    2005-10-21

    Compact quantum electrodynamics in 2 + 1 dimensions often arises as an effective theory for a Mott insulator, with the Dirac fermions representing the low-energy spinons. An important and controversial issue in this context is whether a deconfinement transition takes place. We perform a renormalization group analysis to show that deconfinement occurs when N > Nc = 36/pi3 approximately to 1.161, where N is the number of fermion replica. For N < Nc, however, there are two stable fixed points separated by a line containing a unstable nontrivial fixed point: a fixed point corresponding to the scaling limit of the noncompact theory, and another one governing the scaling behavior of the compact theory. The string tension associated with the confining interspinon potential is shown to exhibit a universal jump as N --> Nc-. Our results imply the stability of a spin liquid at the physical value N = 2 for Mott insulators.

  15. Confinement and Lattice Quantum-Electrodynamic Electric Flux Tubes Simulated with Ultracold Atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Zohar, Erez; Reznik, Benni

    2011-12-30

    We propose a method for simulating (2+1)D compact lattice quantum-electrodynamics, using ultracold atoms in optical lattices. In our model local Bose-Einstein condensates' (BECs) phases correspond to the electromagnetic vector potential, and the local number operators represent the conjugate electric field. The well-known gauge-invariant Kogut-Susskind Hamiltonian is obtained as an effective low-energy theory. The field is then coupled to external static charges. We show that in the strong coupling limit this gives rise to ''electric flux tubes'' and to confinement. This can be observed by measuring the local density deviations of the BECs, and is expected to hold even, to some extent, outside the perturbative calculable regime.

  16. Confinement in Maxwell-Chern-Simons planar quantum electrodynamics and the 1/N approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Hofmann, Christoph P.; Raya, Alfredo; Madrigal, Saul Sanchez

    2010-11-01

    We study the analytical structure of the fermion propagator in planar quantum electrodynamics coupled to a Chern-Simons term within a four-component spinor formalism. The dynamical generation of parity-preserving and parity-violating fermion mass terms is considered, through the solution of the corresponding Schwinger-Dyson equation for the fermion propagator at leading order of the 1/N approximation in Landau gauge. The theory undergoes a first-order phase transition toward chiral symmetry restoration when the Chern-Simons coefficient {theta} reaches a critical value which depends upon the number of fermion families considered. Parity-violating masses, however, are generated for arbitrarily large values of the said coefficient. On the confinement scenario, complete charge screening - characteristic of the 1/N approximation - is observed in the entire (N,{theta})-plane through the local and global properties of the vector part of the fermion propagator.

  17. Orbital Paramagnetism of a Softly Confined 2DEG Strip in the Extreme Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Michael J.

    2002-03-01

    The role of surfaces in the orbital magnetism of a noninteracting electron gas of finite size has long been of continuing theoretical interest[1]. More recent experiments on 2DEG heterostructures embodied in gallium-arsenide squares of micron size indicate orbital electronic paramagnetism much larger than Landau diamagnetism[2]. The orbital magnetism in the extreme quantum limit of softly confined 2DEG strips several microns wide with areal electron densities greater than 10^9 per square centimeter is shown to have a large paramagnetic maximum as a function of magnetic field before reverting to negative Landau diamagnetism at sufficiently large fields. A novel fabricated heterostructure, layered with such strips, is described which may exhibit strong bulk paramagnetism. 1. Frank S. Ham,Phys.Rev.92,1113(1953), and references therein. 2. L.P.Levy,D.H.Reich,L.Pfeiffer, and K.West,Physica B 189, 204(1993).

  18. Field Effect Optoelectronic Modulation of Quantum-Confined Carriers in Black Phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Whitney, William S; Sherrott, Michelle C; Jariwala, Deep; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Bechtel, Hans A; Rossman, George R; Atwater, Harry A

    2017-01-11

    We report measurements of the infrared optical response of thin black phosphorus under field-effect modulation. We interpret the observed spectral changes as a combination of an ambipolar Burstein-Moss (BM) shift of the absorption edge due to band-filling under gate control, and a quantum confined Franz-Keldysh (QCFK) effect, phenomena that have been proposed theoretically to occur for black phosphorus under an applied electric field. Distinct optical responses are observed depending on the flake thickness and starting carrier concentration. Transmission extinction modulation amplitudes of more than two percent are observed, suggesting the potential for use of black phosphorus as an active material in mid-infrared optoelectronic modulator applications.

  19. Field Effect Optoelectronic Modulation of Quantum-Confined Carriers in Black Phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitney, William S.; Sherrott, Michelle C.; Jariwala, Deep; Lin, Wei-Hsiang; Bechtel, Hans A.; Rossman, George R.; Atwater, Harry A.

    2017-01-01

    We report measurements of the infrared optical response of thin black phosphorus under field-effect modulation. We interpret the observed spectral changes as a combination of an ambipolar Burstein-Moss (BM) shift of the absorption edge due to band-filling under gate control, and a quantum confined Franz-Keldysh (QCFK) effect, phenomena which have been proposed theoretically to occur for black phosphorus under an applied electric field. Distinct optical responses are observed depending on the flake thickness and starting carrier concentration. Transmission extinction modulation amplitudes of more than two percent are observed, suggesting the potential for use of black phosphorus as an active material in mid-infrared optoelectronic modulator applications.

  20. Ultrafast spectroscopy of quantum confined states in a single CdSe nanowire.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Thorsten; Giessen, Harald; Lippitz, Markus

    2013-04-10

    We measure for the first time transient absorption spectra of individual CdSe nanowires with about 10 nm diameter. Confinement of the carrier wave functions leads to discrete states which can be described by a six-band effective mass model. Combining transient absorption and luminescence spectroscopy allows us to track the excitation dynamics in the visible and near-infrared spectral range. About 10% of all absorbed photons lead to an excitation of the lowest energy state. Of these excitations, less than 1% lead to a photon in the optical far-field. Almost all emission is reabsorbed by other parts of the nanowire. These findings might explain the low overall quantum efficiency of CdSe nanowires.

  1. Reinventing solid state electronics: Harnessing quantum confinement in bismuth thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gity, Farzan; Ansari, Lida; Lanius, Martin; Schüffelgen, Peter; Mussler, Gregor; Grützmacher, Detlev; Greer, J. C.

    2017-02-01

    Solid state electronics relies on the intentional introduction of impurity atoms or dopants into a semiconductor crystal and/or the formation of junctions between different materials (heterojunctions) to create rectifiers, potential barriers, and conducting pathways. With these building blocks, switching and amplification of electrical currents and voltages are achieved. As miniaturisation continues to ultra-scaled transistors with critical dimensions on the order of ten atomic lengths, the concept of doping to form junctions fails and forming heterojunctions becomes extremely difficult. Here, it is shown that it is not needed to introduce dopant atoms nor is a heterojunction required to achieve the fundamental electronic function of current rectification. Ideal diode behavior or rectification is achieved solely by manipulation of quantum confinement using approximately 2 nm thick films consisting of a single atomic element, the semimetal bismuth. Crucially for nanoelectronics, this approach enables room temperature operation.

  2. CdS/Cyclohexylamine inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductor nanofibers with strong quantum confinement effect.

    PubMed

    Fan, Libo; Song, Hongwei; Zhao, Haifeng; Pan, Guohui; Liu, Lina; Dong, Biao; Wang, Fang; Bai, Xue; Qin, Ruifei; Kong, Xianggui; Ren, Xinguang

    2008-08-01

    Inorganic-organic hybrid semiconductor nanofibers of CdS/CHA (CHA = cyclohexylamine) were successfully synthesized by a simple solvothermal method. The fibers obtained had average diameter of 20 nm and length of several micrometers. In these fibers, periodic layer-like sub-nanometer structures with thickness of approximately 3 nm were identified by high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM). The absorption of the hybrids exhibited a large blue-shift in contrast to the bulk, which was attributed to strong quantum confinement effect (QCE) induced by internal sub-nanometer structures. Pure hexagonal wurtzite CdS (H-CdS) nanorods were also obtained by extracting the CdS/CHA hybrids with dimethyl formamide (DMF). The rods obtained had average diameter of 20 nm and length of 200 nm. A CdS/CHA/polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composite film emitting white light was prepared by spin coating.

  3. Efficient Biexciton Interaction in Perovskite Quantum Dots Under Weak and Strong Confinement.

    PubMed

    Castañeda, Juan A; Nagamine, Gabriel; Yassitepe, Emre; Bonato, Luiz G; Voznyy, Oleksandr; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Nogueira, Ana F; Sargent, Edward H; Cruz, Carlos H Brito; Padilha, Lazaro A

    2016-09-27

    Cesium lead halide perovskite quantum dots (PQDs) have emerged as a promising new platform for lighting applications. However, to date, light emitting diodes (LED) based on these materials exhibit limited efficiencies. One hypothesized limiting factor is fast nonradiative multiexciton Auger recombination. Using ultrafast spectroscopic techniques, we investigate multicarrier interaction and recombination mechanisms in cesium lead halide PQDs. By mapping the dependence of the biexciton Auger lifetime and the biexciton binding energy on nanomaterial size and composition, we find unusually strong Coulomb interactions among multiexcitons in PQDs. This results in weakly emissive biexcitons and trions, and accounts for low light emission efficiencies. We observe that, for strong confinement, the biexciton lifetime depends linearly on the PQD volume. This dependence becomes sublinear in the weak confinement regime as the PQD size increases beyond the Bohr radius. We demonstrate that Auger recombination is faster in PQDs compared to CdSe nanoparticles having the same volume, suggesting a stronger Coulombic interaction in the PQDs. We confirm this by demonstrating an increased biexciton binding energy, which reaches a maximum of about 100 meV, fully three times larger than in CdSe quantum dots. The biexciton shift can lead to low-threshold optical gain in these materials. These findings also suggest that materials engineering to reduce Coulombic interaction in cesium lead halide PQDs could improve prospects for high efficiency optoelectronic devices. Core-shell structures, in particular type-II nanostructures, which are known to reduce the bandedge Coulomb interaction in CdSe/CdS, could beneficially be applied to PQDs with the goal of increasing their potential in lighting applications.

  4. Quantum confined colloidal nanorod heterostructures for solar-to-fuel conversion.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kaifeng; Lian, Tianquan

    2016-07-11

    Solar energy conversion, particularly solar-driven chemical fuel formation, has been intensely studied in the past decades as a potential approach for renewable energy generation. Efficient solar-to-fuel conversion requires artificial photosynthetic systems with strong light absorption, long-lived charge separation and efficient catalysis. Colloidal quantum confined nanoheterostructures have emerged as promising materials for this application because of the ability to tailor their properties through size, shape and composition. In particular, colloidal one-dimensional (1D) semiconductor nanorods (NRs) offer the opportunity to simultaneously maintain quantum confinement in radial dimensions for tunable light absorptions and bulk like carrier transport in the axial direction for long-distance charge separations. In addition, the versatile chemistry of colloidal NRs enables the formation of semiconductor heterojunctions (such as CdSe/CdS dot-in-rod NRs) to separate photogenerated electron-hole pairs and deposition of metallic domains to accept charges and catalyze redox reactions. In this review, we summarize research progress on colloidal NR heterostructures and their applications for solar energy conversion, emphasizing mechanistic insights into the working principle of these systems gained from spectroscopic studies. Following a brief overview of synthesis of various NRs and heterostructures, we introduce their electronic structures and dynamics of exciton and carrier transport and interfacial transfer. We discuss how these exciton and carrier dynamics are controlled by their structures and provide key mechanistic understanding on their photocatalytic performance, including the photo-reduction of a redox mediator (methyl viologen) and light driven H2 generation. We discuss the solar-driven H2 generation mechanism, key efficiency limiting steps, and potential approaches for rational improvement in semiconductor NR/metal heterostructures (such as Pt tipped Cd

  5. A Confined Fabrication of Perovskite Quantum Dots in Oriented MOF Thin Film.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Gu, Zhi-Gang; Fu, Wen-Qiang; Wang, Fei; Zhang, Jian

    2016-10-10

    Organic-inorganic hybrid lead organohalide perovskites are inexpensive materials for high-efficiency photovoltaic solar cells, optical properties and superior electrical conductivity. However, the fabrication of their quantum dots (QDs) with uniform ultra-small particles is still a challenge. Here we use oriented microporous metal-organic framework (MOF) thin film prepared by liquid phase epitaxy approach as a template for CH3NH3PbI2X (X = Cl, Br and I) perovskite QDs fabrication. By introducing the PbI2 and CH3NH3X (MAX) precursors into MOF HKUST-1 (Cu3(BTC)2, BTC = 1,3,5-benzene tricarboxylate) thin film in a stepwise approach, the resulted perovskite MAPbI2X (X = Cl, Br and I) QDs with uniform diameters of 1.5~2 nm match to the pore size of HKUST-1. Furthermore, the photoluminescent properties and stability in the moist air of the perovskite QDs loaded HKUST-1 thin film were studied. This confined fabrication strategy demonstrates that the perovskite QDs loaded MOF thin film will be insensitive to air exposure and offers a novel means of confining the uniform size of the similar perovskite QDs according to the oriented porous MOF materials.

  6. Surface confined quantum well state in MoS{sub 2}(0001) thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Jia-Tao Song, S. R.; Meng, S.; Du, S. X.; Gao, H. J.; Liu, F.

    2015-10-19

    Surface confined quantum well state (scQWS) is a QWS confined around the surface of a thin film whose electronic energy is smaller than the work function of the film. The scQWS is rather rare in most thin films. Here, we show the existence of scQWS in thin films of transition metal dichalcogenides, MoS{sub 2}. Signatures of scQWS are identified as the overall downward band dispersion in the bulk gap of 2 H-MoS{sub 2} thin film at larger binding energy range. These scQWSs are also characterized with a Shockley-type surface state having an inverse parabolic decay into the film and a symmetric (asymmetric) distribution of projected charge density at the two surfaces of odd-layer (even-layer) films. Our findings of scQWS in MoS{sub 2} shed some light on understanding the electronic properties of 2D materials with implications in future 2D electronic devices.

  7. Assessment of field-induced quantum confinement in heterogate germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Padilla, J. L. Alper, C.; Ionescu, A. M.; Gámiz, F.

    2014-08-25

    The analysis of quantum mechanical confinement in recent germanium electron–hole bilayer tunnel field-effect transistors has been shown to substantially affect the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) mechanism between electron and hole inversion layers that constitutes the operating principle of these devices. The vertical electric field that appears across the intrinsic semiconductor to give rise to the bilayer configuration makes the formerly continuous conduction and valence bands become a discrete set of energy subbands, therefore increasing the effective bandgap close to the gates and reducing the BTBT probabilities. In this letter, we present a simulation approach that shows how the inclusion of quantum confinement and the subsequent modification of the band profile results in the appearance of lateral tunneling to the underlap regions that greatly degrades the subthreshold swing of these devices. To overcome this drawback imposed by confinement, we propose an heterogate configuration that proves to suppress this parasitic tunneling and enhances the device performance.

  8. Memory Effects in Brownian Motion, Random Walks under Confining Potentials, and Relaxation of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chase, Matthew

    This dissertation is a report on a number of distinct topics in the field of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics including the evolution of classical as well as quantum systems. The evolution of an object that is described by the Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process generalized through a time-nonlocal attraction is considered. The time-nonlocality is taken to be represented in the Langevin description through the presence of memory. Analysis of the Langevin equation is performed for algebraic and delay-type memories. An equivalent bona-fide Fokker-Planck equation is constructed. A random walker subjected to a non-standard confining potential, taken to be a piece-wise linear function, is analyzed. Matching conditions for arbitrary joining configurations are given. Exact propagators in both the time- and Laplace-domains are derived for the case of a 'V'-shaped potential. Two illustrative applications of such calculations are presented in the areas of chemical physics and biophysics. The relaxation of quantum systems interacting with a thermal reservoir is studied. Calculations for specified bath spectral functions are presented. Our primary focus is the vibrational relaxation of an excited molecule and we provide a generalization of the Montroll-Shuler equation into the coherent domain. A related system, the Stark ladder, is briefly discussed.

  9. Quantum-Confined Stark Effect of Individual Defects in a van der Waals Heterostructure.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Chitraleema; Goodfellow, Kenneth M; Dhara, Sajal; Yoshimura, Anthony; Meunier, Vincent; Vamivakas, A Nick

    2017-03-16

    The optical properties of atomically thin semiconductor materials have been widely studied because of the isolation of monolayer transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs). They have rich optoelectronic properties owing to their large direct bandgap, the interplay between the spin and the valley degree of freedom of charge carriers, and the recently discovered localized excitonic states giving rise to single photon emission. In this Letter, we study the quantum-confined Stark effect of these localized emitters present near the edges of monolayer tungsten diselenide (WSe2). By carefully designing sequences of metallic (graphene), insulating (hexagonal boron nitride), and semiconducting (WSe2) two-dimensional materials, we fabricate a van der Waals heterostructure field effect device with WSe2 hosting quantum emitters that is responsive to external static electric field applied to the device. A very efficient spectral tunability up to 21 meV is demonstrated. Further, evaluation of the spectral shift in the photoluminescence signal as a function of the applied voltage enables us to extract the polarizability volume (up to 2000 Å(3)) as well as information on the dipole moment of an individual emitter. The Stark shift can be further modulated on application of an external magnetic field, where we observe a flip in the sign of dipole moment possibly due to rearrangement of the position of electron and hole wave functions within the emitter.

  10. Nuclear Quantum Effects in H(+) and OH(-) Diffusion along Confined Water Wires.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2016-08-04

    The diffusion of protons and hydroxide ions along water wires provides an efficient mechanism for charge transport that is exploited by biological membrane channels and shows promise for technological applications such as fuel cells. However, what is lacking for a better control and design of these systems is a thorough theoretical understanding of the diffusion process at the atomic scale. Here we focus on two aspects of this process that are often disregarded because of their high computational cost: the use of first-principles potential energy surfaces and the treatment of the nuclei as quantum particles. We consider proton and hydroxide ions in finite water wires using density functional theory augmented with an apolar cylindrical confining potential. We employ machine learning techniques to identify the charged species, thus obtaining an agnostic definition that takes explicitly into account the delocalization of the charge in the Grotthus-like mechanism. We include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) through the thermostated ring polymer molecular dynamics method and model finite system size effects by considering Langevin dynamics on the potential of mean force of the charged species, allowing us to extract the same "universal" diffusion coefficient from simulations with different wire sizes. In the classical case, diffusion coefficients depend significantly on the potential energy surface, in particular on how dispersion forces modulate water-water distances. NQEs, however, make the diffusion less sensitive to the underlying potential and geometry of the wire.

  11. Highly crystalline carbon dots from fresh tomato: UV emission and quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijian; Li, Chun; Sun, Xiaobo; Pan, Wei; Yu, Guifeng; Wang, Jinping

    2017-09-29

    In this article, fresh tomato was explored as low-cost source to prepare carbon dots with high performances by microwave assisted pyrolysis. Given that amino group might act as nucleophile to cleave covalent bridging ester or ether in the crosslinked macromolecules in the biomass bulk, ethylenediamine (EDA) and urea owning amino groups were applied as nucleophile to modulate chemical composites of the carbon nanoparticles so as to tune their fluorescence emission and enhance their quantum yields(QYs). Very interestingly, the carbon dots synthesized in the presence of urea has a highly crystalline nature, a low-degree amorphous surface and a size less than 5 nm. Moreover, the doped N mainly contributes to form core in cyclic forms resulting in the strong electron-withdrawing ability within the conjugated C plane. Therefore, this type of carbon dots exhibits marked quantum confinement with maximum fluorescence peak being located in the UV region. The carbon nanoparticles using pristine fresh tomato and in the presence of EDA with a size more than 20 nm emitted surface state controlled fluorescence. Additionally, the carbon nanoparticles synthesized using fresh tomato pulp in the presence of EDA and urea were explored for the bioimaging of plant pathogenic fungi and the detection of vanillin. © 2017 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  12. Phosphorene confined systems in magnetic field, quantum transport, and superradiance in the quasiflat band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostahie, B.; Aldea, A.

    2016-02-01

    Spectral and transport properties of electrons in confined phosphorene systems are investigated in a five hopping parameter tight-binding model, using analytical and numerical techniques. The main emphasis is on the properties of the topological edge states accommodated by the quasiflat band that characterizes the phosphorene energy spectrum. We show, in the particular case of phosphorene, how the breaking of the bipartite lattice structure gives rise to the electron-hole asymmetry of the energy spectrum. The properties of the topological edge states in the zigzag nanoribbons are analyzed under different aspects: degeneracy, localization, extension in the Brillouin zone, dispersion of the quasiflat band in magnetic field. The finite-size phosphorene plaquette exhibits a Hofstadter-type spectrum made up of two unequal butterflies separated by a gap, where a quasiflat band composed of zigzag edge states is located. The transport properties are investigated by simulating a four-lead Hall device (importantly, all leads are attached on the same zigzag side), and using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. We find out that the chiral edge states due to the magnetic field yield quantum Hall plateaus, but the topological edge states in the gap do not support the quantum Hall effect and prove a dissipative behavior. By calculating the complex eigenenergies of the non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian that describes the open system (plaquette+leads), we prove the superradiance effect in the energy range of the quasiflat band, with consequences for the density of states and electron transmission properties.

  13. Direct Measurement of Quantum Confinement and Environmental Pinning Effects on Metal/Nanostructure Schottky Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tivarus, Cristian

    2005-03-01

    I will discuss direct nm-resolution measurements of metal/quantum well (QW) Schottky contacts made using Cross- sectional Ballistic Electron Emission Microscopy (XBEEM), in order to quantify the influence of small-size effects on hot- carrier injection into semiconductor nanostructures. Molecular Beam Epitaxy was used to grow a sequence of GaAs QWs with width varying from 1nm to 15 nm, separated by thick Al0.3Ga0.7As barrier layers. The samples were cleaved ex-situ and polycrystalline Au contacts were electron-beam evaporated on the cleaved edge using shadow mask or photo-lithography. Samples were studied in ultra-high vacuum using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy and XBEEM. The Schottky barrier height over the QWs was found to systematically increase with decreasing QW width, by up to ˜140 meV for the 1 nm QW. This is mostly due to a large quantum-confinement increase ( up to ˜200 meV) of the QW conduction band minimum (CBM), as estimated by a simple 1D QW model. We also did finite element electrostatic modeling to estimate the ``environmental" effects of the surrounding metal/Al0.3Ga0.7As interface on the QW CBM. Excellent quantitative agreement over the full QW width range is obtained when both quantum confinement and electrostatic effects are considered.I will also discuss on-going measurements to use the metal/QW nanocontacts as unique ``nano-apertures" to directly image and quantify the lateral hot-electron spreading profile in the metal film. This profile is surprisingly large, with a FWHM of ˜15nm (˜21nm) for a 4nm (7nm) thick Au film. XBEEM images directly show that hot-electron spreading is strongly modified by the grain structure in the metal film. In collaboration with J.P. Pelz, M.K. Hudait, and S.A. Ringel. Work supported by NSF and ONR

  14. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xavier, L. J. P.; da Costa, D. R.; Chaves, A.; Pereira, J. M., Jr.; Farias, G. A.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term Δ is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or {{K}\\prime} valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  15. Electronic confinement in graphene quantum rings due to substrate-induced mass radial kink.

    PubMed

    Xavier, L J P; da Costa, D R; Chaves, A; Pereira, J M; Farias, G A

    2016-12-21

    We investigate localized states of a quantum ring confinement in monolayer graphene defined by a circular mass-related potential, which can be induced e.g. by interaction with a substrate that breaks the sublattice symmetry, where a circular line defect provides a change in the sign of the induced mass term along the radial direction. Electronic properties are calculated analytically within the Dirac-Weyl approximation in the presence of an external magnetic field. Analytical results are also compared with those obtained by the tight-binding approach. Regardless of its sign, a mass term [Formula: see text] is expected to open a gap for low-energy electrons in Dirac cones in graphene. Both approaches confirm the existence of confined states with energies inside the gap, even when the width of the kink modelling the mass sign transition is infinitely thin. We observe that such energy levels are inversely proportional to the defect line ring radius and independent on the mass kink height. An external magnetic field is demonstrated to lift the valley degeneracy in this system and easily tune the valley index of the ground state in this system, which can be polarized on either K or [Formula: see text] valleys of the Brillouin zone, depending on the magnetic field intensity. Geometrical changes in the defect line shape are considered by assuming an elliptic line with different eccentricities. Our results suggest that any defect line that is closed in a loop, with any geometry, would produce the same qualitative results as the circular ones, as a manifestation of the topologically protected nature of the ring-like states investigated here.

  16. Theory of the vortex-clustering transition in a confined two-dimensional quantum fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoquan; Billam, Thomas P.; Nian, Jun; Reeves, Matthew T.; Bradley, Ashton S.

    2016-08-01

    Clustering of like-sign vortices in a planar bounded domain is known to occur at negative temperature, a phenomenon that Onsager demonstrated to be a consequence of bounded phase space. In a confined superfluid, quantized vortices can support such an ordered phase, provided they evolve as an almost isolated subsystem containing sufficient energy. A detailed theoretical understanding of the statistical mechanics of such states thus requires a microcanonical approach. Here we develop an analytical theory of the vortex clustering transition in a neutral system of quantum vortices confined to a two-dimensional disk geometry, within the microcanonical ensemble. The choice of ensemble is essential for identifying the correct thermodynamic limit of the system, enabling a rigorous description of clustering in the language of critical phenomena. As the system energy increases above a critical value, the system develops global order via the emergence of a macroscopic dipole structure from the homogeneous phase of vortices, spontaneously breaking the Z2 symmetry associated with invariance under vortex circulation exchange, and the rotational SO (2 ) symmetry due to the disk geometry. The dipole structure emerges characterized by the continuous growth of the macroscopic dipole moment which serves as a global order parameter, resembling a continuous phase transition. The critical temperature of the transition, and the critical exponent associated with the dipole moment, are obtained exactly within mean-field theory. The clustering transition is shown to be distinct from the final state reached at high energy, known as supercondensation. The dipole moment develops via two macroscopic vortex clusters and the cluster locations are found analytically, both near the clustering transition and in the supercondensation limit. The microcanonical theory shows excellent agreement with Monte Carlo simulations, and signatures of the transition are apparent even for a modest system of 100

  17. Effect of thermal annealing on the emission properties of heterostructures containing a quantum-confined GaAsSb layer

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, N. V. Vikhrova, O. V.; Zvonkov, B. N.; Malekhonova, N. V.; Nekorkin, S. M.; Pirogov, A. V.; Pavlov, D. A.

    2015-01-15

    Heterostructures containing single GaAsSb/GaAs quantum wells and bilayer GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum wells are produced by metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy at atmospheric pressure. The growth temperature of the quantum-confined layers is 500–570°C. The structural quality of the samples and the quality of heterointerfaces of the quantum wells are studied by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy of cross sections. The emission properties of the heterostructures are studied by photoluminescence measurements. The structures are subjected to thermal annealing under conditions chosen in accordance with the temperature and time of growth of the upper cladding p-InGaP layer during the formation of GaAs/InGaP laser structures with an active region containing quantum-confined GaAsSb layers. It is found that such heat treatment can have a profound effect on the emission properties of the active region, only if a bilayer GaAsSb/InGaAs quantum well is formed.

  18. Quantum size confinement in gallium selenide nanosheets: band gap tunability versus stability limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres-Penares, Daniel; Cros, Ana; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P.; Sánchez-Royo, Juan F.

    2017-04-01

    Gallium selenide is one of the most promising candidates to extend the window of band gap values provided by existing two-dimensional semiconductors deep into the visible potentially reaching the ultraviolet. However, the tunability of its band gap by means of quantum confinement effects is still unknown, probably due to poor nanosheet stability. Here, we demonstrate that the optical band gap band of GaSe nanosheets can be tuned by ∼120 meV from bulk to 8 nm thick. The luminescent response of very thin nanosheets (<8 nm) is strongly quenched due to early oxidation. Oxidation favors the emergence of sharp material nanospikes at the surface attributable to strain relaxation. Simultaneously, incorporated oxygen progressively replaces selenium giving rise to Ga2O3, with a residual presence of Ga2Se3 that tends to desorb. These results are relevant for the development and design of visible/ultraviolet electronics and optoelectronics with tunable functionalities based on atomically thin GaSe.

  19. Investigation of quantum confinement within the tunneling-percolation transition for ultrathin bismuth films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oller, Declan; Fernandes, Gustavo E.; Kim, Jin Ho; Xu, Jimmy

    2015-10-01

    We investigate conduction phenomena in ultrathin bismuth (Bi) films that are thermally evaporated onto flat quartz. Critical points in the conductance as a function of deposition time are identified and used to scale the data from time dependence to coverage dependence. The resulting nonlinear coverage scaling equation is verified independently via analysis done on transmission electron microscope images of the evaporated films. The scaled data yields critical exponents in very good agreement with classical percolation theory, and clearly shows the transition from the tunneling regime into percolation. Surprisingly, no noticeable signatures of size-quantization effects in the nucleation sites as a function of deposition time is observed in either regime. We discuss our findings in light of Boltzmann transport modeling of 1D conduction as an approximation to the narrow percolative paths that form at the onset of percolation. Our results suggest that lack of a preferred crystallite orientation in the nucleation process may indeed cause quantum-confinement to be too smeared out to be observable in the tunneling to percolation transition.

  20. Quantum size confinement in gallium selenide nanosheets: band gap tunability versus stability limitation.

    PubMed

    Andres-Penares, Daniel; Cros, Ana; Martínez-Pastor, Juan P; Sánchez-Royo, Juan F

    2017-04-28

    Gallium selenide is one of the most promising candidates to extend the window of band gap values provided by existing two-dimensional semiconductors deep into the visible potentially reaching the ultraviolet. However, the tunability of its band gap by means of quantum confinement effects is still unknown, probably due to poor nanosheet stability. Here, we demonstrate that the optical band gap band of GaSe nanosheets can be tuned by ∼120 meV from bulk to 8 nm thick. The luminescent response of very thin nanosheets (<8 nm) is strongly quenched due to early oxidation. Oxidation favors the emergence of sharp material nanospikes at the surface attributable to strain relaxation. Simultaneously, incorporated oxygen progressively replaces selenium giving rise to Ga2O3, with a residual presence of Ga2Se3 that tends to desorb. These results are relevant for the development and design of visible/ultraviolet electronics and optoelectronics with tunable functionalities based on atomically thin GaSe.

  1. Tuning Fermi-surface properties through quantum confinement in metallic metalattices: New metals from old atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crespi, Vincent H.; Han, J. E.

    2001-03-01

    We describe a new class of nanoscale structured metals wherein the effects of quantum confinement are combined with dispersive metallic electronic states to induce modifications to the fundamental low-energy microscopic properties of a three-dimensional metal: the density of states, the distribution of Fermi velocities, and the collective electronic response (J. E. Han and Vincent H. Crespi, to appear in Phys. Rev. Lett.). The metalattice, metal-infiltrated colloidal lattice, possesses two very different length scales, lattice constants of metal atoms and of colloidal spheres. We compute the electronic properties of the metalattice using an empirical tight-binding method. As a result of the hierarchy in the two length scales, electronic states bifurcate into two classes with weak and strong dispersion. The dispersive states reflect the symmetry of the colloidal lattice and have major contribution to the transport properties such as inversion of Fermi velocity and optical response. We also discuss the magnetic structure of the metalattice with magnetic infiltrants such as Pd and Rh.

  2. Bandgap and Carrier Transport Engineering of Quantum Confined Mixed Phase Nanocrystalline/Amorphous Silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Tianyuan; Klafehn, Grant; Kendrick, Chito; Theingi, San; Airuoyo, Idemudia; Lusk, Mark T.; Stradins, Paul; Taylor, Craig; Collins, Reuben T.

    2016-11-21

    Mixed phase nanocrystalline/amorphous-silicon (nc/a-Si:H) thin films with band-gap higher than bulk silicon are prepared by depositing silicon nanoparticles (SiNPs), prepared in a separate deposition zone, and hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), simultaneously. Since the two deposition phases are well decoupled, optimized parameters for each component can apply to the growth process. Photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) shows that the embedded SiNPs are small enough to exhibit quantum confinement effects. The low temperature PL measurements on the mixed phase reveal a dominant emission feature, which is associated with SiNPs surrounded by a-Si:H. In addition, we compare time dependent low temperature PL measurements for both a-Si:H and mixed phase material under intensive laser exposure for various times up to two hours. The PL intensity of a-Si:H with embedded SiNPs degrades much less than that of pure a-Si:H. We propose this improvement of photostability occurs because carriers generated in the a-Si:H matrix quickly transfer into SiNPs and recombine there instead of recombining in a-Si:H and creating defect states (Staebler-Wronski Effect).

  3. Imaging quantum confinement with optical and POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) NMR

    PubMed Central

    Kempf, James G.; Miller, Michael A.; Weitekamp, Daniel P.

    2008-01-01

    The nanoscale distributions of electron density and electric fields in GaAs semiconductor devices are displayed with NMR experiments. The spectra are sensitive to the changes to the nuclear-spin Hamiltonian that are induced by perturbations delivered in synchrony with a line-narrowing pulse sequence. This POWER (perturbations observed with enhanced resolution) method enhanced resolution up to 103-fold, revealing the distribution of perturbations over nuclear sites. Combining this method with optical NMR, we imaged quantum-confined electron density in an individual AlGaAs/GaAs heterojunction via hyperfine shifts. Fits to the coherent evolution and relaxation of nuclei within a hydrogenic state established one-to-one correspondence of radial position to frequency. Further experiments displayed the distribution of photo-induced electric field within the same states via a quadrupolar Stark effect. These unprecedented high-resolution distributions discriminate between competing models for the luminescence and support an excitonic state, perturbed by the interface, as the dominant source of the magnetically modulated luminescence. PMID:19104070

  4. A low-temperature synthesis for organically soluble HgTe nanocrystals exhibiting near-infrared photoluminescence and quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Piepenbrock, Marc-Oliver M; Stirner, Tom; Kelly, Stephen M; O'Neill, Mary

    2006-05-31

    A new low-temperature, one-pot method is introduced for the preparation of organically passivated HgTe nanocrystals, without the use of highly toxic precursors. The nanocrystals show bright photoluminescence in the infrared telecommunication windows about 1300 and 1550 nm with quantum efficiencies between 55 and 60%. They have a zinc blende structure with a mean particle diameter of 3.4 nm, thus exhibiting quantum confinement effects. Particle growth is self-limited by temperature quenching, so a narrow size distribution is obtained. The measured size of the particles agrees with calculations using the pseudopotential method.

  5. Ge/SiGe quantum confined Stark effect electro-absorption modulation with low voltage swing at λ = 1550 nm.

    PubMed

    Dumas, D C S; Gallacher, K; Rhead, S; Myronov, M; Leadley, D R; Paul, D J

    2014-08-11

    Low-voltage swing (≤1.0 V) high-contrast ratio (6 dB) electro-absorption modulation covering 1460 to 1560 nm wavelength has been demonstrated using Ge/SiGe quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) diodes grown on a silicon substrate. The heterolayers for the devices were designed using an 8-band k.p Poisson-Schrödinger solver which demonstrated excellent agreement with the experimental results. Modelling and experimental results demonstrate that by changing the quantum well width of the device, low power Ge/SiGe QCSE modulators can be designed to cover the S- and C-telecommunications bands.

  6. Interplay between quantum confinement and surface effects in thickness selective stability of thin Ag and Eu films

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Xiaojie; Wang, Cai -Zhuang

    2017-04-03

    Using first-principles calculations, we show that both face-centered cubic (fcc) Ag (1 1 0) ultrathin films and body-centered cubic (bcc) Eu(1 1 0) ultrathin films exhibit thickness selective stability. Furthermore, the origin of such thickness selection is different. While the thickness selective stability in fcc Ag(1 1 0) films is mainly due to the well-known quantum well states ascribed to the quantum confinement effects in free-electron-like metal films, the thickness selection in bcc Eu(1 1 0) films is more complex and also strongly correlated with the occupation of the surface and surface resonance states.

  7. Further evidence for the quantum confined electrochemistry model of the formation mechanism of p - -type porous silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, L.; Zang, S. L.; Wong, S. P.; Wilson, I. H.; Hark, S. K.; Liu, Z. F.; Cai, S. M.

    1996-11-01

    Two types of p- porous silicon (PS) were formed in HF solutions of different concentrations. One type with nanoscale (NS) dimensions of about 3 nm and the other with dimensions of about 5 nm. PS samples formed in the lower concentration of HF were anodized again in the higher concentration of HF and vice versa. The photoluminescence peak position and, thus, the size of NS units of PS were found to be related to the concentration of HF in which the PS is formed, independent of the forming time. The larger NS units of PS can be further electrochemically etched by anodization, while the smaller ones cannot. These results give a confirming evidence for the quantum confined electrochemistry model of the formation mechanism of PS based on the quantum confinement effect and classical electrochemical theory [S. L. Zhang, K. S. Ho, Y. T. Hou, B. D. Qian, P. Diao, and S. M. Cai, Appl. Phys. Lett. 62, 642 (1993)].

