Science.gov

Sample records for quantum wires

  1. Magnetoconductance of quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Gerson J.; Sammarco, Filipe; Egues, Carlos

    2010-03-01

    At low temperatures the conductance of a quantum wires exhibit characteristic plate-aus due to the quantization of the transverse modes [1]. In the presence of high in-plane magnetic fields these spin-split transverse modes cross. Recently, these crossings were observed experimentally [2] via measurements of the differential conductance as a function of the gate voltage and the in-plane magnetic-field. These show structures described as either anti-crossings or magnetic phase transitions. Motivated by our previous works on magnetotransport in 2DEGs via the Spin Density Functional Theory (SDFT) [3], here we propose a similar model to investigate the magnetoconductance of quantum wires. We use (i) the SDFT via the Kohn-Sham self-consistent scheme within the local spin density approximation to obtain the electronic structure and (ii) the Landauer-Buettiker formalism to calculate the conductance of a quantum wire. Our results show qualitative agreement with the data of Ref. [2]. [1] B. J. van Wees et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 60, 848 (1988). [2] A. C. Graham et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 226804 (2008). [3] H. J. P. Freire, and J. C. Egues, Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 026801 (2007); G. J. Ferreira, and J. Carlos Egues, J. Supercond. Nov. Mag., in press; G. J. Ferreira, H. J. P. Freire, J. Carlos Egues, submitted.

  2. Bright Core-Shell Semiconductor Quantum Wires

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Wang, Fudong; Hoy, Jessica; Wayman, Virginia L.; Steinberg, Lindsey K.; Loomis, Richard A.; Buhro, William E.

    2012-01-01

    Colloidal CdTe quantum wires are reported having ensemble photoluminescence efficiencies as high as 25% under low excitation-power densities. High photoluminescence efficiencies are achieved by formation of a monolayer CdS shell on the CdTe quantum wires. Like other semiconductor nanowires, the CdTe quantum wires may contain frequent wurtzite–zinc-blende structural alternations along their lengths. The present results demonstrate that the optical properties, emission-peak shape and photoluminescence efficiencies, are independent of the presence or absence of such structural alternations. PMID:23095017

  3. Electrochemical Fabrication of Metallic Quantum Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Nongjian

    2005-01-01

    The fabrication of metallic quantum wires using simple electrochemical techniques is described. The conductance of the system can be readily measured that allows one to constantly monitor the conductance during fabrication and use conductance quantization as a signature to guide the fabrication.

  4. Spectroscopic properties of colloidal indium phosphide quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Li, Jingbo; Hang, Qingling; Zemlyanov, Dmitry; Gibbons, Patrick C.; Wang, Lin-Wang; Janes, David B.; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    Colloidal InP quantum wires are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, and passivated with the traditional quantum dots surfactants 1-hexadecylamine and tri-n-octylphosphine oxide. The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to other experimental results for InP quantum dots and wires, and to the predictions of theory. The photoluminescence behavior of the wires is also investigated. Efforts to enhance photoluminescence efficiencies through photochemical etching in the presence of HF result only in photochemical thinning or photo-oxidation, without a significant influence on quantum-wire photoluminescence. However, photo-oxidation produces residual dot and rod domains within the wires, which are luminescent. The results establish that the quantum-wire band gaps are weakly influenced by the nature of the surface passivation, and that colloidal quantum wires have intrinsically low photoluminescence efficiencies.

  5. Negative excess noise in gated quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Dolcini, F.; Trauzettel, B.; Safi, I.; Grabert, H.

    2009-04-23

    The electrical current noise of a quantum wire is expected to increase with increasing applied voltage. We show that this intuition can be wrong. Specifically, we consider a single channel quantum wire with impurities and with a capacitive coupling to a metallic gate, and find that its excess noise, defined as the change in the noise caused by the finite voltage, can be negative at zero temperature. This feature is present both for large (c>>c{sub q}) and small (c<quantum capacitance of the wire. In particular, for c>>c{sub q}, negativity of the excess noise can occur at finite frequency when the transmission coefficients are energy dependent, i.e. in the presence of Fabry-Perot resonances or band curvature. In the opposite regime c < or approx. c{sub q}, a non trivial voltage dependence of the noise arises even for energy independent transmission coefficients: at zero frequency the noise decreases with voltage as a power law when c

  6. Ballistic spin resonance in multisubband quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachiya, Marco O.; Usaj, Gonzalo; Egues, J. Carlos

    2014-03-01

    Ballistic spin resonance was experimentally observed in a quasi-one-dimensional wire by Frolov et al. [Nature (London) 458, 868 (2009), 10.1038/nature07873]. The spin resonance was generated by a combination of an external static magnetic field and the oscillating effective spin-orbit magnetic field due to periodic bouncings of the electrons off the boundaries of a narrow channel. An increase of the D'yakonov-Perel spin relaxation rate was observed when the frequency of the spin-orbit field matched that of the Larmor precession frequency around the external magnetic field. Here we develop a model to account for the D'yakonov-Perel mechanism in multisubband quantum wires with both the Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions. Considering elastic spin-conserving impurity scatterings in the time-evolution operator (Heisenberg representation), we extract the spin relaxation time by evaluating the time-dependent expectation value of the spin operators. The magnetic field dependence of the nonlocal voltage, which is related to the spin relaxation time behavior, shows a wide plateau, in agreement with the experimental observation. This plateau arises due to injection in higher subbands and small-angle scattering. In this quantum mechanical approach, the spin resonance occurs near the spin-orbit-induced energy anticrossings of the quantum wire subbands with opposite spins. We also predict anomalous dips in the spin relaxation time as a function of the magnetic field in systems with strong spin-orbit couplings.

  7. Electronic Properties of Quantum Wire Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzmenko, Igor

    2005-09-01

    Quantum wire networks (``quantum crossbars'', QCB) represent a 2D grid formed by superimposed crossing arrays of parallel conducting quantum wires, molecular chains or metallic single-wall carbon nanotubes. QCB coupled only by capacitive interaction in the crosses have similar low-energy, long-wave properties characterized as a crossed sliding Luttinger liquid (CSLL) phase. In this Thesis we develop a theory of interacting Bose excitations (plasmons) in QCB. We analyze spectrum of boson fields and two-point correlators in QCB. We show that the standard bosonization procedure is valid, and the system behaves as a CSLL in the infrared limit, but the high frequency spectral and correlation characteristics have either 1D or 2D nature depending on the direction of the wave vector in the 2D BZ of reciprocal lattice. As a result, the crossover from 1D to 2D regime may be experimentally observed. An effective tool for probing QCB spectral properties is the optical spectroscopy. The characteristic values of QCB frequencies and wave vectors determine two possible directions of such an experimental observation. The first of them is IR spectroscopy of QCB where the frequency of an external ac field lies at the same region as the QCB frequency. The second one is an UV scattering on QCB where the wave vector of a scattered field lies in the same region as that of the QCB wave vectors. In both cases, 1D to 2D crossover manifests itself as a splitting of single lines into multiplets.

  8. Universal Entanglement Crossover of Coupled Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Saleur, Hubert

    2014-03-01

    We consider the entanglement between two one-dimensional quantum wires (Luttinger liquids) coupled by tunneling through a quantum impurity. The physics of the system involves a crossover between weak and strong coupling regimes characterized by an energy scale TB, and methods of conformal field theory therefore cannot be applied. The evolution of the entanglement in this crossover has led to many numerical studies, but has remained little understood, analytically or even qualitatively. We argue in this Letter that the correct universal scaling form of the entanglement entropy S (for an arbitrary interval of length L containing the impurity) is ∂S/∂ ln L=f(LTB). In the special case where the coupling to the impurity can be refermionized, we show how the universal function f(LTB) can be obtained analytically using recent results on form factors of twist fields and a defect massless-scattering formalism. Our results are carefully checked against numerical simulations.

  9. Quantum stability and magic lengths of metal atom wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping; Choi, Jin-Ho; Lan, Haiping; Cho, Jun-Hyung; Niu, Qian; Yang, Jinlong; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2016-06-01

    Metal atom wires represent an important class of nanomaterials in the development of future electronic devices and other functional applications. Using first-principles calculations within density functional theory, we carry out a systematic study of the quantum stability of freestanding atom wires consisting of prototypical metal elements with s -, s p -, and s d -valence electrons. We explore how the quantum mechanically confined motion and local bonding of the valence electrons in these different wire systems can dictate their overall structural stability and find that the formation energy of essentially all the wires oscillates with respect to their length measured by the number n of atoms contained in the wires, establishing the existence of highly preferred (or magic) lengths. Furthermore, different wire classes exhibit distinctively different oscillatory characteristics and quantum stabilities. Alkali metal wires possessing an unpaired s valence electron per atom exhibit simple damped even-odd oscillations. In contrast, Al and Ga wires containing three s2p1 valence electrons per atom generally display much larger and undamped even-odd energy oscillations due to stronger local bonding of the p orbitals. Among the noble metals, the s -dominant Ag wires behave similarly to the linear alkali metal wires, while Au and Pt wires distinctly prefer to be structurally zigzagged due to strong relativistic effects. These findings are discussed in connection with existing experiments and should also be instrumental in future experimental realization of different metal atom wires in freestanding or supported environments with desirable functionalities.

  10. Universal entanglement crossover of coupled quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Jacobsen, Jesper; Saleur, Hubert

    2014-03-01

    We consider the entanglement between two one-dimensional quantum wires (Luttinger Liquids) coupled by tunneling through a quantum impurity. The physics of the system involves a crossover between weak and strong coupling regimes characterized by an energy scale TB, and methods of conformal field theory therefore cannot be applied. The evolution of the entanglement in this crossover has led to many numerical studies, but has remained little understood, analytically or even qualitatively. This is, in part, due to the fact that the entanglement in this case is non-perturbative in the tunneling amplitude. We argue that the correct universal scaling form of the entanglement entropy S (for an arbitrary interval containing the impurity) is ∂S / ∂lnL = f(LTB) . In the special case where the coupling to the impurity can be refermionized, we show how the universal function f(LTB) can be obtained analytically using recent results on form factors of twist fields and a defect massless-scattering formalism. Our results are carefully checked against numerical simulations. This work was supported by the the French ANR (ANR Projet 2010 Blanc SIMI 4 : DIME), the US DOE (grant number DE-FG03-01ER45908), the Quantum Materials program of LBNL (RV) and the Institut Universitaire de France (JLJ).

  11. Si, Ge, and SiGe quantum wires and quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearsall, T. P.

    This document is part of subvolume C3 'Optical Properties' of volume 34 'Semiconductor quantum structures' of Landolt-Börnstein, Group III, Condensed Matter, on the optical properties of quantum structures based on group IV semiconductors. It discusses Si, Ge, and SiGe quantum wire and quantum dot structures, the synthesis of quantum wires and quantum dots, and applications of SiGe quantum-dot structures as photodetectors, light-emitting diodes, for optical amplification and as Si quantum-dot memories.

  12. Interaction-induced backscattering in short quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M.-T.; Micklitz, T.; Levchenko, A.; Matveev, K. A.

    2014-10-01

    We study interaction-induced backscattering in clean quantum wires with adiabatic contacts exposed to a voltage bias. Particle backscattering relaxes such systems to a fully equilibrated steady state only on length scales exponentially large in the ratio of bandwidth of excitations and temperature. Here we focus on shorter wires in which full equilibration is not accomplished. Signatures of relaxation then are due to backscattering of hole excitations close to the band bottom which perform a diffusive motion in momentum space while scattering from excitations at the Fermi level. This is reminiscent to the first passage problem of a Brownian particle and, regardless of the interaction strength, can be described by an inhomogeneous Fokker-Planck equation. From general solutions of the latter we calculate the hole backscattering rate for different wire lengths and discuss the resulting length dependence of interaction-induced correction to the conductance of a clean single channel quantum wire.

  13. Time-Domain Simulation of Three Dimensional Quantum Wires.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Dennis M; Mossman, Sean; Kuzyk, Mark G

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of quantum wires. This is a true three-dimensional method based on a direct implementation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It makes no approximations to the Schrödinger equation other than the finite-difference approximation of the space and time derivatives. The accuracy of our method is tested by comparing it to analytical results in a cylindrical wire. PMID:27124603

  14. Time-Domain Simulation of Three Dimensional Quantum Wires

    PubMed Central

    Mossman, Sean; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2016-01-01

    A method is presented to calculate the eigenenergies and eigenfunctions of quantum wires. This is a true three-dimensional method based on a direct implementation of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. It makes no approximations to the Schrödinger equation other than the finite-difference approximation of the space and time derivatives. The accuracy of our method is tested by comparing it to analytical results in a cylindrical wire. PMID:27124603

  15. Multisublevel Magnetoquantum Conductance in Single and Coupled Double Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Ken; Huang, Danhong

    2001-09-15

    We study the ballistic and diffusive magnetoquantum transport using a typical quantum point contact geometry for single and tunnel-coupled double wires that are wide (less than or similar to1 mum) in one perpendicular direction with densely populated sublevels and extremely confined in the other perpendicular (i.e., growth) direction. A general analytic solution to the Boltzmann equation is presented for multisublevel elastic scattering at low temperatures. The solution is employed to study interesting magnetic-field dependent behavior of the conductance such as a large enhancement and quantum oscillations of the conductance for various structures and field orientations. These phenomena originate from the following field-induced properties: magnetic confinement, displacement of the initial- and final-state wave functions for scattering, variation of the Fermi velocities, mass enhancement, depopulation of the sublevels and anticrossing (in double quantum wires). The magnetoconductance is strikingly different in long diffusive (or rough. dirty) wires from the quantized conductance in short ballistic (or clean) wires. Numerical results obtained for the rectangular confinement potentials in the growth direction are satisfactorily interpreted in terms of the analytic solutions based on harmonic confinement potentials. Some of the predicted features of the field-dependent diffusive and quantized conductances are consistent with recent data from GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs double quantum wires.

  16. The Quantum Socket: Wiring for Superconducting Qubits - Part 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, T. G.; Bejanin, J. H.; Rinehart, J. R.; Bateman, J. D.; Earnest, C. T.; McRae, C. H.; Rohanizadegan, Y.; Shiri, D.; Mariantoni, M.; Penava, B.; Breul, P.; Royak, S.; Zapatka, M.; Fowler, A. G.

    Quantum systems with ten superconducting quantum bits (qubits) have been realized, making it possible to show basic quantum error correction (QEC) algorithms. However, a truly scalable architecture has not been developed yet. QEC requires a two-dimensional array of qubits, restricting any interconnection to external classical systems to the third axis. In this talk, we introduce an interconnect solution for solid-state qubits: The quantum socket. The quantum socket employs three-dimensional wires and makes it possible to connect classical electronics with quantum circuits more densely and accurately than methods based on wire bonding. The three-dimensional wires are based on spring-loaded pins engineered to insure compatibility with quantum computing applications. Extensive design work and machining was required, with focus on material quality to prevent magnetic impurities. Microwave simulations were undertaken to optimize the design, focusing on the interface between the micro-connector and an on-chip coplanar waveguide pad. Simulations revealed good performance from DC to 10 GHz and were later confirmed against experimental measurements.

  17. Lattice thermal conductance of quantum wires with disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vyhmeister, Erik; Hershfield, Selman

    We model the lattice thermal conductance in long quantum wires connected to two large heat baths at different temperatures in the harmonic approximation. The thermal conductance is computed with the Landauer formula for phonons, where it is related to the sum over all transmission probabilities for phonons through the wire. The net transmission probability is computed using a recursive Green function technique, which allows one to study long wires efficiently. We consider several different kinds of disorder to reduce the lattice thermal conductivity: periodic rectangular holes of varying sizes and shapes, periodic triangular holes, and narrow bands, averaged over randomness to account for variance in manufacturing. Depending on the model, the thermal conductance was reduced by 80 percent or more from the perfectly ordered wire case. Funded by NSF grant DMR-1461019.

  18. Superradiance in a two-channel quantum wire

    SciTech Connect

    Tayebi, A.; Zelevinsky, V.

    2014-10-15

    A one-dimensional, two-channel quantum wire is studied in the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian framework. Analytical expressions are derived for the band structure of the isolated wire. Quantum states and transport properties of the wire coupled to two ideal leads at the edges are studied in detail. The width distribution of the quasistationary states varies as a function of the coupling strength to the environment. At weak coupling, all the eigenenergies uniformly acquire small widths. The picture changes entirely at strong coupling, a certain number of states (“super-radiant”) are greatly broadened, while the rest remain long-lived states, a pure quantum mechanical effect as a consequence of quantum interference. The transition between the two regimes greatly influences the transport properties of the system. The maximum transmission through the wire occurs at the super-radiance transition. We consider also a realistic situation with energy-dependent coupling to the continuum due to the existence of decay threshold where super-radiance still plays a significant role in transport properties of the system.

  19. Anisotropic Conductance of a Surface Quantum-Wire Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weitering, Hanno; Yoo, Kwonjae

    2001-03-01

    The Ga/Si(112)6x1 interface consists of a self-assembled, mesoscopic array of atomic Ga wires on a high-index Si(112) surface. The structural uniformity of this atomic-wire- or quantum-wire array is far superior to those created by nano-lithography or STM atom manipulation. The details of electron transport in these quantum wires should be very interesting. Si atoms also possess dangling bonds. Since the trivalent Ga atoms are threefold coordinated, their dangling bond orbitals are empty and hence, they should not contribute significantly to the conductivity. However, quasi one-dimensional metallic transport might be possible in the silicon dangling bonds because each dangling bond contributes one electron. These dangling bonds can form a quasi one-dimensional, half-filled electronic band. One of the interesting questions is whether this surface is indeed a quasi 1D metal or whether the Si chains undergo a Jahn-Teller or buckling distortion that opens up a band gap. We have measured the conductance of this mesoscopic wire array as a function of temperature parallel and perpendicular to the Ga chains. Transport measurements reveal a strong conductance anisotropy as expected. However, the conduction channels are orthogonal to the crystallographic chains. This counterintuitive result is in excellent agreement with electronic structure calculations by Ortega and Flores. The theoretical band structure was confirmed independently with photoemission spectroscopy.

  20. Stochastic quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon layers: The role of quantum dots, quantum wires and localized states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez-Porras, A.; García, O.; Vargas, C.; Corrales, A.; Solís, J. D.

    2015-08-01

    Nanocrystallites of Silicon have been produced by electrochemical etching of crystal wafers. The obtained samples show photoluminescence in the red band of the visible spectrum when illuminated by ultraviolet light. The photoluminescence spectra can be deconvolved into three components according to a stochastic quantum confinement model: one band coming from Nanocrystalline dots, or quantum dots, one from Nanocrystalline wires, or quantum wires, and one from the presence of localized surface states related to silicon oxide. The results fit well within other published models.

  1. Efficient numerical simulation of electron states in quantum wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerkhoven, Thomas; Galick, Albert T.; Ravaioli, Umberto; Arends, John H.; Saad, Youcef

    1990-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for the numerical simulation of electrons in a quantum wire as described by a two-dimensional eigenvalue problem for Schroedinger's equation coupled with Poisson's equation. Initially, the algorithm employs an underrelaxed fixed point iteration to generate an approximation which is reasonably close to the solution. Subsequently, this approximate solution is employed as an initial guess for a Jacobian-free implementation of an approximate Newton method. In this manner the nonlinearity in the model is dealt with effectively. The effectiveness of this approach is demonstrated in a set of numerical experiments which study the electron states on the cross section of a quantum wire structure based on III-V semiconductors at 4.2 and 77 K.

  2. LDRD final report on quantum computing using interacting semiconductor quantum wires.

    SciTech Connect

    Lyo, Sungkwun Kenneth; Dunn, Roberto G.; Lilly, Michael Patrick; Tibbetts, Denise R. ); Stephenson, Larry L.; Seamons, John Andrew; Reno, John Louis; Bielejec, Edward Salvador; Simmons, Jerry Alvon

    2006-01-01

    For several years now quantum computing has been viewed as a new paradigm for certain computing applications. Of particular importance to this burgeoning field is the development of an algorithm for factoring large numbers which obviously has deep implications for cryptography and national security. Implementation of these theoretical ideas faces extraordinary challenges in preparing and manipulating quantum states. The quantum transport group at Sandia has demonstrated world-leading, unique double quantum wires devices where we have unprecedented control over the coupling strength, number of 1 D channels, overlap and interaction strength in this nanoelectronic system. In this project, we study 1D-1D tunneling with the ultimate aim of preparing and detecting quantum states of the coupled wires. In a region of strong tunneling, electrons can coherently oscillate from one wire to the other. By controlling the velocity of the electrons, length of the coupling region and tunneling strength we will attempt to observe tunneling oscillations. This first step is critical for further development double quantum wires into the basic building block for a quantum computer, and indeed for other coupled nanoelectronic devices that will rely on coherent transport. If successful, this project will have important implications for nanoelectronics, quantum computing and information technology.

  3. Quasiclassical theory of disordered multi-channel Majorana quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neven, Patrick; Bagrets, Dmitry; Altland, Alexander

    2013-05-01

    Multi-channel spin-orbit quantum wires, when subjected to a magnetic field and proximity coupled to an s-wave superconductor, may support Majorana states. We study what happens to these systems in the presence of disorder. Inspired by the widely established theoretical methods of mesoscopic superconductivity, we develop á la Eilenberger a quasiclassical approach to topological nanowires valid in the limit of strong spin-orbit coupling. We find that the ‘Majorana number’ {\\cal M} , distinguishing between the state with Majorana fermions (symmetry class B) and no Majorana fermions (class D), is given by the product of two Pfaffians of gapped quasiclassical Green's functions fixed by the right and left terminals connected to the wire. A numerical solution of the Eilenberger equations reveals that the class D disordered quantum wires are prone to the formation of the zero-energy anomaly (class D impurity spectral peak) in the local density of states that shares the key features of the Majorana peak. In this way, we confirm the robustness of our previous conclusions (Bagrets and Altland 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 109 227005) on a more restrictive system setup. Generally speaking, we find that the quasiclassical approach provides a highly efficient means to address disordered class D superconductors both in the presence and in the absence of topological structures.

  4. Topological phases and transport properties of screened interacting quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Hengyi; Xiong, Ye; Wang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    We study theoretically the effects of long-range and on-site Coulomb interactions on the topological phases and transport properties of spin-orbit-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires imposed on a s-wave superconductor. The distributions of the electrostatic potential and charge density are calculated self-consistently within the Hartree approximation. Due to the finite width of the wires and charge repulsion, the potential and density distribute inhomogeneously in the transverse direction and tend to accumulate along the lateral edges where the hard-wall confinement is assumed. This result has profound effects on the topological phases and the differential conductance of the interacting quantum wires and their hybrid junctions with superconductors. Coulomb interactions renormalize the gate voltage and alter the topological phases strongly by enhancing the topological regimes and producing jagged boundaries. Moreover, the multicritical points connecting different topological phases are modified remarkably in striking contrast to the predictions of the two-band model. We further suggest the possible non-magnetic topological phase transitions manipulated externally with the aid of long-range interactions. Finally, the transport properties of normal-superconductor junctions are further examined, in particular, the impacts of Coulomb interactions on the zero-bias peaks related to the Majorana fermions and near zero-energy peaks.

  5. van Hove singularities in disordered multichannel quantum wires and nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hügle, S.; Egger, R.

    2002-11-01

    We present a theory for the van Hove singularity (VHS) in the tunneling density of states (TDOS) of disordered multichannel quantum wires, in particular multiwall carbon nanotubes. We assume close-by gates that screen off electron-electron interactions. Diagrammatic perturbation theory within the noncrossing approximation yields analytical expressions governing the disorder-induced broadening and shift of VHS's as new subbands are opened. This problem is nontrivial because the (lowest-order) Born approximation breaks down close to the VHS. Interestingly, compared to the bulk case, the boundary TDOS shows drastically altered VHS's, even in the clean limit.

  6. Class D spectral peak in Majorana quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Bagrets, Dmitry; Altland, Alexander

    2012-11-30

    Proximity coupled spin-orbit quantum wires purportedly support midgap Majorana states at critical points. We show that, in the presence of disorder, these systems generate a second band center anomaly, which is of different physical origin but shares key characteristics with the Majorana state: it is narrow in width, insensitive to magnetic fields, carries unit spectral weight, and is rigidly tied to the band center. Depending on the parity of the number of subgap quasiparticle states, a Majorana mode does or does not coexist with the impurity peak. The strong "entanglement" between the two phenomena may hinder an unambiguous detection of the Majorana by spectroscopic techniques.

  7. Polariton dispersion of a quantum wire superlattice system

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, K. S. Joseph; Revathy, V.; Amalanathan, M.; Lenin, S. Maria

    2015-06-24

    Superlattices have drawn considerable attention in the recent years. In this work, the behaviour of polaritons in a quantum wire superlattice is analysed both at the brillouin zone edge and at centre of the brillouin zone using LiNbO3/ LiTaO3 as an example. The significance of the polariton modes in both the cases are analysed. New modes on the polaritonic gap, where the propagation of electromagnetic wave is forbidden, is obtained in the system as suggested by some recent literature. The effect on nonlinear interactions of phonon polaritons in LiNbO3/ LiTaO3 superlattices is also discussed.

  8. Quantum Monte Carlo Studies of Interaction-Induced Localization in Quantum Dots and Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devrim Güçlü, A.

    2009-03-01

    We investigate interaction-induced localization of electrons in both quantum dots and inhomogeneous quantum wires using variational and diffusion quantum Monte Carlo methods. Quantum dots and wires are highly tunable systems that enable the study of the physics of strongly correlated electrons. With decreasing electronic density, interactions become stronger and electrons are expected to localize at their classical positions, as in Wigner crystallization in an infinite 2D system. (1) Dots: We show that the addition energy shows a clear progression from features associated with shell structure to those caused by commensurability of a Wigner crystal. This cross-over is, then, a signature of localization; it occurs near rs˜20. For higher values of rs, the configuration symmetry of the quantum dot becomes fully consistent with the classical ground state. (2) Wires: We study an inhomogeneous quasi-one-dimensional system -- a wire with two regions, one at low density and the other high. We find that strong localization occurs in the low density quantum point contact region as the gate potential is increased. The nature of the transition from high to low density depends on the density gradient -- if it is steep, a barrier develops between the two regions, causing Coulomb blockade effects. We find no evidence for ferromagnetic spin polarization for the range of parameters studied. The picture emerging here is in good agreement with the experimental measurements of tunneling between two wires. Collaborators: C. J. Umrigar (Cornell), Hong Jiang (Fritz Haber Institut), Amit Ghosal (IISER Calcutta), and H. U. Baranger (Duke).

  9. Electron transport in coupled double quantum wells and wires

    SciTech Connect

    Harff, N.E.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K.

    1997-04-01

    Due to inter-quantum well tunneling, coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) contain an extra degree of electronic freedom in the growth direction, giving rise to new transport phenomena not found in single electron layers. This report describes work done on coupled DQWs subject to inplane magnetic fields B{sub {parallel}}, and is based on the lead author`s doctoral thesis, successfully defended at Oregon State University on March 4, 1997. First, the conductance of closely coupled DQWs in B{sub {parallel}} is studied. B{sub {parallel}}-induced distortions in the dispersion, the density of states, and the Fermi surface are described both theoretically and experimentally, with particular attention paid to the dispersion anticrossing and resulting partial energy gap. Measurements of giant distortions in the effective mass are found to agree with theoretical calculations. Second, the Landau level spectra of coupled DQWs in tilted magnetic fields is studied. The magnetoresistance oscillations show complex beating as Landau levels from the two Fermi surface components cross the Fermi level. A third set of oscillations resulting from magnetic breakdown is observed. A semiclassical calculation of the Landau level spectra is then performed, and shown to agree exceptionally well with the data. Finally, quantum wires and quantum point contacts formed in DQW structures are investigated. Anticrossings of the one-dimensional DQW dispersion curves are predicted to have interesting transport effects in these devices. Difficulties in sample fabrication have to date prevented experimental verification. However, recently developed techniques to overcome these difficulties are described.

  10. Cathodoluminescence of single quantum wires and vertical quantum wells grown on a submicron grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, A.; Samuelson, L.; Malm, J.-O.; Vermeire, G.; Demeester, P.

    1994-02-01

    We present cathodoluminescence (CL) investigations of a corrugated GaAs/AlGaAs single quantum well (QW) structure grown on a submicron grating. The CL spectra have four distinct emission peaks. Using plan-view and cross-sectional CL imaging together with cross-sectional transmission electron microscope imaging, we have assigned the four peaks: They originate in the nominal QW, a quantum wire (QWR), a vertical quantum well (VQW), and the barrier, respectively. We have CL-imaged and -characterized single QWRs and VQWs.

  11. Externally controlled local magnetic field in a conducting mesoscopic ring coupled to a quantum wire

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, Santanu K.

    2015-01-14

    In the present work, the possibility of regulating local magnetic field in a quantum ring is investigated theoretically. The ring is coupled to a quantum wire and subjected to an in-plane electric field. Under a finite bias voltage across the wire a net circulating current is established in the ring which produces a strong magnetic field at its centre. This magnetic field can be tuned externally in a wide range by regulating the in-plane electric field, and thus, our present system can be utilized to control magnetic field at a specific region. The feasibility of this quantum system in designing spin-based quantum devices is also analyzed.

