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Sample records for quantum detection system

  1. Detecting quantum speedup in closed and open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-07-01

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. The speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms for quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup: the former stems from the time evolution process itself with fixed initial conditions, while the latter is a result of adjusting initial conditions. We then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that quantum coherence (or entanglement) and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under specific conditions and assumptions.

  2. Detection Systems and Algorithms for Multiplexed Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, Kelly Christine

    Quantum Dots (QDs) are semiconductor nanocrystals that absorb light and re-emit at a wavelength dependent on its size and shape. A group of quantum dots can be designed to have a unique spectral emission by varying the size of the quantum dots (wavelength) and number of quantum dots (optical power) [1]. This technology is refered to as Multiplexed Quantum Dots (MxQD) and when it was first proposed, MxQD tags were created with 6 optical power levels and one QD colour or 3 QD colours and 2 optical power levels. It was hypothesized that a realistic limit to the number of tags would be a system of 6 optical power levels and 6 QD colours resulting in 46655 unique tags. In recent work, the fabrication and detection of 9 unique tags [2] was demonstrated which is still far from the predicted capability of the technology. The limitations affecting the large number of unique tags are both the fabrication methods and the data detection algorithms used to read the spectral emissions. This thesis makes contributions toward improving the data detection algorithms for MxQD tags. To accomplish this, a communications system model is developed that includes the inteference between QD colours, Inter-Symbol Interference (ISI), and additive noise. The model is developed for the two optical detectors, namely a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) spectrometer and photodiode detectors. The model also includes an analytical expression for the Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of the detectors. For the CCD spectrometer, this model is verified with an experimental prototype. With the models in place, communications systems tools are applied that overcome both ISI and noise. This is an improvement over previous work in the field that only considered algorithms to overcome the ISI or noise separately. Specifically, this thesis outlines the proposal of a matched filter to improve SNR, a Minimum Mean Square Error (MMSE) equalizer that mitigates ISI in the presence of noise and a Maximum Likelihood Sequence

  3. Acquisition of a Recondensing Cryostat for Ultra-Sensitive Charge Detection of Quantum Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-21

    Acquisition of a Recondensing Cryostat for Ultra - Sensitive Charge Detection of Quantum Systems The funding provided by this grant was used to...accelerate our efforts to develop cavity-embedded Cooper pair transistors for ultra sensitive charge detection of quantum systems such as quantum dots and...reviewed journals: Final Report: Acquisition of a Recondensing Cryostat for Ultra -Sensitive Charge Detection of Quantum Systems Report Title The funding

  4. Detecting relay attacks on RFID communication systems using quantum bits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jannati, Hoda; Ardeshir-Larijani, Ebrahim

    2016-11-01

    RFID systems became widespread in variety of applications because of their simplicity in manufacturing and usability. In the province of critical infrastructure protection, RFID systems are usually employed to identify and track people, objects and vehicles that enter restricted areas. The most important vulnerability which is prevalent among all protocols employed in RFID systems is against relay attacks. Until now, to protect RFID systems against this kind of attack, the only approach is the utilization of distance-bounding protocols which are not applicable over low-cost devices such as RFID passive tags. This work presents a novel technique using emerging quantum technologies to detect relay attacks on RFID systems. Recently, it is demonstrated that quantum key distribution (QKD) can be implemented in a client-server scheme where client only requires an on-chip polarization rotator that may be integrated into a handheld device. Now we present our technique for a tag-reader scenario which needs similar resources as the mentioned QKD scheme. We argue that our technique requires less resources and provides lower probability of false alarm for the system, compared with distance-bounding protocols, and may pave the way to enhance the security of current RFID systems.

  5. Tampering detection system using quantum-mechanical systems

    DOEpatents

    Humble, Travis S [Knoxville, TN; Bennink, Ryan S [Knoxville, TN; Grice, Warren P [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-12-13

    The use of quantum-mechanically entangled photons for monitoring the integrity of a physical border or a communication link is described. The no-cloning principle of quantum information science is used as protection against an intruder's ability to spoof a sensor receiver using a `classical` intercept-resend attack. Correlated measurement outcomes from polarization-entangled photons are used to protect against quantum intercept-resend attacks, i.e., attacks using quantum teleportation.

  6. A novel sensitive pathogen detection system based on Microbead Quantum Dot System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Su, Yi-Yu; Shu, Wei-Hsien; Mercado, Augustus T; Wang, Shi-Kwun; Hsu, Ling-Yi; Tsai, Yow-Fu; Chen, Chung-Yung

    2016-04-15

    A fast and accurate detection system for pathogens can provide immediate measurements for the identification of infectious agents. Therefore, the Microbead Quantum-dots Detection System (MQDS) was developed to identify and measure target DNAs of pathogenic microorganisms and eliminated the need of PCR amplifications. This nanomaterial-based technique can detect different microorganisms by flow cytometry measurements. In MQDS, pathogen specific DNA probes were designed to form a hairpin structure and conjugated on microbeads. In the presence of the complementary target DNA sequence, the probes will compete for binding with the reporter probes but will not interfere with the binding between the probe and internal control DNA. To monitor the binding process by flow cytometry, both the reporter probes and internal control probes were conjugated with Quantum dots that fluoresce at different emission wavelengths using the click reaction. When MQDS was used to detect the pathogens in environmental samples, a high correlation coefficient (R=0.994) for Legionella spp., with a detection limit of 0.1 ng of the extracted DNAs and 10 CFU/test, can be achieved. Thus, this newly developed technique can also be applied to detect other pathogens, particularly viruses and other genetic diseases.

  7. Entanglement detection in a coupled atom-field system via quantum Fisher information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirkhalaf, Safoura Sadat; Smerzi, Augusto

    2017-02-01

    We consider a system of finite number of particles collectively interacting with a single-mode coherent field inside a cavity. Depending on the strength of the initial field compared to the number of atoms, we consider three regimes of weak-, intermediate-, and strong-field interaction. The dynamics of multiparticle entanglement detected by quantum Fisher information and spin squeezing are studied in each regime. It is seen that in the weak-field regime, spin squeezing and quantum Fisher information coincide. However, by increasing the initial field population toward the strong-field regime, quantum Fisher information is more effective in detecting entanglement compared to spin squeezing. In addition, in the two-atom system, we also study concurrence. In this case, the quantum Fisher information as a function of time is in good agreement with concurrence in predicting entanglement peaks.

  8. Quantum electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milburn, Gerard J.; Polkinghorne, Rodney

    2001-11-01

    We discuss the conditions under which electromechanical systems, fabricated on a sub micron scale, require a quantum description. We illustrate the discussion with the example of a mechanical electroscope for which the resonant frequency of a cantilever changes in response to a local charge. We show how such devices may be used as a quantum noise limited apparatus for detection of a single charge or spin with applications to quantum computing.

  9. Nonlocality in many-body quantum systems detected with two-body correlators

    SciTech Connect

    Tura, J.; Augusiak, R.; Sainz, A.B.; Lücke, B.; Klempt, C.; Lewenstein, M.; Acín, A.

    2015-11-15

    Contemporary understanding of correlations in quantum many-body systems and in quantum phase transitions is based to a large extent on the recent intensive studies of entanglement in many-body systems. In contrast, much less is known about the role of quantum nonlocality in these systems, mostly because the available multipartite Bell inequalities involve high-order correlations among many particles, which are hard to access theoretically, and even harder experimentally. Standard, “theorist- and experimentalist-friendly” many-body observables involve correlations among only few (one, two, rarely three...) particles. Typically, there is no multipartite Bell inequality for this scenario based on such low-order correlations. Recently, however, we have succeeded in constructing multipartite Bell inequalities that involve two- and one-body correlations only, and showed how they revealed the nonlocality in many-body systems relevant for nuclear and atomic physics [Tura et al., Science 344 (2014) 1256]. With the present contribution we continue our work on this problem. On the one hand, we present a detailed derivation of the above Bell inequalities, pertaining to permutation symmetry among the involved parties. On the other hand, we present a couple of new results concerning such Bell inequalities. First, we characterize their tightness. We then discuss maximal quantum violations of these inequalities in the general case, and their scaling with the number of parties. Moreover, we provide new classes of two-body Bell inequalities which reveal nonlocality of the Dicke states—ground states of physically relevant and experimentally realizable Hamiltonians. Finally, we shortly discuss various scenarios for nonlocality detection in mesoscopic systems of trapped ions or atoms, and by atoms trapped in the vicinity of designed nanostructures.

  10. Quantum State Detection through Repetitive Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Rosenband, T.; Bergquist, J. C.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-03-01

    State detection plays an important role in quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology. In some cases the quantum system of interest can only be detected with poor efficiency. One approach to overcoming this limitation is to couple the primary quantum system to an ancillary quantum system used for measurement [1]. The measurement process consists of mapping the primary state to the ancilla followed by ancilla detection. If this can be done without affecting the projected populations of the primary system, the measurement may be repeated. In this case, detection fidelity can be significantly higher than both the fidelity of state transfer and the intrinsic measurement fidelity of the ancillary system. Using two ions as the primary and ancillary systems (^27Al^+ and ^9Be^+ respectively) held in a harmonic trap, we demonstrate near unit fidelity measurement despite imperfect information transfer and ancilla detection. [1] P.O. Schmidt, et. al. Science 309 749 (2005)

  11. Quantum cascade laser-based multipass absorption system for hydrogen peroxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Jiang, Wenzhe; Ren, Wei; Lewicki, Rafal; Jiang, Dongfang; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant molecular trace gas species, that is related to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the production of radical species such as OH, the generation of sulfate aerosol via oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), and the formation of acid rain. The detection of atmospheric H2O2 involves specific challenges due to its high reactivity and low concentration (ppbv to sub-ppbv level). Traditional methods for measuring atmospheric H2O2 concentration are often based on wet-chemistry methods that require a transfer from the gas- to liquid-phase for a subsequent determination by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy, which can lead to problems such as sampling artifacts and interference by other atmospheric constituents. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based system for the measurement of atmospheric H2O2 with a detection limit of 75 ppb for 1-s integration time was previously reported. In this paper, an updated H2O2 detection system based on long-optical-path-length absorption spectroscopy by using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) will be described. A 7.73-μm CW-DFB-QCL and a thermoelectrically cooled infrared detector, optimized for a wavelength of 8 μm, are employed for theH2O2 sensor system. A commercial astigmatic Herriott multi-pass cell with an effective optical path-length of 76 m is utilized for the reported QCL multipass absorption system. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection is used for enhancing the signal-to-noise-ratio. A minimum detection limit of 13.4 ppb is achieved with a 2 s sampling time. Based on an Allan-Werle deviation analysis the minimum detection limit can be improved to 1.5 ppb when using an averaging time of 300 s.

  12. Lower bounds of concurrence for N-qubit systems and the detection of k-nonseparability of multipartite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xianfei; Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli

    2017-01-01

    Concurrence, as one of the entanglement measures, is a useful tool to characterize quantum entanglement in various quantum systems. However, the computation of the concurrence involves difficult optimizations and only for the case of two qubits, an exact formula was found. We investigate the concurrence of four-qubit quantum states and derive analytical lower bound of concurrence using the multiqubit monogamy inequality. It is shown that this lower bound is able to improve the existing bounds. This approach can be generalized to arbitrary qubit systems. We present an exact formula of concurrence for some mixed quantum states. For even-qubit states, we derive an improved lower bound of concurrence using a monogamy equality for qubit systems. At the same time, we show that a multipartite state is k-nonseparable if the multipartite concurrence is larger than a constant related to the value of k, the qudit number and the dimension of the subsystems. Our results can be applied to detect the multipartite k-nonseparable states.

  13. Quantum cascade laser-based sensor system for nitric oxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tittel, Frank K.; Allred, James J.; Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Ren, Wei; Jiang, Wenzhe; Jiang, Dongfang; Griffin, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive detection of nitric oxide (NO) at ppbv concentration levels has an important impact in diverse fields of applications including environmental monitoring, industrial process control and medical diagnostics. For example, NO can be used as a biomarker of asthma and inflammatory lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Trace gas sensor systems capable of high sensitivity require the targeting of strong rotational-vibrational bands in the mid-IR spectral range. These bands are accessible using state-of-the-art high heat load (HHL) packaged, continuous wave (CW), distributed feedback (DFB) quantum cascade lasers (QCLs). Quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) permits the design of fast, sensitive, selective, and compact sensor systems. A QEPAS sensor was developed employing a room-temperature CW DFB-QCL emitting at 5.26 μm with an optical excitation power of 60 mW. High sensitivity is achieved by targeting a NO absorption line at 1900.08 cm-1 free of interference by H2O and CO2. The minimum detection limit of the sensor is 7.5 and 1 ppbv of NO with 1and 100 second averaging time respectively . The sensitivity of the sensor system is sufficient for detecting NO in exhaled human breath, with typical concentration levels ranging from 24.0 ppbv to 54.0 ppbv.

  14. Adaptive Quantum State Detection through Repetitive Mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, David; Rosenband, Till; Wineland, David; Bergquist, Jim

    2007-06-01

    State detection plays an important role in quantum information processing and quantum-limited metrology. In some quantum systems direct detection is impossible or inefficient. This can be overcome by coupling the primary quantum system to an ancillary system used for measurement [1]. The measurement process consists of mapping the primary state to the ancilla followed by ancilla detection. If the measurement does not affect the projected populations of the primary system, it may be repeated yielding higher fidelity. Using two trapped ion species (^27Al^+ and ^9Be^+) as the primary and ancillary systems, we demonstrate high-fidelity measurement despite imperfect information transfer and ancilla detection. An adaptive measurement strategy allows for multiple qubit state discrimination with one ancilla. This opens the way for several applications in quantum information processing and advances our optical clock effort. [1] P.O. Schmidt, et. al. Science 309 749 (2005)

  15. A comparison of digital radiography systems in terms of effective detective quantum efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Bertolini, Marco; Nitrosi, Andrea; Rivetti, Stefano; Lanconelli, Nico; Pattacini, Pierpaolo; Ginocchi, Vladimiro; Iori, Mauro

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to compare digital radiography systems using the metric effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE), which better reflects digital radiography imaging system performance under clinical operating conditions, in comparison with conventional metrics such as modulation transfer function (MTF), normalized noise power spectra (NNPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Methods: The eDQE was computed by the calculation of the MTF, the NNPS, the phantom attenuation and scatter, and estimation of x-ray flux. The physical characterization of the systems was obtained with the standard beam conditions RQA5 and RQA9, using the PA Chest phantom proposed by AAPM Report no. 31 simulating the attenuation and scatter characteristics of the adult human thorax. The MTF (eMTF) was measured by using an edge test placed at the frontal surface of the phantom, the NNPS (eNNPS) was calculated from images of the phantom acquired at three different exposure levels covering the operating range of the system (E{sub 0}, which is the exposure at which a system is normally operated, 1/3 E{sub 0}, and 3 E0), and scatter measurements were assessed by using a beam-stop technique. The integral of DQE (IDQE) and eDQE (IeDQE) was calculated over the whole spatial frequency range. Results: The eMTF results demonstrate degradation due to magnification and the presence of scattered radiation. The eNNPS was influenced by the grid presence, and in some systems, it contained structured noise. At typical clinical exposure levels, the magnitude of eDQE(0) with respect to DQE(0) at RQA9 beam conditions was 13%, 17%, 16%, 36%, and 24%, respectively, for Carestream DRX-1, Carestream DRX-1C, Carestream Direct View CR975, Philips Digital Diagnost VM, and GE Revolution XR/d. These results were confirmed by the ratio of IeDQE and IDQE in the same conditions. Conclusions: The authors confirm the robustness and reproducibility of the eDQE method. As expected, the DR systems

  16. Quantum computing. Defining and detecting quantum speedup.

    PubMed

    Rønnow, Troels F; Wang, Zhihui; Job, Joshua; Boixo, Sergio; Isakov, Sergei V; Wecker, David; Martinis, John M; Lidar, Daniel A; Troyer, Matthias

    2014-07-25

    The development of small-scale quantum devices raises the question of how to fairly assess and detect quantum speedup. Here, we show how to define and measure quantum speedup and how to avoid pitfalls that might mask or fake such a speedup. We illustrate our discussion with data from tests run on a D-Wave Two device with up to 503 qubits. By using random spin glass instances as a benchmark, we found no evidence of quantum speedup when the entire data set is considered and obtained inconclusive results when comparing subsets of instances on an instance-by-instance basis. Our results do not rule out the possibility of speedup for other classes of problems and illustrate the subtle nature of the quantum speedup question.

  17. CHARACTERISING THE EOS SLOT-SCANNING SYSTEM WITH THE EFFECTIVE DETECTIVE QUANTUM EFFICIENCY.

    PubMed

    Clavel, A H; Monnin, P; Létang, J M; Verdun, F R; Darbon, A

    2016-06-01

    As opposed to the standard detective quantum efficiency (DQE), effective DQE (eDQE) is a figure of merit that allows comparing the performances of imaging systems in the presence of scatter rejection devices. The geometry of the EOS™ slot-scanning system is such that the detector is self-collimated and rejects scattered radiation. In this study, the EOS system was characterised using the eDQE in imaging conditions similar to those used in clinical practice: with phantoms of different widths placed in the X-ray beam, for various incident air kerma and tube voltages corresponding to the phantom thickness. Scatter fractions in EOS images were extremely low, around 2 % for all configurations. Maximum eDQE values spanned 9-14.8 % for a large range of air kerma at the detector plane from 0.01 to 1.34 µGy. These figures were obtained with non-optimised EOS setting but still over-performed most of the maximum eDQEs recently assessed for various computed radiology and digital radiology systems with antiscatter grids.

  18. Effective detective quantum efficiency for two mammography systems: Measurement and comparison against established metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Salvagnini, Elena; Bosmans, Hilde; Marshall, Nicholas W.; Struelens, Lara

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: The aim of this paper was to illustrate the value of the new metric effective detective quantum efficiency (eDQE) in relation to more established measures in the optimization process of two digital mammography systems. The following metrics were included for comparison against eDQE: detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of the detector, signal difference to noise ratio (SdNR), and detectability index (d′) calculated using a standard nonprewhitened observer with eye filter.Methods: The two systems investigated were the Siemens MAMMOMAT Inspiration and the Hologic Selenia Dimensions. The presampling modulation transfer function (MTF) required for the eDQE was measured using two geometries: a geometry containing scattered radiation and a low scatter geometry. The eDQE, SdNR, and d′ were measured for poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thicknesses of 20, 40, 60, and 70 mm, with and without the antiscatter grid and for a selection of clinically relevant target/filter (T/F) combinations. Figures of merit (FOMs) were then formed from SdNR and d′ using the mean glandular dose as the factor to express detriment. Detector DQE was measured at energies covering the range of typical clinically used spectra.Results: The MTF measured in the presence of scattered radiation showed a large drop at low spatial frequency compared to the low scatter method and led to a corresponding reduction in eDQE. The eDQE for the Siemens system at 1 mm{sup −1} ranged between 0.15 and 0.27, depending on T/F and grid setting. For the Hologic system, eDQE at 1 mm{sup −1} varied from 0.15 to 0.32, again depending on T/F and grid setting. The eDQE results for both systems showed that the grid increased the system efficiency for PMMA thicknesses of 40 mm and above but showed only small sensitivity to T/F setting. While results of the SdNR and d′ based FOMs confirmed the eDQE grid position results, they were also more specific in terms of T/F selection. For the Siemens system at 20 mm PMMA

  19. Analysis of the kinestatic charge detection system as a high detective quantum efficiency electronic portal imaging device.

    PubMed

    Samant, Sanjiv S; Gopal, Arun

    2006-09-01

    Megavoltage x-ray imaging suffers from reduced image quality due to low differential x-ray attenuation and large Compton scatter compared with kilovoltage imaging. Notwithstanding this, electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) are now widely used in portal verification in radiotherapy as they offer significant advantages over film, including immediate digital imaging and superior contrast range. However video-camera-based EPIDs (VEPIDs) are limited by problems of low light collection efficiency and significant light scatter, leading to reduced contrast and spatial resolution. Indirect and direct detection-based flat-panel EPIDs have been developed to overcome these limitations. While flat-panel image quality has been reported to exceed that achieved with portal film, these systems have detective quantum efficiency (DQE) limited by the thin detection medium and are sensitive to radiation damage to peripheral read-out electronics. An alternative technology for high-quality portal imaging is presented here: kinesatic charge detection (KCD). The KCD is a scanning tri-electrode ion-chamber containing high-pressure noble gas (xenon at 100 atm) used in conjunction with a strip-collimated photon beam. The chamber is scanned across the patient, and an external electric field is used to regulate the cation drift velocity. By matching the scanning velocity with that of the cation (i.e., ion) drift velocity, the cations remain static in the object frame of reference, allowing temporal integration of the signal. The KCD offers several advantages as a portal imaging system. It has a thick detector geometry with an active detection depth of 6.1 cm, compared to the sub-millimeter thickness of the phosphor layer in conventional phosphor screens, leading to an order of magnitude advantage in quantum efficiency (>0.3). The unique principle of and the use of the scanning strip-collimated x-ray beam provide further integration of charges in time, reduced scatter, and a significantly

  20. Engineering quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Armando N.; Almeida, Álvaro J.; Silva, Nuno A.; Muga, Nelson J.; Martins, Luis M.

    2012-06-01

    Quantum communications can provide almost perfect security through the use of quantum laws to detect any possible leak of information. We discuss critical issues in the implementation of quantum communication systems over installed optical fibers. We use stimulated four-wave mixing to generate single photons inside optical fibers, and by tuning the separation between the pump and the signal we adjust the average number of photons per pulse. We report measurements of the source statistics and show that it goes from a thermal to Poisson distribution with the increase of the pump power. We generate entangled photons pairs through spontaneous four-wave mixing. We report results for different type of fibers to approach the maximum value of the Bell inequality. We model the impact of polarization rotation, attenuation and Raman scattering and present optimum configurations to increase the degree of entanglement. We encode information in the photons polarization and assess the use of wavelength and time division multiplexing based control systems to compensate for the random rotation of the polarization during transmission. We show that time division multiplexing systems provide a more robust solution considering the values of PMD of nowadays installed fibers. We evaluate the impact on the quantum channel of co-propagating classical channels, and present guidelines for adding quantum channels to installed WDM optical communication systems without strongly penalizing the performance of the quantum channel. We discuss the process of retrieving information from the photons polarization. We identify the major impairments that limit the speed and distance of the quantum channel. Finally, we model theoretically the QBER and present results of an experimental performance assessment of the system quality through QBER measurements.

  1. The Role of the Total Entropy Production in the Dynamics of Open Quantum Systems in Detection of Non-Markovianity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salimi, S.; Haseli, S.; Khorashad, A. S.; Adabi, F.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction between system and environment is a fundamental concept in the theory of open quantum systems. As a result of the interaction, an amount of correlation (both classical and quantum) emerges between the system and the environment. In this work, we recall the quantity that will be very useful to describe the emergence of the correlation between the system and the environment, namely, the total entropy production. Appearance of total entropy production is due to the entanglement production between the system and the environment. In this work, we discuss about the role of the total entropy production for detecting the non-Markovianity. By utilizing the relation between the total entropy production and total correlation between subsystems, one can see a temporary decrease of total entropy production is a signature of non-Markovianity. We apply our criterion for the special case, where the composite system has initial correlation with environment.

  2. Prospect of detection and recognition of single biological molecules using ultrafast coherent dynamics in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.

    2015-08-01

    Conventional plasmonic sensors are based on the intrinsic resonances of metallic nanoparticles. In such sensors wavelength shift of such resonances are used to detect biological molecules. Recently we introduced ultra-sensitive timedomain nanosensors based on the way variations in the environmental conditions influence coherent dynamics of hybrid systems consisting of metallic nanoparticles and quantum dots. Such dynamics are generated via interaction of these systems with a laser field, generating quantum coherence and coherent exciton-plasmon coupling. These sensors are based on impact of variations of the refractive index of the environment on such dynamics, generating time-dependent changes in the emission of the QDs. In this paper we study the impact of material properties of the metallic nanoparticles on this process and demonstrate the key role played by the design of the quantum dots. We show that Ag nanoparticles, even in a simple spherical shape, may allow these sensors to operate at room temperature, owing to the special properties of quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems that may allow coherent effects utilized in such sensors happen in the presence of the ultrafast polarization dephasing of quantum dots.

  3. Development and Evaluation of an Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System for Detection, Characterization and Mapping of Unexploded Ordnance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    FINAL REPORT Development and Evaluation of an Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System...Airborne Superconducting Quantum Interference Device-Based Magnetic Gradiometer Tensor System for Detection, Characterization and Mapping of Unexploded...Demonstration of the difference between a single component total field magnetometer and intrinsic gradiometer . (From Clarke, 1994). 4 Figure 3

  4. Detecting quantum critical points using bipartite fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Rachel, Stephan; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Song, H Francis; Le Hur, Karyn

    2012-03-16

    We show that the concept of bipartite fluctuations F provides a very efficient tool to detect quantum phase transitions in strongly correlated systems. Using state-of-the-art numerical techniques complemented with analytical arguments, we investigate paradigmatic examples for both quantum spins and bosons. As compared to the von Neumann entanglement entropy, we observe that F allows us to find quantum critical points with much better accuracy in one dimension. We further demonstrate that F can be successfully applied to the detection of quantum criticality in higher dimensions with no prior knowledge of the universality class of the transition. Promising approaches to experimentally access fluctuations are discussed for quantum antiferromagnets and cold gases.

  5. Exploiting high resolution Fourier transform spectroscopy to inform the development of a quantum cascade laser based explosives detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlysle, Felicity; Nic Daeid, Niamh; Normand, Erwan; McCulloch, Michael

    2012-10-01

    Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) is regularly used in forensic analysis, however the application of high resolution Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy for the detection of explosive materials and explosive precursors has not been fully explored. This project aimed to develop systematically a protocol for the analysis of explosives and precursors using Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and basic data analysis to enable the further development of a quantum cascade laser (QCL) based airport detection system. This paper details the development of the protocol and results of the initial analysis of compounds of interest.

  6. Advanced quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffrey, Evan Robert

    Quantum communication provides several examples of communication protocols which cannot be implemented securely using only classical communication. Currently, the most widely known of these is quantum cryptography, which allows secure key exchange between parties sharing a quantum channel subject to an eavesdropper. This thesis explores and extends the realm of quantum communication. Two new quantum communication protocols are described. The first is a new form of quantum cryptography---relativistic quantum cryptography---which increases communication efficiency by exploiting a relativistic bound on the power of an eavesdropper, in addition to the usual quantum mechanical restrictions intrinsic to quantum cryptography. By doing so, we have observed over 170% improvement in communication efficiency over a similar protocol not utilizing relativity. A second protocol, Quantum Orienteering, allows two cooperating parties to communicate a specific direction in space. This application shows the possibility of using joint measurements, or projections onto an entangled state, in order to extract the maximum useful information from quantum bits. For two-qubit communication, the maximal fidelity of communication using only separable operations is 73.6%, while joint measurements can improve the efficiency to 78.9%. In addition to implementing these protocols, we have improved several resources for quantum communication and quantum computing. Specifically, we have developed improved sources of polarization-entangled photons, a low-loss quantum memory for polarization qubits, and a quantum random number generator. These tools may be applied to a wide variety of future quantum and classical information systems.

  7. Intrusion Detection With Quantum Mechanics: A Photonic Quantum Fence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    computing and quantum key distribution (QKD). Some of the most remarkable examples include quantum teleportation for the non-local transfer of...1 INTRUSION DETECTION WITH QUANTUM MECHANICS: A PHOTONIC QUANTUM FENCE T. S. Humble*, R. S. Bennink, and W. P. Grice Oak Ridge National...use of quantum -mechanically entangled photons for sensing intrusions across a physical perimeter. Our approach to intrusion detection uses the no

  8. The detective quantum efficiency of photon-counting x-ray detectors using cascaded-systems analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, Jesse; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung; Cunningham, Ian A.

    2013-04-15

    Purpose: Single-photon counting (SPC) x-ray imaging has the potential to improve image quality and enable new advanced energy-dependent methods. The purpose of this study is to extend cascaded-systems analyses (CSA) to the description of image quality and the detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of SPC systems. Methods: Point-process theory is used to develop a method of propagating the mean signal and Wiener noise-power spectrum through a thresholding stage (required to identify x-ray interaction events). The new transfer relationships are used to describe the zero-frequency DQE of a hypothetical SPC detector including the effects of stochastic conversion of incident photons to secondary quanta, secondary quantum sinks, additive noise, and threshold level. Theoretical results are compared with Monte Carlo calculations assuming the same detector model. Results: Under certain conditions, the CSA approach can be applied to SPC systems with the additional requirement of propagating the probability density function describing the total number of image-forming quanta through each stage of a cascaded model. Theoretical results including DQE show excellent agreement with Monte Carlo calculations under all conditions considered. Conclusions: Application of the CSA method shows that false counts due to additive electronic noise results in both a nonlinear image signal and increased image noise. There is a window of allowable threshold values to achieve a high DQE that depends on conversion gain, secondary quantum sinks, and additive noise.

  9. Synthetic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, Reginald T.

    2002-10-01

    So far proposed quantum computers use fragile and environmentally sensitive natural quantum systems. Here we explore the new notion that synthetic quantum systems suitable for quantum computation may be fabricated from smart nanostructures using topological excitations of a stochastic neural-type network that can mimic natural quantum systems. These developments are a technological application of process physics which is an information theory of reality in which space and quantum phenomena are emergent, and so indicates the deep origins of quantum phenomena. Analogous complex stochastic dynamical systems have recently been proposed within neurobiology to deal with the emergent complexity of biosystems, particularly the biodynamics of higher brain function. The reasons for analogous discoveries in fundamental physics and neurobiology are discussed.

  10. Efficient fluorescence energy transfer system between fluorescein isothiocyanate and CdTe quantum dots for the detection of silver ions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yueshu; Liu, Liwei; Hu, Siyi; Zou, Peng; Zhang, Jiaqi; Huang, Chen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Sihan; Zhang, Xihe

    2016-03-01

    We report a fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) system in which the fluorescent donor is fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) dye and the fluorescent acceptor is CdTe quantum dot (QDs). Based on FRET quenching theory, we designed a method to detect the concentration of silver ions (Ag(+)). The results revealed a good linear trend over Ag(+) concentrations in the range 0.01-8.96 nmol/L, a range that was larger than with other methods; the quenching coefficient is 0.442. The FRET mechanism and physical mechanisms responsible for dynamic quenching are also discussed.

  11. A nucleic acid strand displacement system for the multiplexed detection of tuberculosis-specific mRNA using quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gliddon, H. D.; Howes, P. D.; Kaforou, M.; Levin, M.; Stevens, M. M.

    2016-05-01

    The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar range using only a standard laboratory plate reader. We demonstrate the utility of our QD-based system for the detection of two genes selected from a microarray-derived tuberculosis-specific gene expression signature. Levels of up- and downregulated gene transcripts comprising this signature can be combined to give a disease risk score, making the signature more amenable for use as a diagnostic marker. Our QD-based approach to detect these transcripts could pave the way for novel diagnostic assays for tuberculosis.The development of rapid, robust and high performance point-of-care diagnostics relies on the advancement and combination of various areas of research. We have developed an assay for the detection of multiple mRNA molecules that combines DNA nanotechnology with fluorescent nanomaterials. The core switching mechanism is toehold-mediated strand displacement. We have used fluorescent quantum dots (QDs) as signal transducers in this assay, as they bring many benefits including bright fluorescence and multiplexing abilities. The resulting assay is capable of multiplexed detection of long RNA targets against a high concentration of background non-target RNA, with high sensitivity and specificity and limits of detection in the nanomolar

  12. Sorting quantum systems efficiently

    PubMed Central

    Ionicioiu, Radu

    2016-01-01

    Measuring the state of a quantum system is a fundamental process in quantum mechanics and plays an essential role in quantum information and quantum technologies. One method to measure a quantum observable is to sort the system in different spatial modes according to the measured value, followed by single-particle detectors on each mode. Examples of quantum sorters are polarizing beam-splitters (PBS) – which direct photons according to their polarization – and Stern-Gerlach devices. Here we propose a general scheme to sort a quantum system according to the value of any d-dimensional degree of freedom, such as spin, orbital angular momentum (OAM), wavelength etc. Our scheme is universal, works at the single-particle level and has a theoretical efficiency of 100%. As an application we design an efficient OAM sorter consisting of a single multi-path interferometer which is suitable for a photonic chip implementation. PMID:27142705

  13. Detective quantum efficiency measured as a function of energy for two full-field digital mammography systems.

    PubMed

    Marshall, N W

    2009-05-07

    This paper presents detective quantum efficiency (DQE) data measured for a range of x-ray beam qualities for two full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems: a caesium iodide (CsI) detector-based unit and a system designed around an amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detector. Four beam qualities were studied for each system, covering mean energies from 17.8 keV to 23.4 keV for the CsI system and 17.8 keV to 24.7 keV for the a-Se unit. These were set using 2, 4, 6 and 7 cm polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) and typical tube voltage and target/filter combinations selected by the automatic exposure control (AEC) program used clinically on these systems. Normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) were calculated from flood images acquired at these beam qualities for a target detector air kerma of 100 microGy. Modulation transfer function (MTF) data were acquired at 28 kV and Mo/Mo target/filter setting. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS results. For comparison, the quantum detective efficiency (QDE) and energy absorption efficiency (EAE) were calculated from tabulated narrow beam spectral data. With regard to detector response, some energy dependence was noted for pixel value plotted against air kerma at the detector. This amounted to a change in the gradient of the detector response of approximately 15% and 30% per keV for the CsI- and a-Se-based systems, respectively. For the DQE results, a reduction in DQE(0) of 22% was found for the CsI-based unit as beam quality changed from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 32 kV Rh/Rh and 7 cm PMMA. For the a-Se system, a change in beam quality from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 34 kV Mo/Rh and 7 cm PMMA led to a reduction in DQE(0) of 8%. Comparing measured data with simple calculations, a reduction in x-ray quantum detection efficiency of 27% was expected for the CsI-based system, while a reduction of 11% was predicted for the a-Se system.

  14. Detective quantum efficiency measured as a function of energy for two full-field digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, N. W.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents detective quantum efficiency (DQE) data measured for a range of x-ray beam qualities for two full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems: a caesium iodide (CsI) detector-based unit and a system designed around an amorphous selenium (a-Se) x-ray detector. Four beam qualities were studied for each system, covering mean energies from 17.8 keV to 23.4 keV for the CsI system and 17.8 keV to 24.7 keV for the a-Se unit. These were set using 2, 4, 6 and 7 cm polymethylmethacralate (PMMA) and typical tube voltage and target/filter combinations selected by the automatic exposure control (AEC) program used clinically on these systems. Normalized noise power spectra (NNPS) were calculated from flood images acquired at these beam qualities for a target detector air kerma of 100 µGy. Modulation transfer function (MTF) data were acquired at 28 kV and Mo/Mo target/filter setting. The DQE was then calculated from the MTF and NNPS results. For comparison, the quantum detective efficiency (QDE) and energy absorption efficiency (EAE) were calculated from tabulated narrow beam spectral data. With regard to detector response, some energy dependence was noted for pixel value plotted against air kerma at the detector. This amounted to a change in the gradient of the detector response of approximately 15% and 30% per keV for the CsI- and a-Se-based systems, respectively. For the DQE results, a reduction in DQE(0) of 22% was found for the CsI-based unit as beam quality changed from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 32 kV Rh/Rh and 7 cm PMMA. For the a-Se system, a change in beam quality from 25 kV Mo/Mo and 2 cm PMMA to 34 kV Mo/Rh and 7 cm PMMA led to a reduction in DQE(0) of 8%. Comparing measured data with simple calculations, a reduction in x-ray quantum detection efficiency of 27% was expected for the CsI-based system, while a reduction of 11% was predicted for the a-Se system.

  15. Quantum system identification.

    PubMed

    Burgarth, Daniel; Yuasa, Kazuya

    2012-02-24

    The aim of quantum system identification is to estimate the ingredients inside a black box, in which some quantum-mechanical unitary process takes place, by just looking at its input-output behavior. Here we establish a basic and general framework for quantum system identification, that allows us to classify how much knowledge about the quantum system is attainable, in principle, from a given experimental setup. We show that controllable closed quantum systems can be estimated up to unitary conjugation. Prior knowledge on some elements of the black box helps the system identification. We present an example in which a Bell measurement is more efficient to identify the system. When the topology of the system is known, the framework enables us to establish a general criterion for the estimability of the coupling constants in its Hamiltonian.

  16. Note: low temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device system with wide pickup coil for detecting small metallic particles.

    PubMed

    Kandori, Akihiko; Ogata, Kuniomi; Kawabata, Ryuzo; Tanimoto, Sayaka; Seki, Yusuke

    2012-07-01

    A one-channel low temperature superconductor superconducting quantum interference device system comprising a second-order axial gradiometer with a sensing area of 10 mm × 190 mm was developed. The gradiometer was mounted in a liquid-helium dewar (450-mm diameter; 975-mm length), with a gap of 12 mm between the pickup coil and the dewar-tail surface. The magnetic field sensitivity was measured to be 16 fT/Hz(1/2) in the white noise regime above 2 Hz. The system was used to measure stainless steel particles of different sizes passing through the sensing area. A 100-μm diameter SUS304 particle was readily detected passing at different positions underneath the large pickup coil by measuring its 1.3-pT magnetic field. Thus, the system was shown to be applicable to quality control of lamination sheet products such as lithium ion batteries.

  17. Quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Gao, Ming; Li, Mo; Zhang, Jian

    2016-08-01

    With the advent of physical unclonable functions (PUFs), PUF-based quantum authentication systems have been proposed for security purposes, and recently, proof-of-principle experiment has been demonstrated. As a further step toward completing the security analysis, we investigate quantum cloning attacks against PUF-based quantum authentication systems and prove that quantum cloning attacks outperform the so-called challenge-estimation attacks. We present the analytical expression of the false-accept probability by use of the corresponding optimal quantum cloning machines and extend the previous results in the literature. In light of these findings, an explicit comparison is made between PUF-based quantum authentication systems and quantum key distribution protocols in the context of cloning attacks. Moreover, from an experimental perspective, a trade-off between the average photon number and the detection efficiency is discussed in detail.

  18. A quantum annealing approach for fault detection and diagnosis of graph-based systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perdomo-Ortiz, A.; Fluegemann, J.; Narasimhan, S.; Biswas, R.; Smelyanskiy, V. N.

    2015-02-01

    Diagnosing the minimal set of faults capable of explaining a set of given observations, e.g., from sensor readouts, is a hard combinatorial optimization problem usually tackled with artificial intelligence techniques. We present the mapping of this combinatorial problem to quadratic unconstrained binary optimization (QUBO), and the experimental results of instances embedded onto a quantum annealing device with 509 quantum bits. Besides being the first time a quantum approach has been proposed for problems in the advanced diagnostics community, to the best of our knowledge this work is also the first research utilizing the route Problem → QUBO → Direct embedding into quantum hardware, where we are able to implement and tackle problem instances with sizes that go beyond previously reported toy-model proof-of-principle quantum annealing implementations; this is a significant leap in the solution of problems via direct-embedding adiabatic quantum optimization. We discuss some of the programmability challenges in the current generation of the quantum device as well as a few possible ways to extend this work to more complex arbitrary network graphs.

  19. Quantum Communication Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-15

    0603048 (2006) [3] Q. Zhang et al, Experimental Quantum Teleportation of a Two-Qubit Composite System, quant-ph/0609129 (2006) [4] G. Y. Xiang et...AFOSR project “ Quantum Communication Systems” University of Oxford and UMK Torun Final Report 15 March 2008 Summary This document...temporal characterization by interference with a local oscillator and the theoretical study of their propagation in lossy quantum channels. Also, their

  20. Size-dependent active effect of cadmium telluride quantum dots on luminol-potassium periodate chemiluminescence system for levodopa detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Cui, Lijuan; Han, Suqin; Hao, Fang

    2015-06-01

    It was found that cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) with different sizes can have a great sensitizing effect on chemiluminescence (CL) emission from luminol-potassium periodate (KIO4) system. Levodopa, a widely prescribed drug in the treatment of Parkinson's disease, could inhibit luminol-KIO4-CdTe QDs CL reaction in alkaline solution. The inhibited CL intensity was proportional to the concentration of levodopa in the range from 8.0 nM to 10.0 μM. The detection limit was 3.8 nM. This method has been successfully applied to determine levodopa in pharmaceutical preparation and human urine and plasma samples with recoveries of 94.1-105.4%. This was the first work for inhibition effect determination of levodopa using a QD-based CL method.

  1. Quantum Detection and Invisibility in Coherent Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Fransson, J.

    2010-04-28

    We address quantum invisibility in the context of electronics in nanoscale quantum structures. In analogy with metamaterials, we use the freedom of design that quantum corrals provide and show that quantum mechanical objects can be hidden inside the corral, with respect to inelastic electron scattering spectroscopy in combination with scanning tunneling microscopy, and we propose a design strategy. A simple illustration of the invisibility is given in terms of an elliptic quantum corral containing a molecule, with a local vibrational mode, at one of the foci. Our work has implications to quantum information technology and presents new tools for nonlocal quantum detection and distinguishing between different molecules.

  2. Quantum hacking on quantum key distribution using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing-Zheng; Kunz-Jacques, Sébastien; Jouguet, Paul; Weedbrook, Christian; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Chen, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2014-03-01

    Imperfect devices in commercial quantum key distribution systems open security loopholes that an eavesdropper may exploit. An example of one such imperfection is the wavelength-dependent coupling ratio of the fiber beam splitter. Utilizing this loophole, the eavesdropper can vary the transmittances of the fiber beam splitter at the receiver's side by inserting lights with wavelengths different from what is normally used. Here, we propose a wavelength attack on a practical continuous-variable quantum key distribution system using homodyne detection. By inserting light pulses at different wavelengths, this attack allows the eavesdropper to bias the shot-noise estimation even if it is done in real time. Based on experimental data, we discuss the feasibility of this attack and suggest a prevention scheme by improving the previously proposed countermeasures.

  3. Compact quantum cascade laser based quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy sensor system for detection of carbon disulfide.

    PubMed

    Waclawek, Johannes P; Moser, Harald; Lendl, Bernhard

    2016-03-21

    A compact gas sensor system based on quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy (QEPAS) employing a continuous wave (CW) distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) operating at 4.59 µm was developed for detection of carbon disulfide (CS2) in air at trace concentration. The influence of water vapor on monitored QEPAS signal was investigated to enable compensation of this dependence by independent moisture sensing. A 1 σ limit of detection of 28 parts per billion by volume (ppbv) for a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was obtained for the CS2 line centered at 2178.69 cm-1 when the gas sample was moisturized with 2.3 vol% H2O. The work reports the suitability of the system for monitoring CS2 with high selectivity and sensitivity, as well as low sample gas volume requirements and fast sensor response for applications such as workplace air and process monitoring at industry.

  4. On Quantum Integrable Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Danilov, Viatcheslav; Nagaitsev, Sergei; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Many quantum integrable systems are obtained using an accelerator physics technique known as Ermakov (or normalized variables) transformation. This technique was used to create classical nonlinear integrable lattices for accelerators and nonlinear integrable plasma traps. Now, all classical results are carried over to a nonrelativistic quantum case. In this paper we have described an extension of the Ermakov-like transformation to the Schroedinger and Pauli equations. It is shown that these newly found transformations create a vast variety of time dependent quantum equations that can be solved in analytic functions, or, at least, can be reduced to time-independent ones.

  5. Spectroscopy system based on a single quantum cascade laser for simultaneous detection of CO and CO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Min; Ye, Qing-Hao; Kan, Rui-Feng; Chen, Bing; Yang, Chen-Guang; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Chen, Xiang; Ruan, Jun; Fan, Xue-Li; Wang, Wei; Hu, Mai; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2016-09-01

    A quantum cascade laser (QCL) based system for simultaneous detection of CO and CO2 is developed. The QCL can scan over two neighboring CO (2055.40 cm-1) and CO2 (2055.16 cm-1) lines with a single current scan. The wavelength modulation spectroscopy (f = 20 kHz) is utilized to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio. A white cell with an effective optical path length of 74 m is used. The calibration of the sensor is performed and minimum detection limits of 1.3 ppb (1 × 10-9) for CO and 0.44 ppm (1 × 10-6) for CO2 are achieved. Project supported by the National Key Scientific Instrument and Equipment Development Project of China (Grnat No. 2014YQ060537), the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2013CB632803), the Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant No. XDA05040102), and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 41405134).

  6. Scheme of thinking quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2009-11-01

    A general approach describing quantum decision procedures is developed. The approach can be applied to quantum information processing, quantum computing, creation of artificial quantum intelligence, as well as to analyzing decision processes of human decision makers. Our basic point is to consider an active quantum system possessing its own strategic state. Processing information by such a system is analogous to the cognitive processes associated to decision making by humans. The algebra of probability operators, associated with the possible options available to the decision maker, plays the role of the algebra of observables in quantum theory of measurements. A scheme is advanced for a practical realization of decision procedures by thinking quantum systems. Such thinking quantum systems can be realized by using spin lattices, systems of magnetic molecules, cold atoms trapped in optical lattices, ensembles of quantum dots, or multilevel atomic systems interacting with electromagnetic field.

  7. Space–time-bounded quantum fields for detection processes

    PubMed Central

    Aguayo, Fernando J.; Jaroszkiewicz, George

    2014-01-01

    We discuss a quantum field detection model comprising two types of detection procedures: maximal detection, where the initial state of the system and detectors undergoes an irreversible evolution, and minimal detection, where the system–detector interaction consists of a small, reversible coupling and posterior maximal detection performed over the detector system. Combined, these detection procedures allow for a time-dependent description of signalling experiments involving yes/no type of questions. A particular minimal detection model, stable in the presence of the vacuum, is presented and studied, successfully reproducing the localization of the state after a detection. PMID:24711717

  8. Quantum Linear Systems Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-02-15

    Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka in Malaysia. The project was then used to partially support a new PhD student, Mr Shanon Vuglar (who is a former...method based on cascade realization of quantum systems is used and a conference and journal paper have been produced. In another approach, a method...based on singular perturbation is used and a conference and journal paper have resulted. This work was extended by the graduate student Shanon Vuglar to

  9. Roadmap on quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumke, Rainer; Lu, Zehuang; Close, John; Robins, Nick; Weis, Antoine; Mukherjee, Manas; Birkl, Gerhard; Hufnagel, Christoph; Amico, Luigi; Boshier, Malcolm G.; Dieckmann, Kai; Li, Wenhui; Killian, Thomas C.

    2016-09-01

    This roadmap bundles fast developing topics in experimental optical quantum sciences, addressing current challenges as well as potential advances in future research. We have focused on three main areas: quantum assisted high precision measurements, quantum information/simulation, and quantum gases. Quantum assisted high precision measurements are discussed in the first three sections, which review optical clocks, atom interferometry, and optical magnetometry. These fields are already successfully utilized in various applied areas. We will discuss approaches to extend this impact even further. In the quantum information/simulation section, we start with the traditionally successful employed systems based on neutral atoms and ions. In addition the marvelous demonstrations of systems suitable for quantum information is not progressing, unsolved challenges remain and will be discussed. We will also review, as an alternative approach, the utilization of hybrid quantum systems based on superconducting quantum devices and ultracold atoms. Novel developments in atomtronics promise unique access in exploring solid-state systems with ultracold gases and are investigated in depth. The sections discussing the continuously fast-developing quantum gases include a review on dipolar heteronuclear diatomic gases, Rydberg gases, and ultracold plasma. Overall, we have accomplished a roadmap of selected areas undergoing rapid progress in quantum optics, highlighting current advances and future challenges. These exciting developments and vast advances will shape the field of quantum optics in the future.

  10. Physical Meaning of the Optimum Measurement Process in Quantum Detection Theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osaki, Masao; Kozuka, Haruhisa; Hirota, Osamu

    1996-01-01

    The optimum measurement processes are represented as the optimum detection operators in the quantum detection theory. The error probability by the optimum detection operators goes beyond the standard quantum limit automatically. However the optimum detection operators are given by pure mathematical descriptions. In order to realize a communication system overcoming the standard quantum limit, we try to give the physical meaning of the optimum detection operators.

  11. Darwinism in quantum systems?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, A.; Toor, A. H.

    2002-03-01

    We investigate the role of quantum mechanical effects in the central stability concept of evolutionary game theory, i.e., an evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS). Using two and three-player symmetric quantum games we show how the presence of quantum phenomenon of entanglement can be crucial to decide the course of evolutionary dynamics in a population of interacting individuals.

  12. Quantum Effects in Biological Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sisir

    2014-07-01

    The debates about the trivial and non-trivial effects in biological systems have drawn much attention during the last decade or so. What might these non-trivial sorts of quantum effects be? There is no consensus so far among the physicists and biologists regarding the meaning of "non-trivial quantum effects". However, there is no doubt about the implications of the challenging research into quantum effects relevant to biology such as coherent excitations of biomolecules and photosynthesis, quantum tunneling of protons, van der Waals forces, ultrafast dynamics through conical intersections, and phonon-assisted electron tunneling as the basis for our sense of smell, environment assisted transport of ions and entanglement in ion channels, role of quantum vacuum in consciousness. Several authors have discussed the non-trivial quantum effects and classified them into four broad categories: (a) Quantum life principle; (b) Quantum computing in the brain; (c) Quantum computing in genetics; and (d) Quantum consciousness. First, I will review the above developments. I will then discuss in detail the ion transport in the ion channel and the relevance of quantum theory in brain function. The ion transport in the ion channel plays a key role in information processing by the brain.