  8. Synthesis and optical properties of MoS2 and isomorphous nanoclusters in the quantum confinement regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcoxon, J. P.; Newcomer, P. P.; Samara, G. A.

    1997-06-01

    Highly crystalline nanoclusters of hexagonal (2H polytype) MoS2 and several of its isomorphous Mo and W chalcogenides have been synthesized with excellent control over cluster size down to ˜2 nm. These clusters exhibit highly structured, bandlike optical absorption and photoluminescence spectra which can be understood in terms of the band-structures for the bulk crystals. Key results of this work include: (1) strong quantum confinement effects with blue shifts in some of the absorption features relative to bulk crystals as large as 4 eV for clusters ˜2.5 nm in size, thereby allowing great tailorability of the optical properties; (2) the quasiparticle (or excitonic) nature of the optical response is preserved down to clusters ≲2.5 nm in size which are only two unit cells thick; (3) the demonstration of the strong influence of dimensionality on the magnitude of the quantum confinement. Specifically, three-dimensional confinement of the carriers produces energy shifts which are over an order of magnitude larger than those due to one-dimensional (perpendicular to the layer planes) confinement emphasizing the two-dimensional nature of the structure and bonding; (4) the observation of large increases in the spin-orbit splittings at the top of the valence band at the K and M points of the Brillouin zone with decreasing cluster size, a feature that reflects quantum confinement as well as possible changes in the degree of hybridization of the electronic orbitals which make up the states at these points; and (5) the observation of photoluminescence due to both direct and surface recombination. Several of these features bode well for the potential of these materials for solar photocatalysis.

  9. Features of the electroluminescence spectra of quantum-confined silicon p{sup +}-n heterojunctions in the infrared spectral region

    SciTech Connect

    Bagraev, N. T.; Klyachkin, L. E.; Kuzmin, R. V. Malyarenko, A. M.; Mashkov, V. A.

    2013-11-15

    The results of studying the characteristics of optical emission in various regions of quantum-confined silicon p{sup +}-n heterojunctions heavily doped with boron are analyzed. The results obtained allow one to conclude that near-infrared electroluminescence arises near the heterointerface between the nanostructured wide-gap silicon p{sup +}-barrier heavily doped with boron and n-type silicon (100), the formation of which included the active involvement of boron dipole centers.

  10. Loosening quantum confinement: observation of real conductivity caused by hole polarons in semiconductor nanocrystals smaller than the Bohr radius.

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, Ronald; Pijpers, Joep J H; Groeneveld, Esther; Koole, Rolf; Donega, Celso de Mello; Vanmaekelbergh, Daniel; Delerue, Christophe; Allan, Guy; Bonn, Mischa

    2012-09-12

    We report on the gradual evolution of the conductivity of spherical CdTe nanocrystals of increasing size from the regime of strong quantum confinement with truly discrete energy levels to the regime of weak confinement with closely spaced hole states. We use the high-frequency (terahertz) real and imaginary conductivities of optically injected carriers in the nanocrystals to report on the degree of quantum confinement. For the smaller CdTe nanocrystals (3 nm < radius < 5 nm), the complex terahertz conductivity is purely imaginary. For nanocrystals with radii exceeding 5 nm, we observe the onset of real conductivity, which is attributed to the increasingly smaller separation between the hole states. Remarkably, this onset occurs for a nanocrystal radius significantly smaller than the bulk exciton Bohr radius a(B) ∼ 7 nm and cannot be explained by purely electronic transitions between hole states, as evidenced by tight-binding calculations. The real-valued conductivity observed in the larger nanocrystals can be explained by the emergence of mixed carrier-phonon, that is, polaron, states due to hole transitions that become resonant with, and couple strongly to, optical phonon modes for larger QDs. These polaron states possess larger oscillator strengths and broader absorption, and thereby give rise to enhanced real conductivity within the nanocrystals despite the confinement.

  11. Quantum confinement in self-assembled two-dimensional nanoporous honeycomb networks at close-packed metal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kepčija, N.; Huang, T.-J.; Klappenberger, F.; Barth, J. V.

    2015-03-01

    Quantum confinement of a two-dimensional electron gas by supramolecular nanoporous networks is investigated using the boundary elements method based on Green's functions for finite geometries and electron plane wave expansion for periodic systems. The "particle in a box" picture was analyzed for cases with selected symmetries that model previously reported architectures constructed from organic and metal-organic scattering centers confining surface state electrons of Ag(111) and Cu(111). First, by analyzing a series of cases with systematically defined parameters (scattering geometry, potentials, and effective broadening), we demonstrate how the scattering processes affect the properties of the confined electrons. For the features of the local density of states reported by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we disentangle the contributions of lifetime broadening and splitting of quantum well states due to coupling of neighboring quantum dots. For each system, we analyze the local electron density distribution and relate it to the corresponding band structure as calculated within the plane-wave expansion framework. Then, we address two experimental investigations, where in one case only STS data and in the other case mainly angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data were reported. In both cases, the experimental findings can be successfully simulated. Furthermore, the missing information can be complemented because our approach allows to correlate the information obtained by STS with that of ARPES. The combined analysis of several observations suggests that the scattering potentials created by the network originate primarily from the adsorbate-induced changes of the local surface dipole barrier.

  12. Structural Metastability and Quantum Confinement in Zn1-xCoxO Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Almonacid, G; Martín-Rodríguez, R; Renero-Lecuna, C; Pellicer-Porres, J; Agouram, S; Valiente, R; González, J; Rodríguez, F; Nataf, L; Gamelin, D R; Segura, A

    2016-08-10

    This paper investigates the electronic structure of wurtzite (W) and rock-salt (RS) Zn1-xCoxO nanoparticles (NPs) by means of optical measurements under pressure (up to 25 GPa), X-ray absorption, and transmission electron microscopy. W-NPs were chemically synthesized at ambient conditions and RS-NPs were obtained by pressure-induced transformation of W-NPs. In contrast to the abrupt phase transition in W-Zn1-xCoxO as thin film or single crystal, occurring sharply at about 9 GPa, spectroscopic signatures of tetrahedral Co(2+) are observed in NPs from ambient pressure to about 17 GPa. Above this pressure, several changes in the absorption spectrum reveal a gradual and irreversible W-to-RS phase transition: (i) the fundamental band-to-band edge shifts to higher photon energies; (ii) the charge-transfer absorption band virtually disappears (or overlaps the fundamental edge); and (iii) the intensity of the crystal-field absorption peaks of Co(2+) around 2 eV decreases by an order of magnitude and shifts to 2.5 eV. After incomplete phase transition pressure cycles, the absorption edge of nontransformed W-NPs at ambient pressure exhibits a blue shift of 0.22 eV. This extra shift is interpreted in terms of quantum confinement effects. The observed gradual phase transition and metastability are related to the NP size distribution: the larger the NP, the lower the W-to-RS transition pressure.

  13. Nanostructured multilayer TiO2-Ge films with quantum confinement effects for photovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Faheem; Mehmood, Mazhar; Aslam, Muhammad; Shah, Syed Ismat

    2010-03-01

    Multilayer TiO(2)-Ge thin films have been deposited using electron beam evaporation and resistive heating. The thickness of the TiO(2) layers is 20 nm, while the thickness of the Ge layers varies from 2 to 20 nm with a step of 2 nm away from the substrate. These films were characterized by studying their optical, electrical, and structural properties. The films were annealed at various temperatures up to 500 degrees C for 2 h. The films are amorphous up to an annealing temperature of 400 degrees C, although Raman spectra suggest short-range ordering (and adjustments). The films annealed at 450 and 500 degrees C exhibit X-ray reflections of Ge and anatase TiO(2). Illumination in sunlight increases the conductivity of the as-deposited and annealed films. The band gap of the amorphous films changes from 1.27 to 1.41 eV up to 400 degrees C; the major contribution is possibly through direct transition. Two band gap regimes are clearly seen after 450 and 500 degrees C, which have been assigned to an indirect band gap at about 1.2 eV and a direct band gap at about 1.8 eV. Conductivity of the multilayer films has been higher than that of pure Ge film. The conductivity increases with annealing temperature with abrupt increase at about 380 degrees C. The results imply that the TiO(2)-Ge multilayer films may be employed as heterojunctions with tunable band gap energy as related to quantum confinement effects.

  14. Strong confinement-induced engineering of the g factor and lifetime of conduction electron spins in Ge quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    Giorgioni, Anna; Paleari, Stefano; Cecchi, Stefano; Vitiello, Elisa; Grilli, Emanuele; Isella, Giovanni; Jantsch, Wolfgang; Fanciulli, Marco; Pezzoli, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Control of electron spin coherence via external fields is fundamental in spintronics. Its implementation demands a host material that accommodates the desirable but contrasting requirements of spin robustness against relaxation mechanisms and sizeable coupling between spin and orbital motion of the carriers. Here, we focus on Ge, which is a prominent candidate for shuttling spin quantum bits into the mainstream Si electronics. So far, however, the intrinsic spin-dependent phenomena of free electrons in conventional Ge/Si heterojunctions have proved to be elusive because of epitaxy constraints and an unfavourable band alignment. We overcome these fundamental limitations by investigating a two-dimensional electron gas in quantum wells of pure Ge grown on Si. These epitaxial systems demonstrate exceptionally long spin lifetimes. In particular, by fine-tuning quantum confinement we demonstrate that the electron Landé g factor can be engineered in our CMOS-compatible architecture over a range previously inaccessible for Si spintronics. PMID:28000670

  15. Strong confinement-induced engineering of the g factor and lifetime of conduction electron spins in Ge quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgioni, Anna; Paleari, Stefano; Cecchi, Stefano; Vitiello, Elisa; Grilli, Emanuele; Isella, Giovanni; Jantsch, Wolfgang; Fanciulli, Marco; Pezzoli, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Control of electron spin coherence via external fields is fundamental in spintronics. Its implementation demands a host material that accommodates the desirable but contrasting requirements of spin robustness against relaxation mechanisms and sizeable coupling between spin and orbital motion of the carriers. Here, we focus on Ge, which is a prominent candidate for shuttling spin quantum bits into the mainstream Si electronics. So far, however, the intrinsic spin-dependent phenomena of free electrons in conventional Ge/Si heterojunctions have proved to be elusive because of epitaxy constraints and an unfavourable band alignment. We overcome these fundamental limitations by investigating a two-dimensional electron gas in quantum wells of pure Ge grown on Si. These epitaxial systems demonstrate exceptionally long spin lifetimes. In particular, by fine-tuning quantum confinement we demonstrate that the electron Landé g factor can be engineered in our CMOS-compatible architecture over a range previously inaccessible for Si spintronics.

  16. Fermion confinement via quantum walks in (2+1)-dimensional and (3+1)-dimensional space-time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Márquez-Martín, I.; Di Molfetta, G.; Pérez, A.

    2017-04-01

    We analyze the properties of a two- and three-dimensional quantum walk that are inspired by the idea of a brane-world model put forward by Rubakov and Shaposhnikov [Phys. Lett. B 125, 136 (1983), 10.1016/0370-2693(83)91253-4]. In that model, particles are dynamically confined on the brane due to the interaction with a scalar field. We translated this model into an alternate quantum walk with a coin that depends on the external field, with a dependence which mimics a domain wall solution. As in the original model, fermions (in our case, the walker) become localized in one of the dimensions, not from the action of a random noise on the lattice (as in the case of Anderson localization) but from a regular dependence in space. On the other hand, the resulting quantum walk can move freely along the "ordinary" dimensions.

  17. Strong carrier localization and diminished quantum-confined Stark effect in ultra-thin high-indium-content InGaN quantum wells with violet light emission

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Suk-Min; Kwack, Ho-Sang; Park, Chunghyun; Yoo, Yang-Seok; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Kwon, Soon-Yong; Jin Kim, Hee; Yoon, Euijoon; Si Dang, Le

    2013-11-25

    Here, we report on the optical and structural characteristics of violet-light-emitting, ultra-thin, high-Indium-content (UTHI) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQWs), and of conventional low-In-content MQWs, which both emit at similar emission energies though having different well thicknesses and In compositions. The spatial inhomogeneity of In content, and the potential fluctuation in high-efficiency UTHI MQWs were compared to those in the conventional low-In-content MQWs. We conclude that the UTHI InGaN MQWs are a promising structure for achieving better quantum efficiency in the visible and near-ultraviolet spectral range, owing to their strong carrier localization and reduced quantum-confined Stark effect.

  18. Strong quantum-confined Stark effect in a lattice-matched GeSiSn/GeSn multi-quantum-well structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ruizhi; Chunfuzhang; Han, Genquan; Hao, Yue

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents modeling and simulation of a multiple quantum well structure formed with Ge0.95Sn0.05 quantum wells separated by Ge0.51Si0.35Sn0.14 barriers for the applications. These alloy compositions are chosen to satisfy two conditions simultaneously: type-I band alignment between Ge0.95Sn0.05/Ge0.51Si0.35Sn0.14 and a lattice match between wells and barriers. This lattice match ensures that the strain-free structure can be grown upon a relaxed Ge0.51Si0.35Sn0.14 buffer on a silicon substrate - a CMOS compatible process. A electro-absorption modulator with the Ge0.95Sn0.05/Ge0.51Si0.35Sn0.14 multiple quantum well structure based on quantum-confined Stark effect(QCSE) is demonstrated in theory. The energy band diagrams of the GeSiSn/GeSn multi-quantum-well structure at 0 and 0.5V bias are calculated, respectively. And the corresponding absorption coefficients as a function of cut-off energy for this multiple quantum well structure at 0 and 0.5Vbias are also obtained, respectively. The reduction of cut-off energy is observed with the applying of the external electric field, indicating a strong QCSE in the structure.

  19. Quantum confinement modulation on the performance of nanometer thin body GaSb/InAs tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Wang, Liwei; En, Yunfei; Jiang, Xiang-Wei

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we have presented an atomistic quantum simulation study to investigate the device performances of GaSb/InAs heterojunction tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) with nanometer body thicknesses. It is revealed that the thin junction induced quantum confinement effect results in a heterojunction type transition from type-III to type-II as the junction thickness reduces, which can be used as an effective modulation of the TFET device performance. It is found that as the channel thickness decreases, both the ON current and OFF current of the device decrease significantly due to the quantum confinement induced effective band gap enlargement. In addition, the OFF current of the heterojunction GaSb/InAs TFET is always larger than that of the homojunction InAs TFET, which is possibly caused by the GaSb/InAs interfacial state assisted tunneling. It is also revealed that the subthreshold swing of the heterojunction TFET does not change much as the channel thickness is reduced.

  20. Quantum confinement in self-assembled two-dimensional nanoporous honeycomb networks at close-packed metal surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Kepčija, N.; Huang, T.-J.; Klappenberger, F. Barth, J. V.

    2015-03-14

    Quantum confinement of a two-dimensional electron gas by supramolecular nanoporous networks is investigated using the boundary elements method based on Green’s functions for finite geometries and electron plane wave expansion for periodic systems. The “particle in a box” picture was analyzed for cases with selected symmetries that model previously reported architectures constructed from organic and metal-organic scattering centers confining surface state electrons of Ag(111) and Cu(111). First, by analyzing a series of cases with systematically defined parameters (scattering geometry, potentials, and effective broadening), we demonstrate how the scattering processes affect the properties of the confined electrons. For the features of the local density of states reported by scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS), we disentangle the contributions of lifetime broadening and splitting of quantum well states due to coupling of neighboring quantum dots. For each system, we analyze the local electron density distribution and relate it to the corresponding band structure as calculated within the plane-wave expansion framework. Then, we address two experimental investigations, where in one case only STS data and in the other case mainly angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) data were reported. In both cases, the experimental findings can be successfully simulated. Furthermore, the missing information can be complemented because our approach allows to correlate the information obtained by STS with that of ARPES. The combined analysis of several observations suggests that the scattering potentials created by the network originate primarily from the adsorbate-induced changes of the local surface dipole barrier.

  1. Optical investigation of the one-dimensional confinement effects in narrow GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birotheau, L.; Izrael, A.; Marzin, J. Y.; Azoulay, R.; Thierry-Mieg, V.; Ladan, F. R.

    1992-12-01

    We show optical data obtained at 8 K on narrow GaAs/GaAlAs quantum wires, with width down to 15 nm, fabricated by reactive ion etching and metal organic chemical vapor deposition overgrowth. Lateral confinement energies (up to 23 meV) and polarization effects are evidenced in the photoluminescence excitation spectra. These experimental results are in good agreement with calculated absorption spectra, which include the effects of wire width fluctuations, yielding, for our fabrication technique, a value of ±5 nm for these size fluctuations.

  2. Theory of confined states of positronium in spherical and circular quantum dots with Kane’s dispersion law

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Confined states of a positronium (Ps) in the spherical and circular quantum dots (QDs) are theoretically investigated in two size quantization regimes: strong and weak. Two-band approximation of Kane’s dispersion law and parabolic dispersion law of charge carriers are considered. It is shown that electron-positron pair instability is a consequence of dimensionality reduction, not of the size quantization. The binding energies for the Ps in circular and spherical QDs are calculated. The Ps formation dependence on the QD radius is studied. PMID:23826867

  3. Size control, quantum confinement, and oxidation kinetics of silicon nanocrystals synthesized at a high rate by expanding thermal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Lihao E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M. E-mail: A.H.M.Smets@tudelft.nl

    2015-05-25

    The growth mechanism of silicon nanocrystals (Si NCs) synthesized at a high rate by means of expanding thermal plasma chemical vapor deposition technique are studied in this letter. A bimodal Gaussian size distribution is revealed from the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images, and routes to reduce the unwanted large Si NCs are discussed. Photoluminescence and Raman spectroscopies are employed to study the size-dependent quantum confinement effect, from which the average diameters of the small Si NCs are determined. The surface oxidation kinetics of Si NCs are studied using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and the importance of post-deposition passivation treatments of hydrogenated crystalline silicon surfaces are demonstrated.

  4. Self-assembly of a novel beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibiting strong quantum confinement effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wu; Ma, Dekun; Huang, Zhen; Tang, Qun; Xie, Qin; Qian, Yitai

    2005-05-01

    The 3D beta-In2S3 flowerlike architecture assembled from nanoflakes was prepared via a novel complex-precursor assisted (CPA) solvothermal route. The as-prepared beta-In2S3 powder was characterized by X-ray diffraction pattern (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS), transition electron microscopy (TEM), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectra, and photoluminescence spectrum. The novel 3D beta-In2S3 nanostructure exhibit a strong quantum confinement effect. FT-IR spectra were used to investigate the coordinative chemical effect in the complex. A possible mechanism was discussed.

  5. High-resolution x-ray diffraction investigations of highly mismatched II-VI quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passow, T.; Leonardi, K.; Stockmann, A.; Selke, H.; Heinke, H.; Hommel, D.

    1999-05-01

    High-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) was used to systematically investigate CdSe and ZnTe quantum wells one to three monolayers thick sandwiched between a ZnSe buffer and cap layer grown at different substrate temperatures. For comparison high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) measurements were performed which were evaluated by digital analysis of lattice images. The x-ray diffraction profiles show typically two main layer peaks. Their intensity ratio depends critically on the quantum well thickness and varies only weakly with the thickness of the ZnSe layers. The total Cd or Te content determined from comparisons of experimental and simulated (004) icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans is well confirmed by the results from digital analysis of HRTEM lattice images. For quantum well thicknesses larger than 1.5 (ZnTe) or 2.0 (CdSe) monolayers, no simulation parameters could be found to achieve good agreement between theoretical and measured diffraction profiles. This transition is more clearly visible in diffraction profiles of asymmetrical reflections. By HRTEM measurements, this could be correlated to the occurrence of stacking faults at these thicknesses. The formation of quantum islands detected by HRTEM was not reflected in the HRXRD icons/Journals/Common/omega" ALT="omega" ALIGN="TOP"/>-2icons/Journals/Common/theta" ALT="theta" ALIGN="TOP"/> scans.

  6. Engineering Electronic Structure of a Two-Dimensional Topological Insulator Bi(111) Bilayer on Sb Nanofilms by Quantum Confinement Effect.

    PubMed

    Bian, Guang; Wang, Zhengfei; Wang, Xiao-Xiong; Xu, Caizhi; Xu, SuYang; Miller, Thomas; Hasan, M Zahid; Liu, Feng; Chiang, Tai-Chang

    2016-03-22

    We report on the fabrication of a two-dimensional topological insulator Bi(111) bilayer on Sb nanofilms via a sequential molecular beam epitaxy growth technique. Our angle-resolved photoemission measurements demonstrate the evolution of the electronic band structure of the heterostructure as a function of the film thickness and reveal the existence of a two-dimensional spinful massless electron gas within the top Bi bilayer. Interestingly, our first-principles calculation extrapolating the observed band structure shows that, by tuning down the thickness of the supporting Sb films into the quantum dimension regime, a pair of isolated topological edge states emerges in a partial energy gap at 0.32 eV above the Fermi level as a consequence of quantum confinement effect. Our results and methodology of fabricating nanoscale heterostructures establish the Bi bilayer/Sb heterostructure as a platform of great potential for both ultra-low-energy-cost electronics and surface-based spintronics.

  7. Long-lived nanosecond spin coherence in high-mobility 2DEGs confined in double and triple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Ullah, S.; Gusev, G. M.; Hernandez, F. G. G.; Bakarov, A. K.

    2016-06-07

    We investigated the spin coherence of high-mobility two-dimensional electron gases confined in multilayer GaAs quantum wells. The dynamics of the spin polarization was optically studied using pump-probe techniques: time-resolved Kerr rotation and resonant spin amplification. For double and triple quantum wells doped beyond the metal-to-insulator transition, the spin-orbit interaction was tailored by the sample parameters of structural symmetry (Rashba constant), width, and electron density (Dresselhaus linear and cubic constants) which allow us to attain long dephasing times in the nanoseconds range. The determination of the scales, namely, transport scattering time, single-electron scattering time, electron-electron scattering time, and spin polarization decay time further supports the possibility of using n-doped multilayer systems for developing spintronic devices.

  8. Quantum well intermixing technique using proton implantation for carrier confinement of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriwaki, Shouhei; Saitou, Minoru; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki

    2016-08-01

    We investigated quantum well intermixing (QWI) using proton implantation to form the carrier confinement structure in the active layer of a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The required potential barrier height is discussed referring to the result of numerical analysis. The bandgap change due to the QWI was investigated experimentally for various quantum well structures, proton dose densities, and thermal annealing conditions. A potential barrier height of 30 meV was observed using a high-indium and thin-well structure. High crystalline quality was confirmed by photoluminescence intensity measurement, even after the QWI process, and the lasing of the fabricated QWI-VCSEL was observed without any deterioration. The proposed technique would be effective in improving the device performance in a simple fabrication process.

  9. Solid Confinement of Quantum Dots in ZIF-8 for Efficient and Stable Color-Conversion White LEDs.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wen; Mao, Yiyin; Wang, Xiaobing; Guo, Yi; He, Haiping; Ye, Zhizhen; Lee, Shuit-Tong; Peng, Xinsheng

    2017-04-10

    The powder form and low photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) of fluorescent metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) present a serious obstacle to fabricating high-efficiency film-like lighting devices. Here, we present a facile way to produce thin films of CdSex S1-x /ZnS quantum dots (QDs)@ZIF-8 with high PLQY by encapsulating red, green, and blue CdSex S1-x /ZnS QDs in ZIF-8 through a one-pot solid-confinement conversion process. The QDs@ZIF-8 thin film emits warm white light with good color quality and presents good thermal stability and long-term durability. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Quantum chemistry study of uranium(VI), neptunium(V), and plutonium(IV,VI) complexes with preorganized tetradentate phenanthrolineamide ligands.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Cheng-Liang; Wu, Qun-Yan; Wang, Cong-Zhi; Zhao, Yu-Liang; Chai, Zhi-Fang; Shi, Wei-Qun

    2014-10-20

    The preorganized tetradentate 2,9-diamido-1,10-phenanthroline ligand with hard-soft donors combined in the same molecule has been found to possess high selectivity toward actinides in an acidic aqueous solution. In this work, density functional theory (DFT) coupled with the quasi-relativistic small-core pseudopotential method was used to investigate the structures, bonding nature, and thermodynamic behavior of uranium(VI), neptunium(V), and plutonium(IV,VI) with phenanthrolineamides. Theoretical optimization shows that Et-Tol-DAPhen and Et-Et-DAPhen ligands are both coordinated with actinides in a tetradentate chelating mode through two N donors of the phenanthroline moiety and two O donors of the amide moieties. It is found that [AnO2L(NO3)](n+) (An = U(VI), Np(V), Pu(VI); n = 0, 1) and PuL(NO3)4 are the main 1:1 complexes. With respect to 1:2 complexes, the reaction [Pu(H2O)9](4+)(aq) + 2L(org) + 2NO3(-)(aq) → [PuL2(NO3)2](2+)(org) + 9H2O(aq) might be another probable extraction mechanism for Pu(IV). From the viewpoint of energy, the phenanthrolineamides extract actinides in the order of Pu(IV) > U(VI) > Pu(VI) > Np(V), which agrees well with the experimental results. Additionally, all of the thermodynamic reactions are more energetically favorable for the Et-Tol-DAPhen ligand than the Et-Et-DAPhen ligand, indicating that substitution of one ethyl group with one tolyl group can enhance the complexation abilities toward actinide cations (anomalous aryl strengthening).

  11. Efficient, High-Speed, Monolithic Optoelectronic Circuits Using Quantum- Confined Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-07-25

    quantum - wells , and L is the effective cavity length of the DBR laser measured between the equivalent reflection planes of the multielement mirrors...waveguide structures can be formed Once the implant is annealed, the mirror layers as well as the quantum - well active region intermixes . The I-V...summarize our progress in the materials and processing as well as the device areas. 14. SUBJECT TERMS Semiconductor lasers, quantum -wire lasers

  12. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Avijit; Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-01

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  13. Non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Avijit Ray, Debasis

    2015-03-15

    The non-resonant elastic scattering of low-energy photons by the bound valence electron in the ground state 3s of atomic sodium confined in quantum plasmas is investigated theoretically. The incident photon energy is assumed to be much smaller than the 3s-3p excitation energy. The alkali atom sodium is first formulated as an effective one-electron problem in which the attractive interaction between the valence electron and the atomic ion core is simulated by a spherically symmetric model potential. The Shukla-Eliasson oscillatory exponential cosine screened-Coulomb potential model is then used to mimic the effective two-body (valence-core) interaction within quantum plasmas. Non-relativistic calculations performed within the electric dipole approximation indicate that the non-resonant elastic photon scattering cross-section undergoes a dramatic growth by several orders of magnitude as the quantum wave number increases. A qualitative explanation of this phenomenon is presented. In the absence of the oscillatory cosine screening term, a similar growth is observed at larger values of the quantum wave number. Our computed relevant atomic data are in very good agreement with the experimental as well as the previous theoretical data for the zero-screening (free atom) case, and with the very limited, accurate theoretical results available for the case of exponential screened-Coulomb two-body interaction, without the cosine screening term.

  14. Quantum-confinement and Structural Anisotropy result in Electrically-Tunable Dirac Cone in Few-layer Black Phosphorous.

    PubMed

    Dolui, Kapildeb; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-07-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) materials are well-known to exhibit interesting phenomena due to quantum confinement. Here, we show that quantum confinement, together with structural anisotropy, result in an electric-field-tunable Dirac cone in 2D black phosphorus. Using density functional theory calculations, we find that an electric field, E ext, applied normal to a 2D black phosphorus thin film, can reduce the direct band gap of few-layer black phosphorus, resulting in an insulator-to-metal transition at a critical field, Ec. Increasing E ext beyond Ec can induce a Dirac cone in the system, provided the black phosphorus film is sufficiently thin. The electric field strength can tune the position of the Dirac cone and the Dirac-Fermi velocities, the latter being similar in magnitude to that in graphene. We show that the Dirac cone arises from an anisotropic interaction term between the frontier orbitals that are spatially separated due to the applied field, on different halves of the 2D slab. When this interaction term becomes vanishingly small for thicker films, the Dirac cone can no longer be induced. Spin-orbit coupling can gap out the Dirac cone at certain electric fields; however, a further increase in field strength reduces the spin-orbit-induced gap, eventually resulting in a topological-insulator-to-Dirac-semimetal transition.

  15. Quantum confinement and its related effects on the critical size of GeO2 nanoparticles anodes for lithium batteries.

    PubMed

    Son, Yoonkook; Park, Mihee; Son, Yeonguk; Lee, Jung-Soo; Jang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Youngsik; Cho, Jaephil

    2014-02-12

    This work has been performed to determine the critical size of the GeO2 nanoparticle for lithium battery anode applications and identify its quantum confinement and its related effects on the electrochemical performance. GeO2 nanoparticles with different sizes of ∼ 2, ∼ 6, ∼ 10, and ∼ 35 nm were prepared by adjusting the reaction rate, controlling the reaction temperature and reactant concentration, and using different solvents. Among the different sizes of the GeO2 nanoparticles, the ∼ 6 nm sized GeO2 showed the best electrochemical performance. Unexpectedly smaller particles of the ∼ 2 nm sized GeO2 showed the inferior electrochemical performances compared to those of the ∼ 6 nm sized one. This was due to the low electrical conductivity of the ∼ 2 nm sized GeO2 caused by its quantum confinement effect, which is also related to the increase in the charge transfer resistance. Those characteristics of the smaller nanoparticles led to poor electrochemical performances, and their relationships were discussed.

  16. First-principles study of quantum confinement and surface effects on the electronic properties of InAs nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, Feng; Tang, Li-Ming Zhang, Yong; Chen, Ke-Qiu

    2013-12-14

    We have used first principles methods to systematically investigate the quantum confinement effect on the electronic properties of zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) InAs nanowires (NWs) with different orientations and diameters, and compared their electronic properties before and after pseudo-hydrogen passivation. The results show that the calculated carrier effective masses are dependent on the NW diameter, except for [110] ZB NWs, and the hole effective masses of [111] ZB NWs are larger than the electron effective masses when the NW diameter is ≥26 Å. The band alignments of [111] ZB and [0001] WZ NWs reveal that the effect of quantum confinement on the conduction bands is greater than on the valence bands, and the position of the valence band maximum level changes little with increasing NW diameter. The pseudo-hydrogen passivated NWs have larger band gaps than the corresponding unpassivated NWs. The carrier effective masses and mobilities can be adjusted by passivating the surface dangling bonds.

  17. Stark-assisted quantum confinement of wavepackets. A coupling of nonadiabatic interaction and CW-laser

    SciTech Connect

    Arasaki, Yasuki; Mizuno, Yuta; Takatsuka, Kazuo; Scheit, Simona

    2016-01-28

    When a nonadiabatic system that has an ionic state (large dipole moment) and a covalent state (small dipole moment) is located in a strong laser field, the crossing point of the two potential energy curves is forced to oscillate due to the oscillating laser field and to meet wavepackets moving on the potential curves many times. This leads to additional transitions between the two states, and under favorable conditions, the wavepacket may be confined in a spatial region rich in nonadiabatic interaction. In this paper, taking the LiF molecule system in a continuous-wave driving field as a prototypical example, the dynamical origins of the wavepacket confinement are theoretically investigated.

  18. Photoinduced electron donor/acceptor processes in colloidal II-VI semiconductor quantum dots and nitroxide free radicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Poulami

    Electron transfer (ET) processes are one of the most researched topics for applications ranging from energy conversion to catalysis. An exciting variation is utilizing colloidal semiconductor nanostructures to explore such processes. Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a novel class of light harvesting, emitting and charge-separation materials for applications such as solar energy conversion. Detailed knowledge of the quantitative dissociation of the photogenerated excitons and the interfacial charge- (electron/hole) transfer is essential for optimization of the overall efficiency of many such applications. Organic free radicals are the attractive counterparts for studying ET to/from QDs because these undergo single-electron transfer steps in reversible fashion. Nitroxides are an exciting class of stable organic free radicals, which have recently been demonstrated to be efficient as redox mediators in dye-sensitized solar cells, making them even more interesting for the aforementioned studies. This dissertation investigates the interaction between nitroxide free radicals TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl), 4-amino-TEMPO (4-amino- 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl) and II-VI semiconductor (CdSe and CdTe) QDs. The nature of interaction in these hybrids has been examined through ground-state UV-Vis absorbance, steady state and time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, transient absorbance, upconversion photoluminescence spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). The detailed analysis of the PL quenching indicates that the intrinsic charge transfer is ultrafast however, the overall quenching is still limited by the lower binding capacities and slower diffusion related kinetics. Careful analysis of the time resolved PL decay kinetics reveal that the decay rate constants are distributed and that the trap states are involved in the overall quenching process. The ultrafast hole transfer from CdSe QDs to 4-Amino TEMPO observed

  19. Influence of quantum-confined Stark effect on optical properties within trench defects in InGaN quantum wells with different indium content

    SciTech Connect

    Vaitkevičius, A. Mickevičius, J.; Dobrovolskas, D.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tuna, Ö.; Giesen, C.; Heuken, M.

    2014-06-07

    The trench defects in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures are studied using confocal photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. A strong blueshift (up to ∼280 meV) and an intensity increase (by up to a factor of 700) of the emission are demonstrated for regions enclosed by trench loops. The influence of the difference in the well width inside and outside the trench loops observed by transmission electron microscopy, the compositional pulling effect, the strain relaxation inside the loop, and corresponding reduction in the built-in field on the PL band peak position and intensity were estimated. The competition of these effects is mainly governed by the width of the quantum wells in the structure. It is shown that the PL band blueshift observed within the trench defect loops in the InGaN structures with wide quantum wells is mainly caused by the reduction in efficiency of the quantum-confined Stark effect due to strain relaxation.

  20. Electron-nuclei spin dynamics in II-VI semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gall, C.; Brunetti, A.; Boukari, H.; Besombes, L.

    2012-05-01

    We report on the dynamics of optically induced nuclear spin polarization in individual CdTe/ZnTe quantum dots loaded with one electron by modulation doping. The fine structure of the hot trion (charged exciton X- with an electron in the P shell) is identified in photoluminescence excitation spectra. A negative polarization rate of the photoluminescence, optical pumping of the resident electron, and the built up of dynamic nuclear spin polarization (DNSP) are observed in time-resolved optical pumping experiments when the quantum dot is excited at higher energy than the hot trion triplet state. The time and magnetic field dependence of the polarization rate of the X- emission allows us to probe the dynamics of formation of the DNSP in the optical pumping regime. We demonstrate using time-resolved measurements that the creation of a DNSP at B=0 T efficiently prevents longitudinal spin relaxation of the electron caused by fluctuations of the nuclear spin bath. The DNSP is built in the microsecond range at high excitation intensity. A relaxation time of the DNSP in about 10 μm is observed at B=0 T and significantly increases under a magnetic field of a few milli-Tesla. We discuss mechanisms responsible for the fast initialization and relaxation of the diluted nuclear spins in this system.

  1. Confinement of spin-orbit induced Dirac states in quantum point contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Tommy

    2015-08-01

    The quantum transmission problem for a particle moving in a quantum point contact in the presence of a Rashba spin-orbit interaction and applied magnetic field is solved semiclassically. A strong Rashba interaction and parallel magnetic field form emergent Dirac states at the center of the constriction, leading to the appearance of resonances which carry spin current and become bound at high magnetic fields. These states can be controlled in situ by modulation of external electric and magnetic fields, and can be used to turn the channel into a spin pump which operates at zero bias. It is shown that this effect is currently experimentally accessible in p -type quantum point contacts.

  2. II-VI widegap superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taguchi, T.; Yamada, Y.; Endoh, Y.; Nozue, Y.; Mullins, J. T.; Ohno, T.; Masumoto, Y.; Takeda, S.

    We review our recent results of the excitonic properties in ZnSeZnS and Cd xZn 1-xSZnS strained-layer superlattices (SLSs). The most important physical insights in the II-VI widegap superlattices are to understand the relationship between the optical properties of quasi-two-dimensional exciton and strain because the well layer frequently receives biaxial compression or tension. The strain thus causes the significant shifts of the bandgap and splitting of the valence band. Semi-quantative calculations lead to an expectation that ZnSeZnS SLS always exhibits a type I band lineup within 100 Å thicknesses of the ZnSe well at a constant ZnS barrier width of several tens angstrom. This is in good agreement with the experimental results of exciton absorption and its luminescence excitation spectra. The Cd 0.3Zn 0.7SZnS SLSs with a range of well widths can produce intense excitonic emissions around 3.4 eV at room temperature due to the quantum confinement of excitons in the ternary CdZnS well. In order to elucidate localisation and relaxation processes of excitons, we have for the first time reported a multiple-LO-phonon emission process in the excitation spectra. The electric-field studies suggest that the concomitant decrease in intensity and the energy downshift of the exciton line may originate from the quantum confined Stark effect.