  12. Correlating Electronic Transport to Atomic Structures in Self-Assembled Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Li, An-Ping; Qin, Shengyong; Kim, Tae Hwan; Ouyang, Wenjie; Zhang, Yanning; Weitering, Harm H; Shih, Chih-Kang; Baddorf, Arthur P; Wu, Ruiqian

    2012-01-01

    Quantum wires, as a smallest electronic conductor, are expected to be a fundamental component in all quantum architectures. The electronic conductance in quantum wires, however, is often dictated by structural instabilities and electron localization at the atomic scale. Here we report on the evolutions of electronic transport as a function of temperature and interwire coupling as the quantum wires of GdSi{sub 2} are self-assembled on Si(100) wire-by-wire. The correlation between structure, electronic properties, and electronic transport are examined by combining nanotransport measurements, scanning tunneling microscopy, and density functional theory calculations. A metal-insulator transition is revealed in isolated nanowires, while a robust metallic state is obtained in wire bundles at low temperature. The atomic defects lead to electron localizations in isolated nanowire, and interwire coupling stabilizes the structure and promotes the metallic states in wire bundles. This illustrates how the conductance nature of a one-dimensional system can be dramatically modified by the environmental change on the atomic scale.

  13. Atmospheric and low pressure metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial growth of vertical quantum wells and quantum well wires on submicron gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeire, G.; Moerman, I.; Yu, Z. Q.; Vermaerke, F.; van Daele, P.; Demeester, P.

    1994-02-01

    Nonplanar metalorganic vapor phase epitaxial growth on submicron gratings has been studied. Growth conditions have been determined to preserve the grating structure and also to enhance the formation of crescent shaped quantum well wire-like GaAs layers. These growth parameters have been used to grow the layer structure of a quantum well wire (QWW) laser, only needing one growth run. Although there is not yet clear evidence for two-dimensional quantum confinement, this technique offers some interesting perspectives for the realization of QWW lasers.

  14. The quantum pinch effect in semiconducting quantum wires: A bird’s-eye view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2016-01-01

    Those who measure success with culmination do not seem to be aware that life is a journey not a destination. This spirit is best reflected in the unceasing failures in efforts for solving the problem of controlled thermonuclear fusion for even the simplest pinches for over decades; and the nature keeps us challenging with examples. However, these efforts have permitted researchers the obtention of a dense plasma with a lifetime that, albeit short, is sufficient to study the physics of the pinch effect, to create methods of plasma diagnostics, and to develop a modern theory of plasma processes. Most importantly, they have impregnated the solid state plasmas, particularly the electron-hole plasmas in semiconductors, which do not suffer from the issues related with the confinement and which have demonstrated their potential not only for the fundamental physics but also for the device physics. Here, we report on a two-component, cylindrical, quasi-one-dimensional quantum plasma subjected to a radial confining harmonic potential and an applied magnetic field in the symmetric gauge. It is demonstrated that such a system, as can be realized in semiconducting quantum wires, offers an excellent medium for observing the quantum pinch effect at low temperatures. An exact analytical solution of the problem allows us to make significant observations: Surprisingly, in contrast to the classical pinch effect, the particle density as well as the current density display a determinable maximum before attaining a minimum at the surface of the quantum wire. The effect will persist as long as the equilibrium pair density is sustained. Therefore, the technological promise that emerges is the route to the precise electronic devices that will control the particle beams at the nanoscale.

  15. Non-Kondo zero-bias anomaly in disordered quantum wires

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Chong-Shian; Hsiao, J. H.; Chen, Jeng-Chung

    2014-02-14

    We investigated the behavior of the zero-bias anomaly in quantum wires that were embedded with impurities. The linear conductance G can exhibit cusp features that evolve with the positions of the impurities, and these features can be continuously changed using a combination of spit-gate and top-gate voltages. ZBA is observed regardless of the presence of impurity. Kondo model is inadequate for describing the behaviors of both G and ZBA. Despite the presence of impurity scattering, various ZBA behaviors that resemble those reported in clean quantum wires can be observed. Our results suggest that ZBA is an intrinsic phenomenon in a quantum wire, and its temperature and magnetic field dependence does not pertain to the Kondo correlations in quantum dot.

  16. Hybrid-impurity resonance in a quantum wire placed in a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpunin, V. V.; Margulis, V. A.

    2016-09-01

    An analytical expression for the absorption coefficient of electromagnetic radiation in a quantum wire is obtained. We consider the case of a field lying in the plane perpendicular to the wire axis. The calculation is performed using second-order perturbation theory with consideration of electron scattering by ionized impurities. We demonstrate the resonant character of the absorption and find the position of resonance frequencies in the dependence on the magnitude and direction of the magnetic field.

  17. Determination of the rod-wire transition length in colloidal indium phosphide quantum rods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2007-11-21

    Colloidal InP quantum rods (QRs) having controlled diameters and lengths are grown by the solution-liquid-solid method, from Bi nanoparticles in the presence of hexadecylamine and other conventional quantum dot surfactants. These quantum rods show band-edge photoluminescence after HF photochemical etching. Photoluminescence efficiency is further enhanced after the Bi tips are selectively removed from the QRs by oleic acid etching. The QRs are anisotropically 3D confined, the nature of which is compared to the corresponding isotropic 3D confinement in quantum dots and 2D confinement in quantum wires. The 3D-2D rod-wire transition length is experimentally determined to be 25 nm, which is about 2 times the bulk InP exciton Bohr radius (of approximately 11 nm).

  18. Bound states in the continuum in zigzag quantum wire enforced by a finger gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadreev, A. F.; Pilipchuk, A. S.

    2015-01-01

    We consider electron transport in a zigzag quantum wire by the effect of finger gate potential. Using a non-Hermitian effective Hamiltonian, we calculate resonance positions and widths to show that the resonance widths are easily governed by the gate potential. In particular, the resonance width can be enforced to be equal to zero, which leads to an electron localization with the Fermi energy embedded in the propagation band of the wire, i.e., the bound state in the continuum (BSC). We show that, for positive values of the potential, a zigzag wire becomes a Fabry-Perot resonator to give rise to BSC too.

  19. Indium segregation during III–V quantum wire and quantum dot formation on patterned substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Moroni, Stefano T.; Dimastrodonato, Valeria; Chung, Tung-Hsun; Juska, Gediminas; Gocalinska, Agnieszka; Pelucchi, Emanuele; Vvedensky, Dimitri D.

    2015-04-28

    We report a model for metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy on non-planar substrates, specifically V-grooves and pyramidal recesses, which we apply to the growth of InGaAs nanostructures. This model—based on a set of coupled reaction-diffusion equations, one for each facet in the system—accounts for the facet-dependence of all kinetic processes (e.g., precursor decomposition, adatom diffusion, and adatom lifetimes) and has been previously applied to account for the temperature-, concentration-, and temporal-dependence of AlGaAs nanostructures on GaAs (111)B surfaces with V-grooves and pyramidal recesses. In the present study, the growth of In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}As quantum wires at the bottom of V-grooves is used to determine a set of optimized kinetic parameters. Based on these parameters, we have modeled the growth of In{sub 0.25}Ga{sub 0.75}As nanostructures formed in pyramidal site-controlled quantum-dot systems, successfully producing a qualitative explanation for the temperature-dependence of their optical properties, which have been reported in previous studies. Finally, we present scanning electron and cross-sectional atomic force microscopy images which show previously unreported facetting at the bottom of the pyramidal recesses that allow quantum dot formation.

  20. The scaling of the effective band gaps in indium-arsenide quantum dots and wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Yu, Heng; Jeong, Sohee; Pietryga, Jeffrey M; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Gibbons, Patrick C; Buhro, William E

    2008-09-23

    Colloidal InAs quantum wires having diameters in the range of 5-57 nm and narrow diameter distributions are grown from Bi nanoparticles by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) mechanism. The diameter dependence of the effective band gaps (DeltaE(g)s) in the wires is determined from photoluminescence spectra and compared to the experimental results for InAs quantum dots and rods and to the predictions of various theoretical models. The DeltaE(g) values for InAs quantum dots and wires are found to scale linearly with inverse diameter (d(-1)), whereas the simplest confinement models predict that DeltaE(g) should scale with inverse-square diameter (d(-2)). The difference in the observed and predicted scaling dimension is attributed to conduction-band nonparabolicity induced by strong valence-band-conduction-band coupling in the narrow-gap InAs semiconductor.

  1. Laser field induced optical gain in a group III-V quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, Subramanian; Peter, Amalorpavam John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2016-08-01

    Effect of intense high frequency laser field on the electronic and optical properties of heavy hole exciton in an InAsP/InP quantum well wire is investigated taking into consideration of the spatial confinement. Laser field induced exciton binding energies, optical band gap, oscillator strength and the optical gain in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum well wire are studied. The variational formulism is applied to find the respective energies. The laser field induced optical properties are studied. The optical gain as a function of photon energy, in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum wire, is obtained in the presence of intense laser field. The compact density matrix method is employed to obtain the optical gain. The results show that the 1.55 μm wavelength for the fibre optic telecommunication applications is achieved for 45 Å wire radius in the absence of laser field intensity whereas the 1.55 μm wavelength is obtained for 40 Å if the amplitude of the laser field amplitude parameter is 50 Å. The characterizing wavelength for telecommunication network is optimized when the intense laser field is applied for the system. It is hoped that the obtained optical gain in the group III-V narrow quantum wire can be applied for fabricating laser sources for achieving the preferred telecommunication wavelength.

  2. Center-of-mass and internal motion of excitons in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glutsch, S.; Bechstedt, F.

    The properties of excitons, which are optically excited in single or coupled quantum wires, are studied within the effective-mass approximation. The two-particle wave functions and energies obey a Schrödinger equation with screened Coulomb interaction of electron and hole and their corresponding wire confinement potentials. This equation is approximately separated into an equation for the center-of-mass motion and another one more or less for the internal motion of the electron hole pairs. This allows a representation of absorption and luminescence spectra near a quantum-well exciton transition by a generalized Elliott formula.

  3. Magnetoresistance of One-Dimensional Subbands in Tunnel-Coupled Double Quantum Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Blount, M.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Moon, J.S.; Reno, J.L.; Simmons, J.A.; Wendt, J.R.

    1999-04-27

    We study the low-temperature in-plane magnetoresistance of tunnel-coupled quasi-one-dimensional quantum wires. The wires are defined by two pairs of mutually aligned split gates on opposite sides of a < 1 micron thick AlGaAs/GaAs double quantum well heterostructure, allowing independent control of their widths. In the ballistic regime, when both wires are defined and the field is perpendicular to the current, a large resistance peak at ~6 Tesla is observed with a strong gate voltage dependence. The data is consistent with a counting model whereby the number of subbands crossing the Fermi level changes with field due to the formation of an anticrossing in each pair of 1D subbands.

  4. Non-Abelian topological insulators from an array of quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, Eran; Oreg, Yuval

    2014-11-01

    We suggest a construction of a large class of topological states using an array of quantum wires. First, we show how to construct a Chern insulator using an array of alternating wires that contain electrons and holes, correlated with an alternating magnetic field. This is supported by semiclassical arguments and a full quantum-mechanical treatment of an analogous tight-binding model. We then show how electron-electron interactions can stabilize fractional Chern insulators (Abelian and non-Abelian). In particular, we construct a non-Abelian Z3 parafermion state. Our construction is generalized to wires with alternating spin-orbit couplings, which give rise to integer and fractional (Abelian and non-Abelian) topological insulators. The states we construct are effectively two dimensional, and are therefore less sensitive to disorder than one-dimensional systems. The possibility of experimental realization of our construction is addressed.

  5. Thermodynamical properties of triangular quantum wires: entropy, specific heat, and internal energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khordad, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, thermodynamical properties of a GaAs quantum wire with equilateral triangle cross section are studied. First, the energy levels of the system are obtained by solving the Schrödinger equation. Second, the Tsallis formalism is applied to obtain entropy, internal energy, and specific heat of the system. We have found that the specific heat and entropy have certain physically meaningful values, which mean thermodynamic properties cannot take any continuous value, unlike classical thermodynamics in which they are considered as continuous quantities. Maximum of entropy increases with increasing the wire size. The specific heat is zero at special temperatures. Specific heat decreases with increasing temperature. There are several peaks in specific heat, and these are dependent on quantum wire size.

  6. Positive and negative Coulomb drag in vertically integrated one-dimensional quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Laroche, D; Gervais, G; Lilly, M P; Reno, J L

    2011-10-30

    Electron interactions in and between wires become increasingly complex and important as circuits are scaled to nanometre sizes, or use reduced-dimensional conductors such as carbon nanotubes, nanowires and gated high-mobility two-dimensional electron systems. This is because the screening of the long-range Coulomb potential of individual carriers is weakened in these systems, which can lead to phenomena such as Coulomb drag, where a current in one wire induces a voltage in a second wire through Coulomb interactions alone. Previous experiments have demonstrated Coulomb electron drag in wires separated by a soft electrostatic barrier of width ≳80 nm (ref. 12), which was interpreted as resulting entirely from momentum transfer. Here, we measure both positive and negative drag between adjacent vertical quantum wires that are separated by ∼15 nm and have independent contacts, which allows their electron densities to be tuned independently. We map out the drag signal versus the number of electron sub-bands occupied in each wire, and interpret the results both in terms of momentum-transfer and charge-fluctuation induced transport models. For wires of significantly different sub-band occupancies, the positive drag effect can be as large as 25%.

  7. Coulomb interaction effects on the Majorana states in quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Manolescu, A; Marinescu, D C; Stanescu, T D

    2014-04-30

    The stability of the Majorana modes in the presence of a repulsive interaction is studied in the standard semiconductor wire-metallic superconductor configuration. The effects of short-range Coulomb interaction, which is incorporated using a purely repulsive δ-function to model the strong screening effect due to the presence of the superconductor, are determined within a Hartree-Fock approximation of the effective Bogoliubov-De Gennes Hamiltonian that describes the low-energy physics of the wire. Through a numerical diagonalization procedure we obtain interaction corrections to the single particle eigenstates and calculate the extended topological phase diagram in terms of the chemical potential and the Zeeman energy. We find that, for a fixed Zeeman energy, the interaction shifts the phase boundaries to a higher chemical potential, whereas for a fixed chemical potential this shift can occur either at lower or higher Zeeman energies. These effects can be interpreted as a renormalization of the g-factor due to the interaction. The minimum Zeeman energy needed to realize Majorana fermions decreases with the increasing strength of the Coulomb repulsion. Furthermore, we find that in wires with multi-band occupancy this effect can be enhanced by increasing the chemical potential, i.e. by occupying higher energy bands. PMID:24722427

  8. Molecular Spintronics: Wiring Spin Coherence between Semiconductor Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouyang, Min

    2004-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive candidates for scalable solid state implementations of quantum information processing based on electron spin states, where a crucial requirement for practical devices is to have efficient and tunable spin coupling between them. We focus on recent femtosecond time-resolved Faraday rotation studies of self-assembled multilayer spintronic devices based on colloidal quantum dots bridged by conjugated molecules (M. Ouyang et al., Science 301, 1074 (2003)). The data reveal the instantaneous transfer of spin coherence through conjugated molecular bridges spanning quantum dots of different size over a broad range of temperature. The room temperature spin transfer efficiency exceeds 20%, which approximately doubles the value measured at T=4.5K. A molecular π-orbital mediated spin coherence transfer mechanism is proposed to provide a qualitative insight into the experimental observations, suggesting a correlation between the stereochemistry of molecules and the transfer process. The results show that conjugated molecules can be used not only as physical links for the assembly of functional networks, but also as efficient channels for shuttling quantum information. This class of structures may be useful as two-spin quantum devices operating at ambient temperatures and may offer promising opportunities for future versatile molecule-based spintronic technologies.

  9. Preferential sites for InAsP/InP quantum wire nucleation using molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez-Moraleda, Bernardo; Pizarro, Joaquin; Guerrero, Elisa; Guerrero-Lebrero, Maria P.; Yáñez, Andres; Molina, Sergio Ignacio; Galindo, Pedro Luis

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, stress fields at the surface of the capping layer of self-assembled InAsP quantum wires grown on an InP (001) substrate have been determined from atomistic models using molecular dynamics and Stillinger-Weber potentials. To carry out these calculations, the quantum wire compositional distribution was extracted from previous works, where the As and P distributions were determined by electron energy loss spectroscopy and high-resolution aberration-corrected Z-contrast imaging. Preferential sites for the nucleation of wires on the surface of the capping layer were studied and compared with (i) previous simulations using finite element analysis to solve anisotropic elastic theory equations and (ii) experimentally measured locations of stacked wires. Preferential nucleation sites of stacked wires were determined by the maximum stress location at the MD model surface in good agreement with experimental results and those derived from finite element analysis. This indicates that MD simulations based on empirical potentials provide a suitable and flexible tool to study strain dependent atom processes.

  10. Thermodynamic compressibility and spin-splitting in one-dimensional quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Luke W.; Hamilton, A. R.; Thomas, K. J.; Pepper, M.; Farrer, I.; Anderson, D.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.

    2012-02-01

    We study spin-splitting and the much-debated 0.7 structure in GaAs quantum wires using compressibility measurements that directly probe the thermodynamic density of states. Two quantum wires are simultaneously defined in the upper and lower well of a GaAs/AlGaAs double quantum well heterostructure, using midline-gated split-gate devices [1]. The lower wire probes the ability of the upper wire to screen the electric field from a biased surface gate. The technique is sensitive enough to resolve spin splitting of the 1D subbands in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field. The compressibility response of the 0.7 structure is measured, and its evolution with increasing temperature and magnetic field is studied [2]. Despite the sensitivity of our measurements we see no evidence of the formation of the quasibound state predicted by the Kondo model of the 0.7 structure. Instead our data are more consistent with theories which predict that the 0.7 structure arises as a result of spontaneous spin polarization. [4pt] [1] I.M. Castleton et al, Physica B 249, 157 (1998).[0pt] [2] L.W. Smith et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 126801 (2011)

  11. InAs/InP single quantum wire formation and emission at 1.5 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Alen, B.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Martinez-Pastor, J.

    2006-12-04

    Isolated InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires have been grown using in situ accumulated stress measurements to adjust the optimal InAs thickness. Atomic force microscopy imaging shows highly asymmetric nanostructures with average length exceeding more than ten times their width. High resolution optical investigation of as-grown samples reveals strong photoluminescence from individual quantum wires at 1.5 {mu}m. Additional sharp features are related to monolayer fluctuations of the two-dimensional InAs layer present during the early stages of the quantum wire self-assembling process.

  12. Nuclear Quantum Effects in H(+) and OH(-) Diffusion along Confined Water Wires.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mariana; Ceriotti, Michele; Manolopoulos, David E

    2016-08-01

    The diffusion of protons and hydroxide ions along water wires provides an efficient mechanism for charge transport that is exploited by biological membrane channels and shows promise for technological applications such as fuel cells. However, what is lacking for a better control and design of these systems is a thorough theoretical understanding of the diffusion process at the atomic scale. Here we focus on two aspects of this process that are often disregarded because of their high computational cost: the use of first-principles potential energy surfaces and the treatment of the nuclei as quantum particles. We consider proton and hydroxide ions in finite water wires using density functional theory augmented with an apolar cylindrical confining potential. We employ machine learning techniques to identify the charged species, thus obtaining an agnostic definition that takes explicitly into account the delocalization of the charge in the Grotthus-like mechanism. We include nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) through the thermostated ring polymer molecular dynamics method and model finite system size effects by considering Langevin dynamics on the potential of mean force of the charged species, allowing us to extract the same "universal" diffusion coefficient from simulations with different wire sizes. In the classical case, diffusion coefficients depend significantly on the potential energy surface, in particular on how dispersion forces modulate water-water distances. NQEs, however, make the diffusion less sensitive to the underlying potential and geometry of the wire. PMID:27440483

  13. Band filling effects on temperature performance of intermediate band quantum wire solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kunets, Vas. P. Furrow, C. S.; Ware, M. E.; Souza, L. D. de; Benamara, M.; Salamo, G. J.; Mortazavi, M.

    2014-08-28

    Detailed studies of solar cell efficiency as a function of temperature were performed for quantum wire intermediate band solar cells grown on the (311)A plane. A remotely doped one-dimensional intermediate band made of self-assembled In{sub 0.4}Ga{sub 0.6}As quantum wires was compared to an undoped intermediate band and a reference p-i-n GaAs sample. These studies indicate that the efficiencies of these solar cells depend on the population of the one-dimensional band by equilibrium free carriers. A change in this population by free electrons under various temperatures affects absorption and carrier transport of non-equilibrium carriers generated by incident light. This results in different efficiencies for both the doped and undoped intermediate band solar cells in comparison with the reference GaAs p-i-n solar cell device.

  14. Effective field theory for the quantum electrodynamics of a graphene wire

    SciTech Connect

    Faccioli, P.; Lipparini, E.

    2009-07-15

    We study the low-energy quantum electrodynamics of electrons and holes in a thin graphene wire. We develop an effective field theory (EFT) based on an expansion in p/p{sub T}, where p{sub T} is the typical momentum of electrons and holes in the transverse direction, while p are the momenta in the longitudinal direction. We show that, to the lowest order in (p/p{sub T}), our EFT theory is formally equivalent to the exactly solvable Schwinger model. By exploiting such an analogy, we find that the ground state of the quantum wire contains a condensate of electron-hole pairs. The excitation spectrum is saturated by electron-hole collective bound states, and we calculate the dispersion law of such modes. We also compute the dc conductivity per unit length at zero chemical potential and find g{sub s}(e{sup 2}/h), where g{sub s}=4 is the degeneracy factor.

  15. Fermionic approach to junctions of multiple quantum wires attached to Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid leads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Zheng; Affleck, Ian

    2016-07-01

    Junctions of multiple one-dimensional quantum wires of interacting electrons have received considerable theoretical attention as a basic constituent of quantum circuits. While results have been obtained on these models using bosonization and density-matrix renormalization-group (DMRG) methods, another powerful technique is based on direct perturbation theory in the bulk interactions combined with the renormalization group. This technique has so far only been applied to the case in which finite-length interacting wires are attached to noninteracting Fermi liquid leads. We extend this method to cover the case of infinite-length interacting leads, obtaining results on two- and three-lead junctions in good agreement with previous bosonization and DMRG results.

  16. Suppression of Impurity Back Scattering in Double Quantum Wires: Theory Beyond the Born Approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Danhong; Lyo, S.K.

    1999-08-09

    The effect of higher-order corrections to the Born approximation is studied for the previously obtained giant conductance enhancement in tunnel-coupled double quantum wires in a parallel magnetic field. The relative correction is found to be significant and depends on various effects such as the magnetic field, electron and impurity densities, impurity positions, symmetric and asymmetric doping profiles, and center barrier thickness.

  17. Emergent Lorentz symmetry with vanishing velocity in a critical two-subband quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Sitte, M; Rosch, A; Meyer, J S; Matveev, K A; Garst, M

    2009-05-01

    We consider a quantum wire with two subbands of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of strong interactions. We focus on the quantum phase transition when the second subband starts to get filled as a function of gate voltage. Performing a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the effective Hamiltonian, we identify the critical fixed-point theory as a conformal field theory having an enhanced SU(2) symmetry and central charge 3/2. While the fixed point is Lorentz invariant, the effective "speed of light" nevertheless vanishes at low energies due to marginally irrelevant operators leading to a diverging critical specific heat coefficient.

  18. Emergent Lorentz symmetry with vanishing velocity in a critical two-subband quantum wire.

    SciTech Connect

    Sitte, M.; Rosch, A.; Meyer, J. S.; Matveev, K. A.; Garst, M.; Materials Science Division; Univ. zu Koln; Ohio State Univ.

    2009-01-01

    We consider a quantum wire with two subbands of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of strong interactions. We focus on the quantum phase transition when the second subband starts to get filled as a function of gate voltage. Performing a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the effective Hamiltonian, we identify the critical fixed-point theory as a conformal field theory having an enhanced SU(2) symmetry and central charge 3/2. While the fixed point is Lorentz invariant, the effective 'speed of light' nevertheless vanishes at low energies due to marginally irrelevant operators leading to a diverging critical specific heat coefficient.

  19. Emergent Lorentz symmetry with vanishing velocity in a critical two-subband quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Sitte, M; Rosch, A; Meyer, J S; Matveev, K A; Garst, M

    2009-05-01

    We consider a quantum wire with two subbands of spin-polarized electrons in the presence of strong interactions. We focus on the quantum phase transition when the second subband starts to get filled as a function of gate voltage. Performing a one-loop renormalization group analysis of the effective Hamiltonian, we identify the critical fixed-point theory as a conformal field theory having an enhanced SU(2) symmetry and central charge 3/2. While the fixed point is Lorentz invariant, the effective "speed of light" nevertheless vanishes at low energies due to marginally irrelevant operators leading to a diverging critical specific heat coefficient. PMID:19518804

  20. New insights into ETS-10 and titanate quantum wire: a comprehensive characterization.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Nak Cheon; Lee, Young Ju; Park, Jung-Hyun; Lim, Hyunjin; Shin, Chae-Ho; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Yoon, Kyung Byung

    2009-09-16

    The titanate quantum wires in ETS-10 crystals remain intact during ion exchange of the pristine cations (Na(+)(0.47) + K(+)(0.53)) with M(n+) ions (M(n+) = Na(+), K(+), Mg(2+), Ca(2+), Sr(2+), Ba(2+), Pb(2+), Cd(2+), Zn(2+)) and during reverse exchange of the newly exchanged cations with Na(+). The binding energies of O(1s) and Ti(2p) decrease as the electronegativity of the cation decreases, and they are inversely proportional to the negative partial charge of the framework oxygen [-delta(O(f))]. At least five different oxygen species were identified, and their binding energies (526.1-531.9 eV) indicate that the titanate-forming oxides are much more basic than those of aluminosilicate zeolites (530.2-533.3 eV), which explains the vulnerability of the quantum wire to acids and oxidants. The chemical shifts of the five NMR-spectroscopically nonequivalent Si sites, delta(I(A)), delta(I(B)), delta(II(A)), delta(II(B)), and delta(III), shift downfield as -delta(O(f)) increases, with slopes of 2.5, 18.6, 133.5, 216.3, and 93.8 ppm/[-delta(O(f))], respectively. The nonuniform responses of the chemical shifts to -delta(O(f)) arise from the phenomenon that the cations in the 12-membered-ring channels shift to the interiors of the cages surrounded by four seven-membered-ring windows. On the basis of the above, we assign delta(I(A)), delta(I(B)), delta(II(A)), and delta(II(B)) to the chemical shifts arising from Si(12,12), Si(12,7), Si(7,12), and Si(7,7) atoms, respectively. The frequency of the longitudinal stretching vibration of the titanate quantum wire increases linearly and the bandwidth decreases nonlinearly with increasing -delta(O(f)), indicating that the titanate quantum wire resembles a metallic carbon nanotube. As the degree of hydration increases, the vibrational frequency shifts linearly to higher frequencies while the bandwidth decreases. We identified another normal mode of vibration of the quantum wire, which vibrates in the region of 274-280 cm(-1). In the

  1. Zigzag Phase Transition in Quantum Wires and Localization in the Inhomogeneous One-Dimensional Electron Gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, Abhijit C.

    In this work, we study two important themes in the physics of the interacting one-dimensional (1D) electron gas: the transition from one-dimensional to higher dimensional behavior, and the role of inhomogeneity. The interplay between interactions, reduced dimensionality, and inhomogeneity drives a rich variety of phenomena in mesoscopic physics. In 1D, interactions fundamentally alter the nature of the electron gas, and the homogeneous 1D electron gas is described by Luttinger Liquid theory. We use Quantum Monte Carlo methods to study two situations that are beyond Luttinger Liquid theory---the quantum phase transition from a linear 1D electron system to a quasi-1D zigzag arrangement, and electron localization in quantum point contacts. Since the interacting electron gas has fundamentally different behavior in one dimension than in higher dimensions, the transition from 1D to higher dimensional behavior is of both practical and theoretical interest. We study the first stage in such a transition; the quantum phase transition from a 1D linear arrangement of electrons in a quantum wire to a quasi-1D zigzag configuration, and then to a liquid-like phase at higher densities. As the density increases from its lowest values, first, the electrons form a linear Wigner crystal; then, the symmetry about the axis of the wire is broken as the electrons order in a quasi-1D zigzag phase; and, finally, the electrons form a disordered liquid-like phase. We show that the linear to zigzag phase transition occurs even in narrow wires with strong quantum fluctuations, and that it has characteristics which are qualitatively different from the classical transition. Experiments in quantum point contacts (QPC's) show an unexplained feature in the conductance known as the "0.7 Effect''. The presence of the 0.7 effect is an indication of the rich physics present in inhomogeneous systems, and we study electron localization in quantum point contacts to evaluate several different proposed

  2. Cylindric quantum wires in a threading magnetic field: A proposal of characterization based on zero bias electron transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onorato, P.

    2012-12-01

    We study the quantum transport properties of cylindrical shaped wires, with submicrometric diameters and large aspect ratio. The zero bias conductance as a function of temperature, magnetic field and disorder is calculated for different kinds of nano cylinders, from semiconductor quantum wires to carbon nanotubes. A comparison between our findings and the experimental results allows the understanding of the charge carriers' localization, in the external surface or in the core of the wires, by highlighting the basic mechanism of charge transport. We discuss how we can infer that in InAs quantum wires the carriers move in the core. We examine the Aharonov-Bohm oscillations and the quenching that should be observed in the measured magneto conductivity of InAs nano cylinders and carbon nanotubes emphasizing the role of the angle between field and tube.

  3. Eigen function and corresponding eigen values of charge carriers in V-grooves quantum wires with variable width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheri, Ali Hossein Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we have calculated analytically the energy spectra of electrons and holes in V-grooves quantum wires. To modify wire structure, we have used the equations which suggested in the work of Inoshita et al. We introduce a new effective potential scheme which is applicable and matchable with actual interface geometry of this groove of ridge quantum wires. By applying this effective potential and considering a suitable transformed coordinate that allows the decoupling of the two-dimensional wave functions, we have calculated eigen values of the charge carriers in three states as well as the wave functions. We found that by increasing the curvature at the top of quantum wire (b) the energy eigen value decreases. Our results are in good agreement with the earlier investigations.