  13. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, William Hvidtfelt Padkær; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-03

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 10(7)) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry-Perot resonator detects these modes' motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to -2.4 dB (-3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry-Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  14. Multimode optomechanical system in the quantum regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hvidtfelt Padkær Nielsen, William; Tsaturyan, Yeghishe; Møller, Christoffer Bo; Polzik, Eugene S.; Schliesser, Albert

    2017-01-01

    We realize a simple and robust optomechanical system with a multitude of long-lived (Q > 107) mechanical modes in a phononic-bandgap shielded membrane resonator. An optical mode of a compact Fabry–Perot resonator detects these modes’ motion with a measurement rate (96 kHz) that exceeds the mechanical decoherence rates already at moderate cryogenic temperatures (10 K). Reaching this quantum regime entails, inter alia, quantum measurement backaction exceeding thermal forces and thus strong optomechanical quantum correlations. In particular, we observe ponderomotive squeezing of the output light mediated by a multitude of mechanical resonator modes, with quantum noise suppression up to ‑2.4 dB (‑3.6 dB if corrected for detection losses) and bandwidths ≲90 kHz. The multimode nature of the membrane and Fabry–Perot resonators will allow multimode entanglement involving electromagnetic, mechanical, and spin degrees of freedom.

  15. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    PubMed Central

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field. PMID:25737558

  16. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-01

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field.

  17. Quantum technologies with hybrid systems.

    PubMed

    Kurizki, Gershon; Bertet, Patrice; Kubo, Yuimaru; Mølmer, Klaus; Petrosyan, David; Rabl, Peter; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2015-03-31

    An extensively pursued current direction of research in physics aims at the development of practical technologies that exploit the effects of quantum mechanics. As part of this ongoing effort, devices for quantum information processing, secure communication, and high-precision sensing are being implemented with diverse systems, ranging from photons, atoms, and spins to mesoscopic superconducting and nanomechanical structures. Their physical properties make some of these systems better suited than others for specific tasks; thus, photons are well suited for transmitting quantum information, weakly interacting spins can serve as long-lived quantum memories, and superconducting elements can rapidly process information encoded in their quantum states. A central goal of the envisaged quantum technologies is to develop devices that can simultaneously perform several of these tasks, namely, reliably store, process, and transmit quantum information. Hybrid quantum systems composed of different physical components with complementary functionalities may provide precisely such multitasking capabilities. This article reviews some of the driving theoretical ideas and first experimental realizations of hybrid quantum systems and the opportunities and challenges they present and offers a glance at the near- and long-term perspectives of this fascinating and rapidly expanding field.

  18. Decoherence in infinite quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, Philippe; Hellmich, Mario

    2012-09-01

    We review and discuss a notion of decoherence formulated in the algebraic framework of quantum physics. Besides presenting some sufficient conditions for the appearance of decoherence in the case of Markovian time evolutions we provide an overview over possible decoherence scenarios. The framework for decoherence we establish is sufficiently general to accommodate quantum systems with infinitely many degrees of freedom.

  19. Remote Detection via Quantum Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scully, Marlan

    2015-03-01

    There is nothing so practical as basic science. As a case in point, the compelling need for standoff detection of hazardous gases and vapor indicators of explosives has motivated the development of remotely pumped, scheme(s) which produce radiation in the backward direction [Science, 331(6016), 442-445 (2011); PRX, 3, 041001 (2013)]. Moving from conceptualization to theoretical analysis and experimental verification, we demonstrate that high gain can be achieved in air. Backward air lasing provides new possibilities for remote detection [Laser Phys. Lett., 8(10), 736-741 (2011)]. We gratefully acknowledge support of the National Science Foundation Grants PHY-1241032 and EEC-0540832 and the Robert A. Welch Foundation (Award A-1261).

  20. Data detection algorithms for multiplexed quantum dot encoding.

    PubMed

    Goss, Kelly C; Messier, Geoff G; Potter, Mike E

    2012-02-27

    A group of quantum dots can be designed to have a unique spectral emission by varying the size of the quantum dots (wavelength) and number of quantum dots (intensity). This technique has been previously proposed for biological tags and object identification. The potential of this system lies in the ability to have a large number of distinguishable wavelengths and intensity levels. This paper presents a communications system model for MxQDs including the interference between neighbouring QD colours and detector noise. An analytical model of the signal-to-noise ratio of a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) spectrometer is presented and confirmed with experimental results. We then apply a communications system perspective and propose data detection algorithms that increase the readability of the quantum dots tags. It is demonstrated that multiplexed quantum dot barcodes can be read with 99.7% accuracy using the proposed data detection algorithms in a system with 6 colours and 6 intensity values resulting in 46,655 unique spectral codes.

  1. Efficient simulation of open quantum system in duality quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-11-01

    Practical quantum systems are open systems due to interactions with their environment. Understanding the evolution of open systems dynamics is important for quantum noise processes , designing quantum error correcting codes, and performing simulations of open quantum systems. Here we proposed an efficient quantum algorithm for simulating the evolution of an open quantum system on a duality quantum computer. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality algorithm, the time evolution of open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally realized in duality quantum computing. Compared to the Lloyd's quantum algorithm [Science.273, 1073(1996)] , the dependence on the dimension of the open quantum system in our algorithm is decreased. Moreover, our algorithm uses a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, exponentially improving the performance on the precision compared with existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations.

  2. Quantum non-Markovianity: characterization, quantification and detection.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Ángel; Huelga, Susana F; Plenio, Martin B

    2014-09-01

    We present a comprehensive and up-to-date review of the concept of quantum non-Markovianity, a central theme in the theory of open quantum systems. We introduce the concept of a quantum Markovian process as a generalization of the classical definition of Markovianity via the so-called divisibility property and relate this notion to the intuitive idea that links non-Markovianity with the persistence of memory effects. A detailed comparison with other definitions presented in the literature is provided. We then discuss several existing proposals to quantify the degree of non-Markovianity of quantum dynamics and to witness non-Markovian behavior, the latter providing sufficient conditions to detect deviations from strict Markovianity. Finally, we conclude by enumerating some timely open problems in the field and provide an outlook on possible research directions.

  3. Concentration and detection of bacteria in virtual environmental samples based on non-immunomagnetic separation and quantum dots by using a laboratory-made system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Zhi; Wu, Taihu; Chen, Feng; Du, Yaohua; Gu, Biao; Li, Chao; Yang, Zijian

    2012-03-01

    This study investigated a method that simultaneously detects three bacteria, Salmonella typhimurium, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus aureus via an approach that combines un-immunized magnetic nanoparticles for the enrichment and antibody-conjugated quantum dots (QDs) as fluorescence markers, by using a laboratory-made system. In the enrichment procedure, the un-immunized superparamagnetic polymer nanoparticles and the three bacteria formed "beadcell" complex. Magnetic nanoparticles with different size were used and some interferents were added into the bacteria suspension respectively to check the influence on concentration efficiency. In the immuno-fluorescence labeling procedure, QDs with different emission wavelenghs were immobilized with antibody. Antibody conjugated QDs capture the bacteria selectively and specifically so that "sandwich" complex were formed. The suspension of the labeled bacteria was trickled onto a microporous membrane. A 450nm semiconductor laser was used as a part of the laboratory-made system to excite the QDs. Three PMT detectors were utilized to detect the fluorescence intensity. These un-immunized magnetic nanoparticles can be applied in nonspecific separation and enrichment of bacteria from environmental samples, and this method, of which the detection procedures are completed within 2 h, can be applied to the cost-effective and rapid detecting of bacterial contamination.

  4. Stochastic quantum Zeno-based detection of noise correlations

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Matthias M.; Gherardini, Stefano; Caruso, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    A system under constant observation is practically freezed to the measurement subspace. If the system driving is a random classical field, the survival probability of the system in the subspace becomes a random variable described by the Stochastic Quantum Zeno Dynamics (SQZD) formalism. Here, we study the time and ensemble average of this random survival probability and demonstrate how time correlations in the noisy environment determine whether the two averages do coincide or not. These environment time correlations can potentially generate non-Markovian dynamics of the quantum system depending on the structure and energy scale of the system Hamiltonian. We thus propose a way to detect time correlations of the environment by coupling a quantum probe system to it and observing the survival probability of the quantum probe in a measurement subspace. This will further contribute to the development of new schemes for quantum sensing technologies, where nanodevices may be exploited to image external structures or biological molecules via the surface field they generate. PMID:27941889

  5. Stochastic quantum Zeno-based detection of noise correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Matthias M.; Gherardini, Stefano; Caruso, Filippo

    2016-12-01

    A system under constant observation is practically freezed to the measurement subspace. If the system driving is a random classical field, the survival probability of the system in the subspace becomes a random variable described by the Stochastic Quantum Zeno Dynamics (SQZD) formalism. Here, we study the time and ensemble average of this random survival probability and demonstrate how time correlations in the noisy environment determine whether the two averages do coincide or not. These environment time correlations can potentially generate non-Markovian dynamics of the quantum system depending on the structure and energy scale of the system Hamiltonian. We thus propose a way to detect time correlations of the environment by coupling a quantum probe system to it and observing the survival probability of the quantum probe in a measurement subspace. This will further contribute to the development of new schemes for quantum sensing technologies, where nanodevices may be exploited to image external structures or biological molecules via the surface field they generate.

  6. Quantum structures for multiband photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2006-06-01

    The work describes multiband photon detectors based on semiconductor micro-and nano-structures. The devices considered include quantum dot, homojunction, and heterojunction structures. In the quantum dot structures, transitions are from one state to another, while free carrier absorption and internal photoemission play the dominant role in homo or heterojunction detectors. Quantum dots-in-a-well (DWELL) detectors can tailor the response wavelength by varying the size of the well. A tunnelling quantum dot infrared photodetector (T-QDIP) could operate at room temperature by blocking the dark current except in the case of resonance. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunnelling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunnelling barriers placed in the structure. A two-colour infrared detector with photoresponse peaks at ˜6 and ˜17 μm at room temperature will be discussed. A homojunction or heterojunction interfacial workfunction internal photoemission (HIWIP or HEIWIP) infrared detector, formed by a doped emitter layer, and an intrinsic layer acting as the barrier followed by another highly doped contact layer, can detect near infrared (NIR) photons due to interband transitions and mid/far infrared (MIR/FIR) radiation due to intraband transitions. The threshold wavelength of the interband response depends on the band gap of the barrier material, and the MIR/FIR response due to intraband transitions can be tailored by adjusting the band offset between the emitter and the barrier. GaAs/AlGaAs will provide NIR and MIR/FIR dual band response, and with GaN/AlGaN structures the detection capability can be extended into the ultraviolet region. These detectors are useful in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  7. Quantum structures for multiband photon detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perera, A. G. U.

    2005-09-01

    The work describes multiband photon detectors based on semiconductor micro- and nano-structures. The devices considered include quantum dot, homojunction, and heterojunction structures. In the quantum dot structures, transitions are from one state to another, while free carrier absorption and internal photoemission play the dominant role in homo or heterojunction detectors. Quantum Dots-in-a-Well (DWELL) detectors can tailor the response wavelength by varying the size of the well. A tunneling Quantum Dot Infrared Photodetector (T-QDIP) could operate at room temperature by blocking the dark current except in the case of resonance. Photoexcited carriers are selectively collected from InGaAs quantum dots by resonant tunneling, while the dark current is blocked by AlGaAs/InGaAs tunneling barriers placed in the structure. A two-color infrared detector with photoresponse peaks at ~6 and ~17 μm at room temperature will be discussed. A Homojunction or HEterojunction Interfacial Workfunction Internal Photoemission (HIWIP or HEIWIP) infrared detector, formed by a doped emitter layer, and an intrinsic layer acting as the barrier followed by another highly doped contact layer, can detect near infrared (NIR) photons due to interband transitions and mid/far infrared (MIR/FIR) radiation due to intraband transitions. The threshold wavelength of the interband response depends on the band gap of the barrier material, and the MIR/FIR response due to intraband transitions can be tailored by adjusting the band offset between the emitter and the barrier. GaAs/AlGaAs will provide NIR and MIR/FIR dual band response, and with GaN/AlGaN structures the detection capability can be extended into the ultraviolet region. These detectors are useful in numerous applications such as environmental monitoring, medical diagnosis, battlefield-imaging, space astronomy applications, mine detection, and remote-sensing.

  8. Preconditioned quantum linear system algorithm.

    PubMed

    Clader, B D; Jacobs, B C; Sprouse, C R

    2013-06-21

    We describe a quantum algorithm that generalizes the quantum linear system algorithm [Harrow et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 150502 (2009)] to arbitrary problem specifications. We develop a state preparation routine that can initialize generic states, show how simple ancilla measurements can be used to calculate many quantities of interest, and integrate a quantum-compatible preconditioner that greatly expands the number of problems that can achieve exponential speedup over classical linear systems solvers. To demonstrate the algorithm's applicability, we show how it can be used to compute the electromagnetic scattering cross section of an arbitrary target exponentially faster than the best classical algorithm.

  9. Mechanism for quantum speedup in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hai-Bin; Yang, W. L.; An, Jun-Hong; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2016-02-01

    The quantum speed limit (QSL) time for open system characterizes the most efficient response of the system to the environmental influences. Previous results showed that the non-Markovianity governs the quantum speedup. Via studying the dynamics of a dissipative two-level system, we reveal that the non-Markovian effect is only the dynamical way of the quantum speedup, while the formation of the system-environment bound states is the essential reason for the quantum speedup. Our attribution of the quantum speedup to the energy-spectrum character can supply another vital path for experiments when the quantum speedup shows up without any dynamical calculations. The potential experimental observation of our quantum speedup mechanism in the circuit QED system is discussed. Our results may be of both theoretical and experimental interest in exploring the ultimate QSL in realistic environments, and may open new perspectives for devising active quantum speedup devices.

  10. Screening in quantum charged systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Ph. A.; Gruber, Ch.

    1984-07-01

    For stationary states of quantum charged systems in ν dimensions, ν>=2, it is proven that the reduced-density matrices satisfy a set of sum rules whenever the clustering is faster than |x|-(ν+l). These sum rules, describing the screening properties, are analogous to those previously derived for classical systems. For neutral quantum fluids, it is shown that the clustering cannot be faster than the decay of the force.

  11. Colloquium: Non-Markovian dynamics in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breuer, Heinz-Peter; Laine, Elsi-Mari; Piilo, Jyrki; Vacchini, Bassano

    2016-04-01

    The dynamical behavior of open quantum systems plays a key role in many applications of quantum mechanics, examples ranging from fundamental problems, such as the environment-induced decay of quantum coherence and relaxation in many-body systems, to applications in condensed matter theory, quantum transport, quantum chemistry, and quantum information. In close analogy to a classical Markovian stochastic process, the interaction of an open quantum system with a noisy environment is often modeled phenomenologically by means of a dynamical semigroup with a corresponding time-independent generator in Lindblad form, which describes a memoryless dynamics of the open system typically leading to an irreversible loss of characteristic quantum features. However, in many applications open systems exhibit pronounced memory effects and a revival of genuine quantum properties such as quantum coherence, correlations, and entanglement. Here recent theoretical results on the rich non-Markovian quantum dynamics of open systems are discussed, paying particular attention to the rigorous mathematical definition, to the physical interpretation and classification, as well as to the quantification of quantum memory effects. The general theory is illustrated by a series of physical examples. The analysis reveals that memory effects of the open system dynamics reflect characteristic features of the environment which opens a new perspective for applications, namely, to exploit a small open system as a quantum probe signifying nontrivial features of the environment it is interacting with. This Colloquium further explores the various physical sources of non-Markovian quantum dynamics, such as structured environmental spectral densities, nonlocal correlations between environmental degrees of freedom, and correlations in the initial system-environment state, in addition to developing schemes for their local detection. Recent experiments addressing the detection, quantification, and control of

  12. Ratiometric Quantum Dot-Ligand System Made by Phase Transfer for Visual Detection of Double-Stranded DNA and Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuqian; Ye, Mingfu; Ge, Qinyu; Qu, Xiaojun; Guo, Qingsheng; Hu, Xianyun; Sun, Qingjiang

    2016-02-02

    We have developed a proof-of-concept quantum dot-ligand (QD-L) system for visual selective detection of nucleic acids, in combination with a ratiometric fluorescence technique. This system comprises a dual-emission QDs nanohybrid formed by embedding a red-emission QD (rQD) in a silica nanoparticle and electrostatically assembling green-emission QDs (gQDs) onto the silica surface, as the signal displaying unit, and a hydrophobic compound, dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz), attached onto the gQDs surface via phase transfer, as the ligand as well as fluorescence quencher of gQDs. This system is successfully used for quantification of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Because of its avid binding with dppz, dsDNA can break up the QD-L system, displacing the dppz ligand from the gQDs surface and restoring the gQDs emission. Since the red emission of embedded rQDs stays constant, variations of the dual-emission intensity ratios display continuous color changes from orange to bright green, which can be clearly observed by the naked eye. More importantly, this system is advantageous in terms of specificity over a QD ionic conjugate, because the electrical neutrality of dppz excludes its nonspecific electrostatic association with dsDNA. The QD-L system also is capable of detecting single-nucleotide polymorphism, exhibiting sequence-specific ratiometric fluorescence as a QD-bioconjugate does, but possessing the obvious advantage in terms of low cost, with the avoidance of modification, labeling, and purification processes. Therefore, the QD-L system provides an extremely simple but general strategy for detecting nucleic acids in a facile, sensitive, and specific manner.

  13. Quantum Communications Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-21

    X.- M . Jin, B.J. Smith, M.B. Plenio , and I.A. Walmsley, Mapping coherence in measurement via full quantum tomog- raphy of a hybrid optical detector...K. C. Lee, B . J. Sussman, M . R. Sprague, P. Michelberger,K. F. Reim,J. Nunn, N. K. Lang- ford,P. J. Bustard, D. Jaksch, and I. A. Walmsley...Macroscopic non-classical states and tera- hertz quantum processing in room-temperature diamond, Nature Photonics 6, 41 (2011) [15] K. C. Lee, M . R. Sprague, B

  14. Single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases: a review of current progress.

    PubMed

    Ott, Herwig

    2016-05-01

    The recent advances in single atom detection and manipulation in experiments with ultracold quantum gases are reviewed. The discussion starts with the basic principles of trapping, cooling and detecting single ions and atoms. The realization of single atom detection in ultracold quantum gases is presented in detail and the employed methods, which are based on light scattering, electron scattering, field ionization and direct neutral particle detection are discussed. The microscopic coherent manipulation of single atoms in a quantum gas is also covered. Various examples are given in order to highlight the power of these approaches to study many-body quantum systems.

  15. Preparation and detection of magnetic quantum phases in optical superlattices.

    PubMed

    Rey, A M; Gritsev, V; Bloch, I; Demler, E; Lukin, M D

    2007-10-05

    We describe a novel approach to prepare, detect, and characterize magnetic quantum phases in ultracold spinor atoms loaded in optical superlattices. Our technique makes use of singlet-triplet spin manipulations in an array of isolated double-well potentials in analogy to recently demonstrated control in quantum dots. We also discuss the many-body singlet-triplet spin dynamics arising from coherent coupling between nearest neighbor double wells and derive an effective description for such systems. We use it to study the generation of complex magnetic states by adiabatic and nonequilibrium dynamics.

  16. Detecting the Kondo screening cloud around a quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Affleck, I; Simon, P

    2001-03-26

    A fundamental prediction of scaling theories of the Kondo effect is the screening of an impurity spin by a cloud of electrons spread out over a mesoscopic distance. This cloud has never been observed experimentally. Recently, aspects of the Kondo effect have been observed in experiments on quantum dots embedded in quantum wires. Since the length of the wire may be of order the size of the screening cloud, such systems provide an ideal opportunity to observe it. We point out that persistent current measurements in a closed ring provide a conceptually simple way of detecting this fundamental length scale.

  17. Protein microarrays and quantum dot probes for early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Zajac, Aleksandra; Song, Dansheng; Qian, Wei; Zhukov, Tatyana

    2007-08-01

    We describe here a novel approach for detection of cancer markers using quantum dot protein microarrays. Both relatively new technologies; quantum dots and protein microarrays, offer very unique features that together allow detection of cancer markers in biological specimens (serum, plasma, body fluids) at pg/ml concentration. Quantum dots offer remarkable photostability and brightness. They do not exhibit photobleaching common to organic fluorophores. Moreover, the high emission amplitude for QDs results in a marked improvement in the signal to noise ratio of the final image. Protein microarrays allow highly parallel quantitation of specific proteins in a rapid, low-cost and low sample volume format. Furthermore the multiplexed assay enables detection of many proteins at once in one sample, making it a powerful tool for biomarker analysis and early cancer diagnostics. In a series of multiplexing experiments we investigated ability of the platform to detect six different cytokines in protein solution. We were able to detect TNF-alpha, IL-8, IL-6, MIP-1beta, IL-13 and IL-1beta down to picomolar concentration, demonstrating high sensitivity of the investigated detection system. We have also constructed and investigated two different models of quantum dot probes. One by conjugation of nanocrystals to antibody specific to the selected marker--IL-10, and the second by use of streptavidin coated quantum dots and biotinylated detector antibody. Comparison of those two models showed better performance of streptavidin QD-biotinylated detector antibody model. Data quantitated using custom designed computer program (CDAS) show that proposed methodology allows monitoring of changes in biomarker concentration in physiological range.

  18. Quantum dynamics of nonlinear cavity systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, Paul David

    In this work we investigate the quantum dynamics of three different configurations of nonlinear cavity systems. We begin by carrying out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector comprising a SQUID with a mechanically compliant loop segment. The SQUID is approximated by a nonlinear current-dependent inductor, inducing an external flux tunable nonlinear Duffing term in the cavity equation of motion. Expressions are derived for the detector signal and noise response where it is found that a soft-spring Duffing self-interaction enables a closer approach to the displacement detection standard quantum limit, as well as cooling closer to the ground state. Next, we consider the use of a superconducting transmission line formed from an array of dc-SQUIDs for investigating analogue Hawking radiation. We will show that biasing the array with a space-time varying flux modifies the propagation velocity of the transmission line, leading to an effective metric with a horizon. As a fundamentally quantum mechanical device, this setup allows for investigations of quantum effects such as backreaction and analogue space-time fluctuations on the Hawking process. Finally, we investigate a quantum parametric amplifier with dynamical pump mode, viewed as a zero-dimensional model of Hawking radiation from an evaporating black hole. The conditions are derived under which the spectrum of particles generated from vacuum fluctuations deviates from the thermal spectrum predicted for the conventional parametric amplifier. We find that significant deviation occurs once the pump mode (black hole) has released nearly half of its initial energy in the signal (Hawking radiation) and idler (in-falling particle) modes. As a model of black hole dynamics, this finding lends support to the view that late-time Hawking radiation contains information about the quantum state of the black hole and is entangled with the black hole's quantum

  19. Active Stand-off Detection of Gas Leaks Using a Short Range Hard-target Backscatter Differential Optical Absorption System Based on a Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Castillo, Paulo; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2016-06-01

    Fugitive gas emissions from agricultural or industrial plants and gas pipelines are an important environmental concern as they can contribute to the global increase of greenhouse gas concentration. Moreover, they are also a security and safety concern because of possible risk of fire/explosion or toxicity. This study presents gas concentration measurements using a quantum cascade laser open path system (QCLOPS). The system retrieves the pathaveraged concentration of N2O and CH4 by collecting the backscattered light from a scattering target. The gas concentration measurements have a high temporal resolution (68 ms) and are achieved at sufficient range (up to 40 m, ~ 130 feet) with a detection limit of 2.6 ppm CH4 and 0.4 ppm for N2O. Given these characteristics, this system is promising for mobile/multidirectional remote detection and evaluation of gas leaks. The instrument is monostatic with a tunable QCL emitting at ~ 7.7 μm wavelength range. The backscattered radiation is collected by a Newtonian telescope and focused on an infrared light detector. Puffs of N2O and CH4 are released along the optical path to simulate a gas leak. The measured absorption spectrum is obtained using the thermal intra-pulse frequency chirped DFB QCL and is analyzed to obtain path averaged gas concentrations.

  20. Quantum walk public-key cryptographic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou, C.; Rodrigues, J.; Mateus, P.; Paunković, N.; Souto, A.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum Cryptography is a rapidly developing field of research that benefits from the properties of Quantum Mechanics in performing cryptographic tasks. Quantum walks are a powerful model for quantum computation and very promising for quantum information processing. In this paper, we present a quantum public-key cryptographic system based on quantum walks. In particular, in the proposed protocol the public-key is given by a quantum state generated by performing a quantum walk. We show that the protocol is secure and analyze the complexity of public key generation and encryption/decryption procedures.

  1. Quantum state readout of individual quantum dots by electrostatic force detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyahara, Yoichi; Roy-Gobeil, Antoine; Grutter, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Electric charge detection by atomic force microscopy (AFM) with single-electron resolution (e-EFM) is a promising way to investigate the electronic level structure of individual quantum dots (QDs). The oscillating AFM tip modulates the energy of the QDs, causing single electrons to tunnel between QDs and an electrode. The resulting oscillating electrostatic force changes the resonant frequency and damping of the AFM cantilever, enabling electrometry with a single-electron sensitivity. Quantitative electronic level spectroscopy is possible by sweeping the bias voltage. Charge stability diagram can be obtained by scanning the AFM tip around the QD. e-EFM technique enables to investigate individual colloidal nanoparticles and self-assembled QDs without nanoscale electrodes. e-EFM is a quantum electromechanical system where the back-action of a tunneling electron is detected by AFM; it can also be considered as a mechanical analog of admittance spectroscopy with a radio frequency resonator, which is emerging as a promising tool for quantum state readout for quantum computing. In combination with the topography imaging capability of the AFM, e-EFM is a powerful tool for investigating new nanoscale material systems which can be used as quantum bits.

  2. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-01

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d3) in contrast to O(d4) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  3. Duality quantum algorithm efficiently simulates open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Wei, Shi-Jie; Ruan, Dong; Long, Gui-Lu

    2016-07-28

    Because of inevitable coupling with the environment, nearly all practical quantum systems are open system, where the evolution is not necessarily unitary. In this paper, we propose a duality quantum algorithm for simulating Hamiltonian evolution of an open quantum system. In contrast to unitary evolution in a usual quantum computer, the evolution operator in a duality quantum computer is a linear combination of unitary operators. In this duality quantum algorithm, the time evolution of the open quantum system is realized by using Kraus operators which is naturally implemented in duality quantum computer. This duality quantum algorithm has two distinct advantages compared to existing quantum simulation algorithms with unitary evolution operations. Firstly, the query complexity of the algorithm is O(d(3)) in contrast to O(d(4)) in existing unitary simulation algorithm, where d is the dimension of the open quantum system. Secondly, By using a truncated Taylor series of the evolution operators, this duality quantum algorithm provides an exponential improvement in precision compared with previous unitary simulation algorithm.

  4. Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy and detection of quantum fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Wen; Liu, Ren-Bao

    2014-04-15

    Central spin decoherence is useful for detecting many-body physics in environments and moreover, the spin echo control can remove the effects of static thermal fluctuations so that the quantum fluctuations are revealed. The central spin decoherence approach, however, is feasible only in some special configurations and often requires uniform coupling between the central spin and individual spins in the baths, which are very challenging in experiments. Here, by making analogue between central spin decoherence and depolarization of photons, we propose a scheme of Faraday rotation echo spectroscopy (FRES) for studying quantum fluctuations in interacting spin systems. The echo control of the photon polarization is realized by flipping the polarization with a birefringence crystal. The FRES, similar to spin echo in magnetic resonance spectroscopy, can suppress the effects of the static magnetic fluctuations and therefore reveal dynamical magnetic fluctuations. We apply the scheme to a rare-earth compound LiHoF4 and calculate the echo signal, which is related to the quantum fluctuations of the system. We observe enhanced signals at the phase boundary. The FRES should be useful for studying quantum fluctuations in a broad range of spin systems, including cold atoms, quantum dots, solid-state impurities, and transparent magnetic materials.

  5. Quantum dynamics in open quantum-classical systems.

    PubMed

    Kapral, Raymond

    2015-02-25

    Often quantum systems are not isolated and interactions with their environments must be taken into account. In such open quantum systems these environmental interactions can lead to decoherence and dissipation, which have a marked influence on the properties of the quantum system. In many instances the environment is well-approximated by classical mechanics, so that one is led to consider the dynamics of open quantum-classical systems. Since a full quantum dynamical description of large many-body systems is not currently feasible, mixed quantum-classical methods can provide accurate and computationally tractable ways to follow the dynamics of both the system and its environment. This review focuses on quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, one of several quantum-classical descriptions, and discusses the problems that arise when one attempts to combine quantum and classical mechanics, coherence and decoherence in quantum-classical systems, nonadiabatic dynamics, surface-hopping and mean-field theories and their relation to quantum-classical Liouville dynamics, as well as methods for simulating the dynamics.

  6. Quantum energy teleportation in a quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Yusa, Go; Izumida, Wataru; Hotta, Masahiro

    2011-09-15

    We propose an experimental method for a quantum protocol termed quantum energy teleportation (QET), which allows energy transportation to a remote location without physical carriers. Using a quantum Hall system as a realistic model, we discuss the physical significance of QET and estimate the order of energy gain using reasonable experimental parameters.

  7. Quantum variance: A measure of quantum coherence and quantum correlations for many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frérot, Irénée; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental common trait of quantum phenomena, from the interference of matter waves to quantum degeneracy of identical particles. Despite its importance, estimating and measuring quantum coherence in generic, mixed many-body quantum states remains a formidable challenge, with fundamental implications in areas as broad as quantum condensed matter, quantum information, quantum metrology, and quantum biology. Here, we provide a quantitative definition of the variance of quantum coherent fluctuations (the quantum variance) of any observable on generic quantum states. The quantum variance generalizes the concept of thermal de Broglie wavelength (for the position of a free quantum particle) to the space of eigenvalues of any observable, quantifying the degree of coherent delocalization in that space. The quantum variance is generically measurable and computable as the difference between the static fluctuations and the static susceptibility of the observable; despite its simplicity, it is found to provide a tight lower bound to most widely accepted estimators of "quantumness" of observables (both as a feature as well as a resource), such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information and the quantum Fisher information. When considering bipartite fluctuations in an extended quantum system, the quantum variance expresses genuine quantum correlations among the two parts. In the case of many-body systems, it is found to obey an area law at finite temperature, extending therefore area laws of entanglement and quantum fluctuations of pure states to the mixed-state context. Hence the quantum variance paves the way to the measurement of macroscopic quantum coherence and quantum correlations in most complex quantum systems.

  8. Noninvasive detection of charge rearrangement in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fricke, C.; Rogge, M. C.; Harke, B.; Reinwald, M.; Wegscheider, W.; Hohls, F.; Haug, R. J.

    2007-04-01

    We demonstrate new results on electron redistribution on a single quantum dot caused by magnetic field. A quantum point contact is used to detect changes in the quantum dot charge. We are able to measure both the change of the quantum dot charge and also changes of the electron configuration at constant number of electrons on the quantum dot. These features are used to exploit the quantum dot in a high magnetic field where transport through the quantum dot displays the effects of Landau shells and spin blockade.

  9. Quantum limited heterodyne detection of spin noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cronenberger, S.; Scalbert, D.

    2016-09-01

    Spin noise spectroscopy is a powerful technique for studying spin relaxation in semiconductors. In this article, we propose an extension of this technique based on optical heterodyne detection of spin noise, which provides several key advantages compared to conventional spin noise spectroscopy: detection of high frequency spin noise not limited by detector bandwidth or sampling rates of digitizers, quantum limited sensitivity even in case of very weak probe power, and possible amplification of the spin noise signal. Heterodyne detection of spin noise is demonstrated on insulating n-doped GaAs. From measurements of spin noise spectra up to 0.4 Tesla, we determined the distribution of g-factors, Δg/g = 0.49%.

  10. Quantum systems under frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Silveri, M P; Tuorila, J A; Thuneberg, E V; Paraoanu, G S

    2017-05-01

    We review the physical phenomena that arise when quantum mechanical energy levels are modulated in time. The dynamics resulting from changes in the transition frequency is a problem studied since the early days of quantum mechanics. It has been of constant interest both experimentally and theoretically since, with the simple two-state model providing an inexhaustible source of novel concepts. When the transition frequency of a quantum system is modulated, several phenomena can be observed, such as Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference, motional averaging and narrowing, and the formation of dressed states with the appearance of sidebands in the spectrum. Adiabatic changes result in the accumulation of geometric phases, which can be used to create topological states. In recent years, an exquisite experimental control in the time domain was gained through the parameters entering the Hamiltonian, and high-fidelity readout schemes allowed the state of the system to be monitored non-destructively. These developments were made in the field of quantum devices, especially in superconducting qubits, as a well as in atomic physics, in particular in ultracold gases. As a result of these advances, it became possible to demonstrate many of the fundamental effects that arise in a quantum system when its transition frequencies are modulated. The purpose of this review is to present some of these developments, from two-state atoms and harmonic oscillators to multilevel and many-particle systems.

  11. Quantum Entanglement and Quantum Discord in Gaussian Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2011-10-03

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable quantum entanglement and quantum discord for a system consisting of two noninteracting modes embedded in a thermal environment. Entanglement and discord are used to quantify the quantum correlations of the system. For all values of the temperature of the thermal reservoir, an initial separable Gaussian state remains separable for all times. In the case of an entangled initial Gaussian state, entanglement suppression (entanglement sudden death) takes place for non-zero temperatures of the environment. Only for a zero temperature of the thermal bath the initial entangled state remains entangled for finite times. We analyze the time evolution of the Gaussian quantum discord, which is a measure of all quantum correlations in the bipartite state, including entanglement, and show that quantum discord decays asymptotically in time under the effect of the thermal bath.

  12. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-01-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions. PMID:26310929

  13. Surface Plasmon Enhanced Sensitive Detection for Possible Signature of Majorana Fermions via a Hybrid Semiconductor Quantum Dot-Metal Nanoparticle System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Jun; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2015-08-01

    In the present work, we theoretically propose an optical scheme to detect the possible signature of Majorana fermions via the optical pump-probe spectroscopy, which is very different from the current tunneling measurement based on electrical methods. The scheme consists of a metal nanoparticle and a semiconductor quantum dot coupled to a hybrid semiconductor/superconductor heterostructures. The results show that the probe absorption spectrum of the quantum dot presents a distinct splitting due to the existence of Majorana fermions. Owing to surface plasmon enhanced effect, this splitting will be more obvious, which makes Majorana fermions more easy to be detectable. The technique proposed here open the door for new applications ranging from robust manipulation of Majorana fermions to quantum information processing based on Majorana fermions.

  14. Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, Aurelian

    2008-01-24

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, the master equation for two independent harmonic oscillators interacting with an environment is solved in the asymptotic long-time regime. Using the Peres-Simon necessary and sufficient condition for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that the two non-interacting systems become asymptotically entangled for certain environments, so that in the long-time regime they manifest non-local quantum correlations. We calculate also the logarithmic negativity characterizing the degree of entanglement of the asymptotic state.

  15. Bioresponsive Release System for Visual Fluorescence Detection of Carcinoembryonic Antigen from Mesoporous Silica Nanocontainers Mediated Optical Color on Quantum Dot-Enzyme-Impregnated Paper.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhenli; Shu, Jian; Tang, Dianping

    2017-04-12

    An all-in-one paper-based analytical device (PAD) was successfully developed for visual fluorescence detection of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) on CdTe/CdSe quantum dot (QD)-enzyme-impregnated paper by coupling with a bioresponsive controlled-release system from DNA-gated mesoporous silica nanocontainers (MSNs). The assay was carried out in a centrifuge tube by using glucose-loaded MSNs with a CEA aptamer and a QD-enzyme-paper attached on the lid. Initially, single-strand complementary DNA to a CEA aptamer was covalently conjugated to the aminated MSN, and then glucose (enzyme substrate) molecules were gated into the pore with the help of the aptamer. Glucose oxidase (GOD) and CdTe/CdSe QDs were coimmobilized on paper for the visual fluorescence signal output. Upon target CEA introduction in the detection cell, the analyte specifically reacted with the immobilized aptamer on the MSN to open the pore, thereby resulting in the glucose release. The released glucose was oxidized by the immobilized GOD on paper to produce gluconic acid and hydrogen peroxide, and the latter quenched the fluorescence of CdTe/CdSe QDs, which could be determined by the naked eye on a portable smartphone and a commercial fluorospectrometer. Under optimal conditions, the PAD-based sensing system enabled sensitive discrimination of target CEA against other biomarkers or proteins in a linear range of 0.05-20 ng mL(-1) with a limit of detection of 6.7 pg mL(-1) (ppt). In addition, our strategy displayed high specificity, good reproducibility, and acceptable accuracy for analyzing human serum specimens with a commercial human CEA ELISA kit. Importantly, this methodology offers promise for simple analysis of biological samples and is suitable for use in the mass production of miniaturized devices, thus opening new opportunities for protein diagnostics and biosecurity.

  16. Wilson-Racah quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhaidari, A. D.; Taiwo, T. J.

    2017-02-01

    Using a recent formulation of quantum mechanics without a potential function, we present a four-parameter system associated with the Wilson and Racah polynomials. The continuum scattering states are written in terms of the Wilson polynomials whose asymptotics give the scattering amplitude and phase shift. On the other hand, the finite number of discrete bound states are associated with the Racah polynomials.

  17. Quantum Indeterminacy of Cosmic Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2013-12-30

    It is shown that quantum uncertainty of motion in systems controlled mainly by gravity generally grows with orbital timescale $H^{-1}$, and dominates classical motion for trajectories separated by distances less than $\\approx H^{-3/5}$ in Planck units. For example, the cosmological metric today becomes indeterminate at macroscopic separations, $H_0^{-3/5}\\approx 60$ meters. Estimates suggest that entangled non-localized quantum states of geometry and matter may significantly affect fluctuations during inflation, and connect the scale of dark energy to that of strong interactions.

  18. Polygamy of entanglement in multipartite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2009-08-01

    We show that bipartite entanglement distribution (or entanglement of assistance) in multipartite quantum systems is by nature polygamous. We first provide an analytical upper bound for the concurrence of assistance in bipartite quantum systems and derive a polygamy inequality of multipartite entanglement in arbitrary-dimensional quantum systems.

  19. Understanding quantum work in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qian; Quan, H. T.

    2017-03-01

    Based on previous studies in a single-particle system in both the integrable [Jarzynski, Quan, and Rahav, Phys. Rev. X 5, 031038 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevX.5.031038] and the chaotic systems [Zhu, Gong, Wu, and Quan, Phys. Rev. E 93, 062108 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevE.93.062108], we study the the correspondence principle between quantum and classical work distributions in a quantum many-body system. Even though the interaction and the indistinguishability of identical particles increase the complexity of the system, we find that for a quantum many-body system the quantum work distribution still converges to its classical counterpart in the semiclassical limit. Our results imply that there exists a correspondence principle between quantum and classical work distributions in an interacting quantum many-body system, especially in the large particle number limit, and further justify the definition of quantum work via two-point energy measurements in quantum many-body systems.

  20. Quantum renewal equation for the first detection time of a quantum walk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedman, H.; Kessler, D. A.; Barkai, E.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the statistics of the first detected passage time of a quantum walk. The postulates of quantum theory, in particular the collapse of the wave function upon measurement, reveal an intimate connection between the wave function of a process free of measurements, i.e. the solution of the Schrödinger equation, and the statistics of first detection events on a site. For stroboscopic measurements a quantum renewal equation yields basic properties of quantum walks. For example, for a tight binding model on a ring we discover critical sampling times, diverging quantities such as the mean time for first detection, and an optimal detection rate. For a quantum walk on an infinite line the probability of first detection decays like {{≤ft(\\text{time}\\right)}-3} with a superimposed oscillation, critical behavior for a specific choice of sampling time, and vanishing amplitude when the sampling time approaches zero due to the quantum Zeno effect.

  1. Localization in Open Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yusipov, I.; Laptyeva, T.; Denisov, S.; Ivanchenko, M.

    2017-02-01

    In an isolated single-particle quantum system, a spatial disorder can induce Anderson localization. Being a result of interference, this phenomenon is expected to be fragile in the face of dissipation. Here we show that a proper dissipation can drive a disordered system into a steady state with tunable localization properties. This can be achieved with a set of identical dissipative operators, each one acting nontrivially on a pair of sites. Operators are parametrized by a uniform phase, which controls the selection of Anderson modes contributing to the state. On the microscopic level, quantum trajectories of a system in the asymptotic regime exhibit intermittent dynamics consisting of long-time sticking events near selected modes interrupted by intermode jumps.

  2. Noncommuting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1971-01-01

    In quantum detection theory, the optimum detection operators must commute; admitting simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables cannot yield a lower Bayes cost. In addition, the lower bounds on mean square errors of parameter estimates, predicted by the quantum mechanical Cramer-Rao inequality, cannot be reduced by such means.

  3. Noncommunting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1971-01-01

    In quantum detection theory the optimum detection operators must commute; admitting simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables cannot yield a lower Bayes cost. The lower bounds on mean square errors of parameter estimates predicted by the quantum-mechanical Cramer-Rao inequality can also not be reduced by such means.

  4. Perturbative approach to Markovian open quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Andy C. Y.; Petruccione, F.; Koch, Jens

    2014-01-01

    The exact treatment of Markovian open quantum systems, when based on numerical diagonalization of the Liouville super-operator or averaging over quantum trajectories, is severely limited by Hilbert space size. Perturbation theory, standard in the investigation of closed quantum systems, has remained much less developed for open quantum systems where a direct application to the Lindblad master equation is desirable. We present such a perturbative treatment which will be useful for an analytical understanding of open quantum systems and for numerical calculation of system observables which would otherwise be impractical. PMID:24811607

  5. Quantum detection and ranging using exciton-plasmon coupling in coherent nanoantennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.; Hatef, A.; Meunier, Michel

    2013-05-01

    We utilize interaction of a laser field with a quantum dot-metallic nanoshell system to investigate nanoscale detection and ranging using quantum coherence. We demonstrate that the nanoshell in this system can act as a coherent nanoantenna capable of designating each position in its range with unique space-time field coordinates. This shows that coherent exciton-plasmon coupling in such a system allows the electric field of this antenna generates position-dependent dynamics in molecules and nanostructures in its vicinity, allowing their remote detection. The results are obtained considering the ultrafast polarization dephasing of the quantum dot at elevated temperatures.

  6. Resonances in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eleuch, Hichem; Rotter, Ingrid

    2017-02-01

    The Hamilton operator of an open quantum system is non-Hermitian. Its eigenvalues are generally complex and provide not only the energies but also the lifetimes of the states of the system. The states may couple via the common environment of scattering wave functions into which the system is embedded. This causes an external mixing (EM) of the states. Mathematically, EM is related to the existence of singular (the so-called exceptional) points. The eigenfunctions of a non-Hermitian operator are biorthogonal, in contrast to the orthogonal eigenfunctions of a Hermitian operator. A quantitative measure for the ratio between biorthogonality and orthogonality is the phase rigidity of the wave functions. At and near an exceptional point (EP), the phase rigidity takes its minimum value. The lifetimes of two nearby eigenstates of a quantum system bifurcate under the influence of an EP. At the parameter value of maximum width bifurcation, the phase rigidity approaches the value one, meaning that the two eigenfunctions become orthogonal. However, the eigenfunctions are externally mixed at this parameter value. The S matrix and therewith the cross section do contain, in the one-channel case, almost no information on the EM of the states. The situation is completely different in the case with two (or more) channels where the resonance structure is strongly influenced by the EM of the states and interesting features of non-Hermitian quantum physics are revealed. We provide numerical results for two and three nearby eigenstates of a non-Hermitian Hamilton operator that are embedded in one common continuum and are influenced by two adjoining EPs. The results are discussed. They are of interest for an experimental test of the non-Hermitian quantum physics as well as for applications.

  7. Optimal protocols for slowly driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zulkowski, Patrick R.; DeWeese, Michael R.

    2015-09-01

    The design of efficient quantum information processing will rely on optimal nonequilibrium transitions of driven quantum systems. Building on a recently developed geometric framework for computing optimal protocols for classical systems driven in finite time, we construct a general framework for optimizing the average information entropy for driven quantum systems. Geodesics on the parameter manifold endowed with a positive semidefinite metric correspond to protocols that minimize the average information entropy production in finite time. We use this framework to explicitly compute the optimal entropy production for a simple two-state quantum system coupled to a heat bath of bosonic oscillators, which has applications to quantum annealing.

  8. Repeated interactions in open quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bruneau, Laurent; Joye, Alain; Merkli, Marco

    2014-07-15

    Analyzing the dynamics of open quantum systems has a long history in mathematics and physics. Depending on the system at hand, basic physical phenomena that one would like to explain are, for example, convergence to equilibrium, the dynamics of quantum coherences (decoherence) and quantum correlations (entanglement), or the emergence of heat and particle fluxes in non-equilibrium situations. From the mathematical physics perspective, one of the main challenges is to derive the irreversible dynamics of the open system, starting from a unitary dynamics of the system and its environment. The repeated interactions systems considered in these notes are models of non-equilibrium quantum statistical mechanics. They are relevant in quantum optics, and more generally, serve as a relatively well treatable approximation of a more difficult quantum dynamics. In particular, the repeated interaction models allow to determine the large time (stationary) asymptotics of quantum systems out of equilibrium.

  9. Quantum control for initiation and detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Greenfield, Margo T; Mc Grane, Shawn D; Scharff, R. Jason; Moore, David S

    2010-01-01

    We employ quantum control methods towards detection and quantum controlled initiation (QCI) of energetic materials. Ultrafast pulse shaping of broadband Infrared ({approx}750 nm to 850 run) and ultraviolet (266 nm, 400 nm) light is utilized for control. The underlying principals behind optimal control can be utilized to both detect and initiate explosives. In each case, time dependent phase shaped electric fields drive the chemical systems towards a desired state. For optimal dynamic detection of explosives (ODD-Ex) a phase specific broadband infrared pulse is created which increases not only the sensitivity of detection but also the selectivity of an explosive's spectral signatures in a background of interferents. QCI on the other hand, seeks to initiate explosives by employing shaped ultraviolet light. QCI is ideal for use with explosive detonators as it removes the possibility of unintentional initiation from an electrical source while adding an additional safety feature, initiation only with the proper pulse shape. Quantum control experiments require: (1) the ability to phase and amplitude shape the laser pulse and (2) the ability to effectively search for the pulse shape which controls the reaction. In these adaptive experiments we utilize both global and local optimization search routines such as genetic algorithm, differential evolution, and downhill simplex. Pulse shaping the broadband IR light, produced by focusing 800 nm light through a pressurized tube of Argon, is straightforward as commercial pulse shapers are available at and around 800 nm. Pulse shaping in the UV requires a home built shaper. Our system is an acoustic optical modulator (AOM) pulse shaper in which consists of a fused silica AOM crystal placed in the Fourier plane of a 4-f zero dispersion compressor.

  10. Quantum correlation of an optically controlled open quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Sham, L. J.

    2012-02-01

    A precise time-dependent optical control of an open quantum system relies on an accurate account of the quantum interference among the system, the photon control and the dissipative environment. In the spirit of the Keldysh non-equilibrium Green's function approach, we develop a diagrammatic technique to precisely calculate this quantum correlation for a fast multimode coherent photon control against slow relaxation, valid for both Markovian and non-Markovian systems. We demonstrate how this novel formalism can lead to a better accuracy than existing approximations of the master equation. We also describe extensions to cases with controls by photon state other than the coherent Glauber state.

  11. Vibrational modes in the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Yan, Bin; Daily, Kevin; Greene, Chris H.

    The hyperspherical adiabatic technique is more familiar to atomic and nuclear few-body systems, but can also be applied with high accuracy to the many-body quantum Hall problem. This technique reformulates the Schrödinger equation for N electrons into hyperspherical coordinates, which, after extracting the trivial center of mass, describes the system in terms of a single global size coordinate known as the hyperradius R, and 2 N - 3 remaining internal angular coordinates. The solutions are approximately separable in the hyperradial coordinate, and solutions in the system are found by treating the hyperradius as an adiabatic coordinate. The approximate separability of the wave functions in this coordinate suggests the presence of hyperradial vibrational modes which are not described in conventional theories. The vibrationally excited states share the internal geometry of their quantum Hall ground states, and their excitation frequencies may vary with the number of participating particles or the strength of the confinement. We plan to discuss the features of these vibrational modes and their possible detection in quantum Hall systems. NSF.

  12. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. III. Quantum operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2007-05-01

    During the last decade, several quantum information protocols, such as quantum key distribution, teleportation or quantum computation, have attracted a lot of interest. Despite the recent success and research efforts in quantum information processing, however, we are just at the beginning of understanding the role of entanglement and the behavior of quantum systems in noisy environments, i.e. for nonideal implementations. Therefore, in order to facilitate the investigation of entanglement and decoherence in n-qubit quantum registers, here we present a revised version of the FEYNMAN program for working with quantum operations and their associated (Jamiołkowski) dual states. Based on the implementation of several popular decoherence models, we provide tools especially for the quantitative analysis of quantum operations. Apart from the implementation of different noise models, the current program extension may help investigate the fragility of many quantum states, one of the main obstacles in realizing quantum information protocols today. Program summaryTitle of program: Feynman Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v3_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: None Operating systems: Any system that supports MAPLE; tested under Microsoft Windows XP, SuSe Linux 10 Program language used:MAPLE 10 Typical time and memory requirements: Most commands that act upon quantum registers with five or less qubits take ⩽10 seconds of processor time (on a Pentium 4 processor with ⩾2 GHz or equivalent) and 5-20 MB of memory. Especially when working with symbolic expressions, however, the memory and time requirements critically depend on the number of qubits in the quantum registers, owing to the exponential dimension growth of the associated Hilbert space. For example, complex (symbolic) noise models (with several Kraus operators) for multi-qubit systems

  13. Portable modular detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brennan, James S.; Singh, Anup; Throckmorton, Daniel J.; Stamps, James F.

    2009-10-13

    Disclosed herein are portable and modular detection devices and systems for detecting electromagnetic radiation, such as fluorescence, from an analyte which comprises at least one optical element removably attached to at least one alignment rail. Also disclosed are modular detection devices and systems having an integrated lock-in amplifier and spatial filter and assay methods using the portable and modular detection devices.