  3. Structure direction of II-VI semiconductor quantum dot binary nanoparticle superlattices by tuning radius ratio.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhuoying; O'Brien, Stephen

    2008-06-01

    We report a nanoparticle radius ratio dependent study of the formation of binary nanoparticle superlattices (BNSLs) of CdTe and CdSe quantum dots. While keeping all other parameters identical in the system, the effective nanoparticle radius ratio, gamma(eff), was tuned to allow the formation of five different BNSL structures, AlB(2), cub-NaZn(13), ico-NaZn(13), CaCu(5), and MgZn(2). For each structure, gamma(eff) is located close to a local maximum of its space-filling factor, based on a model for space filling principles. We demonstrate the ability to select specific BNSLs based solely on gamma(eff), highlighting the role of entropic forces as a driver for self-assembly.

  4. Spectral broadening and electron-photon coupling in III-V infrared detectors of low dimensional quantum confined system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joy, Soumitra R.; Mohammedy, Farseem M.

    2016-05-01

    Present work explores the mid-IR photodetection mechanism in III-V quantum confined system in twofold ways. Firstly, it models the extent of spectral linewidth broadening of photo-detector. Secondly, it investigates whether a strong perturbation of light can modulate the electronic bandstructure. Photo-absorption mechanism in the detector correlated to reduced carrier lifetime in ground state leading to homogeneous spectral widening is calculated. Besides, contribution of non-uniform size and composition of quantum dots towards spectral broadening is modeled in order to get the envelop of inhomogeneously broadened photocurrent spectrum. Our model generates photocurrent spectrum with 1.4 μm broadening centered at 3.5 μm at 77 K for a DWELL-IP, which agrees with the experimental result. The calculated photocurrent spectral width of 1.3 μm for GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Well (QW) centered at 8.31 μm at 77 K also supports experimental data. In addition, our calculation reveals the emergence of a broad resonant peak in the spectrum of QW-IP in far infrared region (20-50 μm) as the photon volume density increases up to 0.1% of carrier density inside the active region. We introduce a hybrid density-of-states for strongly coupled electron-photon system to explain both mid and far IR peak.

  5. Impact of field-induced quantum confinement on the onset of tunneling field-effect transistors: Experimental verification

    SciTech Connect

    Smets, Quentin Verreck, Devin; Heyns, Marc M.; Verhulst, Anne S.; Martens, Koen; Lin, Han Chung; Kazzi, Salim El; Simoen, Eddy; Collaert, Nadine; Thean, Aaron; Raskin, Jean-Pierre

    2014-11-17

    The Tunneling Field-Effect Transistor (TFET) is a promising device for future low-power logic. Its performance is often predicted using semiclassical simulations, but there is usually a large discrepancy with experimental results. An important reason is that Field-Induced Quantum Confinement (FIQC) is neglected. Quantum mechanical simulations show FIQC delays the onset of Band-To-Band Tunneling (BTBT) with hundreds of millivolts in the promising line-TFET configuration. In this letter, we provide experimental verification of this delayed onset. We accomplish this by developing a method where line-TFET are modeled using highly doped MOS capacitors (MOS-CAP). Using capacitance-voltage measurements, we demonstrate AC inversion by BTBT, which was so far unobserved in MOS-CAP. Good agreement is shown between the experimentally obtained BTBT onset and quantum mechanical predictions, proving the need to include FIQC in all TFET simulations. Finally, we show that highly doped MOS-CAP is promising for characterization of traps deep into the conduction band.

  6. II-VI colloidal quantum-dot/quantum-rod heterostructures under electric field effect and their energy transfer rate to graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zahra, H.; Elmaghroui, D.; Fezai, I.; Jaziri, S.

    2016-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the energy transfer between a CdSe/CdS Quantum-dot/Quantum-rod (QD/QR) core/shell structure and a weakly doped graphene layer, separated by a dielectric spacer. A numerical method assuming the realistic shape of the type I and quasi-type II CdSe/CdS QD/QR is developed in order to calculate their energy structure. An electric field is applied for both types to manipulate the carriers localization and the exciton energy. Our evaluation for the isolated QD/QR shows that a quantum confined Stark effect can be obtained with large negative electric filed while a small effect is observed with positive ones. Owing to the evolution of the carriers delocalization and their excitonic energy versus the electric field, both type I and quasi-type II QD/QR donors are suitable as sources of charge and energy. With a view to improve its absorption, the graphene sheet (acceptor) is placed at different distances from the QD/QR (donor). Using the random phase approximation and the massless Dirac Fermi approximation, the quenching rate integral is exactly evaluated. That reveals a high transfer rate that can be obtained with type I QD/QR with no dependence on the electric field. On the contrary, a high dependence is obtained for the quasi-type II donor and a high fluorescence rate from F = 80 kV/cm. Rather than the exciton energy, the transition dipole is found to be responsible for the evolution of the fluorescence rate. We find also that the fluorescence rate decreases with increasing the spacer thickness and shows a power low dependence. The QD/QR fluorescence quenching can be observed up to large distance which is estimated to be dependent only on the donor exciton energy.

  7. Phase Diagrams for the ν = 1/2 Fractional Quantum Hall Effect in Electron Systems Confined to Symmetric, Wide GaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, L. N.; Shabani, J.; Liu, Y.; Shayegan, M.; West, K. W.; Baldwin, K. W.

    2014-03-01

    We report an experimental investigation of fractional quantum Hall effect (FQHE) at the even-denominator Landau level filling factor ν = 1/2 in high quality wide GaAs quantum wells. The quasi-two-dimensional electron systems we study are confined to GaAs quantum wells with widths, W, ranging from 41 to 96 nm and have variable densities in the range of 4 ×1010 to 4 ×1011 cm-2 . We present several experimental phase diagrams for the stability of the ν = 1/2 FQHE in these quantum wells. We find that the densities at which the ν = 1/2 FQHE is stable are larger for narrower quantum wells. Moreover, even a slight charge distribution asymmetry destabilizes the ν = 1/2 FQHE and turns the electron system into a compressible state. We also present a plot of the subband separation (ΔSAS), which characterizes the interlayer tunneling, vs density for various W. Finally, we summarize the experimental data in a diagram that takes into account the relative strengths of the inter-layer and intra-layer Coulomb interactions and ΔSAS. We compare this experimental phase diagram of normalized inter-layer distance vs tunneling to recent theoretical calculations which have been used to conclude a two-component origin for the ν = 1/2 FQHE. A portion of this work was performed at the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory which is supported by NSF Cooperative Agreement No. DMR-1157490, the State of Florida and the US DOE.

  8. Nonperturbative confinement in quantum chromodynamics. I. Study of an approximate equation of Mandelstam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkinson, D.; Drohm, J. K.; Johnson, P. W.; Stam, K.

    1981-11-01

    An approximated form of the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the gluon propagator in quarkless QCD is subjected to nonlinear functional and numerical analysis. It is found that solutions exist, and that these have a double pole at the origin of the square of the propagator momentum, together with an accumulation of soft branch points. This analytic structure is strongly suggestive of confinement by infrared slavery.

  9. Long-wavelength oxide-confined VCSEL using InGaAsN quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, H. C.; Pan, J. S.; Li, Alice C. F.; Tang, M. C.; Wu, C. C.; Lee, Tsin-Dong; Huang, K. F.

    2004-05-01

    Characteristics of oxide-confined vertical-cavity surface emitting laser emitting at 1289nm will be presented in this paper. The wafer is monolithically grown using InGaAsN/GaAs QWs as active layer and GaAs/AlGaAs conventional DBRs. In the structure, the laser employs 39 pairs N-GaAs/Al0.9GaAs and 23 pairs P-GaAs/Al0.9GaAs with a selectively oxide layer located at first DBR close to active region, providing the current and optical confinement. The device processing is similar to the fabrication for current 850nm oxVCSELs. Mesa etching is used to expose the Al-rich AlGaAs layer and followed by oxidation to form the current confinement. The maximum light output power is around 950uW at room temperature under CW operation with a threshold current around 6mA for 10um aperture size devices. The device can still lase at 1000C with a maximum power of 0.14mW. Slope efficiency is 0.133(W/A) and side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) is around 20dB at 10mA operation. The aging data and speed transmission experimental data will also be presented.

  10. Quantum kinetic theory. VI. The growth of a Bose-Einstein condensate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M. D.; Gardiner, C. W.

    2000-09-01

    A detailed analysis of the growth of a Bose-Einstein condensate is given, based on quantum kinetic theory, in which we take account of the evolution of the occupations of lower trap levels, and of the full Bose-Einstein formula for the occupations of higher trap levels, as well as the Bose-stimulated direct transfer of atoms to the condensate level introduced by Gardiner et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1793 (1997); 81, 5266 (1998)]. We find good agreement with experiment at higher temperatures, but at lower temperatures the experimentally observed growth rate is somewhat more rapid. We also confirm the picture of the ``kinetic'' region of evolution, introduced by Kagan, Svistunov, and Shlyapnikov (Zh. Eksp. Teor. Fiz. 101, 528 (1992) [Sov. Phys. JETP 75, 387 (1992)]), for the time up to the initiation of the condensate. The behavior after initiation essentially follows our original growth equation, but with a substantially increased rate coefficient. Our modeling of growth implicitly gives a model of the spatial shape of the density profile of the condensate-vapor system as the condensate grows, and thus provides an alternative to the present phenomenological fitting procedure, based on the sum of a zero-chemical potential vapor and a Thomas-Fermi-shaped condensate. Our method gives substantially different results for condensate numbers and temperatures obtained from phenomenological fits, but fits the published column density data very well.

  11. II-VI Quantum Cascade emitters in the 6-8μm range.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Thor A; De Jesus, Joel; Ravikumar, Arvind P; Gmachl, Claire F; Tamargo, Maria C

    2016-08-01

    We present the growth and characterization of ZnCdSe/ZnCdMgSe quantum cascade (QC) heterostructures grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and designed to operate at 6-8μm. These structures utilize the better-understood ZnCdMgSe with InP lattice matched compositions yielding a bandgap of 2.80 eV as compared to previous work which used ZnCdMgSe compositions with bandgaps at 3.00 eV. Grown structures posses good structural and optical properties evidenced in X-ray diffraction and photoluminescence studies. Fabricated mesa devices show temperature dependent I-V measurements with differential resistance of 3.6 Ω, and a turn on voltage of 11V consistent with design specifications. Electroluminescence was observed in these devices up to room temperature with emission centered at 7.1 μm and line widths of ∼16%(ΔE/E) at 80K. The results show that these are well-behaved electroluminescent structures. Addition of waveguide layers and further improvements in well barrier interfaces are being pursued in efforts to demonstrate lasing.

  12. Photoinduced band filling in strongly confined colloidal PbS quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Ullrich, B.; Xi, H.; Wang, J. S.

    2014-06-21

    Increase in continuous wave laser excitation (6 W/cm{sup 2} to 120 W/cm{sup 2}) of colloidal PbS quantum dots in the strongly quantized regime (diameters 2.0 nm and 4.7 nm) deposited on semi-insulating GaAs and glass causes a clear blue shift (0.019 eV and 0.080 eV) of the emission spectra. Proof of the applicability of a dynamic three-dimensional band filling model is the significance of the presented results and demonstrates the effective electronic coupling in quantum dot arrays similar to superlattices. The work also reveals the influence of quantum dot sizes on photo-doping effects.

  13. Photoinduced band filling in strongly confined colloidal PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullrich, B.; Xi, H.; Wang, J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Increase in continuous wave laser excitation (6 W/cm2 to 120 W/cm2) of colloidal PbS quantum dots in the strongly quantized regime (diameters 2.0 nm and 4.7 nm) deposited on semi-insulating GaAs and glass causes a clear blue shift (0.019 eV and 0.080 eV) of the emission spectra. Proof of the applicability of a dynamic three-dimensional band filling model is the significance of the presented results and demonstrates the effective electronic coupling in quantum dot arrays similar to superlattices. The work also reveals the influence of quantum dot sizes on photo-doping effects.

  14. Nanostructured current-confined single quantum dot light-emitting diode at 1300 nm.

    PubMed

    Monat, Christelle; Alloing, Blandine; Zinoni, Carl; Li, Lianhe H; Fiore, Andrea

    2006-07-01

    A novel light-emitting-diode structure is demonstrated, which relies on nanoscale current injection through an oxide aperture to achieve selective excitation of single InAs/GaAs quantum dots. Low-temperature electroluminescence spectra evidence discrete narrow lines around 1300 nm (line width approximately 75 microeV) at ultralow currents, which are assigned to the emission from single excitons and multiexcitons. This approach, which enables the fabrication of efficient nanoscale active devices at 1300 nm, can provide single-photon-emitting diodes for fiber-based quantum cryptography.

  15. Strong quantum confinement effects in kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 nanospheres for organic optoelectronic cells.

    PubMed

    Arul, Narayanasamy Sabari; Yun, Dong Yeol; Lee, Dea Uk; Kim, Tae Whan

    2013-12-07

    X-ray photoelectron spectra, X-ray diffraction patterns, scanning electron microscopy images, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared samples were Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanospheres with a kesterite phase. Ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra for the CZTS nanospheres with an average crystallite size of 3.26 nm showed that the absorption edge corresponding to the energy gap shifted to the higher energy side due to the quantum confinement within the CZTS nanoparticles. Current-density measurements showed that the power conversion efficiency (0.952%) of the organic photovoltaic cells with CZTS nanospheres was much higher than that (0.120%) of the cells without CZTS nanospheres.

  16. Temperature independent Seebeck coefficient through quantum confinement modulation in amorphous Nb-O/Ni-Ta-O multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Music, Denis; Hunold, Oliver; Coultas, Sarah; Roberts, Adam

    2017-05-01

    Employing a correlative experimental and theoretical methodology, we have investigated amorphous monoxide Nb-O/Ni-Ta-O multilayers. It is feasible to obtain a temperature independent Seebeck coefficient up to 500 °C for these metallic-like conductors, attaining -25 μV K-1. While Nb and Ta strongly interact with O, Ni experiences the metallic and monoxide-like bonding. We observe a 3 eV wide region below the Fermi level convoluted through several first nearest neighbor Ni - Ni and second nearest neighbor Nb - Nb interactions resulting in many confined states. It can be proposed that by increasing temperature these modulated quantum states gradually become thermally accessible eradicating the temperature dependence of the Seebeck coefficient.

  17. Space-charge waves in magnetized and collisional quantum plasma columns confined in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bagheri, Mehran; Abdikian, Alireza

    2014-04-15

    We study the dispersion relation of electrostatic waves propagating in a column of quantum magnetized collisional plasma embraced completely by a metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes. The analysis is based on the quantum linearized hydrodynamic formalism of collective excitations within the quasi-static approximation. It is shown when the electronic de Broglie's wavelength of the plasma is comparable in the order of magnitude to the radius of the nanotube, the quantum effects are quite meaningful and our model anticipates one acoustical and two optical space-charge waves which are positioned into three propagating bands. With increasing the nanotube radius, the features of the acoustical branch remain unchanged, yet two distinct optical branches are degenerated and the classical behavior is recovered. This study might provide a platform to create new finite transverse cross section quantum magnetized plasmas and to devise nanometer dusty plasmas based on the metallic carbon nanotubes in the absence of either a drift or a thermal electronic velocity and their existence could be experimentally examined.

  18. Quantum confinement effect in Si/Ge core-shell nanowires: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Li; Musin, Ryza N.; Wang, Xiao-Qian; Chou, M. Y.

    2008-05-01

    The electronic structure of Si/Ge core-shell nanowires along the [110] and [111] directions are studied with first-principles calculations. We identify the near-gap electronic states that are spatially separated within the core or the shell region, making it possible for a dopant to generate carriers in a different region. The confinement energies of these core and shell states provide an operational definition of the “band offset,” which is not only size dependent but also component dependent. The optimal doping strategy in Si/Ge core-shell nanowires is proposed based on these energy results.

  19. Quantum-mechanical engines working with an ideal gas with a finite number of particles confined in a power-law trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianhui; Ma, Yongli; He, Jizhou

    2015-07-01

    Based on quantum thermodynamic processes, we make a quantum-mechanical (QM) extension of the typical heat engine cycles, such as the Carnot, Brayton, Otto, Diesel cycles, etc., with no introduction of the concept of temperature. When these QM engine cycles are implemented by an ideal gas confined in an arbitrary power-law trap, a relation between the quantum adiabatic exponent and trap exponent is found. The differences and similarities between the efficiency of a given QM engine cycle and its classical counterpart are revealed and discussed.

  20. Superposition of Quantum Confinement Energy (SQCE) model for estimating shell thickness in core-shell quantum dots: validation and comparison.

    PubMed

    Saran, Amit D; Mehra, Anurag; Bellare, Jayesh R

    2012-07-15

    A novel theoretical model based on superposition of core and shell band-gaps, termed as SQCE model, is developed and reported here, which enables one to estimate the shell thickness in a core-shell quantum dot (QD), which is critically important in deciding its optical and electronic properties. We apply the model to two experimental core-shell QD systems, CdSe-CdS and CdSe-ZnS, which we synthesize by microemulsion method. We synthesize and study two series of samples, R and S to study the optical properties. The core size is varied in the R-series (by varying water-to-surfactant ratio, R) whereas the shell thickness is varied in the S-series (by varying the shell-to-core precursor molar ratio, S). The core and core-shell QDs from R-series and S-series are characterized for particle size, shape and crystallographic information. The shell thickness for all core-shell QD samples is estimated by SQCE model, and experimentally measured with TEM and SAXS. A close match is observed between experimental values and model predictions, thus validating the model. Further, the optimum shell thickness (corresponding to maximum quantum yield) values for CdS and ZnS over a 4.26 nm CdSe core have been estimated as 0.585 nm and 0.689 nm, respectively, from the SQCE model. The SQCE model developed in this work is applicable to other core-shell quantum dots also, such as CdTe-CdS, CdTe-CdSe and CdS-ZnS, and will serve as a useful complement to experimental measurement.

  1. An Infinite Order Discrete Variable Representation of an Effective Mass Hamiltonian: Application to Exciton Wave Functions in Quantum Confined Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kaledin, Alexey L; Lian, Tianquan; Hill, Craig L; Musaev, Djamaladdin G

    2014-08-12

    We describe an extension of the conventional Fourier grid discrete variable representation (DVR) to the bound state problem of a particle with a position-dependent mass. An infinite order DVR, derived for a variable mass kinetic energy operator, coupled with an efficient grid contraction scheme yields essentially exact eigenvalues for a chosen grid spacing. Implementation of the method is shown to be very practical due to the fact that in a DVR no integral evaluation is necessary and that the resultant kinetic energy matrix is sparse. Numerical calculations are presented for exciton states of spherical, cylindrical, and toric Type I (CdSe/ZnS) core-shell quantum dots. In these examples, electron-hole interaction is treated explicitly by solving a self-consistent Schrödinger-Poisson equation on a contracted DVR grid. Prospective applications of the developed approach to calculating electron transfer rates between adsorbed molecular acceptors and quantum confined nanocrystals of generic shape, dimensionality, and composition are also discussed.

  2. Quantum-size effects in the energy loss of charged particles interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Borisov, A. G.; Juaristi, J. I.

    2006-01-15

    Time-dependent density-functional theory is used to calculate quantum-size effects in the energy loss of antiprotons interacting with a confined two-dimensional electron gas. The antiprotons follow a trajectory normal to jellium circular clusters of variable size, crossing every cluster at its geometrical center. Analysis of the characteristic time scales that define the process is made. For high-enough velocities, the interaction time between the projectile and the target electrons is shorter than the time needed for the density excitation to travel along the cluster. The finite-size object then behaves as an infinite system, and no quantum-size effects appear in the energy loss. For small velocities, the discretization of levels in the cluster plays a role and the energy loss does depend on the system size. A comparison to results obtained using linear theory of screening is made, and the relative contributions of electron-hole pair and plasmon excitations to the total energy loss are analyzed. This comparison also allows us to show the importance of a nonlinear treatment of the screening in the interaction process.

  3. A robust numerical method for self-polarization energy of spherical quantum dots with finite confinement barriers.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shaozhong

    2010-04-01

    By utilizing a novel three-layer dielectric model for the interface between a spherical quantum dot and the surrounding matrix, a robust numerical method for calculating the self-polarization energy of a spherical quantum dot with a finite confinement barrier is presented in this paper. The proposed numerical method can not only overcome the inherent mathematical divergence in the self-polarization energy which arises for the simplest and most widely used step-like model of the dielectric interface, but also completely eliminate the potential numerical divergence which may occur in the Bolcatto-Proetto's formula [J. Phys.: Condens. Matter 13, 319-334 (2001)], an approximation method commonly employed for more realistic three-layer dielectric models such as the linear and the cosine-like models frequently mentioned in the literature. Numerical experiments have demonstrated the convergence of the proposed numerical method as the number of the steps used to discretize the translation layer in a three-layer model goes to infinity, an important property that the Bolcatto-Proetto's formula appears not necessarily to possess.

  4. Wavelength-tunable visible to near-infrared photoluminescence of carbon dots: the role of quantum confinement and surface states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamsari, Morteza Sasani; Bidzard, Ashkan Momeni; Han, Wooje; Park, Hyung-Ho

    2016-04-01

    Carbon quantum dots (C-QDs) with different size distributions and surface characteristics can exhibit good emission properties in the visible and near-infrared (NIR) regions, which can be applicable in optoelectronic devices as well as biomedical applications. Optical properties of colloidal C-QDs in distilled water at different concentrations produced using a method of alkali-assisted surfactant-free oxidation of cellulose acetate is presented. The structural and optical properties of colloidal C-QDs at different concentrations were investigated, with the aim of clarifying the main mechanisms of photoluminescence emissions. We observed a wide range of tunable visible to NIR emissions with good stability from the C-QD colloids at different applied excitation wavelengths. The colloids show dual emissions with maxima at ˜420 and 775 nm (blue and NIR emissions) when excited at the wavelength range near the energy gaps of the C-QDs. Moreover, by increasing the excitation wavelength, tunable visible emissions at the spectral range of 475 to 550 nm are observed. A detailed analysis of the results shows that the blue and NIR luminescence of colloidal C-QDs originate from the oxide-related surface effects whereas quantum confinement is the responsible mechanism for tunable visible emissions of the C-QD colloid.

  5. Communications on quantum similarity (2): A geometric discussion on holographic electron density theorem and confined quantum similarity measures.

    PubMed

    Carbó-Dorca, R; Besalú, E

    2010-10-01

    The so-called holographic electron density theorem (HEDT) is analyzed from an algebraic perspective, and a brief analytical point of view is also given. The connection of the HEDT with quantum similarity measures (QSM) over electronic density functions (DF) is studied using GTO functions, atomic ASA DF, and promolecular ASA DF. Restricted integration of QSM over a box of finite side length is discussed for all this DF. This work emphasizes the geometric aspects of HEDT, but for the sake of completeness, some analytical insight based on a general Taylor series expansion is also given at the end. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Morphology of ultrathin CdSe quantum confinement layers in ZnSe matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinyama, K. G.; O'Donnell, K. P.; Rosenauer, A.; Gerthsen, D.

    1999-06-01

    Using a combination of transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution TEM (HRTEM), digital analysis of lattice images (DALI), and correspondence analysis (CA) we present at near-atomic resolution the morphology of a nominal 2 monolayer (ML) cadmium selenide (CdSe) quantum well (QW) between ZnSe barriers. We reveal the presence of ˜10 ML zinc cadmium selenide (Zn xCd 1- xSe) alloy insertion layer of varying composition in a ZnSe matrix. A spotty pattern in the plane of the layer indicates the presence of self-assembled clusters or islands similar to the structures commonly referred to as quantum dots. Further analysis indicates that these clusters, of less than 10 nm in lateral extent, themselves contain sites highly saturated with CdSe. Analysis of photoluminescence (PL) spectra suggests that the emission originates predominantly from excitons trapped in these islands.

  7. Nonlinear absorption coefficient and optically detected electrophonon resonance in cylindrical GaAs/AlAs quantum wires with different confined phonon models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoa, Doan Quoc; Phuong, Le Thi Thu; Hoi, Bui Dinh

    2017-03-01

    A quantum kinetic equation for electrons interacting with confined phonons is used to investigate the nonlinear absorption of an intense electromagnetic wave by electrons in cylindrical GaAs/AlAs quantum wires. The analytic expression for absorption coefficient is calculated for three models of confined optical phonons: the dielectric continuum (DC), hydrodynamic continuum (HC), and Huang-Zhu (HZ) models. The absorption coefficient depends on the square of the electromagnetic wave amplitude. The electrophonon resonance and optically detected electrophonon resonance (ODEPR) are observed through the absorption spectrum. The full width at half maximum (the line-width) of the ODEPR peaks is obtained by a computational method. The line-width is found to increase with increasing temperature and decrease with increasing the quantum wire radius. In particular, numerical results show that the DC and HZ models lead to a similar behaviour of electron - confined phonon interaction whereas the HC model results in a quite different one, especially at small quantum wire radius. For large quantum wire radii, above mentioned phonon models have equivalent contributions to the ODEPR line-width.

  8. Impact of artificial lateral quantum confinement on exciton-spin relaxation in a two-dimensional GaAs electronic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kiba, Takayuki Murayama, Akihiro; Tanaka, Toru; Tamura, Yosuke; Higo, Akio; Thomas, Cedric; Samukawa, Seiji

    2014-10-15

    We demonstrate the effect of artificial lateral quantum confinement on exciton-spin relaxation in a GaAs electronic system. GaAs nanodisks (NDs) were fabricated from a quantum well (QW) by top-down nanotechnology using neutral-beam etching aided by protein-engineered bio-nano-templates. The exciton-spin relaxation time was 1.4 ns due to ND formation, significantly extended compared to 0.44 ns for the original QW, which is attributed to weakening of the hole-state mixing in addition to freezing of the carrier momentum. The temperature dependence of the spin-relaxation time depends on the ND thickness, reflecting the degree of quantum confinement.

  9. Tunneling into a quantum confinement created by a single-step nanolithography of conducting oxide interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maniv, E.; Ron, A.; Goldstein, M.; Palevski, A.; Dagan, Y.

    2016-07-01

    A unique nanolithography technique compatible with conducting oxide interfaces, which requires a single lithographic step with no additional amorphous deposition or etching, is presented. It is demonstrated on a SrTiO3/LaAlO3 interface where a constriction is patterned in the electron liquid. We find that an additional backgating can further confine the electron liquid into an isolated island. Conductance and differential conductance measurements show resonant tunneling through the island. The data at various temperatures and magnetic fields are analyzed and the effective island size is found to be of the order of 10 nm. The magnetic field dependence suggests the absence of spin degeneracy in the island. Our method is suitable for creating superconducting and oxide-interface-based electronic devices.

  10. Modeling direct band-to-band tunneling: From bulk to quantum-confined semiconductor devices

    SciTech Connect

    Carrillo-Nuñez, H.; Ziegler, A.; Luisier, M.; Schenk, A.

    2015-06-21

    A rigorous framework to study direct band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) in homo- and hetero-junction semiconductor nanodevices is introduced. An interaction Hamiltonian coupling conduction and valence bands (CVBs) is derived using a multiband envelope method. A general form of the BTBT probability is then obtained from the linear response to the “CVBs interaction” that drives the system out of equilibrium. Simple expressions in terms of the one-electron spectral function are developed to compute the BTBT current in two- and three-dimensional semiconductor structures. Additionally, a two-band envelope equation based on the Flietner model of imaginary dispersion is proposed for the same purpose. In order to characterize their accuracy and differences, both approaches are compared with full-band, atomistic quantum transport simulations of Ge, InAs, and InAs-Si Esaki diodes. As another numerical application, the BTBT current in InAs-Si nanowire tunnel field-effect transistors is computed. It is found that both approaches agree with high accuracy. The first one is considerably easier to conceive and could be implemented straightforwardly in existing quantum transport tools based on the effective mass approximation to account for BTBT in nanodevices.

  11. Electron and boson clusters in confined geometries: Symmetry breaking in quantum dots and harmonic traps

    PubMed Central

    Yannouleas, Constantine; Landman, Uzi

    2006-01-01

    We discuss the formation of crystalline electron clusters in semiconductor quantum dots and of crystalline patterns of neutral bosons in harmonic traps. In a first example, we use calculations for two electrons in an elliptic quantum dot to show that the electrons can localize and form a molecular dimer. The calculated singlet–triplet splitting (J) as a function of the magnetic field (B) agrees with cotunneling measurements with its behavior reflecting the effective dissociation of the dimer for large B. Knowledge of the dot shape and of J(B) allows determination of the degree of entanglement. In a second example, we study strongly repelling neutral bosons in two-dimensional harmonic traps. Going beyond the Gross–Pitaevskii (GP) mean-field approximation, we show that bosons can localize and form polygonal-ring-like crystalline patterns. The total energy of the crystalline phase saturates in contrast to the GP solution, and its spatial extent becomes smaller than that of the GP condensate. PMID:16740665

  12. Quantum confinement of Bi2S3 in glass with magnetic behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panmand, Rajendra P.; Kulkarni, Milind V.; Valant, Matjaz; Gosavi, Suresh W.; Kale, Bharat B.

    2013-02-01

    The novel Bi2S3 quantum dots (QDs) glass nanosystems with unique magnetic properties have been investigated. The monodispersed QDs of size in the range of 3 to 15 nm were grown in the glass matrix. The optical study of these nanosystems clearly demonstrated the size quantization effect resulting in a pronounced band gap variation with QD size. The magnetic properties of the pristine glass and the Bi2S3 QD glass nanosystems were investigated by VSM and SQUID magnetometer. The pristine glass did not show any ferromagnetism while the Bi2S3 glass nanosystems showed significant and reproducible ferromagnetism. We also investigated the effect of the size of Bi2S3 QDs on the magnetic properties. The saturation magnetization for the 15 nm QD glass-nanosystem (124 memu/g) was observed to be higher as compared to the 3nm QD glass nanosystem (58.2 memu/g). The SQUID measurement gave the excellent hysteresis up to 300K. Surprisingly, the bulk Bi2S3 powder is diamagnetic in nature but Bi2S3 quantum dots glass nanosystem showed the ferromagnetic behavior for the first time. The investigated novel QD glass-nanosystem may have a potential application in spintronic devices and most importantly, this nanosystem can be fabricated in any usable shape as per the device requirement.

  13. Mapping the effective mass of electrons in III-V semiconductor quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gass, M. H.; Papworth, A. J.; Beanland, R.; Bullough, T. J.; Chalker, P. R.

    2006-01-01

    The electron effective mass me* can be calculated from the Kramers-Kronig transformation of electron energy loss spectra (EELS) for III-V semiconductor materials. The mapping capabilities of a scanning transmission electron microscope, equipped with a GatanEnfina™ EELS system are exploited to produce maps showing the variation of me* with nanometer scale resolution for a range of semiconductors. The analysis was carried out on three material systems: a GaInNAs quantum well in a GaAs matrix; InAs quantum dots in a GaAs matrix, and bulk wurzitic GaN. Values of me* were measured as ˜0.07m0 for GaAs and 0.183m0 for GaN, both in excellent agreement with the literature. It has also been shown that the high frequency dielectric constant can be calculated using the Kramers-Kronig methodology. When the high frequency dielectric constant is incorporated into the calculations a much more accurate visual representation of me* is displayed in the maps.

  14. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition in silicon/zinc sulfide quantum confined structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretschneider, Eric Colin

    A comprehensive study of low pressure metal-organic chemical vapor deposition growth of zinc sulfide and silicon has been performed. The parameter space for successful deposition of both materials has been investigated and found to overlap, allowing successful deposition of both zinc sulfide and silicon under similar conditions. Undoped and aluminum doped zinc sulfide and silicon films were grown on both (100) and (111) 4sp° off orientation silicon substrates. Diethyl zinc, hydrogen sulfide, triethyl aluminum and disilane where used as precursor materials. It was found that high quality epitaxial zinc sulfide films could be deposited over the temperature range of 300 to 650sp°C. Growth rate was found to be nearly independent of temperature over this temperature range indicating a mass transfer limited growth mechanism. Aluminum doping yielded low resistivity, n-type material. Key parameters affecting the surface roughness of zinc sulfide films were determined using a fractional factorial design. This method increases the efficiency of data collection and allows easy determination of the magnitude of multi-parameter interactions. The parameters studied included substrate orientation, deposition temperature, precursor concentrations, total hydrogen flow and the push flow ratio of the alkyl and hydride injectors. Silicon growth rates varied from 120 to 9000 A/hour at 450 and 600sp° C respectively. A strong temperature dependence of the growth rate was found indicating a reaction limited step with an activation energy of 153.6 ± 18.0 kJ/mol. This agrees well with the energy barrier of 144.3 ± 19.2 kJ/mol for surface diffusion of hydrogen. Quantum mechanical calculations that take into account the differences in effective masses for electrons and holes in silicon and zinc sulfide indicate that the band gap energy of a silicon quantum well shifts into the visible portion of the spectrum for well widths below 20A. Samples containing single and multiple quantum wells

  15. Synthesis of 2-Mercaptonicotinic Acid-Capped CdSe Quantum Dots and its Application to Spectrofluorometric Determination of Cr(VI) in Water Samples.

    PubMed

    Hosseini, Mohammad Saeid; Khorashahi, Somayeh; Hosseini, Navid

    2016-05-01

    The CdSe quantum dots (QDs) capped with 2-mercaptonicotinic acid (H2MN) were prepared through a controllable process at 80 °C. The prepared QDs were characterized by XRD, TEM, IR, UV-Vis and fluorescence (FL) techniques. It was found that the QDs were nearly mono-disperse with the diameters in the range of 8-10 nm. These QDs are capable to exhibit strong FL even in concentrated acidic media. They exhibit an enhanced fluorescence in the presence of Cr(VI), which was used for the determination of Cr(VI) in water samples. The linear range was found to be 1 × 10(-7)-6.0 × 10(-6) M with the RSD and DL of 0.92 % and 5 × 10(-8) M, respectively. Except that Ca(2+) and Fe(3+) which can be eliminated through a simple precipitation process, the other co-existent ions present in natural water were not interfered. The recoveries obtained for the added amounts of Cr(VI) were in the range of 96.9-103.2 %, which denote on application of the method, satisfactorily.

  16. Quantum confinement effects in lithographic sub-5 nm Silicon nanowire fets and integration of si nanograting fet biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivedi, Krutarth B.

    In recent years, widespread accessibility to reliable nanofabrication techniques such as high resolution electron beam lithography as well as development of innovative techniques such as nanoimprint lithography and chemically grown nano-materials like carbon nanotubes and graphene have spurred a boom in many fields of research involving nanoscale features and devices. The breadth of fields in which nanoscale features represent a new paradigm is staggering. Scaling down device dimensions to nanoscale enables non-classical quantum behavior and allows for interaction with similarly sized natural materials, like proteins and DNA, as never before, affording an unprecedented level of performance and control and fostering a seemingly boundless array of unique applications. Much of the research effort has been directed toward understanding such interactions to leverage the potential of nanoscale devices to enhance electronic and medical technology. In keeping with the spirit of application based research, my graduate research career has spanned the development of nanoimprint techniques and devices for novel applications, demonstration and study of sub-5 nm Si nanowire FETs exhibiting tangible performance enhancement over conventional MOSFETs, and development of an integrated Si nanograting FET based biosensor and related framework. The following dissertation details my work in fabrication of sub-5 nm Si nanowire FETs and characterization of quantum confinement effects in charge transport of FETs with 2D and 1D channel geometry, fabrication and characterization of schottky contact Si nanograting FET sensors, integration of miniaturized Si nanograting FET biosensors into Chip-in-Strip(c) packaging, development of an automated microfluidic sensing system, and investigation of electrochemical considerations in the Si nanograting FET biosensor gate stack followed by development of a novel patent-pending strategy for a lithographically patterned on-chip gate electrode.

  17. Low-Energy Charge and Spin Dynamics in Quantum Confined Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, William D.