  4. Eigen function and corresponding eigen values of charge carriers in V-grooves quantum wires with variable width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaheri, Ali Hossein Mohammad

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we have calculated analytically the energy spectra of electrons and holes in V-grooves quantum wires. To modify wire structure, we have used the equations which suggested in the work of Inoshita et al. We introduce a new effective potential scheme which is applicable and matchable with actual interface geometry of this groove of ridge quantum wires. By applying this effective potential and considering a suitable transformed coordinate that allows the decoupling of the two-dimensional wave functions, we have calculated eigen values of the charge carriers in three states as well as the wave functions. We found that by increasing the curvature at the top of quantum wire (b) the energy eigen value decreases. Our results are in good agreement with the earlier investigations.

  5. Hetero-junction of two quantum wires: Critical line and duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Taejin

    2016-08-01

    Applying the Fermi-Bose equivalence and the boundary state formulation, we study the hetero-junction of two quantum wires. Two quantum wires are described by using Tomonaga-Luttinger (TL) liquids with different TL parameters, and electron transport between the two wires is depicted by using a simple hopping interaction. We calculate the radiative corrections to the hopping interaction and obtain the renormalization (RG) exponent, making use of perturbation theory based on the boundary state formulation. The model exhibits a phase transition at zero temperature. We discuss the critical line that defines the phase boundary on the two-dimensional parameter space. The model also exhibits the particle-kink duality, which maps the strong coupling region of the model onto the weak coupling region of the dual model. The strong coupling region of the model is found to match exactly the weak coupling region of the dual model. This model is also important to study the critical behaviors of two-dimensional dissipative systems with anisotropic friction coefficients.

  6. Eigenfunction-expansion method for solving the quantum-wire problem: Formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraff, G. A.; Gershoni, D.

    1991-02-01

    We present a method of formulating the multiband-envelope-function equations for a quantum structure whose internal interfaces are perpendicular planes. The method can be used for quantum wells, quantum wires, or quantum dots (one-, two-, or three-dimensional confinement of the electronic wave function), as well as for periodic repetitions (superlattices) of these elementary structures. The technique used is expansion of the multiband envelope functions in a Fourier series for each of the coordinates x, y, and z. Special attention is paid to formulating interface-matching conditions that impose Hermiticity on the resulting systems of equations. This demand leads to the usual condition that the normal component of the current must be continuous across each internal interface. The method we have devised is similar to the one used by Altarelli for the quantum-well problem in that it leads to a secular equation that is solved by diagonalizing an energy-independent matrix. It differs in that here, the envelope functions are expanded in smooth continuous functions using the same expansion coefficients in all regions of the structure. Using this method, one can now calculate the optical absorption, its frequency, and polarization dependence, with the same amount of detail that has previously been possible only for confinement in one dimension, namely, in the quantum well and one-dimensional superlattice.

  7. Nonlinear spectra of spinons and holons in short GaAs quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M; Ford, C J B; Jin, Y; Griffiths, J P; Farrer, I; Jones, G A C; Ritchie, D A; Tsyplyatyev, O; Schofield, A J

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional electronic fluids are peculiar conducting systems, where the fundamental role of interactions leads to exotic, emergent phenomena, such as spin-charge (spinon-holon) separation. The distinct low-energy properties of these 1D metals are successfully described within the theory of linear Luttinger liquids, but the challenging task of describing their high-energy nonlinear properties has long remained elusive. Recently, novel theoretical approaches accounting for nonlinearity have been developed, yet the rich phenomenology that they predict remains barely explored experimentally. Here, we probe the nonlinear spectral characteristics of short GaAs quantum wires by tunnelling spectroscopy, using an advanced device consisting of 6000 wires. We find evidence for the existence of an inverted (spinon) shadow band in the main region of the particle sector, one of the central predictions of the new nonlinear theories. A (holon) band with reduced effective mass is clearly visible in the particle sector at high energies.

  8. Nonlinear spectra of spinons and holons in short GaAs quantum wires

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, M; Ford, C. J. B.; Jin, Y.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Tsyplyatyev, O.; Schofield, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional electronic fluids are peculiar conducting systems, where the fundamental role of interactions leads to exotic, emergent phenomena, such as spin-charge (spinon-holon) separation. The distinct low-energy properties of these 1D metals are successfully described within the theory of linear Luttinger liquids, but the challenging task of describing their high-energy nonlinear properties has long remained elusive. Recently, novel theoretical approaches accounting for nonlinearity have been developed, yet the rich phenomenology that they predict remains barely explored experimentally. Here, we probe the nonlinear spectral characteristics of short GaAs quantum wires by tunnelling spectroscopy, using an advanced device consisting of 6000 wires. We find evidence for the existence of an inverted (spinon) shadow band in the main region of the particle sector, one of the central predictions of the new nonlinear theories. A (holon) band with reduced effective mass is clearly visible in the particle sector at high energies. PMID:27627993

  9. Nonlinear spectra of spinons and holons in short GaAs quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Moreno, M; Ford, C J B; Jin, Y; Griffiths, J P; Farrer, I; Jones, G A C; Ritchie, D A; Tsyplyatyev, O; Schofield, A J

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional electronic fluids are peculiar conducting systems, where the fundamental role of interactions leads to exotic, emergent phenomena, such as spin-charge (spinon-holon) separation. The distinct low-energy properties of these 1D metals are successfully described within the theory of linear Luttinger liquids, but the challenging task of describing their high-energy nonlinear properties has long remained elusive. Recently, novel theoretical approaches accounting for nonlinearity have been developed, yet the rich phenomenology that they predict remains barely explored experimentally. Here, we probe the nonlinear spectral characteristics of short GaAs quantum wires by tunnelling spectroscopy, using an advanced device consisting of 6000 wires. We find evidence for the existence of an inverted (spinon) shadow band in the main region of the particle sector, one of the central predictions of the new nonlinear theories. A (holon) band with reduced effective mass is clearly visible in the particle sector at high energies. PMID:27627993

  10. Nonlinear spectra of spinons and holons in short GaAs quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno, M.; Ford, C. J. B.; Jin, Y.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Tsyplyatyev, O.; Schofield, A. J.

    2016-09-01

    One-dimensional electronic fluids are peculiar conducting systems, where the fundamental role of interactions leads to exotic, emergent phenomena, such as spin-charge (spinon-holon) separation. The distinct low-energy properties of these 1D metals are successfully described within the theory of linear Luttinger liquids, but the challenging task of describing their high-energy nonlinear properties has long remained elusive. Recently, novel theoretical approaches accounting for nonlinearity have been developed, yet the rich phenomenology that they predict remains barely explored experimentally. Here, we probe the nonlinear spectral characteristics of short GaAs quantum wires by tunnelling spectroscopy, using an advanced device consisting of 6000 wires. We find evidence for the existence of an inverted (spinon) shadow band in the main region of the particle sector, one of the central predictions of the new nonlinear theories. A (holon) band with reduced effective mass is clearly visible in the particle sector at high energies.

  11. Ultranarrow resonance in Coulomb drag between quantum wires at coinciding densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitriev, A. P.; Gornyi, I. V.; Polyakov, D. G.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the influence of the chemical potential mismatch Δ (different electron densities) on Coulomb drag between two parallel ballistic quantum wires. For pair collisions, the drag resistivity ρD(Δ ) shows a peculiar anomaly at Δ =0 with ρD being finite at Δ =0 and vanishing at any nonzero Δ . The "bodyless" resonance in ρD(Δ ) at zero Δ is only broadened by processes of multiparticle scattering. We analyze Coulomb drag for finite Δ in the presence of both two- and three-particle scattering within the kinetic equation framework, focusing on a Fokker-Planck picture of the interaction-induced diffusion in momentum space of the double-wire system. We describe the dependence of ρD on Δ for both weak and strong intrawire equilibration due to three-particle scattering.

  12. Voltage-induced conversion of helical to uniform nuclear spin polarization in a quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kornich, Viktoriia; Stano, Peter; Zyuzin, Alexander A.; Loss, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    We study the effect of bias voltage on the nuclear spin polarization of a ballistic wire, which contains electrons and nuclei interacting via hyperfine interaction. In equilibrium, the localized nuclear spins are helically polarized due to the electron-mediated Ruderman-Kittel-Kasuya-Yosida (RKKY) interaction. Focusing here on nonequilibrium, we find that an applied bias voltage induces a uniform polarization, from both helically polarized and unpolarized spins available for spin flips. Once a macroscopic uniform polarization in the nuclei is established, the nuclear spin helix rotates with frequency proportional to the uniform polarization. The uniform nuclear spin polarization monotonically increases as a function of both voltage and temperature, reflecting a thermal activation behavior. Our predictions offer specific ways to test experimentally the presence of a nuclear spin helix polarization in semiconducting quantum wires.

  13. Bias voltage dependence of the electron spin depolarization in quantum wires in the quantum Hall regime detected by the resistively detected NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Chida, K.; Yamauchi, Y.; Arakawa, T.; Kobayashi, K.; Ono, T.; Hashisaka, M.; Nakamura, S.; Machida, T.

    2013-12-04

    We performed the resistively-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (RDNMR) to study the electron spin polarization in the non-equilibrium quantum Hall regime. By measuring the Knight shift, we derive source-drain bias voltage dependence of the electron spin polarization in quantum wires. The electron spin polarization shows minimum value around the threshold voltage of the dynamic nuclear polarization.

  14. Bridging coupled wires and lattice Hamiltonian for two-component bosonic quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuji, Yohei; He, Yin-Chen; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Pollmann, Frank

    2016-05-01

    We investigate a model of hard-core bosons with correlated hopping on the honeycomb lattice in an external magnetic field by means of a coupled-wire approach. It has been numerically shown that this model exhibits at half filling the bosonic integer quantum Hall (BIQH) state, which is a symmetry-protected topological phase protected by the U (1 ) particle conservation [Y.-C. He et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 116803 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.115.116803]. By combining the bosonization approach and a coupled-wire construction, we analytically confirm this finding and show that it even holds in the strongly anisotropic (quasi-one-dimensional) limit. We discuss the stability of the BIQH phase against tunnelings that break the separate particle conservations on different sublattices down to a global particle conservation. We further argue that a phase transition between two different BIQH phases is in a deconfined quantum critical point described by two copies of the (2 +1 ) -dimensional O (4 ) nonlinear sigma model with the topological θ term at θ =π . Finally, we predict a possible fractional quantum Hall state, the Halperin (221 ) state, at 1 /6 filling.

  15. T-shaped GaAs quantum-wire lasers and the exciton Mott transition.

    PubMed

    Yoshita, M; Liu, S M; Okano, M; Hayamizu, Y; Akiyama, H; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2007-07-25

    T-shaped GaAs quantum-wire (T-wire) lasers fabricated by the cleaved-edge overgrowth method with molecular beam epitaxy on the interface improved by a growth-interrupt high-temperature anneal are measured to study the laser device physics and fundamental many-body physics in clean one-dimensional (1D) systems. A current-injection T-wire laser that has 20 periods of T-wires in the active region and a 0.5 mm long cavity with high-reflection coatings shows a low threshold current of 0.27 mA at 30 K. The origin of the laser gain above the lasing threshold is studied with the high-quality T-wire lasers by means of optical pumping. The lasing energy is about 5 meV below the photoluminescence (PL) peak of free excitons, and is on the electron-hole (e-h) plasma PL band at a high e-h carrier density. The observed energy shift excludes the laser gain due to free excitons, and it suggests a contribution from the e-h plasma instead. A systematic micro-PL study reveals that the PL evolves with the e-h density from a sharp exciton peak, via a biexciton peak, to an e-h-plasma PL band. The data demonstrate an important role of biexcitons in the exciton Mott transition. Comparison with microscopic theories points out some problems in the picture of the exciton Mott transition.

  16. Non-Abelian topological spin liquids from arrays of quantum wires or spin chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Po-Hao; Chen, Jyong-Hao; Gomes, Pedro R. S.; Neupert, Titus; Chamon, Claudio; Mudry, Christopher

    2016-05-01

    We construct two-dimensional non-Abelian topologically ordered states by strongly coupling arrays of one-dimensional quantum wires via interactions. In our scheme, all charge degrees of freedom are gapped, so the construction can use either quantum wires or quantum spin chains as building blocks, with the same end result. The construction gaps the degrees of freedom in the bulk, while leaving decoupled states at the edges that are described by conformal field theories (CFT) in (1 +1 ) -dimensional space and time. We consider both the cases where time-reversal symmetry (TRS) is present or absent. When TRS is absent, the edge states are chiral and stable. We prescribe, in particular, how to arrive at all the edge states described by the unitary CFT minimal models with central charges c <1 . These non-Abelian spin liquid states have vanishing quantum Hall conductivities, but nonzero thermal ones. When TRS is present, we describe scenarios where the bulk state can be a non-Abelian, nonchiral, and gapped quantum spin liquid, or a gapless one. In the former case, we find that the edge states are also gapped. The paper provides a brief review of non-Abelian bosonization and affine current algebras, with the purpose of being self-contained. To illustrate the methods in a warm-up exercise, we recover the tenfold way classification of two-dimensional noninteracting topological insulators using the Majorana representation that naturally arises within non-Abelian bosonization. Within this scheme, the classification reduces to counting the number of null singular values of a mass matrix, with gapless edge modes present when left and right null eigenvectors exist.

  17. Exploring semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Rubio, Sergio I; Galindo, Pedro; Gonzalez, Luisa; Ripalda, JM; Varela del Arco, Maria; Pennycook, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    We review in this communication our contribution to the structural characterisation of semiconductor quantum dots and wires by high resolution electron microscopy, both in phase-contrast and Z-contrast modes. We show how these techniques contribute to predict the preferential sites of nucleation of these nanostructures, and also determine the compositional distribution in 1D and 0D nanostructures. The results presented here were produced in the framework of the European Network of Excellence entitled 'Self-Assembled semiconductor Nanostructures for new Devices in photonics and Electronics (SANDiE)'.

  18. Crystal-Phase Control by Solution-Solid-Solid Growth of II-VI Quantum Wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2016-02-10

    A simple and potentially general means of eliminating the planar defects and phase alternations that typically accompany the growth of semiconductor nanowires by catalyzed methods is reported. Nearly phase-pure, defect-free wurtzite II-VI semiconductor quantum wires are grown from solid rather than liquid catalyst nanoparticles. The solid-catalyst nanoparticles are morphologically stable during growth, which minimizes the spontaneous fluctuations in nucleation barriers between zinc blende and wurtzite phases that are responsible for the defect formation and phase alternations. Growth of single-phase (in our cases the wurtzite phase) nanowires is thus favored. PMID:26731426

  19. Exciton gas compression and metallic condensation in a single semiconductor quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Alén, B; Fuster, D; Muñoz-Matutano, G; Martínez-Pastor, J; González, Y; Canet-Ferrer, J; González, L

    2008-08-01

    We study the metal-insulator transition in individual self-assembled quantum wires and report optical evidence of metallic liquid condensation at low temperatures. First, we observe that the temperature and power dependence of the single nanowire photoluminescence follow the evolution expected for an electron-hole liquid in one dimension. Second, we find novel spectral features that suggest that in this situation the expanding liquid condensate compresses the exciton gas in real space. Finally, we estimate the critical density and critical temperature of the phase transition diagram at n{c} approximately 1 x 10;{5} cm;{-1} and T{c} approximately 35 K, respectively.

  20. Single-particle and collective excitations in quantum wires made up of vertically stacked quantum dots: zero magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Kushwaha, Manvir S

    2011-09-28

    We report on the theoretical investigation of the elementary electronic excitations in a quantum wire made up of vertically stacked self-assembled InAs/GaAs quantum dots. The length scales (of a few nanometers) involved in the experimental setups prompt us to consider an infinitely periodic system of two-dimensionally confined (InAs) quantum dot layers separated by GaAs spacers. The resultant quantum wire is characterized by a two-dimensional harmonic confining potential in the x-y plane and a periodic (Kronig-Penney) potential along the z (or the growth) direction within the tight-binding approximation. Since the wells and barriers are formed from two different materials, we employ the Bastard's boundary conditions in order to determine the eigenfunctions along the z direction. These wave functions are then used to generate the Wannier functions, which, in turn, constitute the legitimate Bloch functions that govern the electron dynamics along the direction of periodicity. Thus, the Bloch functions and the Hermite functions together characterize the whole system. We then make use of the Bohm-Pines' (full) random-phase approximation in order to derive a general nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function. Thus, developed theoretical framework is then specified to work within a (lowest miniband and) two-subband model that enables us to scrutinize the single-particle as well as collective responses of the system. We compute and discuss the behavior of the eigenfunctions, band-widths, density of states, Fermi energy, single-particle and collective excitations, and finally size up the importance of studying the inverse dielectric function in relation with the quantum transport phenomena. It is remarkable to notice how the variation in the barrier- and well-widths can allow us to tailor the excitation spectrum in the desired energy range. Given the advantage of the vertically stacked quantum dots over the planar ones and the foreseen applications in the single-electron devices

  1. Confined acoustic and optical plasmons in double-layered quantum-wire arrays with strong tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethlefsen, A. F.; Heyn, Ch.; Heitmann, D.; Schüller, C.

    2006-05-01

    We investigate electronic excitations in GaAs-AlxGa1-xAs double-layered quantum wire arrays with strong tunneling coupling by resonant inelastic light scattering. By applying an external electric field, we can change the one-dimensional (1D) electron density and the symmetry of the double quantum-well (DQW) structure at the same time. We identify confined optical 1D intersubband plasmons (COP) and confined acoustic 1D intersubband plasmons (CAP). Due to the tunneling coupling, the energies of the CAP exhibit a minimum for a symmetric DQW potential, whereas the energies of the COP are dominated by the total carrier density, and are nearly insensitive to the symmetry of the potential.

  2. The effect of finite-range THz radiation on the electronic transport in a quantum well wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asgharpoor, Bahareh; Hessami Pilehrood, Saeid

    2016-09-01

    A quantum well wire system with lateral parabolic confinement, partly irradiated by intense terahertz laser radiation, is considered. Using the exact electronic states of the system in the presence of the laser field, the transmission probabilities for the sideband components of the electronic states, through the irradiated region, are obtained. Then by considering the scattering of the emerging electronic states by a δ-function scatterer in a formalism based on the Lippmann-Schwinger approach, the contribution of the sideband components in the transmission coefficients and the conductance of the wire are determined. Results indicate the possibility to control the transmission pattern across the wire.

  3. Disordered Quantum Wires: Microscopic Origins of the DMPK Theory and Ohm's Law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachmann, Sven; Butz, Maximilian; De Roeck, Wojciech

    2012-07-01

    We study the electronic transport properties of the Anderson model on a strip, modeling a quasi one-dimensional disordered quantum wire. In the literature, the standard description of such wires is via random matrix theory. Our objective is to firmly relate this theory to a microscopic model. We correct and extend previous work (Bachmann and De Roeck in J. Stat. Phys. 139:541-564, 2010) on the same topic. In particular, we obtain through a physically motivated scaling limit an ensemble of random matrices that is close to, but not identical to the standard transfer matrix ensembles (sometimes called TOE, TUE), corresponding to the Dyson symmetry classes β=1,2. In the β=2 class, the resulting conductance is the same as the one from the ideal ensemble, i.e. from TUE. In the β=1 class, we find a deviation from TOE. It remains to be seen whether or not this deviation vanishes in a thick-wire limit, which is the appropriate regime for metals. For the ideal ensembles, we also prove Ohm's law for all symmetry classes, making mathematically precise a moment expansion by Mello and Stone in Phys. Rev. B 44:3559-3576, 1991. This proof bypasses the explicit but intricate solution methods that underlie most previous results.

  4. Isolated self-assembled InAs/InP(001) quantum wires obtained by controlling the growth front evolution.

    PubMed

    Fuster, David; Alén, Benito; González, Luisa; González, Yolanda; Martínez-Pastor, Juan; González, María Ujué; García, Jorge M

    2007-01-24

    In this work we explore the first stages of quantum wire (QWR) formation studying the evolution of the growth front for InAs coverages below the critical thickness, theta(c), determined by reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). Our results obtained by in situ measurement of the accumulated stress evolution during InAs growth on InP(001) show that the relaxation process starts at a certain InAs coverage theta(R)quantum wires takes place. For theta>theta(R) this ensemble of isolated nanostructures progressively evolves towards QWRs that cover the whole surface for theta = theta(c). These results allow for a better understanding of the self-assembling process of QWRs and enable the study of the individual properties of InAs/InP self-assembled single quantum wires.

  5. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires: Zero magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2013-04-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n-m)-dimensional electron gas, with m ⩽ n and 1 ⩽ n, m ⩽ 3. This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi-n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) [or quantum wire(s) for more practical purposes] led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. In the language of condensed matter physics, a critical scrutiny of Q-1DEG systems has provided us with a host of exotic (electronic, optical, and transport) phenomena unseen in their higher- or lower-dimensional counterparts. This has motivated us to undertake a systematic investigation of the inelastic electron scattering (IES) and the inelastic light scattering (ILS) from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wires. We begin with the Kubo's correlation functions to derive the generalized dielectric function, the inverse dielectric function, and the Dyson equation for the dynamic screened potential in the framework of Bohm-Pines' random-phase approximation. These fundamental tools then lead us to develop methodically the theory of IES and ILS for the Q-1DEG systems. As an application of the general formal results, which know no bounds regarding the subband occupancy, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum [comprised of intrasubband and

  6. Quantum transport through disordered 1D wires: Conductance via localized and delocalized electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gopar, Víctor A.

    2014-01-14

    Coherent electronic transport through disordered systems, like quantum wires, is a topic of fundamental and practical interest. In particular, the exponential localization of electron wave functions-Anderson localization-due to the presence of disorder has been widely studied. In fact, Anderson localization, is not an phenomenon exclusive to electrons but it has been observed in microwave and acoustic experiments, photonic materials, cold atoms, etc. Nowadays, many properties of electronic transport of quantum wires have been successfully described within a scaling approach to Anderson localization. On the other hand, anomalous localization or delocalization is, in relation to the Anderson problem, a less studied phenomenon. Although one can find signatures of anomalous localization in very different systems in nature. In the problem of electronic transport, a source of delocalization may come from symmetries present in the system and particular disorder configurations, like the so-called Lévy-type disorder. We have developed a theoretical model to describe the statistical properties of transport when electron wave functions are delocalized. In particular, we show that only two physical parameters determine the complete conductance distribution.

  7. Magnetotransport in p-type Ge quantum well narrow wire arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Newton, P. J. Llandro, J.; Mansell, R.; Barnes, C. H. W.; Holmes, S. N.; Morrison, C.; Foronda, J.; Myronov, M.; Leadley, D. R.

    2015-04-27

    We report magnetotransport measurements of a SiGe heterostructure containing a 20 nm p-Ge quantum well with a mobility of 800 000 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}. By dry etching arrays of wires with widths between 1.0 μm and 3.0 μm, we were able to measure the lateral depletion thickness, built-in potential, and the phase coherence length of the quantum well. Fourier analysis does not show any Rashba related spin-splitting despite clearly defined Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations being observed up to a filling factor of ν = 22. Exchange-enhanced spin-splitting is observed for filling factors below ν = 9. An analysis of boundary scattering effects indicates lateral depletion of the hole gas by 0.5 ± 0.1 μm from the etched germanium surface. The built-in potential is found to be 0.25 ± 0.04 V, presenting an energy barrier for lateral transport greater than the hole confinement energy. A large phase coherence length of 3.5 ± 0.5 μm is obtained in these wires at 1.7 K.

  8. Density-functional theory of interacting electrons in inhomogeneous quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abedinpour, Saeed H.; Polini, Marco; Xianlong, Gao; Tosi, Mario P.

    2007-03-01

    Motivated by the experimental evidence of electron localization in cleaved edge overgrowth quantum wires and by the recent interest in the development of density-functional schemes for inhomogeneous Luttinger and Luther-Emery liquids, we present a novel density-functional study of a few interacting electrons confined by power-law external potentials into a short portion of a thin quantum wire. The theory employs the quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) homogeneous electron liquid as the reference system and transfers the appropriate Q1D ground-state correlations to the confined inhomogeneous system through a suitable local-density approximation (LDA) to the exchange and correlation energy functional. The LDA describes accurately ``liquid-like'' phases at weak coupling but fails in describing the emergence of ``Wigner molecules'' at strong coupling. A local spin-density approximation allowing for the formation of antiferromagnetic quasi-order with increasing coupling strength is proposed as a first step to overcome this problem.

  9. Electron motion induced by magnetic pulse in a bilayer quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-06-01

    We consider theoretical stimulation of electron motion in a quantum wire by means of ultrashort magnetic pulses of time duration between several and a few tens of picoseconds. In our considerations, an electron is confined in a nanowire which consists of two vertically stacked tunnel-coupled layers. If a magnetic pulse pierces this nanowire and its direction is parallel to the plane established by the layers, and additionally, it is perpendicular to the wire's axis, then the eigenstates of a single electron energy operator for vertical direction are hybridized by the off-diagonal terms of the full Hamiltonian. These terms depend linearly on the momentum operator, which means that such magnetically forced hybridization may induce electron motion in a nanowire. The classical counterpart of this quantum-mechanical picture is a situation in which the rotational electric field generated by a time-varying magnetic field pushes the charge densities localized in the upper and lower layers in opposite directions. We have found, however, that for an asymmetric vertical confinement in a bilayer nanowire, the major part of the single electron density starts to move in the direction of the local electric field in its layer forcing the minority part to move in this direction as well. It results in coherent motion of both densities in a particular direction. We analyze the dynamics of such motion in dependence on the time characteristics of a magnetic pulse and discuss potential applications of this effect in the construction of a magnetic valve.

  10. Generic framework for the secure Yuen 2000 quantum-encryption protocol employing the wire-tap channel approach

    SciTech Connect

    Mihaljevic, Miodrag J.

    2007-05-15

    It is shown that the security, against known-plaintext attacks, of the Yuen 2000 (Y00) quantum-encryption protocol can be considered via the wire-tap channel model assuming that the heterodyne measurement yields the sample for security evaluation. Employing the results reported on the wire-tap channel, a generic framework is proposed for developing secure Y00 instantiations. The proposed framework employs a dedicated encoding which together with inherent quantum noise at the attacker's side provides Y00 security.

  11. Achieving effective terminal exciton delivery in quantum dot antenna-sensitized multistep DNA photonic wires.

    PubMed

    Spillmann, Christopher M; Ancona, Mario G; Buckhout-White, Susan; Algar, W Russ; Stewart, Michael H; Susumu, Kimihiro; Huston, Alan L; Goldman, Ellen R; Medintz, Igor L

    2013-08-27

    Assembling DNA-based photonic wires around semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) creates optically active hybrid architectures that exploit the unique properties of both components. DNA hybridization allows positioning of multiple, carefully arranged fluorophores that can engage in sequential energy transfer steps while the QDs provide a superior energy harvesting antenna capacity that drives a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) cascade through the structures. Although the first generation of these composites demonstrated four-sequential energy transfer steps across a distance >150 Å, the exciton transfer efficiency reaching the final, terminal dye was estimated to be only ~0.7% with no concomitant sensitized emission observed. Had the terminal Cy7 dye utilized in that construct provided a sensitized emission, we estimate that this would have equated to an overall end-to-end ET efficiency of ≤ 0.1%. In this report, we demonstrate that overall energy flow through a second generation hybrid architecture can be significantly improved by reengineering four key aspects of the composite structure: (1) making the initial DNA modification chemistry smaller and more facile to implement, (2) optimizing donor-acceptor dye pairings, (3) varying donor-acceptor dye spacing as a function of the Förster distance R0, and (4) increasing the number of DNA wires displayed around each central QD donor. These cumulative changes lead to a 2 orders of magnitude improvement in the exciton transfer efficiency to the final terminal dye in comparison to the first-generation construct. The overall end-to-end efficiency through the optimized, five-fluorophore/four-step cascaded energy transfer system now approaches 10%. The results are analyzed using Förster theory with various sources of randomness accounted for by averaging over ensembles of modeled constructs. Fits to the spectra suggest near-ideal behavior when the photonic wires have two sequential acceptor dyes (Cy3 and Cy3.5) and

  12. Solution-liquid-solid growth of semiconductor quantum-wire films.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Wayman, Virginia L; Loomis, Richard A; Buhro, William E

    2011-06-28

    We report the growth of cadmium-selenide (CdSe) quantum-wire (QW) films on a variety of substrates by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method. Our SLS syntheses employ size-controlled, near-monodisperse bismuth (Bi) nanoparticles (NPs) as the catalysts for QW growth, which offers several advantages over Bi NPs thermally generated from thin Bi films, including mean QW diameter control, narrow diameter distributions, small diameters in the quantum-confinement regime, and control of the QW density on the substrates. The Bi NPs are deposited on the substrates via drop casting of a Bi-NP solution and subsequently annealed in a reducing atmosphere, a key step to ensure firm attachment of the Bi NPs onto the substrates and maintenance of their catalytic activity for the QW-film growth. The QW growth density is proportional to the Bi-NP coating density, which is determined by the concentration of the Bi-NP deposition solution. Lower concentrations are used for small Bi NPs to reduce their high tendency for agglomeration and to achieve control over mean QW diameter and to produce narrow diameter distributions. Spectroscopic evidence of quantum confinement is provided. Related films of InP, InAs, and PbSe QWs are also described.