  14. Global quantum discord in multipartite systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rulli, C. C.; Sarandy, M. S.

    2011-10-15

    We propose a global measure for quantum correlations in multipartite systems, which is obtained by suitably recasting the quantum discord in terms of relative entropy and local von Neumann measurements. The measure is symmetric with respect to subsystem exchange and is shown to be nonnegative for an arbitrary state. As an illustration, we consider tripartite correlations in the Werner-GHZ (Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger) state and multipartite correlations at quantum criticality. In particular, in contrast with the pairwise quantum discord, we show that the global quantum discord is able to characterize the infinite-order quantum phase transition in the Ashkin-Teller spin chain.

  15. A quantum radar detection protocol for fringe visibility enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koltenbah, Benjamin; Parazzoli, Claudio; Capron, Barbara

    2016-05-01

    We present analysis of a radar detection technique using a Photon Addition Homodyne Receiver (PAHR) that improves SNR of the interferometer fringes and reduces uncertainty of the phase measurement. This system uses the concept of Photon Addition (PA) in which the coherent photon distribution is altered. We discuss this process first as a purely mathematical concept to introduce PA and illustrate its effect on coherent photon distribution. We then present a notional proof-of-concept experiment involving a parametric down converter (PDC) and probabilistic post-selection of the results. We end with presentation of a more deterministic PAHR concept that is more suitable for development into a working system. Coherent light illuminates a target and the return signal interferes with the local oscillator reference photons to create the desired fringes. The PAHR alters the photon probability distribution of the returned light via interaction between the return photons and atoms. We refer to this technique as "Atom Interaction" or AI. The returning photons are focused at the properly prepared atomic system. The injected atoms into this region are prepared in the desired quantum state. During the interaction time, the initial quantum state evolves in such a way that the photon distribution function changes resulting in higher photon count, lower phase noise and an increase in fringe SNR. The result is a 3-5X increase of fringe SNR. This method is best suited for low light intensity (low photon count, 0.1-5) applications. The detection protocol could extend the range of existing systems without loss of accuracy, or conversely enhance a system's accuracy for given range. We present quantum mathematical analysis of the method to illustrate how both range and angular resolution improve in comparison with standard measurement techniques. We also suggest an experimental path to validate the method which also will lead toward deployment in the field.

  16. Quantum Illumination-Based Target Detection and Discrimination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-30

    demonstrated high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) quantum-illumination target detection in a lossy, noisy environment using an optical parametric amplifier...Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 quantum communication, target detection, entanglement, parametric downconversion, optical parametric amplifiers...illumination target detection in a lossy, noisy environment using an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) receiver, and explored the SNR’s dependence on

  17. Experimental test of robust quantum detection and restoration of a qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mičuda, M.; Straka, I.; Miková, M.; Dušek, M.; Ježek, M.; Fiurášek, J.; Filip, R.

    2015-07-01

    Macroscopic devices that probe and control elementary quantum systems are subjected to environment-induced decoherence and typically consist of a large number of particles that cannot be precisely controlled and individually accessed. These two factors limit the control of quantum systems by an open macroscopic device. Here, we investigate a faithful and robust implementation of specific elementary quantum operations under such conditions. We propose a procedure for quantum restoration of a single qubit that is resilient to particle loss and decoherence of the macroscopic device and compare it with a similarly robust procedure for indirect quantum detection of the qubit state by measurement on the macroscopic device. Complementary to detection, the restoration recovers the original state of the system qubit by quantum erasing which decouples the system from the device. Perfect restoration is possible even if the particles of the device are only classically correlated. We experimentally witness the robustness of quantum detection and restoration for a two-qubit device represented by the quantum state of photons.

  18. Quantum Detection Theory for the Free-Space Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilnrotter, V.; Lau, C.-W.

    2001-04-01

    The fundamental performance limits of optical communications over the free-space channel are developed using quantum theory, and presented in terms of concepts familiar to communications engineers. The compact Dirac notation generally employed in quantum mechanics is defined, and key concepts necessary for understanding quantum projection measurements are reviewed. A derivation that provides significant insights into the quantum measurement performed by the optimum receiver is developed by interpreting the familiar technique of photon counting in terms of quantum projection operators. The performance of the optimum quantum receiver for on-off keying and optical binary phase-shift-keying (BPSK) modulation is treated first as a noise-free (or pure-state) problem, then extended to include the effects of background radiation. The performance of the optimum quantum receiver is compared to that of classical optical receivers employing photon-counting and coherent detection techniques, and it is shown to be exponentially better in most cases.

  19. Wave Detection Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit via EPR Entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yiqiu; Miao, Haixing; Pang, Belinda; Evans, Matthew; Zhao, Chunnong; Harms, Jan; Schnabel, Roman; Chen, Yanbei

    2017-01-01

    The Standard Quantum Limit in continuous monitoring of a system is given by the trade-off of shot noise and back-action noise. In gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO, both contributions can simultaneously be squeezed in a broad frequency band by injecting a spectrum of squeezed vacuum states with a frequency-dependent squeeze angle. This approach requires setting up an additional long base-line, low-loss filter cavity in a vacuum system at the detector's site. Here, we show that the need for such a filter cavity can be eliminated, by exploiting EPR-entangled signal and idler beams. By harnessing their mutual quantum correlations and the difference in the way each beam propagates in the interferometer, we can engineer the input signal beam to have the appropriate frequency dependent conditional squeezing once the out-going idler beam is detected. Our proposal is appropriate for all future gravitational-wave detectors for achieving sensitivities beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

  20. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  1. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  2. Detecting the Drift of Quantum Sources: Not the de Finetti Theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Lucia; van Enk, S. J.

    2011-05-01

    We propose and analyze a method to detect and characterize the drift of a nonstationary quantum source. It generalizes a standard measurement for detecting phase diffusion of laser fields to quantum systems of arbitrary Hilbert space dimension, qubits in particular. We distinguish diffusive and systematic drifts, and examine how quickly one can determine that a source is drifting. We show that for single-photon wave packets our measurement is implemented by the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

  3. Detecting the drift of quantum sources: not the de Finetti theorem.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Lucia; van Enk, S J

    2011-05-06

    We propose and analyze a method to detect and characterize the drift of a nonstationary quantum source. It generalizes a standard measurement for detecting phase diffusion of laser fields to quantum systems of arbitrary Hilbert space dimension, qubits in particular. We distinguish diffusive and systematic drifts, and examine how quickly one can determine that a source is drifting. We show that for single-photon wave packets our measurement is implemented by the Hong-Ou-Mandel effect.

  4. Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Ran; Fan, Heng

    2015-01-01

    Quantum Zeno effect shows that frequent observations can slow down or even stop the unitary time evolution of an unstable quantum system. This effect can also be regarded as a physical consequence of the statistical indistinguishability of neighboring quantum states. The accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics under unitary time evolution can be quantitatively estimated by quantum Zeno time in terms of Fisher information. In this work, we investigate the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics in quantum open systems by calculating noisy Fisher information when a trace preserving and completely positive map is assumed. We firstly study the consequences of non-Markovian noise on quantum Zeno effect and give the exact forms of the dissipative Fisher information and the quantum Zeno time. Then, for the operator-sum representation, an achievable upper bound of the quantum Zeno time is given with the help of the results in noisy quantum metrology. It is of significance that the noise reducing the accuracy in the entanglement-enhanced parameter estimation can conversely be favorable for the accessibility of quantum Zeno dynamics of entangled states. PMID:26099840

  5. Contextuality without nonlocality in a superconducting quantum system.

    PubMed

    Jerger, Markus; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Oppliger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Mondal, Mintu; Wallraff, Andreas; Goodenough, Kenneth; Wehner, Stephanie; Juliusson, Kristinn; Langford, Nathan K; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-10-04

    Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell-Kochen-Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing.

  6. Contextuality without nonlocality in a superconducting quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerger, Markus; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Oppliger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Mondal, Mintu; Wallraff, Andreas; Goodenough, Kenneth; Wehner, Stephanie; Juliusson, Kristinn; Langford, Nathan K.; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-10-01

    Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell-Kochen-Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing.

  7. Quantum criticality in a double-quantum-dot system.

    PubMed

    Zaránd, Gergely; Chung, Chung-Hou; Simon, Pascal; Vojta, Matthias

    2006-10-20

    We discuss the realization of the quantum-critical non-Fermi-liquid state, originally discovered within the two-impurity Kondo model, in double-quantum-dot systems. Contrary to common belief, the corresponding fixed point is robust against particle-hole and various other asymmetries and is unstable only to charge transfer between the two dots. We propose an experimental setup where such charge transfer processes are suppressed, allowing a controlled approach to the quantum-critical state. We also discuss transport and scaling properties in the vicinity of the critical point.

  8. Quantum mechanics in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoehn, Ross Douglas

    This document should be considered in its separation; there are three distinct topics contained within and three distinct chapters within the body of works. In a similar fashion, this abstract should be considered in three parts. Firstly, we explored the existence of multiply-charged atomic ions by having developed a new set of dimensional scaling equations as well as a series of relativistic augmentations to the standard dimensional scaling procedure and to the self-consistent field calculations. Secondly, we propose a novel method of predicting drug efficacy in hopes to facilitate the discovery of new small molecule therapeutics by modeling the agonist-protein system as being similar to the process of Inelastic Electron Tunneling Spectroscopy. Finally, we facilitate the instruction in basic quantum mechanical topics through the use of quantum games; this method of approach allows for the generation of exercises with the intent of conveying the fundamental concepts within a first year quantum mechanics classroom. Furthermore, no to be mentioned within the body of the text, yet presented in appendix form, certain works modeling the proliferation of cells types within the confines of man-made lattices for the purpose of facilitating artificial vascular transplants. In Chapter 2, we present a theoretical framework which describes multiply-charged atomic ions, their stability within super-intense laser fields, also lay corrections to the systems due to relativistic effects. Dimensional scaling calculations with relativistic corrections for systems: H, H-, H 2-, He, He-, He2-, He3- within super-intense laser fields were completed. Also completed were three-dimensional self consistent field calculations to verify the dimensionally scaled quantities. With the aforementioned methods the system's ability to stably bind 'additional' electrons through the development of multiple isolated regions of high potential energy leading to nodes of high electron density is shown

  9. Detecting the relative localisation of quantum particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, P. A.; Sindt, J.; Dunningham, J. A.

    2013-06-01

    One interpretation of how the classical world emerges from quantum physics involves the build-up of certain robust entangled states between particles due to scattering events [1]. This is intriguing because it links classical behaviour with the uniquely quantum effect of entanglement and differs from other interpretations that say classicality arises when quantum correlations are lost or neglected in measurements. However, the problem with this new interpretation has been finding an experimental way of verifying it. Here we outline a straightforward scheme that enables just that and should, in principle, allow experiments to confirm the theory to any desired degree of accuracy.

  10. Quantum speed limits in open system dynamics.

    PubMed

    del Campo, A; Egusquiza, I L; Plenio, M B; Huelga, S F

    2013-02-01

    Bounds to the speed of evolution of a quantum system are of fundamental interest in quantum metrology, quantum chemical dynamics, and quantum computation. We derive a time-energy uncertainty relation for open quantum systems undergoing a general, completely positive, and trace preserving evolution which provides a bound to the quantum speed limit. When the evolution is of the Lindblad form, the bound is analogous to the Mandelstam-Tamm relation which applies in the unitary case, with the role of the Hamiltonian being played by the adjoint of the generator of the dynamical semigroup. The utility of the new bound is exemplified in different scenarios, ranging from the estimation of the passage time to the determination of precision limits for quantum metrology in the presence of dephasing noise.

  11. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Quantum interference between independent reservoirs in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne F.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2014-04-01

    When a quantum system interacts with multiple reservoirs, the environmental effects are usually treated in an additive manner. We show that this assumption breaks down for non-Markovian environments that have finite memory times. Specifically, we demonstrate that quantum interferences between independent environments can qualitatively modify the dynamics of the physical system. We illustrate this effect with a two-level system coupled to two structured photonic reservoirs, discuss its origin using a nonequilibrium diagrammatic technique, and show an example when the application of this interference can result in an improved dark state preparation in a Λ system.

  13. Quantum Q systems: from cluster algebras to quantum current algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Francesco, Philippe; Kedem, Rinat

    2017-02-01

    This paper gives a new algebraic interpretation for the algebra generated by the quantum cluster variables of the A_r quantum Q-system (Di Francesco and Kedem in Int Math Res Not IMRN 10:2593-2642, 2014). We show that the algebra can be described as a quotient of the localization of the quantum algebra U_{√{q}}({n}[u,u^{-1}])subset U_{√{q}}(widehat{{sl}}_2), in the Drinfeld presentation. The generating current is made up of a subset of the cluster variables which satisfy the Q-system, which we call fundamental. The other cluster variables are given by a quantum determinant-type formula, and are polynomials in the fundamental generators. The conserved quantities of the discrete evolution (Di Francesco and Kedem in Adv Math 228(1):97-152, 2011) described by quantum Q-system generate the Cartan currents at level 0, in a non-standard polarization. The rest of the quantum affine algebra is also described in terms of cluster variables.

  14. A Quantum Algorithm Detecting Concentrated Maps.

    PubMed

    Beichl, Isabel; Bullock, Stephen S; Song, Daegene

    2007-01-01

    We consider an arbitrary mapping f: {0, …, N - 1} → {0, …, N - 1} for N = 2 (n) , n some number of quantum bits. Using N calls to a classical oracle evaluating f(x) and an N-bit memory, it is possible to determine whether f(x) is one-to-one. For some radian angle 0 ≤ θ ≤ π/2, we say f(x) is θ - concentrated if and only if [Formula: see text] for some given ψ 0 and any 0 ≤ x ≤ N - 1. We present a quantum algorithm that distinguishes a θ-concentrated f(x) from a one-to-one f(x) in O(1) calls to a quantum oracle function Uf with high probability. For 0 < θ < 0.3301 rad, the quantum algorithm outperforms random (classical) evaluation of the function testing for dispersed values (on average). Maximal outperformance occurs at [Formula: see text] rad.

  15. Quasi-Periodically Driven Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdeny, Albert; Puig, Joaquim; Mintert, Florian

    2016-10-01

    Floquet theory provides rigorous foundations for the theory of periodically driven quantum systems. In the case of non-periodic driving, however, the situation is not so well understood. Here, we provide a critical review of the theoretical framework developed for quasi-periodically driven quantum systems. Although the theoretical footing is still under development, we argue that quasi-periodically driven quantum systems can be treated with generalisations of Floquet theory in suitable parameter regimes. Moreover, we provide a generalisation of the Floquet-Magnus expansion and argue that quasi-periodic driving offers a promising route for quantum simulations.

  16. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems.

    PubMed

    Wild, Dominik S; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y; Lukin, Mikhail D

    2016-10-07

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  17. Adiabatic Quantum Search in Open Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wild, Dominik S.; Gopalakrishnan, Sarang; Knap, Michael; Yao, Norman Y.; Lukin, Mikhail D.

    2016-10-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms represent a promising approach to universal quantum computation. In isolated systems, a key limitation to such algorithms is the presence of avoided level crossings, where gaps become extremely small. In open quantum systems, the fundamental robustness of adiabatic algorithms remains unresolved. Here, we study the dynamics near an avoided level crossing associated with the adiabatic quantum search algorithm, when the system is coupled to a generic environment. At zero temperature, we find that the algorithm remains scalable provided the noise spectral density of the environment decays sufficiently fast at low frequencies. By contrast, higher order scattering processes render the algorithm inefficient at any finite temperature regardless of the spectral density, implying that no quantum speedup can be achieved. Extensions and implications for other adiabatic quantum algorithms will be discussed.

  18. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-24

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This "reverse engineering" of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  19. Tailoring superradiance to design artificial quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longo, Paolo; Keitel, Christoph H.; Evers, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Cooperative phenomena arising due to the coupling of individual atoms via the radiation field are a cornerstone of modern quantum and optical physics. Recent experiments on x-ray quantum optics added a new twist to this line of research by exploiting superradiance in order to construct artificial quantum systems. However, so far, systematic approaches to deliberately design superradiance properties are lacking, impeding the desired implementation of more advanced quantum optical schemes. Here, we develop an analytical framework for the engineering of single-photon superradiance in extended media applicable across the entire electromagnetic spectrum, and show how it can be used to tailor the properties of an artificial quantum system. This “reverse engineering” of superradiance not only provides an avenue towards non-linear and quantum mechanical phenomena at x-ray energies, but also leads to a unified view on and a better understanding of superradiance across different physical systems.

  20. Quantum Interference between independent environments in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Ching-Kit; Lin, Guin-Dar; Yelin, Susanne; Lukin, Mikhail

    2014-03-01

    When a general quantum system interacts with multiple environments, the environmental effects are usually treated in an additive manner in the master equation. This assumption becomes questionable for non-Markovian environments that have finite memory times. Here, we show that quantum interferences between independent environments exist and can qualitatively modify the dynamics of the reduced physical system. We illustrate this effect with examples of atomic systems coupled to structured reservoirs, and discuss its origin in general using a non-equilibrium diagrammatic technique. The consequential decoherence dynamics cannot be captured by an additive master equation.

  1. Optimum testing of multiple hypotheses in quantum detection theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P.; Kennedy, R. S.; Lax, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of specifying the optimum quantum detector in multiple hypotheses testing is considered for application to optical communications. The quantum digital detection problem is formulated as a linear programming problem on an infinite-dimensional space. A necessary and sufficient condition is derived by the application of a general duality theorem specifying the optimum detector in terms of a set of linear operator equations and inequalities. Existence of the optimum quantum detector is also established. The optimality of commuting detection operators is discussed in some examples. The structure and performance of the optimal receiver are derived for the quantum detection of narrow-band coherent orthogonal and simplex signals. It is shown that modal photon counting is asymptotically optimum in the limit of a large signaling alphabet and that the capacity goes to infinity in the absence of a bandwidth limitation.

  2. Controlling the shannon entropy of quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yifan; Wu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a new quantum control method which controls the Shannon entropy of quantum systems. For both discrete and continuous entropies, controller design methods are proposed based on probability density function control, which can drive the quantum state to any target state. To drive the entropy to any target at any prespecified time, another discretization method is proposed for the discrete entropy case, and the conditions under which the entropy can be increased or decreased are discussed. Simulations are done on both two- and three-dimensional quantum systems, where division and prediction are used to achieve more accurate tracking.

  3. Quantum-dot-based suspension microarray for multiplex detection of lung cancer markers: preclinical validation and comparison with the Luminex xMAP® system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilan, Regina; Ametzazurra, Amagoia; Brazhnik, Kristina; Escorza, Sergio; Fernández, David; Uríbarri, María; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2017-03-01

    A novel suspension multiplex immunoassay for the simultaneous specific detection of lung cancer markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) clinical samples based on fluorescent microspheres having different size and spectrally encoded with quantum dots (QDEM) was developed. The designed suspension immunoassay was validated for the quantitative detection of three lung cancer markers in BALF samples from 42 lung cancer patients and 10 control subjects. Tumor markers were detected through simultaneous formation of specific immune complexes consisting of a capture molecule, the target antigen, and biotinylated recognition molecule on the surface of the different QDEM in a mixture. The immune complexes were visualized by fluorescently labeled streptavidin and simultaneously analyzed using a flow cytometer. Preclinical validation of the immunoassay was performed and results were compared with those obtained using an alternative 3-plex immunoassay based on Luminex xMAP® technology, developed on classical organic fluorophores. The comparison showed that the QDEM and xMAP® assays yielded almost identical results, with clear discrimination between control and clinical samples. Thus, developed QDEM technology can become a good alternative to xMAP® assays permitting analysis of multiple protein biomarkers using conventional flow cytometers.

  4. Quantum-dot-based suspension microarray for multiplex detection of lung cancer markers: preclinical validation and comparison with the Luminex xMAP® system

    PubMed Central

    Bilan, Regina; Ametzazurra, Amagoia; Brazhnik, Kristina; Escorza, Sergio; Fernández, David; Uríbarri, María; Nabiev, Igor; Sukhanova, Alyona

    2017-01-01

    A novel suspension multiplex immunoassay for the simultaneous specific detection of lung cancer markers in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) clinical samples based on fluorescent microspheres having different size and spectrally encoded with quantum dots (QDEM) was developed. The designed suspension immunoassay was validated for the quantitative detection of three lung cancer markers in BALF samples from 42 lung cancer patients and 10 control subjects. Tumor markers were detected through simultaneous formation of specific immune complexes consisting of a capture molecule, the target antigen, and biotinylated recognition molecule on the surface of the different QDEM in a mixture. The immune complexes were visualized by fluorescently labeled streptavidin and simultaneously analyzed using a flow cytometer. Preclinical validation of the immunoassay was performed and results were compared with those obtained using an alternative 3-plex immunoassay based on Luminex xMAP® technology, developed on classical organic fluorophores. The comparison showed that the QDEM and xMAP® assays yielded almost identical results, with clear discrimination between control and clinical samples. Thus, developed QDEM technology can become a good alternative to xMAP® assays permitting analysis of multiple protein biomarkers using conventional flow cytometers. PMID:28300171

  5. Slightly anharmonic systems in quantum optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klimov, Andrey B.; Chumakov, Sergey M.

    1995-01-01

    We consider an arbitrary atomic system (n-level atom or many such atoms) interacting with a strong resonant quantum field. The approximate evolution operator for a quantum field case can be produced from the atomic evolution operator in an external classical field by a 'quantization prescription', passing the operator arguments to Wigner D-functions. Many important phenomena arising from the quantum nature of the field can be described by such a way.

  6. Quantum Dots in Diagnostics and Detection: Principles and Paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Pisanic, T. R.; Zhang, Y.; Wang, T. H.

    2014-01-01

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit exceptional optical and electrical behaviors not found in their bulk counterparts. Following seminal work in the development of water-soluble quantum dots in the late 1990's, researchers have sought to develop interesting and novel ways of exploiting the extraordinary properties of quantum dots for biomedical applications. Since that time, over 10,000 articles have been published related to the use of quantum dots in biomedicine, many of which regard their use in detection and diagnostic bioassays. This review presents a didactic overview of fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dots and paradigm examples of how these phenomena can and have been readily exploited for manifold uses in nanobiotechnology with a specific focus on their implementation in in vitro diagnostic assays and biodetection. PMID:24770716

  7. Quantum dots in diagnostics and detection: principles and paradigms.

    PubMed

    Pisanic, T R; Zhang, Y; Wang, T H

    2014-06-21

    Quantum dots are semiconductor nanocrystals that exhibit exceptional optical and electrical behaviors not found in their bulk counterparts. Following seminal work in the development of water-soluble quantum dots in the late 1990's, researchers have sought to develop interesting and novel ways of exploiting the extraordinary properties of quantum dots for biomedical applications. Since that time, over 10,000 articles have been published related to the use of quantum dots in biomedicine, many of which regard their use in detection and diagnostic bioassays. This review presents a didactic overview of fundamental physical phenomena associated with quantum dots and paradigm examples of how these phenomena can and have been readily exploited for manifold uses in nanobiotechnology with a specific focus on their implementation in in vitro diagnostic assays and biodetection.

  8. Quantum mechanics. Mechanically detecting and avoiding the quantum fluctuations of a microwave field.

    PubMed

    Suh, J; Weinstein, A J; Lei, C U; Wollman, E E; Steinke, S K; Meystre, P; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2014-06-13

    Quantum fluctuations of the light field used for continuous position detection produce stochastic back-action forces and ultimately limit the sensitivity. To overcome this limit, the back-action forces can be avoided by giving up complete knowledge of the motion, and these types of measurements are called "back-action evading" or "quantum nondemolition" detection. We present continuous two-tone back-action evading measurements with a superconducting electromechanical device, realizing three long-standing goals: detection of back-action forces due to the quantum noise of a microwave field, reduction of this quantum back-action noise by 8.5 ± 0.4 decibels (dB), and measurement imprecision of a single quadrature of motion 2.4 ± 0.7 dB below the mechanical zero-point fluctuations. Measurements of this type will find utility in ultrasensitive measurements of weak forces and nonclassical states of motion.

  9. Measurements-based Moving Target Detection in Quantum Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Khan, Asif R.; Yang, Huamin

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect a moving target in multi-channel quantum video is proposed based on multiple measurements on the video strip. The proposed method is capable of detecting the location of the moving target in each frame of the quantum video thereby ensuring that the motion trail of the object is easily and efficiently retrieved. Three experiments, i.e. moving target detection (MTD) of a pixel, MTD of an object in complex shape, and MTD of a pixel whose color is conterminous with that of its background, are implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal. This study presents a modest attempt to focus on the moving target detection and its applications in quantum video.

  10. Quantum bio-nanosensors based on quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, S. M.

    2013-03-01

    When metallic nanoparticles are put in the vicinity of semiconductor quantum dots and driven by a coherent light source, their intrinsic plasmonic fields can be replaced with a new type of fields (coherent-plasmonic fields). These fields are generated via coherent coupling of excitons in quantum dots and localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs). We show the coherent-plasmonic field of a metallic nanoparticle can lead to a significantly larger field enhancement than that caused by its LSPR. Utilizing this, we investigate how such a coherent field enhancement can improve the sensitivities plasmonic nanosensors for detection single biological molecules. The results demonstrate application of quantum coherence in quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems for chemical and biological sensing applications.

  11. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. V. Quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-01

    The FEYNMAN program has been developed during the last years to support case studies on the dynamics and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers. Apart from basic transformations and (gate) operations, it currently supports a good number of separability criteria and entanglement measures, quantum channels as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects in quantum information theory, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions. With the present update of the FEYNMAN program, we provide a simple access to (the simulation of) quantum measurements. This includes not only the widely-applied projective measurements upon the eigenspaces of some given operator but also single-qubit measurements in various pre- and user-defined bases as well as the support for two-qubit Bell measurements. In addition, we help perform generalized and POVM measurements. Knowing the importance of measurements for many quantum information protocols, e.g., one-way computing, we hope that this update makes the FEYNMAN code an attractive and versatile tool for both, research and education. New version program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v5_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 210 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 960 471 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 12 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; the program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux Classification: 4.15 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADWE_v4_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun

  12. Noninvasive Cardiac Quantum Spectrum Technology Effectively Detects Myocardial Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Xue, Qiao; Liu, Mohan; Zheng, Xiaoqin; Chen, Rui; Li, Yufeng; Dan, Qing; Fang, Danqun

    2016-01-01

    Background A standard resting electrocardiogram (ECG) shows limited sensitivity and specificity for the detection of coronary artery disease (CAD). Several analytic methods exist to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of resting ECG for diagnosis of CAD. We compared a new computer-enhanced, resting ECG analysis device, the cardiac quantum spectrum (CQS) technique, with coronary angiography in the detection of CAD. Material/Methods A consecutive sample of 93 patients with a history of suspected CAD scheduled for coronary angiography was evaluated with CQS before coronary angiography. The sensitivity and specificity of CQS and standard 12-lead ECG for detecting hemodynamically relevant coronary stenosis were compared, using coronary angiography as the reference standard. Kappa analysis was performed to assess the agreement between CQS severity scores and the level of stenosis determined by coronary angiography. Results The CQS system identified 78 of 82 patients with hemodynamically relevant stenosis (sensitivity, 95.1%; specificity, 63.6%; accuracy, 91.4%; positive predictive value, 95.1%; negative predictive value, 63.6%). Sensitivity and accuracy were much higher for CQS analysis than for the standard ECG. The Kappa value, assessing the level of agreement between CQS and coronary angiography, was 0.376 (P<0.001). Conclusions CQS analysis of resting ECG data detects hemodynamically relevant CAD with high sensitivity and specificity. PMID:27351755

  13. Quantum dots microstructured optical fiber for x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  14. Quantum cascade detectors for very long wave infrared detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buffaz, A.; Carras, M.; Doyennette, L.; Nedelcu, A.; Marcadet, X.; Berger, V.

    2010-04-01

    A high responsivity GaAs/AlGaAs quantum cascade detector is demonstrated at a wavelength of 15 μm. The quantum design is optimized for negative bias operation, so that the capture of photoexcited electrons back to the fundamental level is minimized. The detectivity of the detector presented here reaches 1.1×1012 Jones at 25 K for an applied bias of -0.6 V.

  15. Accidental degeneracies in nonlinear quantum deformed systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleixo, A. N. F.; Balantekin, A. B.

    2011-09-01

    We construct a multi-parameter nonlinear deformed algebra for quantum confined systems that includes many other deformed models as particular cases. We demonstrate that such systems exhibit the property of accidental pairwise energy level degeneracies. We also study, as a special case of our multi-parameter deformation formalism, the extension of the Tamm-Dancoff cutoff deformed oscillator and the occurrence of accidental pairwise degeneracy in the energy levels of the deformed system. As an application, we discuss the case of a trigonometric Rosen-Morse potential, which is successfully used in models for quantum confined systems, ranging from electrons in quantum dots to quarks in hadrons.

  16. Quantum Simulation of Tunneling in Small Systems

    PubMed Central

    Sornborger, Andrew T.

    2012-01-01

    A number of quantum algorithms have been performed on small quantum computers; these include Shor's prime factorization algorithm, error correction, Grover's search algorithm and a number of analog and digital quantum simulations. Because of the number of gates and qubits necessary, however, digital quantum particle simulations remain untested. A contributing factor to the system size required is the number of ancillary qubits needed to implement matrix exponentials of the potential operator. Here, we show that a set of tunneling problems may be investigated with no ancillary qubits and a cost of one single-qubit operator per time step for the potential evolution, eliminating at least half of the quantum gates required for the algorithm and more than that in the general case. Such simulations are within reach of current quantum computer architectures. PMID:22916333

  17. Measure of the Quantum Speedup in Closed and Open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. This speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of real dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms of quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup, and then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that entanglement and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under certain conditions. Remarkably, a direct measurement of such speedup is feasible without the need for a tomographic reconstruction of the density matrix, which greatly enhances the feasibility of practical experimental tests. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11204196).

  18. Detection of entanglement in asymmetric quantum networks and multipartite quantum steering

    PubMed Central

    Cavalcanti, D.; Skrzypczyk, P.; Aguilar, G. H.; Nery, R. V.; Ribeiro, P.H. Souto; Walborn, S. P.

    2015-01-01

    The future of quantum communication relies on quantum networks composed by observers sharing multipartite quantum states. The certification of multipartite entanglement will be crucial to the usefulness of these networks. In many real situations it is natural to assume that some observers are more trusted than others in the sense that they have more knowledge of their measurement apparatuses. Here we propose a general method to certify all kinds of multipartite entanglement in this asymmetric scenario and experimentally demonstrate it in an optical experiment. Our results, which can be seen as a definition of genuine multipartite quantum steering, give a method to detect entanglement in a scenario in between the standard entanglement and fully device-independent scenarios, and provide a basis for semi-device-independent cryptographic applications in quantum networks. PMID:26235944

  19. Life detection systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitz, M. A.

    1972-01-01

    Some promising newer approaches for detecting microorganisms are discussed, giving particular attention to the integration of different methods into a single instrument. Life detection methods may be divided into biological, chemical, and cytological methods. Biological methods are based on the biological properties of assimilation, metabolism, and growth. Devices for the detection of organic materials are considered, taking into account an instrument which volatilizes, separates, and analyzes a sample sequentially. Other instrumental systems described make use of a microscope and the cytochemical staining principle.

  20. Detectability of Dissipative Motion in Quantum Vacuum via Superradiance

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo-Joong; Brownell, James Hayden; Onofrio, Roberto

    2006-05-26

    We propose an experiment for generating and detecting vacuum-induced dissipative motion. A high frequency mechanical resonator driven in resonance is expected to dissipate mechanical energy in quantum vacuum via photon emission. The photons are stored in a high quality electromagnetic cavity and detected through their interaction with ultracold alkali-metal atoms prepared in an inverted population of hyperfine states. Superradiant amplification of the generated photons results in a detectable radio-frequency signal temporally distinguishable from the expected background.

  1. Multiplexed hybridization detection with multicolor colocalization of quantum dot nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yi-Ping; Kung, Matthew C; Yang, Samuel; Wang, Tza-Huei

    2005-09-01

    We demonstrate a hybridization detection method using multicolor oligonucleotide-functionalized quantum dots as nanoprobes. In the presence of various target sequences, combinatorial self-assembly of the nanoprobes via independent hybridization reactions leads to the generation of discernible sequence-specific spectral codings. Detection of single-molecule hybridization is achieved by measuring colocalization of individual nanoprobes. Genetic analysis for anthrax pathogenicity through simultaneous detection of multiple relevant sequences is demonstrated using this novel biosensing method as proof-of-concept.

  2. Galilei invariant technique for quantum system description

    SciTech Connect

    Kamuntavičius, Gintautas P.

    2014-04-15

    Problems with quantum systems models, violating Galilei invariance are examined. The method for arbitrary non-relativistic quantum system Galilei invariant wave function construction, applying a modified basis where center-of-mass excitations have been removed before Hamiltonian matrix diagonalization, is developed. For identical fermion system, the Galilei invariant wave function can be obtained while applying conventional antisymmetrization methods of wave functions, dependent on single particle spatial variables.

  3. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    ScienceCinema

    Klinger, Jeff

    2016-07-12

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  4. Idaho Explosive Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Klinger, Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Learn how INL researchers are making the world safer by developing an explosives detection system that can inspect cargo. For more information about INL security research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory

  5. Simulating and detecting the quantum spin Hall effect in the kagome optical lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Guocai; Jiang Shaojian; Sun Fadi; Liu, W. M.; Zhu Shiliang

    2010-11-15

    We propose a model which includes a nearest-neighbor intrinsic spin-orbit coupling and a trimerized Hamiltonian in the kagome lattice and promises to host the transition from the quantum spin Hall insulator to the normal insulator. In addition, we design an experimental scheme to simulate and detect this transition in the ultracold atom system. The lattice intrinsic spin-orbit coupling is generated via the laser-induced-gauge-field method. Furthermore, we establish the connection between the spin Chern number and the spin-atomic density which enables us to detect the quantum spin Hall insulator directly by the standard density-profile technique used in atomic systems.

  6. Thermalization in closed quantum systems: Semiclassical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosme, J. G.; Fialko, O.

    2014-11-01

    Thermalization in closed quantum systems can be understood either by means of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis or the concept of canonical typicality. Both concepts are based on quantum-mechanical formalism, such as spectral properties of the eigenstates or entanglement between subsystems, respectively. Here we study instead the onset of thermalization of Bose particles in a two-band double-well potential using the truncated Wigner approximation. This allows us to use the familiar classical formalism to understand quantum thermalization in this system. In particular, we demonstrate that sampling of an initial quantum state mimics a statistical mechanical ensemble, while subsequent chaotic classical evolution turns the initial quantum state into the thermal state.

  7. Quantum Simulation for Open-System Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; de Oliveira, Marcos Cesar; Berry, Dominic; Sanders, Barry

    2013-03-01

    Simulations are essential for predicting and explaining properties of physical and mathematical systems yet so far have been restricted to classical and closed quantum systems. Although forays have been made into open-system quantum simulation, the strict algorithmic aspect has not been explored yet is necessary to account fully for resource consumption to deliver bounded-error answers to computational questions. An open-system quantum simulator would encompass classical and closed-system simulation and also solve outstanding problems concerning, e.g. dynamical phase transitions in non-equilibrium systems, establishing long-range order via dissipation, verifying the simulatability of open-system dynamics on a quantum Turing machine. We construct an efficient autonomous algorithm for designing an efficient quantum circuit to simulate many-body open-system dynamics described by a local Hamiltonian plus decoherence due to separate baths for each particle. The execution time and number of gates for the quantum simulator both scale polynomially with the system size. DSW funded by USARO. MCO funded by AITF and Brazilian agencies CNPq and FAPESP through Instituto Nacional de Ciencia e Tecnologia-Informacao Quantica (INCT-IQ). DWB funded by ARC Future Fellowship (FT100100761). BCS funded by AITF, CIFAR, NSERC and USARO.

  8. Optimal dynamic discrimination of similar quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Baiqing

    2005-07-01

    The techniques for identifying and separating similar molecules have always been very important to chemistry and other branches of science and engineering. Similar quantum systems share comparable Hamiltonians, so their eigenenergy levels, transition dipole moments, and therefore their ordinary observable properties are alike. Traditional analytical methods have mostly been restricted by working with the subtle differences in the physical and chemical properties of the similar species. Optimal Dynamic Discrimination (ODD) aims at magnifying the dissimilarity of the agents by actively controlling their quantum evolution, drawing on the extremely rich information embedded in their dynamics. ODD is developed based on the tremendous flexibility of Optimal Control Theory (OCT) and on the practical implementation of closed-loop learning control, which has become a more and more indispensable tool for controlling quantum processes. The ODD experimental paradigm is designed to combat a number of factors that are detrimental to the discrimination of similar molecules: laser pulse noise, signal detection errors, finite time resolution in the signals, and environmental decoherence effects. It utilizes either static signals or time series signal, the latter capable of providing more information. Simulations are performed in this dissertation progressing from the wave function to the density matrix formulation, in order to study the decoherence effects. Analysis of the results reveals the roles of the adverse factors, unravels the underlying mechanisms of ODD, and provides insights on laboratory implementation. ODD emphasizes the incorporation of algorithmic development and laboratory design, and seeks to bridge the gap between theoretical/computational chemistry and experimental chemistry, with the help from applied mathematics and computer science.

  9. Detection and compensation of basis deviation in satellite-to-ground quantum communications.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming; Zhang, Liang; Wu, Jincai; Yang, Shiji; Wan, Xiong; He, Zhiping; Jia, Jianjun; Citrin, D S; Wang, Jianyu

    2014-04-21

    Basis deviation is the reference-frame deviation between a sender and receiver caused by satellite motion in satellite-to-ground quantum communications. It increases the quantum-bit error ratio of the system and must be compensated for to guarantee reliable quantum communications. We present a new scheme for compensating for basis deviation that employs a BB84 decoding module to detect basis deviation and half-wave plate to provide compensation. Based on this detection scheme, we design a basis-deviation compensation approach and test its feasibility in a voyage experiment. Unlike other polarization-correction schemes, this compensation scheme is simple, convenient, and can be easily implemented in satellite-to-ground quantum communications without increased burden to the satellite.

  10. Quantum dynamics of excitations and decoherence in many-spin systems detected with Loschmidt echoes: its relation to their spreading through the Hilbert space.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, C M; Levstein, P R; Buljubasich, L; Pastawski, H M; Chattah, A K

    2016-06-13

    In this work, we overview time-reversal nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments in many-spin systems evolving under the dipolar Hamiltonian. The Loschmidt echo (LE) in NMR is the signal of excitations which, after evolving with a forward Hamiltonian, is recovered by means of a backward evolution. The presence of non-diagonal terms in the non-equilibrium density matrix of the many-body state is directly monitored experimentally by encoding the multiple quantum coherences. This enables a spin counting procedure, giving information on the spreading of an excitation through the Hilbert space and the formation of clusters of correlated spins. Two samples representing different spin systems with coupled networks were used in the experiments. Protons in polycrystalline ferrocene correspond to an 'infinite' network. By contrast, the liquid crystal N-(4-methoxybenzylidene)-4-butylaniline in the nematic mesophase represents a finite proton system with a hierarchical set of couplings. A close connection was established between the LE decay and the spin counting measurements, confirming the hypothesis that the complexity of the system is driven by the coherent dynamics.

  11. Underwater laser detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomaa, Walid; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.; El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.

    2015-02-01

    The conventional method used to detect an underwater target is by sending and receiving some form of acoustic energy. But the acoustic systems have limitations in the range resolution and accuracy; while, the potential benefits of a laserbased underwater target detection include high directionality, high response, and high range accuracy. Lasers operating in the blue-green region of the light spectrum(420 : 570nm)have a several applications in the area of detection and ranging of submersible targets due to minimum attenuation through water ( less than 0.1 m-1) and maximum laser reflection from estimated target (like mines or submarines) to provide a long range of detection. In this paper laser attenuation in water was measured experimentally by new simple method by using high resolution spectrometer. The laser echoes from different targets (metal, plastic, wood, and rubber) were detected using high resolution CCD camera; the position of detection camera was optimized to provide a high reflection laser from target and low backscattering noise from the water medium, digital image processing techniques were applied to detect and discriminate the echoes from the metal target and subtract the echoes from other objects. Extraction the image of target from the scattering noise is done by background subtraction and edge detection techniques. As a conclusion, we present a high response laser imaging system to detect and discriminate small size, like-mine underwater targets.

  12. Highly efficient visual detection of trace copper(II) and protein by the quantum photoelectric effect.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Lei, Jianping; Su, Mengqi; Liu, Yueting; Hao, Qing; Ju, Huangxian

    2013-09-17

    This work presented a photocurrent response mechanism of quantum dots (QDs) under illumination with the concept of a quantum photoelectric effect. Upon irradiation, the photoelectron could directly escape from QDs. By using nitro blue tetrazolium (NBT) to capture the photoelectron, a new visual system was proposed due to the formation of an insoluble reduction product, purple formazan, which could be used to visualize the quantum photoelectric effect. The interaction of copper(II) with QDs could form trapping sites to interfere with the quantum confinement and thus blocked the escape of photoelectron, leading to a "signal off" visual method for sensitive copper(II) detection. Meanwhile, by using QDs as a signal tag to label antibody, a "signal on" visual method was also proposed for immunoassay of corresponding protein. With meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic-capped CdTe QDs and carcino-embryonic antigen as models, the proposed visual detection methods showed high sensitivity, low detection limit, and wide detectable concentration ranges. The visualization of quantum photoelectric effect could be simply extended for the detection of other targets. This work opens a new visual detection way and provides a highly efficient tool for bioanalysis.

  13. Quantum hacking: Experimental demonstration of time-shift attack against practical quantum-key-distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Qi, Bing; Chen, Christine; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2008-10-01

    Quantum-key-distribution (QKD) systems can send quantum signals over more than 100km standard optical fiber and are widely believed to be secure. Here, we show experimentally a technologically feasible attack—namely, the time-shift attack—against a commercial QKD system. Our result shows that, contrary to popular belief, an eavesdropper, Eve, has a non-negligible probability (˜4%) to break the security of the system. Eve’s success is due to the well-known detection efficiency loophole in the experimental testing of Bell’s inequalities. Therefore, the detection efficiency loophole plays a key role not only in fundamental physics, but also in technological applications such as QKD systems.

  14. Using quantum dot photoluminescence for load detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, M.; Martin, J.; Hartwig, M.; Baumann, R. R.; Otto, T.; Gessner, T.

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel concept for an integrable and flexible sensor capable to visualize mechanical impacts on lightweight structures by quenching the photoluminescence (PL) of CdSe quantum dots. Considering the requirements such as visibility, storage time and high optical contrast of PL quenching with low power consumption, we have investigated a symmetrical and an asymmetrical layer stack consisting of semiconductor organic N,N,N',N'-Tetrakis(3-methylphenyl)-3,3'-dimethylbenzidine (HMTPD) and CdSe quantum dots with elongated CdS shell. Time-resolved series of PL spectra from layer stacks with applied voltages of different polarity and simultaneous observation of power consumption have shown that a variety of mechanisms such as photo-induced charge separation and charge injection, cause PL quenching. However, mechanisms such as screening of external field as well as Auger-assisted charge ejection is working contrary to that. Investigations regarding the influence of illumination revealed that the positive biased asymmetrical layer stack is the preferred sensor configuration, due to a charge carrier injection at voltages of 10 V without the need of coincident illumination.

  15. Quantum entanglement in condensed matter systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laflorencie, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    This review focuses on the field of quantum entanglement applied to condensed matter physics systems with strong correlations, a domain which has rapidly grown over the last decade. By tracing out part of the degrees of freedom of correlated quantum systems, useful and non-trivial information can be obtained through the study of the reduced density matrix, whose eigenvalue spectrum (the entanglement spectrum) and the associated Rényi entropies are now well recognized to contain key features. In particular, the celebrated area law for the entanglement entropy of ground-states will be discussed from the perspective of its subleading corrections which encode universal details of various quantum states of matter, e.g. symmetry breaking states or topological order. Going beyond entropies, the study of the low-lying part of the entanglement spectrum also allows to diagnose topological properties or give a direct access to the excitation spectrum of the edges, and may also raise significant questions about the underlying entanglement Hamiltonian. All these powerful tools can be further applied to shed some light on disordered quantum systems where impurity/disorder can conspire with quantum fluctuations to induce non-trivial effects. Disordered quantum spin systems, the Kondo effect, or the many-body localization problem, which have all been successfully (re)visited through the prism of quantum entanglement, will be discussed in detail. Finally, the issue of experimental access to entanglement measurement will be addressed, together with its most recent developments.

  16. Communication theory of quantum systems. Ph.D. Thesis, 1970

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, H. P. H.

    1971-01-01

    Communication theory problems incorporating quantum effects for optical-frequency applications are discussed. Under suitable conditions, a unique quantum channel model corresponding to a given classical space-time varying linear random channel is established. A procedure is described by which a proper density-operator representation applicable to any receiver configuration can be constructed directly from the channel output field. Some examples illustrating the application of our methods to the development of optical quantum channel representations are given. Optimizations of communication system performance under different criteria are considered. In particular, certain necessary and sufficient conditions on the optimal detector in M-ary quantum signal detection are derived. Some examples are presented. Parameter estimation and channel capacity are discussed briefly.

  17. Characteristic Energy Scales of Quantum Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Michael J.; Jakovidis, Greg

    1994-01-01

    Provides a particle-in-a-box model to help students understand and estimate the magnitude of the characteristic energy scales of a number of quantum systems. Also discusses the mathematics involved with general computations. (MVL)

  18. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2013-01-01

    We show how to extend the paradigm of software-defined communication to include quantum communication systems. We introduce the decomposition of a quantum communication terminal into layers separating the concerns of the hardware, software, and middleware. We provide detailed descriptions of how each component operates and we include results of an implementation of the super-dense coding protocol. We argue that the versatility of software-defined quantum communication test beds can be useful for exploring new regimes in communication and rapidly prototyping new systems.

  19. Physiological responses induced in tomato plants by a two-component nanostructural system composed of carbon nanotubes conjugated with quantum dots and its in vivo multimodal detection.

    PubMed

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Xu, Yang; Wang, Daoyuan; Biris, Alexandru S; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V

    2011-07-22

    Plant seedlings were exposed to single-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dot conjugates (SWCNT-QD) mixed in the growth medium in order to understand the interactions between these multicomponent nanosystems and plants. A combination of fluorescent and Raman-scattering 2D mapping analysis was used to clearly monitor the presence of the SWCNT-QD conjugates in various parts of the tomato seedlings. We found that the addition of QDs to SWCNTs dramatically changed the biological viability of the tomato plants by significantly accelerating leaf senescence and inhibiting root formation. Although the exposure of SWCNTs only to the plants induced positive effects, the chlorophyll content decreased by 1.5-fold in leaves, and the total weight of the root system decreased four times for the tomato plants exposed to SWCNT-QDs (50 µg ml(-1)) compared to plants grown on regular medium as controls. Our results clearly indicate that the exposure of plants to multicomponent nanomaterials is highly influenced by the presence and bioactivity of each component, individually. Such studies could be the foundation for understanding how complex nanosized systems affect the activity of various biological systems with a major impact on ecotoxicology.

  20. Physiological responses induced in tomato plants by a two-component nanostructural system composed of carbon nanotubes conjugated with quantum dots and its in vivo multimodal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alimohammadi, Mohammad; Xu, Yang; Wang, Daoyuan; Biris, Alexandru S.; Khodakovskaya, Mariya V.

    2011-07-01

    Plant seedlings were exposed to single-walled carbon nanotube-quantum dot conjugates (SWCNT-QD) mixed in the growth medium in order to understand the interactions between these multicomponent nanosystems and plants. A combination of fluorescent and Raman-scattering 2D mapping analysis was used to clearly monitor the presence of the SWCNT-QD conjugates in various parts of the tomato seedlings. We found that the addition of QDs to SWCNTs dramatically changed the biological viability of the tomato plants by significantly accelerating leaf senescence and inhibiting root formation. Although the exposure of SWCNTs only to the plants induced positive effects, the chlorophyll content decreased by 1.5-fold in leaves, and the total weight of the root system decreased four times for the tomato plants exposed to SWCNT-QDs (50 µg ml - 1) compared to plants grown on regular medium as controls. Our results clearly indicate that the exposure of plants to multicomponent nanomaterials is highly influenced by the presence and bioactivity of each component, individually. Such studies could be the foundation for understanding how complex nanosized systems affect the activity of various biological systems with a major impact on ecotoxicology.

  1. Intruder detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    An intruder detection system is described. The system contains a transmitter which sends a frequency modulated and amplitude modulated signal to a remote receiver in response to a geophone detector which responds to seismic impulses created by the intruder. The signal makes it possible for an operator to determine the number of intruders and the manner of movement.

  2. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Franks, Larry A.; Lutz, Stephen S.; Lyons, Peter B.

    1981-01-01

    A radiation detection system including a radiation-to-light converter and fiber optic wave guides to transmit the light to a remote location for processing. The system utilizes fluors particularly developed for use with optical fibers emitting at wavelengths greater than about 500 nm and having decay times less than about 10 ns.

  3. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  4. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, Robert B.; Pruett, Jr., James C.

    1986-01-01

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  5. Solar system fault detection

    DOEpatents

    Farrington, R.B.; Pruett, J.C. Jr.

    1984-05-14

    A fault detecting apparatus and method are provided for use with an active solar system. The apparatus provides an indication as to whether one or more predetermined faults have occurred in the solar system. The apparatus includes a plurality of sensors, each sensor being used in determining whether a predetermined condition is present. The outputs of the sensors are combined in a pre-established manner in accordance with the kind of predetermined faults to be detected. Indicators communicate with the outputs generated by combining the sensor outputs to give the user of the solar system and the apparatus an indication as to whether a predetermined fault has occurred. Upon detection and indication of any predetermined fault, the user can take appropriate corrective action so that the overall reliability and efficiency of the active solar system are increased.