    Condensed matter systems exhibit a variety of dynamical phenomena at low energy scales, from gigahertz (GHz) to terahertz (THz) frequencies in particular, arising from complex interplay between charge, spin, and lattice. A large number of collective and elementary excitations in solids occur in this frequency range, which are further modified and enriched by scattering, interactions, and disorder. Recent advancements in spectroscopic methods for probing low-energy dynamics allow us to investigate novel aspects of charge and spin dynamics in solids. In this dissertation work, we used direct current (DC) conductivity, GHz, THz, and mid-infrared (MIR) techniques to provide significant new insights into interaction and disorder effects in low-dimensional systems. Specifically, we have studied temperature-dependent magnetoresistance (MR) and electron spin resonance (ESR) in single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), intra-exciton scattering in InGaAs quantum wells, and high-field MIR-induced band gaps in graphene. Temperature-dependent resistance and MR were measured in an ensemble of SWCNTs from 0.3 to 350 K. The resistance temperature behavior followed a 3D variable range hopping (VRH) behavior from 0.3 to ˜100 K. A positive MR was observed at temperatures above 25 K and could be fit with a spin-dependent VRH model; negative MR was seen at low temperatures. In the GHz regime, the ESR linewidth for SWCNTs was observed to narrow by as much as 50% as the temperature was increased from 3 to 300 K, a phenomenon known as motional narrowing, suggesting that we are detecting the ESR of hopping spins. From the linewidth change versus temperature, we find the hopping frequency to be 285 GHz. For excitons in InGaAs quantum wells, we demonstrate the manipulation of intra-excitonic populations using intense, narrow-band THz pulses. The THz radiation temporarily quenches the 1s emission, which is then followed by an enhancement and subsequent decay of 2s emission. After the quenching

  18. Methods for modeling non-equilibrium degenerate statistics and quantum-confined scattering in 3D ensemble Monte Carlo transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Dax M.; Valsaraj, Amithraj; David, John K.; Register, Leonard F.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2016-12-01

    Particle-based ensemble semi-classical Monte Carlo (MC) methods employ quantum corrections (QCs) to address quantum confinement and degenerate carrier populations to model tomorrow's ultra-scaled metal-oxide-semiconductor-field-effect-transistors. Here, we present the most complete treatment of quantum confinement and carrier degeneracy effects in a three-dimensional (3D) MC device simulator to date, and illustrate their significance through simulation of n-channel Si and III-V FinFETs. Original contributions include our treatment of far-from-equilibrium degenerate statistics and QC-based modeling of surface-roughness scattering, as well as considering quantum-confined phonon and ionized-impurity scattering in 3D. Typical MC simulations approximate degenerate carrier populations as Fermi distributions to model the Pauli-blocking (PB) of scattering to occupied final states. To allow for increasingly far-from-equilibrium non-Fermi carrier distributions in ultra-scaled and III-V devices, we instead generate the final-state occupation probabilities used for PB by sampling the local carrier populations as function of energy and energy valley. This process is aided by the use of fractional carriers or sub-carriers, which minimizes classical carrier-carrier scattering intrinsically incompatible with degenerate statistics. Quantum-confinement effects are addressed through quantum-correction potentials (QCPs) generated from coupled Schrödinger-Poisson solvers, as commonly done. However, we use these valley- and orientation-dependent QCPs not just to redistribute carriers in real space, or even among energy valleys, but also to calculate confinement-dependent phonon, ionized-impurity, and surface-roughness scattering rates. FinFET simulations are used to illustrate the contributions of each of these QCs. Collectively, these quantum effects can substantially reduce and even eliminate otherwise expected benefits of considered In0.53Ga0.47 As FinFETs over otherwise identical

  19. Quantum confinement effects on optical transitions in nanodiamonds containing nitrogen vacancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, Alessio; Goings, Joshua J.; Li, Xiaosong

    2016-10-01

    Colored nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in nanosize diamonds (d ˜5 nm) are promising probe materials because their optical transitions are sensitive to mechanical, vibrational, and spin changes in the surroundings. Here, a linear response time-dependent density functional theory approach is used to describe the optical transitions in several NV-doped diamond quantum dots (QDs) in order to investigate size effects on the absorption spectra. By computing the full optical spectrum up to band-to-band transitions, we analyze both the localized "pinned" midgap and the charge-transfer excitations for an isolated reduced NV center. Subband charge-transfer excitations are shown to be size dependent, involving the excitation of the dopant s p3 electrons to the diamond conduction band. Additionally, the NV-doped systems exhibit characteristic s p3-s p3 excitations whose experimental energies are reproduced well and do not depend on QD size. However, the NV position and global cluster symmetry can affect the amount of the energy splitting of the vertical excitation energies of the midgap transitions.

  20. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-05-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s-1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications.

  1. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s−1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25996307

  2. Nonequilibrium-Plasma-Synthesized ZnO Nanocrystals with Plasmon Resonance Tunable via Al Doping and Quantum Confinement.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Benjamin L; Ganguly, Shreyashi; Held, Jacob T; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Mkhoyan, K Andre; Aydil, Eray S; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2015-12-09

    Metal oxide semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) tunable within the infrared (IR) region of the electromagnetic spectrum by vacancy or impurity doping. Although a variety of these NCs have been produced using colloidal synthesis methods, incorporation and activation of dopants in the liquid phase has often been challenging. Herein, using Al-doped ZnO (AZO) NCs as an example, we demonstrate the potential of nonthermal plasma synthesis as an alternative strategy for the production of doped metal oxide NCs. Exploiting unique, thoroughly nonequilibrium synthesis conditions, we obtain NCs in which dopants are not segregated to the NC surfaces and local doping levels are high near the NC centers. Thus, we achieve overall doping levels as high as 2 × 10(20) cm(-3) in NCs with diameters ranging from 12.6 to 3.6 nm, and for the first time experimentally demonstrate a clear quantum confinement blue shift of the LSPR energy in vacancy- and impurity-doped semiconductor NCs. We propose that doping of central cores and heavy doping of small NCs are achievable via nonthermal plasma synthesis, because chemical potential differences between dopant and host atoms-which hinder dopant incorporation in colloidal synthesis-are irrelevant when NC nucleation and growth proceed via irreversible interactions among highly reactive gas-phase ions and radicals and ligand-free NC surfaces. We explore how the distinctive nucleation and growth kinetics occurring in the plasma influences dopant distribution and activation, defect structure, and impurity phase formation.

  3. Interplay between strain, quantum confinement, and ferromagnetism in strained ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Anh, Le Duc; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-04-07

    We systematically investigated the influence of strain on the electronic structure and ferromagnetism of (In,Fe)As thin films. It is found that while the shift of the critical point energies of compressive-strained (In,Fe)As layers grown on (In{sub 1−y},Ga{sub y})As (y = 0.05, 0.1) buffer layers can be explained by the hydrostatic deformation effect (HDE) alone, those of tensile-strained (In,Fe)As layers grown on (Ga{sub 1−z},Al{sub z})Sb (z = 0, 0.5, 1) buffer layers can be explained by the combination of HDE and the quantum confinement effect (QCE). The Curie temperature T{sub C} of the (In,Fe)As layers strongly depends on the strain, and shows a maximum for the (In,Fe)As layer grown on a GaSb buffer layer. The strain dependence of T{sub C} can be explained by the s-d exchange mechanism taking into account HDE and QCE.

  4. Interplay between strain, quantum confinement, and ferromagnetism in strained ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Daisuke; Anh, Le Duc; Nam Hai, Pham; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2014-04-01

    We systematically investigated the influence of strain on the electronic structure and ferromagnetism of (In,Fe)As thin films. It is found that while the shift of the critical point energies of compressive-strained (In,Fe)As layers grown on (In1-y,Gay)As (y = 0.05, 0.1) buffer layers can be explained by the hydrostatic deformation effect (HDE) alone, those of tensile-strained (In,Fe)As layers grown on (Ga1-z,Alz)Sb (z = 0, 0.5, 1) buffer layers can be explained by the combination of HDE and the quantum confinement effect (QCE). The Curie temperature TC of the (In,Fe)As layers strongly depends on the strain, and shows a maximum for the (In,Fe)As layer grown on a GaSb buffer layer. The strain dependence of TC can be explained by the s-d exchange mechanism taking into account HDE and QCE.

  5. A theoretical study of electronic and optical properties of SiC nanowires and their quantum confinement effects.

    PubMed

    Laref, A; Alshammari, Nuyer; Laref, S; Luo, S J

    2014-04-14

    We have performed a theoretical study of silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs) within the framework of first-principles calculations by incorporating the size effect and hydrogen terminated surface. Specifically, the variation of the energy gap and optical absorption spectra for hydrogen passivated SiCNWs and pristine wires are examined with respect to the wire diameter. All the [001]-orientated SiCNWs derived from the parent zinc-blende (3C) exhibit semiconducting behavior. Our study demonstrates that the saturated 3C-SiCNWs grown along the [001] direction with larger wire sizes are energetically more favorable than the wires with a smaller diameter. Additionally, the energy gaps are reduced with the increment of wire size because of the quantum-confinement effects. The unsaturated SiCNWs possess smaller band gaps than those of saturated ones when the Si- and C-dangling bonds are passivated by hydrogen atoms. Interestingly, the surface terminated by hydrogen atoms substantially alters the onset of absorption as well as the spectrum behavior at upper energies. Moreover, some pronounced fine structures in the absorption peak are conspicuous at the lower energy region of hydrogen saturated SiCNWs as the wire size increases. We find that the distributions of the highest occupied molecular orbitals and the lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals are uniform along the wire axis, which reveals that the SiCNWs are exceptional candidates in producing nano-optoelectronic devices.

  6. Resistive switching memory based on three-dimensionally confined Ag quantum dots embedded in ultra thin polyimide layers.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang

    2013-02-01

    Resistive switching memory devices based on three-dimensionally confined Ag quantum dots (QDs) embedded in polyimide (PI) layers were fabricated by using spin-coating and thermal evaporation. The Ag QDs embedded in PI layer were distributed uniformly with sizes of approximately 4-6 nm and with surface density of approximately 1.25 x 10(11) cm(-2). The electrical properties of the Ag/PI (10 nm)/Ag QDs/PI (10 nm)/Ag devices were investigated at room temperature. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements on the devices showed a counterclockwise electrical hysteresis behavior with reliable and reproducible resistive switching to the existence of the Ag QDs. The memory device transformed from its original high-resistance state to low-resistance state under positive bias, and regained its original high-resistance state under negative bias. The maximum ON/OFF ratio of the current bistability was 1 x 10(4). The device also revealed excellent endurance ability at ambient conditions. The possible operating mechanisms concerning the interaction between Ag QDs and PI matrix for the resistance-transform phenomenon were analyzed on the basis of the I-V results.

  7. XPS Observations of Crystal Field Splitting in TiO2 Thin Films in Quantum Confinement Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkova, Natalya

    2015-03-01

    Transition metal oxides attract increased interest due to amazing electrical and magnetic properties and their outstanding applications designated by relative d-band redistributions that are shifted in such a way that narrow bands arranged by localized electrons are situated in the vicinity of EF. Different kinds of lattice distortions caused by doping and/or quantum size confinement of TM oxides are assigned to remarkable phenomenon Mott metal-insulator transitions, when mutual metal-oxide orbital arrangement changes dramatically. There is a widespread consensus that strong electron correlations are responsible for that change and magnetic excitation is one of manifestations of these correlations. Here we are presenting XPS study of titanium dioxide nanocrystal formations on silicon substrate with native oxide. The dynamic changes in XPS spectra were used for analysis of TiO2 thin films with mass thicknesses up to 2 monolayers formed by redox reactions of sputtered Ti on Si(100) substrate with native oxide implemented in situ under UHV conditions. XPS spectra evolution, as a traditional source of information on phase composition, was complemented by the possibility to estimate the morphology and crystal field splitting of formed precipitates. Intensity fluctuations observed for O1s, Si 2p, Ti2p spectra were accompanied by crystal field splitting in Ti2p and on second derivatives of O1s. These fluctuations were followed by noticeable changes in the vicinity of band gap indicating possible Mott metal-insulator transitions.

  8. Properties of nanocones formed on a surface of semiconductors by laser radiation: quantum confinement effect of electrons, phonons, and excitons

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    On the basis of the analysis of experimental results, a two-stage mechanism of nanocones formation on the irradiated surface of semiconductors by Nd:YAG laser is proposed for elementary semiconductors and solid solutions, such as Si, Ge, SiGe, and CdZnTe. Properties observed are explained in the frame of quantum confinement effect. The first stage of the mechanism is characterized by the formation of a thin strained top layer, due to redistribution of point defects in temperature-gradient field induced by laser radiation. The second stage is characterized by mechanical plastic deformation of the stained top layer leading to arising of nanocones, due to selective laser absorption of the top layer. The nanocones formed on the irradiated surface of semiconductors by Nd:YAG laser possessing the properties of 1D graded bandgap have been found for Si, Ge, and SiGe as well, however QD structure in CdTe was observed. The model is confirmed by "blue shift" of bands in photoluminescence spectrum, "red shift" of longitudinal optical line in Raman back scattering spectrum of Ge crystal, appearance of Ge phase in SiGe solid solution after irradiation by the laser at intensity 20 MW/cm2, and non-monotonous dependence of Si crystal micro-hardness as function of the laser intensity. PMID:22060172

  9. Light-front holography and superconformal quantum mechanics: A new approach to hadron structure and color confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Deur, Alexandre; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter

    2015-11-01

    A primary question in hadron physics is how the mass scale for hadrons consisting of light quarks, such as the proton, emerges from the QCD Lagrangian even in the limit of zero quark mass. If one requires the effective action which underlies the QCD Lagrangian to remain conformally invariant and extends the formalism of de Alfaro, Fubini and Furlan to light-front Hamiltonian theory, then a unique, color-confining potential with a mass parameter κ emerges. The actual value of the parameter κ is not set by the model - only ratios of hadron masses and other hadronic mass scales are predicted. The result is a nonperturbative, relativistic light-front quantum mechanical wave equation, the Light-Front Schrödinger Equation which incorporates color confinement and other essential spectroscopic and dynamical features of hadron physics, including a massless pion for zero quark mass and linear Regge trajectories with the identical slope in the radial quantum number n and orbital angular momentum L. The same light-front equations for mesons with spin J also can be derived from the holographic mapping to QCD (3+1) at fixed light-front time from the soft-wall model modification of AdS5 space with a specific dilaton profile. Light-front holography thus provides a precise relation between the bound-state amplitudes in the fifth dimension of AdS space and the boost-invariant light-front wavefunctions describing the internal structure of hadrons in physical space-time. One can also extend the analysis to baryons using superconformal algebra - 2 × 2 supersymmetric representations of the conformal group. The resulting fermionic LF bound-state equations predict striking similarities between the meson and baryon spectra. In fact, the holographic QCD light-front Hamiltonians for the states on the meson and baryon trajectories are identical if one shifts the internal angular momenta of the meson (LM) and baryon (LB) by one unit: LM = LB + 1. We also show how the mass scale κ

  10. Single photon emission at 1.55 μm from charged and neutral exciton confined in a single quantum dash

    SciTech Connect

    Dusanowski, Ł. Syperek, M.; Mrowiński, P.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Misiewicz, J.; Sęk, G.; Somers, A.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.; Reithmaier, J. P.

    2014-07-14

    We investigate charged and neutral exciton complexes confined in a single self-assembled InAs/InGaAlAs/InP quantum dash emitting at 1.55 μm. The emission characteristics have been probed by measuring high-spatial-resolution polarization-resolved photoluminescence and cross-correlations of photon emission statistics at T = 5 K. The photon auto-correlation histogram of the emission from both the neutral and charged exciton indicates a clear antibunching dip with as-measured g{sup (2)}(0) values of 0.18 and 0.31, respectively. It proves that these exciton complexes confined in single quantum dashes of InP-based material system can act as true single photon emitters being compatible with standard long-distance fiber communication technology.

  11. Thickness-Induced Metal-Insulator Transition in Sb-doped SnO2 Ultrathin Films: The Role of Quantum Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Chang; Zhu, Weiguang; Zhang, Zheng; Soon Tok, Eng; Ling, Bo; Pan, Jisheng

    2015-01-01

    A thickness induced metal-insulator transition (MIT) was firstly observed in Sb-doped SnO2 (SnO2:Sb) epitaxial ultrathin films deposited on sapphire substrates by pulsed laser deposition. Both electrical and spectroscopic studies provide clear evidence of a critical thickness for the metallic conductivity in SnO2:Sb thin films and the oxidation state transition of the impurity element Sb. With the shrinkage of film thickness, the broadening of the energy band gap as well as the enhancement of the impurity activation energy was studied and attributed to the quantum confinement effect. Based on the scenario of impurity level pinning and band gap broadening in quantum confined nanostructures, we proposed a generalized energy diagram to understand the thickness induced MIT in the SnO2:Sb system. PMID:26616286

  12. Growth and optical properties of Fe2O3 thin films: A study of quantum confinement effects by experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garoufalis, C. S.; Poulopoulos, P.; Bouropoulos, N.; Barnasas, A.; Baskoutas, S.

    2017-05-01

    Thin iron films in the thickness range 0.7-48 nm have been deposited on high quality Corning glass and Si(100) substrates by radio frequency magnetron sputtering. The films were then oxidized by annealing at temperatures of 400-450 °C in a furnace in air. X-ray diffraction experiments revealed the formation of single-phase α-Fe2O3. The films were continuous and present negligible surface roughness. Ultraviolet-visible light absorption spectroscopy has shown a blue shift of both, the indirect and direct band gaps of hematite. The experimental results are interpreted as evidences of quantum confinement effects. This is facilitated by theoretical calculations based on Hartree Fock approximation as applied for an electron-hole system, in the framework of effective mass approximation. The agreement between theory and experiment supports the quantum confinement interpretation.

  13. VIS-NIR-SWIR multicolor avalanche photodetector originating from quantum-confined Stark effect in Si/β-FeSi2/Si structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevlyagin, A. V.; Goroshko, D. L.; Chusovitin, E. A.; Galkin, N. G.

    2016-10-01

    A Si n-i-p avalanche photodetector with embedded β-FeSi2 nanocrystals was developed. The device showed an ultrabroadband photoresponse from the visible (400 nm) to short-wavelength infrared (1800 nm) ranges. Specific detectivity at zero bias conditions reaches 2 × 109 cmHz1/2/W at 1300 nm and 2 × 108 cmHz1/2/W above 1400 nm at room temperature. Observed quantum-confined Stark effect together with avalanche multiplication resulted in a simultaneous two orders of magnitude increase in the photoresponse and spectral sensitivity expanding to 1800 nm when the device is operated in avalanche mode. The application fields of the proposed photodetector potentially include integrated Si photonics and multicolor photodetection; the quantum-confined Stark effect gives grounds for the development of fast-operated electro-optical modulators.

  14. Confinement effect of monolayer MoS2 quantum dots on conjugated polyimide and promotion of solar-driven photocatalytic hydrogen generation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Chenghai; Zhu, Haoyue; Zhou, Jun; Cui, Zhiwei; Liu, Teng; Wang, Yicong; Wang, Ying; Zou, Zhigang

    2017-03-21

    A monolayer MoS2 quantum dot confined polyimide (MQDs/PI) photocatalyst was synthesized by using a facile immersion-hydrothermal method. The investigations on the optical and electronic properties of MQDs/PI composites reveal that the strong quantum confinement effect of MQDs results in a blue-shift of the absorption band edge of PI, and the interfacial electronic interaction between MQDs and PI improves the charge transfer rate of MQDs/PI. The ultra-small size of 3.0 nm and perfect crystals of MQDs endow MQDs/PI composites with plenty of active sites and fast charge transfer, thus resulting in a 360% enhancement in photocatalytic hydrogen production compared with that of Pt/PI at the same loading amount of Pt. This discovery provides a new clue for the development of an efficient and sustainable non-noble metal photocatalyst.

  15. Nanometer-scale monitoring of quantum-confined Stark effect and emission efficiency droop in multiple GaN/AlN quantum disks in nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagonel, L. F.; Tizei, L. H. G.; Vitiello, G. Z.; Jacopin, G.; Rigutti, L.; Tchernycheva, M.; Julien, F. H.; Songmuang, R.; Ostasevicius, T.; de la Peña, F.; Ducati, C.; Midgley, P. A.; Kociak, M.

    2016-05-01

    We report on a detailed study of the intensity dependent optical properties of individual GaN/AlN quantum disks (QDisks) embedded into GaN nanowires (NW). The structural and optical properties of the QDisks were probed by high spatial resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) in a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM). By exciting the QDisks with a nanometric electron beam at currents spanning over three orders of magnitude, strong nonlinearities (energy shifts) in the light emission are observed. In particular, we find that the amount of energy shift depends on the emission rate and on the QDisk morphology (size, position along the NW and shell thickness). For thick QDisks (>4 nm), the QDisk emission energy is observed to blueshift with the increase of the emission intensity. This is interpreted as a consequence of the increase of carriers density excited by the incident electron beam inside the QDisks, which screens the internal electric field and thus reduces the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE) present in these QDisks. For thinner QDisks (<3 nm ), the blueshift is almost absent in agreement with the negligible QCSE at such sizes. For QDisks of intermediate sizes there exists a current threshold above which the energy shifts, marking the transition from unscreened to partially screened QCSE. From the threshold value we estimate the lifetime in the unscreened regime. These observations suggest that, counterintuitively, electrons of high energy can behave ultimately as single electron-hole pair generators. In addition, when we increase the current from 1 to 10 pA the light emission efficiency drops by more than one order of magnitude. This reduction of the emission efficiency is a manifestation of the "efficiency droop" as observed in nitride-based 2D light emitting diodes, a phenomenon tentatively attributed to the Auger effect.

  16. Gold Quantum Boxes: On the Periodicities and the Quantum Confinement in the Au₂₈, Au₃₆, Au₄₄ , and Au₅₂ Magic Series.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Chenjie; Chen, Yuxiang; Iida, Kenji; Nobusada, Katsuyuki; Kirschbaum, Kristin; Lambright, Kelly J; Jin, Rongchao

    2016-03-30

    Revealing the size-dependent periodicities (including formula, growth pattern, and property evolution) is an important task in metal nanocluster research. However, investigation on this major issue has been complicated, as the size change is often accompanied by a structural change. Herein, with the successful determination of the Au44(TBBT)28 structure, where TBBT = 4-tert-butylbenzenethiolate, the missing size in the family of Au28(TBBT)20, Au36(TBBT)24, and Au52(TBBT)32 nanoclusters is filled, and a neat "magic series" with a unified formula of Au8n+4(TBBT)4n+8 (n = 3-6) is identified. Such a periodicity in magic numbers is a reflection of the uniform anisotropic growth patterns in this magic series, and the n value is correlated with the number of (001) layers in the face-centered cubic lattice. The size-dependent quantum confinement nature of this magic series is further understood by empirical scaling law, classical "particle in a box" model, and the density functional theory calculations.

  17. Quantum confinement and dielectric profiles of colloidal nanoplatelets of halide inorganic and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapori, Daniel; Kepenekian, Mikaël; Pedesseau, Laurent; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky

    2016-03-01

    Quantum confinement as well as high frequency ε∞ and static εs dielectric profiles are described for nanoplatelets of halide inorganic perovskites CsPbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D HOP are currently being sought for their impressive photovoltaic ability. Prior to this sudden popularity, 2D HOP materials were driving intense activity in the field of optoelectronics. Such developments have been enriched by the recent ability to synthesize colloidal nanostructures of controlled sizes of 2D and 3D HOP. This raises the need to achieve a thorough description of the electronic structure and dielectric properties of these systems. In this work, we go beyond the abrupt dielectric interface model and reach the atomic scale description. We examine the influence of the nature of the halogen and of the cation on the band structure and dielectric constants. Similarly, we survey the effect of dimensionality and shape of the perovskite. In agreement with recent experimental results, we show an increase of the band gap and a decrease of ε∞ when the size of a nanoplatelet reduces. By inspecting 2D HOP, we find that it cannot be described as a simple superposition of independent inorganic and organic layers. Finally, the dramatic impact of ionic contributions on the dielectric constant εs is analysed.Quantum confinement as well as high frequency ε∞ and static εs dielectric profiles are described for nanoplatelets of halide inorganic perovskites CsPbX3 (X = I, Br, Cl) and hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites (HOP) in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) structures. 3D HOP are currently being sought for their impressive photovoltaic ability. Prior to this sudden popularity, 2D HOP materials were driving intense activity in the field of optoelectronics. Such developments have been enriched by the recent ability to synthesize colloidal nanostructures of controlled

  18. Quantum Confined Semiconductors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    measurements, we ascertained that the p-type conduction channel in the substrate is negligible below 20 K. The elimination of the substrate’s...of the MCT detector to the lock-in amplifier. The x- channel output of the lock-in was then fed back into the analogue input of the BOMEM spectrometer...structural integrity, specifically the propensity for dislocation generation (and propagation), with increasing number of QD stacks in the structure

  19. Causal signal transmission by quantum fields. VI: The Lorentz condition and Maxwell's equations for fluctuations of the electromagnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plimak, L. I.; Stenholm, S.

    2013-11-01

    The general structure of electromagnetic interactions in the so-called response representation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) is analysed. A formal solution to the general quantum problem of the electromagnetic field interacting with matter is found. Independently, a formal solution to the corresponding problem in classical stochastic electrodynamics (CSED) is constructed. CSED and QED differ only in the replacement of stochastic averages of c-number fields and currents by time-normal averages of the corresponding Heisenberg operators. All relations of QED connecting quantum field to quantum current lack Planck's constant, and thus coincide with their counterparts in CSED. In Feynman's terms, one encounters complete disentanglement of the potential and current operators in response picture.

  20. The influence of electron confinement, quantum size effects, and film morphology on the dispersion and the damping of plasmonic modes in Ag and Au thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Politano, Antonio; Chiarello, Gennaro

    2015-05-01

    Plasmons are collective longitudinal modes of charge fluctuation in metal samples excited by an external electric field. Surface plasmons (SPs) are waves that propagate along the surface of a conductor. SPs find applications in magneto-optic data storage, optics, microscopy, and catalysis. The investigation of SPs in silver and gold is relevant as these materials are extensively used in plasmonics. The theoretical approach for calculating plasmon modes in noble metals is complicated by the existence of localized d electrons near the Fermi level. Nevertheless, recent calculations based on linear response theory and time-dependent local density approximation adequately describe the dispersion and damping of SPs in noble metals. Furthermore, in thin films the electronic response is influenced by electron quantum confinement. Confined electrons modify the dynamical screening processes at the film/substrate interface by introducing novel properties with potential applications. The presence of quantum well states in the Ag and Au overlayer affects both the dispersion relation of SP frequency and the damping processes of the SP. Recent calculations indicate the emergence of acoustic surface plasmons (ASP) in Ag thin films exhibiting quantum well states. The slope of the dispersion of ASP decreases with film thickness. High-resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (HREELS) is the main experimental technique for investigating collective electronic excitations, with adequate resolution in both the energy and momentum domains to investigate surface modes. Herein we review on recent progress of research on collective electronic excitations in Ag and Au films deposited on single-crystal substrates.

  1. Influence of quantum confinement and strain on orbital polarization of four-layer LaNiO3 superlattices: A DFT+DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2016-06-01

    Atomically precise superlattices involving transition-metal oxides provide a unique opportunity to engineer correlated electron physics using strain (modulated by choice of substrate) and quantum confinement (controlled by layer thickness). Here we use the combination of density-functional theory and dynamical mean-field theory (DFT+DMFT) to study Ni Egd -orbital polarization in strained LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices consisting of four layers of nominally metallic NiO2 and four layers of insulating AlO2 separated by LaO layers. The layer-resolved orbital polarization is calculated as a function of strain and analyzed in terms of structural, quantum confinement, and correlation effects. The effect of strain is determined from the dependence of the results on the Ni-O bond-length ratio and the octahedral rotation angles, quantum confinement is studied by comparison to bulk calculations with similar degrees of strain, and correlation effects are inferred by varying interaction parameters within our DFT+DMFT calculations. The calculated dependence of orbital polarization on strain in superlattices is qualitatively consistent with recent x-ray-absorption spectroscopy and resonant reflectometry data. However, interesting differences of detail are found between theory and experiment. Under tensile strain, the two inequivalent Ni ions display orbital polarization similar to that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3 and observed in experiment. Compressive strain produces a larger dependence of orbital polarization on Ni position, and even the inner Ni layer exhibits orbital polarization different from that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3.

  2. Influence of quantum confinement and strain on orbital polarization of four-layer LaNiO3 superlattices: A DFT+DMFT study

    DOE PAGES

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2016-06-07

    Atomically precise superlattices involving transition metal oxides provide a unique opportunity to engineer correlated electron physics using strain (modulated by choice of substate) and quantum confinement (controlled by layer thickness). We use the combination of density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) to study Ni Eg d-orbital polarization in strained LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices consisting of four layers of nominally metallic NiO2 and four layers of insulating AlO2 separated by LaO layers. The layer-resolved orbital polarization is calculated as a function of strain and analyzed in terms of structural, quantum confinement, and correlation effects. We determined that the effect ofmore » strain is from the dependence of the results on the Ni-O bondlength ratio and the octahedral rotation angles; quantum confinement is studied by comparison to bulk calculations with similar degrees of strain; correlation effects are inferred by varying interaction parameters within our DFT+DMFT calculations. The calculated dependence of orbital polarization on strain in superlattices is qualitatively consistent with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant reflectometry data. But, interesting differences of detail are found between theory and experiment. Under tensile strain, the two inequivalent Ni ions display orbital polarization similar to that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3 and observed in experiment. Compressive strain produces a larger dependence of orbital polarization on Ni position and even the inner Ni layer exhibits orbital polarization different from that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3.« less

  3. Energy dispersion of the electrosubbands in parabolic confining quantum wires: interplay of Rashba, Dresselhaus, lateral spin-orbit interaction and the Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Yi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Xue-Ming

    2009-08-19

    We have made a thorough theoretical investigation of the interplay of spin-orbit interactions (SOIs) resulting from Rashba, Dresselhaus and the lateral parabolic confining potential on the energy dispersion relation of the spin subbands in a parabolic quantum wire. The influence of an applied external magnetic field is also discussed. We show the interplay of different types of SOI, as well as the Zeeman effect, leads to rather complex and intriguing electrosubbands for different spin branches. The effect of different coupling strengths and different magnetic field strengths is also investigated.

  4. Energy-loss rate of hot electrons due to confined acoustic phonon modes in a semiconductor quantum wire under transverse electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanyan, A.; Yeranosyan, M.; Vardanyan, L.; Asatryan, A.; Kirakosyan, A.; Vartanian, A.

    2017-08-01

    The hot-electron energy-loss rate via the acoustic-phonons in an embedded semiconductor quantum wire of circular cross section in the presence of external electric field has been investigated using deformation potential theory. Dimensional confinement effect on modifying acoustic-phonon modes are taken into account. The energy-loss rate as a function of electric field strength, electron density and electron temperature is obtained. Our calculations show that the electric field applied perpendicularly to the wire axis can be used as an important tool for the control of the energy-loss processes in nanowires.

  5. Combining ligand-induced quantum-confined stark effect with type II heterojunction bilayer structure in CdTe and CdSe nanocrystal-based solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yaacobi-Gross, Nir; Garphunkin, Natalia; Solomeshch, Olga; Vaneski, Aleksandar; Susha, Andrei S; Rogach, Andrey L; Tessler, Nir

    2012-04-24

    We show that it is possible to combine several charge generation strategies in a single device structure, the performance of which benefits from all methods used. Exploiting the inherent type II heterojunction between layered structures of CdSe and CdTe colloidal quantum dots, we systematically study different ways of combining such nanocrystals of different size and surface chemistry and with different linking agents in a bilayer solar cell configuration. We demonstrate the beneficial use of two distinctly different sizes of NCs not only to improve the solar spectrum matching but also to reduce exciton binding energy, allowing their efficient dissociation at the interface. We further make use of the ligand-induced quantum-confined Stark effect in order to enhance charge generation and, hence, overall efficiency of nanocrystal-based solar cells.

  6. Enhanced single photon emission from positioned InP/GaInP quantum dots coupled to a confined Tamm-plasmon mode

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, T.; Baumann, V.; Iff, O.; Schneider, C.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-01-26

    We report on the enhancement of the spontaneous emission in the visible red spectral range from site-controlled InP/GaInP quantum dots by resonant coupling to Tamm-plasmon modes confined beneath gold disks in a hybrid metal/semiconductor structure. The enhancement of the emission intensity is confirmed by spatially resolved micro-photoluminescence area scans and temperature dependent measurements. Single photon emission from our coupled system is verified via second order autocorrelation measurements. We observe bright single quantum dot emission of up to ∼173 000 detected photons per second at a repetition rate of the excitation source of 82 MHz, and calculate an extraction efficiency of our device as high as 7%.

  7. Confinement potentials due to conduction and valence bands in a Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mageshwari, P. Uma; Peter, A. John

    2017-05-01

    The band gap and the discontinuities of GaInNAs and GaAs are studied using model solid theory and the anticrossing model. Calculations are carried out for an exciton confined in a cylindrical quantum dot. The effects of nitrogen and indium concentrations on the band gap and the band offsets of Ga1-xInxNyAs1-y/GaAs quantum dot are brought out. The results show that the effect of N concentration causes the split of the conduction band into two bands and the occurred shift enlarges with the increase in concentration. Tailoring the band gap energy offers an opportunity of using GaInNAs semiconductor alloys for various types of solar power conversion devices.

  8. Giant piezoresistance of p-type nano-thick silicon induced by interface electron trapping instead of 2D quantum confinement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongliang; Li, Xinxin

    2011-01-07

    The p-type silicon giant piezoresistive coefficient is measured in top-down fabricated nano-thickness single-crystalline-silicon strain-gauge resistors with a macro-cantilever bending experiment. For relatively thicker samples, the variation of piezoresistive coefficient in terms of silicon thickness obeys the reported 2D quantum confinement effect. For ultra-thin samples, however, the variation deviates from the quantum-effect prediction but increases the value by at least one order of magnitude (compared to the conventional piezoresistance of bulk silicon) and the value can change its sign (e.g. from positive to negative). A stress-enhanced Si/SiO(2) interface electron-trapping effect model is proposed to explain the 'abnormal' giant piezoresistance that should be originated from the carrier-concentration change effect instead of the conventional equivalent mobility change effect for bulk silicon piezoresistors. An interface state modification experiment gives preliminary proof of our analysis.

  9. Effect of temperature on the single-particle ground-state energy of a polar quantum dot with Gaussian confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Jahan, Luhluh K. Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-05-23

    The temperature and size dependence of the ground-state energy of a polaron in a Gaussian quantum dot have been investigated by using a variational technique. It is found that the ground-state energy increases with increasing temperature and decreases with the size of the quantum dot. Also, it is found that the ground-state energy is larger for a three-dimensional quantum dot as compared to a two-dimensional dot.

  10. Quantum confinement controlled solar hydrogen production from hydrogen sulfide using a highly stable CdS(0.5)Se(0.5)/CdSe quantum dot-glass nanosystem.

    PubMed

    Apte, Sanjay K; Garaje, Sunil N; Naik, Sonali D; Waichal, Rupali P; Baeg, Jin-Ook; Kale, Bharat B

    2014-01-21

    We have demonstrated unique CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe quantum dot-glass nanosystems with quantum confinement effect. The stable, monodispersed CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe quantum dots (QDs) of size 2 to 12 nm have been grown in a germanate glass matrix by a simple melt quench technique at moderate temperature. XRD and Raman studies show formation of hexagonal CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe in the glass matrix. The quantum confinement of CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe was studied using TEM and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The band gap of the glass nanosystem was tuned from 3.6 to 1.8 eV by controlling the CdS0.5Se0.5 quantum dot size in the glass matrix. It can be further tuned to 1.68 eV using growth of CdSe quantum dots in the glass matrix. Considering the tuneable band gap of the CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe quantum dot-glass nanosystem for the visible light absorption, a study of size tuneable photocatalytic activity for hydrogen generation from hydrogen sulfide splitting was performed under visible light irradiation for the first time. The utmost hydrogen evolution, i.e. 8164.53 and 7257.36 μmol h(-1) g(-1) was obtained for the CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe quantum dot-glass nanosystems, respectively. The apparent quantum yield (AQY) was observed to be 26% and 21% for the CdS0.5Se0.5 and CdSe quantum dot-glass nanosystems, respectively. It is noteworthy that the present glass nanosystem as a photocatalyst was found to be very stable as compared to naked powder photocatalysts.

  11. Effects of quantum confinement on excited state properties of SrTiO3 from ab initio many-body perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyes-Lillo, Sebastian E.; Rangel, Tonatiuh; Bruneval, Fabien; Neaton, Jeffrey B.