  13. Self-assembled GaN quantum wires on GaN/AlN nanowire templates.

    PubMed

    Arbiol, Jordi; Magen, Cesar; Becker, Pascal; Jacopin, Gwénolé; Chernikov, Alexey; Schäfer, Sören; Furtmayr, Florian; Tchernycheva, Maria; Rigutti, Lorenzo; Teubert, Jörg; Chatterjee, Sangam; Morante, Joan R; Eickhoff, Martin

    2012-12-01

    We present a novel approach for self-assembled growth of GaN quantum wires (QWRs) exhibiting strong confinement in two spatial dimensions. The GaN QWRs are formed by selective nucleation on {112[combining macron]0} (a-plane) facets formed at the six intersections of {11[combining macron]00} (m-plane) sidewalls of AlN/GaN nanowires used as a template. Based on microscopy observations we have developed a 3D model explaining the growth mechanism of QWRs. We show that the QWR formation is governed by self-limited pseudomorphic growth on the side facets of the nanowires (NWs). Quantum confinement in the QWRs is confirmed by the observation of narrow photoluminescence lines originating from individual QWRs with emission energies up to 4.4 eV. Time-resolved photoluminescence studies reveal a short decay time (~120 ps) of the QWR emission. Capping of the QWRs with AlN allows enhancement of the photoluminescence, which is blue-shifted due to compressive strain. The emission energies from single QWRs are modelled assuming a triangular cross-section resulting from self-limited growth on a-plane facets. Comparison with the experimental results yields an average QWR diameter of about 2.7 nm in agreement with structural characterization. The presented results open a new route towards controlled realization of one-dimensional semiconductor quantum structures with a high potential both for fundamental studies and for applications in electronics and in UV light generation.

  14. Conducting fixed points for inhomogeneous quantum wires: A conformally invariant boundary theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlmayr, N.; Morath, D.; Sirker, J.; Eggert, S.; Affleck, I.

    2014-01-01

    Inhomogeneities and junctions in wires are natural sources of scattering, and hence resistance. A conducting fixed point usually requires an adiabatically smooth system. One notable exception is "healing," which has been predicted in systems with special symmetries, where the system is driven to the homogeneous fixed point. Here we present theoretical results for a different type of conducting fixed point which occurs in inhomogeneous wires with an abrupt jump in hopping and interaction strength. We show that it is always possible to tune the system to an unstable conducting fixed point which does not correspond to translational invariance. We analyze the temperature scaling of correlation functions at and near this fixed point and show that two distinct boundary exponents appear, which correspond to different effective Luttinger liquid parameters. Even though the system consists of two separate interacting parts, the fixed point is described by a single conformally invariant boundary theory. We present details of the general effective bosonic field theory including the mode expansion and the finite size spectrum. The results are confirmed by numerical quantum Monte Carlo simulations on spinless fermions. We predict characteristic experimental signatures of the local density of states near junctions.

  15. Spin-orbit interaction induced anisotropic property in interacting quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Fang; Zhou, Guanghui; Chang, Kai

    2011-01-01

    : We investigate theoretically the ground state and transport property of electrons in interacting quantum wires (QWs) oriented along different crystallographic directions in (001) and (110) planes in the presence of the Rashba spin-orbit interaction (RSOI) and Dresselhaus SOI (DSOI). The electron ground state can cross over different phases, e.g., spin density wave, charge density wave, singlet superconductivity, and metamagnetism, by changing the strengths of the SOIs and the crystallographic orientation of the QW. The interplay between the SOIs and Coulomb interaction leads to the anisotropic dc transport property of QW which provides us a possible way to detect the strengths of the RSOI and DSOI.PACS numbers: 73.63.Nm, 71.10.Pm, 73.23.-b, 71.70.Ej. PMID:21711717

  16. Dual fermionic variables and renormalization group approach to junctions of strongly interacting quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giuliano, Domenico; Nava, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Making a combined use of bosonization and fermionization techniques, we build nonlocal transformations between dual fermion operators, describing junctions of strongly interacting spinful one-dimensional quantum wires. Our approach allows for trading strongly interacting (in the original coordinates) fermionic Hamiltonians for weakly interacting (in the dual coordinates) ones. It enables us to generalize to the strongly interacting regime the fermionic renormalization group approach to weakly interacting junctions. As a result, on one hand, we are able to pertinently complement the information about the phase diagram of the junction obtained within the bosonization approach; on the other hand, we map out the full crossover of the conductance tensors between any two fixed points in the phase diagram connected by a renormalization group trajectory.

  17. Effect of the tilted magnetic field on the magnetosubbands and conductance in the bilayer quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chwiej, T.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the single electron magnetotransport in GaAs and InGaAs vertically stacked bilayer nanowires. In considered geometry, the tilted magnetic field is always perpendicular to the main (transport) axis of the quantum wire and, therefore its transverse and vertical components allow separately for changing the magnitude of intralayer and interlayer subbands mixing. We study the changes introduced to energy dispersion relation E(k) by tilted magnetic field of strength up to several tesla and analyze their origins for symmetric as well as asymmetric confining potentials in the growth direction. Calculated energy dispersion relations are thereafter used to show that the value of a conductance of the bilayer nanowire may abruptly rise as well as fall by few conductance quanta when the Fermi energy in nanosystem is changed. It is also shown that such conductance oscillations, in conjunction with spin Zeeman effect, may give a moderately spin polarized current in the bilayer nanowire.

  18. Spin dynamics of hopping electrons in quantum wires: Algebraic decay and noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumilin, A. V.; Sherman, E. Ya.; Glazov, M. M.

    2016-09-01

    We study theoretically the spin decoherence and intrinsic spin noise in semiconductor quantum wires caused by an interplay of electrons hopping between the localized states and the hyperfine interaction of electron and nuclear spins. At a sufficiently low density of localization sites the hopping rates have an exponentially broad distribution. It allows the description of the spin dynamics in terms of closely situated "pairs" of sites and single "reaching" states, from which the series of hops result in electrons localized inside a "pair." The developed analytical model and numerical simulations demonstrate disorder-dependent algebraic tails in the spin decay and power-law singularities features in the low-frequency part of the spin-noise spectrum.

  19. Dirac electrons in graphene-based quantum wires and quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Peres, N M R; Rodrigues, J N B; Stauber, T; Lopes Dos Santos, J M B

    2009-08-26

    In this paper we analyse the electronic properties of Dirac electrons in finite-size ribbons and in circular and hexagonal quantum dots. We show that due to the formation of sub-bands in the ribbons it is possible to spatially localize some of the electronic modes using a p-n-p junction. We also show that scattering of confined Dirac electrons in a narrow channel by an infinitely massive wall induces mode mixing, giving a qualitative reason for the fact that an analytical solution to the spectrum of Dirac electrons confined in a square box has not yet been found. A first attempt to solve this problem is presented. We find that only the trivial case k = 0 has a solution that does not require the existence of evanescent modes. We also study the spectrum of quantum dots of graphene in a perpendicular magnetic field. This problem is studied in the Dirac approximation, and its solution requires a numerical method whose details are given. The formation of Landau levels in the dot is discussed. The inclusion of the Coulomb interaction among the electrons is considered at the self-consistent Hartree level, taking into account the interaction with an image charge density necessary to keep the back-gate electrode at zero potential. The effect of a radial confining potential is discussed. The density of states of circular and hexagonal quantum dots, described by the full tight-binding model, is studied using the Lanczos algorithm. This is necessary to access the detailed shape of the density of states close to the Dirac point when one studies large systems. Our study reveals that zero-energy edge states are also present in graphene quantum dots. Our results are relevant for experimental research in graphene nanostructures. The style of writing is pedagogical, in the hope that newcomers to the subject will find this paper a good starting point for their research.

  20. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barraud, C.; Choi, T.; Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.

    2014-08-01

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  1. Field effect in the quantum Hall regime of a high mobility graphene wire

    SciTech Connect

    Barraud, C. E-mail: clement.barraud@univ-paris-diderot.fr; Choi, T.; Ihn, T.; Ensslin, K.; Butti, P.; Shorubalko, I.; Taniguchi, T.; Watanabe, K.

    2014-08-21

    In graphene-based electronic devices like in transistors, the field effect applied thanks to a gate electrode allows tuning the charge density in the graphene layer and passing continuously from the electron to the hole doped regime across the Dirac point. Homogeneous doping is crucial to understand electrical measurements and for the operation of future graphene-based electronic devices. However, recently theoretical and experimental studies highlighted the role of the electrostatic edge due to fringing electrostatic field lines at the graphene edges [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008); F. T. Vasko and I. V. Zozoulenko, Appl. Phys. Lett. 97, 092115 (2010)]. This effect originates from the particular geometric design of the samples. A direct consequence is a charge accumulation at the graphene edges giving a value for the density, which deviates from the simple picture of a plate capacitor and also varies along the width of the graphene sample. Entering the quantum Hall regime would, in principle, allow probing this accumulation thanks to the extreme sensitivity of this quantum effect to charge density and the charge distribution. Moreover, the presence of an additional and counter-propagating edge channel has been predicted [P. Silvestrov and K. Efetov, Phys. Rev. B 77, 155436 (2008)] giving a fundamental aspect to this technological issue. In this article, we investigate this effect by tuning a high mobility graphene wire into the quantum Hall regime in which charge carriers probe the electrostatic potential at high magnetic field close to the edges. We observe a slight deviation to the linear shift of the quantum Hall plateaus with magnetic field and we study its evolution for different filling factors, which correspond to different probed regions in real space. We discuss the possible origins of this effect including an increase of the charge density towards the edges.

  2. Interacting functionally graded quantum wires/quantum dots with arbitrary shapes and general anisotropy within a distinct piezoelectric matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shodja, Hossein M.; Rashidinejad, Ehsan

    2014-05-01

    An accurate determination of the two- and three-dimensional electro-elastic fields of periodically as well as arbitrarily distributed interacting quantum wires (QWRs) and interacting quantum dots (QDs) of arbitrary shapes within a piezoelectric matrix is of particular interest. Both the QWR/QD and the barrier may be made of materials with distinct general rectilinear anisotropy in elastic, piezoelectric, and dielectric constants. The lattice mismatch between the QWR/QD and the barrier is accounted by prescribing an initial misfit strain field within the QWR/QD. Previous analytical treatments have neglected the distinction between the electro-mechanical properties of the QWR/QD and those of the barrier. This simplifying assumption is circumvented in the present work by using a novel electro-mechanical equivalent inclusion method in Fourier space (FEMEIM). Moreover, the theory can readily treat cases where the QWRs/QDs are multiphase or functionally graded (FG). It was proven that for two-dimensional problems of either a periodic or an arbitrary distribution of FG QWRs in a transversely isotropic piezoelectric barrier, the elastic and electric fields are electrically and elastically impotent, respectively, and no electric field would be induced in the medium provided that the rotational symmetry and polarization axes coincide. Some numerical examples of more frequent shapes and different distributions of indium nitride QDs/QWRs within transversely isotropic aluminum nitride barrier are solved.

  3. Tuning directional dependent metal–insulator transitions in quasi-1D quantum wires with spin–orbit density wave instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Tanmoy

    2016-07-01

    We study directional dependent band gap evolutions and metal–insulator transitions (MITs) in model quantum wire systems within the spin–orbit density wave (SODW) model. The evolution of MIT is studied as a function of varying anisotropy between the intra-wire hopping ({{t}\\parallel} ) and inter-wire hopping ({{t}\\bot} ) with Rashba spin–orbit coupling. We find that as long as the anisotropy ratio (β ={{t}\\bot}/{{t}\\parallel} ) remains below 0.5, and the Fermi surface nesting is tuned to {{\\mathbf{Q}}1}=≤ft(π,0\\right) , an exotic SODW induced MIT easily develops, with its critical interaction strength increasing with increasing anisotropy. As β \\to 1 (2D system), the nesting vector switches to {{\\mathbf{Q}}2}=≤ft(π,π \\right) , making this state again suitable for an isotropic MIT. Finally, we discuss various physical consequences and possible applications of the directional dependent MIT.

  4. Optical gain for the interband optical transition in InAsP/InP quantum well wire in the influence of laser field intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, S.; Peter, A. John

    2016-05-01

    Intense high frequency laser field induced electronic and optical properties of heavy hole exciton in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum wire is studied taking into account the geometrical confinement effect. Laser field related exciton binding energies and the optical band gap in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum well wire are investigated. The optical gain, for the interband optical transition, as a function of photon energy, in the InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum wire, is obtained in the presence of intense laser field. The compact density matrix method is employed to obtain the optical gain. The obtained optical gain in group III-V narrow quantum wire can be applied for achieving the preferred telecommunication wavelength.

  5. Inelastic electron and Raman scattering from the collective excitations in quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir

    2014-03-01

    The nanofabrication technology has taught us that an m-dimensional confining potential imposed upon an n-dimensional electron gas paves the way to a quasi-(n- m)-dimensional electron gas, with m <= n and 1 <= n , m <= 3 . This is the road to the (semiconducting) quasi- n dimensional electron gas systems we have been happily traversing on now for almost two decades. Achieving quasi-one dimensional electron gas (Q-1DEG) led us to some mixed moments in this journey: while the reduced phase space for the scattering led us believe in the route to the faster electron devices, the proximity to the 1D systems left us in the dilemma of describing it as a Fermi liquid or as a Luttinger liquid. No one had ever suspected the potential of the former, but it took quite a while for some to convince the others on the latter. A realistic Q-1DEG system at the low temperatures is best describable as a Fermi liquid rather than as a Luttinger liquid. This has motivated us to employ the Bohm-Pines' full RPA to develop a systematic methodology for the inelastic electron and light scattering from the collective (plasmon) excitations in Q-1DEG [or quantum wires]. We will discuss in detail the results published in AIP Advances 3, 042103 (2013).

  6. Rashba-Zeeman-effect-induced spin filtering energy windows in a quantum wire

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Xianbo Nie, Wenjie; Chen, Zhaoxia; Zhou, Guanghui; Li, Fei

    2014-06-14

    We perform a numerical study on the spin-resolved transport in a quantum wire (QW) under the modulation of both Rashba spin-orbit coupling (SOC) and a perpendicular magnetic field by using the developed Usuki transfer-matrix method in combination with the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. Wide spin filtering energy windows can be achieved in this system for unpolarized spin injection. In addition, both the width of energy window and the magnitude of spin conductance within these energy windows can be tuned by varying Rashba SOC strength, which can be apprehended by analyzing the energy dispersions and spin-polarized density distributions inside the QW, respectively. Further study also demonstrates that these Rashba-SOC-controlled spin filtering energy windows show a strong robustness against disorders. These findings may not only benefit to further understand the spin-dependent transport properties of a QW in the presence of external fields but also provide a theoretical instruction to design a spin filter device.

  7. Construction of Two Color Semiconductor Quantum Dots Wire by utilizing the complementarity of DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Shin-ichi; Miyata, Tomoko; Kato, Takayuki; Namba, Keiichi; Yanagida, Toshio; Sako, Yasushi; Kawata, Satoshi; Inouye, Yasushi

    2008-10-01

    Nano-particles possess size-tunable optical, electrical and magnetic properties. Especially, semiconductor nano-particle (Quantum dot (Q-dot)) can be used for multi-color biological imaging as well as for the construction of multi-functional biosensors and molecular devices. Arrangement of nano-particles at the molecular level is of crucial importance to realize multi-functional biosensors or molecular devices. Here we report a method for DNA-directed arrangement of Q-dot. A template DNA more than 1,000 bases in length with a repeat unit of 100 bases was synthesized by enzymatic reactions. Alternating Q-dots alignment was fabricated by using complementary binding between the template DNA and short fragments of DNA with two different sequences. Each of them was modified with two different colors of Q-dots by the avidin-biotin reaction and a reaction between an amino group and a sulfo-NHS group, respectively. Alignment of Q-dots on the template DNA was assessed by fluorescence microscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In AFM and TEM images, we have successfully observed Q-dots alignment on the template DNA. These results provide a good starting point to the fabrication of two-color Q-dot wire on the template DNA.

  8. Why a magnetized quantum wire can act as an optical amplifier: a short survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushwaha, Manvir S.

    2014-10-01

    This paper reviews the fundamental issues associated with the magnetoplasmon excitations investigated in a semiconducting quantum wire characterized by a harmonic confining potential and subjected to an applied (perpendicular) magnetic field. We embark on the charge-density excitations in a two-subband model within the framework of Bohm-Pines's random-phase approximation. The problem involves two length scales: {l}0 = √ {\\hbar /m*ω0} and {l}c = √ {\\hbar /m*ωc}, which characterize the strengths of the confinement and the magnetic field (B). Essentially, we focus on the device aspects of the intersubband collective (magnetoroton) excitation, which observes a negative group velocity between maxon and roton. Consequently, it leads to tachyon-like (superluminal) behavior without one's having to introduce the negative energies. Existence of the negative group velocity is a clear manifestation of a medium with population inversion brought about due to a metastable state caused by the magnetic field that satisfies the condition B > Bth; Bth being the threshold value below which the magnetoroton does not exist. The interest in negative group velocity is based on anomalous dispersion in a medium with inverted population, so that gain instead of absorption occurs at the frequencies of interest. A medium with an inverted population has the remarkable ability of amplifying a small optical signal of definite wavelength, i.e. it can serve as an active laser medium. An extensive scrutiny of the gain coefficient suggests an interesting and important application: The electronic device designed on the basis of such magnetoroton modes can act as an optical amplifier. Examining the magnetic field dependence of the life-time of magnetorotons leads us to infer that relatively smaller magnetic fields are optimal.

  9. Intense laser field effects on the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a semiconductor quantum wire with triangle cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barseghyan, M. G.; Duque, C. A.; Niculescu, E. C.; Radu, A.

    2014-02-01

    We study the laser field effects on the intersubband optical absorption and the refractive index changes in a GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wire with equilateral triangle cross section. The wire is under the action of a laser beam which is assumed to be non-resonant with the semiconductor structure and linearly polarized perpendicularly to the triangle side. In the effective mass approximation and for a finite potential barrier we calculate the subband states by using a finite element method. Linear, non linear and total absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are calculated as functions of the laser field for the allowed intersubband transitions. Two polarizations of the pump radiation, parallel and perpendicular to the laser field direction, are discussed.

  10. Spin texturing in quantum wires with Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    B, Gisi; S, Sakiroglu; İ, Sokmen

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the effects of interplay of spin-orbit interaction and in-plane magnetic fields on the electronic structure and spin texturing of parabolically confined quantum wire. Numerical results reveal that the competing effects between Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions and the external magnetic field lead to a complicated energy spectrum. We find that the spin texturing owing to the coupling between subbands can be modified by the strength of spin-orbit couplings as well as the magnitude and the orientation angle of the external magnetic field.

  11. Zeeman effects on the tunneling spectra of a ferromagnetic d-wave superconductor in contact with a quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamipour, Hamidreza; Mehrabzad, Narges

    2016-07-01

    We study tunneling conductance in a quantum wire-insulator-ferromagnetic d-wave superconductor junction. The results show that exchange field of superconductor has a strong impact on tunneling spectra depending on the junction parameters. We have found a gap like structure in the tunneling limit when we have an interface normal to the (100) axis of superconductor. In the case of (110) axis of superconductor, there is not any zero- bias conductance peaks in tunneling spectra. For a metallic junction the dips disappear.

  12. Effect of gate-driven spin resonance on the conductance through a one-dimensional quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadreev, Almas F.; Sherman, E. Ya.

    2013-09-01

    We consider quasiballistic electron transmission in a one-dimensional quantum wire subject to both time-independent and periodic potentials of a finger gate that results in a local time-dependent Rashba-type spin-orbit coupling. A spin-dependent conductance is calculated as a function of external constant magnetic field, the electric field frequency, and potential strength. The results demonstrate the effect of the gate-driven electric dipole spin resonance in a transport phenomenon such as spin-flip electron transmission.

  13. Spectroscopic Identification of Tri-n-octylphosphine Oxide (TOPO) Impurities and Elucidation of Their Roles in Cadmium Selenide Quantum-Wire Growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fudong; Tang, Rui; Kao, Jeff L.-F.; Dingman, Sean D.; Buhro, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (TOPO) is the most commonly used solvent for the synthesis of colloidal nanocrystals. Here we show that the use of different batches of commercially obtained TOPO solvent introduces significant variability into the outcomes of CdSe quantum-wire syntheses. This irreproducibility is attributed to varying amounts of phosphorus-containing impurities in the different TOPO batches. We employ 31P NMR to identify 10 of the common TOPO impurities. Their beneficial, harmful, or negligible effects on quantum-wire growth are determined. The impurity di-n-octylphosphinic acid (DOPA) is found to be the important beneficial TOPO impurity for the reproducible growth of high-quality CdSe quantum wires. DOPA is shown to beneficially modify precursor reactivity through ligand substitution. The other significant TOPO impurities are ranked according to their abilities to similarly influence precursor reactivity. The results are likely of general relevance to most nanocrystal syntheses conducted in TOPO. PMID:19296595

  14. Majorana modes and Kondo effect in a quantum dot attached to a topological superconducting wire (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernek, Edson; Ruiz-Tijerina, David; da Silva, Luis D.; Egues, José Carlos

    2015-09-01

    Quantum dot attached to topological wires has become an interesting setup to study Majorana bound state in condensed matter[1]. One of the major advantage of using a quantum dot for this purpose is that it provides a suitable manner to study the interplay between Majorana bound states and the Kondo effect. Recently we have shown that a non-interacting quantum dot side-connected to a 1D topological superconductor and to metallic normal leads can sustain a Majorana mode even when the dot is empty. This is due to the Majorana bound state of the wire leaking into the quantum dot. Now we investigate the system for the case in which the quantum dot is interacting[3]. We explore the signatures of a Majorana zero-mode leaking into the quantum dot, using a recursive Green's function approach. We then study the Kondo regime using numerical renormalization group calculations. In this regime, we show that a "0.5" contribution to the conductance appears in system due to the presence of the Majorana mode, and that it persists for a wide range of the dot parameters. In the particle-hole symmetric point, in which the Kondo effect is more robust, the total conductance reaches 3e^2/2h, clearly indicating the coexistence of a Majorana mode and the Kondo resonance in the dot. However, the Kondo effect is suppressed by a gate voltage that detunes the dot from its particle-hole symmetric point as well as by a Zeeman field. The Majorana mode, on the other hand, is almost insensitive to both of them. We show that the zero-bias conductance as a function of the magnetic field follows a well-known universal curve. This can be observed experimentally, and we propose that this universality followed by a persistent conductance of 0.5,e^2/h are evidence for the presence of Majorana-Kondo physics. This work is supported by the Brazilians agencies FAPESP, CNPq and FAPEMIG. [1] A. Y. Kitaev, Ann.Phys. {bf 303}, 2 (2003). [2] E. Vernek, P.H. Penteado, A. C. Seridonio, J. C. Egues, Phys. Rev. B {bf

  15. Growing InGaAs quasi-quantum wires inside semi-rhombic shaped planar InP nanowires on exact (001) silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yu; Li, Qiang; Chang, Shih-Pang; Hsu, Wen-Da; Lau, Kei May

    2016-06-01

    We report InGaAs quasi-quantum wires embedded in planar InP nanowires grown on (001) silicon emitting in the 1550 nm communication band. An array of highly ordered InP nanowire with semi-rhombic cross-section was obtained in pre-defined silicon V-grooves through selective-area hetero-epitaxy. The 8% lattice mismatch between InP and Si was accommodated by an ultra-thin stacking disordered InP/GaAs nucleation layer. X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope characterizations suggest excellent crystalline quality of the nanowires. By exploiting the morphological evolution of the InP and a self-limiting growth process in the V-grooves, we grew embedded InGaAs quantum-wells and quasi-quantum-wires with tunable shape and position. Room temperature analysis reveals substantially improved photoluminescence in the quasi-quantum wires as compared to the quantum-well reference, due to the reduced intrusion defects and enhanced quantum confinement. These results show great promise for integration of III-V based long wavelength nanowire lasers on the well-established (001) Si platform.

  16. Dependence of the Hall Coefficient on a length of rectangular quantum wires with infinitely high potential under the influence of a Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thu Huong, Nguyen; Quang Bau, Nguyen; Hung, Le Thai; Hung, Dao Manh

    2016-06-01

    The Hall coefficient (HC) of a strong electromagnetic wave (EMW) caused by confined electrons in a rectangular quantum wire (RQW) is theoretically studied by using the quantum kinetic equation for electrons. The problem is considered in the case of electrons - acoustic phonons scattering. Wave function and energy spectrum in a RQW are different from those in a cylindrical quantum wire (CQW) or two dimensional systems (2D). Therefore analytical expressions for the HC in a RQW is obtained, different from CQW or 2D. Numerical calculations are carried out with a specific GaAs/GaAsAl RQW to show clearly the dependence of HC on a length Lx (Ly) RQW with different low temperature values. We can see that the length Lx (Ly) increases in value within the domain that HC increases. The HC reaches a peak before slightly decreases when the length Lx (Ly) continues going up. However, the HC depends on the radius and the length of CQW and wire size of RQW Lx and Ly at different values of temperatures; this is the fundamental difference between CQW and RQW. If the length Lx (Ly) continues to increase, the HC remains constant. It means that HC is no longer dependent on the length of quantum wires (This behavior is similar to the case of the independence of the HC on the length in bulk semiconductor).

  17. Quantum theory of the effect of grain boundaries on the electrical conductivity of thin films and wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraga, Luis; Henriquez, Ricardo; Solis, Basilio

    2015-08-01

    We calculate the electrical conductivity of a metallic sample under the effects of distributed impurities and a random distribution of grain boundaries by means of a quantum mechanical procedure based on Kubo formula. Grain boundaries are represented either by a one-dimensional regular array of Dirac delta potentials (Mayadas and Shatzkes model) or by its three-dimensional extension (Szczyrbowski and Schmalzbauer model). We give formulas expressing the conductivity of bulk samples, thin films and thin wires of rectangular cross-sections in the case when the samples are bounded by perfectly flat surfaces. We find that, even in the absence of surface roughness, the conductivity in thin samples is reduced from its bulk value. If there are too many grain boundaries per unit length, or their scattering strength is high enough, there is a critical value Rc of the reflectivity R of an individual boundary such that the electrical conductivity vanishes for R >Rc. Also, the conductivity of thin wires shows a stepwise dependence on R. The effect of weak random variations in the strength or separation of the grain boundaries is computed by means of the method of correlation length. Finally, the resistivity of nanometric polycrystalline tungsten films reported in Choi et al. J. Appl. Phys. (2014) 115 104308 is tentatively analyzed by means of the present formalism.

  18. The quantum-mechanical basis of an extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation for a current-carrying ferromagnetic wire.

    PubMed

    Edwards, D M; Wessely, O

    2009-04-01

    An extended Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation is introduced to describe the dynamics of inhomogeneous magnetization in a current-carrying wire. The coefficients of all the terms in this equation are calculated quantum-mechanically for a simple model which includes impurity scattering. This is done by comparing the energies and lifetimes of a spin wave calculated from the LLG equation and from the explicit model. Two terms are of particular importance since they describe non-adiabatic spin-transfer torque and damping processes which do not rely on spin-orbit coupling. It is shown that these terms may have a significant influence on the velocity of a current-driven domain wall and they become dominant in the case of a narrow wall.

  19. Non-linear optical processes involving excited subbands in laser-dressed quantum wires with triangular cross-section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radu, A.; Duque, C. A.

    2015-08-01

    The conduction subband structure of a triangular cross-section GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well wire under intense laser field is theoretically investigated by taking into account a finite confining potential. The calculation of the subband energy levels is based on a two-dimensional finite element method within the effective mass approximation. It is shown that a transversally polarized laser field non-uniformly shifts the subband energy levels and could be used for tuning the intersubband transitions and altering the related optical susceptibilities. We found that the non-resonant laser field allows the magnification and the red- or blueshift of the third-order non-linear susceptibility peaks for particular polarizations of the pump light and proper laser parameter values. The effects of the laser dressing field on the intersubband third harmonic generation and quadratic electro-optical process are discussed.

  20. Electronic states, pseudo-spin, and transport in the zinc-blende quantum wells and wires with vanishing band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Khurgin, J. B.; Vurgaftman, I.

    2014-03-31

    We consider theoretically the electronic structure of quasi-two and quasi-one-dimensional heterostructures comprised of III–V and II–VI semiconductors such as InAs/GaInSb and HgCdTe. We show that not only a Dirac-like dispersion exists in these materials when the energy gap approaches zero but also the states with opposite momentum are orthogonal (i.e., can be described by a pseudo-spin), which suppresses backscattering and thereby enhances the electron mobility, by analogy with the case of graphene. However, unlike in graphene, a quasi-one-dimensional quantum wire with zero gap can be realized, which should eliminate most of the scattering processes and lead to long coherence lengths required for both conventional and ballistic electronic devices.

  1. Growth and fabrication of proximity-coupled topological quantum wire circuits from thin InAs films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kan, Carolyn; Xue, Chi; Bai, Yang; Eckstein, James

    The realization of topological states in strongly spin orbit coupled semiconductors proximity-coupled to conventional superconductors requires delicate materials engineering. Key areas for improvement include the crystalline quality of the semiconductor itself, but a high-quality interface between the semiconductor and superconductor is essential. Recent results have demonstrated the necessity of forming an in situ interface to eliminate the ``soft gap'' observed in earlier experiments. While much work has focused on vertically grown nanowires, we take a lithographic approach to fabricating quantum wires out of MBE-grown thin films, which allow for increased flexibility and scalability of device structures. Notably, our films are grown entirely in situ in linked MBE systems, vastly improving interface transmission and cleanliness. Aspects of growth architecture aimed toward increasing the InAs mobility, such as substrate choice and layer structure, are also discussed.