  6. Idaho Explosives Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Edward L. Reber; J. Keith Jewell; Larry G. Blackwood; Andrew J. Edwards; Kenneth W. Rohde; Edward H. Seabury

    2004-10-01

    The Idaho Explosives Detection System (IEDS) was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to respond to threats imposed by delivery trucks carrying explosives into military bases. A full-scale prototype system has been built and is currently undergoing testing. The system consists of two racks, one on each side of a subject vehicle. Each rack includes a neutron generator and an array of NaI detectors. The two neutron generators are pulsed and synchronized. A laptop computer controls the entire system. The control software is easily operable by minimally trained staff. The system was developed to detect explosives in a medium size truck within a 5-minute measurement time. System performance was successfully demonstrated with explosives at the INL in June 2004 and at Andrews Air Force Base in July 2004.

  7. Software-defined Quantum Communication Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Sadlier, Ronald J

    2014-01-01

    Quantum communication systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for quantum communication engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to prototype proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communica- tion for engineering quantum communication systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose quantum communication terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the super-dense coding protocol as a test case, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We find that while the theoretical benefits of super dense coding are maintained, there is a classical overhead associated with the full implementation.

  8. Isoperiodic classical systems and their quantum counterparts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asorey, M.; Cariñena, J. F.; Marmo, G.; Perelomov, A.

    2007-06-01

    One-dimensional isoperiodic classical systems have been first analyzed by Abel. Abel's characterization can be extended for singular potentials and potentials which are not defined on the whole real line. The standard shear equivalence of isoperiodic potentials can also be extended by using reflection and inversion transformations. We provide a full characterization of isoperiodic rational potentials showing that they are connected by translations, reflections or Joukowski transformations. Upon quantization many of these isoperiodic systems fail to exhibit identical quantum energy spectra. This anomaly occurs at order O( ℏ2) because semiclassical corrections of energy levels of order O( ℏ) are identical for all isoperiodic systems. We analyze families of systems where this quantum anomaly occurs and some special systems where the spectral identity is preserved by quantization. Conversely, we point out the existence of isospectral quantum systems which do not correspond to isoperiodic classical systems.

  9. Robust observer for uncertain linear quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2006-09-15

    In the theory of quantum dynamical filtering, one of the biggest issues is that the underlying system dynamics represented by a quantum stochastic differential equation must be known exactly in order that the corresponding filter provides an optimal performance; however, this assumption is generally unrealistic. Therefore, in this paper, we consider a class of linear quantum systems subjected to time-varying norm-bounded parametric uncertainties and then propose a robust observer such that the variance of the estimation error is guaranteed to be within a certain bound. Although in the linear case much of classical control theory can be applied to quantum systems, the quantum robust observer obtained in this paper does not have a classical analog due to the system's specific structure with respect to the uncertainties. Moreover, by considering a typical quantum control problem, we show that the proposed robust observer is fairly robust against a parametric uncertainty of the system even when the other estimators--the optimal Kalman filter and risk-sensitive observer--fail in the estimation.

  10. High-Fidelity Adaptive Qubit Detection through Repetitive Quantum Nondemolition Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hume, D. B.; Rosenband, T.; Wineland, D. J.

    2007-09-01

    Using two trapped ion species (Al+27 and Be+9) as primary and ancillary quantum systems, we implement qubit measurements based on the repetitive transfer of information and quantum nondemolition detection. The repetition provides a natural mechanism for an adaptive measurement strategy, which leads to exponentially lower error rates compared to using a fixed number of detection cycles. For a single qubit we demonstrate 99.94% measurement fidelity. We also demonstrate a technique for adaptively measuring multiple qubit states using a single ancilla, and apply the technique to spectroscopy of an optical clock transition.

  11. Whole-body, real-time preclinical imaging of quantum dot fluorescence with time-gated detection.

    PubMed

    May, Andrzej; Bhaumik, Srabani; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Zhan, Chun; Yazdanfar, Siavash

    2009-01-01

    We describe a wide-field preclinical imaging system optimized for time-gated detection of quantum dot fluorescence emission. As compared to continuous wave measurements, image contrast was substantially improved by suppression of short-lifetime background autofluorescence. Real-time (8 frames/s) biological imaging of subcutaneous quantum dot injections is demonstrated simultaneously in multiple living mice.

  12. Second-order superintegrable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, W.; Kalnins, E. G.; Kress, J. M.

    2007-03-15

    A classical (or quantum) superintegrable system on an n-dimensional Riemannian manifold is an integrable Hamiltonian system with potential that admits 2n - 1 functionally independent constants of the motion that are polynomial in the momenta, the maximum number possible. If these constants of the motion are all quadratic, then the system is second-order superintegrable, the most tractable case and the one we study here. Such systems have remarkable properties: multi-integrability and separability, a quadratic algebra of symmetries whose representation theory yields spectral information about the Schroedinger operator, and deep connections with expansion formulas relating classes of special functions. For n = 2 and for conformally flat spaces when n = 3, we have worked out the structure of the classical systems and shown that the quadratic algebra always closes at order 6. Here, we describe the quantum analogs of these results. We show that, for nondegenerate potentials, each classical system has a unique quantum extension.

  13. Hybrid quantum systems with trapped charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotler, Shlomi; Simmonds, Raymond W.; Leibfried, Dietrich; Wineland, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Trapped charged particles have been at the forefront of quantum information processing (QIP) for a few decades now, with deterministic two-qubit logic gates reaching record fidelities of 99.9 % and single-qubit operations of much higher fidelity. In a hybrid system involving trapped charges, quantum degrees of freedom of macroscopic objects such as bulk acoustic resonators, superconducting circuits, or nanomechanical membranes, couple to the trapped charges and ideally inherit the coherent properties of the charges. The hybrid system therefore implements a "quantum transducer," where the quantum reality (i.e., superpositions and entanglement) of small objects is extended to include the larger object. Although a hybrid quantum system with trapped charges could be valuable both for fundamental research and for QIP applications, no such system exists today. Here we study theoretically the possibilities of coupling the quantum-mechanical motion of a trapped charged particle (e.g., an ion or electron) to the quantum degrees of freedom of superconducting devices, nanomechanical resonators, and quartz bulk acoustic wave resonators. For each case, we estimate the coupling rate between the charged particle and its macroscopic counterpart and compare it to the decoherence rate, i.e., the rate at which quantum superposition decays. A hybrid system can only be considered quantum if the coupling rate significantly exceeds all decoherence rates. Our approach is to examine specific examples by using parameters that are experimentally attainable in the foreseeable future. We conclude that hybrid quantum systems involving a single atomic ion are unfavorable compared with the use of a single electron because the coupling rates between the ion and its counterpart are slower than the expected decoherence rates. A system based on trapped electrons, on the other hand, might have coupling rates that significantly exceed decoherence rates. Moreover, it might have appealing properties such

  14. Quantum optical properties in plasmonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, C. H. Raymond

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic metallic particle (MP) can affect the optical properties of a quantum system (QS) in a remarkable way. We develop a general quantum nonlinear formalism with exact vectorial description for the scattered photons by the QS. The formalism enables us to study the variations of the dielectric function and photon spectrum of the QS with the particle distance between QS and MP, exciting laser direction, polarization and phase in the presence of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) in the MP. The quantum formalism also serves as a powerful tool for studying the effects of these parameters on the nonclassical properties of the scattered photons. The plasmonic effect of nanoparticles has promising possibilities as it provides a new way for manipulating quantum optical properties of light in nanophotonic systems.

  15. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J.

    1975-01-01

    A monitoring system developed to test the capability of a water recovery system to reject the passage of viruses into the recovered water is described. A nonpathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, is fed into the process stream before the recovery unit and the reclaimed water is assayed for its presence. Detection of the marker virus consists of two major components, concentration and isolation of the marker virus, and detection of the marker virus. The concentration system involves adsorption of virus to cellulose acetate filters in the presence of trivalent cations and low pH with subsequent desorption of the virus using volumes of high pH buffer. The detection of the virus is performed by a passive immune agglutination test utilizing specially prepared polystyrene particles. An engineering preliminary design was performed as a parallel effort to the laboratory development of the marker virus test system. Engineering schematics and drawings of a fully functional laboratory prototype capable of zero-G operation are presented. The instrument consists of reagent pump/metering system, reagent storage containers, a filter concentrator, an incubation/detector system, and an electronic readout and control system.

  16. Optimization of metabolite detection by quantum mechanics simulations in magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gambarota, Giulio

    2016-09-03

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) is a well established modality for investigating tissue metabolism in vivo. In recent years, many efforts by the scientific community have been directed towards the improvement of metabolite detection and quantitation. Quantum mechanics simulations allow for investigations of the MR signal behaviour of metabolites; thus, they provide an essential tool in the optimization of metabolite detection. In this review, we will examine quantum mechanics simulations based on the density matrix formalism. The density matrix was introduced by von Neumann in 1927 to take into account statistical effects within the theory of quantum mechanics. We will discuss the main steps of the density matrix simulation of an arbitrary spin system and show some examples for the strongly coupled two spin system.

  17. Note on quantum groups and integrable systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popolitov, A.

    2016-01-01

    The free-field formalism for quantum groups [preprint ITEP-M3/94, CRM-2202 hep-th/9409093] provides a special choice of coordinates on a quantum group. In these coordinates the construction of associated integrable system [arXiv:1207.1869] is especially simple. This choice also fits into general framework of cluster varieties [math.AG/0311245]—natural changes in coordinates are cluster mutations.

  18. Detection of electromagnetic radiation using micromechanical multiple quantum wells structures

    DOEpatents

    Datskos, Panagiotis G [Knoxville, TN; Rajic, Slobodan [Knoxville, TN; Datskou, Irene [Knoxville, TN

    2007-07-17

    An apparatus and method for detecting electromagnetic radiation employs a deflectable micromechanical apparatus incorporating multiple quantum wells structures. When photons strike the quantum-well structure, physical stresses are created within the sensor, similar to a "bimetallic effect." The stresses cause the sensor to bend. The extent of deflection of the sensor can be measured through any of a variety of conventional means to provide a measurement of the photons striking the sensor. A large number of such sensors can be arranged in a two-dimensional array to provide imaging capability.

  19. Toward simulating complex systems with quantum effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenion-Hanrath, Rachel Lynn

    Quantum effects like tunneling, coherence, and zero point energy often play a significant role in phenomena on the scales of atoms and molecules. However, the exact quantum treatment of a system scales exponentially with dimensionality, making it impractical for characterizing reaction rates and mechanisms in complex systems. An ongoing effort in the field of theoretical chemistry and physics is extending scalable, classical trajectory-based simulation methods capable of capturing quantum effects to describe dynamic processes in many-body systems; in the work presented here we explore two such techniques. First, we detail an explicit electron, path integral (PI)-based simulation protocol for predicting the rate of electron transfer in condensed-phase transition metal complex systems. Using a PI representation of the transferring electron and a classical representation of the transition metal complex and solvent atoms, we compute the outer sphere free energy barrier and dynamical recrossing factor of the electron transfer rate while accounting for quantum tunneling and zero point energy effects. We are able to achieve this employing only a single set of force field parameters to describe the system rather than parameterizing along the reaction coordinate. Following our success in describing a simple model system, we discuss our next steps in extending our protocol to technologically relevant materials systems. The latter half focuses on the Mixed Quantum-Classical Initial Value Representation (MQC-IVR) of real-time correlation functions, a semiclassical method which has demonstrated its ability to "tune'' between quantum- and classical-limit correlation functions while maintaining dynamic consistency. Specifically, this is achieved through a parameter that determines the quantumness of individual degrees of freedom. Here, we derive a semiclassical correction term for the MQC-IVR to systematically characterize the error introduced by different choices of simulation

  20. Quantum hacking of a continuous-variable quantum-key-distribution system using a wavelength attack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jing-Zheng; Weedbrook, Christian; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Wang, Shuang; Li, Hong-Wei; Chen, Wei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2013-06-01

    The security proofs of continuous-variable quantum key distribution are based on the assumptions that the eavesdropper can neither act on the local oscillator nor control Bob's beam splitter. These assumptions may be invalid in practice due to potential imperfections in the implementations of such protocols. In this paper, we consider the problem of transmitting the local oscillator in a public channel and propose a wavelength attack which allows the eavesdropper to control the intensity transmission of Bob's beam splitter by switching the wavelength of the input light. Specifically we target continuous-variable quantum key distribution systems that use the heterodyne detection protocol using either direct or reverse reconciliation. Our attack is proved to be feasible and renders all of the final keys shared between the legitimate parties insecure, even if they have monitored the intensity of the local oscillator. To prevent our attack on commercial systems, a simple wavelength filter should be randomly added before performing monitoring detection.

  1. Simultaneous multicolor detection system of the single-molecular microbial antigen by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy with fluorescent nanocrystal quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshino, Akiyoshi; Fujioka, Kouki; Yamamoto, Mayu; Manabe, Noriyoshi; Yasuhara, Masato; Suzuki, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Kenji

    2005-11-01

    Immunological diagnostic methods have been widely performed and showed high performance in molecular and cellular biology, molecular imaging, and medical diagnostics. We have developed novel methods for the fluorescent labeling of several antibodies coupled with fluorescent nanocrystals QDs. In this study we demonstrated that two bacterial toxins, diphtheria toxin and tetanus toxin, were detected simultaneously in the same view field of a cover slip by using directly QD-conjugated antibodies. We have succeeded in detecting bacterial toxins by counting luminescent spots on the evanescent field with using primary antibody conjugated to QDs. In addition, each bacterial toxin in the mixture can be separately detected by single excitation laser with emission band pass filters, and simultaneously in situ pathogen quantification was performed by calculating the luminescent density on the surface of the cover slip. Our results demonstrate that total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM) enables us to distinguish each antigen from mixed samples and can simultaneously quantitate multiple antigens by QD-conjugated antibodies. Bioconjugated QDs could have great potentialities for in practical biomedical applications to develop various high-sensitivity detection systems.

  2. Intruder detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. D.

    1970-01-01

    Moving coil geophones are utilized to develop a small, rugged, battery operated system capable of detecting seismic disturbances caused by intruders. Seismic disturbances sensed by each geophone are converted into electrical signals, amplified, and transmitted to remote receiver which provides listener with aural signal.

  3. DETECTION OR WARNING SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Tillman, J E

    1953-10-20

    This patent application describes a sensitive detection or protective system capable of giving an alarm or warning upon the entrance or intrusion of any body into a defined area or zone protected by a radiation field of suitable direction or extent.

  4. Super-resolving quantum radar: Coherent-state sources with homodyne detection suffice to beat the diffraction limit

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Kebei; Lee, Hwang; Gerry, Christopher C.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    2013-11-21

    There has been much recent interest in quantum metrology for applications to sub-Raleigh ranging and remote sensing such as in quantum radar. For quantum radar, atmospheric absorption and diffraction rapidly degrades any actively transmitted quantum states of light, such as N00N states, so that for this high-loss regime the optimal strategy is to transmit coherent states of light, which suffer no worse loss than the linear Beer's law for classical radar attenuation, and which provide sensitivity at the shot-noise limit in the returned power. We show that coherent radar radiation sources, coupled with a quantum homodyne detection scheme, provide both longitudinal and angular super-resolution much below the Rayleigh diffraction limit, with sensitivity at shot-noise in terms of the detected photon power. Our approach provides a template for the development of a complete super-resolving quantum radar system with currently available technology.

  5. Revealing Open Quantum Systems with Subsystem DFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishtal, Alisa; Pavanello, Michele

    The traditional quantum chemical methods, wave function or density based, are designed to solve for a closed system, where the Hamiltonian contains all relevant interactions. The closed system is, however, not realistic, as in real life the system is embedded in an environment with which it interacts to some degree. Including the description of the environment at the full quantum mechanical level leads to the Open Quantum Systems (OQS) theory: the only theory which can describe non-Markovian dynamics between the system and the environment. By allowing the flow of information in both directions phenomena such as quantum entanglement, relevant for the design of quantum computers, become available. While most OQS theories rely on the density matrix to describe the system-bath interaction, time-dependent subsystem DFT allows to approach the problem using the electron density. Through Dyson-like equations connecting the density-density response kernels of the OQS and its environment, the extent to which non-Markovian dynamics is present can be revealed. We illustrate this for the process of excitation energy transfer in coupled chromophores embedded in explicit solvent.

  6. Quantum hacking: attacking practical quantum key distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Bing; Fung, Chi-Hang Fred; Zhao, Yi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Chen, Christine; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2007-09-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) can, in principle, provide unconditional security based on the fundamental laws of physics. Unfortunately, a practical QKD system may contain overlooked imperfections and violate some of the assumptions in a security proof. Here, we report two types of eavesdropping attacks against a practical QKD system. The first one is "time-shift" attack, which is applicable to QKD systems with gated single photon detectors (SPDs). In this attack, the eavesdropper, Eve, exploits the time mismatch between the open windows of the two SPDs. She can acquire a significant amount of information on the final key by simply shifting the quantum signals forwards or backwards in time domain. Our experimental results in [9] with a commercial QKD system demonstrate that, under this attack, the original QKD system is breakable. This is the first experimental demonstration of a feasible attack against a commercial QKD system. This is a surprising result. The second one is "phase-remapping" attack [10]. Here, Eve exploits the fact that a practical phase modulator has a finite response time. In principle, Eve could change the encoded phase value by time-shifting the signal pulse relative to the reference pulse.

  7. Quantum teleportation of dynamics and effective interactions between remote systems.

    PubMed

    Muschik, Christine A; Hammerer, Klemens; Polzik, Eugene S; Cirac, Ignacio J

    2013-07-12

    Most protocols for quantum information processing consist of a series of quantum gates, which are applied sequentially. In contrast, interactions between matter and fields, for example, as well as measurements such as homodyne detection of light are typically continuous in time. We show how the ability to perform quantum operations continuously and deterministically can be leveraged for inducing nonlocal dynamics between two separate parties. We introduce a scheme for the engineering of an interaction between two remote systems and present a protocol that induces a dynamics in one of the parties that is controlled by the other one. Both schemes apply to continuous variable systems, run continuously in time, and are based on real-time feedback.

  8. Hacking commercial quantum cryptography systems by tailored bright illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lydersen, Lars; Wiechers, Carlos; Wittmann, Christoffer; Elser, Dominique; Skaar, Johannes; Makarov, Vadim

    2010-10-01

    The peculiar properties of quantum mechanics allow two remote parties to communicate a private, secret key, which is protected from eavesdropping by the laws of physics. So-called quantum key distribution (QKD) implementations always rely on detectors to measure the relevant quantum property of single photons. Here we demonstrate experimentally that the detectors in two commercially available QKD systems can be fully remote-controlled using specially tailored bright illumination. This makes it possible to tracelessly acquire the full secret key; we propose an eavesdropping apparatus built from off-the-shelf components. The loophole is likely to be present in most QKD systems using avalanche photodiodes to detect single photons. We believe that our findings are crucial for strengthening the security of practical QKD, by identifying and patching technological deficiencies.

  9. Authenticated Quantum Key Distribution with Collective Detection using Single Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Xu, Bing-Jie; Duan, Ji-Tong; Liu, Bin; Su, Qi; He, Yuan-Hang; Jia, Heng-Yue

    2016-10-01

    We present two authenticated quantum key distribution (AQKD) protocols by utilizing the idea of collective (eavesdropping) detection. One is a two-party AQKD protocol, the other is a multiparty AQKD protocol with star network topology. In these protocols, the classical channels need not be assumed to be authenticated and the single photons are used as the quantum information carriers. To achieve mutual identity authentication and establish a random key in each of the proposed protocols, only one participant should be capable of preparing and measuring single photons, and the main quantum ability that the rest of the participants should have is just performing certain unitary operations. Security analysis shows that these protocols are free from various kinds of attacks, especially the impersonation attack and the man-in-the-middle (MITM) attack.

  10. Spatially resolved single photon detection with a quantum sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Zagoskin, A. M.; Wilson, R. D.; Everitt, M.; Savel'ev, S.; Gulevich, D. R.; Allen, J.; Dubrovich, V. K.; Il'ichev, E.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a method of resolving a spatially coherent signal, which contains on average just a single photon, against the background of local noise at the same frequency. The method is based on detecting the signal simultaneously in several points more than a wavelength apart through the entangling interaction of the incoming photon with the quantum metamaterial sensor array. The interaction produces the spatially correlated quantum state of the sensor array, characterised by a collective observable (e.g., total magnetic moment), which is read out using a quantum nondemolition measurement. We show that the effects of local noise (e.g., fluctuations affecting the elements of the array) are suppressed relative to the signal from the spatially coherent field of the incoming photon as , where N is the number of array elements. The realisation of this approach in the microwave range would be especially useful and is within the reach of current experimental techniques. PMID:24322568

  11. High-Sensitivity Charge Detection with a Single-Lead Quantum Dot for Scalable Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    House, M. G.; Bartlett, I.; Pakkiam, P.; Koch, M.; Peretz, E.; van der Heijden, J.; Kobayashi, T.; Rogge, S.; Simmons, M. Y.

    2016-10-01

    We report the development of a high-sensitivity semiconductor charge sensor based on a quantum dot coupled to a single lead designed to minimize the geometric requirements of a charge sensor for scalable quantum-computing architectures. The quantum dot is fabricated in Si:P using atomic precision lithography, and its charge transitions are measured with rf reflectometry. A second quantum dot with two leads placed 42 nm away serves as both a charge for the sensor to measure and as a conventional rf single-electron transistor (rf SET) with which to make a comparison of the charge-detection sensitivity. We demonstrate sensitivity equivalent to an integration time of 550 ns to detect a single charge with a signal-to-noise ratio of 1 compared with an integration time of 55 ns for the rf SET. This level of sensitivity is suitable for fast (<15 μ s ) single-spin readout in quantum-information applications, with a significantly reduced geometric footprint compared to the rf SET.

  12. The effects of different quantum feedback operator types on the parameter precision of detection efficiency in optimal quantum estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Shao-Qiang; Zhu, Han-Jie; Zhang, Guo-Feng

    2017-04-01

    The effects of different quantum feedback types on the estimation precision of the detection efficiency are studied. It is found that the precision can be more effective enhanced by a certain feedback type through comparing these feedbacks and the precision has a positive relation with detection efficiency for the optimal feedback when the system reach the state of dynamic balance. In addition, the bigger the proportion of |1> is the higher the precision is and we will not obtain any information about the parameter to be estimated if |0> is chosen as initial state for the feedback type λσz.

  13. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  14. The path integral picture of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceperley, David

    2011-03-01

    The imaginary time path integral ``formalism'' was introduced in 1953 by Feynman to understand the superfluid transition in liquid helium. The equilibrium properties of quantum many body systems is isomorphic to the classical statistical mechanics of cross-linking polymer-like objects. With the Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, invented by Metropolis et al., also in 1953, a potential way of calculating properties of correlated quantum systems was in place. But calculations for many-body quantum systems did not become routine until computers and algorithms had become sufficiently powerful three decades later. Once such simulations could happen, it was realized that simulations provided a deeper insight into boson superfluids, in particular the relation of bose condensation to the polymer end-to-end distance, and the superfluid density to the polymer ``winding number.'' Some recent developments and applications to supersolids, and helium droplets will be given. Finally, limitations of the methodology e.g. to fermion systems are discussed.

  15. Criterion of quantum synchronization and controllable quantum synchronization based on an optomechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2015-02-01

    We propose a quantitative criterion to determine whether the coupled quantum systems can achieve complete synchronization or phase synchronization in the process of analyzing quantum synchronization. Adopting the criterion, we discuss the quantum synchronization effects between optomechanical systems and find that the error between the systems and the fluctuation of error is sensitive to coupling intensity by calculating the largest Lyapunov exponent of the model and quantum fluctuation, respectively. By taking the appropriate coupling intensity, we can control quantum synchronization even under different logical relationships between switches. Finally, we simulate the dynamical evolution of the system to verify the quantum synchronization criterion and to show the ability of synchronization control.

  16. Nonequilibrium Quantum Systems: Fluctuations and Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subasi, Yigit

    We explore some aspects of nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of classical and quantum systems. Two chapters are devoted to fluctuation theorems which were originally derived for classical systems. The main challenge in formulating them in quantum mechanics is the fact that fundamental quantities of interest, like work, are defined via the classical concept of a phase space trajectory. We utilize the decoherent histories conceptual framework, in which classical trajectories emerge in quantum mechanics as a result of coarse graining, and provide a first-principles analysis of the nonequilibrium work relation of Jarzynski and Crooks's fluctuation theorem for a quantum system interacting with a general environment based on the quantum Brownian motion (QBM) model. We indicate a parameter range at low temperatures where the theorems might fail in their original form. Fluctuation theorems of Jarzynski and Crooks for systems obeying classical Hamiltonian dynamics are derived under the assumption that the initial conditions are sampled from a canonical ensemble, even though the equilibrium state of an isolated system is typically associated with the microcanonical ensemble. We address this issue through an exact analysis of the classical Brownian motion model. We argue that a stronger form of ensemble equivalence than usually discussed in equilibrium statistical mechanics is required for these theorems to hold in the infinite environment limit irrespective of the ensemble used, and proceed to prove it for this model. An exact expression for the probability distribution of work is obtained for finite environments. Intuitively one expects a system to relax to an equilibrium state when brought into contact with a thermal environment. Yet it is important to have rigorous results that provide conditions for equilibration and characterize the equilibrium state. We consider the dynamics of open quantum systems using the Langevin and master equations and rigorously show that

  17. Heisenberg picture approach to the stability of quantum Markov systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Yu E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Miao, Zibo E-mail: zibo.miao@anu.edu.au; Amini, Hadis; Gough, John; Ugrinovskii, Valery; James, Matthew R.

    2014-06-15

    Quantum Markovian systems, modeled as unitary dilations in the quantum stochastic calculus of Hudson and Parthasarathy, have become standard in current quantum technological applications. This paper investigates the stability theory of such systems. Lyapunov-type conditions in the Heisenberg picture are derived in order to stabilize the evolution of system operators as well as the underlying dynamics of the quantum states. In particular, using the quantum Markov semigroup associated with this quantum stochastic differential equation, we derive sufficient conditions for the existence and stability of a unique and faithful invariant quantum state. Furthermore, this paper proves the quantum invariance principle, which extends the LaSalle invariance principle to quantum systems in the Heisenberg picture. These results are formulated in terms of algebraic constraints suitable for engineering quantum systems that are used in coherent feedback networks.

  18. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. I. Quantum registers and quantum gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    During recent years, quantum computations and the study of n-qubit quantum systems have attracted a lot of interest, both in theory and experiment. Apart from the promise of performing quantum computations, however, these investigations also revealed a great deal of difficulties which still need to be solved in practice. In quantum computing, unitary and non-unitary quantum operations act on a given set of qubits to form (entangled) states, in which the information is encoded by the overall system often referred to as quantum registers. To facilitate the simulation of such n-qubit quantum systems, we present the FEYNMAN program to provide all necessary tools in order to define and to deal with quantum registers and quantum operations. Although the present version of the program is restricted to unitary transformations, it equally supports—whenever possible—the representation of the quantum registers both, in terms of their state vectors and density matrices. In addition to the composition of two or more quantum registers, moreover, the program also supports their decomposition into various parts by applying the partial trace operation and the concept of the reduced density matrix. Using an interactive design within the framework of MAPLE, therefore, we expect the FEYNMAN program to be helpful not only for teaching the basic elements of quantum computing but also for studying their physical realization in the future. Program summaryTitle of program:FEYNMAN Catalogue number:ADWE Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computers for which the program is designed:All computers with a license of the computer algebra system MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterlo Maple Inc.] Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:Linux, MS Windows XP Programming language used:MAPLE 9.5 (but should be compatible

  19. Quantum Hall effect in semiconductor systems with quantum dots and antidots

    SciTech Connect

    Beltukov, Ya. M.; Greshnov, A. A.

    2015-04-15

    The integer quantum Hall effect in systems of semiconductor quantum dots and antidots is studied theoretically as a factor of temperature. It is established that the conditions for carrier localization in quantum-dot systems favor the observation of the quantum Hall effect at higher temperatures than in quantum-well systems. The obtained numerical results show that the fundamental plateau corresponding to the transition between the ground and first excited Landau levels can be retained up to a temperature of T ∼ 50 K, which is an order of magnitude higher than in the case of quantum wells. Implementation of the quantum Hall effect at such temperatures requires quantum-dot systems with controllable characteristics, including the optimal size and concentration and moderate geometrical and composition fluctuations. In addition, ordered arrangement is desirable, hence quantum antidots are preferable.

  20. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-11

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic–based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium–tin–oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir–Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10{sup −15} M to 10{sup −11} M.

  1. Quantum dot-based microfluidic biosensor for cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghrera, Aditya Sharma; Pandey, Chandra Mouli; Ali, Md. Azahar; Malhotra, Bansi Dhar

    2015-05-01

    We report results of the studies relating to fabrication of an impedimetric microfluidic-based nucleic acid sensor for quantification of DNA sequences specific to chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). The sensor chip is prepared by patterning an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate via wet chemical etching method followed by sealing with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microchannel for fluid control. The fabricated microfluidic chip comprising of a patterned ITO substrate is modified by depositing cadmium selenide quantum dots (QCdSe) via Langmuir-Blodgett technique. Further, the QCdSe surface has been functionalized with specific DNA probe for CML detection. The probe DNA functionalized QCdSe integrated miniaturized system has been used to monitor target complementary DNA concentration by measuring the interfacial charge transfer resistance via hybridization. The presence of complementary DNA in buffer solution significantly results in decreased electro-conductivity of the interface due to presence of a charge barrier for transport of the redox probe ions. The microfluidic DNA biosensor exhibits improved linearity in the concentration range of 10-15 M to 10-11 M.

  2. Detection of chemical clouds using widely tunable quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyal, Anish K.; Kotidis, Petros; Deutsch, Erik R.; Zhu, Ninghui; Norman, Mark; Ye, Jim; Zafiriou, Kostas; Mazurenko, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    Widely tunable quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) spanning the long-wave infrared (LWIR) atmospheric transmission window and an HgCdTe detector were incorporated into a transceiver having a 50-mm-diameter transmit/receive aperture. The transceiver was used in combination with a 50-mm-diameter hollow retro-reflector for the open-path detection of chemical clouds. Two rapidly tunable external-cavity QCLs spanned the wavelength range of 7.5 to 12.8 m. Open-path transmission measurements were made over round-trip path-lengths of up to 562 meters. Freon-132a and other gases were sprayed into the beam path and the concentration-length (CL) product was measured as a function of time. The system exhibited a noise-equivalent concentration (NEC) of 3 ppb for Freon-132a given a round-trip path of 310 meters. Algorithms based on correlation methods were used to both identify the gases and determine their CLproducts as a function of time.

  3. Effects of image processing on the detective quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hye-Suk; Kim, Hee-Joung; Cho, Hyo-Min; Lee, Chang-Lae; Lee, Seung-Wan; Choi, Yu-Na

    2010-04-01

    Digital radiography has gained popularity in many areas of clinical practice. This transition brings interest in advancing the methodologies for image quality characterization. However, as the methodologies for such characterizations have not been standardized, the results of these studies cannot be directly compared. The primary objective of this study was to standardize methodologies for image quality characterization. The secondary objective was to evaluate affected factors to Modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectrum (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) according to image processing algorithm. Image performance parameters such as MTF, NPS, and DQE were evaluated using the international electro-technical commission (IEC 62220-1)-defined RQA5 radiographic techniques. Computed radiography (CR) images of hand posterior-anterior (PA) for measuring signal to noise ratio (SNR), slit image for measuring MTF, white image for measuring NPS were obtained and various Multi-Scale Image Contrast Amplification (MUSICA) parameters were applied to each of acquired images. In results, all of modified images were considerably influence on evaluating SNR, MTF, NPS, and DQE. Modified images by the post-processing had higher DQE than the MUSICA=0 image. This suggests that MUSICA values, as a post-processing, have an affect on the image when it is evaluating for image quality. In conclusion, the control parameters of image processing could be accounted for evaluating characterization of image quality in same way. The results of this study could be guided as a baseline to evaluate imaging systems and their imaging characteristics by measuring MTF, NPS, and DQE.

  4. Time dilation in quantum systems and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikovski, Igor; Zych, Magdalena; Costa, Fabio; Brukner, Časlav

    2017-02-01

    Both quantum mechanics and general relativity are based on principles that defy our daily intuitions, such as time dilation, quantum interference and entanglement. Because the regimes where the two theories are typically tested are widely separated, their foundational principles are rarely jointly studied. Recent works have found that novel phenomena appear for quantum particles with an internal structure in the presence of time dilation, which can take place at low energies and in weak gravitational fields. Here we briefly review the effects of time dilation on quantum interference and generalize the results to a variety of systems. In addition, we provide an extended study of the basic principles of quantum theory and relativity that are of relevance for the effects and also address several questions that have been raised, such as the description in different reference frames, the role of the equivalence principle and the effective irreversibility of the decoherence. The manuscript clarifies some of the counterintuitive aspects arising when quantum phenomena and general relativistic effects are jointly considered.

  5. Relativistic quantum metrology in open system dynamics.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zehua; Wang, Jieci; Fan, Heng; Jing, Jiliang

    2015-01-22

    Quantum metrology studies the ultimate limit of precision in estimating a physical quantity if quantum strategies are exploited. Here we investigate the evolution of a two-level atom as a detector which interacts with a massless scalar field using the master equation approach for open quantum system. We employ local quantum estimation theory to estimate the Unruh temperature when probed by a uniformly accelerated detector in the Minkowski vacuum. In particular, we evaluate the Fisher information (FI) for population measurement, maximize its value over all possible detector preparations and evolution times, and compare its behavior with that of the quantum Fisher information (QFI). We find that the optimal precision of estimation is achieved when the detector evolves for a long enough time. Furthermore, we find that in this case the FI for population measurement is independent of initial preparations of the detector and is exactly equal to the QFI, which means that population measurement is optimal. This result demonstrates that the achievement of the ultimate bound of precision imposed by quantum mechanics is possible. Finally, we note that the same configuration is also available to the maximum of the QFI itself.

  6. Quantum Control in an Atomic Spin System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, C. S.; Woods, W.; Potts, J. R.; Ponsor, S.; Gardner, J. R.

    1998-11-01

    The experimental work described here investigates the physics of coherent quantum control in an atomic spin system. This type of system is very attractive for precision studies of coherent control for a number of reasons, including the ease with which it may be manipulated experimentally and the relative simplicity of its theoretical description. To this end, we are studying quantum control of the spin wavefunction of ground state (F=3) ^85Rb atoms confined in a vapor-cell MOT. Application of uniform magnetic and optical fields to this system results in an anharmonic ladder of seven levels whose state can be manipulated arbitrarily using radio-frequency rotating magnetic fields. Using the optimal control formalism of Shi and Rabitz, we have developed a numerical model of this system which predicts the appropriate control pulse shape given the initial and desired final state of the system. As predicted, we find that the control pulse which causes a given system evolution is not unique, allowing the construction of control pulses with multiple goals, such as evolution through specified intermediate states. This freedom should allow for the construction of control pulses that both produce the desired final state and are robust to decoherence effects. This type of precise control may find application in the development of quantum computation devices as well as in other types of nano-technology. An experimental implementation of quantum control in this system, already underway in our lab, will be presented.

  7. Network realization of triplet-type quantum stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Shaosheng; Fu, Shizhou; Chen, Yuping

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on a problem of network synthesis for a class of quantum stochastic systems. The systems under consideration are of triplet-type form and stem from linear quantum optics and linear quantum circuits. A new quantum network realization approach is proposed by generalizing the scattering operator from the scalar form to a unitary matrix in network components. It shows that the triplet-type quantum stochastic system can be approximated by a quantum network which consists of some one-degree-of-freedom generalized open-quantum harmonic oscillators (1DGQHOs) via series, concatenation and feedback connections.

  8. Water system virus detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fraser, A. S.; Wells, A. F.; Tenoso, H. J. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    The performance of a waste water reclamation system is monitored by introducing a non-pathogenic marker virus, bacteriophage F2, into the waste-water prior to treatment and, thereafter, testing the reclaimed water for the presence of the marker virus. A test sample is first concentrated by absorbing any marker virus onto a cellulose acetate filter in the presence of a trivalent cation at low pH and then flushing the filter with a limited quantity of a glycine buffer solution to desorb any marker virus present on the filter. Photo-optical detection of indirect passive immune agglutination by polystyrene beads indicates the performance of the water reclamation system in removing the marker virus. A closed system provides for concentrating any marker virus, initiating and monitoring the passive immune agglutination reaction, and then flushing the system to prepare for another sample.

  9. Ultrasonic Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Youngquist, Robert C. (Inventor); Moerk, J. Steven (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A system for detecting ultrasonic vibrations. such as those generated by a small leak in a pressurized container. vessel. pipe. or the like. comprises an ultrasonic transducer assembly and a processing circuit for converting transducer signals into an audio frequency range signal. The audio frequency range signal can be used to drive a pair of headphones worn by an operator. A diode rectifier based mixing circuit provides a simple, inexpensive way to mix the transducer signal with a square wave signal generated by an oscillator, and thereby generate the audio frequency signal. The sensitivity of the system is greatly increased through proper selection and matching of the system components. and the use of noise rejection filters and elements. In addition, a parabolic collecting horn is preferably employed which is mounted on the transducer assembly housing. The collecting horn increases sensitivity of the system by amplifying the received signals. and provides directionality which facilitates easier location of an ultrasonic vibration source.

  10. Quantum jump model for a system with a finite-size environment.

    PubMed

    Suomela, S; Kutvonen, A; Ala-Nissila, T

    2016-06-01

    Measuring the thermodynamic properties of open quantum systems poses a major challenge. A calorimetric detection has been proposed as a feasible experimental scheme to measure work and fluctuation relations in open quantum systems. However, the detection requires a finite size for the environment, which influences the system dynamics. This process cannot be modeled with the standard stochastic approaches. We develop a quantum jump model suitable for systems coupled to a finite-size environment. We use the method to study the common fluctuation relations and prove that they are satisfied.

  11. Constraint algebra for interacting quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fubini, S.; Roncadelli, M.

    1988-04-01

    We consider relativistic constrained systems interacting with external fields. We provide physical arguments to support the idea that the quantum constraint algebra should be the same as in the free quantum case. For systems with ordering ambiguities this principle is essential to obtain a unique quantization. This is shown explicitly in the case of a relativistic spinning particle, where our assumption about the constraint algebra plus invariance under general coordinate transformations leads to a unique S-matrix. On leave from Dipartimento di Fisica Nucleare e Teorica, Università di Pavia and INFN, I-27100 Pavia, Italy.

  12. Quons in a quantum dissipative system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-03-01

    String theory proves to be an imperative tool to explore the critical behavior of the quantum dissipative system. We discuss the quantum particles moving in two dimensions, in the presence of a uniform magnetic field, subject to a periodic potential and a dissipative force, which are described by the dissipative Wannier-Azbel-Hofstadter (DWAH) model. Using string theory formulation of the model, we find that the elementary excitations of the system at the generic points of the off-critical regions, in the zero temperature limit are quons, which satisfy q-deformed statistics.

  13. Contextuality without nonlocality in a superconducting quantum system

    PubMed Central

    Jerger, Markus; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Oppliger, Markus; Potočnik, Anton; Mondal, Mintu; Wallraff, Andreas; Goodenough, Kenneth; Wehner, Stephanie; Juliusson, Kristinn; Langford, Nathan K.; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-01-01

    Classical realism demands that system properties exist independently of whether they are measured, while noncontextuality demands that the results of measurements do not depend on what other measurements are performed in conjunction with them. The Bell–Kochen–Specker theorem states that noncontextual realism cannot reproduce the measurement statistics of a single three-level quantum system (qutrit). Noncontextual realistic models may thus be tested using a single qutrit without relying on the notion of quantum entanglement in contrast to Bell inequality tests. It is challenging to refute such models experimentally, since imperfections may introduce loopholes that enable a realist interpretation. Here we use a superconducting qutrit with deterministic, binary-outcome readouts to violate a noncontextuality inequality while addressing the detection, individual-existence and compatibility loopholes. This evidence of state-dependent contextuality also demonstrates the fitness of superconducting quantum circuits for fault-tolerant quantum computation in surface-code architectures, currently the most promising route to scalable quantum computing. PMID:27698351

  14. Gas Flow Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moss, Thomas; Ihlefeld, Curtis; Slack, Barry

    2010-01-01

    This system provides a portable means to detect gas flow through a thin-walled tube without breaking into the tubing system. The flow detection system was specifically designed to detect flow through two parallel branches of a manifold with only one inlet and outlet, and is a means for verifying a space shuttle program requirement that saves time and reduces the risk of flight hardware damage compared to the current means of requirement verification. The prototype Purge Vent and Drain Window Cavity Conditioning System (PVD WCCS) Flow Detection System consists of a heater and a temperature-sensing thermistor attached to a piece of Velcro to be attached to each branch of a WCCS manifold for the duration of the requirement verification test. The heaters and thermistors are connected to a shielded cable and then to an electronics enclosure, which contains the power supplies, relays, and circuit board to provide power, signal conditioning, and control. The electronics enclosure is then connected to a commercial data acquisition box to provide analog to digital conversion as well as digital control. This data acquisition box is then connected to a commercial laptop running a custom application created using National Instruments LabVIEW. The operation of the PVD WCCS Flow Detection System consists of first attaching a heater/thermistor assembly to each of the two branches of one manifold while there is no flow through the manifold. Next, the software application running on the laptop is used to turn on the heaters and to monitor the manifold branch temperatures. When the system has reached thermal equilibrium, the software application s graphical user interface (GUI) will indicate that the branch temperatures are stable. The operator can then physically open the flow control valve to initiate the test flow of gaseous nitrogen (GN2) through the manifold. Next, the software user interface will be monitored for stable temperature indications when the system is again at

  15. Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCLs) for standoff explosives detection : LDRD 138733 final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, Lisa Anne; Linker, Kevin Lane

    2009-09-01

    Continued acts of terrorism using explosive materials throughout the world have led to great interest in explosives detection technology, especially technologies that have a potential for remote or standoff detection. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the benefit of the possible use of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff explosives detection equipment. Standoff detection of explosives is currently one of the most difficult problems facing the explosives detection community. Increased domestic and troop security could be achieved through the remote detection of explosives. An effective remote or standoff explosives detection capability would save lives and prevent losses of mission-critical resources by increasing the distance between the explosives and the intended targets and/or security forces. Many sectors of the US government are urgently attempting to obtain useful equipment to deploy to our troops currently serving in hostile environments. This LDRD was undertaken to investigate the potential benefits of utilizing quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in standoff detection systems. This report documents the potential opportunities that Sandia National Laboratories can contribute to the field of QCL development. The following is a list of areas where SNL can contribute: (1) Determine optimal wavelengths for standoff explosives detection utilizing QCLs; (2) Optimize the photon collection and detection efficiency of a detection system for optical spectroscopy; (3) Develop QCLs with broader wavelength tunability (current technology is a 10% change in wavelength) while maintaining high efficiency; (4) Perform system engineering in the design of a complete detection system and not just the laser head; and (5) Perform real-world testing with explosive materials with commercial prototype detection systems.

  16. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, K.N.

    1999-05-18

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard. 1 fig.

  17. Arc fault detection system

    DOEpatents

    Jha, Kamal N.

    1999-01-01

    An arc fault detection system for use on ungrounded or high-resistance-grounded power distribution systems is provided which can be retrofitted outside electrical switchboard circuits having limited space constraints. The system includes a differential current relay that senses a current differential between current flowing from secondary windings located in a current transformer coupled to a power supply side of a switchboard, and a total current induced in secondary windings coupled to a load side of the switchboard. When such a current differential is experienced, a current travels through a operating coil of the differential current relay, which in turn opens an upstream circuit breaker located between the switchboard and a power supply to remove the supply of power to the switchboard.

  18. Realization of quantum information processing in quantum star network constituted by superconducting hybrid systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-12-01

    In the framework of superconducting hybrid systems, we construct a star quantum network in which a superconducting transmission line resonator as a quantum bus and multiple units constituted by transmission line resonator and superconducting qubits as the carriers of quantum information. We further propose and analyze a theoretical scheme to realize quantum information processing in the quantum network. The coupling between the bus and any two superconducting qubits can be selectively implemented based on the dark state resonances of the highly dissipative transmission line resonators, and it can be found that quantum information processing between any two units can be completed in one step. As examples, the transmission of unknown quantum states and the preparation of quantum entanglement in this quantum network are investigated. At last, we exhibit our simulation results and complete the relevant discussions in order to show the advantages of this kind of quantum network.

  19. Lyapunov Control of Quantum Systems with Impulsive Control Fields

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei; Sun, Jitao

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the Lyapunov control of finite-dimensional quantum systems with impulsive control fields, where the studied quantum systems are governed by the Schrödinger equation. By three different Lyapunov functions and the invariant principle of impulsive systems, we study the convergence of quantum systems with impulsive control fields and propose new results for the mentioned quantum systems in the form of sufficient conditions. Two numerical simulations are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed control method. PMID:23766712

  20. Quantum emulation of quasiperiodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senaratne, Ruwan; Geiger, Zachary; Fujiwara, Kurt; Singh, Kevin; Rajagopal, Shankari; Weld, David

    2016-05-01

    Tunable quasiperiodic optical traps can enable quantum emulation of electronic phenomena in quasicrystals. A 1D bichromatic lattice or a Gaussian beam intersecting a 2D square lattice in a direct analogy of the ``cut-and-project'' construction can be used to create tunable 1D quasiperiodic potentials for cold neutral atoms. We report on progress towards the observation of singular continuous diffraction patterns, fractal energy spectra, and Bloch oscillations in these synthetic quasicrystals. We will also discuss the existence of edge states which can be topologically pumped across the lattice by varying a phasonic parameter. We acknowledge support from the ONR, the ARO and the PECASE and DURIP programs, the AFOSR, the Alfred P. Sloan foundation and the President's Research Catalyst Award from the University of California Office of the President.

  1. Quantum dots as optical labels for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Shubha, Likitha R; Bhatt, Praveena; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2014-07-15

    Considering the fact that polyphenols have versatile activity in-vivo, its detection and quantification is very much important for a healthy diet. Laccase enzyme can convert polyphenols to yield mono/polyquinones which can quench Quantum dots fluorescence. This phenomenon of charge transfer from quinones to QDs was exploited as optical labels to detect polyphenols. CdTe QD may undergo dipolar interaction with quinones as a result of broad spectral absorption due to multiple excitonic states resulting from quantum confinement effects. Thus, "turn-off" fluorescence method was applied for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols by using laccase. We observed proportionate quenching of QDs fluorescence with respect to polyphenol concentration in the range of 100 µg to 1 ng/mL. Also, quenching of the photoluminescence was highly efficient and stable and could detect individual and total polyphenols with high sensitivity (LOD-1 ng/mL). Moreover, proposed method was highly efficient than any other reported methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and selectivity. Therefore, a novel optical sensor was developed for the detection of polyphenols at a sensitive level based on the charge transfer mechanism.

  2. EDITORIAL: CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems CAMOP: Quantum Non-Stationary Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodonov, Victor V.; Man'ko, Margarita A.

    2010-09-01

    Although time-dependent quantum systems have been studied since the very beginning of quantum mechanics, they continue to attract the attention of many researchers, and almost every decade new important discoveries or new fields of application are made. Among the impressive results or by-products of these studies, one should note the discovery of the path integral method in the 1940s, coherent and squeezed states in the 1960-70s, quantum tunneling in Josephson contacts and SQUIDs in the 1960s, the theory of time-dependent quantum invariants in the 1960-70s, different forms of quantum master equations in the 1960-70s, the Zeno effect in the 1970s, the concept of geometric phase in the 1980s, decoherence of macroscopic superpositions in the 1980s, quantum non-demolition measurements in the 1980s, dynamics of particles in quantum traps and cavity QED in the 1980-90s, and time-dependent processes in mesoscopic quantum devices in the 1990s. All these topics continue to be the subject of many publications. Now we are witnessing a new wave of interest in quantum non-stationary systems in different areas, from cosmology (the very first moments of the Universe) and quantum field theory (particle pair creation in ultra-strong fields) to elementary particle physics (neutrino oscillations). A rapid increase in the number of theoretical and experimental works on time-dependent phenomena is also observed in quantum optics, quantum information theory and condensed matter physics. Time-dependent tunneling and time-dependent transport in nano-structures are examples of such phenomena. Another emerging direction of study, stimulated by impressive progress in experimental techniques, is related to attempts to observe the quantum behavior of macroscopic objects, such as mirrors interacting with quantum fields in nano-resonators. Quantum effects manifest themselves in the dynamics of nano-electromechanical systems; they are dominant in the quite new and very promising field of circuit

  3. Classical system boundaries cannot be determined within quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Chris

    Multiple observers who interact with environmental encodings of the states of a macroscopic quantum system S as required by quantum Darwinism cannot demonstrate that they are jointly observing S without a joint a priori assumption of a classical boundary separating S from its environment E. Quantum Darwinism cannot, therefore, be regarded as providing a purely quantum-mechanical explanation of the "emergence" of classicality.

  4. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  5. Contributed Review: Quantum cascade laser based photoacoustic detection of explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J. S. Yu, B.; Fischer, H.; Chen, W.; Yalin, A. P.

    2015-03-15

    Detecting trace explosives and explosive-related compounds has recently become a topic of utmost importance for increasing public security around the world. A wide variety of detection methods and an even wider range of physical chemistry issues are involved in this very challenging area. Optical sensing methods, in particular mid-infrared spectrometry techniques, have a great potential to become a more desirable tools for the detection of explosives. The small size, simplicity, high output power, long-term reliability make external cavity quantum cascade lasers (EC-QCLs) the promising spectroscopic sources for developing analytical instrumentation. This work reviews the current technical progress in EC-QCL-based photoacoustic spectroscopy for explosives detection. The potential for both close-contact and standoff configurations using this technique is completely presented over the course of approximately the last one decade.