    2016-07-01

    The Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) homologous series Srn +1TinO3 n +1 provides a useful template for the study and control of the effects of dimensionality and quantum confinement on the excited state properties of the complex oxide SrTiO3. We use ab initio many-body perturbation theory within the G W approximation and the Bethe-Salpeter equation approach to calculate quasiparticle energies and absorption spectra of Srn +1TinO3 n +1 for n =1 -5 and ∞ . Our computed direct and indirect optical gaps are in excellent agreement with spectroscopic measurements. The calculated optical spectra reproduce the main experimental features and reveal excitonic structure near the gap edge. We find that electron-hole interactions are important across the series, leading to significant exciton binding energies that increase for small n and reach a value of 330 meV for n =1 , a trend attributed to increased quantum confinement. We find that the lowest-energy singlet exciton of Sr2TiO4 (n =1 ) localizes in the two-dimensional plane defined by the TiO2 layer, and we explain the origin of its localization.

  12. Influence of quantum confinement and strain on orbital polarization of strained four-layer LaNiO3 superlattices: a DFT+DMFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew; Marianetti, Chris

    Here we use the combination of density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory to study Ni d orbital polarization in strained LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices consisting of four layers of nominally metallic NiO2 and four layers of insulating AlO2 separated by LaO layers. The layer-resolved orbital polarization is calculated as a function of strain and analysed in terms of structural, quantum confinement, and correlation effects. The overall dependence of orbital polarization on strain in superlattices is qualitatively consistent with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant reflectometry data. However, interesting differences of detail are found depending on the sign of strain. Under tensile strain, the two inequivalent Ni ions display orbital polarization similar to that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3 and observed in experiment. Compressive strain produces a larger dependence of orbital polarization on Ni position and even the inner Ni layer exhibits orbital polarization different from that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3. The quantum confinement effect is as important as the strain effect and more stronger for tensile strain. This work is supported by DOE ER-046169 and FAME, one of six centers of STARnet, a Semiconductor Research Corporation program sponsored by MARCO and DARPA.

  13. Blueshift of the optical band gap: Implications for the quantum confinement effect in a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H multilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaudoin, M.; Meunier, M.; Arsenault, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Optical-absorption measurements are presented for multilayer structures of hydrogenated amorphous silicon and hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-Si:H/a-SiNx:H) produced by glow discharge. Small-angle x-ray-scattering measurements show that these multilayers are very periodic and confirm that the interfaces are abrupt. Optical band-gap measurements are presented for two sets of samples. Samples for the first set have constant barrier thickness and a fixed number of layer repeats while for the second set the composition and total thickness are kept constant. Even for very thin well layer thicknesses, no blueshift in the optical band gap is observed for the second set whereas the first set displays this effect quite well. This can be explained if the blueshift in the second set is due to an artifact of the Tauc law rather than quantum confinement effects as suggested by Collins and Huang [Phys. Rev. B 34, 2910 (1986)]. This interpretation is further supported by a Cody law [Solar Energy Mater. 8, 231 (1982)] analysis for which no blueshift in the optical band gap is observed for either set of samples. We conclude that optical band-gap measurements cannot be used as proof for the quantum confinement of carriers in these structures.

  14. Integration of Quantum Confinement and Alloy Effect to Modulate Electronic Properties of RhW Nanocrystals for Improved Catalytic Performance toward CO2 Hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenbo; Wang, Liangbing; Liu, Haoyu; Hao, Yiping; Li, Hongliang; Khan, Munir Ullah; Zeng, Jie

    2017-02-08

    The d-band center and surface negative charge density generally determine the adsorption and activation of CO2, thus serving as important descriptors of the catalytic activity toward CO2 hydrogenation. Herein, we engineered the d-band center and negative charge density of Rh-based catalysts by tuning their dimensions and introducing non-noble metals to form an alloy. During the hydrogenation of CO2 into methanol, the catalytic activity of Rh75W25 nanosheets was 5.9, 4.0, and 1.7 times as high as that of Rh nanoparticles, Rh nanosheets, and Rh73W27 nanoparticles, respectively. Mechanistic studies reveal that the remarkable activity of Rh75W25 nanosheets is owing to the integration of quantum confinement and alloy effect. Specifically, the quantum confinement in one dimension shifts up the d-band center of Rh75W25 nanosheets, strengthening the adsorption of CO2. Moreover, the alloy effect not only promotes the activation of CO2 to form CO2(δ-) but also enhances the adsorption of intermediates to facilitate further hydrogenation of the intermediates into methanol.

  15. 1D versus 3D quantum confinement in 1-5 nm ZnO nanoparticle agglomerations for application in charge-trapping memory devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar

    2016-07-01

    ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) have attracted considerable interest from industry and researchers due to their excellent properties with applications in optoelectronic devices, sunscreens, photocatalysts, sensors, biomedical sciences, etc. However, the agglomeration of NPs is considered to be a limiting factor since it can affect the desirable physical and electronic properties of the NPs. In this work, 1-5 nm ZnO NPs deposited by spin- and dip-coating techniques are studied. The electronic and physical properties of the resulting agglomerations of NPs are studied using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and their application in metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) memory devices is analyzed. The results show that both dip- and spin-coating techniques lead to agglomerations of the NPs mostly in the horizontal direction. However, the width of the ZnO clusters is larger with dip-coating which leads to 1D quantum confinement, while the smaller ZnO clusters obtained by spin-coating enable 3D quantum confinement in ZnO. The ZnO NPs are used as the charge-trapping layer of a MOS-memory structure and the analysis of the high-frequency C-V measurements allow further understanding of the electronic properties of the ZnO agglomerations. A large memory window is achieved in both devices which confirms that ZnO NPs provide large charge-trapping density. In addition, ZnO confined in 3D allows for a larger memory window at lower operating voltages due to the Poole-Frenkel charge-emission mechanism.

  16. Lorentz-covariant quantum 4-potential and orbital angular momentum for the transverse confinement of matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducharme, R.; da Paz, I. G.

    2016-08-01

    In two recent papers exact Hermite-Gaussian solutions to relativistic wave equations were obtained for both electromagnetic and particle beams. The solutions for particle beams correspond to those of the Schrödinger equation in the nonrelativistic limit. Here, it will be shown that each beam particle has additional 4-momentum resulting from transverse localization compared to a free particle traveling in the same direction as the beam with the same speed. This will be referred to as the quantum 4-potential term since it will be shown to play an analogous role in relativistic Hamiltonian quantum mechanics as the Bohm potential in the nonrelativistic quantum Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Low-order localization effects include orbital angular momentum, Gouy phase, and beam spreading. Toward a more systematic approach for calculating localization effects at all orders, it will be shown that both the electromagnetic and quantum 4-potentials couple into the canonical 4-momentum of a particle in a similar way. This offers the prospect that traditional methods used to calculate the affect of an electromagnetic field on a particle can now be adapted to take localization effects into account. The prospects for measuring higher order quantum 4-potential related effects experimentally are also discussed alongside some questions to challenge the quantum information and quantum field theorists.

  17. Photonic transistor and router using a single quantum-dot-confined spin in a single-sided optical microcavity

    PubMed Central

    Hu, C. Y.

    2017-01-01

    The future Internet is very likely the mixture of all-optical Internet with low power consumption and quantum Internet with absolute security guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Photons would be used for processing, routing and com-munication of data, and photonic transistor using a weak light to control a strong light is the core component as an optical analogue to the electronic transistor that forms the basis of modern electronics. In sharp contrast to previous all-optical tran-sistors which are all based on optical nonlinearities, here I introduce a novel design for a high-gain and high-speed (up to terahertz) photonic transistor and its counterpart in the quantum limit, i.e., single-photon transistor based on a linear optical effect: giant Faraday rotation induced by a single electronic spin in a single-sided optical microcavity. A single-photon or classical optical pulse as the gate sets the spin state via projective measurement and controls the polarization of a strong light to open/block the photonic channel. Due to the duality as quantum gate for quantum information processing and transistor for optical information processing, this versatile spin-cavity quantum transistor provides a solid-state platform ideal for all-optical networks and quantum networks. PMID:28349960

  18. Photonic transistor and router using a single quantum-dot-confined spin in a single-sided optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Hu, C Y

    2017-03-28

    The future Internet is very likely the mixture of all-optical Internet with low power consumption and quantum Internet with absolute security guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Photons would be used for processing, routing and com-munication of data, and photonic transistor using a weak light to control a strong light is the core component as an optical analogue to the electronic transistor that forms the basis of modern electronics. In sharp contrast to previous all-optical tran-sistors which are all based on optical nonlinearities, here I introduce a novel design for a high-gain and high-speed (up to terahertz) photonic transistor and its counterpart in the quantum limit, i.e., single-photon transistor based on a linear optical effect: giant Faraday rotation induced by a single electronic spin in a single-sided optical microcavity. A single-photon or classical optical pulse as the gate sets the spin state via projective measurement and controls the polarization of a strong light to open/block the photonic channel. Due to the duality as quantum gate for quantum information processing and transistor for optical information processing, this versatile spin-cavity quantum transistor provides a solid-state platform ideal for all-optical networks and quantum networks.

  19. Photonic transistor and router using a single quantum-dot-confined spin in a single-sided optical microcavity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, C. Y.

    2017-03-01

    The future Internet is very likely the mixture of all-optical Internet with low power consumption and quantum Internet with absolute security guaranteed by the laws of quantum mechanics. Photons would be used for processing, routing and com-munication of data, and photonic transistor using a weak light to control a strong light is the core component as an optical analogue to the electronic transistor that forms the basis of modern electronics. In sharp contrast to previous all-optical tran-sistors which are all based on optical nonlinearities, here I introduce a novel design for a high-gain and high-speed (up to terahertz) photonic transistor and its counterpart in the quantum limit, i.e., single-photon transistor based on a linear optical effect: giant Faraday rotation induced by a single electronic spin in a single-sided optical microcavity. A single-photon or classical optical pulse as the gate sets the spin state via projective measurement and controls the polarization of a strong light to open/block the photonic channel. Due to the duality as quantum gate for quantum information processing and transistor for optical information processing, this versatile spin-cavity quantum transistor provides a solid-state platform ideal for all-optical networks and quantum networks.

  20. Spatially confined synthesis of SiOx nano-rod with size-controlled Si quantum dots in nano-porous anodic aluminum oxide membrane.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yi-Hao; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2011-01-17

    By depositing Si-rich SiOx nano-rod in nano-porous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane using PECVD, the spatially confined synthesis of Si quantum-dots (Si-QDs) with ultra-bright photoluminescence spectra are demonstrated after low-temperature annealing. Spatially confined SiOx nano-rod in nano-porous AAO membrane greatly increases the density of nucleated positions for Si-QD precursors, which essentially impedes the route of thermally diffused Si atoms and confines the degree of atomic self-aggregation. The diffusion controlled growth mechanism is employed to determine the activation energy of 6.284 kJ mole(-1) and diffusion length of 2.84 nm for SiO1.5 nano-rod in nano-porous AAO membrane. HRTEM results verify that the reduced geometric dimension of the SiOx host matrix effectively constrain the buried Si-QD size at even lower annealing temperature. The spatially confined synthesis of Si-QD essentially contributes the intense PL with its spectral linewidth shrinking from 210 to 140 nm and its peak intensity enhancing by two orders of magnitude, corresponding to the reduction on both the average Si-QD size and its standard deviation from 2.6 to 2.0 nm and from 25% to 12.5%, respectively. The red-shifted PL wavelength of the Si-QD reveals an inverse exponential trend with increasing temperature of annealing, which is in good agree with the Si-QD size simulation via the atomic diffusion theory.

  1. Development of near infrared I-III-VI quantum dots for in vivo imaging applications (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pons, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    Near infrared (NIR) emitting quantum dots based on copper indium chalcogenides present unique optical properties for in vivo fluorescence imaging. Here we present the synthesis of CuIn(S,Se)2/ZnS core/shell QDs with 30-50% quantum yield in the NIR range. These nanoprobes are solubilized in water using a block copolymer surface ligand composed of multiple binding groups for enhanced stability and zwitterionic groups for solubility and minimized nonspecific adsorption. They present limited toxicity compared to heavy metal-containing QDs. These versatile nanoprobes can be directly injected in the peritumoral region for sentinel lymph node imaging. We also demonstrate their vectorization with RGD peptides or their incorporation in folic acid-functionalized silica particles to target specific cancer cells. Their long fluorescence lifetime enables rejection of autofluorescence using time-gated detection. This considerably enhances the sensitivity of in vivo fluorescence imaging. These QDs have been used for long term labeling of cancer cells ex vivo. Following reinjection of these cells, time-gated detection enables in vivo imaging of these cancer cells in the blood stream at the single cell level. Finally, these QDs can be doped with paramagnetic manganese ions to provide multimodal contrast in both fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

  2. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    DOE PAGES

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; ...

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximationsmore » made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals« less

  3. High-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well lasers on Si substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jae-Hoon; Lang, Robert J.; Radhakrishnan, Gouri; Katz, Joseph; Narayanan, Authi A.

    1989-01-01

    A high-power low-threshold graded-index separate confinement heterostructure AlGaAs single quantum well laser on Si substrates has been demonstrated for the first time by a hybrid growth of migration-enhanced molecular beam epitaxy followed by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. The quantum well laser showed an output power of more than 400 mW per facet under pulsed conditions. A room-temperature threshold current of 300 mA was obtained with a differential quantum efficiency of 40 percent without facet coating. The threshold current density was 550 A/sq cm for a cavity length of 500 microns. These results show the highest peak power reported to date for low-threshold lasers on Si substrates. The full width at half maximum of the far-field pattern parallel to the junction was 6 deg. Threshold current densities as low as 250 A/sq cm were obtained for lasers on GaAs substrates.

  4. Effects of strain and quantum confinement in optically pumped nuclear magnetic resonance in GaAs: Interpretation guided by spin-dependent band structure calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R. M.; Saha, D.; McCarthy, L. A.; Tokarski, III, J. T.; Sanders, G. D.; Kuhns, P. L.; McGill, S. A.; Reyes, A. P.; Reno, J. L.; Stanton, C. J.; Bowers, C. R.

    2014-10-29

    A combined experimental-theoretical study of optically pumped NMR (OPNMR) has been performed in a GaAs/Al0.1Ga0.9As quantum well film with thermally induced biaxial strain. The photon energy dependence of the Ga-71 OPNMR signal was recorded at magnetic fields of 4.9 and 9.4 T at a temperature of 4.8-5.4 K. The data were compared to the nuclear spin polarization calculated from differential absorption to spin-up and spin-down states of the conduction band using a modified Pidgeon Brown model. Reasonable agreement between theory and experiment is obtained, facilitating assignment of features in the OPNMR energy dependence to specific interband transitions. Despite the approximations made in the quantum-mechanical model and the inexact correspondence between the experimental and calculated observables, the results provide insight into how effects of strain and quantum confinement are manifested in OPNMR signals

  5. Optical phonons in nanostructured thin films composed by zincblende zinc selenide quantum dots in strong size-quantization regime: Competition between phonon confinement and strain-related effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pejova, Biljana

    2014-05-01

    Raman scattering in combination with optical spectroscopy and structural studies by X-ray diffraction was employed to investigate the phonon confinement and strain-induced effects in 3D assemblies of variable-size zincblende ZnSe quantum dots close packed in thin film form. Nanostructured thin films were synthesized by colloidal chemical approach, while tuning of the nanocrystal size was enabled by post-deposition thermal annealing treatment. In-depth insights into the factors governing the observed trends of the position and half-width of the 1LO band as a function of the average QD size were gained. The overall shifts in the position of 1LO band were found to result from an intricate compromise between the influence of phonon confinement and lattice strain-induced effects. Both contributions were quantitatively and exactly modeled. Accurate assignments of the bands due to surface optical (SO) modes as well as of the theoretically forbidden transverse optical (TO) modes were provided, on the basis of reliable physical models (such as the dielectric continuum model of Ruppin and Englman). The size-dependence of the ratio of intensities of the TO and LO modes was studied and discussed as well. Relaxation time characterizing the phonon decay processes in as-deposited samples was found to be approximately 0.38 ps, while upon post-deposition annealing already at 200 °C it increases to about 0.50 ps. Both of these values are, however, significantly smaller than those characteristic for a macrocrystalline ZnSe sample. - Graphical abstract: Optical phonons in nanostructured thin films composed by zincblende zinc selenide quantum dots in strong size-quantization regime: competition between phonon confinement and strain-related effects. - Highlights: • Phonon confinement vs. strain-induced effects in ZnSe 3D QD assemblies were studied. • Shifts of the 1LO band result from an intricate compromise between the two effects. • SO and theoretically forbidden TO modes were

  6. Optical properties of quantum-confined heterostructures based on GaP{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-x-y} alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, A. Yu.; Kryzhanovskaya, N. V.; Sobolev, M. S.

    2011-09-15

    The results of calculations of the band gap in GaP{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-x-y} alloys and the estimated parameter of hybridization of the conduction band in GaP and the localized level of nitrogen are reported. The optical properties of quantum-confined heterostructures based on GaP{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-x-y} alloys synthesized on the GaP (100) substrate surface are studied by photoluminescence measurements in the temperature range of 15-300 K. The heterostructures consist of GaP{sub 0.814}N{sub 0.006}As{sub 0.18} quantum wells separated by GaP barrier layers. The well width and the barrier thickness are 5 nm. Heterostructures with different numbers of periods are considered. On optical excitation of the structures, an intense photoluminescence line is observed in the spectral range 620-650 nm. The photoluminescence spectra of the GaP{sub 0.814}N{sub 0.006}As{sub 0.18}/GaP quantum wells are profoundly broadened because of the inhomogeneity of the quaternary alloy in composition. It is established that the increase in the number of quantum well layers from 10 to 25 does not results in degradation of the photoluminescence properties of the heterostructures. The results of the study support the view that it is possible to produce efficient optoelectronic devices on the basis of GaP{sub x}N{sub y}As{sub 1-x-y} alloys.

  7. Tailoring the Indium island sizes on the Silicon surface by controlling the deposition rate. Interplay between the size selectivity due to the quantum confinement effect and kinetic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouralnik, A. S.; Ivanchenko, M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Indium films of the same thickness were grown on the Si(111) surfaces at radically different deposition rates and studied by AES. The deposition rates ratio was of the order of 1000:1. Calculations within the simple model used yield both island thickness and coverage from AES data. The ratios of the average island thicknesses obtained from the AES data are in agreement with the theoretical predictions. It is demonstrated that control of the deposition rate in the large range allows fabrication of islands with predefined average thickness. The thickness values obtained from our AES data were nearly the same as the "magic" values reported by Altfeder et al. (Physical Review Letters 92 (2004) 226404 [7]), where Indium island thickness selectivity was explained by the quantum confinement effect.

  8. Polarization-induced confinement of continuous hole-states in highly pumped, industrial-grade, green InGaN quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Nippert, Felix Callsen, Gordon; Westerkamp, Steffen; Kure, Thomas; Nenstiel, Christian; Hoffmann, Axel; Nirschl, Anna; Pietzonka, Ines; Strassburg, Martin; Schulz, Tobias; Albrecht, Martin

    2016-06-07

    We investigate industrial-grade InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) emitting in the green spectral region under high, resonant pumping conditions. Consequently, an ubiquitous high energy luminescence is observed that we assign to a polarization field Confined Hole Continuum (CHC). Our finding is supported by a unique combination of experimental techniques, including transmission electron microscopy, (time-resolved) photoluminescence under various excitation conditions, and electroluminescence, which confirm an extended out-of-plane localization of the CHC-states. The larger width of this localization volume surpasses the QW thickness, yielding enhanced non-radiative losses due to point defects and interfaces, whereas the energetic proximity to the bulk valence band states promotes carrier leakage.

  9. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range.

    PubMed

    Shamsi, Javad; Dang, Zhiya; Bianchini, Paolo; Canale, Claudio; Stasio, Francesco Di; Brescia, Rosaria; Prato, Mirko; Manna, Liberato

    2016-06-15

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed.

  10. Colloidal Synthesis of Quantum Confined Single Crystal CsPbBr3 Nanosheets with Lateral Size Control up to the Micrometer Range

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report the nontemplated colloidal synthesis of single crystal CsPbBr3 perovskite nanosheets with lateral sizes up to a few micrometers and with thickness of just a few unit cells (i.e., below 5 nm), hence in the strong quantum confinement regime, by introducing short ligands (octanoic acid and octylamine) in the synthesis together with longer ones (oleic acid and oleylamine). The lateral size is tunable by varying the ratio of shorter ligands over longer ligands, while the thickness is mainly unaffected by this parameter and stays practically constant at 3 nm in all the syntheses conducted at short-to-long ligands volumetric ratio below 0.67. Beyond this ratio, control over the thickness is lost and a multimodal thickness distribution is observed. PMID:27228475

  11. Absence of quantum confinement effects in the photoluminescence of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}–embedded Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Hiller, D. Zelenina, A.; Gutsch, S.; Zacharias, M.; Dyakov, S. A.; López-Conesa, L.; López-Vidrier, J.; Peiró, F.; Garrido, B.; Estradé, S.; Schnabel, M.; Weiss, C.; Janz, S.

    2014-05-28

    Superlattices of Si-rich silicon nitride and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} are prepared by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and, subsequently, annealed at 1150 °C to form size-controlled Si nanocrystals (Si NCs) embedded in amorphous Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}. Despite well defined structural properties, photoluminescence spectroscopy (PL) reveals inconsistencies with the typically applied model of quantum confined excitons in nitride-embedded Si NCs. Time-resolved PL measurements demonstrate 10{sup 5} times faster time-constants than typical for the indirect band structure of Si NCs. Furthermore, a pure Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} reference sample exhibits a similar PL peak as the Si NC samples. The origin of this luminescence is discussed in detail on the basis of radiative defects and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} band tail states in combination with optical absorption measurements. The apparent absence of PL from the Si NCs is explained conclusively using electron spin resonance data from the Si/Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} interface defect literature. In addition, the role of Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} valence band tail states as potential hole traps is discussed. Most strikingly, the PL peak blueshift with decreasing NC size, which is often observed in literature and typically attributed to quantum confinement (QC), is identified as optical artifact by transfer matrix method simulations of the PL spectra. Finally, criteria for a critical examination of a potential QC-related origin of the PL from Si{sub 3}N{sub 4}-embedded Si NCs are suggested.

  12. Effect of isotropy and anisotropy of the confinement potential on the Rashba spin-orbit interaction for an electron in a two-dimensional quantum dot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tojo, Tatsuki; Inui, Masashi; Ooi, Ryo; Takeda, Kyozaburo; Tokura, Yasuhiro

    2017-07-01

    We theoretically study the energetics of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (SOI) in the two-dimensional (2D) system by comparing the numerical calculation of the exact diagonalization with the analytical calculation based on the perturbation approach and also with the unitary transformed effective Hamiltonian method. The Rashba SOI consists of ls-like and Zeeman-like components, and the out-of-plane application of the external electric field generates the ls-like component, whereas the in-plane application generates the Zeeman-like part. Accordingly, we can separate them by tuning the direction of the applied external electric field. Interestingly, these features do not change provided the confinement is isotropic. The unitary transformation of the total Hamiltonian and the Liouvillian operator expansion technique demonstrate that the Rashba SOI energetics is represented fully in terms of the six orders, in the Rashba coupling. Consequently, the second-order perturbation approach satisfactorily describes the inherent features. When anisotropy is introduced in the confinement, the angular momentum is no longer a good quantum number. The resulting energetics of the Rashba SOI is then unified into the isotropic ground-state type (l = 0).

  13. Tunneling of a few strongly repulsive hard-sphere bosons in an optical lattice with tight external harmonic confinement: A quantum Monte Carlo investigation in continuous space

    SciTech Connect

    Sakhel, Asaad R.; Dubois, Jonathan L.; Sakhel, Roger R.

    2010-04-15

    The effect of strongly repulsive interactions on the tunneling amplitude of hard-sphere (HS) bosons confined in a simple cubic optical lattice plus tight external harmonic confinement in continuous space is investigated. The quantum variational Monte Carlo (VMC) and the variational path integral (VPI) Monte Carlo techniques are used at zero temperature. The effects of the lattice spacing on the tunneling amplitude are also considered. The occupancies of the lattice sites as a function of the repulsion between the bosons are further revealed. Our chief result is that for a small number of bosons (N=8) the overlap of the wave functions in neighboring wells practically does not change with an increase of the repulsive interactions and changes only minimally for a larger number of particles (N=40). The tunneling amplitude rises with a reduction in the lattice spacing. In addition, the occupancy of the center of the trap decreases in favor of a rise in the occupancy of the lattice sites at the edges of the trap with increasing HS repulsion. Further, it was found that the energy per particle at certain optical-lattice barrier heights is insensitive to the number of particles and variations in the HS diameter of the bosons. In order to support our results, we compare the VMC results with corresponding VPI results.

  14. Observation of Distinct Two-Photon Transition Channels in CdTe Quantum Dots in a Regime of Very Strong Confinement.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves Vivas, Marcelo; Leandro De Sousa, José Carlos; De Boni, Leonardo; Schiavon, Marco Antônio; Mendonca, Cleber Renato

    2017-03-30

    We report here on the direct observation of distinct two-photon transition channels in glutathione-capped (GSH) CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in a very strong confinement regime. CdTe-GSH QDs with different average diameters (2.5, 3.0, and 3.3 nm) were synthesized through the one-pot method and their two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum determined by a femtosecond wavelength-tunable Z-scan. Our results show that the two lower-energy one-photon-allowed excitonic transitions, 1S3/2(h) → 1S(e) and 2S3/2(h) → 1S(e), are also accessed via 2PA. These results were ascribed to the relaxation of the parity selection rules due to the noncentrosymmetric structure of the CdTe QDs (zinc-blended structure), whose magnitude are determined by surface defects and structural irregularities present in CdTe-GSH QDs, in the strong confinement regime.

  15. An environment-dependent semi-empirical tight binding model suitable for electron transport in bulk metals, metal alloys, metallic interfaces, and metallic nanostructures. II. Application—Effect of quantum confinement and homogeneous strain on Cu conductance

    SciTech Connect

    Hegde, Ganesh Povolotskyi, Michael; Kubis, Tillmann; Charles, James; Klimeck, Gerhard

    2014-03-28

    The Semi-Empirical tight binding model developed in Part I Hegde et al. [J. Appl. Phys. 115, 123703 (2014)] is applied to metal transport problems of current relevance in Part II. A systematic study of the effect of quantum confinement, transport orientation, and homogeneous strain on electronic transport properties of Cu is carried out. It is found that quantum confinement from bulk to nanowire boundary conditions leads to significant anisotropy in conductance of Cu along different transport orientations. Compressive homogeneous strain is found to reduce resistivity by increasing the density of conducting modes in Cu. The [110] transport orientation in Cu nanowires is found to be the most favorable for mitigating conductivity degradation since it shows least reduction in conductance with confinement and responds most favorably to compressive strain.

  16. Analysis of strain-modified confinement potentials in vertically stacked InAs/GaAs quantum dot nanostructures with varying stacking period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Hyunho; Yoo, Yo-Han; Lee, Woong

    2003-11-01

    The change in confinement potentials in InAs/GaAs quantum dot (QD) nanostructures due to the interaction of strain fields from InAs QDs has been systematically investigated as a function of vertical stacking period in the light of the 'model solid' theory of Van de Walle and Martin using the strain information obtained from finite element analysis. As the stacking period (inter-dot separation) of InAs QDs decreases, in general, the interaction of strain fields in the nanostructure increases the direct band gap in most of the QD volume while a minor volume near the apex region shows a decreased band gap. A substantially close stacking of QDs results in a type-II behaviour along the stacking direction. In the inter-dot separation regime where the influences of the minor volume in the apex region, the type-II behaviour, and quantum mechanical coupling among QDs are not significant, it is anticipated that the closer stacking of QDs would yield an increased band gap and thus increased recombination energy for blue shift in photoluminescence spectra, as experimentally observed elsewhere recently.

  17. Control of orbital reconstruction in (LaAlO3)M/(SrTiO3)N(001) quantum wells by strain and confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doennig, David; Pentcheva, Rossitza

    2015-01-01

    The diverse functionality emerging at oxide interfaces calls for a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and control parameters of electronic reconstructions. Here, we explore the evolution of electronic phases in (LaAlO3)M/(SrTiO3)N (001) superlattices as a function of strain and confinement of the SrTiO3 quantum well. Density functional theory calculations including a Hubbard U term reveal a charge ordered Ti3+ and Ti4+ state for N = 2 with an unanticipated orbital reconstruction, displaying alternating dxz and dyz character at the Ti3+ sites, unlike the previously reported dxy state, obtained only for reduced c-parameter at aSTO. At aLAO c-compression leads to a Dimer-Mott insulator with alternating dxz, dyz sites and an almost zero band gap. Beyond a critical thickness of N = 3 (aSTO) and N = 4 (aLAO) an insulator-to-metal transition takes place, where the extra e/2 electron at the interface is redistributed throughout the STO slab with a dxy interface orbital occupation and a mixed dxz + dyz occupation in the inner layers. Chemical variation of the SrTiO3 counterpart (LaAlO3 vs. NdGaO3) proves that the significant octahedral tilts and distortions in the SrTiO3 quantum well are induced primarily by the electrostatic doping at the polar interface and not by variation of the SrTiO3 counterpart.

  18. Quantum Hall effect in a bulk antiferromagnet EuMnBi2 with magnetically confined two-dimensional Dirac fermions.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Hideaki; Tokunaga, Masashi; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Miyake, Atsushi; Shiogai, Junichi; Nakamura, Shintaro; Awaji, Satoshi; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Arima, Taka-hisa; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ishiwata, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    For the innovation of spintronic technologies, Dirac materials, in which low-energy excitation is described as relativistic Dirac fermions, are one of the most promising systems because of the fascinating magnetotransport associated with extremely high mobility. To incorporate Dirac fermions into spintronic applications, their quantum transport phenomena are desired to be manipulated to a large extent by magnetic order in a solid. We report a bulk half-integer quantum Hall effect in a layered antiferromagnet EuMnBi2, in which field-controllable Eu magnetic order significantly suppresses the interlayer coupling between the Bi layers with Dirac fermions. In addition to the high mobility of more than 10,000 cm(2)/V s, Landau level splittings presumably due to the lifting of spin and valley degeneracy are noticeable even in a bulk magnet. These results will pave a route to the engineering of magnetically functionalized Dirac materials.

  19. Quantum Hall effect in a bulk antiferromagnet EuMnBi2 with magnetically confined two-dimensional Dirac fermions

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Hidetoshi; Sakai, Hideaki; Tokunaga, Masashi; Yamasaki, Yuichi; Miyake, Atsushi; Shiogai, Junichi; Nakamura, Shintaro; Awaji, Satoshi; Tsukazaki, Atsushi; Nakao, Hironori; Murakami, Youichi; Arima, Taka-hisa; Tokura, Yoshinori; Ishiwata, Shintaro

    2016-01-01

    For the innovation of spintronic technologies, Dirac materials, in which low-energy excitation is described as relativistic Dirac fermions, are one of the most promising systems because of the fascinating magnetotransport associated with extremely high mobility. To incorporate Dirac fermions into spintronic applications, their quantum transport phenomena are desired to be manipulated to a large extent by magnetic order in a solid. We report a bulk half-integer quantum Hall effect in a layered antiferromagnet EuMnBi2, in which field-controllable Eu magnetic order significantly suppresses the interlayer coupling between the Bi layers with Dirac fermions. In addition to the high mobility of more than 10,000 cm2/V s, Landau level splittings presumably due to the lifting of spin and valley degeneracy are noticeable even in a bulk magnet. These results will pave a route to the engineering of magnetically functionalized Dirac materials. PMID:27152326

  20. Quest for Inexpensive Hydrogen Isotopic Fractionation: Do We Need 2D Quantum Confining in Porous Materials or Are Rough Surfaces Enough? The Case of Ammonia Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Mella, Massimo; Curotto, E

    2016-10-05

    We study the adsorption energetics and quantum properties of the molecular hydrogen isotopes H2, D2, and T2 onto the surface of rigid ammonia nanoclusters with quantum simulations and accurate model potential energy surfaces (PES). A highly efficient diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) algorithm for rigid rotors allowed us to accurately define zero-point adsorption energies for the three isotopes, as well as the degree of translational and rotational delocalization that each affords on the surface. From the data emerges that the quantum adsorption energy (Eads) of T2 can be up to twice the one of H2 at 0 K, suggesting the possibility of exploiting some form of solid ammonia to selectivity separate hydrogen isotopes at low temperatures (≃20 K). This is discussed by focusing on the structural motif that may be more effective for the task. The analysis of the contributions to Eads, however, surprisingly indicates that the average kinetic energy (E(kin)) and rotation energy (Erot(kin)) of T2 can also be, respectively, 2 times and 20 times higher than those of H2; this finding markedly deviates from what is predicted for hydrogen molecules inside carbon nanotubes (CNT) or metallic-organic frameworks (MOF), where E(kin) and Erot(kin) is higher for H2 due to the unavoidable effects of confinement and hindrance to its rotational motion. The rationale for these differences is provided by the geometrical distributions for the rigid rotors, which reveal an increasingly stronger coupling between rotational and translational degrees of freedom upon increasing the isotopic mass. This effect has never been observed before on adsorbing surfaces (e.g., graphite) and is induced by a strongly anisotropic and anharmonic bowl-like potential experienced by the rotors.

  1. Impact of quantum confinement on transport and the electrostatic driven performance of silicon nanowire transistors at the scaling limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ameri, Talib; Georgiev, Vihar P.; Sadi, Toufik; Wang, Yijiao; Adamu-Lema, Fikru; Wang, Xingsheng; Amoroso, Salvatore M.; Towie, Ewan; Brown, Andrew; Asenov, Asen

    2017-03-01

    In this work we investigate the impact of quantum mechanical effects on the device performance of n-type silicon nanowire transistors (NWT) for possible future CMOS applications at the scaling limit. For the purpose of this paper, we created Si NWTs with two channel crystallographic orientations <1 1 0> and <1 0 0> and six different cross-section profiles. In the first part, we study the impact of quantum corrections on the gate capacitance and mobile charge in the channel. The mobile charge to gate capacitance ratio, which is an indicator of the intrinsic performance of the NWTs, is also investigated. The influence of the rotating of the NWTs cross-sectional geometry by 90° on charge distribution in the channel is also studied. We compare the correlation between the charge profile in the channel and cross-sectional dimension for circular transistor with four different cross-sections diameters: 5 nm, 6 nm, 7 nm and 8 nm. In the second part of this paper, we expand the computational study by including different gate lengths for some of the Si NWTs. As a result, we establish a correlation between the mobile charge distribution in the channel and the gate capacitance, drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and the subthreshold slope (SS). All calculations are based on a quantum mechanical description of the mobile charge distribution in the channel. This description is based on the solution of the Schrödinger equation in NWT cross sections along the current path, which is mandatory for nanowires with such ultra-scale dimensions.

  2. Efficient Nonvolatile Rewritable Memories Based on Three-Dimensionally Confined Au Quantum Dots Embedded in Ultrathin Polyimide Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chaoxing; Li, Fushan; Guo, Tailiang; Qu, Bo; Chen, Zhijian; Gong, Qihuang

    2011-03-01

    The electrical properties of a nonvolatile organic bistable device (OBD) utilizing Au quantum dots (QDs) sandwiched between two thin insulating polyimide layers were investigated. Current-voltage (I-V) measurements on the device at room temperature showed a current bistability due to the existence of the Au QDs. The maximum ON/OFF ratio of the current bistability in the OBD was 1 ×108, the largest value ever reported for a stable OBD. The device has excellent endurance and retention ability in ambient conditions. The electrical properties and operating mechanisms for the device are analyzed on the basis of the I-V results.

  3. Quantum confinement-tunable intersystem crossing and the triplet state lifetime of cationic porphyrin-CdTe quantum dot nano-assemblies.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ghada H; Aly, Shawkat M; Usman, Anwar; Eita, Mohamed S; Melnikov, Vasily A; Mohammed, Omar F

    2015-05-11

    Here, we report a ground-state interaction between the positively charged cationic porphyrin and the negatively charged carboxylate groups of the thiol ligands on the surface of CdTe quantum dots (QDs), leading to the formation of a stable nanoassembly between the two components. Our time-resolved data clearly demonstrate that we can dramatically tune the intersystem crossing (ISC) and the triplet state lifetime of porphyrin by changing the size of the QDs in the nanoassembly.

  4. Negative activation energy and dielectric signatures of excitons and excitonic Mott transitions in quantum confined laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhunia, Amit; Bansal, Kanika; Henini, Mohamed; Alshammari, Marzook S.; Datta, Shouvik

    2016-10-01

    Mostly, optical spectroscopies are used to investigate the physics of excitons, whereas their electrical evidences are hardly explored. Here, we examined a forward bias activated differential capacitance response of GaInP/AlGaInP based multi-quantum well laser diodes to trace the presence of excitons using electrical measurements. Occurrence of "negative activation energy" after light emission is understood as thermodynamical signature of steady state excitonic population under intermediate range of carrier injections. Similar corroborative results are also observed in an InGaAs/GaAs quantum dot laser structure grown by molecular beam epitaxy. With increasing biases, the measured differential capacitance response slowly vanishes. This represents gradual Mott transition of an excitonic phase into an electron-hole plasma in a GaInP/AlGaInP laser diode. This is further substantiated by more and more exponentially looking shapes of high energy tails in electroluminescence spectra with increasing forward bias, which originates from a growing non-degenerate population of free electrons and holes. Such an experimental correlation between electrical and optical properties of excitons can be used to advance the next generation excitonic devices.