  2. Longitudinal photocurrent spectroscopy of a single GaAs/AlGaAs v-groove quantum wire.

    PubMed

    Cade, N I; Hadjipanayi, M; Roshan, R; Maciel, A C; Ryan, J F; Macherey, F; Schäpers, Th; Lüth, H

    2005-02-01

    Modulation-doped GaAs v-groove quantum wires (QWRs) have been fabricated with novel electrical contacts made to two-dimensional electron-gas (2DEG) reservoirs. Here, we present longitudinal photocurrent (photoconductivity/PC) spectroscopy measurements of a single QWR. We clearly observe conductance in the ground-state one-dimensional subbands; in addition, a highly temperature-dependent response is seen from other structures within the v-groove. The latter phenomenon is attributed to the effects of structural topography and localization on carrier relaxation. The results of power-dependent PC measurements suggest that the QWR behaves as a series of weakly interacting localized states, at low temperatures.

  3. Wurtzite GaAs Quantum Wires: One-Dimensional Subband Formation.

    PubMed

    Vainorius, Neimantas; Lehmann, Sebastian; Gustafsson, Anders; Samuelson, Lars; Dick, Kimberly A; Pistol, Mats-Erik

    2016-04-13

    It is of contemporary interest to fabricate nanowires having quantum confinement and one-dimensional subband formation. This is due to a host of applications, for example, in optical devices, and in quantum optics. We have here fabricated and optically investigated narrow, down to 10 nm diameter, wurtzite GaAs nanowires which show strong quantum confinement and the formation of one-dimensional subbands. The fabrication was bottom up and in one step using the vapor-liquid-solid growth mechanism. Combining photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy with transmission electron microscopy on the same individual nanowires, we were able to extract the effective masses of the electrons in the two lowest conduction bands as well as the effective masses of the holes in the two highest valence bands. Our results, combined with earlier demonstrations of thin crystal phase nanodots in GaAs, set the stage for the fabrication of crystal phase quantum dots having full three-dimensional confinement. PMID:27004550

  4. Quantum wire and magnetic control of a spin qubit in the Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danga, J. E.; Kenfack, S. C.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interferometry is extensively investigated in a 3D heterostructure magnetic quantum wire. Local magnetic fields are used to coherently manipulate and control a qubit’s quantum state. For our numerical calculations, a parabolic confinement is assumed. Energy eigenvalues, non-adiabatic and adiabatic transition probabilities are calculated from the diabatic and adiabatic bases for two-level systems. Here, we show that the spatial crossing between interspin levels becomes a spatial anticrossing if the two spin states are coupled by external fields, and that consequently, due to the spin dependence of the harmonic confinement, it will undergo Landau-Zener-Stückelberg interference. It is shown that the system undergoes nonadiabatic Landau-Zener dynamics for a strong confinement in a strong external field, whereas a weak external field induces adiabatic Landau-Zener transition dynamics. Our system allows the coupling strength between the level states at the anti(crossing) point to be modulated. This system allows one to tune the wire’s parabolic confinement potential using experimentally accessible parameters.

  5. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy studies of quantum wire structures grown on submicrometre gratings of V-grooves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustafsson, A.; Malm, J.-O.; Carlsson, A.; Vermeire, G.

    1996-11-01

    We present an extensive characterization of a quantum wire (QWR) structure using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structure consisted of a single GaAs layer in between AlGaAs barriers, grown on a GaAs substrate patterned with a submicrometre grating of V-grooves. For reference we also studied other QWR, as well as, quantum well (QW) samples, fabricated under similar conditions. We used bright field and dark field imaging to study the overall structure, high-resolution TEM to study the layer thickness and the interface quality, and chemical lattice imaging to study the compositional variations across the interfaces. In the QWR sample, there were mainly two distinctly different areas of the QW: on the (100) planes between the V-grooves, the QW was flat, whereas the QW on the near 0268-1242/11/11/018/img5 side walls of the V-grooves had a flat lower interface and a saw-tooth shaped upper interface. The QWRs at the bottom of the V-grooves were crescent shaped. We also observed a fundamental difference in growth of the GaAs and the AlGaAs on the side wall, where the AlGaAs formed straight interfaces, determined by high-index planes, whereas the GaAs tended to form alternating low-index planes giving a saw-tooth appearance of the GaAs QW.

  6. Quantum wire and magnetic control of a spin qubit in the Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interferometry transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danga, J. E.; Kenfack, S. C.; Fai, L. C.

    2016-05-01

    Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interferometry is extensively investigated in a 3D heterostructure magnetic quantum wire. Local magnetic fields are used to coherently manipulate and control a qubit’s quantum state. For our numerical calculations, a parabolic confinement is assumed. Energy eigenvalues, non-adiabatic and adiabatic transition probabilities are calculated from the diabatic and adiabatic bases for two-level systems. Here, we show that the spatial crossing between interspin levels becomes a spatial anticrossing if the two spin states are coupled by external fields, and that consequently, due to the spin dependence of the harmonic confinement, it will undergo Landau–Zener–Stückelberg interference. It is shown that the system undergoes nonadiabatic Landau–Zener dynamics for a strong confinement in a strong external field, whereas a weak external field induces adiabatic Landau–Zener transition dynamics. Our system allows the coupling strength between the level states at the anti(crossing) point to be modulated. This system allows one to tune the wire’s parabolic confinement potential using experimentally accessible parameters.

  7. On Improving Accuracy of Finite-Element Solutions of the Effective-Mass Schrödinger Equation for Interdiffused Quantum Wells and Quantum Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topalović, D. B.; Arsoski, V. V.; Pavlović, S.; Čukarić, N. A.; Tadić, M. Ž.; Peeters, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    We use the Galerkin approach and the finite-element method to numerically solve the effective-mass Schrödinger equation. The accuracy of the solution is explored as it varies with the range of the numerical domain. The model potentials are those of interdiffused semiconductor quantum wells and axially symmetric quantum wires. Also, the model of a linear harmonic oscillator is considered for comparison reasons. It is demonstrated that the absolute error of the electron ground state energy level exhibits a minimum at a certain domain range, which is thus considered to be optimal. This range is found to depend on the number of mesh nodes N approximately as α0 logeα1(α2N), where the values of the constants α0, α1, and α2 are determined by fitting the numerical data. And the optimal range is found to be a weak function of the diffusion length. Moreover, it was demonstrated that a domain range adaptation to the optimal value leads to substantial improvement of accuracy of the solution of the Schrödinger equation. Supported by the Ministry of Education, Science, and Technological Development of Serbia and the Flemish fund for Scientific Research (FWO Vlaanderen)

  8. Optical properties of double quantum wires under the combined effect of spin-orbit interaction and in-plane magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakiroglu, S.; Gisi, B.; Karaaslan, Y.; Kasapoglu, E.; Sari, H.; Sokmen, I.

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we investigate the intersubband optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes for transitions between the lower-lying electronic levels of double quantum wires formed by a symmetric, double quartic-well potential. The system is subjected to an external in-plane magnetic field and Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit couplings are taken into account. The analytical expressions of the linear and nonlinear absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are obtained by using the compact density-matrix approach and iterative method. The dependence of the optical characteristics on the magnetic field, spin-orbit interactions, quantum wire radius, structural parameter and photon energies has been examined. Numerical results exhibit that the optical properties are considerably sensitive to the strength and orientation of magnetic field as well as to the spin-orbit couplings and thus can be controlled by these parameters.

  9. Room temperature continuous wave operation in a photonic crystal microcavity laser with a single layer of InAs/InP self-assembled quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Martínez, Luis Javier; Alén, Benito; Prieto, Ivan; Fuster, David; González, Luisa; González, Yolanda; Dotor, María Luisa; Postigo, Pablo Aitor

    2009-08-17

    We present continuous wave laser emission in a photonic crystal microcavity operating at 1.5 microm at room temperature. The structures have been fabricated in an InP slab including a single layer of self-assembled InAs/InP quantum wires (QWrs) as active material. Laser emission in air suspended membranes with thresholds of effective optical pump power of 22 microW and quality factors up to 55000 have been measured.

  10. From an array of quantum wires to three-dimensional fractional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagi, Eran; Oreg, Yuval

    2015-11-01

    The coupled-wires approach has been shown to be useful in describing two-dimensional strongly interacting topological phases. In this manuscript, we extend this approach to three-dimensions, and construct a model for a fractional strong topological insulator. This topologically ordered phase has an exotic gapless state on the surface, called a fractional Dirac liquid, which cannot be described by the Dirac theory of free fermions. Like in noninteracting strong topological insulators, the surface is protected by the presence of time-reversal symmetry and charge conservation. We show that upon breaking these symmetries, the gapped fractional Dirac liquid presents unique features. In particular, the gapped phase that results from breaking time-reversal symmetry has a halved fractional Hall conductance of the form σx y=1/2 e/2m h if the filling is ν =1 /m . On the other hand, if the surface is gapped by proximity coupling to an s -wave superconductor, we end up with an exotic topological superconductor. To reveal the topological nature of this superconducting phase, we partition the surface into two regions: one with broken time-reversal symmetry and another coupled to a superconductor. We find a fractional Majorana mode, which cannot be described by a free Majorana theory, on the boundary between the two regions. The density of states associated with tunneling into this one-dimensional channel is proportional to ωm -1, in analogy to the edge of the corresponding Laughlin state.

  11. Modeling of high-efficiency ITO/ZnO quantum wire photovoltaic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Althowibi, F.; Donkor, E.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a new nanofiber photovoltaic cell with ITO/ZnO/ITO concentric core designed to have high efficiency of solar energy conversion. The high energy bandgap of ZnO relative to ITO creates quantum wells for effective charge transfer of photogenerated carries from the ZnO active region, and the higher refractive index of the ZnO relative to the ITO enables solar radiation, incident on the ITO inner and outer cores, to couple to the ZnO resulting in effective separation of the optical signal path and the drift current. At the highest fill factor of 0.941, the proposed fiber produces 0.654V as an open-circuit voltage with fiber length of 1mm; where the solar cell could operate at maximum power point of Pmp =0.24mW at Vmp =0.5722V and Imp =0.0.415mA. The cell voltage and current are dependent on fiber length and area where the highest open-circuit voltage recorded at 0.9317V and the highest shortcircuits current recorded at 0.4379A for fiber length of 1μm with power of 0.408W.

  12. An easy shortcut synthesis of size-controlled bismuth nanoparticles and their use in the SLS growth of high-quality colloidal cadmium selenide quantum wires.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fudong; Buhro, William E

    2010-02-22

    An easy shortcut synthesis of thermally stable, near-monodisperse Bi nanoparticles from BiCl(3) and Na[N(SiMe(3))(2)] is described. The diameters of the Bi nanoparticles are controlled in the range of 4-29 nm by varying the amounts of BiCl(3) and Na[N(SiMe(3))(2)] employed. Standard deviations in their diameter distributions are 5-15% of the mean diameters, consistent with near monodispersity. These Bi nanoparticles are shown to be the best currently available catalysts for the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) growth of high-quality CdSe quantum wires.

  13. Circular photogalvanic effect induced by near-infrared radiation in InAs quantum wires patterned quasi-two-dimensional electron system

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang Chongyun; Chen Yonghai; Ma Hui; Yu Jinling; Liu Yu

    2011-06-06

    In this letter we investigated the InAs/InAlAs quantum wires (QWRs) superlattice by optically exciting the structure with near-infrared radiation. By varying the helicity of the radiation at room temperature we observed the circular photogalvanic effect related to the C{sub 2v} symmetry of the structure, which could be attributed to the formation of a quasi-two-dimensional system underlying in the vicinity of the QWRs pattern. The ratio of Rashba and Dresselhaus terms shows an evolution of the spin-orbit interaction in quasi-two-dimensional structure with the QWR layer deposition thickness.

  14. Energy dispersion of the electrosubbands in parabolic confining quantum wires: interplay of Rashba, Dresselhaus, lateral spin-orbit interaction and the Zeeman effect.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tong-Yi; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Xue-Ming

    2009-08-19

    We have made a thorough theoretical investigation of the interplay of spin-orbit interactions (SOIs) resulting from Rashba, Dresselhaus and the lateral parabolic confining potential on the energy dispersion relation of the spin subbands in a parabolic quantum wire. The influence of an applied external magnetic field is also discussed. We show the interplay of different types of SOI, as well as the Zeeman effect, leads to rather complex and intriguing electrosubbands for different spin branches. The effect of different coupling strengths and different magnetic field strengths is also investigated.

  15. Basic Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This module is the first in a series of three wiring publications; it serves as the foundation for students enrolled in a wiring program. It is a prerequisite to either "Residential Wiring" or "Commercial and Industrial Wiring." The module contains 16 instructional units that cover the following topics: occupational introduction; general safety;…

  16. Influence of composition and substrate miscut on the evolution of (105)-terminated in-plane Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} quantum wires on Si(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Watzinger, H.; Glaser, M.; Zhang, J. J.; Daruka, I.; Schäffler, F.

    2014-07-01

    Isolated in-plane wires on Si(001) are promising nanostructures for quantum transport applications. They can be fabricated in a catalyst-free process by thermal annealing of self-organized Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} hut clusters. Here, we report on the influence of composition and small substrate miscuts on the unilateral wire growth during annealing at 570 °C. The addition of up to 20% of Si mainly affects the growth kinetics in the presence of energetically favorable sinks for diffusing Ge atoms, but does not significantly change the wire base width. For the investigated substrate miscuts of <0.12°, we find geometry-induced wire tapering, but no strong influence on the wire lengths. Miscuts <0.02° lead to almost perfect quantum wires terminated by virtually step-free (105) and (001) facets over lengths of several 100 nm. Generally, the investigated Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} wires are metastable: Annealing at ≥600 °C under otherwise identical conditions leads to the well-known coexistence of Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} pyramids and domes.

  17. Dispersions and FRÖHLICH Electron-Phonon Interaction Hamiltonian of Propagating Optical Phonon Modes in Quasi-One Wurtzite GaN-BASED Quantum Well Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Xie, Hong-Jing

    Based on the dielectric continuum model and Loudon's uniaxial crystal model, the propagating (PR) optical phonon modes and the Fröhlich-like electron-PR phonon interaction Hamiltonian in a quasi-one-dimensional (Q1D) wurtzite quantum well wire (QWW) structure are deduced and analyzed. Numerical calculations on AlGaN/GaN/AlGaN wurtzite QWW are performed. Results reveal that the dispersive frequencies of PR modes are the continuous functions of free wavenumber kz in z-direction and discrete functions of azimuthal quantum number m. The reduced behavior of the PR modes in wurtzite quantum systems is obviously observed. From the discussion of the electron-PR phonon coupling functions, it is found that the low-order PR modes in the case of small kz and m play a more important role in the electron-PR phonon interactions. Moreover, a detailed comparison of the PR modes in Q1D QWW structures with those in quasi-two-dimensional quantum wells are also carried out. The physical reasons resulting in the relationship and distinction in the two types of systems are also analyzed deeply.

  18. An efficient finite-difference scheme for computation of electron states in free-standing and core-shell quantum wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsoski, V. V.; Čukarić, N. A.; Tadić, M. Ž.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    The electron states in axially symmetric quantum wires are computed by means of the effective-mass Schrödinger equation, which is written in cylindrical coordinates φ, ρ, and z. We show that a direct discretization of the Schrödinger equation by central finite differences leads to a non-symmetric Hamiltonian matrix. Because diagonalization of such matrices is more complex it is advantageous to transform it in a symmetric form. This can be done by the Liouville-like transformation proposed by Rizea et al. (2008), which replaces the wave function ψ(ρ) with the function F(ρ) = ψ(ρ) √{ ρ } and transforms the Hamiltonian accordingly. Even though a symmetric Hamiltonian matrix is produced by this procedure, the computed wave functions are found to be inaccurate near the origin, and the accuracy of the energy levels is not very high. In order to improve on this, we devised a finite-difference scheme which discretizes the Schrödinger equation in the first step, and then applies the Liouville-like transformation to the difference equation. Such a procedure gives a symmetric Hamiltonian matrix, resulting in an accuracy comparable to the one obtained with the finite element method. The superior efficiency of the new finite-difference scheme (FDM) is demonstrated for a few ρ-dependent one-dimensional potentials which are usually employed to model the electron states in free-standing and core-shell quantum wires. The new scheme is compared with the other FDM schemes for solving the effective-mass Schrödinger equation, and is found to deliver energy levels with much smaller numerical error for all the analyzed potentials. It also gives more accurate results than the scheme of Rizea et al., except for the ground state of an infinite rectangular potential in freestanding quantum wires. Moreover, the PT symmetry is invoked to explain similarities and differences between the considered FDM schemes.

  19. Self-assembled InAs quantum wire lasers on (001)InP at 1.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, F.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, L.; Gonzalez, Y.; Garcia, J. M.; Dotor, M. L.

    2006-08-28

    In this work, the authors present results on the growth by atomic layer molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of lasers with one and three stacked layers of InAs quantum wires (QWRs) as active zone and aluminum-free waveguides on (001) InP substrates. The separated confinement heterostructure consists of n-p InP claddings and a waveguide formed by short period superlattices of (InP){sub 5}/(GaInAs){sub 4} lattice matched to the InP substrate. The optimum growth conditions (substrate temperature and As and P pressures) have been determined to obtain waveguides with a flat surface in order to get a uniform QWR distribution. Lasing emission is observed at a wavelength of {approx}1.66 {mu}m up to 270 K from 15x3000 {mu}m{sup 2} devices, with a threshold current density at that temperature of 2 kA/cm{sup 2}.

  20. Novel room-temperature functional analogue and digital nanoelectronic circuits based on three-terminal ballistic junctions and planar quantum-wire transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, J.; Wallin, D.; Brusheim, P.; Maximov, I.; Xu, H. Q.

    2008-03-01

    Three-Terminal ballistic junctions (TBJs) and planar quantum-wire transistors (QWTs) are emerging nanoelectronic devices with various novel electrical properties. In this work, we realize novel nanoelectronic analogue and digital circuits with TBJs and planar QWTs made on In0.75Ga0.25As/InP two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) material. First we show that a single TBJ can work as a frequency mixer or a phase detector. Second, we fabricate an integrated nanostructure containing two planar QWTs, which can be used as an RS flip-flop element. Third, we make a nanoelectronic circuit by the integration of two TBJs and two planar QWTs. This circuit shows the RS flip-flop functionalities with much larger noise margins in both high and low level inputs. All measurements in this work are done at room temperature.

  1. Doping-induced stability in vanadium-doped ZnO quantum well wires (QWW): Combination of DFT calculations within experimental measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yumak, A.; Goumri-Said, Souraya; Khan, Wilayat; Boubaker, Karem; Petkova, P.

    2016-07-01

    ZnO quantum well wires (QWW) have grown on glass substrates by an inexpensive, simplified and enhanced spray pyrolysis technique then doped by Vanadium. The effects of V-doping on the structural, morphological and optical properties of the QWW were investigated experimentally and theoretically. The accuracy of control can be achieved on functional performance by adjusting vanadium doping extent. The incorporation of Vanadium in ZnO-QWW induced the formation of band tailing in states. The interactions with phonons and the presence of a tail absorption profile are following the empirical Urbach law. The electronic structure using density functional theory have shown the changes induced by vanadium doping in ZnO-QWW, where the phonon band structure and density of states were reported. The DFT results showed a good agreement with the lattice compatibility theory as well as with the experimental results.

  2. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  3. High uniformity of self-organized InAs quantum wires on InAlAs buffers grown on misoriented InP(001)

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yuanli; Jin, P.; Ye, X.L.; Zhang, C.L.; Shi, G.X.; Li, R.Y.; Chen, Y.H.; Wang, Z.G.

    2006-03-20

    Highly uniform InAs quantum wires (QWRs) have been obtained on the In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As buffer layer grown on the InP substrate 8{sup (convolutionsign)} off (001) towards (111) by molecular-beam epitaxy. The quasi-periodic composition modulation was spontaneously formed in the In{sub 0.5}Al{sub 0.5}As buffer layer on this misoriented InP (001). The width and period of the In-rich bands are about 10 and 40 nm, respectively. The periodic In-rich bands play a major role in the sequent InAs QWRs growth and the InAs QWRs are well positioned atop In-rich bands. The photoluminescence (PL) measurements showed a significant reduction in full width at half maximum and enhanced PL efficiency for InAs QWRs on misoriented InP(001) as compared to that on normal InP(001)

  4. Pressure-induced interband optical transitions in an InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanan, S.; Peter, A. John; Lee, Chang Woo

    2015-12-01

    Hydrostatic pressure-induced exciton binding energy in an InAs0.8P0.2/InP quantum well wire is investigated taking into account the geometrical confinement effect. Numerical calculations are carried out using variational approach within the single-band effective-mass approximation. The compressive strain contribution to the confinement potential is included throughout the calculations. The energy difference of the ground and the first excited state is found with the consideration of spatial confinement effect in the influence of pressure. The second-order susceptibility of harmonic generation is carried out using the compact density method. The optical gain as a function of incident photon energy is computed in the presence of the hydrostatic pressure. The result shows that the range of wavelength for the potential applications of telecommunications (1.3-1.55 μm) can be obtained by the application of the hydrostatic pressure. We believe that the obtained results can be applied for tuning the ranges of fibre optical wavelength in telecommunications.

  5. Wire Wise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swanquist, Barry

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how today's technology is encouraging schools to invest in furnishings that are adaptable to computer use and telecommunications access. Explores issues concerning modularity, wiring management, ergonomics, durability, price, and aesthetics. (GR)

  6. No Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeLoughry, Thomas J.

    1995-01-01

    The University of California at Santa Cruz has completed a successful test of a wireless computer network that would enable students and professors to get on line from anywhere on campus. The network, linked by radio waves, could save millions of dollars in campus wiring costs and would better meet student and faculty information needs. (MSE)

  7. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, Eldon D.; Hooper, Frederick M.; Reichenbach, Marvin L.

    1992-01-01

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut.

  8. Precision wire feeder for small diameter wire

    DOEpatents

    Brandon, E.D.; Hooper, F.M.; Reichenbach, M.L.

    1992-08-11

    A device for feeding small diameter wire having a diameter less than 0.04 mm (16 mil) to a welding station includes a driving wheel for controllably applying a non-deforming driving force to the wire to move the free end of the wire towards the welding station; and a tension device such as a torque motor for constantly applying a reverse force to the wire in opposition to the driving force to keep the wire taut. 1 figure.

  9. Nonuniversal metallic behavior of superconducting wires

    SciTech Connect

    Renn, S.R.; Duan, J.

    1996-04-01

    We calculate the low temperature resistance of a narrow superconducting wire associated with quantum mechanical phase slippage. Particular attention is payed to the effects of Coulomb interactions. Using a renormalization group approach, we obtain the temperature dependent resistance. The results show that, near the superconductor-insulator transition, the wire displays quasimetallic behavior characterized by a small but finite low temperature resistance. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. Negative Coulomb drag in a one-dimensional wire.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, M; Stopa, M; Tokura, Y; Hirayama, Y; Tarucha, S

    2006-07-14

    We observed negative Coulomb drag for parallel coupled quantum wires, in which electrons flow in the opposite directions between the wires. This only occurred under the conditions of strong correlation in the wires, that is, low density, high magnetic field, and low temperature, and cannot be addressed by a standard theory of momentum transfer. We propose a Coulomb drag model in which formation of a Wigner crystal state in the drag wire and a particle-like state in the drive wire is taken into account.

  11. Windows: Life after Wire.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Razwick, Jerry

    2003-01-01

    Although wired glass is extremely common in school buildings, the International Building Code adopted new standards that eliminate the use of traditional wired glass in K-12 schools, daycare centers, and athletic facilities. Wired glass breaks easily, and the wires can cause significant injuries by forming dangerous snags when the glass breaks.…

  12. Binding energy of the donor impurities in GaAs-Ga 1- x Al x As quantum well wires with Morse potential in the presence of electric and magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aciksoz, Esra; Bayrak, Orhan; Soylu, Asim

    2016-10-01

    The behavior of a donor in the GaAs-Ga1-x Al x As quantum well wire represented by the Morse potential is examined within the framework of the effective-mass approximation. The donor binding energies are numerically calculated for with and without the electric and magnetic fields in order to show their influence on the binding energies. Moreover, how the donor binding energies change for the constant potential parameters (D e, r e, and a) as well as with the different values of the electric and magnetic field strengths is determined. It is found that the donor binding energy is highly dependent on the external electric and magnetic fields as well as parameters of the Morse potential. Project supported by the Turkish Science Research Council (TÜBİTAK) and the Financial Supports from Akdeniz and Nigde Universities.

  13. Wire breakage in SLC wire profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.; McCormick, D.; Raimondi, P.; Ross, M.

    1998-12-10

    Wire-scanning beam profile monitors are used at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) for emittance preservation control and beam optics optimization. Twenty such scanners have proven most useful for this purpose and have performed a total of 1.5 million scans in the 4 to 6 years since their installation. Most of the essential scanners are equipped with 20 to 40 {mu}m tungsten wires. SLC bunch intensities and sizes often exceed 2x10{sup 7}particles/{mu}m{sup 2} (3C/m{sup 2}). We believe that this has caused a number of tungsten wire failures that appear at the ends of the wire, near the wire support points, after a few hundred scans are accumulated. Carbon fibers, also widely used at SLAC (1), have been substituted in several scanners and have performed well. In this paper, we present theories for the wire failure mechanism and techniques learned in reducing the failures.

  14. Wire breakage in SLC wire profile monitors

    SciTech Connect

    Field, C.; McCormick, D.; Raimondi, P.; Ross, M.

    1998-05-01

    Wire scanning beam profile monitors are used at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC) for emittance preservation control and beam optics optimization. Twenty such scanners have proven most useful for this purpose and have performed a total of 1.5 million scans in the 4 to 6 years since their installation. Most of the essential scanners are equipped with 20 to 40 {micro}m tungsten wires. SLC bunch intensities and sizes often exceed 2 x 10{sup 7} particles/{micro}m{sup 2} (3C/m{sup 2}). The authors believe that this has caused a number of tungsten wire failures that appear at the ends of the wire, near the wire support points, after a few hundred scans are accumulated. Carbon fibers, also widely used at SLAC, have been substituted in several scanners and have performed well. In this paper, the authors present theories for the wire failure mechanism and techniques learned in reducing the failures.

  15. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest.

  16. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: 3.7 amps per wire, bundle of 15 or more wires, 70 C environment, and vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  17. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1999-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 degree C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire (2) bundle of 15 or more wires (3) 70 C environment (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  18. Cable Bundle Wire Derating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Ray A.; Leidecker, Henning

    1998-01-01

    The allowable operating currents of electrical wiring when used in the space vacuum environment is predominantly determined by the maximum operating temperature of the wire insulation. For Kapton insulated wire this value is 200 C. Guidelines provided in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Preferred Parts List (PPL) limit the operating current of wire within vacuum to ensure the maximum insulation temperature is not exceeded. For 20 AWG wire, these operating parameters are: (1) 3.7 amps per wire; (2) bundle of 15 or more wires; (3) 70 C environment: and (4) vacuum of 10(exp -5) torr or less. To determine the behavior and temperature of electrical wire at different operating conditions, a thermal vacuum test was performed on a representative electrical harness of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) power distribution system. This paper describes the test and the results.

  19. Wire harness twisting aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casey, E. J.; Commadore, C. C.; Ingles, M. E.

    1980-01-01

    Long wire bundles twist into uniform spiral harnesses with help of simple apparatus. Wires pass through spacers and through hand-held tool with hole for each wire. Ends are attached to low speed bench motor. As motor turns, operator moves hand tool away forming smooth twists in wires between motor and tool. Technique produces harnesses that generate less radio-frequency interference than do irregularly twisted cables.

  20. EMF wire code research

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.

    1993-11-01

    This paper examines the results of previous wire code research to determines the relationship with childhood cancer, wire codes and electromagnetic fields. The paper suggests that, in the original Savitz study, biases toward producing a false positive association between high wire codes and childhood cancer were created by the selection procedure.

  1. Laser Wire Stripper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    NASA-developed space shuttle technology is used in a laser wire stripper designed by Raytheon Company. Laser beams cut through insulation on a wire without damaging conductive metal, because laser radiation that melts plastic insulation is reflected by the metal. The laser process is fast, clean, precise and repeatable. It eliminates quality control problems and the expense of rejected wiring.

  2. Electronic properties of quasi one-dimensional quantum wire models under equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions in the presence of an in-plane magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Papp, E.; Micu, C.; Racolta, D.

    2013-11-13

    In this paper one deals with the theoretical derivation of energy bands and of related wavefunctions characterizing quasi 1D semiconductor heterostructures, such as InAs quantum wire models. Such models get characterized this time by equal coupling strength superpositions of Rashba and Dresselhaus spin-orbit interactions of dimensionless magnitude a under the influence of in-plane magnetic fields of magnitude B. We found that the orientations of the field can be selected by virtue of symmetry requirements. For this purpose one resorts to spin conservations, but alternative conditions providing sensible simplifications of the energy-band formula can be reasonably accounted for. Besides the wavenumber k relying on the 1D electron, one deals with the spin-like s=±1 factors in the front of the square root term of the energy. Having obtained the spinorial wavefunction, opens the way to the derivation of spin precession effects. For this purpose one resorts to the projections of the wavenumber operator on complementary spin states. Such projections are responsible for related displacements proceeding along the Ox-axis. This results in a 2D rotation matrix providing both the precession angle as well as the precession axis.