  6. Lithography system using quantum entangled photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Colin (Inventor); Dowling, Jonathan (Inventor); della Rossa, Giovanni (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A system of etching using quantum entangled particles to get shorter interference fringes. An interferometer is used to obtain an interference fringe. N entangled photons are input to the interferometer. This reduces the distance between interference fringes by n, where again n is the number of entangled photons.

  7. Eigenstate tracking in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jun; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Lidar, Daniel A.; Luo, Da-Wei; Wu, Lian-Ao

    2016-10-01

    Keeping a quantum system in a given instantaneous eigenstate is a control problem with numerous applications, e.g., in quantum information processing. The problem is even more challenging in the setting of open quantum systems, where environment-mediated transitions introduce additional decoherence channels. Adiabatic passage is a well-established solution but requires a sufficiently slow evolution time that is dictated by the adiabatic theorem. Here we develop a systematic projection theory formulation for the transitionless evolution of general open quantum systems described by time-local master equations. We derive a time-convolutionless dynamical equation for the target instantaneous eigenstate of a given time-dependent Hamiltonian. A transitionless dynamics then arises in terms of a competition between the average Hamiltonian gap and the decoherence rate, which implies optimal adiabaticity timescales. We show how eigenstate tracking can be accomplished via control pulses, without explicitly incorporating counter-diabatic driving, thus offering an alternative route to accelerate adiabaticity. We examine rectangular pulses, chaotic signals, and white noise, and find that, remarkably, the effectiveness of eigenstate tracking hardly depends on the details of the control functions. In all cases the control protocol keeps the system in the desired instantaneous eigenstate throughout the entire evolution, along an accelerated adiabatic path.

  8. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations. PMID:27725688

  9. Optimal control of complex atomic quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Frank, S.; Bonneau, M.; Schmiedmayer, J.; Hild, S.; Gross, C.; Cheneau, M.; Bloch, I.; Pichler, T.; Negretti, A.; Calarco, T.; Montangero, S.

    2016-10-01

    Quantum technologies will ultimately require manipulating many-body quantum systems with high precision. Cold atom experiments represent a stepping stone in that direction: a high degree of control has been achieved on systems of increasing complexity. However, this control is still sub-optimal. In many scenarios, achieving a fast transformation is crucial to fight against decoherence and imperfection effects. Optimal control theory is believed to be the ideal candidate to bridge the gap between early stage proof-of-principle demonstrations and experimental protocols suitable for practical applications. Indeed, it can engineer protocols at the quantum speed limit – the fastest achievable timescale of the transformation. Here, we demonstrate such potential by computing theoretically and verifying experimentally the optimal transformations in two very different interacting systems: the coherent manipulation of motional states of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate and the crossing of a quantum phase transition in small systems of cold atoms in optical lattices. We also show that such processes are robust with respect to perturbations, including temperature and atom number fluctuations.

  10. Hidden supersymmetry in quantum bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Correa, Francisco Plyushchay, Mikhail S.

    2007-10-15

    We show that some simple well-studied quantum mechanical systems without fermion (spin) degrees of freedom display, surprisingly, a hidden supersymmetry. The list includes the bound state Aharonov-Bohm, the Dirac delta and the Poeschl-Teller potential problems, in which the unbroken and broken N = 2 supersymmetry of linear and nonlinear (polynomial) forms is revealed.

  11. Coherent control in simple quantum systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prants, Sergey V.

    1995-01-01

    Coherent dynamics of two, three, and four-level quantum systems, simultaneously driven by concurrent laser pulses of arbitrary and different forms, is treated by using a nonperturbative, group-theoretical approach. The respective evolution matrices are calculated in an explicit form. General aspects of controllability of few-level atoms by using laser fields are treated analytically.

  12. Open quantum systems approach to atomtronics

    SciTech Connect

    Pepino, R. A.; Cooper, J.; Meiser, D.; Anderson, D. Z.; Holland, M. J.

    2010-07-15

    We derive a quantum master equation to treat quantum systems interacting with multiple reservoirs. The formalism is used to investigate the atomic transport of bosons across a variety of lattice configurations. We demonstrate how the behavior of an electronic diode, a field-effect transistor, and a bipolar junction transistor can be realized with neutral, ultracold atoms trapped in optical lattices. An analysis of the current fluctuations is provided for the case of the atomtronic diode. Finally, we show that it is possible to demonstrate and logic gate behavior in an optical lattice.

  13. Duality in the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lütken, C. A.; Ross, G. G.

    1992-05-01

    We suggest that a unified description of the integer and fractional phases of the quantum Hall system may be possible if the scaling diagram of transport coefficients is invariant under linear fractional (modular) transformations. In this model the hierarchy of states, as well as the observed universality of critical exponents, are consequences of a discrete SL(2,openZ) symmetry acting on the parameter space of an effective quantum-field theory. Available scaling data on the position of delocalization fixed points in the integer case and the position of mobility fixed points in the fractional case agree with the model within experimental accuracy.

  14. Suppressing Chaos of Warship Power System Based on the Quantum Mechanics Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Xinrong; Li, Longsuo

    2014-08-01

    Chaos control of marine power system is investigated by adding the Gaussian white noise to the system. The top Lyapunov exponent is computed to detect whether the classical system chaos or not, also the phase portraits are plotted to further verify the obtained results. The classical control of chaos and its quantum counterpart of the marine power system are investigated. The Hamiltonian of the controlled system is given to analyze the quantum counterpart of the classical system, which is based on the quantum mechanics theory.

  15. An impurity-induced gap system as a quantum data bus for quantum state transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Bing; Li, Yong; Song, Z.; Sun, C.-P.

    2014-09-15

    We introduce a tight-binding chain with a single impurity to act as a quantum data bus for perfect quantum state transfer. Our proposal is based on the weak coupling limit of the two outermost quantum dots to the data bus, which is a gapped system induced by the impurity. By connecting two quantum dots to two sites of the data bus, the system can accomplish a high-fidelity and long-distance quantum state transfer. Numerical simulations for finite system show that the numerical and analytical results of the effective coupling strength agree well with each other. Moreover, we study the robustness of this quantum communication protocol in the presence of disorder in the couplings between the nearest-neighbor quantum dots. We find that the gap of the system plays an important role in robust quantum state transfer.

  16. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, Hoi-Kwong; Chau, Hoi Fung

    1998-01-01

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically.

  17. Quantum cryptographic system with reduced data loss

    DOEpatents

    Lo, H.K.; Chau, H.F.

    1998-03-24

    A secure method for distributing a random cryptographic key with reduced data loss is disclosed. Traditional quantum key distribution systems employ similar probabilities for the different communication modes and thus reject at least half of the transmitted data. The invention substantially reduces the amount of discarded data (those that are encoded and decoded in different communication modes e.g. using different operators) in quantum key distribution without compromising security by using significantly different probabilities for the different communication modes. Data is separated into various sets according to the actual operators used in the encoding and decoding process and the error rate for each set is determined individually. The invention increases the key distribution rate of the BB84 key distribution scheme proposed by Bennett and Brassard in 1984. Using the invention, the key distribution rate increases with the number of quantum signals transmitted and can be doubled asymptotically. 23 figs.

  18. Heat exchange mediated by a quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panasyuk, George Y.; Levin, George A.; Yerkes, Kirk L.

    2012-08-01

    We consider heat transfer between two thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system using the generalized quantum Langevin equation. The thermal reservoirs are treated as ensembles of oscillators within the framework of the Drude-Ullersma model. General expressions for the heat current and thermal conductance are obtained for arbitrary coupling strength between the reservoirs and the mediator and for different temperature regimes. As an application of these results we discuss the origin of Fourier's law in a chain of large but finite subsystems coupled to each other by the quantum mediators. We also address a question of anomalously large heat current between the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and substrate found in a recent experiment. The question of minimum thermal conductivity is revisited in the framework of scaling theory as a potential application of the developed approach.

  19. Heat exchange mediated by a quantum system.

    PubMed

    Panasyuk, George Y; Levin, George A; Yerkes, Kirk L

    2012-08-01

    We consider heat transfer between two thermal reservoirs mediated by a quantum system using the generalized quantum Langevin equation. The thermal reservoirs are treated as ensembles of oscillators within the framework of the Drude-Ullersma model. General expressions for the heat current and thermal conductance are obtained for arbitrary coupling strength between the reservoirs and the mediator and for different temperature regimes. As an application of these results we discuss the origin of Fourier's law in a chain of large but finite subsystems coupled to each other by the quantum mediators. We also address a question of anomalously large heat current between the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) tip and substrate found in a recent experiment. The question of minimum thermal conductivity is revisited in the framework of scaling theory as a potential application of the developed approach.

  20. Glycol leak detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabe, Paul; Browne, Keith; Brink, Janus; Coetzee, Christiaan J.

    2016-07-01

    MonoEthylene glycol coolant is used extensively on the Southern African Large Telescope to cool components inside the telescope chamber. To prevent coolant leaks from causing serious damage to electronics and optics, a Glycol Leak Detection System was designed to automatically shut off valves in affected areas. After two years of research and development the use of leaf wetness sensors proved to work best and is currently operational. These sensors are placed at various critical points within the instrument payload that would trigger the leak detector controller, which closes the valves, and alerts the building management system. In this paper we describe the research of an initial concept and the final accepted implementation and the test results thereof.

  1. Identification of open quantum systems from observable time traces

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2015-05-27

    Estimating the parameters that dictate the dynamics of a quantum system is an important task for quantum information processing and quantum metrology, as well as fundamental physics. In our paper we develop a method for parameter estimation for Markovian open quantum systems using a temporal record of measurements on the system. Furthermore, the method is based on system realization theory and is a generalization of our previous work on identification of Hamiltonian parameters.

  2. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature.

  3. Edge reconstructions in fractional quantum Hall systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Yogesh; Nguyen, Hoang; Murthy, Ganpathy

    2003-03-01

    Two dimensional electron systems exhibiting fractional quantum Hall effects are characterized by a quantized Hall conductance and a dissipationless bulk. The transport in these systems occurs only at the edges where gapless excitations are possible [1]. We present a microscopic calculation of these egde-states at filling factors ν=1/3 and ν=2/5 using the Hamiltonian theory of the fractional quantum Hall effect [2]. We find that the quantum Hall egde undergoes a reconstruction as the confining potential, produced by the background charge density, softens [3,4]. Our results have implications to the tunneling experiments into the edge of a fractional quantum Hall system [5]. 1: X. G.Wen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 64, 2206 (1990). 2: R. Shankar and G. Murthy, Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 4437 (1997). 3: C. de C. Chamon and X. G. Wen, Phys. Rev. B 49, 8227 (1994). 4: X. Wan, K. Yang, and E. H. Razayi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 056802 (2002). 5: A.M.Chang et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 143 (2000).

  4. Periodic thermodynamics of open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandner, Kay; Seifert, Udo

    2016-06-01

    The thermodynamics of quantum systems coupled to periodically modulated heat baths and work reservoirs is developed. By identifying affinities and fluxes, the first and the second law are formulated consistently. In the linear response regime, entropy production becomes a quadratic form in the affinities. Specializing to Lindblad dynamics, we identify the corresponding kinetic coefficients in terms of correlation functions of the unperturbed dynamics. Reciprocity relations follow from symmetries with respect to time reversal. The kinetic coefficients can be split into a classical and a quantum contribution subject to an additional constraint, which follows from a natural detailed balance condition. This constraint implies universal bounds on efficiency and power of quantum heat engines. In particular, we show that Carnot efficiency cannot be reached whenever quantum coherence effects are present, i.e., when the Hamiltonian used for work extraction does not commute with the bare system Hamiltonian. For illustration, we specialize our universal results to a driven two-level system in contact with a heat bath of sinusoidally modulated temperature.

  5. Quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads for multiplex detection of tumor markers.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Wang, Huan; Dong, Shujun; Zhu, Peizhi; Diao, Guowang; Yang, Zhanjun

    2014-12-04

    Novel quantum-dot-tagged photonic crystal beads were fabricated for multiplex detection of tumor markers via self-assembly of quantum dot-embedded polystyrene nanospheres into photonic crystal beads through a microfluidic device.

  6. Ergodicity in randomly perturbed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherardini, Stefano; Lovecchio, Cosimo; Müller, Matthias M.; Lombardi, Pietro; Caruso, Filippo; Saverio Cataliotti, Francesco

    2017-03-01

    The theoretical cornerstone of statistical mechanics is the ergodic assumption, i.e. the assumption that the time average of an observable equals its ensemble average. Here, we show how such a property is present when an open quantum system is continuously perturbed by an external environment effectively observing the system at random times while the system dynamics approaches the quantum Zeno regime. In this context, by large deviation theory we analytically show how the most probable value of the probability for the system to be in a given state eventually deviates from the non-stochastic case when the Zeno condition is not satisfied. We experimentally test our results with ultra-cold atoms prepared on an atom chip.

  7. Detection of single quantum dots in model organisms with sheet illumination microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Friedrich, Mike; Nozadze, Revaz; Gan, Qiang; Zelman-Femiak, Monika; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Wagner, Toni U.; Harms, Gregory S.

    2009-12-18

    Single-molecule detection and tracking is important for observing biomolecule interactions in the microenvironment. Here we report selective plane illumination microscopy (SPIM) with single-molecule detection in living organisms, which enables fast imaging and single-molecule tracking and optical penetration beyond 300 {mu}m. We detected single nanocrystals in Drosophila larvae and zebrafish embryo. We also report our first tracking of single quantum dots during zebrafish development, which displays a transition from flow to confined motion prior to the blastula stage. The new SPIM setup represents a new technique, which enables fast single-molecule imaging and tracking in living systems.

  8. Some Theoretical Studies of Disordered Quantum Systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrosavljevic, Vladimir

    1988-12-01

    In the first part of the thesis, two examples of disordered electronic systems are considered. I first investigate the role of conformational disorder relevant to the electronic structure of conjugated polymers such as polydiacetylene. Both in a solid and in solution the polymer undergoes a conformational transition accompanied by color changes as the temperature is increased. A simple statistical mechanical model for the transition is presented and solved, with the result defining the effective distribution of disorder for the electronic system. Renormalization group methods are then used to calculate the density of states and localization length for the model. Next, I study the fate of a hydrogenic atom in a hard sphere fluid. In this case, the disorder comes from the distribution of open spaces in the fluid accommodating the electron on its way around the nucleus. Simplified models for the electronic propagation in limits of small and large orbitals are presented. Simple variational methods can then be used to calculate the shift and broadening of spectral lines as a function of solvent density. In the second part, I examine the effects of quantum fluctuations on phase transitions in disordered systems. An example where such effects are manifestly important is the proton glass--a random mixture of a ferroelectric and an antiferroelectric component. The system can be described using a quantum mechanical Ising spin glass model, and the mean-field theory is solved using a novel combination of discretized path integral methods and replica techniques. The results show that the glassy phase is more susceptible to destruction by tunneling than are the ordered phases. Finally, I also consider the role of randomness in the size of quantum fluctuations, on the example of an Ising model with randomly mixed classical and quantum spins. For this model, the existence of a critical concentration of quantum spins is demonstrated, below which tunneling cannot destroy the ordered

  9. Quantum hologram and relativistic hodogram: Magnetic resonance tomography and gravitational wavelet detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binz, Ernst; Schempp, Walter

    2001-06-01

    Quantum holography is a well established theory of mathematical physics based on harmonic analysis on the Heisenberg Lie group G. The geometric quantization is performed by projectivization of the complexified coadjoint orbit picture of the unitary dual Ĝ of G in order to achieve a geometric adjustment of the quantum scenario to special relativity theory. It admits applications to various imaging modalities such as synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in the microwave range, and, most importantly for the field of non-invasive medical diagnosis, to the clinical imaging modality of magnetic resonance tomography (MRI) in the radio frequency range. Quantum holography explains the quantum teleportation phenomemon through Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) channels which is a consequence of the non-locality of phase coherent quantum field theory, the concept of absolute simultaneity of special relativity theory which provides the Einstein equivalence of energy and Fitzgerald-Lorentz dilated mass, and the perfect quantum holographic replication process of molecular genetic information processing. It specifically reveals what was before unobservable in quantum optics, namely the interference phenomena of matter wavelets of Bose-Einstein condensates, and what was before unobservable in special relativity, namely the light in flight (LIF) recording processing by ultrafast laser pulse trains. Finally, it provides a Lie group theoretical approach to the Kruskal coordinatized Schwarzschild manifold of relativistic cosmology with large scale applications to general relativity theory such as gravitational instanton symmetries and the theory of black holes. The direct spinorial detection of gravitational wavelets emitted by the binary radio pulsar PSR 1913+16 and known only by anticipatory system computation so far will also be based on the principles of quantum holography applied to very large array (VLA) radio interferometers. .

  10. Uncertainty relation for non-Hamiltonian quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Tarasov, Vasily E.

    2013-01-15

    General forms of uncertainty relations for quantum observables of non-Hamiltonian quantum systems are considered. Special cases of uncertainty relations are discussed. The uncertainty relations for non-Hamiltonian quantum systems are considered in the Schroedinger-Robertson form since it allows us to take into account Lie-Jordan algebra of quantum observables. In uncertainty relations, the time dependence of quantum observables and the properties of this dependence are discussed. We take into account that a time evolution of observables of a non-Hamiltonian quantum system is not an endomorphism with respect to Lie, Jordan, and associative multiplications.

  11. Quantum chaos and thermalization in gapped systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rigol, Marcos; Santos, Lea F.

    2010-07-15

    We investigate the onset of thermalization and quantum chaos in finite one-dimensional gapped systems of hard-core bosons. Integrability in these systems is broken by next-nearest-neighbor repulsive interactions, which also generate a superfluid to insulator transition. By employing full exact diagonalization, we study chaos indicators and few-body observables. We show that with increasing system size, chaotic behavior is seen over a broader range of parameters and, in particular, deeper into the insulating phase. Concomitantly, we observe that, as the system size increases, the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis extends its range of validity inside the insulating phase and is accompanied by the thermalization of the system.

  12. Neonatal Jaundice Detection System.

    PubMed

    Aydın, Mustafa; Hardalaç, Fırat; Ural, Berkan; Karap, Serhat

    2016-07-01

    Neonatal jaundice is a common condition that occurs in newborn infants in the first week of life. Today, techniques used for detection are required blood samples and other clinical testing with special equipment. The aim of this study is creating a non-invasive system to control and to detect the jaundice periodically and helping doctors for early diagnosis. In this work, first, a patient group which is consisted from jaundiced babies and a control group which is consisted from healthy babies are prepared, then between 24 and 48 h after birth, 40 jaundiced and 40 healthy newborns are chosen. Second, advanced image processing techniques are used on the images which are taken with a standard smartphone and the color calibration card. Segmentation, pixel similarity and white balancing methods are used as image processing techniques and RGB values and pixels' important information are obtained exactly. Third, during feature extraction stage, with using colormap transformations and feature calculation, comparisons are done in RGB plane between color change values and the 8-color calibration card which is specially designed. Finally, in the bilirubin level estimation stage, kNN and SVR machine learning regressions are used on the dataset which are obtained from feature extraction. At the end of the process, when the control group is based on for comparisons, jaundice is succesfully detected for 40 jaundiced infants and the success rate is 85 %. Obtained bilirubin estimation results are consisted with bilirubin results which are obtained from the standard blood test and the compliance rate is 85 %.

  13. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes.

  14. Photoelectric detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, J. R.; Schansman, R. R.

    1982-03-01

    A photoelectric beam system for the detection of the arrival of an object at a discrete station wherein artificial light, natural light, or no light may be present is described. A signal generator turns on and off a signal light at a selected frequency. When the object in question arrives on station, ambient light is blocked by the object, and the light from the signal light is reflected onto a photoelectric sensor which has a delayed electrical output but is of the frequency of the signal light. Outputs from both the signal source and the photoelectric sensor are fed to inputs of an exclusively OR detector which provides as an output the difference between them. The difference signal is a small width pulse occurring at the frequency of the signal source. By filter means, this signal is distinguished from those responsive to sunlight, darkness, or 120 Hz artificial light. In this fashion, the presence of an object is positively established.

  15. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latifah, E.; Purwanto, A.

    2014-03-01

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  16. Multiple-state quantum Otto engine, 1D box system

    SciTech Connect

    Latifah, E.; Purwanto, A.

    2014-03-24

    Quantum heat engines produce work using quantum matter as their working substance. We studied adiabatic and isochoric processes and defined the general force according to quantum system. The processes and general force are used to evaluate a quantum Otto engine based on multiple-state of one dimensional box system and calculate the efficiency. As a result, the efficiency depends on the ratio of initial and final width of system under adiabatic processes.

  17. Thermalization of field driven quantum systems

    PubMed Central

    Fotso, H.; Mikelsons, K.; Freericks, J. K.

    2014-01-01

    There is much interest in how quantum systems thermalize after a sudden change, because unitary evolution should preclude thermalization. The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis resolves this because all observables for quantum states in a small energy window have essentially the same value; it is violated for integrable systems due to the infinite number of conserved quantities. Here, we show that when a system is driven by a DC electric field there are five generic behaviors: (i) monotonic or (ii) oscillatory approach to an infinite-temperature steady state; (iii) monotonic or (iv) oscillatory approach to a nonthermal steady state; or (v) evolution to an oscillatory state. Examining the Hubbard model (which thermalizes under a quench) and the Falicov-Kimball model (which does not), we find both exhibit scenarios (i–iv), while only Hubbard shows scenario (v). This shows richer behavior than in interaction quenches and integrability in the absence of a field plays no role. PMID:24736404

  18. Direct detection of classically undetectable dark matter through quantum decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riedel, C. Jess

    2014-03-01

    Although various pieces of indirect evidence about the nature of dark matter have been collected, its direct detection has eluded experimental searches despite extensive effort. If the mass of dark matter is below 1 MeV, it is essentially imperceptible to conventional detection methods because negligible energy is transferred to nuclei during collisions. Here I propose directly detecting dark matter through the quantum decoherence it causes rather than its classical effects such as recoil or ionization. I show that quantum spatial superpositions are sensitive to low-mass dark matter which is inaccessible to classical techniques. This provides new independent motivation for matter interferometry with large masses, especially on spaceborne platforms. The apparent dark matter wind we experience as the Sun travels through the Milky Way ensures interferometers and related devices are directional detectors, and so are able to provide unmistakable evidence that decoherence has galactic origins. This research was partially supported by the U.S. Department of Energy through the LANL/LDRD program, and by the John Templeton Foundation through grant number 21484.

  19. Mesoscopic systems: classical irreversibility and quantum coherence.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Bernard

    2012-09-28

    Mesoscopic physics is a sub-discipline of condensed-matter physics that focuses on the properties of solids in a size range intermediate between bulk matter and individual atoms. In particular, it is characteristic of a domain where a certain number of interacting objects can easily be tuned between classical and quantum regimes, thus enabling studies at the border of the two. In magnetism, such a tuning was first realized with large-spin magnetic molecules called single-molecule magnets (SMMs) with archetype Mn(12)-ac. In general, the mesoscopic scale can be relatively large (e.g. micrometre-sized superconducting circuits), but, in magnetism, it is much smaller and can reach the atomic scale with rare earth (RE) ions. In all cases, it is shown how quantum relaxation can drastically reduce classical irreversibility. Taking the example of mesoscopic spin systems, the origin of irreversibility is discussed on the basis of the Landau-Zener model. A classical counterpart of this model is described enabling, in particular, intuitive understanding of most aspects of quantum spin dynamics. The spin dynamics of mesoscopic spin systems (SMM or RE systems) becomes coherent if they are well isolated. The study of the damping of their Rabi oscillations gives access to most relevant decoherence mechanisms by different environmental baths, including the electromagnetic bath of microwave excitation. This type of decoherence, clearly seen with spin systems, is easily recovered in quantum simulations. It is also observed with other types of qubits such as a single spin in a quantum dot or a superconducting loop, despite the presence of other competitive decoherence mechanisms. As in the molecular magnet V(15), the leading decoherence terms of superconducting qubits seem to be associated with a non-Markovian channel in which short-living entanglements with distributions of two-level systems (nuclear spins, impurity spins and/or charges) leading to 1/f noise induce τ(1)-like

  20. Detection of Majorana Kramers Pairs Using a Quantum Point Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian; Pan, Wei; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a setup that integrates a quantum point contact (QPC) and a Josephson junction on a quantum spin Hall sample, experimentally realizable in InAs/GaSb quantum wells. The confinement due to both the QPC and the superconductor results in a Kramers pair of Majorana zero-energy bound states when the superconducting phases in the two arms differ by an odd multiple of π across the Josephson junction. We investigate the detection of these Majorana pairs with the integrated QPC, and find a robust switching from normal to Andreev scattering across the edges due to the presence of Majorana Kramers pairs. Such a switching of the current represents a qualitative signature where multiterminal differential conductances oscillate with alternating signs when the external magnetic field is tuned. We show that this qualitative signature is also present in current cross-correlations. Thus, the change of the backscattering current nature affects both conductance and shot noise, the measurement of which offers a significant advantage over quantitative signatures such as conductance quantization in realistic measurements.

  1. Quantum hacking: Experimental demonstration of time-shift attack against practical quantum-key-distribution systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yi; Fung, Chi-Hang F.; Qi, Bing; Chen, Christine; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2009-03-01

    Quantum key distribution (QKD) systems can send signals over more than 100 km standard optical fiber and are widely believed to be secure. Here, we show experimentally for the first time a technologically feasible attack, namely the time-shift attack, against a commercial QKD system. Our result shows that, contrary to popular belief, an eavesdropper, Eve, has a non-negligible probability (˜4%) to break the security of the system. Eve's success is due to the well-known detection efficiency loophole in the experimental testing of Bell inequalities. Therefore, the detection efficiency loophole plays a key role not only in fundamental physics, but also in technological applications such as QKD. Our work is published in [1]. [4pt] [1] Y. Zhao, C.-H. F. Fung, B. Qi, C. Chen, and H.-K. Lo, Phys. Rev. A, 78:042333 (2008).

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on Mechanical Systems at the Quantum Limit FOCUS ON MECHANICAL SYSTEMS AT THE QUANTUM LIMIT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aspelmeyer, Markus; Schwab, Keith

    2008-09-01

    The last five years have witnessed an amazing development in the field of nano- and micromechanics. What was widely considered fantasy ten years ago is about to become an experimental reality: the quantum regime of mechanical systems is within reach of current experiments. Two factors (among many) have contributed significantly to this situation. As part of the widespread effort into nanoscience and nanofabrication, it is now possible to produce high-quality nanomechanical and micromechanical resonators, spanning length scales of millimetres to nanometres, and frequencies from kilohertz to gigahertz. Researchers coupled these mechanical elements to high-sensitivity actuation and readout systems such as single-electron transistors, quantum dots, atomic point contacts, SQUID loops, high-finesse optical or microwave-cavities etc. Some of these ultra-sensitive readout schemes are in principle capable of detection at the quantum limit and a large part of the experimental effort is at present devoted to achieving this. On the other hand, the fact that the groups working in the field come from various different physics backgrounds—the authors of this editorial are a representative sample—has been a constant source of inspiration for helpful theoretical and experimental tools that have been adapted from other fields to the mechanical realm. To name just one example: ideas from quantum optics have led to the recent demonstration (both in theory and experiment) that coupling a mechanical resonator to a high-finesse optical cavity can be fully analogous to the well-known sideband-resolved laser cooling of ions and hence is capable in principle of cooling a mechanical mode into its quantum ground state. There is no doubt that such interdisciplinarity has been a crucial element for the development of the field. It is interesting to note that a very similar sociological phenomenon occurred earlier in the quantum information community, an area which is deeply enriched by the

  3. Electron Dynamics in Finite Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Christopher R.

    The multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock (MCTDHF) and multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (MCTDH) methods are employed to investigate nonperturbative multielectron dynamics in finite quantum systems. MCTDHF is a powerful tool that allows for the investigation of multielectron dynamics in strongly perturbed quantum systems. We have developed an MCTDHF code that is capable of treating problems involving three dimensional (3D) atoms and molecules exposed to strong laser fields. This code will allow for the theoretical treatment of multielectron phenomena in attosecond science that were previously inaccessible. These problems include complex ionization processes in pump-probe experiments on noble gas atoms, the nonlinear effects that have been observed in Ne atoms in the presence of an x-ray free-electron laser (XFEL) and the molecular rearrangement of cations after ionization. An implementation of MCTDH that is optimized for two electrons, each moving in two dimensions (2D), is also presented. This implementation of MCTDH allows for the efficient treatment of 2D spin-free systems involving two electrons; however, it does not scale well to 3D or to systems containing more that two electrons. Both MCTDHF and MCTDH were used to treat 2D problems in nanophysics and attosecond science. MCTDHF is used to investigate plasmon dynamics and the quantum breathing mode for several electrons in finite lateral quantum dots. MCTDHF is also used to study the effects of manipulating the potential of a double lateral quantum dot containing two electrons; applications to quantum computing are discussed. MCTDH is used to examine a diatomic model molecular system exposed to a strong laser field; nonsequential double ionization and high harmonic generation are studied and new processes identified and explained. An implementation of MCTDHF is developed for nonuniform tensor product grids; this will allow for the full 3D implementation of MCTDHF and will provide a means to

  4. On Mathematical Modeling Of Quantum Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Achuthan, P.; Narayanankutty, Karuppath

    2009-07-02

    The world of physical systems at the most fundamental levels is replete with efficient, interesting models possessing sufficient ability to represent the reality to a considerable extent. So far, quantum mechanics (QM) forming the basis of almost all natural phenomena, has found beyond doubt its intrinsic ingenuity, capacity and robustness to stand the rigorous tests of validity from and through appropriate calculations and experiments. No serious failures of quantum mechanical predictions have been reported, yet. However, Albert Einstein, the greatest theoretical physicist of the twentieth century and some other eminent men of science have stated firmly and categorically that QM, though successful by and large, is incomplete. There are classical and quantum reality models including those based on consciousness. Relativistic quantum theoretical approaches to clearly understand the ultimate nature of matter as well as radiation have still much to accomplish in order to qualify for a final theory of everything (TOE). Mathematical models of better, suitable character as also strength are needed to achieve satisfactory explanation of natural processes and phenomena. We, in this paper, discuss some of these matters with certain apt illustrations as well.

  5. On Mathematical Modeling Of Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achuthan, P.; Narayanankutty, Karuppath

    2009-07-01

    The world of physical systems at the most fundamental levels is replete with efficient, interesting models possessing sufficient ability to represent the reality to a considerable extent. So far, quantum mechanics (QM) forming the basis of almost all natural phenomena, has found beyond doubt its intrinsic ingenuity, capacity and robustness to stand the rigorous tests of validity from and through appropriate calculations and experiments. No serious failures of quantum mechanical predictions have been reported, yet. However, Albert Einstein, the greatest theoretical physicist of the twentieth century and some other eminent men of science have stated firmly and categorically that QM, though successful by and large, is incomplete. There are classical and quantum reality models including those based on consciousness. Relativistic quantum theoretical approaches to clearly understand the ultimate nature of matter as well as radiation have still much to accomplish in order to qualify for a final theory of everything (TOE). Mathematical models of better, suitable character as also strength are needed to achieve satisfactory explanation of natural processes and phenomena. We, in this paper, discuss some of these matters with certain apt illustrations as well.

  6. DCE Bio Detection System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lind, Michael A.; Batishko, Charles R.; Morgen, Gerald P.; Owsley, Stanley L.; Dunham, Glen C.; Warner, Marvin G.; Willett, Jesse A.

    2007-12-01

    The DCE (DNA Capture Element) Bio-Detection System (Biohound) was conceived, designed, built and tested by PNNL under a MIPR for the US Air Force under the technical direction of Dr. Johnathan Kiel and his team at Brooks City Base in San Antonio Texas. The project was directed toward building a measurement device to take advantage of a unique aptamer based assay developed by the Air Force for detecting biological agents. The assay uses narrow band quantum dots fluorophores, high efficiency fluorescence quenchers, magnetic micro-beads beads and selected aptamers to perform high specificity, high sensitivity detection of targeted biological materials in minutes. This final report summarizes and documents the final configuration of the system delivered to the Air Force in December 2008

  7. Artificial quantum thermal bath: Engineering temperature for a many-body quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Alireza; Neven, Hartmut

    2016-11-01

    Temperature determines the relative probability of observing a physical system in an energy state when that system is energetically in equilibrium with its environment. In this paper we present a theory for engineering the temperature of a quantum system different from its ambient temperature. We define criteria for an engineered quantum bath that, when coupled to a quantum system with Hamiltonian H , drives the system to the equilibrium state e/-H/TTr (e-H /T) with a tunable parameter T . This is basically an analog counterpart of the digital quantum metropolis algorithm. For a system of superconducting qubits, we propose a circuit-QED approximate realization of such an engineered thermal bath consisting of driven lossy resonators. Our proposal opens the path to simulate thermodynamical properties of many-body quantum systems of size not accessible to classical simulations. Also we discuss how an artificial thermal bath can serve as a temperature knob for a hybrid quantum-thermal annealer.

  8. Approximation of reachable sets for coherently controlled open quantum systems: Application to quantum state engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jun; Lu, Dawei; Luo, Zhihuang; Laflamme, Raymond; Peng, Xinhua; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-07-01

    Precisely characterizing and controlling realistic quantum systems under noises is a challenging frontier in quantum sciences and technologies. In developing reliable controls for open quantum systems, one is often confronted with the problem of the lack of knowledge on the system controllability. The purpose of this paper is to give a numerical approach to this problem, that is, to approximately compute the reachable set of states for coherently controlled quantum Markovian systems. The approximation consists of setting both upper and lower bounds for system's reachable region of states. Furthermore, we apply our reachability analysis to the control of the relaxation dynamics of a two-qubit nuclear magnetic resonance spin system. We implement some experimental tasks of quantum state engineering in this open system at a near optimal performance in view of purity: e.g., increasing polarization and preparing pseudopure states. These results demonstrate the usefulness of our theory and show interesting and promising applications of environment-assisted quantum dynamics.

  9. Isochronous classical systems and quantum systems with equally spaced spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cariñena, J. F.; Perelomov, A. M.; Rañada, M. F.

    2007-11-01

    We study isoperiodic classical systems, what allows us to find the classical isochronous systems, i.e. having a period independent of the energy. The corresponding quantum analog, systems with an equally spaced spectrum are analysed by looking for possible creation-like differential operators. The harmonic oscillator and the isotonic oscillator are the two main essentially unique examples of such situation.

  10. Enhanced fault-tolerant quantum computing in d-level systems.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Earl T

    2014-12-05

    Error-correcting codes protect quantum information and form the basis of fault-tolerant quantum computing. Leading proposals for fault-tolerant quantum computation require codes with an exceedingly rare property, a transversal non-Clifford gate. Codes with the desired property are presented for d-level qudit systems with prime d. The codes use n=d-1 qudits and can detect up to ∼d/3 errors. We quantify the performance of these codes for one approach to quantum computation known as magic-state distillation. Unlike prior work, we find performance is always enhanced by increasing d.

  11. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, Matthew; Preiss, Philipp; Tai, Eric; Lukin, Alex; Schittko, Robert; Kaufman, Adam; Ma, Ruichao; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The presence of large-scale entanglement is a defining characteristic of exotic quantum phases of matter. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially true in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. We demonstrate a novel approach to the measurement of entanglement entropy of any bosonic system, using a quantum gas microscope with tailored potential landscapes. This protocol enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. In general, these experiments exemplify a method enabling the measurement and characterization of quantum phase transitions and in particular would be apt for studying systems such as magnetic ordering within the quantum Ising model.

  12. Dynamical systems and quantum bicrossproduct algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arratia, Oscar; del Olmo, Mariano A.

    2002-06-01

    We present a unified study of some aspects of quantum bicrossproduct algebras of inhomogeneous Lie algebras, such as Poincaré, Galilei and Euclidean in N dimensions. The action associated with the bicrossproduct structure allows us to obtain a nonlinear action over a new group linked to the translations. This new nonlinear action associates a dynamical system with each generator which is the object of our study.

  13. Intelligent Leak Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Mohaghegh, Shahab D.

    2014-10-27

    apability of underground carbon dioxide storage to confine and sustain injected CO2 for a very long time is the main concern for geologic CO2 sequestration. If a leakage from a geological CO2 sequestration site occurs, it is crucial to find the approximate amount and the location of the leak in order to implement proper remediation activity. An overwhelming majority of research and development for storage site monitoring has been concentrated on atmospheric, surface or near surface monitoring of the sequestered CO2. This study aims to monitor the integrity of CO2 storage at the reservoir level. This work proposes developing in-situ CO2 Monitoring and Verification technology based on the implementation of Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG) or “Smart Wells” along with Artificial Intelligence and Data Mining (AI&DM). The technology attempts to identify the characteristics of the CO2 leakage by de-convolving the pressure signals collected from Permanent Down-hole Gauges (PDG). Citronelle field, a saline aquifer reservoir, located in the U.S. was considered for this study. A reservoir simulation model for CO2 sequestration in the Citronelle field was developed and history matched. The presence of the PDGs were considered in the reservoir model at the injection well and an observation well. High frequency pressure data from sensors were collected based on different synthetic CO2 leakage scenarios in the model. Due to complexity of the pressure signal behaviors, a Machine Learning-based technology was introduced to build an Intelligent Leakage Detection System (ILDS). The ILDS was able to detect leakage characteristics in a short period of time (less than a day) demonstrating the capability of the system in quantifying leakage characteristics subject to complex rate behaviors. The performance of ILDS was examined under different conditions such as multiple well leakages, cap rock leakage, availability of an additional monitoring well, presence of pressure drift and noise

  14. A Modular Quantum System of Trapped Atomic Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hucul, David Alexander

    Scaling up controlled quantum systems to involve large numbers of qubits remains one of the outstanding challenges of quantum information science. One path toward scalability is the use of a modular architecture where adjacent qubits may be entangled with applied electromagnetic fields, and remote qubits may be entangled using photon interference. Trapped atomic ion qubits are one of the most promising platforms for scaling up quantum systems by combining long coherence times with high fidelity entangling operations between proximate and remote qubits. In this thesis, I present experimental progress on combining entanglement between remote atomic ions separated by 1 meter with near-field entanglement between atomic ions in the same ion trap. I describe the experimental improvements to increase the remote entanglement rate by orders of magnitude to nearly 5 per second. This is the first experimental demonstration where the remote entanglement rate exceeds the decoherence rate of the entangled qubits. The flexibility of creating remote entanglement through photon interference is demonstrated by using the interference of distinguishable photons without sacrificing remote entanglement rate or fidelity. Next I describe the use of master clock in combination with a frequency comb to lock the phases of all laser-induced interactions between remote ion traps while removing optical phase stability requirements. The combination of both types of entanglement gates to create a small quantum network are described. Finally, I present ways to mitigate cross talk between photonic and memory qubits by using different trapped ion species. I show preliminary work on performing state detection of nuclear spin 0 ions by using entanglement between atomic ion spin and photon polarization. These control techniques may be important for building a large-scale modular quantum system.

  15. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-15

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ{sub 3}(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  16. Open quantum systems and random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulhall, Declan

    2014-10-01

    A simple model for open quantum systems is analyzed with RMT. The system is coupled to the continuum in a minimal way. In this paper we see the effect of opening the system on the level statistics, in particular the level spacing, width distribution and Δ3(L) statistic are examined as a function of the strength of this coupling. The usual super-radiant state is observed, and it is seen that as it is formed, the level spacing and Δ3(L) statistic exhibit the signatures of missed levels.

  17. Quantum entanglement in multiparticle systems of two-level atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Deb, Ram Narayan

    2011-09-15

    We propose the necessary and sufficient condition for the presence of quantum entanglement in arbitrary symmetric pure states of two-level atomic systems. We introduce a parameter to quantify quantum entanglement in such systems. We express the inherent quantum fluctuations of a composite system of two-level atoms as a sum of the quantum fluctuations of the individual constituent atoms and their correlation terms. This helps to separate out and study solely the quantum correlations among the atoms and obtain the criterion for the presence of entanglement in such multiatomic systems.

  18. Introduction to Quantum Sensors in Cryogenic Particle Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yong-Hamb; Kim, Sun Kee

    Cryogenic detectors have been important tools in many aspects of science because their sensitivities can provide more than extreme limits of conventional semiconductor based detectors. The sensor developments in cryogenic particle detection are based on the precise measurement of noble properties of condensed matter in low temperatures. The major measurement technologies originate from quantum measurements, phase transitions and superconducting electronics. Although the early developments of cryogenic detectors were initiated by applications to elementary particle physics, they have been adopted in biology, forensics, and security as well as astronomy and nuclear science. Various types of cryogenic detectors cover a wide energy range from THz radiations to hundreds MeV particles. We review the recent development of sensor technologies in cryogenic particle detection. The measurement principles are covered together with applications to elementary particle physics and THz measurement.

  19. Quantum Information Biology: From Theory of Open Quantum Systems to Adaptive Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Masanari; Basieva, Irina; Khrennikov, Andrei; Ohya, Masanori; Tanaka, Yoshiharu; Yamato, Ichiro

    This chapter reviews quantum(-like) information biology (QIB). Here biology is treated widely as even covering cognition and its derivatives: psychology and decision making, sociology, and behavioral economics and finances. QIB provides an integrative description of information processing by bio-systems at all scales of life: from proteins and cells to cognition, ecological and social systems. Mathematically QIB is based on the theory of adaptive quantum systems (which covers also open quantum systems). Ideologically QIB is based on the quantum-like (QL) paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all bio-scales. QIB re ects the two fundamental principles: a) adaptivity; and, b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). In addition, quantum adaptive dynamics provides the most generally possible mathematical representation of these principles.

  20. Practical expressions describing detective quantum efficiency in flat-panel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. K.

    2011-11-01

    In radiology, image quality excellence is a balance between system performance and patient dose, hence x-ray systems must be designed to ensure the maximum image quality is obtained for the lowest consistent dose. The concept of detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is widely used to quantify, understand, measure, and predict the performance of x-ray detectors and imaging systems. Cascaded linear-systems theory can be used to estimate DQE based on the system design parameters and this theoretical DQE can be utilized for determining the impact of various physical processes, such as secondary quantum sinks, noise aliasing, reabsorption noise, and others. However, the prediction of DQE usually requires tremendous efforts to determine each parameter consisting of the cascaded linear-systems model. In this paper, practical DQE formalisms assessing both the photoconductor- and scintillator-based flat-panel detectors under quantum-noise-limited operation are described. The developed formalisms are experimentally validated and discussed for their limits. The formalisms described in this paper would be helpful for the rapid prediction of the DQE performances of developing systems as well as the optimal design of systems.

  1. Incipient fire detection system

    DOEpatents

    Brooks, Jr., William K.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus for an incipient fire detection system that receives gaseous samples and measures the light absorption spectrum of the mixture of gases evolving from heated combustibles includes a detector for receiving gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy and determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples. The wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples are compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. The method includes receiving gaseous samples, subjecting the samples to light spectroscopy, determining wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples, comparing the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples to predetermined absorption wavelengths and generating a warning signal whenever the wavelengths of absorption of the gaseous samples correspond to the predetermined absorption wavelengths. In an alternate embodiment, the apparatus includes a series of channels fluidically connected to a plurality of remote locations. A pump is connected to the channels for drawing gaseous samples into the channels. A detector is connected to the channels for receiving the drawn gaseous samples and subjecting the samples to spectroscopy. The wavelengths of absorption are determined and compared to predetermined absorption wavelengths is provided. A warning signal is generated whenever the wavelengths correspond.

  2. Analysis of the scatter effect on detective quantum efficiency of digital mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jiwoong; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Dong Woon; Baek, Cheol-Ha; Youn, Hanbean; Jeon, Hosang; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2016-03-01

    The scatter effect on detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of digital mammography is investigated using the cascaded-systems model. The cascaded-systems model includes a scatter-reduction device as a binomial selection stage. Quantum-noise-limited operation approximates the system DQE into the multiplication form of the scatter-reduction device DQE and the conventional detector DQE. The developed DQE model is validated in comparisons with the measured results using a CMOS flat-panel detector under scatter environments. For various scatter-reduction devices, the slot-scan method shows the best scatter-cleanup performance in terms of DQE, and the scatter-cleanup performance of the conventional one-dimensional grid is rather worse than the air gap. The developed model can also be applied to general radiography and will be very useful for a better design of imaging chain.

  3. Experimental simulation of quantum tunneling in small systems.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guan-Ru; Lu, Yao; Hao, Liang; Zhang, Fei-Hao; Long, Gui-Lu

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that quantum computers are superior to classical computers in efficiently simulating quantum systems. Here we report the first experimental simulation of quantum tunneling through potential barriers, a widespread phenomenon of a unique quantum nature, via NMR techniques. Our experiment is based on a digital particle simulation algorithm and requires very few spin-1/2 nuclei without the need of ancillary qubits. The occurrence of quantum tunneling through a barrier, together with the oscillation of the state in potential wells, are clearly observed through the experimental results. This experiment has clearly demonstrated the possibility to observe and study profound physical phenomena within even the reach of small quantum computers.

  4. Quantum Random Access Codes Using Single d -Level Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavakoli, Armin; Hameedi, Alley; Marques, Breno; Bourennane, Mohamed

    2015-05-01

    Random access codes (RACs) are used by a party to, with limited communication, access an arbitrary subset of information held by another party. Quantum resources are known to enable RACs that break classical limitations. Here, we study quantum and classical RACs with high-level communication. We derive average performances of classical RACs and present families of high-level quantum RACs. Our results show that high-level quantum systems can significantly increase the advantage of quantum RACs over their classical counterparts. We demonstrate our findings in an experimental realization of a quantum RAC with four-level communication.

  5. Preparing ground States of quantum many-body systems on a quantum computer.

    PubMed

    Poulin, David; Wocjan, Pawel

    2009-04-03

    Preparing the ground state of a system of interacting classical particles is an NP-hard problem. Thus, there is in general no better algorithm to solve this problem than exhaustively going through all N configurations of the system to determine the one with lowest energy, requiring a running time proportional to N. A quantum computer, if it could be built, could solve this problem in time sqrt[N]. Here, we present a powerful extension of this result to the case of interacting quantum particles, demonstrating that a quantum computer can prepare the ground state of a quantum system as efficiently as it does for classical systems.

  6. Ramsey interference in a multilevel quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. P.; Bennett, A. J.; Skiba-Szymanska, J.; Ellis, D. J. P.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Shields, A. J.

    2016-02-01

    We report Ramsey interference in the excitonic population of a negatively charged quantum dot measured in resonant fluorescence. Our experiments show that the decay time of the Ramsey interference is limited by the spectral width of the transition. Applying a vertical magnetic field induces Zeeman split transitions that can be addressed by changing the laser detuning to reveal two-, three-, and four-level system behavior. We show that under finite field the phase-sensitive control of two optical pulses from a single laser can be used to prepare both population and spin states simultaneously. We also demonstrate the coherent optical manipulation of a trapped spin in a quantum dot in a Faraday geometry magnetic field.

  7. Coherent manipulation of single quantum systems in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Childress, Lilian Isabel

    2007-12-01

    The controlled, coherent manipulation of quantum-mechanical systems is an important challenge in modern science and engineering, with significant applications in quantum information science. Solid-state quantum systems such as electronic spins, nuclear spins, and superconducting islands are among the most promising candidates for realization of quantum bits (qubits). However, in contrast to isolated atomic systems, these solid-state qubits couple to a complex environment which often results in rapid loss of coherence, and, in general, is difficult to understand. Additionally, the strong interactions which make solid-state quantum systems attractive can typically only occur between neighboring systems, leading to difficulties in coupling arbitrary pairs of quantum bits. This thesis presents experimental progress in understanding and controlling the complex environment of a solid-state quantum bit, and theoretical techniques for extending the distance over which certain quantum bits can interact coherently. Coherent manipulation of an individual electron spin associated with a nitrogen-vacancy center in diamond is used to gain insight into its mesoscopic environment. Furthermore, techniques for exploiting coherent interactions between the electron spin and a subset of the environment are developed and demonstrated, leading to controlled interactions with single isolated nuclear spins. The quantum register thus formed by a coupled electron and nuclear spin provides the basis for a theoretical proposal for fault-tolerant long-distance quantum communication with minimal physical resource requirements. Finally, we consider a mechanism for long-distance coupling between quantum dots based on chip-scale cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  8. Quantum Darwinism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zurek, Wojciech Hubert

    2009-03-01

    Quantum Darwinism describes the proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of a quantum system. It explains how the quantum fragility of a state of a single quantum system can lead to the classical robustness of states in their correlated multitude; shows how effective `wave-packet collapse' arises as a result of the proliferation throughout the environment of imprints of the state of the system; and provides a framework for the derivation of Born's rule, which relates the probabilities of detecting states to their amplitudes. Taken together, these three advances mark considerable progress towards settling the quantum measurement problem.

  9. Quantum entanglement for systems of identical bosons: I. General features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalton, B. J.; Goold, J.; Garraway, B. M.; Reid, M. D.

    2017-02-01

    These two accompanying papers are concerned with two mode entanglement for systems of identical massive bosons and the relationship to spin squeezing and other quantum correlation effects. Entanglement is a key quantum feature of composite systems in which the probabilities for joint measurements on the composite sub-systems are no longer determined from measurement probabilities on the separate sub-systems. There are many aspects of entanglement that can be studied. This two-part review focuses on the meaning of entanglement, the quantum paradoxes associated with entangled states, and the important tests that allow an experimentalist to determine whether a quantum state—in particular, one for massive bosons is entangled. An overall outcome of the review is to distinguish criteria (and hence experiments) for entanglement that fully utilize the symmetrization principle and the super-selection rules that can be applied to bosonic massive particles. In the first paper (I), the background is given for the meaning of entanglement in the context of systems of identical particles. For such systems, the requirement is that the relevant quantum density operators must satisfy the symmetrization principle and that global and local super-selection rules prohibit states in which there are coherences between differing particle numbers. The justification for these requirements is fully discussed. In the second quantization approach that is used, both the system and the sub-systems are modes (or sets of modes) rather than particles, particles being associated with different occupancies of the modes. The definition of entangled states is based on first defining the non-entangled states—after specifying which modes constitute the sub-systems. This work mainly focuses on the two mode entanglement for massive bosons, but is put in the context of tests of local hidden variable theories, where one may not be able to make the above restrictions. The review provides the detailed

  10. Quantum integrable systems related to lie algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olshanetsky, M. A.; Perelomov, A. M.