  5. Optical properties of self-assembled arrays of InP quantum wires confined in nanotubes of chrysotile asbestos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, S. G.; Sotomayor Torres, C. M.; Yates, H. M.; Pemble, M. E.; Butko, V.; Tretijakov, V.

    1997-07-01

    Three-dimensional arrays of structurally confined InP wire-like nanostructures were grown in channels (nanotubes) of a chrysotile asbestos matrix by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. The formation of the InP compound was confirmed by absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering. It is shown that the density of states around the band edge increases with the InP loading of the matrix. Photoluminescence spectra of the asbestos filled in with InP consist mainly of two bands: a high energy band which is interpreted to be associated with charge transfer from InP to defect states of the asbestos and a low energy band which is associated with energy relaxation in the InP deposit itself. We show that the optical properties of this material are dominated by the size and dimensionality of the pore system of the matrix for heavy loading and by the semiconductor-to-matrix interface for light loading of the matrix with InP.

  6. Extremely confined quantum-well states for (2×2)-K and (3×3)-K on graphite: First-principles calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chis, V.; Walldén, L.

    2011-10-01

    We report on the atomic and electronic structure obtained by first-principles density functional theory calculations for a (2×2)-K monolayer as well as a (3×3)-K monolayer on graphite represented by an 11-layer carbon slab. In both cases, the calculations predict that the K atoms reside above hollows [2.93 Å above the surface atomic layers for (2×2)-K]. The electronic structure is characterized by a partially occupied, free-electron-like overlayer quantum-well (QW)-state band (EF-0.76 eV at Γ¯, 1.14me) and one empty QW band (EF+1.7 eV, 1.0me), for (2×2)-K. The partially filled QW band, which has an energy and dispersion close to that which has been experimentally observed, provides examples of extremely confined states with nearly all charge (93%) deposited in the overlayer. In the substrate, the layer-confined σ bands are rigidly downshifted, by 0.6 eV for the outermost carbon-atom layer and by 0.14 eV for the second layer. For the π electrons, downshifted bands are split off from the ladder of closely spaced band energies, which approximate the continuum of states in a thick graphite sample. The splitting off can be regarded as the formation of a QW state, since the electrons are found mainly in the outermost layer of carbon atoms. The split-off band is not obtained via a downshift of the band with the lowest energy among the closely spaced states, since the band-edge states of the bare substrate have only a small amplitude in the outermost layer of carbon atoms. The high degree of confinement for both the K overlayer states and the C underlayer π states should make the system of interest for studies of the excitations of two near-two-dimensional electron gases at short distance.

  7. Control of orbital reconstruction in (LaAlO3)M/(SrTiO3)N(001) quantum wells by strain and confinement

    PubMed Central

    Doennig, David; Pentcheva, Rossitza

    2015-01-01

    The diverse functionality emerging at oxide interfaces calls for a fundamental understanding of the mechanisms and control parameters of electronic reconstructions. Here, we explore the evolution of electronic phases in (LaAlO3)M/(SrTiO3)N (001) superlattices as a function of strain and confinement of the SrTiO3 quantum well. Density functional theory calculations including a Hubbard U term reveal a charge ordered Ti3+ and Ti4+ state for N = 2 with an unanticipated orbital reconstruction, displaying alternating dxz and dyz character at the Ti3+ sites, unlike the previously reported dxy state, obtained only for reduced c-parameter at aSTO. At aLAO c-compression leads to a Dimer-Mott insulator with alternating dxz, dyz sites and an almost zero band gap. Beyond a critical thickness of N = 3 (aSTO) and N = 4 (aLAO) an insulator-to-metal transition takes place, where the extra e/2 electron at the interface is redistributed throughout the STO slab with a dxy interface orbital occupation and a mixed dxz + dyz occupation in the inner layers. Chemical variation of the SrTiO3 counterpart (LaAlO3 vs. NdGaO3) proves that the significant octahedral tilts and distortions in the SrTiO3 quantum well are induced primarily by the electrostatic doping at the polar interface and not by variation of the SrTiO3 counterpart. PMID:25601648

  8. Polyaniline/graphene quantum dot-modified screen-printed carbon electrode for the rapid determination of Cr(VI) using stopped-flow analysis coupled with voltammetric technique.

    PubMed

    Punrat, Eakkasit; Maksuk, Chakkarin; Chuanuwatanakul, Suchada; Wonsawat, Wanida; Chailapakul, Orawon

    2016-04-01

    Polyaniline/graphene quantum dots (PANI/GQDs) were used to modify a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) in a flow-based system. A method for rapidly determining the Cr(VI) concentrations by using stopped-flow analysis has been developed using an Auto-Pret system coupled with linear-sweep voltammetry using the PANI/GQD-modified SPCE. The GQDs, synthesized in a botton-up manner from citric acid, were mixed with aniline monomer in an optimized ratio. The mixture was injected into an electrochemical flow cell in which electro-polymerization of the aniline monomer occurred. Under conditions optimized for determining Cr(VI), wide linearity was obtained in the range of 0.1-10 mg L(-1), with a detection limit of 0.097 mg L(-1). For a sample volume of 0.5 m L, the modified SPCE can be used continuously with a sample-throughput of more than 90 samples per hour. In addition, this proposed method was successfully applied to mineral water samples with acceptable accuracy, and the quantitative agreement was accomplished in deteriorated Cr-plating solutions with a standard traditional method for Cr(VI) detection.

  9. Quantum dot resonant tunneling spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Mark A.; Randall, John N.; Luscombe, James H.; Frensley, William R.; Aggarwal, Raj J.; Matyi, Richard J.; Moore, Tom M.; Wetsel, Anna E.

    The electronic transport through 3-dimensionally confined semiconductor quantum wells (quantum dots) is investigated and analyzed. The spectra corresponds to resonant tunneling from laterally-confined emitter contact subbands through the discrete 3-dimensionally confined quantum dot states. Momentum nonconservation is observed in these structures. Results on coupled quantum dot states (molccules) will be presented.

  10. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 μg/mg creatinine), severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally <100 μg/mg creatinine), mild dysostosis multiplex, with death in the 4th or 5th decades. Other clinical findings may include cardiac valve disease, reduced pulmonary function, hepatosplenomegaly, sinusitis, otitis media, hearing loss, sleep apnea, corneal clouding, carpal tunnel disease, and inguinal or umbilical hernia. Although intellectual deficit is generally absent in MPS VI, central nervous system findings may include cervical cord compression caused by cervical spinal instability, meningeal thickening and/or bony stenosis, communicating hydrocephalus, optic nerve atrophy and blindness. The disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14). Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase) activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity <10% of the lower limit of normal in cultured fibroblasts or isolated leukocytes, and demonstration of a normal activity of a different sulfatase enzyme

  11. Mucopolysaccharidosis VI.

    PubMed

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Nicely, Helen; Harmatz, Paul; Turbeville, Sean

    2010-04-12

    Mucopolysaccharidosis VI (MPS VI) is a lysosomal storage disease with progressive multisystem involvement, associated with a deficiency of arylsulfatase B leading to the accumulation of dermatan sulfate. Birth prevalence is between 1 in 43,261 and 1 in 1,505,160 live births. The disorder shows a wide spectrum of symptoms from slowly to rapidly progressing forms. The characteristic skeletal dysplasia includes short stature, dysostosis multiplex and degenerative joint disease. Rapidly progressing forms may have onset from birth, elevated urinary glycosaminoglycans (generally >100 microg/mg creatinine), severe dysostosis multiplex, short stature, and death before the 2nd or 3rd decades. A more slowly progressing form has been described as having later onset, mildly elevated glycosaminoglycans (generally <100 microg/mg creatinine), mild dysostosis multiplex, with death in the 4th or 5th decades. Other clinical findings may include cardiac valve disease, reduced pulmonary function, hepatosplenomegaly, sinusitis, otitis media, hearing loss, sleep apnea, corneal clouding, carpal tunnel disease, and inguinal or umbilical hernia. Although intellectual deficit is generally absent in MPS VI, central nervous system findings may include cervical cord compression caused by cervical spinal instability, meningeal thickening and/or bony stenosis, communicating hydrocephalus, optic nerve atrophy and blindness. The disorder is transmitted in an autosomal recessive manner and is caused by mutations in the ARSB gene, located in chromosome 5 (5q13-5q14). Over 130 ARSB mutations have been reported, causing absent or reduced arylsulfatase B (N-acetylgalactosamine 4-sulfatase) activity and interrupted dermatan sulfate and chondroitin sulfate degradation. Diagnosis generally requires evidence of clinical phenotype, arylsulfatase B enzyme activity <10% of the lower limit of normal in cultured fibroblasts or isolated leukocytes, and demonstration of a normal activity of a different sulfatase

  12. Electronic structure of parabolically confined quantum wire with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions under the influence of perpendicular magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarikurt, Sevil; Sakiroglu, Serpil; Akgungor, Kadir; Sokmen, Ismail

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the effect of spin-orbit (SO) coupling on the energy level spectrum and spin texturing of parabolically confined quantum wire that is subjected to an externally applied perpendicular magnetic field. Additionally we have also taken into account exchange-correlation contribution.Highly accurate numerical calculations have been carried out by finite element method. Our results have been revealed that the interplay of the SO coupling with effective magnetic field significantly modifies the band structure, producing additional subband extrema and energy gaps. Energy subband structure varies depending on which type of SO coupling strength is considered and also the magnitude of SO coupling. We also obtain that spatial modulation of spin density along the wire width can be considerably modified by SO coupling strength, magnetic field and charge carrier concentration. Besides, we have observed that the presence of exchange-correlation contribution leads to a softening behavior in the local maxima at subbands and shifts all energy subbands to lower energy values. Numerical results point out that the combined effect of exchange-correlation and SO coupling produces asymmetry in the dispersion relations. Supported by Scientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey.

  13. Optical properties of ionized donor-bound excitons confined in strained wurtzite ZnO/MgxZn1-xO quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dongmei, Zheng; Zongchi, Wang; Boqi, Xiao

    2015-03-01

    Within the framework of the effective-mass approximation and the dipole approximation, considering the three-dimensional confinement of the electron and hole and the strong built-in electric field (BEF) in strained wurtzite ZnO/Mg0.25Zn0.75O quantum dots (QDs), the optical properties of ionized donor-bound excitons (D+, X) are investigated theoretically using a variational method. The computations are performed in the case of finite band offset. Numerical results indicate that the optical properties of (D+, X) complexes sensitively depend on the donor position, the QD size and the BEF. The binding energy of (D+, X) complexes is larger when the donor is located in the vicinity of the left interface of the QDs, and it decreases with increasing QD size. The oscillator strength reduces with an increase in the dot height and increases with an increase in the dot radius. Furthermore, when the QD size decreases, the absorption peak intensity shows a marked increment, and the absorption coefficient peak has a blueshift. The strong BEF causes a redshift of the absorption coefficient peak and causes the absorption peak intensity to decrease remarkably. The physical reasons for these relationships have been analyzed in depth. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation for Young Scientists of China (No. 11102100), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in Fujian Province University (No. JA14285) and the Program for Young Top-Notch Innovative Talents of Fujian Province of China.

  14. Nanocrystalline-Si-dot multi-layers fabrication by chemical vapor deposition with H-plasma surface treatment and evaluation of structure and quantum confinement effects

    SciTech Connect

    Kosemura, Daisuke Mizukami, Yuki; Takei, Munehisa; Numasawa, Yohichiroh; Ogura, Atsushi; Ohshita, Yoshio

    2014-01-15

    100-nm-thick nanocrystalline silicon (nano-Si)-dot multi-layers on a Si substrate were fabricated by the sequential repetition of H-plasma surface treatment, chemical vapor deposition, and surface oxidation, for over 120 times. The diameter of the nano-Si dots was 5–6 nm, as confirmed by both the transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. The annealing process was important to improve the crystallinity of the nano-Si dot. We investigated quantum confinement effects by Raman spectroscopy and photoluminescence (PL) measurements. Based on the experimental results, we simulated the Raman spectrum using a phenomenological model. Consequently, the strain induced in the nano-Si dots was estimated by comparing the experimental and simulated results. Taking the estimated strain value into consideration, the band gap modulation was measured, and the diameter of the nano-Si dots was calculated to be 5.6 nm by using PL. The relaxation of the q ∼ 0 selection rule model for the nano-Si dots is believed to be important to explain both the phenomena of peak broadening on the low-wavenumber side observed in Raman spectra and the blue shift observed in PL measurements.

  15. Magneto-photon-phonon interaction in a parabolically confined quantum dot in the presence of high magnetic fields and intense terahertz radiation fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, W. Y.; Xu, W.

    2012-07-01

    We present a theoretical study on magneto-photon-phonon interaction in a parabolically confined quantum dot subjected simultaneously to static magnetic field and radiation field. A nonperturbative treatment for electron-photon interaction is proposed by solving analytically the time-dependent Schrödinger equation in which the magnetic field and the radiation field are included exactly. We employ the energy-balance equation approach on the basis of the Boltzmann equation to evaluate the energy transfer rate induced by optical transition events. It is found that for relatively low radiation levels, two peaks of the cyclotron resonance (CR) appear at two Kohn's frequencies ω±, and the strength and the width of the CR increase with radiation intensity. The CR at ω+ is more prominent than that at ω-. When the radiation become intense, the splitting of the CR peaks can be observed and the splitting increases with radiation intensity. The physics reasons behind these interesting findings are discussed. This study is pertinent to the application of intense terahertz radiation sources such as free-electron lasers in the investigation into low-dimensional semiconductor systems.

  16. Gyromagnetic ratios of electrons confined in quantum wells in ZnSe/ZnxMg1-xSySe1-y heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, J. J.; Wolverson, D.; Griffin, I. J.; Karimov, O. Z.; Orange, C. L.; Hommel, D.; Behringer, M.

    2000-10-01

    The gyromagnetic ratios (g values) of electrons in ZnSe quantum wells with ZnxMg1-xSySe1-y barriers have been determined by resonance spin-flip Raman scattering as functions of well width and of the direction of the applied magnetic field. These heterostructures provide an excellent test of k.p perturbation theories since there is both a large penetration of the electron wave function into the barrier and a considerable difference in the light-hole and heavy-hole confinement energies in the well. The former leads to exposure of the electron to a region in which the spin-orbit coupling is significantly reduced, while the latter introduces a marked anisotropy in the g tensor. The behavior of the g tensor as the well width is decreased is described very well by simple analytic expressions obtained from three-band k.p theory, excellent agreement with experiment being obtained with a 10% conduction band offset ratio.

  17. Independent variations of applied voltage and injection current for controlling the quantum-confined Stark effect in an InGaN/GaN quantum-well light-emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Chen, Horng-Shyang; Liu, Zhan Hui; Shih, Pei-Ying; Su, Chia-Ying; Chen, Chih-Yen; Lin, Chun-Han; Yao, Yu-Feng; Kiang, Yean-Woei; Yang, C C

    2014-04-07

    A reverse-biased voltage is applied to either device in the vertical configuration of two light-emitting diodes (LEDs) grown on patterned and flat Si (110) substrates with weak and strong quantum-confined Stark effects (QCSEs), respectively, in the InGaN/GaN quantum wells for independently controlling the applied voltage across and the injection current into the p-i-n junction in the lateral configuration of LED operation. The results show that more carrier supply is needed in the LED of weaker QCSE to produce a carrier screening effect for balancing the potential tilt in increasing the forward-biased voltage, when compared with the LED of stronger QCSE. The small spectral shift range in increasing injection current in the LED of weaker QCSE is attributed not only to the weaker QCSE, but also to its smaller device resistance such that a given increment of applied voltage leads to a larger increment of injection current. From a viewpoint of practical application in LED operation, by applying a reverse-biased voltage in the vertical configuration, the applied voltage and injection current in the lateral configuration can be independently controlled by adjusting the vertical voltage for keeping the emission spectral peak fixed.

  18. Fast pixelated sensors for radiation detection and imaging based on quantum confined structures in III/V semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tortora, M.; Biasiol, G.; Cautero, G.; Menk, R. H.; Plaisier, J. R.; Antonelli, M.

    2017-03-01

    In order to improve the characterisation of the delivered beams in many types of photon sources, innovative beam profilers based on III/V semiconductor materials (InGaAs/InAlAs) have been deeply investigated. Owing to a tunable and direct band gap these devices allow radiation detection in a wide spectral range. In order to increase the sensitivity of the device in radiation detection charge amplification on the sensor level is implemented. This is obtained by exploiting In0.75Ga0.25As/In0.75Al0.25As quantum wells (QW) hosting a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) through molecular beam epitaxy (MBE). Internal charge-amplification mechanism can be achieved for very low applied voltages, while the high carrier mobility allows the design of very fast photon detectors with sub-nanosecond response times. This technology has been preliminarily exploited to fabricate prototype beam profilers with a strip geometry (with 50-μm-wide strips). Tests were carried out both with conventional X-ray tubes and at the Elettra synchrotron facility. The results testify how these profilers are capable of reconstructing the shape of the beam, as well as estimating the position of the beam centroid with a precision of about 400 nm. Further measurements with different samples of decreasing thickness have shown how this precision could be further improved by an optimised microfabrication. For this reason a new design, based on a membrane-photodetector, is proposed. Results regarding the spatial resolution as function of the sensor thickness will be presented and discussed.

  19. Walking droplets in confined domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sáenz, Pedro; Bush, John

    2016-11-01

    A millimetric liquid drop can walk spontaneously along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath, propelled by a resonant interaction with its own wave field. These walking droplets exhibit features previously thought to be exclusive to the microscopic quantum realm. We here explore experimentally the dynamics and statistics of this macroscopic wave-particle system in confined domains, or 'corrals'. Particular attention is given to characterizing the influence of the corral geometry on the emergent probability distributions. The relation to analogous quantum systems (specifically, quantum corrals, the quantum mirage and scarring in Bose-Einstein condensates) is discussed. NSF support via CMMI-1333242.

  20. Rheology of water ices V and VI

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; Stern, L.A.; Kirby, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    We have measured the mechanical strength (??) of pure water ices V and VI under steady state deformation conditions. Constant displacement rate compressional tests were conducted in a gas apparatus at confining pressures from 400 250 K. Ices V and VI are thus Theologically distinct but by coincidence have approximately the same strength under the conditions chosen for these experiments. To avoid misidentification, these tests are therefore accompanied by careful observations of the occurrences and characteristics of phase changes. One sample each of ice V and VI was quenched at pressure to metastably retain the high-pressure phase and the acquired deformation microstructures; X ray diffraction analysis of these samples confirmed the phase identification. Surface replicas of the deformed and quenched samples suggest that ice V probably deforms largely by dislocation creep, while ice VI deforms by a more complicated process involving substantial grain size reduction through recrystallization.

  1. Influence of quantum confinement and strain on orbital polarization of four-layer LaNiO3 superlattices: A DFT+DMFT study

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Hyowon; Millis, Andrew J.; Marianetti, Chris A.

    2016-06-07

    Atomically precise superlattices involving transition metal oxides provide a unique opportunity to engineer correlated electron physics using strain (modulated by choice of substate) and quantum confinement (controlled by layer thickness). We use the combination of density functional theory and dynamical mean field theory (DFT+DMFT) to study Ni Eg d-orbital polarization in strained LaNiO3/LaAlO3 superlattices consisting of four layers of nominally metallic NiO2 and four layers of insulating AlO2 separated by LaO layers. The layer-resolved orbital polarization is calculated as a function of strain and analyzed in terms of structural, quantum confinement, and correlation effects. We determined that the effect of strain is from the dependence of the results on the Ni-O bondlength ratio and the octahedral rotation angles; quantum confinement is studied by comparison to bulk calculations with similar degrees of strain; correlation effects are inferred by varying interaction parameters within our DFT+DMFT calculations. The calculated dependence of orbital polarization on strain in superlattices is qualitatively consistent with recent X-ray absorption spectroscopy and resonant reflectometry data. But, interesting differences of detail are found between theory and experiment. Under tensile strain, the two inequivalent Ni ions display orbital polarization similar to that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3 and observed in experiment. Compressive strain produces a larger dependence of orbital polarization on Ni position and even the inner Ni layer exhibits orbital polarization different from that calculated for strained bulk LaNiO3.

  2. Quantum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elbaz, Edgard

    This book gives a new insight into the interpretation of quantum mechanics (stochastic, integral paths, decoherence), a completely new treatment of angular momentum (graphical spin algebra) and an introduction to Fermion fields (Dirac equation) and Boson fields (e.m. and Higgs) as well as an introduction to QED (quantum electrodynamics), supersymmetry and quantum cosmology.

  3. Electronic structure of and quantum size effect in III-V and II-VI semiconducting nanocrystals using a realistic tight binding approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanatha, Ranjani; Sapra, Sameer; Saha-Dasgupta, Tanusri; Sarma, D. D.

    2005-07-01

    We analyze the electronic structure of group III-V semiconductors obtained within full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FP-LAPW) method and arrive at a realistic and minimal tight-binding model, parametrized to provide an accurate description of both valence and conduction bands. It is shown that the cation sp3 - anion sp3d5 basis along with the next nearest neighbor model for hopping interactions is sufficient to describe the electronic structure of these systems over a wide energy range, obviating the use of any fictitious s* orbital, employed previously. Similar analyses were also performed for the II-VI semiconductors, using the more accurate FP-LAPW method compared to previous approaches, in order to enhance reliability of the parameter values. Using these parameters, we calculate the electronic structure of III-V and II-VI nanocrystals in real space with sizes ranging up to about 7nm in diameter, establishing a quantitatively accurate description of the bandgap variation with sizes for the various nanocrystals by comparing with available experimental results from the literature.

  4. Effect of the deposition of cobalt on the optoelectronic properties of quantum-confined In(Ga)As/GaAs heteronanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Volkova, N. S.; Gorshkov, A. P.; Zdoroveyshchev, A. V.; Istomin, L. A.; Levichev, S. B.

    2015-12-15

    The systematic features of the inf luence of defect formation during the deposition of a cobalt contact on the optoelectronic characteristics of structures containing InAs/GaAs quantum dots and In{sub x}Ga{sub 1–x}As/GaAs quantum wells are studied. From analysis of the temperature dependences of the photosensitivity of the InAs/GaAs quantum-dot structures, the values of the resultant recombination lifetime of photoexcited charge carriers in quantum dots at different conditions of Co deposition and at different structural parameters are determined.

  5. Causal signal transmission by quantum fields. VI: The Lorentz condition and Maxwell’s equations for fluctuations of the electromagnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Plimak, L.I.; Stenholm, S.

    2013-11-15

    The general structure of electromagnetic interactions in the so-called response representation of quantum electrodynamics (QED) is analysed. A formal solution to the general quantum problem of the electromagnetic field interacting with matter is found. Independently, a formal solution to the corresponding problem in classical stochastic electrodynamics (CSED) is constructed. CSED and QED differ only in the replacement of stochastic averages of c-number fields and currents by time-normal averages of the corresponding Heisenberg operators. All relations of QED connecting quantum field to quantum current lack Planck’s constant, and thus coincide with their counterparts in CSED. In Feynman’s terms, one encounters complete disentanglement of the potential and current operators in response picture. Based on this parallelism between QED and CSED, it is natural to expect validity of the Lorentz condition and Maxwell’s equations for the time-normal averages of the potential and current. Things however turn out to be more complicated. Maxwell’s equations under the time-normal ordering can only be demonstrated subject to cancellation of the so-called Schwinger terms by gauge-invariant regularisations. We presume this pattern to be general, formulating this as “commutativity conjecture”. Consistency of the latter with the Heisenberg uncertainty principle is discussed. -- Highlights: •The general structure of interaction in quantum electrodynamics (QED) is analysed. •A detailed parallelism between QED and classical stochastic electrodynamics is shown. •Validity of Maxwell’s equations for fluctuations of the field is discussed. •This validity turns out to be in essence a renormalisation postulate.

  6. Effect of carrier confinement on effective mass of excitons and estimation of ultralow disorder in Al x Ga1-x As/GaAs quantum wells by magneto-photoluminescence.

    PubMed

    Haldar, S; Dixit, V K; Vashisht, Geetanjali; Khamari, Shailesh Kumar; Porwal, S; Sharma, T K; Oak, S M

    2017-07-07

    Effect of charge carrier confinement and ultra-low disorder acquainted in AlGaAs/GaAs multi-quantum well system is investigated via Magneto-photoluminescence spectroscopy. Significant increase of effective mass is observed for the confined exciton in narrow QWs. The foremost reason behind such an observation is due to the induced non-parabolicity in bands. Moreover, as the thickness of the QW are reduced, confined excitons in QW experience atomic irregularities at the hetero-junctions and their effects are prominent in the photoluminescence linewidth. Amount of photoluminescence line-broadening caused by the atomic irregularities at the hetero-junctions is correlated with average fluctuation (δ 1) in QW thickness. The estimated δ 1 for Al0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs QWs are found to be ±(0.14 - 1.6)× 'one monolayer thickness of GaAs layer'. Further, the strong perturbations due to magnetic field in a system helps in realizing optical properties of exciton in QWs, where magnetic field is used as a probe to detect ultralow defects in the QW. Additionally, the influence of magnetic field on the free and bound exciton luminescence is explained by a simple model. The proposed approach for measuring the interface and volume defects in an ultra-low disordered system by Magneto-PL spectroscopy technique will be highly beneficial in high mobility devices for advanced applications.

  7. Surfactant ligand removal and rational fabrication of inorganically connected quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haitao; Hu, Bo; Sun, Liangfeng; Hovden, Robert; Wise, Frank W; Muller, David A; Robinson, Richard D

    2011-12-14

    A novel method is reported to create inorganically connected nanocrystal (NC) assemblies for both II-VI and IV-VI semiconductors by removing surfactant ligands using (NH4)2S. This surface modification process differs from ligand exchange methods in that no new surfactant ligands are introduced and the post-treated NC surfaces are nearly bare. The detailed mechanism study shows that the high reactivity between (NH4)2S and metal-surfactant ligand complexes enables the complete removal of surfactant ligands in seconds and converts the NC metal-rich shells into metal sulfides. The post-treated NCs are connected through metal-sulfide bonding and form a larger NCs film assembly, while still maintaining quantum confinement. Such "connected but confined" NC assemblies are promising new materials for electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  8. Electron states in semiconductor quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Dhayal, Suman S.; Ramaniah, Lavanya M.; Ruda, Harry E.; Nair, Selvakumar V.

    2014-11-28

    In this work, the electronic structures of quantum dots (QDs) of nine direct band gap semiconductor materials belonging to the group II-VI and III-V families are investigated, within the empirical tight-binding framework, in the effective bond orbital model. This methodology is shown to accurately describe these systems, yielding, at the same time, qualitative insights into their electronic properties. Various features of the bulk band structure such as band-gaps, band curvature, and band widths around symmetry points affect the quantum confinement of electrons and holes. These effects are identified and quantified. A comparison with experimental data yields good agreement with the calculations. These theoretical results would help quantify the optical response of QDs of these materials and provide useful input for applications.

  9. Multimodal Mn-doped I-III-VI quantum dots for near infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging: from synthesis to in vivo application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sitbon, Gary; Bouccara, Sophie; Tasso, Mariana; Francois, Aurélie; Bezdetnaya, Lina; Marchal, Frédéric; Beaumont, Marine; Pons, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The development of sensitive multimodal contrast agents is a key issue to provide better global, multi-scale images for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Here we present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se)/Zn1-xMnxS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) that can be used as markers for both near-infrared fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We first present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se) cores coated with a thick ZnS shell doped with various proportions of Mn. Their emission wavelengths can be tuned over the NIR optical window suitable for deep tissue imaging. The incorporation of manganese ions (up to a few thousand ions per QD) confers them a paramagnetic character, as demonstrated by structural analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. These QDs maintain their optical properties after transfer to water using ligand exchange. They exhibit T1-relaxivities up to 1400 mM-1 [QD] s-1 at 7 T and 300 K. We finally show that these QDs are suitable multimodal in vivo probes and demonstrate MRI and NIR fluorescence detection of regional lymph nodes in mice.The development of sensitive multimodal contrast agents is a key issue to provide better global, multi-scale images for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes. Here we present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se)/Zn1-xMnxS core-shell quantum dots (QDs) that can be used as markers for both near-infrared fluorescence imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We first present the synthesis of Zn-Cu-In-(S, Se) cores coated with a thick ZnS shell doped with various proportions of Mn. Their emission wavelengths can be tuned over the NIR optical window suitable for deep tissue imaging. The incorporation of manganese ions (up to a few thousand ions per QD) confers them a paramagnetic character, as demonstrated by structural analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. These QDs maintain their optical properties after transfer to water using ligand exchange. They exhibit T1-relaxivities

  10. PREFACE: International Conference on Optics of Excitons in Confined Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viña, Luis; Tejedor, Carlos; Calleja, José M.

    2010-01-01

    The OECS11 (International Conference on Optics of Excitons in Confined Systems) was the eleventh of a very successful series of conferences that started in 1987 in Rome (Italy). Afterwards the conference was held at Naxos (Sicily, Italy, 1991), Montpellier (France, 1993), Cortona (Italy, 1995), Göttingen (Germany, 1997), Ascona (Switzerland, 1999), Montpellier (France, 2001), Lecce (Italy, 2003), Southampton (UK, 2005) and Patti (Sicily, Italy, 2007). It is addressed to scientists who lead fundamental and applied research on the optical properties of excitons in novel condensed-matter nanostructures. The 2009 meeting (7-11 September 2009) has brought together a large representation of the world leading actors in this domain, with the aim of stimulating the exchange of ideas, promoting international collaborations, and coordinating research on the newest exciton-related issues such as quantum information science and exciton quantum-collective phenomena. The meeting has included invited lectures, contributed oral presentations and posters, covering the following general topics: low-dimensional heterostructures: quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots polaritons quantum optics with excitons and polaritons many-body effects under coherent and incoherent excitation coherent optical spectroscopy quantum coherence and quantum-phase manipulation Bose-Einstein condensation and other collective phenomena excitons in novel materials The OECS 11 was held at the campus of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid in Cantoblanco. The scientific program was composed of more than 200 contributions divided into 16 invited talks, 44 oral contributions and 3 poster sessions with a total of 150 presentations. The scientific level of the presentations was guaranteed by a selection process where each contribution was rated by three members of the Program Committee. The Conference has gathered 238 participants from 21 different countries, with the following distribution: Germany (43

  11. Size-confined fixed-composition and composition-dependent engineered band gap alloying induces different internal structures in L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adegoke, Oluwasesan; Park, Enoch Y.

    2016-06-01

    The development of alloyed quantum dot (QD) nanocrystals with attractive optical properties for a wide array of chemical and biological applications is a growing research field. In this work, size-tunable engineered band gap composition-dependent alloying and fixed-composition alloying were employed to fabricate new L-cysteine-capped alloyed quaternary CdZnTeS QDs exhibiting different internal structures. Lattice parameters simulated based on powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) revealed the internal structure of the composition-dependent alloyed CdxZnyTeS QDs to have a gradient nature, whereas the fixed-composition alloyed QDs exhibited a homogenous internal structure. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis confirmed the size-confined nature and monodispersity of the alloyed nanocrystals. The zeta potential values were within the accepted range of colloidal stability. Circular dichroism (CD) analysis showed that the surface-capped L-cysteine ligand induced electronic and conformational chiroptical changes in the alloyed nanocrystals. The photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) values of the gradient alloyed QDs were 27–61%, whereas for the homogenous alloyed QDs, the PL QY values were spectacularly high (72–93%). Our work demonstrates that engineered fixed alloying produces homogenous QD nanocrystals with higher PL QY than composition-dependent alloying.

  12. Tuning the g-factor of neutral and charged excitons confined to self-assembled (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Corfdir, P. Van Hattem, B.; Phillips, R. T.; Fontana, Y.; Russo-Averchi, E.; Heiss, M.; Fontcuberta i Morral, A.

    2014-12-01

    We study the neutral exciton (X) and charged exciton (CX) transitions from (Al,Ga)As shell quantum dots located in core-shell nanowires, in the presence of a magnetic field. The g-factors and the diamagnetic coefficients of both the X and the CX depend on the orientation of the field with respect to the nanowire axis. The aspect ratio of the X wavefunction is quantified based on the anisotropy of the diamagnetic coefficient. For specific orientations of the magnetic field, it is possible to cancel the g-factor of the bright states of the X and the CX by means of an inversion of the sign of the hole's g-factor, which is promising for quantum information processing applications.

  13. Influence of the Nuclear Electric Quadrupolar Interaction on the Coherence Time of Hole and Electron Spins Confined in Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackmann, J.; Glasenapp, Ph.; Greilich, A.; Bayer, M.; Anders, F. B.

    2015-11-01

    The real-time spin dynamics and the spin noise spectra are calculated for p and n -charged quantum dots within an anisotropic central spin model extended by additional nuclear electric quadrupolar interactions and augmented by experimental data. Using realistic estimates for the distribution of coupling constants including an anisotropy parameter, we show that the characteristic long time scale is of the same order for electron and hole spins strongly determined by the quadrupolar interactions even though the analytical form of the spin decay differs significantly consistent with our measurements. The low frequency part of the electron spin noise spectrum is approximately 1 /3 smaller than those for hole spins as a consequence of the spectral sum rule and the different spectral shapes. This is confirmed by our experimental spectra measured on both types of quantum dot ensembles in the low power limit of the probe laser.

  14. Coexistence of strongly and weakly confined energy levels in (Cd,Zn)Se quantum dots: Tailoring the near-band-edge and defect-levels for white light emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tapan Kumar; Ilaiyaraja, P.; Sudakar, C.

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate white light emission (WLE) from (Cd,Zn)Se system, which is a composite of Zn alloyed CdSe quantum dot and ZnSe-amorphous (ZnSe-a) phase. Detailed structural and photoluminescence emission studies on pure CdSe and (Cd,Zn)Se show cubic zinc blende structure in the size range of 2.5 to 5 nm. (Cd,Zn)Se quantum dots (QDs) also have a significant fraction of ZnSe-a phase. The near-band-edge green-emission in crystalline CdSe and (Cd,Zn)Se is tunable between 500 to 600 nm. The (Cd,Zn)Se system also exhibits a broad, deep defect level (DL) red-emission in the range 600 to 750 nm and a sharp ZnSe near-band-edge blue-emission (ZS-NBE) between 445 to 465 nm. While DL and CdSe near-band-edge (CS-NBE) emissions significantly shift with the size of QD due to strong confinement effect, the ZS-NBE show minimal change in peak position indicating a weak confinement effect. The intensities of ZS-NBE and DL emissions also exhibit a strong dependence on the QD size. A gamut of emission colors is obtained by combining the CS-NBE with the ZS-NBE emission and broad DL emission in (Cd,Zn)Se system. Interestingly, we find the convergence of Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage (CIE) coordinates towards the white light with increasing Zn concentration in CdSe. We demonstrate by combining these three emissions in a proper weight ratio WLE can be achieved. Cd1-yZnySe (y = 0. 5; QD size ˜4.9 nm) alloy with a maximum quantum yield of 57% exhibits CIE coordinates of (0.39, 0.4), color rendering index (CRI) of 82, correlated color temperature (CCT) of 3922 K, and Duv of 0.0078 which is very promising for white light applications.

  15. Crystal field effect induced topological crystalline insulators in monolayer IV-VI semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Junwei; Qian, Xiaofeng; Fu, Liang

    2015-04-08

    Two-dimensional (2D) topological crystalline insulators (TCIs) were recently predicted in thin films of the SnTe class of IV-VI semiconductors, which can host metallic edge states protected by mirror symmetry. As thickness decreases, quantum confinement effect will increase and surpass the inverted gap below a critical thickness, turning TCIs into normal insulators. Surprisingly, based on first-principles calculations, here we demonstrate that (001) monolayers of rocksalt IV-VI semiconductors XY (X = Ge, Sn, Pb and Y = S, Se, Te) are 2D TCIs with the fundamental band gap as large as 260 meV in monolayer PbTe. This unexpected nontrivial topological phase stems from the strong crystal field effect in the monolayer, which lifts the degeneracy between p(x,y) and p(z) orbitals and leads to band inversion between cation pz and anion px,y orbitals. This crystal field effect induced topological phase offers a new strategy to find and design other atomically thin 2D topological materials.