  3. Quantum phase slip noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, Andrew G.; Zaikin, Andrei D.

    2016-07-01

    Quantum phase slips (QPSs) generate voltage fluctuations in superconducting nanowires. Employing the Keldysh technique and making use of the phase-charge duality arguments, we develop a theory of QPS-induced voltage noise in such nanowires. We demonstrate that quantum tunneling of the magnetic flux quanta across the wire yields quantum shot noise which obeys Poisson statistics and is characterized by a power-law dependence of its spectrum SΩ on the external bias. In long wires, SΩ decreases with increasing frequency Ω and vanishes beyond a threshold value of Ω at T →0 . The quantum coherent nature of QPS noise yields nonmonotonous dependence of SΩ on T at small Ω .

  4. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  5. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  6. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  11. 30 CFR 77.1802 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 77.1802 Section 77.1802... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 77.1802 Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1003 - Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires and trolley feeder wires. 75.1003 Section 75.1003... Insulation of trolley wires, trolley feeder wires and bare signal wires; guarding of trolley wires...

  14. Lingual straight wire method.

    PubMed

    Takemoto, Kyoto; Scuzzo, Giuseppe; Lombardo, L U C A; Takemoto, Y U I

    2009-12-01

    The mushroom arch-wire is mainly used in lingual orthodontic treatment but the complicated wire bending it requires affects both the treatment results and the time spent at the chair. The author proposes a new lingual straight wire method (LSW) in order to facilitate arch coordination and simplify the mechanics. The attention paid to the set-up model and bracket positioning and bonding plus the use of the new LSW method will also improve patient comfort.

  15. Sintered wire annode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2007-12-25

    A plurality of high atomic number wires are sintered together to form a porous rod that is parted into porous disks which will be used as x-ray targets. A thermally conductive material is introduced into the pores of the rod, and when a stream of electrons impinges on the sintered wire target and generates x-rays, the heat generated by the impinging x-rays is removed by the thermally conductive material interspersed in the pores of the wires.

  16. Concealed wire tracing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31

    An apparatus and method that combines a signal generator and a passive signal receiver to detect and record the path of partially or completely concealed electrical wiring without disturbing the concealing surface is disclosed. The signal generator applies a series of electrical pulses to the selected wiring of interest. The applied pulses create a magnetic field about the wiring that can be detected by a coil contained within the signal receiver. An audible output connected to the receiver and driven by the coil reflects the receivers position with respect to the wiring. The receivers audible signal is strongest when the receiver is directly above the wiring and the long axis of the receivers coil is parallel to the wiring. A marking means is mounted on the receiver to mark the location of the wiring as the receiver is directed over the wiring's concealing surface. Numerous marks made on various locations of the concealing surface will trace the path of the wiring of interest. 4 figs.

  17. Wire-inhomogeneity detector

    DOEpatents

    Gibson, G.H.; Smits, R.G.; Eberhard, P.H.

    1982-08-31

    A device for uncovering imperfections in electrical conducting wire, particularly superconducting wire, by detecting variations in eddy currents. Eddy currents effect the magnetic field in a gap of an inductor, contained in a modified commercial ferrite core, through which the wire being tested is passed. A small increase or decrease in the amount of conductive material, such as copper, in a fixed cross section of wire will unbalance a bridge used to measure the impedance of the inductor, tripping a detector and sounding an alarm.

  18. Transport properties of bismuth nano-wire systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Z.; Dresselhaus, M. S.; Ying, J. Y.; Heremans, J.

    1998-03-01

    Ultra-fine Bi nano-wires (10--120 nm diameter) with packing density as high as 7×10^10/cm^2 were fabricated by pressure injecting molten Bi into the evacuated channels of an anodic alumina template. The resulting Bi nano-wires are shown to be single crystals (with the same structure as bulk Bi) and all the nano-wires are similarly oriented. The small effective mass of Bi, high anisotropy of its Fermi surface, and the high aspect ratio (length/diameter) of Bi nano-wires make this an excellent system for studying quantum confinement effects in a one-dimensional (1D) electron gas. Transport properties, such as electrical conductivity, magnetoresistance and thermoelectric power, are investigated for both Bi nano-wire arrays and free-standing Bi nano-wires with various wire diameters (10-120 nm) and Te doping concentrations (0.025-0.5 at.%), and at various temperatures and magnetic fields. A theoretical model based on the basic band structure of bulk Bi, suitably modified for the 1D situation, explains the many unusual effects that are observed. Strong evidence is provided for an interesting quantum confinement-induced semimetal to semiconductor transition in such Bi nano-wires.

  19. 1998 wire development workshop proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1998-04-01

    This report consists of vugraphs of the presentations at the conference. The conference was divided into the following sessions: (1) First Generation Wire Development: Status and Issues; (2) First Generation Wire in Pre-Commercial Prototypes; (3) Second Generation Wire Development: Private Sector Progress and Issues; (4) Second Generation Wire Development: Federal Laboratories; and (5) Fundamental Research Issues for HTS Wire Development.

  20. VIEW SOUTHEASTBUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW SOUTHEAST-BUILDING 4 NO. 1 WIRE MILL (1871) WIRE DRAWING MACHINE - John A. Roebling's Sons Company & American Steel & Wire Company, South Broad, Clark, Elmer, Mott & Hudson Streets, Trenton, Mercer County, NJ

  1. Wire Array Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner-Evans, Dan

    Over the past five years, the cost of solar panels has dropped drastically and, in concert, the number of installed modules has risen exponentially. However, solar electricity is still more than twice as expensive as electricity from a natural gas plant. Fortunately, wire array solar cells have emerged as a promising technology for further lowering the cost of solar. Si wire array solar cells are formed with a unique, low cost growth method and use 100 times less material than conventional Si cells. The wires can be embedded in a transparent, flexible polymer to create a free-standing array that can be rolled up for easy installation in a variety of form factors. Furthermore, by incorporating multijunctions into the wire morphology, higher efficiencies can be achieved while taking advantage of the unique defect relaxation pathways afforded by the 3D wire geometry. The work in this thesis shepherded Si wires from undoped arrays to flexible, functional large area devices and laid the groundwork for multijunction wire array cells. Fabrication techniques were developed to turn intrinsic Si wires into full p-n junctions and the wires were passivated with a-Si:H and a-SiNx:H. Single wire devices yielded open circuit voltages of 600 mV and efficiencies of 9%. The arrays were then embedded in a polymer and contacted with a transparent, flexible, Ni nanoparticle and Ag nanowire top contact. The contact connected >99% of the wires in parallel and yielded flexible, substrate free solar cells featuring hundreds of thousands of wires. Building on the success of the Si wire arrays, GaP was epitaxially grown on the material to create heterostructures for photoelectrochemistry. These cells were limited by low absorption in the GaP due to its indirect bandgap, and poor current collection due to a diffusion length of only 80 nm. However, GaAsP on SiGe offers a superior combination of materials, and wire architectures based on these semiconductors were investigated for multijunction

  2. Commercial and Industrial Wiring.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; Flowers, Gary

    This module is the third in a series of three wiring publications, includes additional technical knowledge and applications required for job entry in the commercial and industrial wiring trade. The module contains 15 instructional units that cover the following topics: blueprint reading and load calculations; tools and equipment; service;…

  3. 2016 MOST WIRED.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul; Butcher, Lola; Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2016-07-01

    This year's IT survey shows that hospitals are aggressively fighting cyber crime and looking for ways to use data to help in the transition to value-based care. Find out who made the 2016 lists of Most Wired, Most Advanced, Most Improved and Most Wired-Small and Rural. PMID:27526506

  4. 2016 MOST WIRED.

    PubMed

    Barr, Paul; Butcher, Lola; Hoppszallern, Suzanna

    2016-07-01

    This year's IT survey shows that hospitals are aggressively fighting cyber crime and looking for ways to use data to help in the transition to value-based care. Find out who made the 2016 lists of Most Wired, Most Advanced, Most Improved and Most Wired-Small and Rural.

  5. Water Desalination with Wires.

    PubMed

    Porada, S; Sales, B B; Hamelers, H V M; Biesheuvel, P M

    2012-06-21

    We show the significant potential of water desalination using a novel capacitive wire-based technology in which anode/cathode wire pairs are constructed from coating a thin porous carbon electrode layer on top of electrically conducting rods (or wires). By alternately dipping an array of electrode pairs in freshwater with and in brine without an applied cell voltage, we create an ion adsorption/desorption cycle. We show experimentally how in six subsequent cycles we can reduce the salinity of 20 mM feed (brackish) water by a factor of 3, while application of a cation exchange membrane on the cathode wires makes the desalination factor increase to 4. Theoretical modeling rationalizes the experimental findings, and predicts that system performance can be significantly enhanced by material modifications. To treat large volumes of water, multiple stacks of wire pairs can be used simultaneously in a "merry-go-round" operational mode.

  6. International space station wire program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, Todd

    1995-01-01

    Hardware provider wire systems and current wire insulation issues for the International Space Station (ISS) program are discussed in this viewgraph presentation. Wire insulation issues include silicone wire contamination, Tefzel cold temperature flexibility, and Russian polyimide wire insulation. ISS is a complex program with hardware developed and managed by many countries and hundreds of contractors. Most of the obvious wire insulation issues are known by contractors and have been precluded by proper selection.

  7. Wire tension versus wire frequency: an experimental Ilizarov frame study.

    PubMed

    La Russa, Valentina; Skallerud, Bjørn; Klaksvik, Jomar; Foss, Olav A

    2010-08-26

    Stability of an Ilizarov frame highly depends on maintenance of adequate tension in the wires. Wire tension should be measured accurately in experimental laboratory studies when new types of wire fixators are tested. In this study, 20 wires were tested using two different wire fixators. The wires were sequentially tensioned from 0 to 1275 N in 50 N intervals. For each tension value, corresponding vibration frequency was recorded. We then described the relationship between wire tension and wire vibration frequency in an empirical equation (R(2)=99.8). Wire vibration frequency can also be described theoretically by the Euler-Bernoulli equation for a thin beam. Theoretical frequencies were calculated and compared with corresponding experimental frequencies. A close agreement was found (95% limits of agreement, +/-3.2 Hz). This empirical equation represents a simple tool, applicable when investigating the effect of new wire fixators, pre-tensioning and frame constructions on wire tension. PMID:20472242

  8. Nanowire terahertz quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Grange, Thomas

    2014-10-06

    Quantum cascade lasers made of nanowire axial heterostructures are proposed. The dissipative quantum dynamics of their carriers is theoretically investigated using non-equilibrium Green functions. Their transport and gain properties are calculated for varying nanowire thickness, from the classical-wire regime to the quantum-wire regime. Our calculation shows that the lateral quantum confinement provided by the nanowires allows an increase of the maximum operation temperature and a strong reduction of the current density threshold compared to conventional terahertz quantum cascade lasers.

  9. Next Generation Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medelius, Petro; Jolley, Scott; Fitzpatrick, Lilliana; Vinje, Rubiela; Williams, Martha; Clayton, LaNetra; Roberson, Luke; Smith, Trent; Santiago-Maldonado, Edgardo

    2007-01-01

    Wiring is a major operational component on aerospace hardware that accounts for substantial weight and volumetric space. Over time wire insulation can age and fail, often leading to catastrophic events such as system failure or fire. The next generation of wiring must be reliable and sustainable over long periods of time. These features will be achieved by the development of a wire insulation capable of autonomous self-healing that mitigates failure before it reaches a catastrophic level. In order to develop a self-healing insulation material, three steps must occur. First, methods of bonding similar materials must be developed that are capable of being initiated autonomously. This process will lead to the development of a manual repair system for polyimide wire insulation. Second, ways to initiate these bonding methods that lead to materials that are similar to the primary insulation must be developed. Finally, steps one and two must be integrated to produce a material that has no residues from the process that degrades the insulating properties of the final repaired insulation. The self-healing technology, teamed with the ability to identify and locate damage, will greatly improve reliability and safety of electrical wiring of critical systems. This paper will address these topics, discuss the results of preliminary testing, and remaining development issues related to self-healing wire insulation.

  10. Premelting of thin wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gülseren, O.; Ercolessi, F.; Tosatti, E.

    1995-03-01

    We have investigated the melting behavior of thin lead wires using molecular dynamics. We find that-in analogy with cluster melting-the melting temperature Tm(R) of a wire with radius R is lower than that of a bulk solid Tbm by Tm(R)=Tbm-c/R. Surface melting effects, with formation of a thin skin of highly diffusive atoms at the wire surface, are observed. The diffusivity is lower over (111)-oriented faces, and higher at (110) and (100) rounded areas. The possible relevance to recent results on nonrupturing thin necks between a scanning tunnel microscope tip and a warm surface is addressed.

  11. Splicing Wires Permanently With Explosives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bement, Laurence J.; Kushnick, Anne C.

    1990-01-01

    Explosive joining process developed to splice wires by enclosing and metallurgically bonding wires within copper sheets. Joints exhibit many desirable characteristics, 100-percent conductivity and strength, no heat-induced annealing, no susceptibility to corrosion in contacts between dissimilar metals, and stability at high temperature. Used to join wires to terminals, as well as to splice wires. Applicable to telecommunications industry, in which millions of small wires spliced annually.

  12. Liquid ``Wires" for Microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kellis, Nathan; Mazzeo, Aaron; Mazzeo, Brian

    2009-10-01

    We demonstrate liquid ``wires'' in a simple solution measurement device. This device highlights the possibility of fabricating liquid circuits. These ``wires'' were formed by filling micro-milled PMMA channels with 5M NaCl solution. Wires were connected to these salt solution channels; the impedance of a test channel filled with solution was measured by an HP 4294A Impedance Analyzer. Deionized water, 2-propanol, and 5M NaCl were measured. Numerical simulations were performed on the channel cross-section to determine the predicted impedance of the device. The simulated results were compared to the experimental data. Graphs of simulations and experiments are presented for the frequency range 1 KHz to 110 MHz. The data show electrode polarization at the electrode-electrolyte interface, as well as parasitic capacitance inherent in the experimental arrangement.

  13. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, R.A.

    1995-09-19

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus. 13 figs.

  14. Wire brush fastening device

    DOEpatents

    Meigs, Richard A.

    1995-01-01

    A fastening device is provided which is a variation on the conventional nut and bolt. The bolt has a longitudinal axis and threading helically affixed thereon along the longitudinal axis. A nut having a bore extending therethrough is provided. The bore of the nut has a greater diameter than the diameter of the bolt so the bolt can extend through the bore. An array of wire bristles are affixed within the bore so as to form a brush. The wire bristles extend inwardly from the bore and are constructed and arranged of the correct size, length and stiffness to guide the bolt within the bore and to restrain the bolt within the bore as required. A variety of applications of the wire brush nut are disclosed, including a bolt capture device and a test rig apparatus.

  15. Flying wires at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Gannon, J.; Crawford, C.; Finley, D.; Flora, R.; Groves, T.; MacPherson, M.

    1989-03-01

    Transverse beam profile measurement systems called ''Flying Wires'' have been installed and made operational in the Fermilab Main Ring and Tevatron accelerators. These devices are used routinely to measure the emittance of both protons and antiprotons throughout the fill process, and for emittance growth measurements during stores. In the Tevatron, the individual transverse profiles of six proton and six antiproton bunches are obtained simultaneously, with a single pass of the wire through the beam. Essential features of the hardware, software, and system operation are explained in the rest of the paper. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  16. Quantum computational webs

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, D.; Eisert, J.

    2010-10-15

    We discuss the notion of quantum computational webs: These are quantum states universal for measurement-based computation, which can be built up from a collection of simple primitives. The primitive elements--reminiscent of building blocks in a construction kit--are (i) one-dimensional states (computational quantum wires) with the power to process one logical qubit and (ii) suitable couplings, which connect the wires to a computationally universal web. All elements are preparable by nearest-neighbor interactions in a single pass, of the kind accessible in a number of physical architectures. We provide a complete classification of qubit wires, a physically well-motivated class of universal resources that can be fully understood. Finally, we sketch possible realizations in superlattices and explore the power of coupling mechanisms based on Ising or exchange interactions.

  17. Wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad

    1994-01-01

    The insulation testing and analysis consists of: identifying and prioritizing NASA wiring requirements; selecting candidate wiring constructions; developing test matrix and formulating test program; managing, coordinating, and conducting tests; and analyzing and documenting data, establishing guidelines and recommendations.

  18. One hundred angstrom niobium wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cline, H. E.; Rose, R. M.; Wulff, J.

    1968-01-01

    Composite of fine niobium wires in copper is used to study the size and proximity effects of a superconductor in a normal matrix. The niobium rod was drawn to a 100 angstrom diameter wire on a copper tubing.

  19. Wired To Flex.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Discusses wire and cable management solutions school construction committees can use that do not limit flexibility. Topics cover such areas as using perimeter raceways in classrooms, incorporating a flexible communications cabling infrastructure in to the initial design, and answering the question of how to meet future requirements and…

  20. Basic Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaltwasser, Stan; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a foundation course to prepare students for additional courses of training for entry-level employment in either the residential or commercial and industrial wiring trades. Included in the guide are 17 instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using…

  1. A World without Wires

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panettieri, Joseph C.

    2006-01-01

    The wireless bandwagon is rolling across Mississippi, picking up a fresh load of converts and turning calamity into opportunity. Traditional wired school networks, many of which unraveled during Hurricane Katrina, are giving way to advanced wireless mesh networks that frequently include voice-over-IP (VoIP) capabilities. Vendor funding is helping…

  2. Residential Wiring. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Mark; And Others

    This guide is designed to assist teachers conducting a course to prepare students for entry-level employment in the residential wiring trade. Included in the guide are six instructional units and the following sections of information for teachers: guidelines in using the unit components; academic and workplace skills classifications and…

  3. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  4. NewsWire, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrom, Elizabeth, Ed.; Bingham, Margaret, Ed.; Bowman, Gloria, Ed.; Shoemaker, Dan, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This document presents the 3 2002 issues of the newsletter "NewsWire," (volume 5). Issue Number One focuses on collaborative Web projects. This issue begins with descriptions of four individual projects: "iEARN"; "Operation RubyThroat"; "Follow the Polar Huskies!"; and "Log in Your Animal Roadkill!" Features that follow include: "Bringing the…

  5. Wire EDM for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zellars, G. R.; Harris, F. E.; Lowell, C. E.; Pollman, W. M.; Rys, V. J.; Wills, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    In an attempt to reduce fabrication time and costs, Wire Electrical Discharge Machine (Wire EDM) method was investigated as tool for fabricating matched blade roots and disk slots. Eight high-strength nickel-base superalloys were used. Computer-controlled Wire EDM technique provided high quality surfaces with excellent dimensional tolerances. Wire EDM method offers potential for substantial reductions in fabrication costs for "hard to machine" alloys and electrically conductive materials in specific high-precision applications.

  6. 1997 wire development workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    1997-04-01

    This conference is divided into the following sections: (1) First Generation Wires I; (2) First Generation Wires II; (3) Coated conductors I; and (4) Coated conductors II. Applications of the superconducting wires include fault current limiters, superconducting motors, transformers, and power transmission lines.

  7. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  8. From wires to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin, Mustafa A.; Baumann, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    We provide a statistical framework for characterizing stochastic particle production in the early universe via a precise correspondence to current conduction in wires with impurities. Our approach is particularly useful when the microphysics is uncertain and the dynamics are complex, but only coarse-grained information is of interest. We study scenarios with multiple interacting fields and derive the evolution of the particle occupation numbers from a Fokker-Planck equation. At late times, the typical occupation numbers grow exponentially which is the analog of Anderson localization for disordered wires. Some statistical features of the occupation numbers show hints of universality in the limit of a large number of interactions and/or a large number of fields. For test cases, excellent agreement is found between our analytic results and numerical simulations.

  9. Wire insulation defect detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greulich, Owen R. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Wiring defects are located by detecting a reflected signal that is developed when an arc occurs through the defect to a nearby ground. The time between the generation of the signal and the return of the reflected signal provides an indication of the distance of the arc (and therefore the defect) from the signal source. To ensure arcing, a signal is repeated at gradually increasing voltages while the wire being tested and a nearby ground are immersed in a conductive medium. In order to ensure that the arcing occurs at an identifiable time, the signal whose reflection is to be detected is always made to reach the highest potential yet seen by the system.

  10. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, L.; Tweed, H.

    1972-01-01

    The work performed entailed the design, development, construction and testing of a 4000 word by 18 bit random access, NDRO plated wire memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft imput/output unit and central processing unit. The primary design parameters, in order of importance, were high reliability, low power, volume and weight. A single memory unit, referred to as a qualification model, was delivered.

  11. Superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, Ivan K.; Ketterson, John B.; Banerjee, Indrajit

    1986-01-01

    A superconducting tape or wire with an improved critical field is formed of alternating layers of a niobium-containing superconductor such as Nb, NbTi, Nb.sub.3 Sn or Nb.sub.3 Ge with a thickness in the range of about 0.5-1.5 times its coherence length, supported and separated by layers of copper with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170-600 .ANG..

  12. Wiring for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, J. L., Jr.; Dickman, J. E.; Bercaw, R. W.; Myers, I. T.; Hammoud, A. N.; Stavnes, M.; Evans, J.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, the authors summarize the current state of knowledge of arc propagation in aerospace power wiring and efforts by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) towards the understanding of the arc tracking phenomena in space environments. Recommendations will be made for additional testing. A database of the performance of commonly used insulating materials will be developed to support the design of advanced high power missions, such as Space Station Freedom and Lunar/Mars Exploration.

  13. The quantum neurocomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galushkin, A. I.; Luskinovich, P. N.; Nesmeyanov, S. S.; Nikishin, V. I.; Frolov, V. D.

    1994-08-01

    The present time Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) techniques allow quantum confinement nanostructures to be formed which act as electronic components arrangeable into nanoscale sets, which can be operated as extremely large integration neural nets of up to 10(exp 9) to 10(exp 12) neurodevices/cu mm. The problem of obtaining low energy dissipation, generally met with in very large integration systems, is solved owing to the low dissipation characteristics of quantum dipole switches and quantum wires. Magnetic and/or electric interactions can supply connection among components, so that wiring problems (the 'interconnection tyranny') can be overcome. Quantum neurocomputers can be envisaged to provide transmission rates higher than 10(exp 10) bit/s.

  14. Unpacking of a Crumpled Wire from Two-Dimensional Cavities.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Thiago A; Gomes, Marcelo A F; Machado, Núbia R; Brito, Valdemiro P

    2015-01-01

    The physics of tightly packed structures of a wire and other threadlike materials confined in cavities has been explored in recent years in connection with crumpled systems and a number of topics ranging from applications to DNA packing in viral capsids and surgical interventions with catheter to analogies with the electron gas at finite temperature and with theories of two-dimensional quantum gravity. When a long piece of wire is injected into two-dimensional cavities, it bends and originates in the jammed limit a series of closed structures that we call loops. In this work we study the extraction of a crumpled tightly packed wire from a circular cavity aiming to remove loops individually. The size of each removed loop, the maximum value of the force needed to unpack each loop, and the total length of the extracted wire were measured and related to an exponential growth and a mean field model consistent with the literature of crumpled wires. Scaling laws for this process are reported and the relationship between the processes of packing and unpacking of wire is commented upon.

  15. Unpacking of a Crumpled Wire from Two-Dimensional Cavities

    PubMed Central

    Sobral, Thiago A.; Gomes, Marcelo A. F.; Machado, Núbia R.; Brito, Valdemiro P.

    2015-01-01

    The physics of tightly packed structures of a wire and other threadlike materials confined in cavities has been explored in recent years in connection with crumpled systems and a number of topics ranging from applications to DNA packing in viral capsids and surgical interventions with catheter to analogies with the electron gas at finite temperature and with theories of two-dimensional quantum gravity. When a long piece of wire is injected into two-dimensional cavities, it bends and originates in the jammed limit a series of closed structures that we call loops. In this work we study the extraction of a crumpled tightly packed wire from a circular cavity aiming to remove loops individually. The size of each removed loop, the maximum value of the force needed to unpack each loop, and the total length of the extracted wire were measured and related to an exponential growth and a mean field model consistent with the literature of crumpled wires. Scaling laws for this process are reported and the relationship between the processes of packing and unpacking of wire is commented upon. PMID:26047315

  16. Unpacking of a Crumpled Wire from Two-Dimensional Cavities.

    PubMed

    Sobral, Thiago A; Gomes, Marcelo A F; Machado, Núbia R; Brito, Valdemiro P

    2015-01-01

    The physics of tightly packed structures of a wire and other threadlike materials confined in cavities has been explored in recent years in connection with crumpled systems and a number of topics ranging from applications to DNA packing in viral capsids and surgical interventions with catheter to analogies with the electron gas at finite temperature and with theories of two-dimensional quantum gravity. When a long piece of wire is injected into two-dimensional cavities, it bends and originates in the jammed limit a series of closed structures that we call loops. In this work we study the extraction of a crumpled tightly packed wire from a circular cavity aiming to remove loops individually. The size of each removed loop, the maximum value of the force needed to unpack each loop, and the total length of the extracted wire were measured and related to an exponential growth and a mean field model consistent with the literature of crumpled wires. Scaling laws for this process are reported and the relationship between the processes of packing and unpacking of wire is commented upon. PMID:26047315

  17. Dual wire welding torch and method

    SciTech Connect

    Diez, Fernando Martinez; Stump, Kevin S.; Ludewig, Howard W.; Kilty, Alan L.; Robinson, Matthew M.; Egland, Keith M.

    2009-04-28

    A welding torch includes a nozzle with a first welding wire guide configured to orient a first welding wire in a first welding wire orientation, and a second welding wire guide configured to orient a second welding wire in a second welding wire orientation that is non-coplanar and divergent with respect to the first welding wire orientation. A method of welding includes moving a welding torch with respect to a workpiece joint to be welded. During moving the welding torch, a first welding wire is fed through a first welding wire guide defining a first welding wire orientation and a second welding wire is fed through a second welding wire guide defining a second welding wire orientation that is divergent and non-coplanar with respect to the first welding wire orientation.

  18. Manually Operated Welding Wire Feeder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rybicki, Daniel J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A manual welding wire feeder apparatus comprising a bendable elongate metal frame with a feed roller mounted at the center thereof for rotation about an axis transverse to the longitudinal axis of the frame. The frame ends are turned up as tabs and each provided with openings in alignment with each other and the mid-width center of the roller surface. The tab openings are sized to accommodate welding wire and each extends to a side edge of the tab, both opening on the same side of the frame, whereby welding wire can be side-loaded onto the frame. On the side of the frame, opposite the roller a lock ring handle is attached tangentially and is rotatable about the attachment point and an axis perpendicular to the frame. The device is grasped in the hand normally used to hold the wire. A finger is placed through the loop ring and the frame positioned across the palm and lower fingers. The thumb is positioned atop the wire so it can be moved from the back of the frame across the roller, and towards the front. In doing so, the wire is advanced at a steady rate in axial alignment with the tab openings and roller. To accommodate different wire diameters the frame is bendable about its center in the plane of the frame axis and wire so as to keep the wire in sufficient tension against the roller and to keep the wire fixed when the frame is tilted and thumb pressure released.

  19. Wire Array Solar Cells: Fabrication and Photoelectrochemical Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spurgeon, Joshua Michael

    /polymer composite films showed that their energy-conversion properties were comparable to those of an array attached to the growth substrate. High quantum efficiencies were observed relative to the packing density of the wires, particularly with illumination at high angles of incidence. The results indicate that an inexpensive, solid-state Si wire array solar cell is possible, and a plan is presented to develop one.

  20. Making Superconducting Welds between Superconducting Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penanen, Konstantin I.; Eom, Byeong Ho

    2008-01-01

    A technique for making superconducting joints between wires made of dissimilar superconducting metals has been devised. The technique is especially suitable for fabrication of superconducting circuits needed to support persistent electric currents in electromagnets in diverse cryogenic applications. Examples of such electromagnets include those in nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems and in superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs). Sometimes, it is desirable to fabricate different parts of a persistent-current-supporting superconducting loop from different metals. For example, a sensory coil in a SQUID might be made of Pb, a Pb/Sn alloy, or a Cu wire plated with Pb/Sn, while the connections to the sensory coil might be made via Nb or Nb/Ti wires. Conventional wire-bonding techniques, including resistance spot welding and pressed contact, are not workable because of large differences between the hardnesses and melting temperatures of the different metals. The present technique is not subject to this limitation. The present technique involves the use (1) of a cheap, miniature, easy-to-operate, capacitor-discharging welding apparatus that has an Nb or Nb/Ti tip and operates with a continuous local flow of gaseous helium and (2) preparation of a joint in a special spark-discharge welding geometry. In a typical application, a piece of Nb foil about 25 m thick is rolled to form a tube, into which is inserted a wire that one seeks to weld to the tube (see figure). The tube can be slightly crimped for mechanical stability. Then a spark weld is made by use of the aforementioned apparatus with energy and time settings chosen to melt a small section of the niobium foil. The energy setting corresponds to the setting of a voltage to which the capacitor is charged. In an experiment, the technique was used to weld an Nb foil to a copper wire coated with a Pb/Sn soft solder, which is superconducting. The joint was evaluated as

  1. Metering Wheel-Wire Track Wire Boom Deployment Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Granoff, Mark S.

    2014-01-01

    The NASA MMS Spin Plane Double Probe (SDP) Deployer utilizes a helical path, rotating Metering Wheel and a spring loaded Wire "Holding" Track to pay out a "fixed end" 57 meter x 1.5 mm diameter Wire Boom stored between concentric storage cylinders. Unlike rotating spool type storage devices, the storage cylinders remain stationary, and the boom wire is uncoiled along the length of the cylinder via the rotation of the Metering Wheel. This uncoiling action avoids the need for slip-ring contacts since the ends of the wire can remain stationary. Conventional fixed electrical connectors (Micro-D type) are used to terminate to operational electronics.

  2. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  3. Plated wire memory subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, K. H.