    1983-03-01

    Some quantum integrable finite-dimensional systems related to Lie algebras are considered. This review continues the previous review of the same authors [83] devoted to the classical aspects of these systems. The dynamics of some of these systems is closely related to free motion in symmetric spaces. Using this connection with the theory of symmetric spaces some results such as the forms of spectra, wave functions, S-matrices, quantum integrals of motion are derived. In specific cases the considered systems describe the one-dimensional n-body systems interacting pairwise via potentials g2v( q) of the following 5 types: vI( q) = q-2, vII( q) = sinh-2q, vIII( q) = sin-2q, v IV(q) = P(q) , vV( q) = q-2 + ω2q2. Here P(q) is the Weierstrass function, so that the first three cases are merely subcases of the fourth. The system characterized by the Toda nearest-neighbour potential exp( qjqj+ 1 ) is moreover considered. This review presents from a general and universal point of view results obtained mainly over the past fifteen years. Besides, it contains some new results both of physical and mathematical interest.

  11. Teaching the environment to control quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pechen, Alexander; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-06-15

    A nonequilibrium, generally time-dependent, environment whose form is deduced by optimal learning control is shown to provide a means for incoherent manipulation of quantum systems. Incoherent control by the environment (ICE) can serve to steer a system from an initial state to a target state, either mixed or in some cases pure, by exploiting dissipative dynamics. Implementing ICE with either incoherent radiation or a gas as the control is explicitly considered, and the environmental control is characterized by its distribution function. Simulated learning control experiments are performed with simple illustrations to find the shape of the optimal nonequilibrium distribution function that best affects the posed dynamical objectives.

  12. Evolution of Quantum Entanglement in Open Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Isar, A.

    2010-08-04

    In the framework of the theory of open systems based on completely positive quantum dynamical semigroups, we give a description of the continuous-variable entanglement for a system consisting of two uncoupled harmonic oscillators interacting with a thermal environment. Using Peres-Simon necessary sufficient criterion for separability of two-mode Gaussian states, we show that for some values of diffusion coefficient, dissipation constant and temperature of the environment, the state keeps for all times its initial type: separable or entangled. In other cases, entanglement generation, entanglement sudden death or a periodic collapse revival of entanglement take place.

  13. Inverse engineering control in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Jun; Wu, Lian-Ao; Sarandy, Marcelo S.; Muga, J. Gonzalo

    2013-11-01

    We propose a scheme for inverse engineering control in open quantum systems. Starting from an undetermined time evolution operator, a time-dependent Hamiltonian is derived in order to guide the system to attain an arbitrary target state at a predefined time. We calculate the fidelity of our inverse engineering control protocol in the presence of the noise with respect to the stochastic fluctuation of the linear parameters of the Hamiltonian during the time evolution. For a special family of Hamiltonians for two-level systems, we show that the control evolution of the system under noise can be categorized into two standard decohering processes: dephasing and depolarization, for both Markovian and non-Markovian conditions. In particular, we illustrate our formalism by analyzing the robustness of the engineered target state against errors. Moreover, we discuss the generalization of the inverse protocol for higher-dimensional systems.

  14. Thermalization and Pseudolocality in Extended Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doyon, Benjamin

    2017-04-01

    Recently, it was understood that modified concepts of locality played an important role in the study of extended quantum systems out of equilibrium, in particular in so-called generalized Gibbs ensembles. In this paper, we rigorously study pseudolocal charges and their involvement in time evolutions and in the thermalization process of arbitrary states with strong enough clustering properties. We show that the densities of pseudolocal charges form a Hilbert space, with inner product determined by thermodynamic susceptibilities. Using this, we define the family of pseudolocal states, which are determined by pseudolocal charges. This family includes thermal Gibbs states at high enough temperatures, as well as (a precise definition of) generalized Gibbs ensembles. We prove that the family of pseudolocal states is preserved by finite time evolution, and that, under certain conditions, the stationary state emerging at infinite time is a generalized Gibbs ensemble with respect to the evolution dynamics. If the evolution dynamics does not admit any conserved pseudolocal charges other than the evolution Hamiltonian, we show that any stationary pseudolocal state with respect to these dynamics is a thermal Gibbs state, and that Gibbs thermalization occurs. The framework is that of translation-invariant states on hypercubic quantum lattices of any dimensionality (including quantum chains) and finite-range Hamiltonians, and does not involve integrability.

  15. Optimization Via Open System Quantum Annealing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-07

    mapping between the Ising spin glass partition function and circuit model decision problems, discovered in a previous ARO Quantum Algorithms funded...of tunneling in providing quantum annealing speedup over classical algorithms • Characterized the effects of classical hardness on the performance...15 Annual APS March meeting, Tutorial on Quantum Annealing 12/14 Quantum Sensing, Metrology, and Algorithms Workshop, Northrop Grumman, Los

  16. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Reithmaier, G; Lichtmannecker, S; Reichert, T; Hasch, P; Müller, K; Bichler, M; Gross, R; Finley, J J

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems.

  17. Hand held explosives detection system

    DOEpatents

    Conrad, Frank J.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a sensitive hand-held explosives detection device capable of detecting the presence of extremely low quantities of high explosives molecules, and which is applicable to sampling vapors from personnel, baggage, cargo, etc., as part of an explosives detection system.

  18. Observing quantum vacuum lensing in a neutron star binary system.

    PubMed

    Dupays, Arnaud; Robilliard, Cécile; Rizzo, Carlo; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2005-04-29

    In this Letter we study the propagation of light in the neighborhood of magnetized neutron stars. Because of the optical properties of quantum vacuum in the presence of a magnetic field, the light emitted by background astronomical objects is deviated, giving rise to a phenomenon of the same kind as the gravitational one. We give a quantitative estimation of this effect, and we discuss the possibility of its observation. We show that this effect could be detected by monitoring the evolution of the recently discovered double neutron star system J0737-3039.

  19. Extreme ultraviolet quantum detection efficiency of rubidium bromide opaque photocathodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Gaines, Geoffrey A.

    1990-01-01

    Measurements are presented of the quantum detection efficiency (QDE) of three samples of RbBr photocathode layers over the 44-150-A wavelength range. The QDE of RbBr-coated microchannel plate (MCP) was measured using a back-to-back Z-stack MCP configuration in a detector with a wedge and strip position-sensitive anode, of the type described by Siegmund et al. (1984). To assess the stability of RbBr layer, the RbBr photocathode was exposed to air at about 30 percent humidity for 20 hr. It was found that the QDE values for the aged cathode were within the QDE measurement errors of the original values. A simple QDE model was developed, and it was found that its predictions are in accord with the QDE measurements.

  20. Quantum simulation. Coherent imaging spectroscopy of a quantum many-body spin system.

    PubMed

    Senko, C; Smith, J; Richerme, P; Lee, A; Campbell, W C; Monroe, C

    2014-07-25

    Quantum simulators, in which well-controlled quantum systems are used to reproduce the dynamics of less understood ones, have the potential to explore physics inaccessible to modeling with classical computers. However, checking the results of such simulations also becomes classically intractable as system sizes increase. Here, we introduce and implement a coherent imaging spectroscopic technique, akin to magnetic resonance imaging, to validate a quantum simulation. We use this method to determine the energy levels and interaction strengths of a fully connected quantum many-body system. Additionally, we directly measure the critical energy gap near a quantum phase transition. We expect this general technique to become a verification tool for quantum simulators once experiments advance beyond proof-of-principle demonstrations and exceed the resources of conventional computers.

  1. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  2. Preliminary results of heterodyne detection with quantum-cascade lasers in the 9 microm region.

    PubMed

    Parvitte, B; Joly, L; Zéninari, V; Courtois, D

    2004-12-01

    In this paper, we describe recent results in mid-infrared heterodyne detection using quantum-cascade (QC) lasers as local oscillator (LO). In the 9 microm range, the heterodyne detection technique was first developed with CO(2) lasers and then with Pb-salt diode lasers. Quantum-cascade lasers are promising high quality tunable mid-infrared sources. We developed a quantum-cascade laser based heterodyne spectrometer. Atmospheric absorption spectra of ozone are presented.

  3. Emerging applications of fluorescent nanocrystals quantum dots for micrometastases detection.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Wael; Sukhanova, Alyona; Oleinikov, Vladimir; Rakovich, Yury P; Donegan, John F; Pluot, Michel; Cohen, Jacques H M; Volkov, Yuri; Nabiev, Igor

    2010-02-01

    The occurrence of metastases is one of the main causes of death in many cancers and the main cause of death for breast cancer patients. Micrometastases of disseminated tumour cells and circulating tumour cells are present in more than 30% of breast cancer patients without any clinical or even histopathological signs of metastasis. Low abundance of these cell types in clinical diagnostic material dictates the necessity of their enrichment prior to reliable detection. Current micrometastases detection techniques are based on immunocytochemical and molecular methods suffering from low efficiency of tumour cells enrichment and observer-dependent interpretation. The use of highly fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as "quantum dots" and nanocrystal-encoded microbeads tagged with a wide panel of antibodies against specific tumour markers offers unique possibilities for ultra-sensitive micrometastases detection in patients' serum and tissues. The nanoparticle-based diagnostics provides an opportunity for highly sensitive parallel quantification of specific proteins in a rapid and low-cost method, thereby providing a link between the primary tumour and the micrometastases for early diagnosis.

  4. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-03

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems.

  5. Noncommutative Skyrmions in Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.

    Charged excitations in quantum Hall (QH) systems are noncommutative skyrmions. QH systems represent an ideal system equipped with noncommutative geometry. When an electron is confined within the lowest Landau level, its position is described solely by the guiding center, whose X and Y coordinates do not commute with one another. Topological excitations in such a noncommutative plane are noncommutative skyrmions flipping several spins coherently. We construct a microscopic skyrmion state by applying a certain unitary transformation to an electron or hole state. A remarkable property is that a noncommutative skyrmion carries necessarily the electron number proportional to the topological charge. More remarkable is the bilayer QH system with the layer degree of freedom acting as the pseudospin, where the quasiparticle is a topological soliton to be identified with the pseudospin skyrmion. Such a skyrmion is deformed into a bimeron (a pair of merons) by the parallel magnetic field penetrated between the two layers. Each meron carries the electric charge ±e/2.

  6. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissues or other specimens, using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular m...

  7. Antigen detection systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infectious agents or their constituent parts (antigens or nucleic acids) can be detected in fresh, frozen, or fixed tissue using a variety of direct or indirect assays. The assays can be modified to yield the greatest sensitivity and specificity but in most cases a particular methodology is chosen ...

  8. Partitioning technique for discrete quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, L.; Song, Z.

    2011-06-15

    We develop the partitioning technique for quantum discrete systems. The graph consists of several subgraphs: a central graph and several branch graphs, with each branch graph being rooted by an individual node on the central one. We show that the effective Hamiltonian on the central graph can be constructed by adding additional potentials on the branch-root nodes, which generates the same result as does the the original Hamiltonian on the entire graph. Exactly solvable models are presented to demonstrate the main points of this paper.

  9. Entanglement in fermion systems and quantum metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benatti, F.; Floreanini, R.; Marzolino, U.

    2014-03-01

    Entanglement in fermion many-body systems is studied using a generalized definition of separability based on partitions of the set of observables, rather than on particle tensor products. In this way, the characterizing properties of nonseparable fermion states can be explicitly analyzed, allowing a precise description of the geometric structure of the corresponding state space. These results have direct applications in fermion quantum metrology: Sub-shot-noise accuracy in parameter estimation can be obtained without the need of a preliminary state entangling operation.

  10. Energy transport in closed quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Levin, G A; Jones, W A; Walczak, K; Yerkes, K L

    2012-03-01

    We examine energy transport in an ensemble of closed quantum systems driven by stochastic perturbations. One can show that the probability and energy fluxes can be described in terms of quantum advection modes (QAMs) associated with the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. These QAMs play the role of Landauer channels in a system with discrete energy spectrum and the eigenfunctions that cannot be described as plane waves. In order to determine the type of correlations that exist between the direction and magnitudes of each QAM and the average direction of energy and probability fluxes we have numerically solved the time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing a single particle trapped in a parabolic potential well which is perturbed by stochastic ripples. The ripples serve as a localized energy source and are offset to one side of the potential well. As the result a nonzero net energy flux flows from one part of the potential well to another across the symmetry center of the potential. We find that some modes exhibit positive correlation with the direction of the energy flow. Other modes, that carry a smaller energy per unit of the probability flux, anticorrelate with the energy flow and thus provide a backflow of the probability. The overall picture of energy transport that emerges from our results is very different from the conventional one based on a system with continuous energy spectrum.

  11. Energy transport in closed quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, G. A.; Jones, W. A.; Walczak, K.; Yerkes, K. L.

    2012-03-01

    We examine energy transport in an ensemble of closed quantum systems driven by stochastic perturbations. One can show that the probability and energy fluxes can be described in terms of quantum advection modes (QAMs) associated with the off-diagonal elements of the density matrix. These QAMs play the role of Landauer channels in a system with discrete energy spectrum and the eigenfunctions that cannot be described as plane waves. In order to determine the type of correlations that exist between the direction and magnitudes of each QAM and the average direction of energy and probability fluxes we have numerically solved the time-dependent Schrödinger equation describing a single particle trapped in a parabolic potential well which is perturbed by stochastic ripples. The ripples serve as a localized energy source and are offset to one side of the potential well. As the result a nonzero net energy flux flows from one part of the potential well to another across the symmetry center of the potential. We find that some modes exhibit positive correlation with the direction of the energy flow. Other modes, that carry a smaller energy per unit of the probability flux, anticorrelate with the energy flow and thus provide a backflow of the probability. The overall picture of energy transport that emerges from our results is very different from the conventional one based on a system with continuous energy spectrum.

  12. Quantum phase transition in strongly correlated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Longhua

    In this thesis, we investigated the strongly correlated phenomena in bilayer quantum Hall effect, inhomogeneous superconductivity and Boson Hubbard model. Bilayer quantum Hall system is studied in chapter 2. By using the Composite Boson (CB) theory developed by J. Ye, we derive the ground state, quasihole and a quasihole-pair wave functions from the CB theory and its dual action. We find that the ground state wave function is the product of two parts, one in the charge sector which is the well known Halperin's (111) wave function and the other in the spin sector which is non-trivial at any finite d due to the gapless mode. So the total groundstate wave function differs from the well known (111) wave function at any finite d. In addition to commonly known multiplicative factors, the quasihole and quasihole-pair wave functions also contain non-trivial normalization factors multiplying the correct ground state wave function. Then we continue to study the quantum phase transition from the excitonic superfluid (ESF) to a possible pseudo-spin density wave (PSDW) at some intermediate distances driven by the magneto-roton minimum collapsing at a finite wavevector. We analyze the properties of the PSDW and explicitly show that a square lattice is the favored lattice. We suggest that correlated hopping of vacancies in the active and passive layers in the PSDW state leads to very large and temperature-dependent drag, consistent with the experimental data. Comparisons with previous microscopic numerical calculations are made. Further experimental implications are given. In chapter 3, we investigate inhomogeneous superconductivity. Starting from the Ginzburg-Landau free energy describing the normal state to Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) state transition, we evaluate the free energy of seven most common lattice structures: stripe, square, triangular, Simple Cubic (SC), Face centered Cubic (FCC), Body centered Cubic (BCC) and Quasicrystal (QC). We find that the stripe

  13. Characterizing and quantifying frustration in quantum many-body systems.

    PubMed

    Giampaolo, S M; Gualdi, G; Monras, A; Illuminati, F

    2011-12-23

    We present a general scheme for the study of frustration in quantum systems. We introduce a universal measure of frustration for arbitrary quantum systems and we relate it to a class of entanglement monotones via an exact inequality. If all the (pure) ground states of a given Hamiltonian saturate the inequality, then the system is said to be inequality saturating. We introduce sufficient conditions for a quantum spin system to be inequality saturating and confirm them with extensive numerical tests. These conditions provide a generalization to the quantum domain of the Toulouse criteria for classical frustration-free systems. The models satisfying these conditions can be reasonably identified as geometrically unfrustrated and subject to frustration of purely quantum origin. Our results therefore establish a unified framework for studying the intertwining of geometric and quantum contributions to frustration.

  14. Protein detection system

    DOEpatents

    Fruetel, Julie A.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; McIlroy, Andrew

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  15. Magnetic-field sensing with quantum error detection under the effect of energy relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Benjamin, Simon

    2017-03-01

    A solid state spin is an attractive system with which to realize an ultrasensitive magnetic field sensor. A spin superposition state will acquire a phase induced by the target field, and we can estimate the field strength from this phase. Recent studies have aimed at improving sensitivity through the use of quantum error correction (QEC) to detect and correct any bit-flip errors that may occur during the sensing period. Here we investigate the performance of a two-qubit sensor employing QEC and under the effect of energy relaxation. Surprisingly, we find that the standard QEC technique to detect and recover from an error does not improve the sensitivity compared with the single-qubit sensors. This is a consequence of the fact that the energy relaxation induces both a phase-flip and a bit-flip noise where the former noise cannot be distinguished from the relative phase induced from the target fields. However, we have found that we can improve the sensitivity if we adopt postselection to discard the state when error is detected. Even when quantum error detection is moderately noisy, and allowing for the cost of the postselection technique, we find that this two-qubit system shows an advantage in sensing over a single qubit in the same conditions.

  16. Particle detection and non-detection in a quantum time of arrival measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Sombillo, Denny Lane B. Galapon, Eric A.

    2016-01-15

    The standard time-of-arrival distribution cannot reproduce both the temporal and the spatial profile of the modulus squared of the time-evolved wave function for an arbitrary initial state. In particular, the time-of-arrival distribution gives a non-vanishing probability even if the wave function is zero at a given point for all values of time. This poses a problem in the standard formulation of quantum mechanics where one quantizes a classical observable and uses its spectral resolution to calculate the corresponding distribution. In this work, we show that the modulus squared of the time-evolved wave function is in fact contained in one of the degenerate eigenfunctions of the quantized time-of-arrival operator. This generalizes our understanding of quantum arrival phenomenon where particle detection is not a necessary requirement, thereby providing a direct link between time-of-arrival quantization and the outcomes of the two-slit experiment. -- Highlights: •The time-evolved position density is contained in the standard TOA distribution. •Particle may quantum mechanically arrive at a given point without being detected. •The eigenstates of the standard TOA operator are linked to the two-slit experiment.

  17. Statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints.

    PubMed

    Sergi, Alessandro

    2006-01-14

    The statistical mechanics of quantum-classical systems with holonomic constraints is formulated rigorously by unifying the classical Dirac bracket and the quantum-classical bracket in matrix form. The resulting Dirac quantum-classical theory, which conserves the holonomic constraints exactly, is then used to formulate time evolution and statistical mechanics. The correct momentum-jump approximation for constrained systems arises naturally from this formalism. Finally, in analogy with what was found in the classical case, it is shown that the rigorous linear-response function of constrained quantum-classical systems contains nontrivial additional terms which are absent in the response of unconstrained systems.

  18. High Speed Quantum Key Distribution Over Optical Fiber Network System1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lijun; Mink, Alan; Tang, Xiao

    2009-01-01

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has developed a number of complete fiber-based high-speed quantum key distribution (QKD) systems that includes an 850 nm QKD system for a local area network (LAN), a 1310 nm QKD system for a metropolitan area network (MAN), and a 3-node quantum network controlled by a network manager. This paper discusses the key techniques used to implement these systems, which include polarization recovery, noise reduction, frequency up-conversion detection based on a periodically polled lithium nitrate (PPLN) waveguide, custom high-speed data handling boards and quantum network management. Using our quantum network, a QKD secured video surveillance application has been demonstrated. Our intention is to show the feasibility and sophistication of QKD systems based on current technology. PMID:27504218

  19. Intrinsic decoherence in isolated quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yang-Le; Deng, Dong-Ling; Li, Xiaopeng; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-01-01

    We study the intrinsic, disorder-induced decoherence of an isolated quantum system under its own dynamics. Specifically, we investigate the characteristic time scale (i.e., the decoherence time) associated with an interacting many-body system losing the memory of its initial state. To characterize the erasure of the initial state memory, we define a time scale, the intrinsic decoherence time, by thresholding the gradual decay of the disorder-averaged return probability. We demonstrate the system-size independence of the intrinsic decoherence time in different models, and we study its dependence on the disorder strength. We find that the intrinsic decoherence time increases monotonically as the disorder strength increases in accordance with the relaxation of locally measurable quantities. We investigate several interacting spin (e.g., Ising and Heisenberg) and fermion (e.g., Anderson and Aubry-André) models to obtain the intrinsic decoherence time as a function of disorder and interaction strength.

  20. Variational functions in driven open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakob, Matthias; Stenholm, Stig

    2003-03-01

    We consider the Lindblad-type master equation of an open system. We address the question how to construct a functional of the quantum state which displays a monotonic behavior in time. This thus defines uniquely the direction of time in the system. As the generator of time evolution is not a Hermitian operator, the theory requires the considerations of right and left eigenstates. In this paper we assume them to form two complete bases, which allows us to construct the desired quantity. This can be interpreted as a generalized entropy functional. We show how the construction is carried out in the general case, and we illustrate the theory by solving the case of an externally driven and damped two-level system. The treatment is related to earlier work in the field, and its possible relation to time inversion is discussed.

  1. Software-defined quantum communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humble, Travis S.; Sadlier, Ronald J.

    2014-08-01

    Quantum communication (QC) systems harness modern physics through state-of-the-art optical engineering to provide revolutionary capabilities. An important concern for QC engineering is designing and prototyping these systems to evaluate the proposed capabilities. We apply the paradigm of software-defined communication for engineering QC systems to facilitate rapid prototyping and prototype comparisons. We detail how to decompose QC terminals into functional layers defining hardware, software, and middleware concerns, and we describe how each layer behaves. Using the superdense coding protocol as an example, we describe implementations of both the transmitter and receiver, and we present results from numerical simulations of the behavior. We conclude that the software-defined QC provides a robust framework in which to explore the large design space offered by this new regime of communication.

  2. Detection of CdSe quantum dot photoluminescence for security label on paper

    SciTech Connect

    Isnaeni, Sugiarto, Iyon Titok; Bilqis, Ratu; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro

    2016-02-08

    CdSe quantum dot has great potential in various applications especially for emitting devices. One example potential application of CdSe quantum dot is security label for anti-counterfeiting. In this work, we present a practical approach of security label on paper using one and two colors of colloidal CdSe quantum dot, which is used as stamping ink on various types of paper. Under ambient condition, quantum dot is almost invisible. The quantum dot security label can be revealed by detecting emission of quantum dot using photoluminescence and cnc machine. The recorded quantum dot emission intensity is then analyzed using home-made program to reveal quantum dot pattern stamp having the word ’RAHASIA’. We found that security label using quantum dot works well on several types of paper. The quantum dot patterns can survive several days and further treatment is required to protect the quantum dot. Oxidation of quantum dot that occurred during this experiment reduced the emission intensity of quantum dot patterns.

  3. Linear response theory for open systems: Quantum master equation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ban, Masashi; Kitajima, Sachiko; Arimitsu, Toshihico; Shibata, Fumiaki

    2017-02-01

    A linear response theory for open quantum systems is formulated by means of the time-local and time-nonlocal quantum master equations, where a relevant quantum system interacts with a thermal reservoir as well as with an external classical field. A linear response function that characterizes how a relaxation process deviates from its intrinsic process by a weak external field is obtained by extracting the linear terms with respect to the external field from the quantum master equation. It consists of four parts. One represents the linear response of a quantum system when system-reservoir correlation at an initial time and correlation between reservoir states at different times are neglected. The others are correction terms due to these effects. The linear response function is compared with the Kubo formula in the usual linear response theory. To investigate the properties of the linear response of an open quantum system, an exactly solvable model for a stochastic dephasing of a two-level system is examined. Furthermore, the method for deriving the linear response function is applied for calculating two-time correlation functions of open quantum systems. It is shown that the quantum regression theorem is not valid for open quantum systems unless their reduced time evolution is Markovian.

  4. Quantum and statistical mechanics in open systems: theory and examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zueco, David

    2009-08-01

    Using the system-bath model Hamiltonian this thesis covers the equilibrium and out of equilibrium properties of quantum open systems. Topics included are the calculation of thermodynamical quantities of open systems, derivation of quantum master equations, phase space and numerical methods and Linear and non Linear Response Theory. Applications are the transport in periodic potentials and the dynamics of spins.

  5. Repetitive Interrogation of 2-Level Quantum Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Chung, Sang K.

    2010-01-01

    Trapped ion clocks derive information from a reference atomic transition by repetitive interrogations of the same quantum system, either a single ion or ionized gas of many millions of ions. Atomic beam frequency standards, by contrast, measure reference atomic transitions in a continuously replenished "flow through" configuration where initial ensemble atomic coherence is zero. We will describe some issues and problems that can arise when atomic state selection and preparation of the quantum atomic system is not completed, that is, optical pumping has not fully relaxed the coherence and also not fully transferred atoms to the initial state. We present a simple two-level density matrix analysis showing how frequency shifts during the state-selection process can cause frequency shifts of the measured clock transition. Such considerations are very important when a low intensity lamp light source is used for state selection, where there is relatively weak relaxation and re-pumping of ions to an initial state and much weaker 'environmental' relaxation of the atomic coherence set-up in the atomic sample.

  6. Quantum simulation of disordered systems with cold atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garreau, Jean-Claude

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the physics of quantum disorder in relation with a series of experiments using laser-cooled atoms exposed to "kicks" of a standing wave, realizing a paradigmatic model of quantum chaos, the kicked rotor. This dynamical system can be mapped onto a tight-binding Hamiltonian with pseudo-disorder, formally equivalent to the Anderson model of quantum disorder, with quantum chaos playing the role of disorder. This provides a very good quantum simulator for the Anderson physics. xml:lang="fr"

  7. SQUID detected NMR and NQR. Superconducting Quantum Interference Device.

    PubMed

    Augustine, M P; TonThat, D M; Clarke, J

    1998-03-01

    The dc Superconducting QUantum Interference Device (SQUID) is a sensitive detector of magnetic flux, with a typical flux noise of the order 1 muphi0 Hz(-1/2) at liquid helium temperatures. Here phi0 = h/2e is the flux quantum. In our NMR or NQR spectrometer, a niobium wire coil wrapped around the sample is coupled to a thin film superconducting coil deposited on the SQUID to form a flux transformer. With this untuned input circuit the SQUID measures the flux, rather than the rate of change of flux, and thus retains its high sensitivity down to arbitrarily low frequencies. This feature is exploited in a cw spectrometer that monitors the change in the static magnetization of a sample induced by radio frequency irradiation. Examples of this technique are the detection of NQR in 27Al in sapphire and 11B in boron nitride, and a level crossing technique to enhance the signal of 14N in peptides. Research is now focused on a SQUID-based spectrometer for pulsed NQR and NMR, which has a bandwidth of 0-5 MHz. This spectrometer is used with spin-echo techniques to measure the NQR longitudinal and transverse relaxation times of 14N in NH4ClO4, 63+/-6 ms and 22+/-2 ms, respectively. With the aid of two-frequency pulses to excite the 359 kHz and 714 kHz resonances in ruby simultaneously, it is possible to obtain a two-dimensional NQR spectrum. As a third example, the pulsed spectrometer is used to study NMR spectrum of 129Xe after polariza-tion with optically pumped Rb. The NMR line can be detected at frequencies as low as 200 Hz. At fields below about 2 mT the longitudinal relaxation time saturates at about 2000 s. Two recent experiments in other laboratories have extended these pulsed NMR techniques to higher temperatures and smaller samples. In the first, images were obtained of mineral oil floating on water at room temperature. In the second, a SQUID configured as a thin film gradiometer was used to detect NMR in a 50 microm particle of 195Pt at 6 mT and 4.2 K.

  8. Quantum dot based rapid tests for zearalenone detection.

    PubMed

    Beloglazova, N V; Speranskaya, E S; De Saeger, S; Hens, Z; Abé, S; Goryacheva, I Yu

    2012-07-01

    Three different kinds of immunosorbent assays with luminescence detection were developed for the determination of zearalenone (ZEN), a secondary toxic metabolite of Fusarium fungi. CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs) were used as a label in quantitative micro-well plate immunoassays (fluorescent-labeled immunosorbent assay, FLISA) and in qualitative column test methods. As carriers for QD-based column tests, sepharose gel (for covalent binding of antibody) and polyethylene frits (for physical absorption of antibody) were used and compared. The application of QDs as a label resulted in a fourfold decrease in the IC(50) value with FLISA (0.1 ng mL(-1)) with a detection limit of 0.03 ng mL(-1) when compared with the traditional immunosorbent assay which makes use of horseradish peroxidase as the enzyme label. The cutoff levels for both qualitative column test methods were selected based on the maximum level for ZEN in unprocessed cereals established by the European Commission (100 μg kg(-1)) as 5 ng mL(-1) taking into account extraction and dilution. The different developed immumoassays were tested for ZEN determination in raw wheat samples. As a confirmatory method, liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry was used. The obtained results allow using FLISA and both qualitative column test methods for the analysis of analytes with very low established maximum limits, even in very complicated food matrices, owing to the high dilution of the sample extract.

  9. Particle detection systems and methods

    DOEpatents

    Morris, Christopher L.; Makela, Mark F.

    2010-05-11

    Techniques, apparatus and systems for detecting particles such as muons and neutrons. In one implementation, a particle detection system employs a plurality of drift cells, which can be for example sealed gas-filled drift tubes, arranged on sides of a volume to be scanned to track incoming and outgoing charged particles, such as cosmic ray-produced muons. The drift cells can include a neutron sensitive medium to enable concurrent counting of neutrons. The system can selectively detect devices or materials, such as iron, lead, gold, uranium, plutonium, and/or tungsten, occupying the volume from multiple scattering of the charged particles passing through the volume and can concurrently detect any unshielded neutron sources occupying the volume from neutrons emitted therefrom. If necessary, the drift cells can be used to also detect gamma rays. The system can be employed to inspect occupied vehicles at border crossings for nuclear threat objects.

  10. Work exchange between quantum systems: the spin-oscillator model.

    PubMed

    Schröder, Heiko; Mahler, Günter

    2010-02-01

    With the development of quantum thermodynamics it has been shown that relaxation to thermal equilibrium and with it the concept of heat flux may emerge directly from quantum mechanics. This happens for a large class of quantum systems if embedded into another quantum environment. In this paper, we discuss the complementary question of the emergence of work flux from quantum mechanics. We introduce and discuss two different methods to assess the work source quality of a system, one based on the generalized factorization approximation, the other based on generalized definitions of work and heat. By means of those methods, we show that small quantum systems can, indeed, act as work reservoirs. We illustrate this behavior for a simple system consisting of a spin coupled to an oscillator and investigate the effects of two different interactions on the work source quality. One case will be shown to allow for a work source functionality of arbitrarily high quality.

  11. Supersensitive SQUID/magnetostrictor detecting system

    SciTech Connect

    Golovashkin, Aleksander I; Zherikhina, L N; Tskhovrebov, Andrei M; Izmailov, G N

    2012-12-31

    It is shown that using the state-of-the-art quantum interferometer (SQUID) with the resolution 10{sup -6} {Phi}{sub 0} Hz{sup -1/2} = 2.07 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -21} Wb Hz{sup -1/2}, coupled to a magnetostrictor, playing the role of tensomagnetic transducer, it is possible to construct a system for detecting pressure variations with the ultimate sensitivity of 10{sup -13} Pa Hz{sup -1/2} and for measuring specific elongation with the sensitivity of 10{sup -24} Hz{sup -1/2}. The analysis of physical grounds of the inverse magnetostriction effect demonstrates concrete ways to essentially higher efficiency of tensomagnetic conversion. The estimates performed demonstrate the possibility of using the SQUID/magnetostrictor system as a detector of gravitational waves. Other possibilities of using this system for solving both fundamental and applied problems are also considered. (experimental techniques)

  12. Determination of the detective quantum efficiency of a prototype, megavoltage indirect detection, active matrix flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    El-Mohri, Y; Jee, K W; Antonuk, L E; Maolinbay, M; Zhao, Q

    2001-12-01

    After years of aggressive development, active matrix flat-panel imagers (AMFPIs) have recently become commercially available for radiotherapy imaging. In this paper we report on a comprehensive evaluation of the signal and noise performance of a large-area prototype AMFPI specifically developed for this application. The imager is based on an array of 512 x 512 pixels incorporating amorphous silicon photodiodes and thin-film transistors offering a 26 x 26 cm2 active area at a pixel pitch of 508 microm. This indirect detection array was coupled to various x-ray converters consisting of a commercial phosphor screen (Lanex Fast B, Lanex Regular, or Lanex Fine) and a 1 mm thick copper plate. Performance of the imager in terms of measured sensitivity, modulation transfer function (MTF), noise power spectra (NPS), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) is reported at beam energies of 6 and 15 MV and at doses of 1 and 2 monitor units (MU). In addition, calculations of system performance (NPS, DQE) based on cascaded-system formalism were reported and compared to empirical results. In these calculations, the Swank factor and spatial energy distributions of secondary electrons within the converter were modeled by means of EGS4 Monte Carlo simulations. Measured MTFs of the system show a weak dependence on screen type (i.e., thickness), which is partially due to the spreading of secondary radiation. Measured DQE was found to be independent of dose for the Fast B screen, implying that the imager is input-quantum-limited at 1 MU, even at an extended source-to-detector distance of 200 cm. The maximum DQE obtained is around 1%--a limit imposed by the low detection efficiency of the converter. For thinner phosphor screens, the DQE is lower due to their lower detection efficiencies. Finally, for the Fast B screen, good agreement between calculated and measured DQE was observed.

  13. Coulomb crystallization in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonitz, Michael

    2007-11-01

    Coulomb crystallization occurs in one-component plasmas when the average interaction energy exceeds the kinetic energy by about two orders of magnitude. A simple road to reach such strong coupling consists in using external confinement potentials the strength of which controls the density. This has been succsessfully realized with ions in traps and storage rings and also in dusty plasma. Recently a three-dimensional spherical confinement could be created [1] which allows to produce spherical dust crystals containing concentric shells. I will give an overview on our recent results for these ``Yukawa balls'' and compare them to experiments. The shell structure of these systems can be very well explained by using an isotropic statically screened pair interaction. Further, the thermodynamic properties of these systems, such as the radial density distribution are discussed based on an analytical theory [3]. I then will discuss Coulomb crystallization in trapped quantum systems, such as mesoscopic electron and electron hole plasmas in coupled layers [4,5]. These systems show a very rich correlation behavior, including liquid and solid like states and bound states (excitons, biexcitons) and their crystals. On the other hand, also collective quantum and spin effects are observed, including Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity of bound electron-hole pairs [4]. Finally, I consider Coulomb crystallization in two-component neutral plasmas in three dimensions. I discuss the necessary conditions for crystals of heavy charges to exist in the presence of a light component which typically is in the Fermi gas or liquid state. It can be shown that their exists a critical ratio of the masses of the species of the order of 80 [5] which is confirmed by Quantum Monte Carlo simulations [6]. Familiar examples are crystals of nuclei in the core of White dwarf stars, but the results also suggest the existence of other crystals, including proton or α-particle crystals in dense matter

  14. On microstates counting in many body polymer quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chacon-Acosta, Guillermo; Morales-Tecotl, Hugo A.; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2011-10-14

    Polymer quantum systems are mechanical models quantized in a similar way as loop quantum gravity but in which loops/graphs resembling polymers are replaced by discrete sets of points. Such systems have allowed to study in a simpler context some novel aspects of loop quantum gravity. Although thermal aspects play a crucial role in cosmology and black hole physics little attention has been given to the thermostatistics of many body polymer quantum systems. In this work we explore how the features of a one-dimensional effective polymer gas, affect its microstate counting and hence the corresponding thermodynamical quantities.

  15. Holonomic Quantum Control with Continuous Variable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, Victor V.; Shu, Chi; Krastanov, Stefan; Shen, Chao; Liu, Ren-Bao; Yang, Zhen-Biao; Schoelkopf, Robert J.; Mirrahimi, Mazyar; Devoret, Michel H.; Jiang, Liang

    2016-04-01

    Universal computation of a quantum system consisting of superpositions of well-separated coherent states of multiple harmonic oscillators can be achieved by three families of adiabatic holonomic gates. The first gate consists of moving a coherent state around a closed path in phase space, resulting in a relative Berry phase between that state and the other states. The second gate consists of "colliding" two coherent states of the same oscillator, resulting in coherent population transfer between them. The third gate is an effective controlled-phase gate on coherent states of two different oscillators. Such gates should be realizable via reservoir engineering of systems that support tunable nonlinearities, such as trapped ions and circuit QED.

  16. Capacities of linear quantum optical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, Cosmo; Giovannetti, Vittorio; Pirandola, Stefano; Mancini, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth

    2012-06-01

    A wide variety of communication channels employ the quantized electromagnetic field to convey information. Their communication capacity crucially depends on losses associated to spatial characteristics of the channel such as diffraction and antenna design. Here we focus on the communication via a finite pupil, showing that diffraction is formally described as a memory channel. By exploiting this equivalence we then compute the communication capacity of an optical refocusing system, modeled as a converging lens. Even though loss of information originates from the finite pupil of the lens, we show that the presence of the refocusing system can substantially enhance the communication capacity. We mainly concentrate on communication of classical information, the extension to quantum information being straightforward.

  17. Control of decoherence in open quantum systems using feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan

    Decoherence, which is caused due to the interaction of a quantum system with its environment plagues all quantum systems and leads to the loss of quantum properties that are vital for quantum computation and quantum information processing. In this work we propose a novel strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done so. A novel construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Almost all the earlier work on decoherence control employ density matrix and stochastic master equations to analyze the problem. Our approach to decoherence control involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with non-trivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and Decoherence Free Subspaces (DFS). Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. The two concepts are contrasted and an improved theory of disturbance decoupling for general input affine systems is developed. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system has to be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. Finally the results are also shown to be superior to the ones obtained via master equations. In order to apply feedback a reliable information extraction scheme is presented that employs continuous indirect measurements with the help of a quantum probe. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform

  18. Realization of quantum state privacy amplification in a nuclear magnetic resonance quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liang; Wang, Chuan; Long, Gui Lu

    2010-06-01

    Quantum state privacy amplification (QSPA) is the quantum analogue of classical privacy amplification. If the state information of a series of single-particle states has some leakage, QSPA reduces this leakage by condensing the state information of two particles into the state of one particle. Recursive applications of the operations will eliminate the quantum state information leakage to a required minimum level. In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of a quantum state privacy amplification protocol in a nuclear magnetic resonance system. The density matrices of the states are constructed in the experiment, and the experimental results agree well with theory.

  19. NORSAR Detection Processing System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-05-31

    systems have been reliable. NTA/Lillestrom and Hamar will take a new initiative medio April regarding 04C. The line will be remeasured and if a certain...estimate of the ambient noise level at the site of the FINESA array, ground motion spectra were calculated for four time intervals. Two intervals were

  20. Remote Voice Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-25

    back to the laser Doppler vibrometer and the digital camera, respectively. Mechanical beam steering mirror modules, such as galvanometer steering...mirror module 43 in accordance with this invention. An appropriate galvanometer -based tracker system has been used for tracking eye motion during laser

  1. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOEpatents

    Peurrung, Anthony J.; Stromswold, David C.

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  2. Quantum dot-fluorescence in situ hybridisation for Ectromelia virus detection based on biotin-streptavidin interactions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ting; Zheng, Zhenhua; Zhang, Xian-En; Wang, Hanzhong

    2016-09-01

    Ectromelia virus (ECTV) is an pathogen that can lead to a lethal, acute toxic disease known as mousepox in mice. Prevention and control of ECTV infection requires the establishment of a rapid and sensitive diagnostic system for detecting the virus. In the present study, we developed a method of quantum-dot-fluorescence based in situ hybridisation for detecting ECTV genome DNA. Using biotin-dUTP to replace dTTP, biotin was incorporated into a DNA probe during polymerase chain reaction. High sensitivity and specificity of ECTV DNA detection were displayed by fluorescent quantum dots based on biotin-streptavidin interactions. ECTV DNA was then detected by streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots that bound the biotin-labelled probe. Results indicated that the established method can visualise ECTV genomic DNA in both infected cells and mouse tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting quantum-dot-fluorescence based in situ hybridisation for the detection of viral nucleic acids, providing a reference for the identification and detection of other viruses.

  3. Quantum Computing in Fock Space Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezin, Alexander A.

    1997-04-01

    Fock space system (FSS) has unfixed number (N) of particles and/or degrees of freedom. In quantum computing (QC) main requirement is sustainability of coherent Q-superpositions. This normally favoured by low noise environment. High excitation/high temperature (T) limit is hence discarded as unfeasible for QC. Conversely, if N is itself a quantized variable, the dimensionality of Hilbert basis for qubits may increase faster (say, N-exponentially) than thermal noise (likely, in powers of N and T). Hence coherency may win over T-randomization. For this type of QC speed (S) of factorization of long integers (with D digits) may increase with D (for 'ordinary' QC speed polynomially decreases with D). This (apparent) paradox rests on non-monotonic bijectivity (cf. Georg Cantor's diagonal counting of rational numbers). This brings entire aleph-null structurality ("Babylonian Library" of infinite informational content of integer field) to superposition determining state of quantum analogue of Turing machine head. Structure of integer infinititude (e.g. distribution of primes) results in direct "Platonic pressure" resembling semi-virtual Casimir efect (presure of cut-off vibrational modes). This "effect", the embodiment of Pythagorean "Number is everything", renders Godelian barrier arbitrary thin and hence FSS-based QC can in principle be unlimitedly efficient (e.g. D/S may tend to zero when D tends to infinity).

  4. Quantum Interference Induced Photon Blockade in a Coupled Single Quantum Dot-Cavity System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jing; Geng, Weidong; Xu, Xiulai

    2015-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to implement a strong photon blockade with a single quantum dot coupled to a nanocavity. The photon blockade effect can be tremendously enhanced by driving the cavity and the quantum dot simultaneously with two classical laser fields. This enhancement of photon blockade is ascribed to the quantum interference effect to avoid two-photon excitation of the cavity field. Comparing with Jaynes-Cummings model, the second-order correlation function at zero time delay g(2)(0) in our scheme can be reduced by two orders of magnitude and the system sustains a large intracavity photon number. A red (blue) cavity-light detuning asymmetry for photon quantum statistics with bunching or antibunching characteristics is also observed. The photon blockade effect has a controllable flexibility by tuning the relative phase between the two pumping laser fields and the Rabi coupling strength between the quantum dot and the pumping field. Moreover, the photon blockade scheme based on quantum interference mechanism does not require a strong coupling strength between the cavity and the quantum dot, even with the pure dephasing of the system. This simple proposal provides an effective way for potential applications in solid state quantum computation and quantum information processing. PMID:25783560

  5. Software Systems for High-performance Quantum Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Britt, Keith A

    2016-01-01

    Quantum computing promises new opportunities for solving hard computational problems, but harnessing this novelty requires breakthrough concepts in the design, operation, and application of computing systems. We define some of the challenges facing the development of quantum computing systems as well as software-based approaches that can be used to overcome these challenges. Following a brief overview of the state of the art, we present models for the quantum programming and execution models, the development of architectures for hybrid high-performance computing systems, and the realization of software stacks for quantum networking. This leads to a discussion of the role that conventional computing plays in the quantum paradigm and how some of the current challenges for exascale computing overlap with those facing quantum computing.

  6. Emulation of complex open quantum systems using superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostame, Sarah; Huh, Joonsuk; Kreisbeck, Christoph; Kerman, Andrew J.; Fujita, Takatoshi; Eisfeld, Alexander; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2017-02-01

    With quantum computers being out of reach for now, quantum simulators are alternative devices for efficient and accurate simulation of problems that are challenging to tackle using conventional computers. Quantum simulators are classified into analog and digital, with the possibility of constructing "hybrid" simulators by combining both techniques. Here we focus on analog quantum simulators of open quantum systems and address the limit that they can beat classical computers. In particular, as an example, we discuss simulation of the chlorosome light-harvesting antenna from green sulfur bacteria with over 250 phonon modes coupled to each electronic state. Furthermore, we propose physical setups that can be used to reproduce the quantum dynamics of a standard and multiple-mode Holstein model. The proposed scheme is based on currently available technology of superconducting circuits consist of flux qubits and quantum oscillators.

  7. FY 2005 Quantum Cascade Laser Alignment System Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Cannon, Bret D.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Broocks, Bryan T.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2006-01-11

    The Alignment Lasers Task of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project (Project PL211I) is a co-funded project between DOE NA-22 and a Classified Client. This project, which began in the second half of FY03, involved building and delivering a Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System to be used for testing the pupil alignment of an infrared sensor by measuring the response from four pairs of diametrically opposed QC lasers. PNNL delivered the system in FY04 and provided technical assistance in FY05 culminating into a successful demonstration of the system. This project evolved from the Laser Development Task of PL211I, which is involved in developing novel laser technology to support development of advanced chemical sensors for detecting the proliferation of nuclear weapons. The laser systems are based on quantum cascade (QC) lasers, a new semiconductor source in the infrared. QC lasers can be tailored to emit light throughout the infrared region (3.5 ? 17 ?m) and have high output power and stability. Thus, these lasers provide an infrared source with superb power and spectral stability enabling them to be used for applications such as alignment and calibration in addition to chemical sensing.

  8. Meron-Pair Excitations in Bilayer Quantum Hall System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Kyungsun

    Bilayer two-dimensional electron gas systems can form unusual broken symmetry states with spontaneous inter-layer phase coherence at certain filling factors. At total filling factor νT = 1, the lowest energy charged excitation of the system is theoretically suggested to be a linearly-confined meron-pair, which is topologically identical to a single skyrmion. We will review how this remarkable excitation arises and can help unravel various experimental results demonstrated in bilayer quantum Hall system. In order to detect the linearly-confined meron-pair excitation directly, we propose a gated bilayer Hall bar experiment, where the magnitude and orientation of magnetic field B‖ applied parallel to the 2D plane can be controlled. We demonstrate a strong angle-dependent transport due to the anisotropic nature of linearly-confined meron-pairs and discuss how it would be manifested in experiment.

  9. Parametric representation of open quantum systems and cross-over from quantum to classical environment.

    PubMed

    Calvani, Dario; Cuccoli, Alessandro; Gidopoulos, Nikitas I; Verrucchi, Paola

    2013-04-23

    The behavior of most physical systems is affected by their natural surroundings. A quantum system with an environment is referred to as open, and its study varies according to the classical or quantum description adopted for the environment. We propose an approach to open quantum systems that allows us to follow the cross-over from quantum to classical environments; to achieve this, we devise an exact parametric representation of the principal system, based on generalized coherent states for the environment. The method is applied to the s = 1/2 Heisenberg star with frustration, where the quantum character of the environment varies with the couplings entering the Hamiltonian H. We find that when the star is in an eigenstate of H, the central spin behaves as if it were in an effective magnetic field, pointing in the direction set by the environmental coherent-state angle variables (θ, ϕ), and broadened according to their quantum probability distribution. Such distribution is independent of ϕ, whereas as a function of θ is seen to get narrower as the quantum character of the environment is reduced, collapsing into a Dirac-δ function in the classical limit. In such limit, because ϕ is left undetermined, the Von Neumann entropy of the central spin remains finite; in fact, it is equal to the entanglement of the original fully quantum model, a result that establishes a relation between this latter quantity and the Berry phase characterizing the dynamics of the central spin in the effective magnetic field.

  10. de Finetti Representation Theorem for Infinite-Dimensional Quantum Systems and Applications to Quantum Cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renner, R.; Cirac, J. I.

    2009-03-01

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  11. De Finetti representation theorem for infinite-dimensional quantum systems and applications to quantum cryptography.

    PubMed

    Renner, R; Cirac, J I

    2009-03-20

    We show that the quantum de Finetti theorem holds for states on infinite-dimensional systems, provided they satisfy certain experimentally verifiable conditions. This result can be applied to prove the security of quantum key distribution based on weak coherent states or other continuous variable states against general attacks.

  12. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, Victor R.; Watwood, Donald B.

    1994-01-01

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard.

  13. Power line detection system

    DOEpatents

    Latorre, V.R.; Watwood, D.B.

    1994-09-27

    A short-range, radio frequency (RF) transmitting-receiving system that provides both visual and audio warnings to the pilot of a helicopter or light aircraft of an up-coming power transmission line complex. Small, milliwatt-level narrowband transmitters, powered by the transmission line itself, are installed on top of selected transmission line support towers or within existing warning balls, and provide a continuous RF signal to approaching aircraft. The on-board receiver can be either a separate unit or a portion of the existing avionics, and can also share an existing antenna with another airborne system. Upon receipt of a warning signal, the receiver will trigger a visual and an audio alarm to alert the pilot to the potential power line hazard. 4 figs.

  14. Centrifugal unbalance detection system

    DOEpatents

    Cordaro, Joseph V.; Reeves, George; Mets, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A system consisting of an accelerometer sensor attached to a centrifuge enclosure for sensing vibrations and outputting a signal in the form of a sine wave with an amplitude and frequency that is passed through a pre-amp to convert it to a voltage signal, a low pass filter for removing extraneous noise, an A/D converter and a processor and algorithm for operating on the signal, whereby the algorithm interprets the amplitude and frequency associated with the signal and once an amplitude threshold has been exceeded the algorithm begins to count cycles during a predetermined time period and if a given number of complete cycles exceeds the frequency threshold during the predetermined time period, the system shuts down the centrifuge.