  16. Large phonon-drag enhancement induced by narrow quantum confinement at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pallecchi, I.; Telesio, F.; Marré, D.; Li, D.; Gariglio, S.; Triscone, J.-M.; Filippetti, A.

    2016-05-01

    The thermoelectric power of the two-dimensional electron system (2DES) at the LaAlO3/SrTiO3 interface is explored below room temperature, in comparison with that of Nb-doped SrTiO3 single crystals. For the interface, we find a region below T =50 K where thermopower is dominated by phonon drag, whose amplitude is hugely amplified with respect to the corresponding bulk value, reaching values ˜mV /K and above. The phonon-drag enhancement at the interface is traced back to the tight carrier confinement of the 2DES, and represents a sharp signature of strong electron-acoustic phonon coupling at the interface.

  17. On the Effects of Curvature on the Confinement of a Neutral Particle to a Quantum Dot Induced by Non-inertial Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakke, K.

    2012-03-01

    We discuss the influence of a linear topological defect on the bound states of a non-relativistic neutral particle with permanent magnetic dipole moment in two distinct cases: In the first case, we consider a Fermi-Walker reference frame for the observers and show how non-inertial effects yield bound states analogous to having a neutral particle subject to the Tan-Inkson model for a quantum dot (W.-C. Tan, J.C. Inkson, Semicond. Sci. Technol. 11:1635, 1996); in the second case, we consider the action of a constant force and obtain the energy levels of the bound states.

  18. Effects of free electrons and quantum confinement in ultrathin ZnO films: a comparison between undoped and Al-doped ZnO.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Chen, T P; Liu, P; Liu, Y; Leong, K C

    2013-06-17

    Band gaps and exciton binding energies of undoped and Al-doped ZnO thin films were determined from optical absorption measurement based on the Elliott's exciton absorption theory. As compared to the undoped films, the doped films exhibit a band gap expansion and a reduction in the exciton binding energies due to the free electron screening effect, which suppresses the excitonic absorption and results in a blue shift of the absorption edge. The undoped and doped films show the same quantum size dependence, i.e. both the exciton binding energies and band gap energies increase with decreasing grain size of the oxides.

  19. Deriving k·p parameters from full-Brillouin-zone descriptions: A finite-element envelope function model for quantum-confined wurtzite nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Xiangyu; Ghione, Giovanni; Bertazzi, Francesco Goano, Michele; Bellotti, Enrico

    2014-07-21

    We present a multiband envelope-function model for wurtzite nanostructures based on a rigorous numerical procedure to determine operator ordering and band parameters from nonlocal empirical pseudopotential calculations. The proposed approach, implemented within a finite-element scheme, leads to well-posed, numerically stable envelope equations that accurately reproduce full-Brillouin-zone subband dispersions of quantum systems. Although demonstrated here for III-nitride nonlocal empirical pseudopotentials, the model provides a general theoretical framework applicable to ab initio electronic structures of wurtzite semiconductors.

  20. Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horii, M.; Funakawa, K.

    1991-01-01

    The Engineering Test Satellite-VI (ETS-VI) is being developed as the third Japanese three-axis stabilized engineering test satellite to establish the 2-ton geostationary operational satellite bus system and to demonstrate the high performance satellite communication technology for future operational satellites. The satellite is expected to be stationed at 154 deg east latitude. It will be launched from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan by a type H-II launch vehicle. The Deep Space Network (DSN) will support the prelaunch compatibility test, data interface verification testing, and launch rehersals. The DSN primary support period is from launch through the final AEF plus 1 hour. Contingency support is from final AEF plus 1 hour until launch plus 1 month. The coverage will consist of all the 26-m antennas as prime and the 34-m antennas at Madrid and Canberra as backup. Maximum support will consist of two 8-hour tracks per station for a 7-day period, plus the contingency support, if required. Information is given in tabular form for DSN support, telemetry, command, and tracking support responsibility.

  1. Electric field induced optical gain of a hydrogenic impurity in a Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Se/ZnSe parabolic quantum dot

    SciTech Connect

    Jasmine, P. Christina Lily; Peter, A. John

    2015-06-24

    The dependence of electric field on the electronic and optical properties is investigated in a Cd{sub 0.8}Zn{sub 0.2}Se/ZnSe quantum dot. The hydrogenic binding energy, in the presence of electric field, is calculated with the spatial confinement effect. The electric field dependent optical gain with the photon energy is found using compact density matrix method. The results show that the electric field has a great influence on the optical properties of II-VI semiconductor quantum dot.

  2. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-05-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g‑1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g‑1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g‑1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g‑1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance.

  3. Exciton confinement in homo- and heteroepitaxial ZnO/Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O quantum wells with x < 0.1

    SciTech Connect

    Laumer, Bernhard; Wassner, Thomas A.; Schuster, Fabian; Stutzmann, Martin; Schoermann, Joerg; Eickhoff, Martin; Rohnke, Marcus; Chernikov, Alexej; Bornwasser, Verena; Koch, Martin; Chatterjee, Sangam

    2011-11-01

    ZnO/Zn{sub 1-x}Mg{sub x}O single quantum well (SQW) structures with well widths d{sub W} between 1.1 nm and 10.4 nm were grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy both heteroepitaxially on c-plane sapphire and homoepitaxially on (0001)-oriented bulk ZnO. A significantly reduced Mg incorporation in the top barrier related to the generation of stacking faults is observed for heteroepitaxial samples. Exciton localization is observed for both types of samples, while an enhancement of the exciton binding energy compared to bulk ZnO is only found for homoepitaxial SQWs for 2 nm {<=} d{sub W} {<=} 4 nm. Consistently, for homoepitaxial samples, the carrier dynamics are mainly governed by radiative recombination and carrier cooling processes at temperatures below 170 K, whereas thermally activated non-radiative recombination dominates in heteroepitaxial samples. The effects of polarization-induced electric fields are concealed for Mg concentrations x < 0.1 due to the reduction of the exciton binding energy, the screening by residual carriers as well as the asymmetric barrier structure in heteroepitaxial wells.

  4. Confined SnO2 quantum-dot clusters in graphene sheets as high-performance anodes for lithium-ion batteries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Chengling; Zhu, Shenmin; Zhang, Kai; Hui, Zeyu; Pan, Hui; Chen, Zhixin; Li, Yao; Zhang, Di; Wang, Da-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Construction of metal oxide nanoparticles as anodes is of special interest for next-generation lithium-ion batteries. The main challenge lies in their rapid capacity fading caused by the structural degradation and instability of solid-electrolyte interphase (SEI) layer during charge/discharge process. Herein, we address these problems by constructing a novel-structured SnO2-based anode. The novel structure consists of mesoporous clusters of SnO2 quantum dots (SnO2 QDs), which are wrapped with reduced graphene oxide (RGO) sheets. The mesopores inside the clusters provide enough room for the expansion and contraction of SnO2 QDs during charge/discharge process while the integral structure of the clusters can be maintained. The wrapping RGO sheets act as electrolyte barrier and conductive reinforcement. When used as an anode, the resultant composite (MQDC-SnO2/RGO) shows an extremely high reversible capacity of 924 mAh g−1 after 200 cycles at 100 mA g−1, superior capacity retention (96%), and outstanding rate performance (505 mAh g−1 after 1000 cycles at 1000 mA g−1). Importantly, the materials can be easily scaled up under mild conditions. Our findings pave a new way for the development of metal oxide towards enhanced lithium storage performance. PMID:27181691

  5. Effect of the Photoquenching of EL2 in GaAs Substrate on the Piezoelectric Photothermal and Surface Photovoltage Spectra of a GaAs Single Quantum Well Confined by GaAs/AlAs Short-Period Superlattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ping; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Akashi, Yoshito; Ikari, Tetsuo

    2008-01-01

    Two nondestructive techniques, surface photovoltage (SPV) and piezoelectric photothermal (PPT) spectroscopies, were adopted to investigate a GaAs single quantum well (SQW) confined by GaAs/AlAs short-period superlattices (SPSs) fabricated on a semi-insulating (SI) GaAs substrate, whose absorption spectra cannot be obtained easily using conventional techniques. Excitonic absorptions associated with subband transitions in a GaAs SQW and SPSs were clearly observed. We also examined how a SI-GaAs substrate affects the PPT and SPV spectra, particularly the effect of the photoquenching of the deep donor level EL2. It was found that the photoquenching of EL2 causes a significant change in the total built-in potential at the interface between the epitaxial layers and the substrate, and affected the signal intensities observed in the PPT and SPV spectra. The present experimental results have shown that a large amount of carrier leakage occurs from a GaAs SQW and SPSs to the sample surface, even in the presence of Al0.3Ga0.7As buffer layers.

  6. Heat does not come in different colours: entropy-enthalpy compensation, free energy windows, quantum confinement, pressure perturbation calorimetry, solvation and the multiple causes of heat capacity effects in biomolecular interactions.

    PubMed

    Cooper, A; Johnson, C M; Lakey, J H; Nöllmann, M

    2001-11-28

    Modern techniques in microcalorimetry allow us to measure directly the heat changes and associated thermodynamics for biomolecular processes in aqueous solution at reasonable concentrations. All these processes involve changes in solvation/hydration, and it is natural to assume that the heats for these processes should reflect, in some way, such changes in solvation. However, the interpretation of data is still somewhat ambiguous, since different non-covalent interactions may have similar thermodynamic signatures, and analysis is frustrated by large entropy-enthalpy compensation effects. Changes in heat capacity (Delta C(p)) have been related to changes in hydrophobic hydration and non-polar accessible surface areas, but more recent empirical and theoretical work has shown how this need not always be the case. Entropy-enthalpy compensation is a natural consequence of finite Delta C(p) values and, more generally, can arise as a result of quantum confinement effects, multiple weak interactions, and limited free energy windows, giving rise to thermodynamic homeostasis that may be of evolutionary and functional advantage. The new technique of pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) has enormous potential here as a means of probing solvation-related volumetric changes in biomolecules at modest pressures, as illustrated with preliminary data for a simple protein-inhibitor complex.

  7. Division Vi: Interstellar Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millar, Tom; Chu, You-Hua; Dyson, John; Breitschwerdt, Dieter; Burton, Mike; Cabrit, Sylvie; Caselli, Paola; de Gouveia Dal Pino, Elisabete; Ferland, Gary; Juvela, Mika; Koo, Bon-Chul; Kwok, Sun; Lizano, Susana; Rozyczka, Michal; Tóth, Viktor; Tsuboi, Masato; Yang, Ji

    2010-05-01

    The business meeting of Division VI was held on Monday 10 October 2009. Apologies had been received in advance from D Breitschwerdt, P Caselli, G Ferland, M Juvela, S Lizano, M Rozyczka, V Tóth, M Tsuboi, J Yang and B-C Koo.

  8. Quantum Entanglement of Quantum Dot Spin Using Flying Qubits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT OF QUANTUM DOT SPIN USING FLYING QUBITS UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN MAY 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE...To) SEP 2012 – DEC 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE QUANTUM ENTANGLEMENT OF QUANTUM DOT SPIN USING FLYING QUBITS 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8750-12-2-0333...semiconductor quantum dots doped with a single electron, made possible by the Coulomb blockade in this system. The quantum dots confine both electrons and

  9. CdS quantum dots confined in mesoporous TiO2 with exceptional photocatalytic performance for degradation of organic polutants.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Panpan; Xie, Yu; Fang, Jing; Ling, Yun; Yu, Changling; Liu, Xiaoming; Dai, Yuhua; Qin, Yuancheng; Zhou, Dan

    2017-07-01

    In this paper, the mesoporous TiO2 with different concentration of CdS quantum dots (i.e., x% CdS/TiO2) was successfully fabricated by the sol-gel method. The composition, structure and morphology of the nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), UV-vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-Vis/DRS) and nitrogen physical adsorption test and so on. The proportion of CdS and TiO2 is very important for the photocatalytic performance. As a result, the photocatalytic degradation performance from the most to the least is in the order of 2% CdS/TiO2, 4% CdS/TiO2, 8% CdS/TiO2, pure TiO2 and 1% CdS/TiO2. The photocatalytic (PC) activity of the 2% CdSTiO2 is characterized by photocatalytic degradation of methyl orange, which can be completely degraded within 45 min better than 60 min TiO2 takes. It is also much better than CdS. Moreover, other four organic pollutants, such as methylthionine chloride, bisphenol A, rhodamine B, malachite green can also be degraded quickly on the condition of 2% CdS/TiO2. What's more, the chemical stability and cycling capability of 2% CdS/TiO2 are reflected by five cyclic degradation of methyl orange.

  10. I. Excitonic Phase Diagram in Silicon: Evidence for Two Condensed Phases. I. Motion of Photoexcited Carriers in GALLIUM-ARSENIDE/ALUMINUM(X)GALLIUM(1-X)ARSENIDE Multiple Quantum Wells-Anomalous Confinement at High Densities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Leigh Morris

    This thesis describes work on the thermodynamics and transport properties of photoexcited carriers in bulk and two-dimensional semiconductors. Two major topics are addressed. I. Photoluminescence experiments of excitons in unstressed silicon are presented which indicate the existence of a new non-degenerate condensed phase of plasma. This new liquid has a density one-tenth that of the ground state electron-hole liquid and is observed both above and below the liquid-gas critical point (~24.5K). A new phase diagram of excitons in silicon is presented which includes these two condensed plasmas. Consistent with the Gibbs phase rule, a triple point at 18.5 K is inferred from the luminescence data as the only temperature where the exciton gas, condensed plasma (CP) and electron-hole liquid (EHL) coexist. The low density condensed plasma persists up to a second critical point at 45 +/- 5K, above which the photoexcited carriers are observed to continuously decay into a partially ionized excitonic gas. II. We have measured the in-plane motion of photoexcited carriers in semiconductor quantum wells with 5 μm spatial and 10 ps temporal resolution and have discovered several surprising results. The effective diffusivity of the carriers at densities below n = 2 times 10^{11}cm ^{-2} is found to depend upon excitation level, possibly indicating defect-limited diffusion or phonon-wind effects. Above this density the spatial profiles exhibit two distinct components with widely differing diffusivities. This remarkable behavior may be understood with consideration of the interactions of non-equilibrium phonons with the photoexcited carriers. We postulate that the slowly diffusing component represents carriers which are "thermally confined" to a phonon hot spot, while the rapidly moving component is driven by the flux of non-equilibrium phonons away from the excitation region.

  11. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  12. Indoor Confined Feedlots.

    PubMed

    Grooms, Daniel L; Kroll, Lee Anne K

    2015-07-01

    Indoor confined feedlots offer advantages that make them desirable in northern climates where high rainfall and snowfall occur. These facilities increase the risk of certain health risks, including lameness and tail injuries. Closed confinement can also facilitate the rapid spread of infectious disease. Veterinarians can help to manage these health risks by implementing management practices to reduce their occurrence.

  13. Confinement Aquaculture. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delaplaine School District, AR.

    The Delaplaine Agriculture Department Confinement Project, begun in June 1988, conducted a confinement aquaculture program by comparing the growth of channel catfish raised in cages in a pond to channel catfish raised in cages in the Black River, Arkansas. The study developed technology that would decrease costs in the domestication of fish, using…

  14. Cosmic Dust VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Kolokolova, Ludmilla; Li, Aigen; Inoue, Akio K.; Jäger, Cornelia

    2014-10-01

    This special issue is primarily devoted to the 6th meeting on Cosmic Dust (COSMIC DUST VI), which was held at CPS (Center for Planetary Science) in Kobe, Japan, on August 5-9, 2013. This meeting was coordinated in an order where a friendly and welcoming atmosphere persuaded the participants of the meeting to develop human relations and interactions among themselves. This has been our interdisciplinary approach to answering the question of where dust comes from and where dust goes. We briefly review some of the exciting papers presented at the meeting and provide perspectives for the development of cosmic dust research.

  15. Quantum Error Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lidar, Daniel A.; Brun, Todd A.

    2013-09-01

    Prologue; Preface; Part I. Background: 1. Introduction to decoherence and noise in open quantum systems Daniel Lidar and Todd Brun; 2. Introduction to quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 3. Introduction to decoherence-free subspaces and noiseless subsystems Daniel Lidar; 4. Introduction to quantum dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 5. Introduction to quantum fault tolerance Panos Aliferis; Part II. Generalized Approaches to Quantum Error Correction: 6. Operator quantum error correction David Kribs and David Poulin; 7. Entanglement-assisted quantum error-correcting codes Todd Brun and Min-Hsiu Hsieh; 8. Continuous-time quantum error correction Ognyan Oreshkov; Part III. Advanced Quantum Codes: 9. Quantum convolutional codes Mark Wilde; 10. Non-additive quantum codes Markus Grassl and Martin Rötteler; 11. Iterative quantum coding systems David Poulin; 12. Algebraic quantum coding theory Andreas Klappenecker; 13. Optimization-based quantum error correction Andrew Fletcher; Part IV. Advanced Dynamical Decoupling: 14. High order dynamical decoupling Zhen-Yu Wang and Ren-Bao Liu; 15. Combinatorial approaches to dynamical decoupling Martin Rötteler and Pawel Wocjan; Part V. Alternative Quantum Computation Approaches: 16. Holonomic quantum computation Paolo Zanardi; 17. Fault tolerance for holonomic quantum computation Ognyan Oreshkov, Todd Brun and Daniel Lidar; 18. Fault tolerant measurement-based quantum computing Debbie Leung; Part VI. Topological Methods: 19. Topological codes Héctor Bombín; 20. Fault tolerant topological cluster state quantum computing Austin Fowler and Kovid Goyal; Part VII. Applications and Implementations: 21. Experimental quantum error correction Dave Bacon; 22. Experimental dynamical decoupling Lorenza Viola; 23. Architectures Jacob Taylor; 24. Error correction in quantum communication Mark Wilde; Part VIII. Critical Evaluation of Fault Tolerance: 25. Hamiltonian methods in QEC and fault tolerance Eduardo Novais, Eduardo Mucciolo and

  16. Clusters, Quantum Confinement and Energy Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connerade, Jean-Patrick

    One of the challenges posed by the demand for clean urban transportation is the compact and cyclically recoverable storage of energy in quantities sufficient for propulsion. Promising routes, such as the reversible insertion of Li+ ions inside solids for `rocking chair' batteries, require a deformable host material with no irreversibility. Such `soft' deformations are in general highly complex, but the compressibility of atoms or larger systems can be studied directly in situations with simpler symmetry. Thus, the search for `soft' materials leads one to consider certain types of cluster, as well as linear or nearly-spherical structures (chains of metallofullerenes, for example) whose deformations can be computed from the Schrodinger equation. Extended or `giant' atomic models allow one to construct compression-dilation cycles analogous in a rough sense to the Carnot cycle of classical thermodynamics. This simplified approach suggests that, even for idealised systems, there are constraints on the reversible storage and recovery of energy, and that (when applied to realistic structures) modelling based on such principles might help in the selection of appropriate materials.

  17. Confinement effects in semimagnetic semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietl, Tomasz

    1998-02-01

    An overview is given of selected novel effects observed recently by various groups in modulated structures of Cd 1- xMn xTe. Millikelvin studies of submicron wires doped with either indium or iodine have demonstrated the existence of a new mechanism, by which the universal conductance fluctuations can be generated in mesoscopic systems containing magnetic ions. Moreover, 1/ f conductance noise as well as thermal and magnetic irreversibilities have been observed, providing important information on spin-glass dynamics. Finite size effects in magnetic properties have been probed by direct static and dynamic SQUID measurements on superlattices consisting of few-monolayer spin-glass films separated by nonmagnetic barriers. The confined holes have been found to exert a strong influence upon the magnetic ions and to induce a ferromagnetic phase transition above 1 K in quantum wells modulation doped by nitrogen. Finally, it has been shown also that the giant spin-splitting of the bands offers a tool to tune the coupling between confined photon and exciton modes in photonic structures.

  18. Symmetry breaking in confined fluids.

    PubMed

    Ruckenstein, Eli; Berim, Gersh O

    2010-02-26

    The recent progress in the theoretical investigation of the symmetry breaking (the existence of a stable state of a system, in which the symmetry is lower than the symmetry of the system itself) for classical and quantum fluids is reviewed. The emphasis is on the conditions which cause symmetry breaking in the density distribution for one component fluids and binary mixtures confined in a closed nanoslit between identical solid walls. The existing studies have revealed that two kinds of symmetry breaking can occur in such systems. First, a one-dimensional symmetry breaking occurs only in the direction normal to the walls as a fluid density profile asymmetric with respect of the middle of the slit and uniform in any direction parallel to the walls. Second, a two-dimensional symmetry breaking occurs in the fluid density distribution which is nonuniform in one of the directions parallel to the walls and asymmetrical in the direction normal to the walls. It manifests through liquid bumps and bridges in the fluid density distribution. For one component fluids, conditions of existence of symmetry breaking are provided in terms of the average fluid density, strength of fluid-solid interactions, distance at which the solid wall generates a hard core repulsion, and temperature. In the case of binary mixtures, the occurrence of symmetry breaking also depends on the composition of the confined mixtures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Science-based design of stable quantum dots for energy-efficient lighting

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, James E.; Rohwer, Lauren E. S.; van Swol, Frank B.; Zhou, Xiaowang; Lu, Ping

    2015-09-01

    II-VI quantum dots, such as CdSe and CdTe, are attractive as downconversion materials for solid-state lighting, because of their narrow linewidth, tunable emission. However, for these materials to have acceptable quantum yields (QYs) requires that they be coated with a II-VI shell material whose valence band offset serves to confine the hole to the core. Confinement prevents the hole from accessing surface traps that lead to nonradiative decay of the exciton. Examples of such hole-confined core/shell QDs include CdTe/CdSe and CdSe/CdS. Unfortunately, the shell can also cause problems due to lattice mismatch, which ranges from 4-6% for systems of interest. This lattice mismatch can create significant interface energies at the heterojunction and places the core under radial compression and the shell under tangential tension. At elevated temperatures (~240°C) interfacial diffusion can relax these stresses, as can surface reconstruction, which can expose the core, creating hole traps. But such high temperatures favor the hexagonal Wurtzite structure, which has lower QY than the cubic zinc blende structure, which can be synthesized at lower temperatures, ~140°C. In the absence of alloying the core/shell structure can become metastable, or even unstable, if the shell is too thick. This can cause result in an irregular shell or even island growth. But if the shell is too thin thermallyactivated transport of the hole to surface traps can occur. In our LDRD we have developed a fundamental atomistic modeling capability, based on Stillinger-Weber and Bond-Order potentials we developed for the entire II-VI class. These pseudo-potentials have enabled us to conduct large-scale atomistic simulations that have led to the computation of phase diagrams of II-VI QDs. These phase diagrams demonstrate that at elevated temperatures the zinc blende phase of CdTe with CdSe grown on it epitaxially becomes thermodynamically unstable due to alloying. This is accompanied by a loss of hole

  20. From Confinement to Superfluidity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. I.

    2011-04-01

    We describe a unified picture of confining and deconfined phases of Yang-Mills theories in terms of nonperturbative vacuum defects. The confinement is related to condensation of (magnetic) strings. The phase transition at T = Tc is viewed as change of dimensions, 4d → 3d. Namely, all the defects become time oriented. As a result, percolation of strings becomes percolation of 3d trajectories or, in field theoretic language, condensation of a 3d scalar field. The condensation, in turn, might signal superfluidity of the quark-gluon plasma. The notes are mostly a mini-review. A remark on entanglement and confinement is added.

  1. Elastic membranes in confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostwick, Joshua; Miksis, Michael; Davis, Stephen

    2014-11-01

    An elastic membrane stretched between two walls takes a shape defined by its length and the volume of fluid it encloses. Many biological structures, such as cells, mitochondria and DNA, have finer internal structure in which a membrane (or elastic member) is geometrically ``confined'' by another object. We study the shape stability of elastic membranes in a ``confining'' box and introduce repulsive van der Waals forces to prevent the membrane from intersecting the wall. We aim to define the parameter space associated with mitochondria-like deformations. We compare the confined to `unconfined' solutions and show how the structure and stability of the membrane shapes changes with the system parameters.

  2. Mass gap without confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faedo, Antón F.; Mateos, David; Pravos, David; Subils, Javier G.

    2017-06-01

    We revisit a one-parameter family of three-dimensional gauge theories with known supergravity duals. We show that three infrared behaviors are possible. For generic values of the parameter, the theories exhibit a mass gap but no confinement, meaning no linear quark-antiquark potential; for one limiting value of the parameter the theory flows to an infrared fixed point; and for another limiting value it exhibits both a mass gap and confinement. Theories close to these limiting values exhibit quasi-conformal and quasi-confining dynamics, respectively. Eleven-dimensional supergravity provides a simple, geometric explanation of these features.

  3. Quantum Tunneling, Field Induced Injecting Contact, and Excitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yixin

    1995-01-01

    This thesis consists of three parts: Quantum tunneling simulation, Schottky barrier induced injecting contact on wide band gap II-VI materials, and excitons in semiconductor heterostructures. Part I presents a new method for quantum transport calculations in semiconductor tunnel structures using multiband {bf k}cdot{bf p} theory. This method circumvents the numerical instability problems that arise in the standard transfer -matrix method. In addition to being numerically stable, efficient, and easy to implement, this method can also be easily generalized to include the magnetic field and strain effects, and extended to the calculations of electronic band structures in quantum confinement and superlattice structures. We have applied this technique to the study of magnetotunneling in InAs/GaSb/AlSb based interband tunnel structures. Part II describes a novel approach to achieve ohmic injecting contact on wide bandgap II-VI semiconductors. The method consists of forming the device structure in an electric field at elevated temperatures in the Schottky barrier region to spatially separate the ionized dopants from the compensating centers. Large net concentration of dopants in a thin surface layer can thus be obtained, resulting in a depletion layer that is sufficiently thin to allow tunneling injection. Calculations of band profiles, distributions of dopant concentrations, and current-voltage characteristics were performed on Al doped ZnTe. Results show for Schottky barrier heights above 1 eV, doping concentrations as high as 10^{20} cm ^{-3} are needed to achieve the injecting current density required for LED and laser diode operations. In part III, calculations of exciton binding energies and oscillator strengths are performed for both Type-I strained CdTe/ZnTe and Type-II strained ZnTe/ZnSe superlattices using variational approach. We have also studied exciton coherent transfer between quantum wells, quantum wires and quantum dots, respectively. The results show

  4. Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovskii, Alexander

    2012-07-01

    Lithographic Techniques: III-V Semiconductors and Carbon: 15. Electrically controlling single spin coherence in semiconductor nanostructures Y. Dovzhenko, K. Wang, M. D. Schroer and J. R. Petta; 16. Theory of electron and nuclear spins in III-V semiconductor and carbon-based dots H. Ribeiro and G. Burkard; 17. Graphene quantum dots: transport experiments and local imaging S. Schnez, J. Guettinger, F. Molitor, C. Stampfer, M. Huefner, T. Ihn and K. Ensslin; Part VI. Single Dots for Future Telecommunications Applications: 18. Electrically operated entangled light sources based on quantum dots R. M. Stevenson, A. J. Bennett and A. J. Shields; 19. Deterministic single quantum dot cavities at telecommunication wavelengths D. Dalacu, K. Mnaymneh, J. Lapointe, G. C. Aers, P. J. Poole, R. L. Williams and S. Hughes; Index.

  5. Polymer Crystallization under Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floudas, George

    Recent efforts indicated that polymer crystallization under confinement can be substantially different from the bulk. This can have important technological applications for the design of polymeric nanofibers with tunable mechanical strength, processability and optical clarity. However, the question of how, why and when polymers crystallize under confinement is not fully answered. Important studies of polymer crystallization confined to droplets and within the spherical nanodomains of block copolymers emphasized the interplay between heterogeneous and homogeneous nucleation. Herein we report on recent studies1-5 of polymer crystallization under hard confinement provided by model self-ordered AAO nanopores. Important open questions here are on the type of nucleation (homogeneous vs. heterogeneous), the size of critical nucleus, the crystal orientation and the possibility to control the overall crystallinity. Providing answers to these questions is of technological relevance for the understanding of nanocomposites containing semicrystalline polymers. In collaboration with Y. Suzuki, H. Duran, M. Steinhart, H.-J. Butt.

  6. Confinement and the Pomeron

    SciTech Connect

    White, A.R.

    1989-09-25

    The importance of confinement for obtaining a unitary high-energy limit for QCD is discussed. Minijets'' are argued to build up non-unitary behavior{endash}when k{sub T} {gt} {Lambda} is imposed. For minijets to mix with low k{sub T} Pomeron Field Theory describing confinement, and give consistent asymptotic behavior, new quarks'' must enter the theory above the minijet transverse momentum scale. The Critical Pomeron is the resulting high-energy limit. 22 refs.

  7. Chemistry of the Colloidal Group II-VI Nanocrystal Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Haitao

    2007-05-17

    In the last two decades, the field of nanoscience andnanotechnology has witnessed tremendous advancement in the synthesis andapplication of group II-VI colloidal nanocrystals. The synthesis based onhigh temperature decomposition of organometallic precursors has becomeone of the most successful methods of making group II-VI colloidalnanocrystals. This methodis first demonstrated by Bawendi and coworkersin 1993 to prepare cadmium chalcogenide colloidal quantum dots and laterextended by others to prepare other group II-VI quantum dots as well asanisotropic shaped colloidal nanocrystals, such as nanorod and tetrapod.This dissertation focuses on the chemistry of this type of nanocrystalsynthesis. The synthesis of group II-VI nanocrystals was studied bycharacterizing the molecular structures of the precursors and productsand following their time evolution in the synthesis. Based on theseresults, a mechanism was proposed to account for the 2 reaction betweenthe precursors that presumably produces monomer for the growth ofnanocrystals. Theoretical study based on density functional theorycalculations revealed the detailed free energy landscape of the precursordecomposition and monomerformation pathway. Based on the proposedreaction mechanism, a new synthetic method was designed that uses wateras a novel reagent to control the diameter and the aspect ratio of CdSeand CdS nanorods.

  8. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  9. Fusion, magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Berk, H.L.

    1992-08-06

    An overview is presented of the principles of magnetic confinement of plasmas for the purpose of achieving controlled fusion conditions. Sec. 1 discusses the different nuclear fusion reactions which can be exploited in prospective fusion reactors and explains why special technologies need to be developed for the supply of tritium or {sup 3}He, the probable fuels. In Sec. 2 the Lawson condition, a criterion that is a measure of the quality of confinement relative to achieving fusion conditions, is explained. In Sec. 3 fluid equations are used to describe plasma confinement. Specific confinement configurations are considered. In Sec. 4 the orbits of particle sin magneti and electric fields are discussed. In Sec. 5 stability considerations are discussed. It is noted that confinement systems usually need to satisfy stability constraints imposed by ideal magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) theory. The paper culminates with a summary of experimental progress in magnetic confinement. Present experiments in tokamaks have reached the point that the conditions necessary to achieve fusion are being satisfied.

  10. Confinement-induced resonance in quasi-one-dimensional systems under transversely anisotropic confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Shi-Guo; Bohloul, Seyyed S.; Liu, Xia-Ji; Hu, Hui; Drummond, Peter D.

    2010-12-01

    We theoretically investigate the confinement-induced resonance for quasi-one-dimensional quantum systems under transversely anisotropic confinement, using a two-body s-wave-scattering model in the zero-energy collision limit. We predict a single resonance for any transverse anisotropy, whose position shows a slight downshift with increasing anisotropy. We compare our prediction with the recent experimental result by Haller [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.104.153203 104, 153203 (2010)], in which two resonances are observed in the presence of transverse anisotropy. The discrepancy between theory and experiment remains to be resolved.

  11. Casimir effects for classical and quantum liquids in slab geometry: A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Shyamal

    2015-05-01

    We analytically explore Casimir effects for confinement of classical and quantum fluctuations in slab (film) geometry (i) for classical (critical) fluctuations over 4He liquid around the λ point, and (ii) for quantum (phonon) fluctuations of Bogoliubov excitations over an interacting Bose-Einstein condensate. We also briefly review Casimir effects for confinement of quantum vacuum fluctuations confined to two plates of different geometries.

  12. The Azimuthal Dependence of Outflows and Accretion Detected Using O VI Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-12-01

    We report a bimodality in the azimuthal angle (Φ) distribution of gas around galaxies traced by O vi absorption. We present the mean Φ probability distribution function of 29 Hubble Space Telescope-imaged O vi absorbing (EW > 0.1 Å) and 24 non-absorbing (EW < 0.1 Å) isolated galaxies (0.08 \\lt z \\lt 0.67) within ˜200 kpc of background quasars. We show that equivalent width (EW) is anti-correlated with impact parameter and O vi covering fraction decreases from 80% within 50 kpc to 33% at 200 kpc. The presence of O vi absorption is azimuthally dependent and occurs between ±10°-20° of the galaxy projected major axis and within ±30° of the projected minor axis. We find higher EWs along the projected minor axis with weaker EWs along the project major axis. Highly inclined galaxies have the lowest covering fractions due to minimized outflow/inflow cross-section geometry. Absorbing galaxies also have bluer colors while non-absorbers have redder colors, suggesting that star formation is a key driver in the O vi detection rate. O vi surrounding blue galaxies exists primarily along the projected minor axis with wide opening angles while O vi surrounding red galaxies exists primarily along the projected major axis with smaller opening angles, which may explain why absorption around red galaxies is less frequently detected. Our results are consistent with a circumgalactic medium (CGM) originating from major axis-fed inflows/recycled gas and from minor axis-driven outflows. Non-detected O vi occurs between Φ = 20°-60°, suggesting that O vi is not mixed throughout the CGM and remains confined within the outflows and the disk-plane. We find low O vi covering fractions within +/- 10^\\circ of the projected major axis, suggesting that cool dense gas resides in a narrow planer geometry surrounded by diffuse O vi gas.

  13. Fluorescence from Individual PbS Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Jeffrey

    2005-03-01

    Due to their extremely large electron, hole, and exciton Bohr radii, PbS quantum dots (QDs) can achieve levels of quantum confinement not accessible to III-V and II-VI QDs. Thus, the strong confinement regime is attained for relatively large particles, which may mitigate deleterious surface effects and impart novel properties. PbS QDs are also optically active in the near-infrared region, making these materials potentially useful for telecommunications and biotechnological applications. We will present investigations of single PbS QD fluorescence using far-field microscopy. PbS QDs were synthesized with a size-tunable exciton absorbance ranging between 765 nm and 1800 nm. Of particular note is the ability to synthesize highly luminescent, small radii QDs, allowing for fluorescence detection with high sensitivity silicon CCDs. Upon spincoating QDs onto glass substrates at densities near the single dot level, we observe fluorescence intermittency, or “blinking” and a narrowing of the fluorescence spectra relative to the ensemble, both hallmarks of single fluorophores. The fluorescence energy irreversibly blue shifts with longer integration times and higher excitation intensities, indicative of a photo-induced degradation. Photobleaching of the majority of PbS QDs occurred in 30 sec. An analysis of the blinking statistics will be discussed.

  14. Simulations of Enhanced Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorland, W.; Kotschenreuther, M.; Liu, Q. P.; Jones, C. S.; Beer, M. A.; Hammett, G. W.

    1996-11-01

    Most existing tokamaks routinely achieve enhanced confinement regimes. Designs for new, larger tokamaks therefore are typically predicated upon reliable enhanced confinement performance. However, most enhanced confinement regimes rely (to some degree) upon sheared E×B flows to stabilize the turbulence that otherwise limits the confinement. For example, the pedestal H-mode transport barrier is typically attributed to shear stabilization [Biglari, Diamond and Terry, Phys. Fl. B, 2 1 (1990)]. Unfortunately, it is easily shown that sheared E×B stabilization of microinstabilities such as the ITG mode does not scale favorably with machine size. Here, using nonlinear gyrofluid simulations in general geometry, we attempt to quantify the confinement enhancement that can be expected from velocity shear stabilization for conventional reactor plasmas. We also consider other microinstability stabilization mechanisms(See related presentations by Beer, Kotschenreuther, Manickam, and Ramos, this conference.) (strong density peaking, Shafranov shift stabilization, dots) and unconventional reactor configurations.^2 Experimental datasets from JET, DIII-D, C-Mod and TFTR are analyzed, and ITER operation is considered.

  15. Two-dimensionally confined topological edge states in photonic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Sabyasachi; Miyake, Hirokazu; DeGottardi, Wade; Waks, Edo; Hafezi, Mohammad

    2016-11-01

    We present an all-dielectric photonic crystal structure that supports two-dimensionally confined helical topological edge states. The topological properties of the system are controlled by the crystal parameters. An interface between two regions of differing band topologies gives rise to topological edge states confined in a dielectric slab that propagate around sharp corners without backscattering. Three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations show these edges to be confined in the out-of-plane direction by total internal reflection. Such nanoscale photonic crystal architectures could enable strong interactions between photonic edge states and quantum emitters.