    1974-01-01

    The design, construction, and test history of a 4096 word by 18 bit random access NDRO Plated Wire Memory for use in conjunction with a spacecraft input/output and central processing unit is reported. A technical and functional description is given along with diagrams illustrating layout and systems operation. Test data is shown on the procedures and results of system level and memory stack testing, and hybrid circuit screening. A comparison of the most significant physical and performance characteristics of the memory unit versus the specified requirements is also included.

  4. Texture development in Galfenol wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boesenberg, A. J.; Restorff, J. B.; Wun-Fogle, M.; Sailsbury, H.; Summers, E.

    2013-05-01

    Galfenol (Fe-Ga alloy) wire fabrication provides a low cost alternative to directional solidification methods. This work evaluates the compositional dependence of the wire drawing suitability of Fe-Ga and characterizes the microstructural and magnetic properties of these wires. Wire has been produced with Ga contents between 10 at. % and 17 at. % to allow determination of the ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) in wire manufacture. Published results on chill cast bend specimens indicated that a DTBT occurs at roughly 15 at. % Ga. This DTBT was observed under tensile loading with a corresponding change in fracture behavior from transverse fracture to intergranular fracture. For improved magnetostrictive performance, higher Ga contents are desired, closer to the 17 at. % Ga evaluated in this work. Electron backscattered diffraction B-H loop and resonance measurements as a function of magnetic field (to determine modulus and coupling factor) are presented for as-drawn, furnace, and direct current (DC) annealed wire. Galfenol wire produced via traditional drawing methods is found to have a strong <110> (α) texture parallel to the drawing direction. As-drawn wire was observed to have a lower magnetic permeability and larger hysteresis than DC annealed wire. This is attributed to the presence of a large volume of crystalline defects; such as vacancies and dislocations.

  5. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  6. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  7. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from...

  8. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  9. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  10. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SIGNAL SYSTEM SAFETY... of insulated wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from...

  11. 49 CFR 236.74 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... underground wire. 236.74 Section 236.74 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RULES, STANDARDS, AND INSTRUCTIONS GOVERNING... wire; splice in underground wire. Insulated wire shall be protected from mechanical injury....

  12. Focus on quantum efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchleitner, Andreas; Burghardt, Irene; Cheng, Yuan-Chung; Scholes, Gregory D.; Schwarz, Ulrich T.; Weber-Bargioni, Alexander; Wellens, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Technologies which convert light into energy, and vice versa, rely on complex, microscopic transport processes in the condensed phase, which obey the laws of quantum mechanics, but hitherto lack systematic analysis and modeling. Given our much improved understanding of multicomponent, disordered, highly structured, open quantum systems, this ‘focus on’ collection collects cutting-edge research on theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum transport in truly complex systems as defined, e.g., by the macromolecular functional complexes at the heart of photosynthesis, by organic quantum wires, or even photovoltaic devices. To what extent microscopic quantum coherence effects can (be made to) impact on macroscopic transport behavior is an equally challenging and controversial question, and this ‘focus on’ collection provides a setting for the present state of affairs, as well as for the ‘quantum opportunities’ on the horizon.

  13. Soft magnetic wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez, M.

    2001-06-01

    An overview of the present state of the art on the preparation techniques, outstanding magnetic properties and applications of soft magnetic micro and nanowires is presented. Rapid solidification techniques (in-rotating-water quenching and drawing methods) to fabricate amorphous microwires with diameter in the range from 100 down to 1 μm are first described. Electrodeposition is also employed to prepare composite microtubes (magnetic coatings) and to fill porous membranes (diameter of the order of 0.1 μm). Magnetic behaviours of interest are related to the different hysteresis loops of samples: square-shaped loops typical of bistable behaviour, and nearly non-hysteretic loop with well-defined transverse anisotropy field. The role played by magnetic dipolar interactions in the magnetic behaviour of arrays of micro and nanowires is described. A particular analysis is done on the giant magnetoimpedance (GMI) effect in the radio and microwave frequency ranges exhibited by ultrasoft microwires. Finally, a few examples of applications are introduced for magnetostrictive and non-magnetostrictive wires, they are: “magnetoelastic pens”, micromotors; DC current-sensors based on GMI, and sharpened amorphous wire tips in spin polarised scanning tunneling microscopy.

  14. Improved superconducting magnet wire

    DOEpatents

    Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

    1983-08-16

    This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

  15. The Current in a Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Keith

    2009-01-01

    This little problem arose because I was frustrated with the standard electromagnetism texts, which show the magnetic field due to a current-bearing wire outside the wire [proportional to] 1/r and inside [proportional to] r. However, they never point out that the moving electrons must be influenced by the magnetic field created by the other moving…

  16. Most Wired 2006: measuring value.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2006-07-01

    As the Most Wired hospitals incorporate information technology into their strategic plans, they combine a"balanced scorecard"approach with classic business analytics to measure how well IT delivers on their goals. To find out which organizations made this year's 100 Most Wired list, as well as those named in other survey categories, go to the foldout section.

  17. Aircraft wiring program status report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beach, Rex

    1995-01-01

    In this Naval Air Warfare Center (NAWC) Aircraft Division status report, the general and wire and cable component activities, the systems engineering activities, the aircraft wiring lead maintenance activities, the NAVAIR/NASA interface activities, and the Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) Commission recommendations are presented.

  18. Most Wired 2006: measuring value.

    PubMed

    Solovy, Alden

    2006-07-01

    As the Most Wired hospitals incorporate information technology into their strategic plans, they combine a"balanced scorecard"approach with classic business analytics to measure how well IT delivers on their goals. To find out which organizations made this year's 100 Most Wired list, as well as those named in other survey categories, go to the foldout section. PMID:16915970

  19. Wire and Packing Tape Sandwiches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rabinowitz, Sandy

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can combine craft wire with clear packing tape to create a two-dimensional design that can be bent and twisted to create a three-dimensional form. Students sandwich wire designs between two layers of tape. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  20. Wire metamaterials: physics and applications.

    PubMed

    Simovski, Constantin R; Belov, Pavel A; Atrashchenko, Alexander V; Kivshar, Yuri S

    2012-08-16

    The physics and applications of a broad class of artificial electromagnetic materials composed of lattices of aligned metal rods embedded in a dielectric matrix are reviewed. Such structures are here termed wire metamaterials. They appear in various settings and can operate from microwaves to THz and optical frequencies. An important group of these metamaterials is a wire medium possessing extreme optical anisotropy. The study of wire metamaterials has a long history, however, most of their important and useful properties have been revealed and understood only recently, especially in the THz and optical frequency ranges where the wire media correspond to the lattices of microwires and nanowires, respectively. Another group of wire metamaterials are arrays and lattices of nanorods of noble metals whose unusual properties are driven by plasmonic resonances.

  1. Welding wire pressure sensor assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Timothy B. (Inventor); Milly, Peter F., Sr. (Inventor); White, J. Kevin (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device which is used to monitor the position of a filler wire relative to a base material being welded as the filler wire is added to a welding pool. The device is applicable to automated welding systems wherein nonconsumable electrode arc welding processes are utilized in conjunction with a filler wire which is added to a weld pool created by the electrode arc. The invention senses pressure deviations from a predetermined pressure between the filler wire and the base material, and provides electrical signals responsive to the deviations for actuating control mechanisms in an automatic welding apparatus so as to minimize the pressure deviation and to prevent disengagement of the contact between the filler wire and the base material.

  2. Tungsten wire for incandescent lamps

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, J.L.; Briant, C.L. )

    1990-09-01

    Tungsten wire for incandescent lamp filaments must operate at high temperatures and for long times. To meet these requirements, the grain morphology of the wire must be controlled to reduce the propensity for grain boundary sliding. The morphology is a function of the distribution of very small pockets of potassium in the wire and the mechanical processing from ingot to wire. The behavior of the filament is directly related to the grain morphology. This paper describes the mechanism by which the potassium is incorporated into and distributed in the ingot. The elongation and spheroidization of the bubbles during hot rolling and swaging is also examined and related to the grain morphology of wire. Some indications of the relationship between grain morphology and filament behavior are also given.

  3. Apollo experience report: Electrical wiring subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    The general requirements of the electrical wiring subsystems and the problem areas and solutions that occurred during the major part of the Apollo Program are detailed in this report. The concepts and definitions of specific requirements for electrical wiring; wire-connecting devices; and wire-harness fabrication, checkout, and installation techniques are discussed. The design and development of electrical wiring and wire-connecting devices are described. Mission performance is discussed, and conclusions and recommendations for future programs are presented.

  4. Internal wire guide for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a filler metal wire guide positioned within the torch, and within the shielding gas nozzle. The wire guide is adjacent to the tungsten electrode and has a ceramic liner through which the wire is fed. This reduces the size of the torch and eliminates the outside clearance problems that exit with external wire guides. Additionally, since the wire is always within the shielding gas, oxidizing of the wire is eliminated.

  5. Electrode carrying wire for GTAW welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Gene E. (Inventor); Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A welding torch for gas tungsten arc welding apparatus has a hollow tungsten electrode including a ceramic liner and forms the filler metal wire guide. The wire is fed through the tungsten electrode thereby reducing the size of the torch to eliminate clearance problems which exist with external wire guides. Since the wire is preheated from the tungsten more wire may be fed into the weld puddle, and the wire will not oxidize because it is always within the shielding gas.

  6. Mesoscopic mechanical resonators as quantum noninertial reference frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, B. N.; Blencowe, M. P.; Schwab, K. C.

    2015-10-01

    An atom attached to a micrometer-scale wire that is vibrating at a frequency ˜100 MHz and with displacement amplitude ˜1 nm experiences an acceleration magnitude ˜109ms -2 , approaching the surface gravity of a neutron star. As one application of such extreme noninertial forces in a mesoscopic setting, we consider a model two-path atom interferometer with one path consisting of the 100 MHz vibrating wire atom guide. The vibrating wire guide serves as a noninertial reference frame and induces an in principle measurable phase shift in the wave function of an atom traversing the wire frame. We furthermore consider the effect on the two-path atom wave interference when the vibrating wire is modeled as a quantum object, hence functioning as a quantum noninertial reference frame. We outline a possible realization of the vibrating wire, atom interferometer using a superfluid helium quantum interference setup.

  7. Nano-storage wires.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong Jun; Kim, Eunji; Kim, Daesan; Park, Juhun; Hong, Seunghun

    2013-08-27

    We report the development of "nano-storage wires" (NSWs), which can store chemical species and release them at a desired moment via external electrical stimuli. Here, using the electrodeposition process through an anodized aluminum oxide template, we fabricated multisegmented nanowires composed of a polypyrrole segment containing adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecules, a ferromagnetic nickel segment, and a conductive gold segment. Upon the application of a negative bias voltage, the NSWs released ATP molecules for the control of motor protein activities. Furthermore, NSWs can be printed onto various substrates including flexible or three-dimensional structured substrates by direct writing or magnetic manipulation strategies to build versatile chemical storage devices. Since our strategy provides a means to store and release chemical species in a controlled manner, it should open up various applications such as drug delivery systems and biochips for the controlled release of chemicals.

  8. Sintered wire cathode

    DOEpatents

    Falce, Louis R.; Ives, R. Lawrence

    2009-06-09

    A porous cathode structure is fabricated from a plurality of wires which are placed in proximity to each other in elevated temperature and pressure for a sintering time. The sintering process produces the porous cathode structure which may be divided into a plurality of individual porous cathodes, one of which may be placed into a dispenser cathode support which includes a cavity for containing a work function reduction material such as BaO, CaO, and Al.sub.2O.sub.3. The work function reduction material migrates through the pores of the porous cathode from a work replenishment surface adjacent to the cavity of the dispenser cathode support to an emitting cathode surface, thereby providing a dispenser cathode which has a uniform work function and therefore a uniform electron emission.

  9. Particle in a Moebius wire and half-integer orbital angular momentum

    SciTech Connect

    Miliordos, Evangelos

    2011-06-15

    Restricting one particle on the rim of a Moebius strip (Moebius wire), its wave functions are explicitly calculated through the nonrelativistic quantum theory. Demanding the wave function to be single valued, it is proven that in the case of a narrow strip the orbital angular momentum of the particle takes both integer and half-integer values of ({h_bar}/2{pi}). In addition, the energy values of two chiral Moebius wires are proven to be equal.

  10. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  11. Photoassisted transport in silicon dangling bond wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleshchonok, Andrii; Gutierrez, Rafael; Joachim, Christian; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically investigate charge transport through dangling bond (DB) nanostructures built on a passivated silicon (100) surface by selectively removing hydrogen atoms. We focus on dangling bond wires and on T-junctions. In the latter case, destructive quantum interference effects lead to a strong suppression of charge transport mediated by the DB electronic states. We demonstrate, however, that by applying a time periodic voltage, mimicking irradiation with monochromatic light, a dramatic enhancement of the current up to the μA range can be achieved. This result is however limited by the restriction on the AC field strength and frequency that bulk states should minimally contribute to charge transport; otherwise current leakage will set in. Despite this constraint, transconductance values of the order of 10 - 6 A/V can be achieved, illustrating the potential of the discussed systems to find applications in nanoscale electronics.

  12. Demonstrating Forces between Parallel Wires.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Blane

    2000-01-01

    Describes a physics demonstration that dramatically illustrates the mutual repulsion (attraction) between parallel conductors using insulated copper wire, wooden dowels, a high direct current power supply, electrical tape, and an overhead projector. (WRM)

  13. Wire Jewelry/Black History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Robert A.; Robinson, Charles C.

    1984-01-01

    Described is a project which made the study of Black history more real to fifth graders by having them make wire jewelry, smaller versions of the ornate filigreed ironwork produced by slave blacksmiths. (RM)

  14. Spring control of wire harness loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Curcio, P. J.

    1979-01-01

    Negator spring control guides wire harness between movable and fixed structure. It prevents electrical wire harness loop from jamming or being severed as wire moves in response to changes in position of aircraft rudder. Spring-loaded coiled cable controls wire loop regardless of rudder movement.

  15. Method of manufacturing superconductor wire

    SciTech Connect

    Motowidlo, Leszek

    2014-09-16

    A method for forming Nb.sub.3Sn superconducting wire is provided. The method employs a powder-in-tube process using a high-tin intermetallic compound, such as MnSn.sub.2, for producing the Nb.sub.3Sn. The use of a high-tin intermetallic compound enables the process to perform hot extrusion without melting the high-tin intermetallic compound. Alternatively, the method may entail drawing the wire without hot extrusion.

  16. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    ScienceCinema

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2016-07-12

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  17. Smart Wire Grid: Resisting Expectations

    SciTech Connect

    Ramsay, Stewart; Lowe, DeJim

    2014-03-03

    Smart Wire Grid's DSR technology (Discrete Series Reactor) can be quickly deployed on electrical transmission lines to create intelligent mesh networks capable of quickly rerouting electricity to get power where and when it's needed the most. With their recent ARPA-E funding, Smart Wire Grid has been able to move from prototype and field testing to building out a US manufacturing operation in just under a year.

  18. 1 mil gold bond wire study.

    SciTech Connect

    Huff, Johnathon; McLean, Michael B.; Jenkins, Mark W.; Rutherford, Brian Milne

    2013-05-01

    In microcircuit fabrication, the diameter and length of a bond wire have been shown to both affect the current versus fusing time ratio of a bond wire as well as the gap length of the fused wire. This study investigated the impact of current level on the time-to-open and gap length of 1 mil by 60 mil gold bond wires. During the experiments, constant current was provided for a control set of bond wires for 250ms, 410ms and until the wire fused; non-destructively pull-tested wires for 250ms; and notched wires. The key findings were that as the current increases, the gap length increases and 73% of the bond wires will fuse at 1.8A, and 100% of the wires fuse at 1.9A within 60ms. Due to the limited scope of experiments and limited data analyzed, further investigation is encouraged to confirm these observations.

  19. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.

  20. Experimental Results for Space-Wire-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkes, Steve; Gibson, David; Ferrer, Albert

    2015-09-01

    SpaceWire-D is a deterministic extension to SpaceWire that uses time-division multiplexing to schedule traffic within time-slots. It allows a single SpaceWire network to be used for both time-critical avionics control applications and asynchronous payload data-handling simultaneously using existing SpaceWire technology. In this paper we describe the services of SpaceWire-D and present experimental results for each service.

  1. Fabrication of Pd-Cr wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diamond, Sidney; Leach, Dennen M.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication of Pd-13 percent Cr alloy wires is described. Melting, casting, swaging and annealing processes are discussed. Drawing to reach two diameters (0.003 inch and 0.00176 inch) of wire is described. Representative micrographs of the Pd-Cr alloy at selected stages during wire fabrication are included. The resistance of the wire was somewhat lower, by about 15 to 20 percent, than comparable wire of other alloys used for strain gages.

  2. Connecting to Thermocouples with Fewer Lead Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    2003-01-01

    A simple technique has been devised to reduce the number of lead wires needed to connect an array of thermocouples to the instruments (e.g., voltmeters) used to read their output voltages. Because thermocouple wires are usually made of expensive metal alloys, reducing the number of lead wires can effect a considerable reduction in the cost of such an array. Reducing the number of wires also reduces the number of terminals and the amount of space needed to accommodate the wires.

  3. Directional coupling for quantum computing and communication.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulos, Georgios M

    2008-11-14

    We introduce the concept of directional coupling, i.e., the selective transfer of a state between adjacent quantum wires, in the context of quantum computing and communication. Our analysis rests upon a mathematical analogy between a dual-channel directional coupler and a composite spin system.

  4. Plasma arc torch with coaxial wire feed

    DOEpatents

    Hooper, Frederick M

    2002-01-01

    A plasma arc welding apparatus having a coaxial wire feed. The apparatus includes a plasma arc welding torch, a wire guide disposed coaxially inside of the plasma arc welding torch, and a hollow non-consumable electrode. The coaxial wire guide feeds non-electrified filler wire through the tip of the hollow non-consumable electrode during plasma arc welding. Non-electrified filler wires as small as 0.010 inches can be used. This invention allows precision control of the positioning and feeding of the filler wire during plasma arc welding. Since the non-electrified filler wire is fed coaxially through the center of the plasma arc torch's electrode and nozzle, the wire is automatically aimed at the optimum point in the weld zone. Therefore, there is no need for additional equipment to position and feed the filler wire from the side before or during welding.

  5. Californium Recovery from Palladium Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, Jon D.

    2014-08-01

    The recovery of 252Cf from palladium-252Cf cermet wires was investigated to determine the feasibility of implementing it into the cermet wire production operation at Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Radiochemical Engineering Development Center. The dissolution of Pd wire in 8 M HNO3 and trace amounts of HCl was studied at both ambient and elevated temperatures. These studies showed that it took days to dissolve the wire at ambient temperature and only 2 hours at 60°C. Adjusting the ratio of the volume of solvent to the mass of the wire segment showed little change in the kinetics of dissolution, which ranged from 0.176 mL/mg down to 0.019 mL/mg. A successful chromatographic separation of 153Gd, a surrogate for 252Cf, from Pd was demonstrated using AG 50x8 cation exchange resin with a bed volume of 0.5 mL and an internal diameter of 0.8 cm.

  6. Wire Detection Algorithms for Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kasturi, Rangachar; Camps, Octavia I.

    2002-01-01

    In this research we addressed the problem of obstacle detection for low altitude rotorcraft flight. In particular, the problem of detecting thin wires in the presence of image clutter and noise was studied. Wires present a serious hazard to rotorcrafts. Since they are very thin, their detection early enough so that the pilot has enough time to take evasive action is difficult, as their images can be less than one or two pixels wide. Two approaches were explored for this purpose. The first approach involved a technique for sub-pixel edge detection and subsequent post processing, in order to reduce the false alarms. After reviewing the line detection literature, an algorithm for sub-pixel edge detection proposed by Steger was identified as having good potential to solve the considered task. The algorithm was tested using a set of images synthetically generated by combining real outdoor images with computer generated wire images. The performance of the algorithm was evaluated both, at the pixel and the wire levels. It was observed that the algorithm performs well, provided that the wires are not too thin (or distant) and that some post processing is performed to remove false alarms due to clutter. The second approach involved the use of an example-based learning scheme namely, Support Vector Machines. The purpose of this approach was to explore the feasibility of an example-based learning based approach for the task of detecting wires from their images. Support Vector Machines (SVMs) have emerged as a promising pattern classification tool and have been used in various applications. It was found that this approach is not suitable for very thin wires and of course, not suitable at all for sub-pixel thick wires. High dimensionality of the data as such does not present a major problem for SVMs. However it is desirable to have a large number of training examples especially for high dimensional data. The main difficulty in using SVMs (or any other example-based learning

  7. Designing potentials by sculpturing wires

    SciTech Connect

    Della Pietra, Leonardo; Aigner, Simon; Groth, Soenke; Hagen, Christoph von; Schmiedmayer, Joerg; Bar-Joseph, Israel; Lezec, Henri J.

    2007-06-15

    Magnetic trapping potentials for atoms on atom chips are determined by the current flow in the chip wires. By modifying the shape of the conductor we can realize specialized current flow patterns and therefore microdesign the trapping potentials. We have demonstrated this by nano-machining an atom chip using the focused ion beam technique. We built a trap, a barrier, and using a Bose-Einstein Condensate as a probe we showed that by polishing the conductor edge the potential roughness on the selected wire can be reduced. Furthermore, we give different other designs and discuss the creation of a one-dimensional magnetic lattice on an atom chip.

  8. Infrared spectral marker bands characterizing a transient water wire inside a hydrophobic membrane protein

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Steffen; Gerwert, Klaus; Freier, Erik; Cui, Qiang

    2014-12-14

    Proton conduction along protein-bound “water wires” is an essential feature in membrane proteins. Here, we analyze in detail a transient water wire, which conducts protons via a hydrophobic barrier within a membrane protein to create a proton gradient. It is formed only for a millisecond out of three water molecules distributed at inactive positions in a polar environment in the ground state. The movement into a hydrophobic environment causes characteristic shifts of the water bands reflecting their different chemical properties. These band shifts are identified by time-resolved Fourier Transform Infrared difference spectroscopy and analyzed by biomolecular Quantum Mechanical/Molecular Mechanical simulations. A non-hydrogen bonded (“dangling”) O–H stretching vibration band and a broad continuum absorbance caused by a combined vibration along the water wire are identified as characteristic marker bands of such water wires in a hydrophobic environment. The results provide a basic understanding of water wires in hydrophobic environments.

  9. Conductance decay of a surface hydrogen tunneling junction fabricated along a Si(001)- (2×1) -H atomic wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hiroyo; Yeo, Yong Kiat; Saeys, Mark; Joachim, Christian

    2010-05-01

    On a Si(001)- (2×1) -H substrate, electrons tunneling through hydrogen atomic junctions fabricated between two surface dangling-bond (DB) wires are theoretically investigated using the elastic-scattering quantum-chemistry method. The surface states introduced in the Si band gap by removing H atoms from a Si(001)- (2×1) -H surface were calculated and also analyzed using a simple tight-binding model. The two-channel surface conductance of a DB wire results from a combination of through-space and through-lattice electronic couplings between DB states. The conductance of the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure decreases exponentially with the length of H junction with an inverse decay rate ranging from 0.20 to 0.23Å-1 , depending on the energy. When the DB wire-H-junction-DB wire structure is contacted by Au nanoelectrodes, the transmission resonances corresponding to the DB wire states split, demonstrating a coupling of the DB wires through short surface hydrogen atomic junctions. This splitting decreases with the length of H junction between the DB wires with an inverse decay length ranging from 0.22 to 0.44Å-1 , indicating that such an atomic scale surface tunneling junction is not a very good insulator.

  10. 30 CFR 57.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Underground § 57.12047 Guy wires. Guy wires of poles supporting high-voltage transmission lines shall meet the... “Safety Rules for the Installation and Maintenance of Electric Supply and Communication Lines”...

  11. Anode wire aging tests with selected gases

    SciTech Connect

    Kadyk, J.; Wise, J.; Hess, D.; Williams, M. )

    1990-04-01

    As a continuation of earlier wire aging investigations, additional candidates for wire chamber gas and wire have been tested. These include the gases: argon/ethane, HRS gas, dimethyl ether, carbon dioxide/ethane, and carbon tetrafluoride/isobutane. Wires used were: gold- plated tungsten, Stablohm, Nicotin, and Stainless Steel. Measurements were made of the effects upon wire aging of impurities from plumbing materials or contamination from various types of oil. Attempts were made to induce wire aging by adding measured amounts of oxygen and halogen (methyl chloride) with negative results. In this paper, the possible role of electronegativity in the wire aging process is discussed, and measurements of electronegativity are made with several single carbon Freons, using both an electron capture detector and a wire chamber operating with dimethyl ether.

  12. Wire Capture Programs for Macintosh and IBM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiley, Gale

    1989-01-01

    Discusses wire capture programs (computer programs which gather and process wire services such as the Associated Press or United Press) for computer labs in journalism departments. Describes details of such programs for Macintosh, IBM, and IBM clones. (SR)

  13. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    .... Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor, Trailer, and Motor Coach Wiring, October 1981, except the jumper cable plug and receptacle need...

  14. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    .... Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor, Trailer, and Motor Coach Wiring, October 1981, except the jumper cable plug and receptacle need...

  15. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    .... Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor, Trailer, and Motor Coach Wiring, October 1981, except the jumper cable plug and receptacle need...

  16. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    .... Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor, Trailer, and Motor Coach Wiring, October 1981, except the jumper cable plug and receptacle need...

  17. Put Your Cable Wiring to the Test.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day, C. William

    2001-01-01

    Discusses why schools and universities should use testing procedures in any wire bid specification for cable wiring and also know how experienced the installers are in testing and installing structured cabling systems. Key cabling terms are included. (GR)

  18. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  19. New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenski, George

    1994-01-01

    Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

  20. Technique for stripping Teflon insulated wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babb, B. D.

    1967-01-01

    Cryogenic stripping of Teflon insulated wire leaves no residue and produces no physical damage. After the wire is immersed in liquid nitrogen, bent slightly, and returned to room temperature, the Teflon is removed by fingernails or flat-nosed pliers.

  1. The effect of split gate dimensions on the electrostatic potential and 0.7 anomaly within one-dimensional quantum wires on a modulation doped GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, L. W.; Al-Taie, H.; Lesage, A. A. J.; Thomas, K. J.; Sfigakis, F.; See, P.; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Kelly, M. J.; Smith, C. G.

    We use a multiplexing scheme to measure the conductance properties of 95 split gates of 7 different gate dimensions fabricated on a GaAs/AlGaAs chip, in a single cool down. The number of devices for which conductance is accurately quantized reduces as the gate length increases. However, even the devices for which conductance is accurately quantized in units of 2e2 / h show no correlation between the length of electrostatic potential barrier in the channel and the gate length, using a saddle point model to estimate the barrier length. Further, the strength of coupling between the gates and the 1D channel does not increase with gate length beyond 0.7 μm. The background electrostatic profile appears as significant as the gate dimension in determining device behavior. We find a clear correlation between the curvature of the electrostatic barrier along the channel and the strength of the ``0.7 anomaly'' which identifies the electrostatic length of the channel as the principal factor governing the conductance of the 0.7 anomaly. Present address: Wisconsin Institute for Quantum Information, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI.

  2. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey; Pereira, T. A. S.; Farias, G. A.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-01

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  3. Quantum tunneling between bent semiconductor nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Sousa, A. A.; Chaves, Andrey Farias, G. A.; Pereira, T. A. S.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-11-07

    We theoretically investigate the electronic transport properties of two closely spaced L-shaped semiconductor quantum wires, for different configurations of the output channel widths as well as the distance between the wires. Within the effective-mass approximation, we solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation using the split-operator technique that allows us to calculate the transmission probability, the total probability current, the conductance, and the wave function scattering between the energy subbands. We determine the maximum distance between the quantum wires below which a relevant non-zero transmission is still found. The transmission probability and the conductance show a strong dependence on the width of the output channel for small distances between the wires.

  4. Regeneration: New Neurons Wire Up.

    PubMed

    Raymond, Pamela A

    2016-09-12

    Functional repair of damage in the nervous system requires re-establishment of precise patterns of synaptic connectivity. A new study shows that after selective ablation, zebrafish retinal neurons regenerate and reconstruct some, although not all, of their stereotypic wiring. PMID:27623258

  5. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    SciTech Connect

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading.

  6. Ultrasonic Calibration Wire Test Phantom

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, S K; Fisher, K A; Werve, M; Chambers, D H

    2004-09-24

    We designed and built a phantom consisting of vertical wires maintained under tension to be used as an ultrasonic test, calibration, and reconstruction object for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory annular array scanner. We provide a description of the phantom, present example data sets, preliminary reconstructions, example metadata, and MATLAB codes to read the data.

  7. Troubleshooting plated-wire memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, C. M.; Bright, T. M.; Constable, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Faults in plated wire memories are identified and located from outside of system by applying electrical impulses and analyzing their reflectance in technique of Time-Domain Reflectometry (TDR). Intermittent faults are easier to find because memory system is not disturbed by probing or disassembly.

  8. Flexible substrate for printed wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakura, M.; Yabe, K.; Tanaka, H.; Soda, A.

    1982-01-01

    A very flexible substrate for printed wiring is disclosed which is composed of a blend of phenoxy resin-polyisocyanate-brominated epoxy resin in which the equivalent ration of the functional groups is hydroxyl grouped: isocyanate group: epoxy group = 1:0.2 to 2:0.5 to 3. The product has outstanding solder resistance and is applied to metal without using adhesives.

  9. Plated wire random access memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouldin, L. D.

    1975-01-01

    A program was conducted to construct 4096-work by 18-bit random access, NDRO-plated wire memory units. The memory units were subjected to comprehensive functional and environmental tests at the end-item level to verify comformance with the specified requirements. A technical description of the unit is given, along with acceptance test data sheets.