  15. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Whited, R.C.

    A system for obtaining improved resolution in relatively thick semiconductor radiation detectors, such as HgI/sub 2/, which exhibit significant hole trapping. Two amplifiers are used: the first measures the charge collected and the second the contribution of the electrons to the charge collected. The outputs of the two amplifiers are utilized to unfold the total charge generated within the detector in response to a radiation event.

  16. Dynamical algebra of observables in dissipative quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour, Sahar; Chruściński, Dariusz; Facchi, Paolo; Marmo, Giuseppe; Pascazio, Saverio; Rezakhani, Ali T.

    2017-02-01

    Dynamics and features of quantum systems can be drastically different from classical systems. Dissipation is understood as a general mechanism through which quantum systems may lose part or all of their quantum aspects. Here we discuss a method to analyze behaviors of dissipative quantum systems in an algebraic sense. This method employs a time-dependent product between system’s observables which is induced by the underlying dissipative dynamics. We argue that the long-time limit of the algebra of observables defined with this product yields a contractive algebra which reflects the loss of some quantum features of the dissipative system, and it bears relevant information about irreversibility. We illustrate this result through several examples of dissipation in various Markovian and non-Markovian systems.

  17. Detecting the quantum discord of an unknown state by a single observable

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Chengjie; Oh, C. H.; Yu Sixia; Chen Qing

    2011-09-15

    We propose a single observable to witness the nonzero quantum discord of an unknown quantum state provided that we have four copies of the state. The expectation value of this observable provides a necessary and sufficient condition for the nonzero quantum discord in 2xN systems and a necessary condition in higher finite-dimensional bipartite systems. Furthermore, a nontrivial lower bound of the quantum discord can be obtained from this expectation value. The proposed observable can be experimentally measured in exactly the same way as the entanglement witness. Moreover, a quantum circuit is designed to determine the expectation value of our observable with four simultaneous local qubit measurements.

  18. Shelving-style QND phonon-number detection in quantum optomechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanay, Yariv; Clerk, Aashish A.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a new method for optomechanical quantum non-demolition detection of phonon number, based on a ‘shelving’ style measurement. The scheme uses a two-mode optomechanical system where the frequency splitting of the two photonic modes is near-resonant with the mechanical frequency. The combination of a strong optical drive and the underlying nonlinear optomechanical interaction gives rise to spin-like dynamics which facilitate the measurement. This approach allows phonon number measurement to be accomplished parametrically faster than in other schemes which are restricted to weak driving.

  19. Detection and measurement of electroreflectance on quantum cascade laser device using Fourier transform infrared microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Enobio, Eli Christopher I.; Ohtani, Keita; Ohno, Yuzo; Ohno, Hideo

    2013-12-02

    We demonstrate the use of a Fourier Transform Infrared microscope system to detect and measure electroreflectance (ER) from mid-infrared quantum cascade laser (QCL) device. To characterize intersubband transition (ISBT) energies in a functioning QCL device, a microscope is used to focus the probe on the QCL cleaved mirror. The measured ER spectra exhibit resonance features associated to ISBTs under applied electric field in agreement with the numerical calculations and comparable to observed photocurrent, and emission peaks. The method demonstrates the potential as a characterization tool for QCL devices.

  20. Graphene quantum dots for ultrasensitive detection of acetylcholinesterase and its inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Nan; Wang, Xuewan; Chen, Jie; Sun, Lei; Chen, Peng

    2015-09-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) are emerging zero-dimensional materials promising a wide spectrum of novel applications including development of optical sensors. Herein, a GQD-based fluorometric sensor is devised to detect acetylcholinesterase (AChE, a critical enzyme in central nervous system and neuromuscular junctions) with an ultralow detection limit (0.58 pM with S/N of 5.0), using a photoluminescence ‘turn-off’ mechanism. This simple ‘mix-and-detect’ platform can also be employed to sense a variety of compounds that can directly or indirectly inhibit the enzymatic activities of AChE, such as nerve gases, pesticides, and therapeutic drugs. As the proof-of-concept demonstrations, we show the sensitive detection of paraoxon (a pesticide), tacrine (a drug to treat Alzheimer’s disease), and dopamine (an important neurotransmitter).

  1. Superconducting Quantum Interference Devices for the Detection of Magnetic Flux and Application to Airborne High Frequency Direction Finding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS...SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS Presented to the...SUPERCONDUCTING QUANTUM INTERFERENCE DEVICES FOR THE DETECTION OF MAGNETIC FLUX AND APPLICATION TO AIRBORNE HIGH FREQUENCY DIRECTION FINDING THESIS Travis

  2. Quantum Phase Transitions in Conventional Matrix Product Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; Huang, Fei; Chang, Yan

    2017-02-01

    For matrix product states(MPSs) of one-dimensional spin-1/2 chains, we investigate a new kind of conventional quantum phase transition(QPT). We find that the system has two different ferromagnetic phases; on the line of the two ferromagnetic phases coexisting equally, the system in the thermodynamic limit is in an isolated mediate-coupling state described by a paramagnetic state and is in the same state as the renormalization group fixed point state, the expectation values of the physical quantities are discontinuous, and any two spin blocks of the system have the same geometry quantum discord(GQD) within the range of open interval (0,0.25) and the same classical correlation(CC) within the range of open interval (0,0.75) compared to any phase having no any kind of correlation. We not only realize the control of QPTs but also realize the control of quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems on the critical line by adjusting the environment parameters, which may have potential application in quantum information fields and is helpful to comprehensively and deeply understand the quantum correlation, and the organization and structure of quantum correlation especially for long-range quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems.

  3. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  4. Energy transfer in hybrid systems quantum dot-plasmonic nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaplik, A. V.

    2016-06-01

    Radiationless relaxation in hybrid systems quantum dot (QD)-plasmonic nanostructure is considered. For the system QD-2D plasma the relaxation rate extremely steeply depends on the radius of quantum dot while in the pair QD-cylindrical wire contacting each other this dependence is logarithmic weak.

  5. Quantum Liquid Crystal Phases in Strongly Correlated Fermionic Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This thesis is devoted to the investigation of the quantum liquid crystal phases in strongly correlated electronic systems. Such phases are characterized by their partially broken spatial symmetries and are observed in various strongly correlated systems as being summarized in Chapter 1. Although quantum liquid crystal phases often involve…

  6. Ultracold atoms for simulation of many body quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchinson, David A. W.

    2017-01-01

    Feynman famously proposed simulating quantum physics using other, better controlled, quantum systems. This vision is now a reality within the realm of ultracold atomic physics. We discuss how these systems can be used to simulate many body physics, concentrating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition in 2D physics and the role of disorder.

  7. Homodyne detection with on-off detector systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipfert, T.; Sperling, J.; Vogel, W.

    2015-11-01

    Phase-sensitive properties of light play a crucial role in a variety of quantum optical phenomena, which have been mostly discussed in the framework of photoelectric detection theory. However, modern detection schemes, such as arrays of on-off detectors, are not based on photoelectric counting. We demonstrate that the theory of homodyning with such click-counting detectors can be established by using a proper detection model. For practical applications, a variety of typically occurring imperfections are rigorously analyzed and directly observable nonclassicality criteria are studied. Fundamental examples demonstrate the general functionality of our technique. Thus, our approach of homodyne detection with on-off detector systems is able to bridge the gap between imperfect detection and the phase resolution demands for modern applications of quantum light.

  8. Diversified transmission multichannel detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Tournois, P.; Engelhard, P.

    1984-07-03

    A detection system for imaging by sonar or radar signals. The system associates diversified transmissions with an interferometric base. This base provides an angular channel formation means and each signal formed in this way is processed by matched filtering in a circuit containing copy signals characterizing the space coloring obtained by the diversified transmission means. The invention is particularly applicable to side or front looking detection sonars.

  9. Quantum-classical correspondence in steady states of nonadiabatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Mikiya; Yamashita, Koichi

    2015-12-31

    We first present nonadiabatic path integral which is exact formulation of quantum dynamics in nonadiabatic systems. Then, by applying the stationary phase approximations to the nonadiabatic path integral, a semiclassical quantization condition, i.e., quantum-classical correspondence, for steady states of nonadiabatic systems is presented as a nonadiabatic trace formula. The present quantum-classical correspondence indicates that a set of primitive hopping periodic orbits, which are invariant under time evolution in the phase space of the slow degree of freedom, should be quantized. The semiclassical quantization is then applied to a simple nonadiabatic model and accurately reproduces exact quantum energy levels.

  10. Eigenstate Gibbs ensemble in integrable quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandy, Sourav; Sen, Arnab; Das, Arnab; Dhar, Abhishek

    2016-12-01

    The eigenstate thermalization hypothesis conjectures that for a thermodynamically large system in one of its energy eigenstates, the reduced density matrix describing any finite subsystem is determined solely by a set of relevant conserved quantities. In a chaotic quantum system, only the energy is expected to play that role and hence eigenstates appear locally thermal. Integrable systems, on the other hand, possess an extensive number of such conserved quantities and therefore the reduced density matrix requires specification of all the corresponding parameters (generalized Gibbs ensemble). However, here we show by unbiased statistical sampling of the individual eigenstates with a given finite energy density that the local description of an overwhelming majority of these states of even such an integrable system is actually Gibbs-like, i.e., requires only the energy density of the eigenstate. Rare eigenstates that cannot be represented by the Gibbs ensemble can also be sampled efficiently by our method and their local properties are then shown to be described by appropriately truncated generalized Gibbs ensembles. We further show that the presence of these rare eigenstates differentiates the model from the chaotic case and leads to the system being described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble at long time under a unitary dynamics following a sudden quench, even when the initial state is a typical (Gibbs-like) eigenstate of the prequench Hamiltonian.

  11. Realization of a Binary-Outcome Projection Measurement of a Three-Level Superconducting Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerger, Markus; Macha, Pascal; Hamann, Andrés Rosario; Reshitnyk, Yarema; Juliusson, Kristinn; Fedorov, Arkady

    2016-07-01

    Binary-outcome measurements allow one to determine whether a multilevel quantum system is in a certain state while preserving quantum coherence between all orthogonal states. In this paper, we explore different regimes of the dispersive readout of a three-level superconducting quantum system coupled to a microwave cavity in order to implement binary-outcome measurements. By designing identical cavity-frequency shifts for the first and second excited states of the system, we realize strong projective binary-outcome measurements onto its ground state with a fidelity of 94.3%. Complemented with standard microwave control and low-noise parametric amplification, this scheme enables the quantum nondemolition detection of leakage errors and can be used to create sets of compatible measurements to reveal the contextual nature of superconducting circuits.

  12. Phonon Overlaps in Molecular Quantum Dot Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Connie; Sethna, James

    2004-03-01

    We model the amplitudes and frequencies of the vibrational sidebands for the new molecular quantum dot systems. We calculate the Franck-Condon phonon overlaps in the 3N-dimensional configuration sapce. We solve the general case where the vibrational frequencies and eigenmodes change during the transition. We perform PM3 and DFT calculations for the case of the dumb bell-shaped C140 molecule. We find that the strongest amplitudes are associated with the 11 meV stretch mode, in agreement with experiment. The experimental amplitudes vary from molecule to molecule; indicating that the molecular overlaps are environment dependent. We explore overlaps in the presence of external electric fields from image charges and counter ions.

  13. Quantum-biological control of energy transfer in hybrid quantum dot-metallic nanoparticle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadeghi, Seyed M.; Hood, Brady; Patty, Kira

    2016-09-01

    We show theoretically that when a semiconductor quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle system interacts with a laser field, quantum coherence can introduce a new landscape for the dynamics of Forster resonance energy transfer (FRET). We predict adsorption of biological molecules to such a hybrid system can trigger dramatic changes in the way energy is transferred, blocking FRET while the distance between the quantum dot and metallic nanoparticle (R) and other structural specifications remain unchanged. We study the impact of variation of R on the FRET rate in the presence of quantum coherence and its ultrafast decay, offering a characteristically different dependency than the standard 1/R6. Application of the results for quantum nanosensors is discussed.

  14. Strong polygamy of quantum correlations in multi-party quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong San

    2014-10-01

    We propose a new type of polygamy inequality for multi-party quantum entanglement. We first consider the possible amount of bipartite entanglement distributed between a fixed party and any subset of the rest parties in a multi-party quantum system. By using the summation of these distributed entanglements, we provide an upper bound of the distributed entanglement between a party and the rest in multi-party quantum systems. We then show that this upper bound also plays as a lower bound of the usual polygamy inequality, therefore the strong polygamy of multi-party quantum entanglement. For the case of multi-party pure states, we further show that the strong polygamy of entanglement implies the strong polygamy of quantum discord.

  15. A real-time spectrum acquisition system design based on quantum dots-quantum well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Guo, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the structure characteristics of quantum dots-quantum well photodetector with response wavelength range from 400 nm to 1000 nm. It has the characteristics of high sensitivity, low dark current and the high conductance gain. According to the properties of the quantum dots-quantum well photodetectors, we designed a new type of capacitive transimpedence amplifier (CTIA) readout circuit structure with the advantages of adjustable gain, wide bandwidth and high driving ability. We have implemented the chip packaging between CTIA-CDS structure readout circuit and quantum dots detector and tested the readout response characteristics. According to the timing signals requirements of our readout circuit, we designed a real-time spectral data acquisition system based on FPGA and ARM. Parallel processing mode of programmable devices makes the system has high sensitivity and high transmission rate. In addition, we realized blind pixel compensation and smoothing filter algorithm processing to the real time spectrum data by using C++. Through the fluorescence spectrum measurement of carbon quantum dots and the signal acquisition system and computer software system to realize the collection of the spectrum signal processing and analysis, we verified the excellent characteristics of detector. It meets the design requirements of quantum dot spectrum acquisition system with the characteristics of short integration time, real-time and portability.

  16. Advanced-Retarded Differential Equations in Quantum Photonic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Perez-Leija, Armando; Egusquiza, Iñigo L.; Gräfe, Markus; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Szameit, Alexander; Solano, Enrique

    2017-02-01

    We propose the realization of photonic circuits whose dynamics is governed by advanced-retarded differential equations. Beyond their mathematical interest, these photonic configurations enable the implementation of quantum feedback and feedforward without requiring any intermediate measurement. We show how this protocol can be applied to implement interesting delay effects in the quantum regime, as well as in the classical limit. Our results elucidate the potential of the protocol as a promising route towards integrated quantum control systems on a chip.

  17. Dynamics of open bosonic quantum systems in coherent state representation

    SciTech Connect

    Dalvit, D. A. R.; Berman, G. P.; Vishik, M.

    2006-01-15

    We consider the problem of decoherence and relaxation of open bosonic quantum systems from a perspective alternative to the standard master equation or quantum trajectories approaches. Our method is based on the dynamics of expectation values of observables evaluated in a coherent state representation. We examine a model of a quantum nonlinear oscillator with a density-density interaction with a collection of environmental oscillators at finite temperature. We derive the exact solution for dynamics of observables and demonstrate a consistent perturbation approach.

  18. Advanced-Retarded Differential Equations in Quantum Photonic Systems

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Rodriguez, Unai; Perez-Leija, Armando; Egusquiza, Iñigo L.; Gräfe, Markus; Sanz, Mikel; Lamata, Lucas; Szameit, Alexander; Solano, Enrique

    2017-01-01

    We propose the realization of photonic circuits whose dynamics is governed by advanced-retarded differential equations. Beyond their mathematical interest, these photonic configurations enable the implementation of quantum feedback and feedforward without requiring any intermediate measurement. We show how this protocol can be applied to implement interesting delay effects in the quantum regime, as well as in the classical limit. Our results elucidate the potential of the protocol as a promising route towards integrated quantum control systems on a chip. PMID:28230090

  19. Quantum interference in an electron-hole graphene ring system

    SciTech Connect

    Smirnov, D.; Schmidt, H.; Haug, R. J.

    2013-12-04

    Quantum interference is observed in a graphene ring system via the Aharonov Bohm effect. As graphene is a gapless semiconductor, this geometry allows to study the unique situation of quantum interference between electrons and holes in addition to the unipolar quantum interference. The period and amplitude of the observed Aharonov-Bohm oscillations are independent of the sign of the applied gate voltage showing the equivalence between unipolar and dipolar interference.

  20. Quantum and classical operational complementarity for single systems

    SciTech Connect

    Luis, Alfredo

    2005-07-15

    We investigate duality relations between conjugate observables after measurements performed on a single realization of the system. The application of standard inference methods implies the existence of duality relations for single systems when using classical as well as quantum physics.

  1. Adiabatic response and quantum thermoelectrics for ac-driven quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludovico, María Florencia; Battista, Francesca; von Oppen, Felix; Arrachea, Liliana

    2016-02-01

    We generalize the theory of thermoelectrics to include coherent electron systems under adiabatic ac driving, accounting for quantum pumping of charge and heat, as well as for the work exchanged between the electron system and driving potentials. We derive the relevant response coefficients in the adiabatic regime and show that they obey generalized Onsager reciprocity relations. We analyze the consequences of our generalized thermoelectric framework for quantum motors, generators, heat engines, and heat pumps, characterizing them in terms of efficiencies and figures of merit. We illustrate these concepts in a model for a quantum pump.

  2. Few-body treatment of the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Chris; Daily, Kevin; Wooten, Rachel

    2015-03-01

    The quantum Hall system is perhaps the simplest real physical system to exhibit complicated, highly-correlated quantum behavior. Our initial theoretical exploration of this problem approaches it from a few-body perspective using the adiabatic hyperspherical representation developed originally for atomic systems. Such a 2D system with interacting charged particles that move in an external magnetic field can be simulated for cold atoms using artificial vector gauge potentials. Supported by NSF.

  3. Measurements of nanoresonator-qubit interactions in a hybrid quantum electromechanical system.

    PubMed

    Rouxinol, F; Hao, Y; Brito, F; Caldeira, A O; Irish, E K; LaHaye, M D

    2016-09-09

    Experiments to probe the basic quantum properties of motional degrees of freedom of mechanical systems have developed rapidly over the last decade. One promising approach is to use hybrid electromechanical systems incorporating superconducting qubits and microwave circuitry. However, a critical challenge facing the development of these systems is to achieve strong coupling between mechanics and qubits while simultaneously reducing coupling of both the qubit and mechanical mode to the environment. Here we report measurements of a qubit-coupled mechanical resonator system consisting of an ultra-high-frequency nanoresonator and a long coherence-time superconducting transmon qubit, embedded in a superconducting coplanar waveguide cavity. It is demonstrated that the nanoresonator and transmon have commensurate energies and transmon coherence times are one order of magnitude larger than for all previously reported qubit-coupled nanoresonators. Moreover, we show that numerical simulations of this new hybrid quantum system are in good agreement with spectroscopic measurements and suggest that the nanoresonator in our device resides at low thermal occupation number, near its ground state, acting as a dissipative bath seen by the qubit. We also outline how this system could soon be developed as a platform for implementing more advanced experiments with direct relevance to quantum information processing and quantum thermodynamics, including the study of nanoresonator quantum noise properties, reservoir engineering, and nanomechanical quantum state generation and detection.

  4. Measurements of nanoresonator-qubit interactions in a hybrid quantum electromechanical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rouxinol, F.; Hao, Y.; Brito, F.; Caldeira, A. O.; Irish, E. K.; LaHaye, M. D.

    2016-09-01

    Experiments to probe the basic quantum properties of motional degrees of freedom of mechanical systems have developed rapidly over the last decade. One promising approach is to use hybrid electromechanical systems incorporating superconducting qubits and microwave circuitry. However, a critical challenge facing the development of these systems is to achieve strong coupling between mechanics and qubits while simultaneously reducing coupling of both the qubit and mechanical mode to the environment. Here we report measurements of a qubit-coupled mechanical resonator system consisting of an ultra-high-frequency nanoresonator and a long coherence-time superconducting transmon qubit, embedded in a superconducting coplanar waveguide cavity. It is demonstrated that the nanoresonator and transmon have commensurate energies and transmon coherence times are one order of magnitude larger than for all previously reported qubit-coupled nanoresonators. Moreover, we show that numerical simulations of this new hybrid quantum system are in good agreement with spectroscopic measurements and suggest that the nanoresonator in our device resides at low thermal occupation number, near its ground state, acting as a dissipative bath seen by the qubit. We also outline how this system could soon be developed as a platform for implementing more advanced experiments with direct relevance to quantum information processing and quantum thermodynamics, including the study of nanoresonator quantum noise properties, reservoir engineering, and nanomechanical quantum state generation and detection.

  5. Room-temperature efficient light detection by amorphous Ge quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this work, ultrathin amorphous Ge films (2 to 30 nm in thickness) embedded in SiO2 layers were grown by magnetron sputtering and employed as proficient light sensitizer in photodetector devices. A noteworthy modification of the visible photon absorption is evidenced due to quantum confinement effects which cause both a blueshift (from 0.8 to 1.8 eV) in the bandgap and an enhancement (up to three times) in the optical oscillator strength of confined carriers. The reported quantum confinement effects have been exploited to enhance light detection by Ge quantum wells, as demonstrated by photodetectors with an internal quantum efficiency of 70%. PMID:23496870

  6. Control of quantum correlations in solid state systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berrada, K.

    2015-11-01

    The quantum correlations between two independent qubits immersed in an anisotropic and isotropic photonic band-gab (PBG) crystal have been studied without Born or Markovian approximation. We show that the amount of the entanglement and quantum discord between the qubits in the photonic crystal is greatly different from that of qubits in vacuum or that subjected to the usual non-Markovian reservoir. The results also show that, for PBG materials as environment, high values of quantum correlation trapping can be achieved and thus prevention of correlation sudden drop occurs, which seriously enhances the coherence and increase the amount of the correlations. Moreover, we show that the quantum correlations in the isotropic PBG are more easily preserved than that in the anisotropic PBG under the same condition. These features make the quantum systems in PBG materials as a good candidate for implementation of different schemes of quantum optics and information with high performance.

  7. Quantum Hysteresis in Coupled Light-Matter Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ruiz, Fernando; Acevedo, Oscar; Quiroga, Luis; Rodríguez, Ferney; Johnson, Neil

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the non-equilibrium quantum dynamics of a canonical light-matter system, namely the Dicke model, when the light-matter interaction is ramped up and down through a cycle across the quantum phase transition. Our calculations reveal a rich set of dynamical behaviors determined by the cycle times, ranging from the slow, near adiabatic regime through to the fast, sudden quench regime. As the cycle time decreases, we uncover a crossover from an oscillatory exchange of quantum information between light and matter that approaches a reversible adiabatic process, to a dispersive regime that generates large values of light-matter entanglement. The phenomena uncovered in this work have implications in quantum control, quantum interferometry, as well as in quantum information theory.

  8. Anonymous voting for multi-dimensional CV quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rong-Hua, Shi; Yi, Xiao; Jin-Jing, Shi; Ying, Guo; Moon-Ho, Lee

    2016-06-01

    We investigate the design of anonymous voting protocols, CV-based binary-valued ballot and CV-based multi-valued ballot with continuous variables (CV) in a multi-dimensional quantum cryptosystem to ensure the security of voting procedure and data privacy. The quantum entangled states are employed in the continuous variable quantum system to carry the voting information and assist information transmission, which takes the advantage of the GHZ-like states in terms of improving the utilization of quantum states by decreasing the number of required quantum states. It provides a potential approach to achieve the efficient quantum anonymous voting with high transmission security, especially in large-scale votes. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61272495, 61379153, and 61401519), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20130162110012), and the MEST-NRF of Korea (Grant No. 2012-002521).

  9. Probabilistic Model of Fault Detection in Quantum Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, A.; Pathak, A.

    Since the introduction of quantum computation, several protocols (such as quantum cryptography, quantum algorithm, quantum teleportation) have established quantum computing as a superior future technology. Each of these processes involves quantum circuits, which are prone to different kinds of faults. Consequently, it is important to verify whether the circuit hardware is defective or not. The systematic procedure to do so is known as fault testing. Normally testing is done by providing a set of valid input states and measuring the corresponding output states and comparing the output states with the expected output states of the perfect (fault less) circuit. This particular set of input vectors are known as test set [6]. If there exists a fault then the next step would be to find the exact location and nature of the defect. This is known as fault localization. A model that explains the logical or functional faults in the circuit is a fault model. Conventional fault models include (i) stuck at faults, (ii) bridge faults, and (iii) delay faults. These fault models have been rigorously studied for conventional irreversible circuit. But with the advent of reversible classical computing and quantum computing it has become important to enlarge the domain of the study on test vectors.

  10. Deterministic secure quantum communication using a single d-level system

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dong; Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2017-01-01

    Deterministic secure quantum communication (DSQC) can transmit secret messages between two parties without first generating a shared secret key. Compared with quantum key distribution (QKD), DSQC avoids the waste of qubits arising from basis reconciliation and thus reaches higher efficiency. In this paper, based on data block transmission and order rearrangement technologies, we propose a DSQC protocol. It utilizes a set of single d-level systems as message carriers, which are used to directly encode the secret message in one communication process. Theoretical analysis shows that these employed technologies guarantee the security, and the use of a higher dimensional quantum system makes our protocol achieve higher security and efficiency. Since only quantum memory is required for implementation, our protocol is feasible with current technologies. Furthermore, Trojan horse attack (THA) is taken into account in our protocol. We give a THA model and show that THA significantly increases the multi-photon rate and can thus be detected. PMID:28327557

  11. Deterministic secure quantum communication using a single d-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Dong; Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2017-03-01

    Deterministic secure quantum communication (DSQC) can transmit secret messages between two parties without first generating a shared secret key. Compared with quantum key distribution (QKD), DSQC avoids the waste of qubits arising from basis reconciliation and thus reaches higher efficiency. In this paper, based on data block transmission and order rearrangement technologies, we propose a DSQC protocol. It utilizes a set of single d-level systems as message carriers, which are used to directly encode the secret message in one communication process. Theoretical analysis shows that these employed technologies guarantee the security, and the use of a higher dimensional quantum system makes our protocol achieve higher security and efficiency. Since only quantum memory is required for implementation, our protocol is feasible with current technologies. Furthermore, Trojan horse attack (THA) is taken into account in our protocol. We give a THA model and show that THA significantly increases the multi-photon rate and can thus be detected.

  12. Deterministic secure quantum communication using a single d-level system.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dong; Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2017-03-22

    Deterministic secure quantum communication (DSQC) can transmit secret messages between two parties without first generating a shared secret key. Compared with quantum key distribution (QKD), DSQC avoids the waste of qubits arising from basis reconciliation and thus reaches higher efficiency. In this paper, based on data block transmission and order rearrangement technologies, we propose a DSQC protocol. It utilizes a set of single d-level systems as message carriers, which are used to directly encode the secret message in one communication process. Theoretical analysis shows that these employed technologies guarantee the security, and the use of a higher dimensional quantum system makes our protocol achieve higher security and efficiency. Since only quantum memory is required for implementation, our protocol is feasible with current technologies. Furthermore, Trojan horse attack (THA) is taken into account in our protocol. We give a THA model and show that THA significantly increases the multi-photon rate and can thus be detected.

  13. Alternative Hamiltonian description for quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dubrovin, B.A. ); Marno, G.; Simoni, A. )

    1990-06-20

    The existence of time-invariant Kahler structures is analyzed in both Classical and Quantum Mechanics. In Quantum Mechanics, a family of such Kahler structures is found, in the finite-dimensional case it is proven that this family is complete.

  14. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  15. Security proof for quantum key distribution using qudit systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sheridan, Lana; Scarani, Valerio

    2010-09-15

    We provide security bounds against coherent attacks for two families of quantum key distribution protocols that use d-dimensional quantum systems. In the asymptotic regime, both the secret key rate for fixed noise and the robustness to noise increase with d. The finite key corrections are found to be almost insensitive to d < or approx. 20.

  16. Photon nonlinear mixing in subcarrier multiplexed quantum key distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Capmany, José

    2009-04-13

    We provide, for the first time to our knowledge, an analysis of the influence of nonlinear photon mixing on the end to end quantum bit error rate (QBER) performance of subcarrier multiplexed quantum key distribution systems. The results show that negligible impact is to be expected for modulation indexes in the range of 2%.

  17. Quantum-Classical Connection for Hydrogen Atom-Like Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syam, Debapriyo; Roy, Arup

    2011-01-01

    The Bohr-Sommerfeld quantum theory specifies the rules of quantization for circular and elliptical orbits for a one-electron hydrogen atom-like system. This article illustrates how a formula connecting the principal quantum number "n" and the length of the major axis of an elliptical orbit may be arrived at starting from the quantum…

  18. Quantum cascade laser-based screening portal for the detection of explosive precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindley, Ruth; Normand, Erwan; Howieson, Iain; McCulloch, Michael; Black, Paul; Lewis, Colin; Foulger, Brian

    2007-10-01

    In recent years, quantum cascade lasers (QCL) have been proven in robust, high-performance gas analyzers designed for continuous emission monitoring (CEM) in harsh environments. In 2006, Cascade Technologies reported progress towards adapting its patented technology for homeland security applications by publishing initial results on explosive compound detection. This paper presents the performance and results from a QCL-based people screening portal developed during the past year and aimed at the detection of precursors used in the make up of improvised explosive devices (IED). System tests have been carried out on a large number of potential interferents, together with target precursor materials, reinforcing original assumptions that compound fingerprinting can be effectively demonstrated using this technique. Results have shown that an extremely high degree of specificity can be achieved with a sub-second response time. Furthermore, it has been shown that unambiguous precursor signature recognition can be extended to compound mixtures associated with the intermediate stages in the make up of IEDs, whilst maintaining interferent immunity. The portal sensitivity was configured for parts per billion (ppb) detection level thresholds, but is currently being reconfigured for sub-ppb detection. In summary, the results obtained from the QCL based portal indicate that development of a low cost detection system, with enhanced features such as low false positive and high throughput screening of individuals or items, is possible. Development and testing was carried out with the support of the UK government.

  19. Ultrasensitive fluorescence detection of heparin based on quantum dots and a functional ruthenium polypyridyl complex.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanlin; Shi, Shuo; Wang, Linlin; Yao, Junliang; Yao, Tianming

    2014-05-15

    A new strategy for the detection of heparin is developed by utilizing quantum dots (QDs) and a functional ruthenium polypyridyl complex [Ru(phen)2(dppz-idzo)](2+) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline, dppz-idzo=dipyrido-[3,2-a:2',3'-c] phenazine-imidazolone). The emission of CdTe QDs is found to be quenched by Ru complex due to electron transfer. Upon addition of the polyanionic heparin, it could remove the quencher (Ru complex) from the surface of QDs owing to the electrostatic and/or hydrogen bonding interactions between heparin and Ru complex, which led to significant fluorescence recovery of CdTe QDs. The fluorescence intensity enhanced with the increase of heparin and a linear relationship was observed in the range of 21-77 nM for heparin detection in buffer solution and the limit of detection (LOD) is 0.38 nM. Moreover, the strategy was successfully applied to detect heparin as low as 0.68 nM with a linear range of 35-98 nM in fetal bovine serum samples. The selectivity results of the fluorescence assay revealed that our system displayed excellent fluorescence selectivity towards heparin over its analogues, such as chondroitin 4-sulfate (Chs) or hyaluronic acid (Hya). This fluorescence "switch on" assay for heparin is label-free, convenient, sensitive and selective, which can be used to detect heparin in biological systems even with the naked eyes.

  20. Performing repetitive error detection in a superconducting quantum circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, J.; Barends, R.; Fowler, A.; Megrant, A.; Jeffrey, E.; White, T.; Sank, D.; Mutus, J.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Y.; Chen, Z.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Hoi, I.-C.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Quintana, C.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; Cleland, A. N.; Martinis, J. M.

    2015-03-01

    Recently, there has been a large interest in the surface code error correction scheme, as gate and measurement fidelities are near the threshold. If error rates are sufficiently low, increased systems size leads to suppression of logical error. We have combined high fidelity gate and measurements in a single nine qubit device, and use it to perform up to eight rounds of repetitive bit error detection. We demonstrate suppression of environmentally-induced error as compared to a single physical qubit, as well as reduced logical error rates with increasing system size.

  1. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  2. Implementing quantum electrodynamics with ultracold atomic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, V.; Hebenstreit, F.; Jendrzejewski, F.; Oberthaler, M. K.; Berges, J.

    2017-02-01

    We discuss the experimental engineering of model systems for the description of quantum electrodynamics (QED) in one spatial dimension via a mixture of bosonic 23Na and fermionic 6Li atoms. The local gauge symmetry is realized in an optical superlattice, using heteronuclear boson–fermion spin-changing interactions which preserve the total spin in every local collision. We consider a large number of bosons residing in the coherent state of a Bose–Einstein condensate on each link between the fermion lattice sites, such that the behavior of lattice QED in the continuum limit can be recovered. The discussion about the range of possible experimental parameters builds, in particular, upon experiences with related setups of fermions interacting with coherent samples of bosonic atoms. We determine the atomic system’s parameters required for the description of fundamental QED processes, such as Schwinger pair production and string breaking. This is achieved by benchmark calculations of the atomic system and of QED itself using functional integral techniques. Our results demonstrate that the dynamics of one-dimensional QED may be realized with ultracold atoms using state-of-the-art experimental resources. The experimental setup proposed may provide a unique access to longstanding open questions for which classical computational methods are no longer applicable.

  3. Quantum detection of coherent-state signals in the presence of noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, V. A.; Lau, C. W.

    2003-01-01

    A general method for solving an important class of quantum detection problems will be presented and evaluated. The quantum theory for detecting pure states for communications purposes has been developed over two decades ago, however the mixed state problem representing signal plus noise states has received little attention due to its great complexity. Here we develop a practical model for solving the mixed-state problem using a discrete approximation to the coherent-state representation of signal plus noise density operators.

  4. Quantum limits on the detection sensitivity of a linear detector with feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Yang

    2017-03-01

    We show that the detection sensitivity of a linear detector is lower bounded by some quantum limits. For the force sensitivity, which is relevant for atomic force microscopes, the lower bound is given by the so-called ultimate quantum limit (UQL). For the displacement sensitivity, which is relevant for detecting gravitational waves, a generalized lower bound that can overcome the usual UQL is obtained.

  5. Nuclear-Spin Measurements of Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Yoshiro

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is widely used in the physical, chemical, and biological sciences. However, conventional NMR techniques based on induction-detection have drawbacks of low-sensitivity and the need of a relatively large sample. It is not suitable to investigate single or double layers (or their nanostructure), which is essential in studying quantum Hall (QH) effects. In this presentation, I discussed a resistively-detected technique to overcome the low-sensitivity limitation of conventional NMR and its application to QH systems. Resistively-detected nuclear-spin-based measurements rely on enhanced interactions between electron and nuclear spins at the degenerate point of different electron-spin states. For example, at the ν = 2/3 degenerate point in a AlGaAs/GaAs system,1-3 nuclear-spin polarization far beyond the thermal equilibrium is generated using current flow (dynamic nuclear-spin polarization). Moreover, nuclear-spin polarization can be detected as enhanced resistance, which is proportional to the magnetization, Mz, of nuclear spins.2 It should be stressed that the special states of ν = 2/3 are needed for dynamic nuclear-spin polarization and Mz detection, but we can apply NMR spectrum and nuclear-spin relaxation (T1 time) measurements for any state we want to estimate. These nuclear-spin-based measurements were successfully applied to characterize QH systems, especially their electron-spin features, using single and double layer systems where characteristics are controlled electrically by the gate biases. For a single layer, we could clarify skyrmion,2 spin-polarization of composite fermion,4 and enhanced spin-orbit interactions in a strongly asymmetric confinement.5 Exciting phases, like a canted antiferromagnetic phase, were studied in a double layer QH system with a total filling factor of 2 (Refs. 6, 7). The low-frequency mode was sensitively detected by monitoring T1, reflecting correlated electron spin features.7 The clear

  6. Certifying single-system steering for quantum-information processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Che-Ming; Chen, Yueh-Nan; Lambert, Neill; Chiu, Ching-Yi; Nori, Franco

    2015-12-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering describes how different ensembles of quantum states can be remotely prepared by measuring one particle of an entangled pair. Here, we investigate quantum steering for single quantum d -dimensional systems (qudits) and devise efficient conditions to certify the steerability therein, which we find are applicable both to single-system steering and EPR steering. In the single-system case our steering conditions enable the unambiguous ruling out of generic classical means of mimicking steering. Ruling out "false-steering" scenarios has implications for securing channels against both cloning-based individual attack and coherent attacks when implementing quantum key distribution using qudits. We also show that these steering conditions also have applications in quantum computation, in that they can serve as an efficient criterion for the evaluation of quantum logic gates of arbitrary size. Finally, we describe how the nonlocal EPR variant of these conditions also function as tools for identifying faithful one-way quantum computation, secure entanglement-based quantum communication, and genuine multipartite EPR steering.

  7. Bell inequalities for multipartite qubit quantum systems and their maximal violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2012-11-01

    We present a set of Bell inequalities for multiqubit quantum systems. These Bell inequalities are shown to be able to detect multiqubit entanglement better than previous Bell inequalities such as Werner-Wolf-Zukowski-Brukner ones. Computable formulas are presented for calculating the maximal violations of these Bell inequalities for any multiqubit states.

  8. Computable criterion for partial entanglement in continuous-variable quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Gabriel, Andreas; Huber, Marcus; Radic, Sasa; Hiesmayr, Beatrix C.

    2011-05-15

    A general and computable criterion for k-(in)separability in continuous multipartite quantum systems is presented. The criterion can be experimentally implemented with a finite and comparatively low number of local observables. We discuss in detail how the detection quality can be optimized.

  9. Detection and quantification of explosives and CWAs using a handheld widely tunable quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutsch, Erik R.; Haibach, Frederick G.; Mazurenko, Alexander

    2012-06-01

    The requirements for standoff detection of Explosives and CWA/TICs on surfaces in the battlefield are challenging because of the low detection limits. The variety of targets, backgrounds and interferences increase the challenges. Infrared absorption spectroscopy with traditional infrared detection technologies, incandescent sources that offer broad wavelength range but poor spectral intensity, are particularly challenged in standoff applications because most photons are lost to the target, background and the environment. Using a brighter source for active infrared detection e.g. a widely-tunable quantum cascade laser (QCL) source, provides sufficient spectral intensity to achieve the needed sensitivity and selectivity for explosives, CWAs, and TICs on surfaces. Specific detection of 1-10 μg/cm2 is achieved within seconds. CWAs, and TICs in vapor and aerosol form present a different challenge. Vapors and aerosols are present at low concentrations, so long pathlengths are required to achieve the desired sensitivity. The collimated output beam from the QCL simplifies multi-reflection cells for vapor detection while also enabling large standoff distances. Results obtained by the QCL system indicate that <1 ppm for vapors can be achieved with specificity in a measurement time of seconds, and the QCL system was successfully able to detect agents in the presence of interferents. QCLs provide additional capabilities for the dismounted warfighter. Given the relatively low power consumption, small package, and instant-on capability of the QCL, a handheld device can provide field teams with early detection of toxic agents and energetic materials in standoff, vapor, or aerosol form using a single technology and device which makes it attractive compared other technologies.

  10. Experimental detection of quantum coherent evolution through the violation of Leggett-Garg-type inequalities.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zong-Quan; Huelga, Susana F; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2015-09-11

    We discuss the use of inequalities of the Leggett-Garg type (LGtI) to witness quantum coherence and present the first experimental violation of this type of inequalities using a light-matter interfaced system. By separately benchmarking the Markovian character of the evolution and the translational invariance of the conditional probabilities, the observed violation of a LGtI is attributed to the quantum coherent character of the process. These results provide a general method to benchmark "quantumness" when the absence of memory effects can be independently certified and confirm the persistence of quantum coherent features within systems of increasing complexity.

  11. Decoherence control in open quantum systems via classical feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Narayan; Tarn, Tzyh-Jong

    2007-03-01

    In this work we propose a strategy using techniques from systems theory to completely eliminate decoherence and also provide conditions under which it can be done. A construction employing an auxiliary system, the bait, which is instrumental to decoupling the system from the environment is presented. Our approach to decoherence control in contrast to other approaches in the literature involves the bilinear input affine model of quantum control system which lends itself to various techniques from classical control theory, but with nontrivial modifications to the quantum regime. The elegance of this approach yields interesting results on open loop decouplability and decoherence free subspaces. Additionally, the feedback control of decoherence may be related to disturbance decoupling for classical input affine systems, which entails careful application of the methods by avoiding all the quantum mechanical pitfalls. In the process of calculating a suitable feedback the system must be restructured due to its tensorial nature of interaction with the environment, which is unique to quantum systems. In the subsequent section we discuss a general information extraction scheme to gain knowledge of the state and the amount of decoherence based on indirect continuous measurement. The analysis of continuous measurement on a decohering quantum system has not been extensively studied before. Finally, a methodology to synthesize feedback parameters itself is given, that technology permitting, could be implemented for practical 2-qubit systems to perform decoherence free quantum computing. The results obtained are qualitatively different and superior to the ones obtained via master equations.

  12. Few-body treatment of the quantum Hall system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wooten, Rachel; Daily, Kevin; Greene, Chris H.

    2015-05-01

    When confined to a finite, two-dimensional area and exposed to a strong magnetic field, fermions exhibit complicated, highly-correlated quantum behavior known as the quantum Hall effect. At certain electron densities and magnetic fields, the system exhibits strong quantization due entirely to Coulomb interactions. Typical theoretical studies in the field consist of many-body numerical configuration interaction calculations performed in an energy-restricted single-particle Hilbert subspace. So far, quantum Hall behavior has been observed experimentally only in condensed matter systems, but there is significant interest in reproducing and studying the effect in highly-controlled cold atom systems. In light of such potential experimental developments, we approach the theoretical study of the quantum Hall system from a few-body perspective using the hyperspherical adiabatic technique developed originally for atomic systems. We gratefully acknowledge support from NSF.

  13. Protection of quantum information and optimal singlet conversion through higher-dimensional quantum systems and environment monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, E.; Marques, B.; Santos, M. Franca; Cavalcanti, D.; Cunha, M. Terra

    2010-03-15

    We study how to protect quantum information in quantum systems subjected to local dissipation. We show that combining the use of three-level systems, environment monitoring, and local feedback can fully and deterministically protect any available quantum information, including entanglement initially shared by different parties. These results can represent a gain in resources and/or distances in quantum communication protocols such as quantum repeaters and teleportation as well as time for quantum memories. Finally, we show that monitoring local environments physically implements the optimum singlet conversion protocol, which is essential for classical entanglement percolation.

  14. Hearing aid malfunction detection system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessinger, R. L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A malfunction detection system for detecting malfunctions in electrical signal processing circuits is disclosed. Malfunctions of a hearing aid in the form of frequency distortion and/or inadequate amplification by the hearing aid amplifier, as well as weakening of the hearing aid power supply are detectable. A test signal is generated and a timed switching circuit periodically applies the test signal to the input of the hearing aid amplifier in place of the input signal from the microphone. The resulting amplifier output is compared with the input test signal used as a reference signal. The hearing aid battery voltage is also periodically compared to a reference voltage. Deviations from the references beyond preset limits cause a warning system to operate.

  15. Measuring entanglement entropy of a generic many-body system with a quantum switch.

    PubMed

    Abanin, Dmitry A; Demler, Eugene

    2012-07-13

    Entanglement entropy has become an important theoretical concept in condensed matter physics because it provides a unique tool for characterizing quantum mechanical many-body phases and new kinds of quantum order. However, the experimental measurement of entanglement entropy in a many-body system is widely believed to be unfeasible, owing to the nonlocal character of this quantity. Here, we propose a general method to measure the entanglement entropy. The method is based on a quantum switch (a two-level system) coupled to a composite system consisting of several copies of the original many-body system. The state of the switch controls how different parts of the composite system connect to each other. We show that, by studying the dynamics of the quantum switch only, the Rényi entanglement entropy of the many-body system can be extracted. We propose a possible design of the quantum switch, which can be realized in cold atomic systems. Our work provides a route towards testing the scaling of entanglement in critical systems as well as a method for a direct experimental detection of topological order.

  16. Nano-optics with single quantum systems.

    PubMed

    Hecht, Bert

    2004-04-15

    This paper reviews the recent progress in using single quantum systems, here mainly single fluorescent molecules, as local probes for nano-optical field distributions. We start by discussing the role of the absorption cross-section for the spatial resolution attainable in such experiments and its behaviour for different environmental conditions. It is shown that the spatial distribution of field components in a high-numerical aperture laser focus can be mapped with high precision using single fluorescent molecules embedded in a thin polymer film on glass. With this proof-of-principle experiment as a starting point, the possibility of mapping strongly confined and enhanced nano-optical fields close to material structures, e.g. sharp metal tips, is discussed. The mapping of the spatial distribution of the enhanced field at an etched gold tip using a single molecule is presented as an example. Energy transfer effects and quenching are identified as possible artefacts in this context. Finally, it is demonstrated that the local quenching at a sharp metal structure nevertheless can be exploited as a novel contrast mechanism for ultrahigh-resolution optical microscopy with single-molecule sensitivity.

  17. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system

    PubMed Central

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Ågren, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree–Fock, Kohn–Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller–Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms. PMID:25309629

  18. The Dalton quantum chemistry program system.

    PubMed

    Aidas, Kestutis; Angeli, Celestino; Bak, Keld L; Bakken, Vebjørn; Bast, Radovan; Boman, Linus; Christiansen, Ove; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Coriani, Sonia; Dahle, Pål; Dalskov, Erik K; Ekström, Ulf; Enevoldsen, Thomas; Eriksen, Janus J; Ettenhuber, Patrick; Fernández, Berta; Ferrighi, Lara; Fliegl, Heike; Frediani, Luca; Hald, Kasper; Halkier, Asger; Hättig, Christof; Heiberg, Hanne; Helgaker, Trygve; Hennum, Alf Christian; Hettema, Hinne; Hjertenæs, Eirik; Høst, Stinne; Høyvik, Ida-Marie; Iozzi, Maria Francesca; Jansík, Branislav; Jensen, Hans Jørgen Aa; Jonsson, Dan; Jørgensen, Poul; Kauczor, Joanna; Kirpekar, Sheela; Kjærgaard, Thomas; Klopper, Wim; Knecht, Stefan; Kobayashi, Rika; Koch, Henrik; Kongsted, Jacob; Krapp, Andreas; Kristensen, Kasper; Ligabue, Andrea; Lutnæs, Ola B; Melo, Juan I; Mikkelsen, Kurt V; Myhre, Rolf H; Neiss, Christian; Nielsen, Christian B; Norman, Patrick; Olsen, Jeppe; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus H; Osted, Anders; Packer, Martin J; Pawlowski, Filip; Pedersen, Thomas B; Provasi, Patricio F; Reine, Simen; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ruden, Torgeir A; Ruud, Kenneth; Rybkin, Vladimir V; Sałek, Pawel; Samson, Claire C M; de Merás, Alfredo Sánchez; Saue, Trond; Sauer, Stephan P A; Schimmelpfennig, Bernd; Sneskov, Kristian; Steindal, Arnfinn H; Sylvester-Hvid, Kristian O; Taylor, Peter R; Teale, Andrew M; Tellgren, Erik I; Tew, David P; Thorvaldsen, Andreas J; Thøgersen, Lea; Vahtras, Olav; Watson, Mark A; Wilson, David J D; Ziolkowski, Marcin; Agren, Hans

    2014-05-01

    Dalton is a powerful general-purpose program system for the study of molecular electronic structure at the Hartree-Fock, Kohn-Sham, multiconfigurational self-consistent-field, Møller-Plesset, configuration-interaction, and coupled-cluster levels of theory. Apart from the total energy, a wide variety of molecular properties may be calculated using these electronic-structure models. Molecular gradients and Hessians are available for geometry optimizations, molecular dynamics, and vibrational studies, whereas magnetic resonance and optical activity can be studied in a gauge-origin-invariant manner. Frequency-dependent molecular properties can be calculated using linear, quadratic, and cubic response theory. A large number of singlet and triplet perturbation operators are available for the study of one-, two-, and three-photon processes. Environmental effects may be included using various dielectric-medium and quantum-mechanics/molecular-mechanics models. Large molecules may be studied using linear-scaling and massively parallel algorithms. Dalton is distributed at no cost from http://www.daltonprogram.org for a number of UNIX platforms.

  19. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Few, Doug; Versteeg, Roelof; Herman, Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude - from an autonomous robotic perspective - the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  20. Portable Microleak-Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, H. Kevin; Sikora, Joseph G.; Sankaran, Sankara N.

    2007-01-01

    The figure schematically depicts a portable microleak-detection system that has been built especially for use in testing hydrogen tanks made of polymer-matrix composite materials. (As used here, microleak signifies a leak that is too small to be detectable by the simple soap-bubble technique.) The system can also be used to test for microleaks in tanks that are made of other materials and that contain gases other than hydrogen. Results of calibration tests have shown that measurement errors are less than 10 percent for leak rates ranging from 0.3 to 200 cm3/min. Like some other microleak-detection systems, this system includes a vacuum pump and associated plumbing for sampling the leaking gas, and a mass spectrometer for analyzing the molecular constituents of the gas. The system includes a flexible vacuum chamber that can be attached to the outer surface of a tank or other object of interest that is to be tested for leakage (hereafter denoted, simply, the test object). The gas used in a test can be the gas or vapor (e.g., hydrogen in the original application) to be contained by the test object. Alternatively, following common practice in leak testing, helium can be used as a test gas. In either case, the mass spectrometer can be used to verify that the gas measured by the system is the test gas rather than a different gas and, hence, that the leak is indeed from the test object.