  16. Structural and Electronic Properties of IV-VI Semiconductor Nanodots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leitsmann, Roman; Bechstedt, Friedhelm

    2008-03-01

    The characterization of nanostructure properties versus dimension and surface passivation is of increasing importance for the nanotechnology. Especially the stoichiometry, geometry, and the electronic states of IV-VI semiconductor nanodots are of special interest [1,2]. We use ab initio methods to calculate structural and electronic properties of colloidal IV-VI semiconductor nanodots as a function of the dot diameter. A method to passivate the non-directional dangling bonds at the nanodot surfaces is derived and used to study the confinement effect on the HOMO (highest occupied molecular orbital) and LUMO (lowest unoccupied molecular orbital) states. In addition we take the influence of relativistic (spin-orbit coupling -- SOC ) and excitonic effects into account. While the SOC leads to a considerable decrease of the HOMO-LUMO gap, excitonic effects play a minor role. [1] JACS 128, 10337 (2006) [2] JACS 129, 11354 (2007)

  17. Confined Brownian ratchets.

    PubMed

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Rubi, J Miguel

    2013-05-21

    We analyze the dynamics of Brownian ratchets in a confined environment. The motion of the particles is described by a Fick-Jakobs kinetic equation in which the presence of boundaries is modeled by means of an entropic potential. The cases of a flashing ratchet, a two-state model, and a ratchet under the influence of a temperature gradient are analyzed in detail. We show the emergence of a strong cooperativity between the inherent rectification of the ratchet mechanism and the entropic bias of the fluctuations caused by spatial confinement. Net particle transport may take place in situations where none of those mechanisms leads to rectification when acting individually. The combined rectification mechanisms may lead to bidirectional transport and to new routes to segregation phenomena. Confined Brownian ratchets could be used to control transport in mesostructures and to engineer new and more efficient devices for transport at the nanoscale.

  18. Confined Brownian ratchets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malgaretti, Paolo; Pagonabarraga, Ignacio; Rubi, J. Miguel

    2013-05-01

    We analyze the dynamics of Brownian ratchets in a confined environment. The motion of the particles is described by a Fick-Jakobs kinetic equation in which the presence of boundaries is modeled by means of an entropic potential. The cases of a flashing ratchet, a two-state model, and a ratchet under the influence of a temperature gradient are analyzed in detail. We show the emergence of a strong cooperativity between the inherent rectification of the ratchet mechanism and the entropic bias of the fluctuations caused by spatial confinement. Net particle transport may take place in situations where none of those mechanisms leads to rectification when acting individually. The combined rectification mechanisms may lead to bidirectional transport and to new routes to segregation phenomena. Confined Brownian ratchets could be used to control transport in mesostructures and to engineer new and more efficient devices for transport at the nanoscale.

  19. Optical Studies of Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yükselici, H.; Allahverdi, Ç.; Aşıkoğlu, A.; Ünlü, H.; Baysal, A.; Çulha, M.; İnce, R.; İnce, A.; Feeney, M.; Athalin, H.

    Optical absorption (ABS), steady-state photoluminescence (PL), resonant Raman, and photoabsorption (PA) spectroscopies are employed to study quantum-size effects in II-VI semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) grown in glass samples. We observe a size-dependent shift in the energetic position of the first exciton peak and have examined the photoinduced evolution of the differential absorption spectra. The Raman shifts of the phonon modes are employed to monitor stoichiometric changes in the composition of the QDs during growth. Two sets of glass samples were prepared from color filters doped with CdS x Se1 - x and Zn x Cd1 - x Te. We analyze the optical properties of QDs through the ABS, PL, resonant Raman, and PA spectroscopies. The glass samples were prepared from commercially available semiconductor doped filters by a two-step thermal treatment. The average size of QDs is estimated from the energetic position of the first exciton peak in the ABS spectrum. A calculation based on a quantized-state effective mass model in the strong confinement regime predicts that the average radius of QDs in the glass samples ranges from 2.9 to 4.9 nm for CdTe and from 2.2 to 9.3 nm for CdS0. 08Se0. 92. We have also studied the nonlinear optical properties of QDs by reviewing the results of size-dependent photoinduced modulations in the first exciton band of CdTe QDs studied by PA spectroscopy.

  20. Exciton states in a circular graphene quantum dot: Magnetic field induced intravalley to intervalley transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. L.; Zarenia, M.; Xu, W.; Dong, H. M.; Peeters, F. M.

    2017-01-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the energy spectrum, wave function, binding energy, and oscillator strength of exciton states confined in a circular graphene quantum dot (CGQD) is obtained within the configuration interaction method. We predict that (i) excitonic effects are very significant in the CGQD as a consequence of a combination of geometric confinement, magnetic confinement, and reduced screening; (ii) two types of excitons (intravalley and intervalley) are present in the CGQD because of the valley degree of freedom in graphene; (iii) the intravalley and intervalley exciton states display different magnetic-field dependencies due to the different electron-hole symmetries of the single-particle energy spectra; (iv) with increasing magnetic field, the exciton ground state in the CGQD undergoes an intravalley to intervalley transition accompanied by a change of angular momentum; (v) the exciton binding energy does not increase monotonically with the magnetic field due to the competition between geometric and magnetic confinements; and (vi) the optical transitions of the intervalley and intravalley excitons can be tuned by the magnetic field, and valley-dependent excitonic transitions can be realized in a CGQD.

  1. Non-resonant Nanoscale Extreme Light Confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Subramania, Ganapathi Subramanian; Huber, Dale L.

    2014-09-01

    A wide spectrum of photonics activities Sandia is engaged in such as solid state lighting, photovoltaics, infrared imaging and sensing, quantum sources, rely on nanoscale or ultrasubwavelength light-matter interactions (LMI). The fundamental understanding in confining electromagnetic power and enhancing electric fields into ever smaller volumes is key to creating next generation devices for these programs. The prevailing view is that a resonant interaction (e.g. in microcavities or surface-plasmon polaritions) is necessary to achieve the necessary light confinement for absorption or emission enhancement. Here we propose new paradigm that is non-resonant and therefore broadband and can achieve light confinement and field enhancement in extremely small areas [~(λ/500)^2 ]. The proposal is based on a theoretical work[1] performed at Sandia. The paradigm structure consists of a periodic arrangement of connected small and large rectangular slits etched into a metal film named double-groove (DG) structure. The degree of electric field enhancement and power confinement can be controlled by the geometry of the structure. The key operational principle is attributed to quasistatic response of the metal electrons to the incoming electromagnetic field that enables non-resonant broadband behavior. For this exploratory LDRD we have fabricated some test double groove structures to enable verification of quasistatic electronic response in the mid IR through IR optical spectroscopy. We have addressed some processing challenges in DG structure fabrication to enable future design of complex sensor and detector geometries that can utilize its non-resonant field enhancement capabilities.].

  2. Plasma confinement at JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunes, I.; JET Contributors

    2016-01-01

    Operation with a Be/W wall at JET (JET-ILW) has an impact on scenario development and energy confinement with respect to the carbon wall (JET-C). The main differences observed were (1) strong accumulation of W in the plasma core and (2) the need to mitigate the divertor target temperature to avoid W sputtering by Be and other low Z impurities and (3) a decrease of plasma energy confinement. A major difference is observed on the pedestal pressure, namely a reduction of the pedestal temperature which, due to profile stiffness the plasma core temperature is also reduced leading to a degradation of the global confinement. This effect is more pronounced in low β N scenarios. At high β N, the impact of the wall on the plasma energy confinement is mitigated by the weaker plasma energy degradation with power relative to the IPB98(y, 2) scaling calculated empirically for a CFC first wall. The smaller tolerable impurity concentration for tungsten (<10-5) compared to that of carbon requires the use of electron heating methods to prevent W accumulation in the plasma core region as well as gas puffing to avoid W entering the plasma core by ELM flushing and reduction of the W source by decreasing the target temperature. W source and the target temperature can also be controlled by impurity seeding. Nitrogen and Neon have been used and with both gases the reduction of the W source and the target temperature is observed. Whilst more experiments with Neon are necessary to assess its impact on energy confinement, a partial increase of plasma energy confinement is observed with Nitrogen, through the increase of edge temperature. The challenge for scenario development at JET is to extend the pulse length curtailed by its transient behavior (W accumulation or MHD), but more importantly by the divertor target temperature limits. Re-optimisation of the scenarios to mitigate the effect of the change of wall materials maintaining high global energy confinement similar to JET-C is

  3. Optical resonators and quantum dots: An excursion into quantum optics, quantum information and photonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianucci, Pablo

    Modern communications technology has encouraged an intimate connection between Semiconductor Physics and Optics, and this connection shows best in the combination of electron-confining structures with light-confining structures. Semiconductor quantum dots are systems engineered to trap electrons in a mesoscopic scale (the are composed of ≈ 10000 atoms), resulting in a behavior resembling that of atoms, but much richer. Optical microresonators are engineered to confine light, increasing its intensity and enabling a much stronger interaction with matter. Their combination opens a myriad of new directions, both in fundamental Physics and in possible applications. This dissertation explores both semiconductor quantum dots and microresonators, through experimental work done with semiconductor quantum dots and microsphere resonators spanning the fields of Quantum Optics, Quantum Information and Photonics; from quantum algorithms to polarization converters. Quantum Optics leads the way, allowing us to understand how to manipulate and measure quantum dots with light and to elucidate the interactions between them and microresonators. In the Quantum Information area, we present a detailed study of the feasibility of excitons in quantum dots to perform quantum computations, including an experimental demonstration of the single-qubit Deutsch-Jozsa algorithm performedin a single semiconductor quantum dot. Our studies in Photonics involve applications of microsphere resonators, which we have learned to fabricate and characterize. We present an elaborate description of the experimental techniques needed to study microspheres, including studies and proof of concept experiments on both ultra-sensitive microsphere sensors and whispering gallery mode polarization converters.

  4. On VI at intermediate redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simcoe, R.; Sargent, W.; Rauch, M.

    2001-05-01

    Recent observations using the FUSE satellite and HST/STIS have emphasized the contribution of shock-heated O VI to the local baryon budget. Also, photoionized O VI is well known to be an excellent tracer of metal enrichment in the lowest density regions of the IGM. Searches for oxygen at higher redshift from the ground have been limited by severe bending of the doublet with lines in the lyman-alpha and lyman-beta forests. However, there exists a growing body of both direct (at high column density) and statistical (at low column density) evidence that suggests the presence of O VI at a wide range of associated H I column densities, even at large lookback times. We will discuss progress on a systematic, large pathlength search for O VI absorption in the spectra of a sample of quasars observed with the Keck I telescope and HIRES spectrograph, and we will describe our strategy for dealing with the blending problem. Where O VI is unambiguously detected, we compare its abundance and kinematics with those of other highly ionized species. We will also discuss the initial results of statistcial searches for oxygen at the weakest levels of absorption.

  5. Self-organized MBE growth of II VI epilayers on patterned GaSb substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wissmann, H.; Tran Anh, T.; Rogaschewski, S.; von Ortenberg, M.

    1999-05-01

    We report on the self-organized MBE growth of II-VI epilayers on patterned and unpatterned GaSb substrates resulting in quantum wires and quantum wells, respectively. The HgSe : Fe quantum wires were grown on (0 0 1)GaSb substrates with a buffer of lattice-matched ZnTe 1- xSe x. Due to the anisotropic growth of HgSe on the A-oriented stripes roof-like overgrowth with a definite ridge was obtained. Additional Fe doping in the direct vicinity of the ridge results in a highly conductive quantum wire.

  6. Totally confined explosive welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, L. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The undesirable by-products of explosive welding are confined and the association noise is reduced by the use of a simple enclosure into which the explosive is placed and in which the explosion occurs. An infrangible enclosure is removably attached to one of the members to be bonded at the point directly opposite the bond area. An explosive is completely confined within the enclosure at a point in close proximity to the member to be bonded and a detonating means is attached to the explosive. The balance of the enclosure, not occupied by explosive, is filled with a shaped material which directs the explosive pressure toward the bond area. A detonator adaptor controls the expansion of the enclosure by the explosive force so that the enclosure at no point experiences a discontinuity in expansion which causes rupture. The use of the technique is practical in the restricted area of a space station.

  7. Inertial Confinement fusion targets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, C. D.

    1982-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques were devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems, and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

  8. Classical confined particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horzela, Andrzej; Kapuscik, Edward

    1993-01-01

    An alternative picture of classical many body mechanics is proposed. In this picture particles possess individual kinematics but are deprived from individual dynamics. Dynamics exists only for the many particle system as a whole. The theory is complete and allows to determine the trajectories of each particle. It is proposed to use our picture as a classical prototype for a realistic theory of confined particles.

  9. Energy confinement in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Sugihara, M.; Singer, C.

    1986-08-01

    A straightforward generalization is made of the ohmic heating energy confinement scalings of Pfeiffer and Waltz and Blackwell et. al. The resulting model is systematically calibrated to published data from limiter tokamaks with ohmic, electron cyclotron, and neutral beam heating. With considerably fewer explicitly adjustable free parameters, this model appears to give a better fit to the available data for limiter discharges than the combined ohmic/auxiliary heating model of Goldston.

  10. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  11. Freezing in confined geometries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokol, P. E.; Ma, W. J.; Herwig, K. W.; Snow, W. M.; Wang, Y.; Koplik, Joel; Banavar, Jayanth R.

    1992-01-01

    Results of detailed structural studies, using elastic neutron scattering, of the freezing of liquid O2 and D2 in porous vycor glass, are presented. The experimental studies have been complemented by computer simulations of the dynamics of freezing of a Lennard-Jones liquid in narrow channels bounded by molecular walls. Results point to a new simple physical interpretation of freezing in confined geometries.

  12. Pilot-wave dynamics in confined geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Daniel M.; Bush, John W. M.

    2012-11-01

    Yves Couder and coworkers have demonstrated that millimetric droplets can propel themselves along the surface of a vibrating fluid bath by virtue of their pilot-wave dynamics, and that these walking droplets exhibit several features reminiscent of microscopic quantum particles. We here present the results of an experimental investigation of droplets walking in confined geometries, giving particular attention to elucidating the dynamics and statistics of the walking droplets. The behaviour depends critically on the amplitude of the vibrational forcing, specifically, the proximity to the Faraday threshold, which determines the spatio-temporal extent of the guiding wave field. Near the Faraday threshold, we demonstrate that a coherent statistical behavior emerges from the complex underlying nonlinear dynamics, and that, as in quantum mechanics, the statistics can be readily described with a linear wave equation.

  13. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  14. Quantum Dots: An Experiment for Physical or Materials Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, L. D.; Arceo, J. F.; Hughes, W. C.; DeGraff, B. A.; Augustine, B. H.

    2005-01-01

    An experiment is conducted for obtaining quantum dots for physical or materials chemistry. This experiment serves to both reinforce the basic concept of quantum confinement and providing a useful bridge between the molecular and solid-state world.

  15. Protostars and Planets VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuther, Henrik; Klessen, Ralf S.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.; Henning, Thomas

    star and planet formation. They are used by students to dive into new topics, and they are much valued by experienced researchers as a comprehensive overview of the field with all its interactions. We hope that you will enjoy reading (and learning from) this book as much as we do. The organization of the Protostars and Planets conference was carried out in close collaboration between the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy and the Center for Astronomy of the University Heidelberg, with generous support from the German Science Foundation. This volume is a product of effort and care by many people. First and foremost, we want to acknowledge the 250 contributing authors, as it is only due to their expertise and knowledge that such a comprehensive review compendium in all its depth and breadth is possible. The Protostars and Planets VI conference and this volume was a major undertaking, with support and contributions by many people and institutions. We like to thank the members of the Scientific Advisory Committee who selected the 38 teams and chapters out of more than 120 submitted proposals. Similarly, we are grateful to the reviewers, who provided valuable input and help to the chapter authors. The book would also not have been possible without the great support of Renée Dotson and other staff from USRA’s Lunar and Planetary Institute, who handled the detailed processing of all manuscripts and the production of the book, and of Allyson Carter and other staff from the University of Arizona Press. We are also grateful to Richard Binzel, the General Editor of the Space Science Series, for his constant support during the long process, from the original concept to this final product. Finally, we would like to express a very special thank you to the entire conference local organizing committee, and in particular, Carmen Cuevas and Natali Jurina, for their great commitment to the project and for a very fruitful and enjoyable collaboration.

  16. Effect of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the electronic, thermodynamic, magnetic and transport properties of GaAs, InAs and InSb quantum dots with Gaussian confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boda, Aalu; Boyacioglu, Bahadir; Erkaslan, Ugur; Chatterjee, Ashok

    2016-10-01

    The effect of Rashba spin-orbit interaction on the electronic, thermodynamic, magnetic and transport properties of a one-electron Gaussian quantum dot is investigated in the presence of a magnetic field and its interaction with the electron spin using the canonical ensemble approach. The temperature-dependent energy, magnetization, susceptibility, specific heat and the persistent current are calculated as a function of the spin-orbit coupling parameter. The results are applied to GaAs, InAs and InSb quantum dots.

  17. Molecular-beam epitaxy of heterostructures of wide-gap II–VI compounds for low-threshold lasers with optical and electron pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, S. V. Gronin, S. V.; Sedova, I. V.; Rakhlin, M. V.; Baidakova, M. V.; Kop’ev, P. S.; Vainilovich, A. G.; Lutsenko, E. V.; Yablonskii, G. P.; Gamov, N. A.; Zhdanova, E. V.; Zverev, M. M.; Ruvimov, S. S.; Ivanov, S. V.

    2015-03-15

    The paper presents basic approaches in designing and growing by molecular beam epitaxy of (Zn,Mg)(S,Se)-based laser heterostructures with multiple CdSe quantum dot (QD) sheets or ZnCdSe quantum wells (QW). The method of calculation of compensating short-period ZnSSe/ZnSe superlattices (SLs) in both active and waveguide regions of laser heterostructures possessing the different waveguide thickness and different number of active regions is presented. The method allowing reduction of the density of nonequilibrium point defects in the active region of the II–VI laser structures has been proposed. It utilizes the migration enhanced epitaxy mode in growing the ZnSe QW confining the CdSe QD sheet. The threshold power density as low as P{sub thr} ∼ 0.8 kW/cm{sup 2} at T = 300 K has been demonstrated for laser heterostructure with single CdSe QD sheet and asymmetric graded-index waveguide with strain-compensating SLs.

  18. Luminescent Tungsten(VI) Complexes: Photophysics and Applicability to Organic Light-Emitting Diodes and Photocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Kwan-Ting; To, Wai-Pong; Sun, Chenyue; Cheng, Gang; Ma, Chensheng; Tong, Glenna So Ming; Yang, Chen; Che, Chi-Ming

    2017-01-02

    The synthesis, excited-state dynamics, and applications of two series of air-stable luminescent tungsten(VI) complexes are described. These tungsten(VI) complexes show phosphorescence in the solid state and in solutions with emission quantum yields up to 22 % in thin film (5 % in mCP) at room temperature. Complex 2 c, containing a 5,7-diphenyl-8-hydroxyquinolinate ligand, displays prompt fluorescence (blue-green) and phosphorescence (red) of comparable intensity, which could be used for ratiometric luminescent sensing. Solution-processed organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) based on 1 d showed a stable yellow emission with an external quantum efficiency (EQE) and luminance up to 4.79 % and 1400 cd m(-2) respectively. These tungsten(VI) complexes were also applied in light-induced aerobic oxidation reactions. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Transforming common III-V/II-VI insulating building blocks into topological heterostructure via the intrinsic electric polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zunger, Alex; Zhang, Xiuwen; Abdalla, Leonardo; Liu, Qihang

    Currently known topological insulators (TIs) are limited to narrow gap compounds incorporating heavy elements, thus severely limiting the material pool available for such applications. We show how a heterovalent superlattice made of common semiconductor building blocks can transform its non-TI components into a topological heterostructure. The heterovalent nature of such interfaces sets up, in the absence of interfacial atomic exchange, a natural internal electric field that along with the quantum confinement leads to band inversion, transforming these semiconductors into a topological phase while also forming a giant Rashba spin splitting. We demonstrate this paradigm of designing TIs from ordinary semiconductors via first-principle calculations on III-V/II-VI superlattice InSb/CdTe. We illustrate the relationship between the interfacial stability and the topological transition, finding a ``window of opportunity'' where both conditions can be optimized. This work illustrates the general principles of co-evaluation of TI functionality with thermodynamic stability as a route of identifying realistic combination of common insulators that could produce topological heterostructures. This work was supported by Basic Energy Science, MSE division (Grant DE-FG02-13ER46959).

  20. Confinement studies in TFTR

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, M.; Arunasalam, V.; Bell, J.D.; Bell, M.G.; Bitter, M.; Blanchard, W.R.; Boody, F.; Boyd, D.; Bretz, N.; Bush, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The paper describes the present (end of February 1985) status of the plasma confinement studies in the TFTR tokamak with emphasis on those with neutral beam injection (NBI). Recent improvements in the device capabilities have substantially extended operating parameters: B/sub T/ increased to 4.0 T, I/sub p/ to 2.0 MA, injection power (P/sub b/) to 5 MW with H/sup 0/ or D/sup 0/ beams anti n/sub e/ to 5 x 10/sup 19/ m/sup -3/, and Z/sub eff/ reduced to 1.4. With ohmic heating (OH) alone, the previously established scaling for gross energy confinement time (tau/sub E/ = anti n/sub e/q) has been confirmed at higher I/sub p/ and B/sub T/, and the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.4 sec has been achieved. With NBI at P/sub b/ substantially (by factor >2) higher than P/sub OH/, excellent power and particle accountability have been established. This suggests that the less-than-expected increase in stored energy with NBI is not due to problems of power delivery, but due to problems of confinement deterioration. tau/sub E/ is observed to scale approximately as I/sub p/ P/sub b//sup -0.5/ (independent of anti n/sub e/), consistent with previous L-mode scalings. With NBI we have achieved the maximum tau/sub E/ of 0.2 sec and the maximum T/sub i/(o) of 4.4 keV in the normal operating regime, and even higher T/sub i/(o) in the energetic-ion regime with low-n/sub e/ and low-I/sub p/ operation.

  1. Confinement Contains Condensates

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Roberts, Craig D.; Shrock, Robert; Tandy, Peter C.

    2012-03-12

    Dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and its connection to the generation of hadron masses has historically been viewed as a vacuum phenomenon. We argue that confinement makes such a position untenable. If quark-hadron duality is a reality in QCD, then condensates, those quantities that have commonly been viewed as constant empirical mass-scales that fill all spacetime, are instead wholly contained within hadrons; i.e., they are a property of hadrons themselves and expressed, e.g., in their Bethe-Salpeter or light-front wave functions. We explain that this paradigm is consistent with empirical evidence, and incidentally expose misconceptions in a recent Comment.

  2. Quark confinement dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, T.J.; Olsson, M.G.; Veseli, S.; Williams, K. |

    1997-05-01

    Starting from Buchm{umlt u}ller{close_quote}s observation that a chromoelectric flux tube meson will exhibit only the Thomas-type spin-orbit interaction, we show that a model built upon the related assumption that a quark feels only a constant radial chromoelectric field in its rest frame implies a complete relativistic effective Hamiltonian that can be written explicitly in terms of quark canonical variables. The model yields linear Regge trajectories and exhibits some similarities to scalar confinement, but with the advantage of being more closely linked to QCD. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  3. Confinement Vessel Dynamic Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    R. Robert Stevens; Stephen P. Rojas

    1999-08-01

    A series of hydrodynamic and structural analyses of a spherical confinement vessel has been performed. The analyses used a hydrodynamic code to estimate the dynamic blast pressures at the vessel's internal surfaces caused by the detonation of a mass of high explosive, then used those blast pressures as applied loads in an explicit finite element model to simulate the vessel's structural response. Numerous load cases were considered. Particular attention was paid to the bolted port connections and the O-ring pressure seals. The analysis methods and results are discussed, and comparisons to experimental results are made.

  4. Electron Confinement in Cylindrical Potential Well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltenkov, A. S.; Msezane, A. Z.

    2016-05-01

    We show that studying the solutions of the wave equation for an electron confined in a cylindrical potential well offers the possibility to analyze the confinement behavior of an electron executing one- or two-dimensional motion in the remaining three-dimensional space within the framework of the same mathematical model of the potential well. Some low-lying electronic states with different symmetries are considered and the corresponding wave functions are calculated. The behavior of their nodes and their peak positions with respect to the parameters of the cylindrical well is analyzed. Additionally, the momentum distributions of electrons in these states are calculated. The limiting cases of the ratio of the cylinder length H to its radius R0 are considered; when H significantly exceeds R0 and when R0 is much greater than H. The possible application of the results obtained here for the description of the general features in the behavior of electrons in nanowires with metallic type of conductivity (or nanotubes) and ultrathin epitaxial films (or graphene sheets) are discussed. Possible experiments are suggested as well where the quantum confinement can be manifested. Work supported by the Uzbek Foundation (ASB) and by the U.S. DOE, Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences and Biosciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Office of Energy Research (AZM).

  5. Positron confinement in embedded lithium nanoclusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Huis, M. A.; van Veen, A.; Schut, H.; Falub, C. V.; Eijt, S. W.; Mijnarends, P. E.; Kuriplach, J.

    2002-02-01

    Quantum confinement of positrons in nanoclusters offers the opportunity to obtain detailed information on the electronic structure of nanoclusters by application of positron annihilation spectroscopy techniques. In this work, positron confinement is investigated in lithium nanoclusters embedded in monocrystalline MgO. These nanoclusters were created by means of ion implantation and subsequent annealing. It was found from the results of Doppler broadening positron beam analysis that approximately 92% of the implanted positrons annihilate in lithium nanoclusters rather than in the embedding MgO, while the local fraction of lithium at the implantation depth is only 1.3 at. %. The results of two-dimensional angular correlation of annihilation radiation confirm the presence of crystalline bulk lithium. The confinement of positrons is ascribed to the difference in positron affinity between lithium and MgO. The nanocluster acts as a potential well for positrons, where the depth of the potential well is equal to the difference in the positron affinities of lithium and MgO. These affinities were calculated using the linear muffin-tin orbital atomic sphere approximation method. This yields a positronic potential step at the MgO||Li interface of 1.8 eV using the generalized gradient approximation and 2.8 eV using the insulator model.

  6. Electroluminescence of quantum-dash-based quantum cascade laser structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liverini, V.; Bismuto, A.; Nevou, L.; Beck, M.; Faist, J.

    2011-12-23

    We developed two mid-infrared quantum cascade structures based on InAs quantum dashes. The dashes were embedded either in AlInGaAs lattice-matched to InP or in tensile-strained AlInAs. The devices emit between 7 and 11 {mu}m and are a step forward in the development of quantum cascade lasers based on 3-D confined active regions.

  7. Autoionization resonance states of two-electron atomic systems with finite spherical confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Chakraborty, Sumana; Ho, Y. K.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the lowest-lying S-wave resonant states of two-electron atoms confined by a spherical quantum cavity under the framework of the stabilization method. Hylleraas-type wave functions (basis length N = 444) taking the correlation effects between all the charged particles into account are used in the present paper. The finite oscillator potential is used to represent the confinement potential. We present the resonant parameters (energies and widths) of the quantum-confined two-electron atoms with different depths and various ranges of the potentials.

  8. Quark Confinement and Strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    't Hooft, Gerardus

    QCD was proposed as a theory for the strong interactions long before we had any idea as to how it could be that its fundamental constituents, the quarks, are never seen as physical particles. Massless gluons also do not exist as free particles. How can this be explained? The first indication that this question had to be considered in connection with the topological structure of a gauge theory came when Nielsen and Olesen observed the occurrence of stable magnetic vortex structures [1] in the Abelian Higgs model. Expanding on such ideas, the magnetic monopole solution was found [2]. Other roundabout attempts to understand confinement involve instantons. Today, we have better interpretations of these topological structures, including a general picture of the way they do lead to unbound potentials confining quarks. It is clear that these unbound potentials can be ascribed to a string-like structure of the vortices formed by the QCD field lines. Can string theory be used to analyze QCD? Many researchers think so. The leading expert on this is Sacha Polyakov. In his instructive account he adds how he experienced the course of events in Gauge Theory, emphasizing the fact that quite a few discoveries often ascribed to researchers from the West, actually were made independently by scientists from the Soviet Union…

  9. Human reliability and confinement.

    PubMed

    Hauty, G T

    1964-01-01

    Problems inherent in the modifiability of circadian periodicity and in impoverished sensory environments were explored for the purpose of appraising attenuative effects upon human reliability. Accordingly, highly selected subjects were confined within a one-man altitude chamber for prolonged periods of time and under a variety of designed conditions. The findings relative to the modifiability of biological rhythm indicate that adjustment to a drastic revision of the 24-hour biological day was accomplished to a significant and practical extent by certain subjects, the extent of adjustment was directly related to the maintenance of high initial levels of proficiency, and just as subjects differ greatly in their adjustment to revised biological time, they differ to an equal extent in the degree of synchronization manifested by the apparent periodicities of the different physiological systems. In the investigation of impoverished sensory environments, it was found that the joint effects of impoverished sensory conditions and continuous work at an operator system drastically degraded the reliability of certain subjects. Further, neither prior experience nor knowledge acted to mitigate the degree of aberrancy experienced which in the case of one subject was so extreme as to necessitate his removal from the chamber prior to the termination of confinement period. Finally, management of certain aberrant behavior, specifically hallucinatory experiences, could be successfully achieved by those subjects who continuously attempted to maintain a diversity of sensory input.

  10. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  11. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes.

    PubMed

    Domanov, Yegor A; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E S; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-08-02

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the "membrane size" for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111-3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman-Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion.

  12. Mobility in geometrically confined membranes

    PubMed Central

    Domanov, Yegor A.; Aimon, Sophie; Toombes, Gilman E. S.; Renner, Marianne; Quemeneur, François; Triller, Antoine; Turner, Matthew S.; Bassereau, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Lipid and protein lateral mobility is essential for biological function. Our theoretical understanding of this mobility can be traced to the seminal work of Saffman and Delbrück, who predicted a logarithmic dependence of the protein diffusion coefficient (i) on the inverse of the size of the protein and (ii) on the “membrane size” for membranes of finite size [Saffman P, Delbrück M (1975) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 72:3111—3113]. Although the experimental proof of the first prediction is a matter of debate, the second has not previously been thought to be experimentally accessible. Here, we construct just such a geometrically confined membrane by forming lipid bilayer nanotubes of controlled radii connected to giant liposomes. We followed the diffusion of individual molecules in the tubular membrane using single particle tracking of quantum dots coupled to lipids or voltage-gated potassium channels KvAP, while changing the membrane tube radius from approximately 250 to 10 nm. We found that both lipid and protein diffusion was slower in tubular membranes with smaller radii. The protein diffusion coefficient decreased as much as 5-fold compared to diffusion on the effectively flat membrane of the giant liposomes. Both lipid and protein diffusion data are consistent with the predictions of a hydrodynamic theory that extends the work of Saffman and Delbrück to cylindrical geometries. This study therefore provides strong experimental support for the ubiquitous Saffman–Delbrück theory and elucidates the role of membrane geometry and size in regulating lateral diffusion. PMID:21768336

  13. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M.; Hu, W.-F.; Farutin, A.; Rafaï, S.; Lai, M.-C.; Peyla, P.; Misbah, C.

    2015-11-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  14. Amoeboid motion in confined geometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Thiébaud, M; Hu, W-F; Farutin, A; Rafaï, S; Lai, M-C; Peyla, P; Misbah, C

    2015-01-01

    Many eukaryotic cells undergo frequent shape changes (described as amoeboid motion) that enable them to move forward. We investigate the effect of confinement on a minimal model of amoeboid swimmer. A complex picture emerges: (i) The swimmer's nature (i.e., either pusher or puller) can be modified by confinement, thus suggesting that this is not an intrinsic property of the swimmer. This swimming nature transition stems from intricate internal degrees of freedom of membrane deformation. (ii) The swimming speed might increase with increasing confinement before decreasing again for stronger confinements. (iii) A straight amoeoboid swimmer's trajectory in the channel can become unstable, and ample lateral excursions of the swimmer prevail. This happens for both pusher- and puller-type swimmers. For weak confinement, these excursions are symmetric, while they become asymmetric at stronger confinement, whereby the swimmer is located closer to one of the two walls. In this study, we combine numerical and theoretical analyses.

  15. Embedding beyond electrostatics—The role of wave function confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nâbo, Lina J.; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Holmgaard List, Nanna; Solanko, Lukasz M.; Wüstner, Daniel; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-09-01

    We study excited states of cholesterol in solution and show that, in this specific case, solute wave-function confinement is the main effect of the solvent. This is rationalized on the basis of the polarizable density embedding scheme, which in addition to polarizable embedding includes non-electrostatic repulsion that effectively confines the solute wave function to its cavity. We illustrate how the inclusion of non-electrostatic repulsion results in a successful identification of the intense π → π∗ transition, which was not possible using an embedding method that only includes electrostatics. This underlines the importance of non-electrostatic repulsion in quantum-mechanical embedding-based methods.

  16. Embedding beyond electrostatics-The role of wave function confinement.

    PubMed

    Nåbo, Lina J; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Holmgaard List, Nanna; Solanko, Lukasz M; Wüstner, Daniel; Kongsted, Jacob

    2016-09-14

    We study excited states of cholesterol in solution and show that, in this specific case, solute wave-function confinement is the main effect of the solvent. This is rationalized on the basis of the polarizable density embedding scheme, which in addition to polarizable embedding includes non-electrostatic repulsion that effectively confines the solute wave function to its cavity. We illustrate how the inclusion of non-electrostatic repulsion results in a successful identification of the intense π → π(∗) transition, which was not possible using an embedding method that only includes electrostatics. This underlines the importance of non-electrostatic repulsion in quantum-mechanical embedding-based methods.

  17. The Properties of Confined Water and Fluid Flow at the Nanoscale

    SciTech Connect

    Schwegler, E; Reed, J; Lau, E; Prendergast, D; Galli, G; Grossman, J C; Cicero, G

    2009-03-09

    This project has been focused on the development of accurate computational tools to study fluids in confined, nanoscale geometries, and the application of these techniques to probe the structural and electronic properties of water confined between hydrophilic and hydrophobic substrates, including the presence of simple ions at the interfaces. In particular, we have used a series of ab-initio molecular dynamics simulations and quantum Monte Carlo calculations to build an understanding of how hydrogen bonding and solvation are modified at the nanoscale. The properties of confined water affect a wide range of scientific and technological problems - including protein folding, cell-membrane flow, materials properties in confined media and nanofluidic devices.

  18. Photon mass via current confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyas, Vivek M.; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.

    2017-08-01

    A parity invariant theory, consisting of two massive Dirac fields, defined in three dimensional space-time, with the confinement of a certain current is studied. It is found that the electromagnetic field, when coupled minimally to these Dirac fields, becomes massive owing to the current confinement. It is seen that the origin of photon mass is not due to any kind of spontaneous symmetry breaking, but only due to current confinement.

  19. Summary report of session VI

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou et al.

    2002-08-19

    This report gives a brief review of the presentations in Session VI of the Ecloud'02 Workshop and summarizes the major points during the discussions. Some points (e.g., the critical mass phenomenon) are not conclusive and even controversial. But it has been agreed that further investigations are warranted. The topic of Session VI in the Ecloud'02 workshop is ''Discussions of future studies, collaborations and possible solutions.'' Half of the session is devoted to presentations, another half to discussions. This report will focus on the latter. There are six presentations: (1) R. Macek, Possible cures to the e-cloud problem; (2) G. Rumolo, Driving the electron-cloud instability by an electron cooler; (3) U. Iriso Ariz, RF test benches for electron-cloud studies; (4) F. Caspers, Stealth clearing electrodes; (5) F. Ruggiero, Future electron-cloud studies at CERN; and (6) E. Perevedentsev, Beam-beam and transverse impedance model.

  20. Directional Mechanosensing in Myosin VI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yubo; Tehver, Riina

    2013-03-01

    Myosin is a family of versatile motor proteins that perform various tasks, such as organelle transport, anchoring and cell deformation. Although the general mechanism of the motors has been fairly well established, details on dynamic aspects like force response of the motor, and force propagation are yet to be fully understood. In this poster, we present the response of the ATP binding region to force exerted on the tail domain in order to test the proposed tension-dependent gating mechanism of myosin VI processive motion. We employed the Self-Organized Polymer model in a computer simulation to explore the effect. Current results show that the ATP binding domain of myosin VI indeed exhibits tension dependence - both structurally and dynamically.