  1. Semi autonomous mine detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Douglas Few; Roelof Versteeg; Herman Herman

    2010-04-01

    CMMAD is a risk reduction effort for the AMDS program. As part of CMMAD, multiple instances of semi autonomous robotic mine detection systems were created. Each instance consists of a robotic vehicle equipped with sensors required for navigation and marking, a countermine sensors and a number of integrated software packages which provide for real time processing of the countermine sensor data as well as integrated control of the robotic vehicle, the sensor actuator and the sensor. These systems were used to investigate critical interest functions (CIF) related to countermine robotic systems. To address the autonomy CIF, the INL developed RIK was extended to allow for interaction with a mine sensor processing code (MSPC). In limited field testing this system performed well in detecting, marking and avoiding both AT and AP mines. Based on the results of the CMMAD investigation we conclude that autonomous robotic mine detection is feasible. In addition, CMMAD contributed critical technical advances with regard to sensing, data processing and sensor manipulation, which will advance the performance of future fieldable systems. As a result, no substantial technical barriers exist which preclude – from an autonomous robotic perspective – the rapid development and deployment of fieldable systems.

  2. Non-destructive state detection for quantum logic spectroscopy of molecular ions.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Fabian; Wan, Yong; Heip, Jan C; Gebert, Florian; Shi, Chunyan; Schmidt, Piet O

    2016-02-25

    Precision laser spectroscopy of cold and trapped molecular ions is a powerful tool in fundamental physics--used, for example, in determining fundamental constants, testing for their possible variation in the laboratory, and searching for a possible electric dipole moment of the electron. However, the absence of cycling transitions in molecules poses a challenge for direct laser cooling of the ions, and for controlling and detecting their quantum states. Previously used state-detection techniques based on photodissociation or chemical reactions are destructive and therefore inefficient, restricting the achievable resolution in laser spectroscopy. Here, we experimentally demonstrate non-destructive detection of the quantum state of a single trapped molecular ion through its strong Coulomb coupling to a well controlled, co-trapped atomic ion. An algorithm based on a state-dependent optical dipole force changes the internal state of the atom according to the internal state of the molecule. We show that individual quantum states in the molecular ion can be distinguished by the strength of their coupling to the optical dipole force. We also observe quantum jumps (induced by black-body radiation) between rotational states of a single molecular ion. Using the detuning dependence of the state-detection signal, we implement a variant of quantum logic spectroscopy of a molecular resonance. Our state-detection technique is relevant to a wide range of molecular ions, and could be applied to state-controlled quantum chemistry and to spectroscopic investigations of molecules that serve as probes for interstellar clouds.

  3. Closed-Loop and Robust Control of Quantum Systems

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lin-Cheng

    2013-01-01

    For most practical quantum control systems, it is important and difficult to attain robustness and reliability due to unavoidable uncertainties in the system dynamics or models. Three kinds of typical approaches (e.g., closed-loop learning control, feedback control, and robust control) have been proved to be effective to solve these problems. This work presents a self-contained survey on the closed-loop and robust control of quantum systems, as well as a brief introduction to a selection of basic theories and methods in this research area, to provide interested readers with a general idea for further studies. In the area of closed-loop learning control of quantum systems, we survey and introduce such learning control methods as gradient-based methods, genetic algorithms (GA), and reinforcement learning (RL) methods from a unified point of view of exploring the quantum control landscapes. For the feedback control approach, the paper surveys three control strategies including Lyapunov control, measurement-based control, and coherent-feedback control. Then such topics in the field of quantum robust control as H∞ control, sliding mode control, quantum risk-sensitive control, and quantum ensemble control are reviewed. The paper concludes with a perspective of future research directions that are likely to attract more attention. PMID:23997680

  4. Quantum Correlations, Separability, and Quantum Coherence Length in Equilibrium Many-Body Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malpetti, Daniele; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-09-01

    Nonlocality is a fundamental trait of quantum many-body systems, both at the level of pure states, as well as at the level of mixed states. Because of nonlocality, mixed states of any two subsystems are correlated in a stronger way than what can be accounted for by considering the correlated probabilities of occupying some microstates. In the case of equilibrium mixed states, we explicitly build two-point quantum correlation functions, which capture the specific, superior correlations of quantum systems at finite temperature, and which are directly accessible to experiments when correlating measurable properties. When nonvanishing, these correlation functions rule out a precise form of separability of the equilibrium state. In particular, we show numerically that quantum correlation functions generically exhibit a finite quantum coherence length, dictating the characteristic distance over which degrees of freedom cannot be considered as separable. This coherence length is completely disconnected from the correlation length of the system—as it remains finite even when the correlation length of the system diverges at finite temperature—and it unveils the unique spatial structure of quantum correlations.

  5. Self-assembled quantum dots in a nanowire system for quantum photonics.

    PubMed

    Heiss, M; Fontana, Y; Gustafsson, A; Wüst, G; Magen, C; O'Regan, D D; Luo, J W; Ketterer, B; Conesa-Boj, S; Kuhlmann, A V; Houel, J; Russo-Averchi, E; Morante, J R; Cantoni, M; Marzari, N; Arbiol, J; Zunger, A; Warburton, R J; Fontcuberta i Morral, A

    2013-05-01

    Quantum dots embedded within nanowires represent one of the most promising technologies for applications in quantum photonics. Whereas the top-down fabrication of such structures remains a technological challenge, their bottom-up fabrication through self-assembly is a potentially more powerful strategy. However, present approaches often yield quantum dots with large optical linewidths, making reproducibility of their physical properties difficult. We present a versatile quantum-dot-in-nanowire system that reproducibly self-assembles in core-shell GaAs/AlGaAs nanowires. The quantum dots form at the apex of a GaAs/AlGaAs interface, are highly stable, and can be positioned with nanometre precision relative to the nanowire centre. Unusually, their emission is blue-shifted relative to the lowest energy continuum states of the GaAs core. Large-scale electronic structure calculations show that the origin of the optical transitions lies in quantum confinement due to Al-rich barriers. By emitting in the red and self-assembling on silicon substrates, these quantum dots could therefore become building blocks for solid-state lighting devices and third-generation solar cells.

  6. Driven harmonic oscillator as a quantum simulator for open systems

    SciTech Connect

    Piilo, Jyrki; Maniscalco, Sabrina

    2006-09-15

    We show theoretically how a driven harmonic oscillator can be used as a quantum simulator for the non-Markovian damped harmonic oscillator. In the general framework, our results demonstrate the possibility to use a closed system as a simulator for open quantum systems. The quantum simulator is based on sets of controlled drives of the closed harmonic oscillator with appropriately tailored electric field pulses. The non-Markovian dynamics of the damped harmonic oscillator is obtained by using the information about the spectral density of the open system when averaging over the drives of the closed oscillator. We consider single trapped ions as a specific physical implementation of the simulator, and we show how the simulator approach reveals physical insight into the open system dynamics, e.g., the characteristic quantum mechanical non-Markovian oscillatory behavior of the energy of the damped oscillator, usually obtained by the non-Lindblad-type master equation, can have a simple semiclassical interpretation.

  7. Information Theory Density Matrix for a Simple Quantum System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, William J.

    1979-01-01

    Derives the density matrix that best describes, according to information theory, a one-dimensional single particle quantum system when the only information available is the values for the linear and quadratic position-momentum moments. (Author/GA)

  8. Quantum teleportation of composite systems via mixed entangled states

    SciTech Connect

    Bandyopadhyay, Somshubhro; Sanders, Barry C.

    2006-09-15

    We analyze quantum teleportation for composite systems, specifically for concatenated teleporation (decomposing a large composite state into smaller states of dimension commensurate with the channel) and partial teleportation (teleporting one component of a larger quantum state). We obtain an exact expression for teleportation fidelity that depends solely on the dimension and singlet fraction for the entanglement channel and entanglement (measures by I concurrence) for the state; in fact quantum teleportation for composite systems provides an operational interpretation for I concurrence. In addition we obtain tight bounds on teleportation fidelity and prove that the average fidelity approaches the lower bound of teleportation fidelity in the high-dimension limit.

  9. Phases and phase transitions in disordered quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vojta, Thomas

    2013-08-01

    These lecture notes give a pedagogical introduction to phase transitions in disordered quantum systems and to the exotic Griffiths phases induced in their vicinity. We first review some fundamental concepts in the physics of phase transitions. We then derive criteria governing under what conditions spatial disorder or randomness can change the properties of a phase transition. After introducing the strong-disorder renormalization group method, we discuss in detail some of the exotic phenomena arising at phase transitions in disordered quantum systems. These include infinite-randomness criticality, rare regions and quantum Griffiths singularities, as well as the smearing of phase transitions. We also present a number of experimental examples.

  10. Quantum Brayton cycle with coupled systems as working substance.

    PubMed

    Huang, X L; Wang, L C; Yi, X X

    2013-01-01

    We explore the quantum version of the Brayton cycle with a composite system as the working substance. The actual Brayton cycle consists of two adiabatic and two isobaric processes. Two pressures can be defined in our isobaric process; one corresponds to the external magnetic field (characterized by F(x)) exerted on the system, while the other corresponds to the coupling constant between the subsystems (characterized by F(y)). As a consequence, we can define two types of quantum Brayton cycle for the composite system. We find that the subsystem experiences a quantum Brayton cycle in one quantum Brayton cycle (characterized by F(x)), whereas the subsystem's cycle is quantum Otto cycle in another Brayton cycle (characterized by F(y)). The efficiency for the composite system equals to that for the subsystem in both cases, but the work done by the total system is usually larger than the sum of the work done by the two subsystems. The other interesting finding is that for the cycle characterized by F(y), the subsystem can be a refrigerator, while the total system is a heat engine. The result in this paper can be generalized to a quantum Brayton cycle with a general coupled system as the working substance.

  11. Tape Cassette Bacteria Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and testing of an automatic bacteria detection system with a zero-g capability and based on the filter-capsule approach is described. This system is intended for monitoring the sterility of regenerated water in a spacecraft. The principle of detection is based on measuring the increase in chemiluminescence produced by the action of bacterial porphyrins (i.e., catalase, cytochromes, etc.) on a luminol-hydrogen peroxide mixture. Since viable as well as nonviable organisms initiate this luminescence, viable organisms are detected by comparing the signal of an incubated water sample with an unincubated control. Higher signals for the former indicate the presence of viable organisms. System features include disposable sealed sterile capsules, each containing a filter membrane, for processing discrete water samples and a tape transport for moving these capsules through a processing sequence which involves sample concentration, nutrient addition, incubation, a 4 Molar Urea wash and reaction with luminol-hydrogen peroxide in front of a photomultiplier tube. Liquids are introduced by means of a syringe needle which pierces a rubber septum contained in the wall of the capsule. Detection thresholds obtained with this unit towards E. coli and S. marcescens assuming a 400 ml water sample are indicated.

  12. Geodesic paths and topological charges in quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grangeiro Souza Barbosa Lima, Tiago Aecio

    This dissertation focuses on one question: how should one drive an experimentally prepared state of a generic quantum system into a different target-state, simultaneously minimizing energy dissipation and maximizing the fidelity between the target and evolved-states? We develop optimal adiabatic driving protocols for general quantum systems, and show that these are geodesic paths. Geometric ideas have always played a fundamental role in the understanding and unification of physical phenomena, and the recent discovery of topological insulators has drawn great interest to topology from the field of condensed matter physics. Here, we discuss the quantum geometric tensor, a mathematical object that encodes geometrical and topological properties of a quantum system. It is related to the fidelity susceptibility (an important quantity regarding quantum phase transitions) and to the Berry curvature, which enables topological characterization through Berry phases. A refined understanding of the interplay between geometry and topology in quantum mechanics is of direct relevance to several emergent technologies, such as quantum computers, quantum cryptography, and quantum sensors. As a demonstration of how powerful geometric and topological ideas can become when combined, we present the results of an experiment that we recently proposed. This experimental work was done at the Google Quantum Lab, where researchers were able to visualize the topological nature of a two-qubit system in sharp detail, a startling contrast with earlier methods. To achieve this feat, the optimal protocols described in this dissertation were used, allowing for a great improvement on the experimental apparatus, without the need for technical engineering advances. Expanding the existing literature on the quantum geometric tensor using notions from differential geometry and topology, we build on the subject nowadays known as quantum geometry. We discuss how slowly changing a parameter of a quantum

  13. Geometric phase for open quantum systems and stochastic unravelings

    SciTech Connect

    Bassi, Angelo; Ippoliti, Emiliano

    2006-06-15

    We analyze the geometric phase for an open quantum system when computed by resorting to a stochastic unraveling of the reduced density matrix (quantum jump approach or stochastic Schroedinger equations). We show that the resulting phase strongly depends on the type of unraveling used for the calculations: as such, this phase is not a geometric object since it depends on nonphysical parameters, which are not related to the path followed by the density matrix during the evolution of the system.

  14. Genuine quantum and classical correlations in multipartite systems.

    PubMed

    Giorgi, Gian Luca; Bellomo, Bruno; Galve, Fernando; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-11-04

    Generalizing the quantifiers used to classify correlations in bipartite systems, we define genuine total, quantum, and classical correlations in multipartite systems. The measure we give is based on the use of relative entropy to quantify the distance between two density matrices. Moreover, we show that, for pure states of three qubits, both quantum and classical bipartite correlations obey a ladder ordering law fixed by two-body mutual informations, or, equivalently, by one-qubit entropies.

  15. Entropies and correlations in classical and quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man'ko, Margarita A.; Man'ko, Vladimir I.; Marmo, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    We present a review of entropy properties for classical and quantum systems including Shannon entropy, von Neumann entropy, Rényi entropy, and Tsallis entropy. We discuss known and new entropic and information inequalities for classical and quantum systems, both composite and noncomposite. We demonstrate matrix inequalities associated with the entropic subadditivity and strong subadditivity conditions and give a new inequality for matrix elements of unitary matrices.

  16. Contexts, Systems and Modalities: A New Ontology for Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffèves, Alexia; Grangier, Philippe

    2016-02-01

    In this article we present a possible way to make usual quantum mechanics fully compatible with physical realism, defined as the statement that the goal of physics is to study entities of the natural world, existing independently from any particular observer's perception, and obeying universal and intelligible rules. Rather than elaborating on the quantum formalism itself, we propose a new quantum ontology, where physical properties are attributed jointly to the system, and to the context in which it is embedded. In combination with a quantization principle, this non-classical definition of physical reality sheds new light on counter-intuitive features of quantum mechanics such as the origin of probabilities, non-locality, and the quantum-classical boundary.

  17. Neutron interferometry for precise characterization of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarenac, Dusan; Shahi, Chandra; Mineeva, Taisiya; Wood, Christopher J.; Huber, Michael G.; Arif, Muhammad; Clark, Charles W.; Cory, David G.; Pushin, Dmitry A.

    Neutron interferometry (NI) is among the most precise techniques used to test the postulates of quantum mechanics. It has demonstrated coherent spinor rotation and superposition, gravitationally induced quantum interference, the Aharonov-Casher effect, violation of a Bell-like inequality, and generation of a single-neutron entangled state. As massive, penetrating and neutral particles neutrons now provide unique capabilities in classical imaging applications that we seek to extend to the quantum domain. We present recent results on NI measurements of quantum discord in a bipartite quantum system and neutron orbital angular momentum multiplexing, and review progress on our commissioning of a decoherence-free-subspace NI user facility at the NIST Center for Neutron Research. Supported in part by CERC, CIFAR, NSERC and CREATE.

  18. Noncommuting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.; Kennedy, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    Basing decisions and estimates on simultaneous approximate measurements of noncommuting observables in a quantum receiver is shown to be equivalent to measuring commuting projection operators on a large Hilbert space than that of the receiver itself. The quantum-mechanical Cramer-Rao inequalities derived from right logarithmic derivatives and symmetrized logarithmic derivatives of the density operator are compared, and it is shown that the latter give superior lower bounds on the error variances of individual unbiased estimates of arrival time and carrier frequency of a coherent signal. For a suitably weighted sum of the error variances of simultaneous estimates of these, the former yield the superior lower bound under some conditions.

  19. Noncommuting observables in quantum detection and estimation theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Basing decisions and estimates on simultaneous approximate measurements of noncommuting observables in a quantum receiver is shown to be equivalent to measuring commuting projection operators on a larger Hilbert space than that of the receiver itself. The quantum-mechanical Cramer-Rao inequalities derived from right logarithmic derivatives and symmetrized logarithmic derivatives of the density operator are compared, and it is shown that the latter give superior lower bounds on the error variances of individual unbiased estimates of arrival time and carrier frequency of a coherent signal. For a suitably weighted sum of the error variances of simultaneous estimates of these, the former yield the superior lower bound under some conditions.

  20. Quantitative multiplex detection of biomarkers on a waveguide-based biosensor using quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Hongzhi; Mukundan, Harshini; Martinez, Jennifer S; Swanson, Basil I; Anderson, Aaron S; Grace, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The quantitative, simultaneous detection of multiple biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity is critical for biomedical diagnostics, drug discovery and biomarker characterization [Wilson 2006, Tok 2006, Straub 2005, Joos 2002, Jani 2000]. Detection systems relying on optical signal transduction are, in general, advantageous because they are fast, portable, inexpensive, sensitive, and have the potential for multiplex detection of analytes of interest. However, conventional immunoassays for the detection of biomarkers, such as the Enzyme Linked Immunosorbant Assays (ELISAs) are semi-quantitative, time consuming and insensitive. ELISA assays are also limited by high non-specific binding, especially when used with complex biological samples such as serum and urine (REF). Organic fluorophores that are commonly used in such applications lack photostability and possess a narrow Stoke's shift that makes simultaneous detection of multiple fluorophores with a single excitation source difficult, thereby restricting their use in multiplex assays. The above limitations with traditional assay platforms have resulted in the increased use of nanotechnology-based tools and techniques in the fields of medical imaging [ref], targeted drug delivery [Caruthers 2007, Liu 2007], and sensing [ref]. One such area of increasing interest is the use of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) for biomedical research and diagnostics [Gao and Cui 2004, Voura 2004, Michalet 2005, Chan 2002, Jaiswal 2004, Gao 2005, Medintz 2005, So 2006 2006, Wu 2003]. Compared to organic dyes, QDs provide several advantages for use in immunoassay platforms, including broad absorption bands with high extinction coefficients, narrow and symmetric emission bands with high quantum yields, high photostablility, and a large Stokes shift [Michalet 2005, Gu 2002]. These features prompted the use of QDs as probes in biodetection [Michalet 2005, Medintz 2005]. For example, Jaiswal et al. reported long term multiple color

  1. Controllable multiple-quantum transitions in a T-shaped small quantum dot-ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiongwen; Chen, Baoju; Song, Kehui; Zhou, Guanghui

    2016-05-01

    Based on the tight-binding model and the slave boson mean field approximation, we investigate the electron transport properties in a small quantum dot (QD)-ring system. Namely, a strongly correlated QD not only attaches directly to two normal metallic electrodes, but also forms a magnetic control Aharonov-Bohm quantum ring with a few noninteracting QDs. We show that the parity effect, the Kondo effect, and the multiple Fano effects coexist in our system. Moreover, the parities, defined by the odd- and even-numbered energy levels in this system, can be switched by adjusting magnetic flux phase ϕ located at the center of the quantum ring, which induces multiple controllable Fano-interference energy pathways. Therefore, the constructive and destructive multi-Fano interference transition, the Kondo and Fano resonance transition at the Fermi level, the Fano resonance and ani-resonance transition are realized in the even parity system. They can also be observed in the odd parity system when one adjusts the phase ϕ and the gate voltage Vg applied to the noninteracting QDs. The multi-quantum transitions determine some interesting transport properties such as the current switch and its multi-flatsteps, the differential conductance switch at zero bias voltage and its oscillation or quantization at the low bias voltage. These results may be useful for the observation of multiple quantum effect interplays experimentally and the design of controllable QD-based device.

  2. Mixed quantum-classical versus full quantum dynamics: Coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schanz, Holger; Esser, Bernd

    1997-05-01

    The relation between the dynamical properties of a coupled quasiparticle-oscillator system in the mixed quantum-classical and fully quantized descriptions is investigated. The system is considered as a model for applying a stepwise quantization. Features of the nonlinear dynamics in the mixed description such as the presence of a separatrix structure or regular and chaotic motion are shown to be reflected in the evolu- tion of the quantum state vector of the fully quantized system. In particular, it is demonstrated how wave packets propagate along the separatrix structure of the mixed description, and that chaotic dynamics leads to a strongly entangled quantum state vector. Special emphasis is given to viewing the system from a dyn- amical Born-Oppenheimer approximation defining integrable reference oscillators, and elucidating the role of the nonadiabatic couplings which complement this approximation into a rigorous quantization scheme.

  3. Analysis of quantum Monte Carlo dynamics for quantum adiabatic evolution in infinite-range spin systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Jun-Ichi

    2011-03-01

    We analytically derive deterministic equations of order parameters such as spontaneous magnetization in infinite-range quantum spin systems obeying quantum Monte Carlo dynamics. By means of the Trotter decomposition, we consider the transition probability of Glauber-type dynamics of microscopic states for the corresponding classical system. Under the static approximation, differential equations with respect to macroscopic order parameters are explicitly obtained from the master equation that describes the microscopic-law. We discuss several possible applications of our approach to disordered spin systems for statistical-mechanical informatics. Especially, we argue the ground state searching for infinite-range random spin systems via quantum adiabatic evolution. We were financially supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C) of Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, No. 22500195.

  4. Scavenging quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rapcan, P.; Calsamiglia, J.; Munoz-Tapia, R.; Bagan, E.; Buzek, V.

    2011-09-15

    Given an unknown state of a qudit that has already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? Clearly, after a maximally informative measurement, the state of the system collapses into a postmeasurement state from which the same observer cannot obtain further information about the original state of the system. However, the system still encodes a significant amount of information about the original preparation for a second observer who is unaware of the actions of the first one. We study how a series of independent observers can obtain, or can scavenge, information about the unknown state of a system (quantified by the fidelity) when they sequentially measure it. We give closed-form expressions for the estimation fidelity when one or several qudits are available to carry information about the single-qudit state, and we study the classical limit when an arbitrarily large number of observers can obtain (nearly) complete information on the system. In addition to the case where all observers perform most informative measurements, we study the scenario where a finite number of observers estimates the state with equal fidelity, regardless of their position in the measurement sequence and the scenario where all observers use identical measurement apparatuses (up to a mutually unknown orientation) chosen so that a particular observer's estimation fidelity is maximized.

  5. Electron-phonon interaction in quantum transport through quantum dots and molecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda, J. H.; Duque, C. A.; Laroze, D.

    2016-12-01

    The quantum transport and effects of decoherence properties are studied in quantum dots systems and finite homogeneous chains of aromatic molecules connected to two semi-infinite leads. We study these systems based on the tight-binding approach through Green's function technique within a real space renormalization and polaron transformation schemes. In particular, we calculate the transmission probability following the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the I - V characteristics and the noise power of current fluctuations taken into account the decoherence. Our results may explain the inelastic effects through nanoscopic systems.

  6. Quantum seismography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanzagorta, Marco; Jitrik, Oliverio; Uhlmann, Jeffrey; Venegas, Salvador

    2016-05-01

    A major scientific thrust from recent years has been to try to harness quantum phenomena to increase the performance of a wide variety of information processing devices. In particular, quantum radar has emerged as an intriguing theoretical concept that could revolutionize electromagnetic standoff sensing. In this paper we will discuss how the techniques developed for quantum radar could also be used towards the design of novel seismographs able to detect small ground vibrations., We use a hypothetical earthquake warning system in order to compare quantum seismography with traditional seismographic techniques.

  7. Locality and nonlocality of classical restrictions of quantum spin systems with applications to quantum large deviations and entanglement

    SciTech Connect

    De Roeck, W. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Maes, C. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Schütz, M. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be; Netočný, K. E-mail: christian.maes@fys.kuleuven.be E-mail: marius.schutz@fys.kuleuven.be

    2015-02-15

    We study the projection on classical spins starting from quantum equilibria. We show Gibbsianness or quasi-locality of the resulting classical spin system for a class of gapped quantum systems at low temperatures including quantum ground states. A consequence of Gibbsianness is the validity of a large deviation principle in the quantum system which is known and here recovered in regimes of high temperature or for thermal states in one dimension. On the other hand, we give an example of a quantum ground state with strong nonlocality in the classical restriction, giving rise to what we call measurement induced entanglement and still satisfying a large deviation principle.

  8. Anomaly detection in reconstructed quantum states using a machine-learning technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hara, Satoshi; Ono, Takafumi; Okamoto, Ryo; Washio, Takashi; Takeuchi, Shigeki

    2014-02-01

    The accurate detection of small deviations in given density matrices is important for quantum information processing. Here we propose a method based on the concept of data mining. We demonstrate that the proposed method can more accurately detect small erroneous deviations in reconstructed density matrices, which contain intrinsic fluctuations due to the limited number of samples, than a naive method of checking the trace distance from the average of the given density matrices. This method has the potential to be a key tool in broad areas of physics where the detection of small deviations of quantum states reconstructed using a limited number of samples is essential.

  9. Quantum witness of high-speed low-noise single-photon detection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lin; Huang, Kun; Liang, Yan; Chen, Jie; Shi, Xueshun; Wu, E; Zeng, Heping

    2015-12-14

    We demonstrate high-speed and low-noise near-infrared single-photon detection by using a capacitance balancing circuit to achieve a high spike noise suppression for an InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiode. The single-photon detector could operate at a tunable gate repetition rate from 10 to 60 MHz. A peak detection efficiency of 34% has been achieved with a dark count rate of 9 × 10⁻³ per gate when the detection window was set to 1 ns. Additionally, quantum detector tomography has also been performed at 60 MHz of repetition rate and for the detection window of 1 ns, enabling to witness the quantum features of the detector with the help of a negative Wigner function. By varying the bias voltage of the detector, we further demonstrated a transition from the full-quantum to semi-classical regime.

  10. A microfluidic biosensor using graphene oxide and aptamer-functionalized quantum dots for peanut allergen detection.

    PubMed

    Weng, Xuan; Neethirajan, Suresh

    2016-11-15

    The increasing prevalence of food allergies and the intake of packing foods in the past two decades urge the need for more rapid, accurate, and sensitive assays to detect potential allergens in food in order to control the allergen content. Most of the commercial analytical tools for allergen detection rely on immunoassays such as ELISA. As far as disadvantages, ELISA can be time-consuming and expensive. Biosensors appear as a suitable alternative for the detection of allergens because they are rapid, highly sensitive, selective, less expensive, environmentally friendly, and easy to handle. In this study, we developed a microfluidic system integrated with a quantum dots (Qdots) aptamer functionalized graphene oxide (GO) nano-biosensor for simple, rapid, and sensitive food allergen detection. The biosensor utilized Qdots-aptamer-GO complexes as probes to undergo conformational change upon interaction with the food allergens, resulting in fluorescence changes due to the fluorescence quenching and recovering properties of GO by adsorption and desorption of aptamer-conjugated Qdots. This one-step 'turn on' homogenous assay in a ready-to-use microfluidic chip took ~10min to achieve a quantitative detection of Ara h 1, one of the major allergens appearing in peanuts. The results suggested this system had remarkable sensitivity and selectivity. The integration of a microfluidics platform in a homemade miniaturized optical analyzer provides a promising way for the rapid, cost-effective, and accurate on-site determination of food allergens. This biosensor can also be extended to the detection of other food allergens with a selection of corresponding aptamers.

  11. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  12. Graphene quantum dots modified silicon nanowire array for ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, T. Y.; Duan, C. Y.; Zhu, Y. X.; Chen, Y. F.; Wang, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Si nanostructure-based gas detectors have attracted much attention due to their huge surface areas, relatively high carrier mobility, maneuverability for surface functionalization and compatibility to modern electronic industry. However, the unstable surface of Si, especially for the nanostructures in a corrosive atmosphere, hinders their sensitivity and reproducibility when used for detection in the gas phase. In this study, we proposed a novel strategy to fabricate a Si-based gas detector by using the vertically aligned Si nanowire (SiNW) array as a skeleton and platform, and decorated chemically inert graphene quantum dots (GQDs) to protect the SiNWs from oxidation and promote the carriers’ interaction with the analytes. The radial core–shell structures of the GQDs/SiNW array were then assembled into a resistor-based gas detection system and evaluated by using nitrogen dioxide (NO2) as the model analyte. Compared to the bare SiNW array, our novel sensor exhibited ultrahigh sensitivity for detecting trace amounts of NO2 with the concentration as low as 10 ppm in room temperature and an immensely reduced recovery time, which is of significant importance for their practical application. Meanwhile, strikingly, reproducibility and stability could also be achieved by showing no sensitivity decline after storing the GQDs/SiNW array in air for two weeks. Our results demonstrate that protecting the surface of the SiNW array with chemically inert GQDs is a feasible strategy to realize ultrasensitive detection in the gas phase.

  13. A quantum key distribution system for optical fiber networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Richard J.; Chapuran, Thomas E.; Dallmann, Nicholas; Hiskett, Philip A.; McCabe, Kevin P.; Montano, Paul M.; Nordholt, Jane E.; Peterson, Charles G.; Runser, Robert J.; Sedillo, Robert; Tyagi, Kush; Wipf, Christopher C.

    2005-08-01

    A novel, user-friendly quantum key distribution (QKD) system operating at a wavelength of 1550nm and at a clock rate of 10MHz was constructed to explore the compatibility of this emerging technology with the optical fiber network environment. Custom circuit boards providing the low-level control and sensing functions for both the transmitter and receiver were developed, allowing software-based system reconfiguration via USB interface to personal computers. The computer control allowed the user to change operating parameters such as detector bias voltages and pulse delays and also allowed for self-tuning of the system. Epitaxx avalanche photodiodes, operated in Geiger mode, were used to detect the single photons. A complete QKD protocol stack incorporating the "sifting", reconciliation, privacy amplification, authentication and key confirmation functions was implemented in software. The system was tested over twenty five kilometers of dark underground fiber, producing 18.6 million sifted bits, with a sifted bit error rate of 4.9% at an average number of photons per pulse of 0.2, during a continuous 12-hour period of self-sustaining operation: a small portion of the secret bits distilled from each session's sifted bits were used to authenticate the next session. A total of 6.8 million shared secret bits were produced.

  14. Quantum-well detector concept for hyperspectral coregistered full Stokes vector detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serna, Mario

    2002-09-01

    By layering quantum well stacks separated by partially transmissive linear gratings, similar to a multi-color QWIP, one may be able to detect the full Stokes vector at a single pixel. Such a detector would greatly aid polarization-based automated algorithms to detect targets from earth-gazing platforms. We report results from a theoretical calculation of normally incident infrared light absorbed by quantum wells in an eight-layer quantum-well/grating structure. The structure consists of four quantum-well stacks, of 50 quantum wells each, separated by contact layers and lamellar gratings. The gratings following the first three quantum well stacks are formed by perfectly conducting rectangular strips separated by a transparent dielectric that allows some light to be transmitted. The top grating, following the fourth quantum well stack, is completely reflective. Each of the four lamellar gratings is oriented at a different angle. Incident radiation is diffracted and reflected to different orders and at different angles at each of the four gratings. The model is based on a uniaxial-optics transfer-matrix technique. We calculate the energy absorbed by each of the layers. This in turn allows one to predict and compare which layers will respond for partially- and fully-polarized incident light of either linear or circular polarization.

  15. Detecting transition in agricultural systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neary, P. J.; Coiner, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Remote sensing of agricultural phenomena has been largely concentrated on analysis of agriculture at the field level. Concern has been to identify crop status, crop condition, and crop distribution, all of which are spatially analyzed on a field-by-field basis. A more general level of abstraction is the agricultural system, or the complex of crops and other land cover that differentiate various agricultural economies. The paper reports on a methodology to assist in the analysis of the landscape elements of agricultural systems with Landsat digital data. The methodology involves tracing periods of photosynthetic activity for a fixed area. Change from one agricultural system to another is detected through shifts in the intensity and periodicity of photosynthetic activity as recorded in the radiometric return to Landsat. The Landsat-derived radiometric indicator of photosynthetic activity appears to provide the ability to differentiate agricultural systems from each other as well as from conterminous natural vegetation.

  16. Experimental demonstration of subcarrier multiplexed quantum key distribution system.

    PubMed

    Mora, José; Ruiz-Alba, Antonio; Amaya, Waldimar; Martínez, Alfonso; García-Muñoz, Víctor; Calvo, David; Capmany, José

    2012-06-01

    We provide, to our knowledge, the first experimental demonstration of the feasibility of sending several parallel keys by exploiting the technique of subcarrier multiplexing (SCM) widely employed in microwave photonics. This approach brings several advantages such as high spectral efficiency compatible with the actual secure key rates, the sharing of the optical fainted pulse by all the quantum multiplexed channels reducing the system complexity, and the possibility of upgrading with wavelength division multiplexing in a two-tier scheme, to increase the number of parallel keys. Two independent quantum SCM channels featuring a sifted key rate of 10 Kb/s/channel over a link with quantum bit error rate <2% is reported.

  17. Non-Adiabatic Holonomic Quantum Gates in an atomic system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azimi Mousolou, Vahid; Canali, Carlo M.; Sjoqvist, Erik

    2012-02-01

    Quantum computation is essentially the implementation of a universal set of quantum gate operations on a set of qubits, which is reliable in the presence of noise. We propose a scheme to perform robust gates in an atomic four-level system using the idea of non-adiabatic holonomic quantum computation proposed in [1]. The gates are realized by applying sequences of short laser pulses that drive transitions between the four energy levels in such a way that the dynamical phases vanish. [4pt] [1] E. Sjoqvist, D.M. Tong, B. Hessmo, M. Johansson, K. Singh, arXiv:1107.5127v2 [quant-ph

  18. A LONE code for the sparse control of quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciaramella, G.; Borzì, A.

    2016-03-01

    In many applications with quantum spin systems, control functions with a sparse and pulse-shaped structure are often required. These controls can be obtained by solving quantum optimal control problems with L1-penalized cost functionals. In this paper, the MATLAB package LONE is presented aimed to solving L1-penalized optimal control problems governed by unitary-operator quantum spin models. This package implements a new strategy that includes a globalized semi-smooth Krylov-Newton scheme and a continuation procedure. Results of numerical experiments demonstrate the ability of the LONE code in computing accurate sparse optimal control solutions.

  19. Quantum Well Intrasubband Photodetector for Far Infared and Terahertz Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ting, David Z. -Y.; Chang, Yia-Chung; Bandara, Sumith V.; Gunapala, Sarath D.

    2007-01-01

    The authors present a theoretical analysis on the possibility of using the dopant-assisted intrasubband absorption mechanism in quantum wells for normal-incidence far infrared/terahertz radiation detection. The authors describe the proposed concept of the quantum well intrasubband photodetector (QWISP), which is a compact semiconductor heterostructure device compatible with existing GaAs focal-plane array technology, and present theoretical results demonstrating strong normal-incidence absorption and responsivity in the QWISP.

  20. Coherent versus Measurement Feedback: Linear Systems Theory for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing a control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal; hence, their comparison in several situations is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals: backaction evasion, generation of a quantum nondemolished variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem, all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand, it is shown that, for each control goal there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of the above three notions in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  1. Detection of quantum steering in multipartite continuous-variable Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-like states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Meng; Xiang, Yu; He, Qiongyi; Gong, Qihuang

    2015-01-01

    The multipartite entangled state has drawn broad attention for both foundations of quantum mechanics and applications in quantum information processing. Here, we study the spatially separated N -partite continuous-variable Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger-like states, which can be produced by a linear optical network with squeezed light and N -1 beamsplitters. We investigate the properties of multipartite Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen steering possessed by those states, and find that the steering of a given quantum mode is allowed when not less than half of the modes within the states take part in the steering group. This is certified by the detection of the correlation between position and momentum quadratures of the steered mode and a combination of quadratures of other modes inside the steering group. The steering is evidenced by the high correlation where the steering group can infer the quadratures of the steered mode to high precision, i.e., below the quantum limit for the position and momentum quadratures of the steered quantum mode. We also examine the influence of inefficiency on the multipartite steering, and derive the threshold of the loss tolerance. Furthermore, we discuss the collective N -partite steering induced by the asymmetric loss on beams, which exists when a given quantum mode can only be steered by all the remaining N -1 modes collaboratively. The present multipartite steering correlation may have potential applications in certain quantum information tasks where the issue of trust is important, such as one-sided device-independent quantum secret sharing.

  2. Ergodic dynamics and thermalization in an isolated quantum system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neill, C.; Roushan, P.; Fang, M.; Chen, Y.; Kolodrubetz, M.; Chen, Z.; Megrant, A.; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Jeffrey, E.; Kelly, J.; Mutus, J.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Quintana, C.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Polkovnikov, A.; Martinis, J. M.

    2016-11-01

    Statistical mechanics is founded on the assumption that all accessible configurations of a system are equally likely. This requires dynamics that explore all states over time, known as ergodic dynamics. In isolated quantum systems, however, the occurrence of ergodic behaviour has remained an outstanding question. Here, we demonstrate ergodic dynamics in a small quantum system consisting of only three superconducting qubits. The qubits undergo a sequence of rotations and interactions and we measure the evolution of the density matrix. Maps of the entanglement entropy show that the full system can act like a reservoir for individual qubits, increasing their entropy through entanglement. Surprisingly, these maps bear a strong resemblance to the phase space dynamics in the classical limit; classically, chaotic motion coincides with higher entanglement entropy. We further show that in regions of high entropy the full multi-qubit system undergoes ergodic dynamics. Our work illustrates how controllable quantum systems can investigate fundamental questions in non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

  3. Nucleic acid detection system and method for detecting influenza

    DOEpatents

    Cai, Hong; Song, Jian

    2015-03-17

    The invention provides a rapid, sensitive and specific nucleic acid detection system which utilizes isothermal nucleic acid amplification in combination with a lateral flow chromatographic device, or DNA dipstick, for DNA-hybridization detection. The system of the invention requires no complex instrumentation or electronic hardware, and provides a low cost nucleic acid detection system suitable for highly sensitive pathogen detection. Hybridization to single-stranded DNA amplification products using the system of the invention provides a sensitive and specific means by which assays can be multiplexed for the detection of multiple target sequences.

  4. Experimental quantum computing to solve systems of linear equations.

    PubMed

    Cai, X-D; Weedbrook, C; Su, Z-E; Chen, M-C; Gu, Mile; Zhu, M-J; Li, Li; Liu, Nai-Le; Lu, Chao-Yang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-06-07

    Solving linear systems of equations is ubiquitous in all areas of science and engineering. With rapidly growing data sets, such a task can be intractable for classical computers, as the best known classical algorithms require a time proportional to the number of variables N. A recently proposed quantum algorithm shows that quantum computers could solve linear systems in a time scale of order log(N), giving an exponential speedup over classical computers. Here we realize the simplest instance of this algorithm, solving 2×2 linear equations for various input vectors on a quantum computer. We use four quantum bits and four controlled logic gates to implement every subroutine required, demonstrating the working principle of this algorithm.

  5. Symmetry and the thermodynamics of currents in open quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, Daniel; Hurtado, Pablo I.

    2014-09-01

    Symmetry is a powerful concept in physics, and its recent application to understand nonequilibrium behavior is providing deep insights and groundbreaking exact results. Here we show how to harness symmetry to control transport and statistics in open quantum systems. Such control is enabled by a first-order-type dynamic phase transition in current statistics and the associated coexistence of different transport channels (or nonequilibrium steady states) classified by symmetry. Microreversibility then ensues, via the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation theorem, a twin dynamic phase transition for rare current fluctuations. Interestingly, the symmetry present in the initial state is spontaneously broken at the fluctuating level, where the quantum system selects the symmetry sector that maximally facilitates a given fluctuation. We illustrate these results in a qubit network model motivated by the problem of coherent energy harvesting in photosynthetic complexes, and introduce the concept of a symmetry-controlled quantum thermal switch, suggesting symmetry-based design strategies for quantum devices with controllable transport properties.

  6. Controlling open quantum systems: tools, achievements, and limitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, Christiane P.

    2016-06-01

    The advent of quantum devices, which exploit the two essential elements of quantum physics, coherence and entanglement, has sparked renewed interest in the control of open quantum systems. Successful implementations face the challenge of preserving relevant nonclassical features at the level of device operation. A major obstacle is decoherence, which is caused by interaction with the environment. Optimal control theory is a tool that can be used to identify control strategies in the presence of decoherence. Here we review recent advances in optimal control methodology that allow typical tasks in device operation for open quantum systems to be tackled and discuss examples of relaxation-optimized dynamics. Optimal control theory is also a useful tool to exploit the environment for control. We discuss examples and point out possible future extensions.

  7. Assessing the quantumness of a damped two-level system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedenberger, Alexander; Lutz, Eric

    2017-02-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of the nonclassical properties of a damped two-level system. We compute and compare three different criteria of quantumness, the l1 norm of coherence, the Leggett-Garg inequality, and a quantum witness based on the no-signaling in time condition. We show that all three quantum indicators decay exponentially in time as a result of the coupling to the thermal reservoir. We further demonstrate that the corresponding characteristic times are identical and given by the coherence half-life. These results quantify how violations of Leggett-Garg inequalities and nonzero values of the quantum witness are connected to the coherence of the two-level system.

  8. Schroedinger-equation formalism for a dissipative quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    Anisimovas, E.; Matulis, A.

    2007-02-15

    We consider a model dissipative quantum-mechanical system realized by coupling a quantum oscillator to a semi-infinite classical string which serves as a means of energy transfer from the oscillator to the infinity and thus plays the role of a dissipative element. The coupling between the two--quantum and classical--parts of the compound system is treated in the spirit of the mean-field approximation and justification of the validity of such an approach is given. The equations of motion of the classical subsystem are solved explicitly and an effective dissipative Schroedinger equation for the quantum subsystem is obtained. The proposed formalism is illustrated by its application to two basic problems: the decay of the quasistationary state and the calculation of the nonlinear resonance line shape.

  9. Relativistic quantum Darwinism in Dirac fermion and graphene systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ni, Xuan; Huang, Liang; Lai, Ying-Cheng; Pecora, Louis

    2012-02-01

    We solve the Dirac equation in two spatial dimensions in the setting of resonant tunneling, where the system consists of two symmetric cavities connected by a finite potential barrier. The shape of the cavities can be chosen to yield both regular and chaotic dynamics in the classical limit. We find that certain pointer states about classical periodic orbits can exist, which are signatures of relativistic quantum Darwinism (RQD). These localized states suppress quantum tunneling, and the effect becomes less severe as the underlying classical dynamics in the cavity is chaotic, leading to regularization of quantum tunneling. Qualitatively similar phenomena have been observed in graphene. A physical theory is developed to explain relativistic quantum Darwinism and its effects based on the spectrum of complex eigenenergies of the non-Hermitian Hamiltonian describing the open cavity system.

  10. Quantum cascade laser based active hyperspectral imaging for standoff detection of chemicals on surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugger, S.; Fuchs, F.; Jarvis, J.; Yang, Q. K.; Rattunde, M.; Ostendorf, R.; Schilling, C.; Driad, R.; Bronner, W.; Aidam, R.; Wagner, J.; Tybussek, T.; Rieblinger, K.

    2016-02-01

    We employ active hyperspectral imaging using tunable mid-infrared (MIR) quantum cascade lasers for contactless identification of solid and liquid contaminations on surfaces. By collecting the backscattered laser radiation with a camera, a hyperspectral data cube, containing the spatially resolved spectral information of the scene is obtained. Data is analyzed using appropriate algorithms to find the target substances even on substrates with a priori unknown spectra. Eye-save standoff detection of residues of explosives and precursors over extended distances is demonstrated and the main purpose of our system. However, it can be applied to any substance with characteristic reflectance / absorbance spectrum. As an example, we present first results of monitoring food quality by distinguishing fresh and mold contaminated peanuts by their MIR backscattering spectrum.

  11. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-01

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  12. Quantum and classical behavior in interacting bosonic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hertzberg, Mark P.

    2016-11-21

    It is understood that in free bosonic theories, the classical field theory accurately describes the full quantum theory when the occupancy numbers of systems are very large. However, the situation is less understood in interacting theories, especially on time scales longer than the dynamical relaxation time. Recently there have been claims that the quantum theory deviates spectacularly from the classical theory on this time scale, even if the occupancy numbers are extremely large. Furthermore, it is claimed that the quantum theory quickly thermalizes while the classical theory does not. The evidence for these claims comes from noticing a spectacular difference in the time evolution of expectation values of quantum operators compared to the classical micro-state evolution. If true, this would have dramatic consequences for many important phenomena, including laboratory studies of interacting BECs, dark matter axions, preheating after inflation, etc. In this work we critically examine these claims. We show that in fact the classical theory can describe the quantum behavior in the high occupancy regime, even when interactions are large. The connection is that the expectation values of quantum operators in a single quantum micro-state are approximated by a corresponding classical ensemble average over many classical micro-states. Furthermore, by the ergodic theorem, a classical ensemble average of local fields with statistical translation invariance is the spatial average of a single micro-state. So the correlation functions of the quantum and classical field theories of a single micro-state approximately agree at high occupancy, even in interacting systems. Furthermore, both quantum and classical field theories can thermalize, when appropriate coarse graining is introduced, with the classical case requiring a cutoff on low occupancy UV modes. We discuss applications of our results.

  13. Architectures and Applications for Scalable Quantum Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    collaboration between computer science and physical sciences involving four groups: MIT, providing experimental quantum technology parameters and...quantum information processing system. Our project was a collaborative computer science and physical sciences effort involving four groups working in tight...Automate QRAM / QCL / Q QCC ARQOptimizers QASM QCPOL Layout Tools QIR • Approach: • Open-source • Layered hierarchy • Results: • Physical requirements

  14. Josephson inplane and tunneling currents in bilayer quantum Hall system

    SciTech Connect

    Ezawa, Z. F.; Tsitsishvili, G.; Sawada, A.

    2013-12-04

    A Bose-Einstein condensation is formed by composite bosons in the quantum Hall state. A composite boson carries the fundamental charge (–e). We investigate Josephson tunneling of such charges in the bilayer quantum Hall system at the total filling ν = 1. We show the existence of the critical current for the tunneling current to be coherent and dissipationless in tunneling experiments with various geometries.

  15. Compensated intruder-detection systems

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, David R.; Miller, William R.

    1984-01-01

    Intruder-detection systems in which intruder-induced signals are transmitted through a medium also receive spurious signals induced by changes in a climatic condition affecting the medium. To combat this, signals received from the detection medium are converted to a first signal. The system also provides a reference signal proportional to climate-induced changes in the medium. The first signal and the reference signal are combined for generating therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the climatic changes in the medium. An alarm is energized if the output signal exceeds a preselected value. In one embodiment, an acoustic cable is coupled to a fence to generate a first electrical signal proportional to movements thereof. False alarms resulting from wind-induced movements of the fence (detection medium) are eliminated by providing an anemometer-driven voltage generator to provide a reference voltage proportional to the velocity of wind incident on the fence. An analog divider receives the first electrical signal and the reference signal as its numerator and denominator inputs, respectively, and generates therefrom an output signal which is insensitive to the wind-induced movements in the fence.

  16. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  17. Detecting a Majorana-Fermion Zero Mode Using a Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong E.; Baranger, Harold U.

    2012-02-01

    We propose an setup for detecting a Majorana zero mode consisting of a spinless quantum dot coupled to the end of a p-wave superconducting nanowire [1]. The conductance through the dot is monitored by adding two external leads. We find that the Majorana bound state at the end of the wire strongly influences the conductance through the quantum dot: driving the wire through the topological phase transition causes a sharp jump in the conductance by a factor of 1/2. In the topological phase, the zero temperature peak value of the dot conductance (i.e. on resonance and symmetric coupling) is e^2/2h. In contrast, if the wire is in its trivial phase, the peak is e^2/h, or if a regular fermionic zero mode occurs, the conductance is 0. We also consider coupling the dot to both ends of the wire (two MBS), with a magnetic flux f through the loop. The conductance as a function of phase shows peaks at f/f0 = (2n+1)*pi which can be used to tune Flensberg's qubit system [PRL (2011)] to the energy degeneracy point. [4pt] [1] D. E. Liu and H. U. Baranger, PRB in press (2011); arXiv/1107.4338.

  18. Scheme for efficient extraction of low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit by frequency-shift detection.

    PubMed

    Yang, R G; Zhang, J; Zhai, Z H; Zhai, S Q; Liu, K; Gao, J R

    2015-08-10

    Low-frequency (Hz~kHz) squeezing is very important in many schemes of quantum precision measurement. But it is more difficult than that at megahertz-frequency because of the introduction of laser low-frequency technical noise. In this paper, we propose a scheme to obtain a low-frequency signal beyond the quantum limit from the frequency comb in a non-degenerate frequency and degenerate polarization optical parametric amplifier (NOPA) operating below threshold with type I phase matching by frequency-shift detection. Low-frequency squeezing immune to laser technical noise is obtained by a detection system with a local beam of two-frequency intense laser. Furthermore, the low-frequency squeezing can be used for phase measurement in Mach-Zehnder interferometer, and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) can be enhanced greatly.

  19. Ionization detection system for aerosols

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Martin E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system utilizes a measuring ionization chamber which is modified to minimize false alarms and reductions in sensitivity resulting from changes in ambient temperature. In the preferred form of the modification, an annular radiation shield is mounted about the usual radiation source provided to effect ionization in the measuring chamber. The shield is supported by a bimetallic strip which flexes in response to changes in ambient temperature, moving the shield relative to the source so as to vary the radiative area of the source in a manner offsetting temperature-induced variations in the sensitivity of the chamber.

  20. Method for adding nodes to a quantum key distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Grice, Warren P

    2015-02-24

    An improved quantum key distribution (QKD) system and method are provided. The system and method introduce new clients at intermediate points along a quantum channel, where any two clients can establish a secret key without the need for a secret meeting between the clients. The new clients perform operations on photons as they pass through nodes in the quantum channel, and participate in a non-secret protocol that is amended to include the new clients. The system and method significantly increase the number of clients that can be supported by a conventional QKD system, with only a modest increase in cost. The system and method are compatible with a variety of QKD schemes, including polarization, time-bin, continuous variable and entanglement QKD.