  10. NEMA wire and cable standards development programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Robert W.

    1994-01-01

    The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) is the nation's largest trade association for manufacturers of electrical equipment. Its member companies produce components, end-use equipment and systems for the generation, transmission, distribution, control and use of electricity. The wire and cable division is presented in 6 sections: building wire and cable, fabricated conductors, flexible cords, high performance wire and cable, magnet wire, and power and control cable. Participating companies are listed.

  11. Novel Wiring Technologies for Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Tracy L.; Parrish, Lewis M.

    2014-01-01

    Because wire failure in aerospace vehicles could be catastrophic, smart wiring capabilities have been critical for NASA. Through the years, researchers at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) have developed technologies, expertise, and research facilities to meet this need. In addition to aerospace applications, NASA has applied its knowledge of smart wiring, including self-healing materials, to serve the aviation industry. This webinar will discuss the development efforts of several wiring technologies at KSC and provide insight into both current and future research objectives.

  12. Home and School Technology: Wired versus Wireless.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Horn, Royal

    2001-01-01

    Presents results of informal research on smart homes and appliances, structured home wiring, whole-house audio/video distribution, hybrid cable, and wireless networks. Computer network wiring is tricky to install unless all-in-one jacketed cable is used. Wireless phones help installers avoid pre-wiring problems in homes and schools. (MLH)

  13. 49 CFR 236.838 - Wire, shunt.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wire, shunt. 236.838 Section 236.838 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Wire, shunt. A wire forming part of a shunt circuit....

  14. Aluminum conducts better than copper at the atomic scale: a first-principles study of metallic atomic wires.

    PubMed

    Simbeck, Adam J; Lanzillo, Nick; Kharche, Neerav; Verstraete, Matthieu J; Nayak, Saroj K

    2012-12-21

    Using a first-principles density functional method, we have studied the electronic structure, electron-phonon coupling, and quantum transport properties of atomic wires of Ag, Al, Au, and Cu. Non-equilibrium Green's function-based transport studies of finite atomic wires suggest that the conductivity of Al atomic wires is higher than that of Ag, Au, and Cu in contrast to the bulk where Al has the lowest conductivity among these systems. This is attributed to the higher number of eigenchannels in Al wires, which becomes the determining factor in the ballistic limit. On the basis of density functional perturbation theory, we find that the electron-phonon coupling constant of the Al atomic wire is lowest among the four metals studied, and more importantly, that the value is reduced by a factor of 50 compared to the bulk. PMID:23083218

  15. Measurements and simulations of the ablation stage of wire arrays with different initial wire sizes

    SciTech Connect

    Sinars, D.B.; Cuneo, M.E.; Yu, E.P.; Jones, B.; Mehlhorn, T.A.; Porter, J.L.; Wenger, D.F.; Lebedev, S.V.; Cochrane, K.R.; MacFarlane, J.J.

    2006-04-15

    Comparisons of 20 mm diameter, 300-wire tungsten arrays with different initial wire sizes were made on the 20 MA Sandia Z facility. Radiographic measurements of each wire array, taken at the same point in the current during the wire ablation stage, show systematic differences. A detailed comparison of the radiography and self-emission data with simulations and analytic models suggests that a variation in the mass ablation rate with wire size may be responsible.

  16. Emittance growth due to Tevatron flying wires

    SciTech Connect

    Syphers, M; Eddy, Nathan

    2004-06-01

    During Tevatron injection, Flying Wires have been used to measure the transverse beam size after each transfer from the Main Injector in order to deduce the transverse emittances of the proton and antiproton beams. This amounts to 36 + 9 = 45 flies of each of 3 wire systems, with an individual wire passing through each beam bunch twice during a single ''fly''. below they estimate the emittance growth induced by the interaction of the wires with the particles during these measurements. Changes of emittance from Flying Wire measurements conducted during three recent stores are compared with the estimations.

  17. SpaceWire Data Handling Demonstration System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mills, S.; Parkes, S. M.; O'Gribin, N.

    2007-08-01

    The SpaceWire standard was published in 2003 with the aim of providing a standard for onboard communications, defining the physical and data link layers of an interconnection, in order to improve reusability, reliability and to reduce the cost of mission development. The many benefits which it provides mean that it has already been used in a number of missions, both in Europe and throughout the world. Recent work by the SpaceWire community has included the development of higher level protocols for SpaceWire, such as the Remote Memory Access Protocol (RMAP) which can be used for many purposes, including the configuration of SpaceWire devices. Although SpaceWire has become very popular, the various ways in which it can be used are still being discovered, as are the most efficient ways to use it. At the same time, some in the space industry are not even aware of SpaceWire's existence. This paper describes the SpaceWire Data Handling Demonstration System that has been developed by the University of Dundee. This system simulates an onboard data handling network based on SpaceWire. It uses RMAP for all communication, and so demonstrates how SpaceWire and standardised higher level protocols can be used onboard a spacecraft. The system is not only a good advert for those who are unfamiliar with the benefits of SpaceWire, it is also a useful tool for those using SpaceWire to test ideas.

  18. Wire Crimp Connectors Verification using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, K. Elliott; Perey, Daniel F.; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp connections is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp connector and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which previously has been used to assess crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies (missing wire strands, incorrect wire gauge, incomplete wire insertion in connector) are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with pull-testing data) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying the technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented.

  19. Composite wire plasma formation and evolution

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, R.B.

    2000-01-01

    The detailed understanding of the formation and evolution of plasma from rapidly heated metallic wires is a long-standing challenge in the field of plasma physics and in exploding wire engineering. This physical process is made even more complicated if the wire material is composed of a number of individual layers. The authors have successfully developed both optical and x-ray backlighting diagnostics. In particular, the x-ray backlighting technique has demonstrated the capability for quantitative determination of the plasma density over a wide range of densities. This diagnostic capability shows that the process of plasma formation is composed of two separate phases: first, current is passed through a cold wire and the wire is heated ohmically, and, second, the heated wire evolves gases that break down and forms a low-density plasma surrounding the wire.

  20. NASA wiring for space applications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulze, Norman

    1995-01-01

    An overview of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program and its relationship to NASA's space technology enterprise is given in viewgraph format. The mission of the space technology enterprise is to pioneer, with industry, the development and use of space technology to secure national economic competitiveness, promote industrial growth, and to support space missions. The objectives of the NASA Wiring for Space Applications Program is to improve the safety, performance, and reliability of wiring systems for space applications and to develop improved wiring technologies for NASA flight programs and commercial applications. Wiring system failures in space and commercial applications have shown the need for arc track resistant wiring constructions. A matrix of tests performed versus wiring constructions is presented. Preliminary data indicate the performance of the Tensolite and Filotex hybrid constructions are the best of the various candidates.

  1. Vibrating wire for beam profile scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutunian, S. G.; Dobrovolski, N. M.; Mailian, M. R.; Sinenko, I. G.; Vasiniuk, I. E.

    1999-12-01

    A method that measures the transverse profile (emittance) of the bunch by detecting radiation arising at the scattering of the bunch on scanning wire is widely used. In this work information about bunch scattering is obtained by measuring the oscillation frequency of the tightened scanning wire. In such a way, the system of radiation (or secondary particles) extraction and measurement can be removed. The entire unit consists of a compact fork with tightened wire and a scanning system. Normal oscillation frequency of a wire depends on wire tension, its geometric parameters, and, in a second approximation, its elastic characteristics. Normal oscillations are generated by interaction of an alternating current through the wire with magnetic field of a permanent magnet. In this case, it is suggested that the magnetic field of the accelerator (field of dipole magnets or quadrupole magnets) be used for excitation of oscillations. The dependence of oscillation frequency on beam scattering is determined by several factors, including changes of wire tension caused by transverse force of the beam and influence of beam self-field. Preliminary calculations show that the influence of wire heating will dominate. We have studied strain gauges on the basis of vibrating wire from various materials (tungsten, beryl bronze, and niobium zirconium alloys). A scheme of normal oscillation generation by alternating current in autogeneration circuit with automatic frequency adjustment was selected. A special method of wire fixation and elimination of transverse degrees of freedom allows us to achieve relative stability better than 10-5 during several days at a relative resolution of 10-6. Experimental results and estimates of wire heating of existing scanners show that the wire heats up to a few hundred grades, which is enough for measurements. The usage of wire of micrometer thickness diminishes the problem of wire thermalization speed during the scanning of the bunch.

  2. Sintered wire cesium dispenser photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Montgomery, Eric J; Ives, R. Lawrence; Falce, Louis R

    2014-03-04

    A photoelectric cathode has a work function lowering material such as cesium placed into an enclosure which couples a thermal energy from a heater to the work function lowering material. The enclosure directs the work function lowering material in vapor form through a low diffusion layer, through a free space layer, and through a uniform porosity layer, one side of which also forms a photoelectric cathode surface. The low diffusion layer may be formed from sintered powdered metal, such as tungsten, and the uniform porosity layer may be formed from wires which are sintered together to form pores between the wires which are continuous from the a back surface to a front surface which is also the photoelectric surface.

  3. Low-energy theory of transport in Majorana wire junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zazunov, A.; Egger, R.; Levy Yeyati, A.

    2016-07-01

    We formulate and apply a low-energy transport theory for hybrid quantum devices containing junctions of topological superconductor (TS) wires and conventional normal (N) or superconducting (S) leads. We model TS wires as spinless p -wave superconductors and derive their boundary Keldysh Green's function, capturing both the Majorana end state and continuum quasiparticle excitations in a unified manner. We also specify this Green's function for a finite-length TS wire. Junctions connecting different parts of the device are described by the standard tunneling Hamiltonian. Using this Hamiltonian approach, one also has the option to include many-body interactions in a systematic manner. For N-TS junctions, we provide the current-voltage (I -V ) characteristics at arbitrary junction transparency and give exact results for the shot-noise power and the excess current. For TS-TS junctions, analytical results for the thermal noise spectrum and for the I -V curve in the high-transparency low-bias regime are presented. For S-TS junctions, we compute the entire I -V curve and clarify the conditions for having a finite Josephson current.

  4. The transmaxillary K-wire.

    PubMed Central

    Silverton, J. S.; Bostwick, J.; Jurkiewicz, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    The transmaxillary K-wire is a simple, fast, safe, and effective technique for the fixation of unstable tractured malar bones. Combined with other techniques such as interdental fixation it simplifies and provides the fixation of the Le Fort II fracture or osteotomy and certain osteotomies used for facial advancement. The technique of insertion is described and illustrated. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:666241

  5. Reduced-Wiring Tactile Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohm, Timothy R.

    1991-01-01

    Proposed tactile sensor on robot finger puts out multiplexed analog signals transmitted to control computer on fewer wires than needed to transmit equivalent digital signals. Analog output represents data on contact area of object being gripped, on position of object, and on direction and rate of slippage if any. Consists of chains of normally open switches and resistors on surface of finger. Each resistance double preceding resistance in each chain. Constant-current sources supply power to chains.

  6. Investigation of Photovoltaic Properties of Single Core-Shell GaN/InGaN Wires.

    PubMed

    Messanvi, A; Zhang, H; Neplokh, V; Julien, F H; Bayle, F; Foldyna, M; Bougerol, C; Gautier, E; Babichev, A; Durand, C; Eymery, J; Tchernycheva, M

    2015-10-01

    We report the investigation of the photovoltaic properties of core-shell GaN/InGaN wires. The radial structure is grown on m-plane {11̅00} facets of self-assembled c̅-axis GaN wires elaborated by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. The conversion efficiency of wires with radial shell composed of thick In0.1Ga0.9N layers and of 30× In0.18Ga0.82N/GaN quantum wells are compared. We also investigate the impact of the contact nature and layout on the carrier collection and photovoltaic performances. The contact optimization results in an improved conversion efficiency of 0.33% and a fill factor of 83% under 1 sun (AM1.5G) on single wires with a quantum well-based active region. Photocurrent spectroscopy demonstrates that the response ascribed to the absorption of InGaN/GaN quantum wells appears at wavelengths shorter than 440 nm.

  7. Investigation of Photovoltaic Properties of Single Core-Shell GaN/InGaN Wires.

    PubMed

    Messanvi, A; Zhang, H; Neplokh, V; Julien, F H; Bayle, F; Foldyna, M; Bougerol, C; Gautier, E; Babichev, A; Durand, C; Eymery, J; Tchernycheva, M

    2015-10-01

    We report the investigation of the photovoltaic properties of core-shell GaN/InGaN wires. The radial structure is grown on m-plane {11̅00} facets of self-assembled c̅-axis GaN wires elaborated by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) on sapphire substrates. The conversion efficiency of wires with radial shell composed of thick In0.1Ga0.9N layers and of 30× In0.18Ga0.82N/GaN quantum wells are compared. We also investigate the impact of the contact nature and layout on the carrier collection and photovoltaic performances. The contact optimization results in an improved conversion efficiency of 0.33% and a fill factor of 83% under 1 sun (AM1.5G) on single wires with a quantum well-based active region. Photocurrent spectroscopy demonstrates that the response ascribed to the absorption of InGaN/GaN quantum wells appears at wavelengths shorter than 440 nm. PMID:26378593

  8. Effect of low transverse magnetic field on the confinement strength in a quasi-1D wire

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Thomas, K. J.; Smith, L. W.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Jones, G. A. C.; Griffiths, J.; Pepper, M.

    2013-12-04

    Transport measurements in a quasi-one dimensional (1D) quantum wire are reported in the presence of low transverse magnetic field. Differential conductance shows weak quantised plateaus when the 2D electrons are squeezed electrostatically. Application of a small transverse magnetic field (0.2T) enhances the overall degree of quantisation due to the formation of magneto-electric subbands. The results show the role of magnetic field to fine tune the confinement strength in low density wires when interaction gives rise to double row formation.

  9. Method and apparatus for laying wire arrays

    DOEpatents

    Horowitz, Seymour M.; Nesbitt, Dale D.

    1986-01-01

    Wire arrays (11) having a continuous wire (12) which is formed into a predetermined pattern and adhered to a backing material or substrate (13) are fabricated by applying adhesive material (16a, 16b) along opposite edge portions (17, 18) of the substrate, positioning a row of winding spools (21) along each of the edge portions and repeatedly extending the wire between and around successive spools at the opposite edge portions. The wound wire is then traveled along each spool toward the substrate and into contact with the adhesive. The spools are then removed and a coating of hardenable material (54) is applied to secure the wound wire to the substrate. Tension in the wire is relieved prior to contact of the wire with the adhesive and a small amount of slack is introduced into the wire before the final coating step. Mechanism (32) is provided for lifting the spools away from the substrate without disturbing the wound wire. The method and apparatus enable manufacture of precisely configured wire arrays without complex or costly equipment and do not require structural alterations in the substrate for the purpose of accommodating to fabrication equipment.

  10. Analysis of Conical Wire Array Z-Pinch Stability with a Center Wire

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.; Presura, R.; Wright, S.; Plechaty, C.; Neff, S.; Wanex, L.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2009-01-21

    Adding a center wire on the axis of a conical wire array produces conditions suitable for studying shear flow stabilization of the Z-pinch. The conical wire array produces and axial plasma flow while the center wire introduces a radial variation of the axial velocity. Experiments of this array configuration were preformed on the 1 MA Zebra Z-pinch generator and showed stabilization of the kink instability when a center wire was present. Comparison with equivalent cylindrical wire arrays indicates that the shear flow stabilization plays a role in the stabilization of the kink instability.

  11. A Vibrating Wire System For Quadrupole Fiducialization

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zachary

    2010-12-13

    A vibrating wire system is being developed to fiducialize the quadrupoles between undulator segments in the LCLS. This note provides a detailed analysis of the system. The LCLS will have quadrupoles between the undulator segments to keep the electron beam focused. If the quadrupoles are not centered on the beam axis, the beam will receive transverse kicks, causing it to deviate from the undulator axis. Beam based alignment will be used to move the quadrupoles onto a straight line, but an initial, conventional alignment must place the quadrupole centers on a straight line to 100 {micro}m. In the fiducialization step of the initial alignment, the position of the center of the quadrupole is measured relative to tooling balls on the outside of the quadrupole. The alignment crews then use the tooling balls to place the magnet in the tunnel. The required error on the location of the quadrupole center relative to the tooling balls must be less than 25 {micro}m. In this note, we analyze a system under construction for the quadrupole fiducialization. The system uses the vibrating wire technique to position a wire onto the quadrupole magnetic axis. The wire position is then related to tooling balls using wire position detectors. The tooling balls on the wire position detectors are finally related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to perform the fiducialization. The total 25 {micro}m fiducialization error must be divided between these three steps. The wire must be positioned onto the quadrupole magnetic axis to within 10 {micro}m, the wire position must be measured relative to tooling balls on the wire position detectors to within 15 {micro}m, and tooling balls on the wire position detectors must be related to tooling balls on the quadrupole to within 10 {micro}m. The techniques used in these three steps will be discussed. The note begins by discussing various quadrupole fiducialization techniques used in the past and discusses why the vibrating wire technique is our method

  12. quantum mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Carl M; DeKieviet, Maarten; Klevansky, S. P.

    2013-01-01

    -symmetric quantum mechanics (PTQM) has become a hot area of research and investigation. Since its beginnings in 1998, there have been over 1000 published papers and more than 15 international conferences entirely devoted to this research topic. Originally, PTQM was studied at a highly mathematical level and the techniques of complex variables, asymptotics, differential equations and perturbation theory were used to understand the subtleties associated with the analytic continuation of eigenvalue problems. However, as experiments on -symmetric physical systems have been performed, a simple and beautiful physical picture has emerged, and a -symmetric system can be understood as one that has a balanced loss and gain. Furthermore, the phase transition can now be understood intuitively without resorting to sophisticated mathe- matics. Research on PTQM is following two different paths: at a fundamental level, physicists are attempting to understand the underlying mathematical structure of these theories with the long-range objective of applying the techniques of PTQM to understanding some of the outstanding problems in physics today, such as the nature of the Higgs particle, the properties of dark matter, the matter–antimatter asymmetry in the universe, neutrino oscillations and the cosmological constant; at an applied level, new kinds of -synthetic materials are being developed, and the phase transition is being observed in many physical contexts, such as lasers, optical wave guides, microwave cavities, superconducting wires and electronic circuits. The purpose of this Theme Issue is to acquaint the reader with the latest developments in PTQM. The articles in this volume are written in the style of mini-reviews and address diverse areas of the emerging and exciting new area of -symmetric quantum mechanics. PMID:23509390

  13. Tensile deformation of NiTi wires.

    PubMed

    Gall, Ken; Tyber, Jeff; Brice, Valerie; Frick, Carl P; Maier, Hans J; Morgan, Neil

    2005-12-15

    We examine the structure and properties of cold drawn Ti-50.1 at % Ni and Ti-50.9 at % Ni shape memory alloy wires. Wires with both compositions possess a strong <111> fiber texture in the wire drawing direction, a grain size on the order of micrometers, and a high dislocation density. The more Ni rich wires contain fine second phase precipitates, while the wires with lower Ni content are relatively free of precipitates. The wire stress-strain response depends strongly on composition through operant deformation mechanisms, and cannot be explained based solely on measured differences in the transformation temperatures. We provide fundamental connections between the material structure, deformation mechanisms, and resulting stress-strain responses. The results help clarify some inconsistencies and common misconceptions in the literature. Ramifications on materials selection and design for emerging biomedical applications of NiTi shape memory alloys are discussed.

  14. Wire codes, magnetic fields, and childhood cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kheifets, L.I.; Kavet, R.; Sussman, S.S.

    1997-05-01

    Childhood cancer has been modestly associated with wire codes, an exposure surrogate for power frequency magnetic fields, but less consistently with measured fields. The authors analyzed data on the population distribution of wire codes and their relationship with several measured magnetic field metrics. In a given geographic area, there is a marked trend for decreased prevalence from low to high wire code categories, but there are differences between areas. For average measured fields, there is a positive relationship between the mean of the distributions and wire codes but a large overlap among the categories. Better discrimination is obtained for the extremes of the measurement values when comparing the highest and the lowest wire code categories. Instability of measurements, intermittent fields, or other exposure conditions do not appear to provide a viable explanation for the differences between wire codes and magnetic fields with respect to the strength and consistency of their respective association with childhood cancer.

  15. Wire frame to MOVIE. BYU transfer program

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, D.; Byers, L.D.; Benner, M.S.

    1982-12-01

    At SNLA, the primary computer-aided drafting tool is the Applicon Graphics System (AGS). The data base for mechanical parts on the AGS is a wire frame model. This report summarizes a method of adding surface information to the wire frame and passing this information up stream to MOVIE.BYU which is on a VAX computer and is used to produce shaded graphics pictures of the AGS wire frame model on a RAMTEK 9400 display terminal.

  16. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  17. Space Shuttle Columbia Aging Wiring Failure Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDaniels, Steven J.

    2005-01-01

    A Space Shuttle Columbia main engine controller 14 AWG wire short circuited during the launch of STS-93. Post-flight examination divulged that the wire had electrically arced against the head of a nearby bolt. More extensive inspection revealed additional damage to the subject wire, and to other wires as well from the mid-body of Columbia. The shorted wire was to have been constructed from nickel-plated copper conductors surrounded by the polyimide insulation Kapton, top-coated with an aromatic polyimide resin. The wires were analyzed via scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDX), and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA); differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) were performed on the polyimide. Exemplar testing under laboratory conditions was performed to replicate the mechanical damage characteristics evident on the failed wires. The exemplar testing included a step test, where, as the name implies, a person stepped on a simulated wire bundle that rested upon a bolt head. Likewise, a shear test that forced a bolt head and a torque tip against a wire was performed to attempt to damage the insulation and conductor. Additionally, a vibration test was performed to determine if a wire bundle would abrade when vibrated against the head of a bolt. Also, an abrasion test was undertaken to determine if the polyimide of the wire could be damaged by rubbing against convolex helical tubing. Finally, an impact test was performed to ascertain if the use of the tubing would protect the wire from the strike of a foreign object.

  18. Thin-wire scatterers in chiral media.

    PubMed

    Jaggard, D L; Liu, J C; Grot, A; Pelet, P

    1991-06-01

    The effect of the handedness of chiral materials on the differential scattering cross section of embedded conducting wires is examined. The bow-tie-shaped induced current distributions and the resulting forbidden zone of radiation are explained through fundamental physical principles. We find that thin-wire scatterers can be divided into subchiral, chiral, and superchiral classes according to the degree of chirality of the host material and the electromagnetic length of the wire.

  19. Nondestructive Evaluation of Aircraft and Spacecraft Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, John E.; Tucholski, Edward J.; Green, Robert E., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    Spacecraft, and especially aircraft, often fry well past their original design lives and, therefore, the need to develop nondestructive evaluation procedures for inspection of vital structures in these craft is extremely important. One of the more recent problems is the degradation of wiring and wiring insulation. The present paper describes several nondestructive characterization methods which afford the possibility to detect wiring and insulation degradation in-situ prior to major problems with the safety of aircraft and spacecraft.

  20. Development of the Axial Instability in Low Wire Number Wire Array Z-Pinches

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, P. F.; Bell, K. S.; Blesener, I. C.; Chalenski, D. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Greenly, J. B.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.; Hall, G. N.

    2009-01-21

    We are investigating the development of the axial instability, a modulation of the size of the coronal plasma that develops around each wire in wire-array Z-pinches. The modulation is a result of nonuniform ablation of material from the relatively cold wire core. It has long been known that the wavelength of this modulation is constant late in time and, since it is unique to different materials, it has come to be known as the fundamental mode. In these experiments we imaged individual wires with laser shadowgraphy early in time primarily in low wire number, large wire diameter aluminum arrays for ease of viewing. We Observe the development of this modulation from the time of initiation of coronal plasma, obtaining its dominant wavelength and amplitude growth as a function of time. We also studied the instability on coiled wires, which modify the wire ablation mechanism and completely suppress the fundamental mode[Hall2008]. time is discussed.

  1. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING... Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.241 Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground...

  2. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING... Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.241 Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground...

  3. 49 CFR 234.241 - Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... underground wire. 234.241 Section 234.241 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION GRADE CROSSING SAFETY, INCLUDING... Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.241 Protection of insulated wire; splice in underground...

  4. Manifestations of quantum phase transitions in transport through nanosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Pustilnik, Michael

    2014-08-28

    The award led to several important new results in theory of interacting low-dimensional systems. The results are relevant for both traditional condensed matter systems, such as quantum wires and quantum spin chains, and for the relatively new field of ultra-cold atomic gases.

  5. Wired.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conklin, Aaron R.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses technology's impact on scoreboard design: the development of the light-emitting diode (LED) display. How the LED system works is explained, as are the advantages and disadvantages of LED compared with incandescent lamp boards. Final comments address deciding on materials for scoreboard casings. (GR)

  6. Wired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlowicz, Michael

    Every American grade school and library ought to have free access to the Internet, and universities and institutions ought to have better access, according to the Clinton Administration.In an October 10 speech in Knoxville, Tennessee, President Clinton proposed that all of the nation's 100,000 public schools and 9,000 libraries receive a two-tiered E-rate (education rate) for access to Internet services. All schools and libraries should receive basic connections for free, as well as deep discounts on video conferencing and highspeed connections (with prices influenced by how much the school can afford to pay). The basic connections (and part of the cost of the more sophisticated connections) would be paid from a special federal fund that currently provides below-cost phone service to households in poor and rural areas. That fund is currently drawn from fees assessed on local and long-distance telephone providers; the Clinton Administration would have cable operators and cellular service providers contribute as well. Companies that provide Internet services would be paid at the best available commercial rate.

  7. A deployable .015 inch diameter wire antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dibiasi, L.

    1979-01-01

    This mechanism was developed to dispense a small diameter wire which serves as a receiving antenna for electric field measurements on an Earth orbiting satellite. The antenna is deployed radially from a spinning satellite. A brushless dc motor drives a storage spool to dispense the wire at a controlled rate. Centrifugal force, acting on a mass attached to the end of the wire, keeps the wire in the radial position. The mechanism design, testing, and performance characteristics are discussed. Finally, operational data of the mechanism while in orbit are presented.

  8. Ferromagnetic resonance in submicron amorphous wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraus, Luděk; Frait, Zdeněk; Ababei, Gabriel; Chayka, Oleksandr; Chiriac, Horia

    2012-03-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance in glass-coated amorphous wires with the diameter of metallic core varying from 25 μm to 133 nm is investigated. The microwave frequencies of 49.1 and 69.7 GHz are used and static magnetic field is applied either parallel or perpendicular to the long wire axis. In agreement with theoretical predictions the resonance curves of submicron wires substantially differ from the curves of the bulk wires. Depending on the symmetry and intensity of microwave electric and magnetic fields in the sample vicinity the circumferential and/or dipolar resonance modes can be excited. In bulk wires the resonance fields of the two modes coincide. In submicron wires, however, their resonance fields differ, indicating the metallic character of the circumferential mode and the insulator character of the dipolar mode. In wires with diameters 717 and 869 nm radial standing spin wave resonances are observed in parallel field configuration. The experimental results for the parallel field configuration can be well explained by the rigorous theoretical model. From the fit of experimental data the exchange stiffness constant A = 8.2 10-12 J/m and perpendicular surface anisotropy constant Ks = 6 × 10-4 J/m2 are obtained. The resonance curves measured in the transversal field configuration can be well explained in the frame of the skin effect and quasistatic approximations for the bulk and submicron wires, respectively. In submicron wires, however, an additional resonance of unknown origin is observed at higher magnetic fields.

  9. Development of parallel wire regenerator for cryocoolers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Jeong, Sangkwon

    2006-04-01

    This paper describes development of a novel regenerator geometry for cryocoolers. Parallel wire type is a wire bundle stacked in parallel with the flow in the housing, which is similar to a conventional parallel plate or tube. Simple and unique fabrication procedure is developed and fully depicted in this paper. Hydrodynamic and thermal experiments are performed to demonstrate the feasibility of the parallel wire regenerator. First, pressure drop characteristic of the parallel wire regenerator is compared to that of the screen mesh regenerator. Experimental result shows that the steady flow friction factor of the parallel wire type is three to five times smaller than that of the screen mesh type. Second, thermal ineffectiveness is determined by measuring the instantaneous pressure, the flow rate and the gas temperature at the warm and cold ends of the regenerator. The measured ineffectiveness of the parallel wire regenerator is larger than that of the screen regenerator due to the excessive axial conduction loss. To alleviate the intrinsic axial conduction loss of the parallel wire regenerator, segmentation is introduced and the experimental results reveal the favorable effect of the segmentation. Entropy generation calculation is adopted to compare the total losses between the screen regenerator and the parallel wire regenerator for various operating ranges. Simulation results show that the parallel wire regenerator can be an attractive candidate to improve cryocooler performance especially for the case of smaller NTU and lower cold-end temperature.

  10. Discharge electrode wire assembly for electrostatic precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Ivester, F. D.; Troulias, J. R.

    1985-03-05

    An electrostatic precipitator having a casing defining a precipitation chamber wherein a plurality of discharge electrode frames are disposed alternately between a plurality of collecting electrode plates. Each discharge electrode frame is comprised of a plurality of individual discharge electrode wires tautly strung across a support frame. Individual discharge electrode wires are maintained in a taut condition during operation by tensioning coil springs which interconnect neighboring discharge electrode wires to take-up any lengthening of the discharge electrode wires in a horizontal direction.

  11. Superconducting-wire fabrication. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Glad, W.E.; Chase, G.G.

    1990-05-01

    Experiments were done leading to the fabrication of high-temperature superconducting composite wire. Bulk superconductor was characterized by using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy. The chemical compatibility of superconducting materials with a number of metal sheathing candidates was tested, with silver offering the best compatibility. Wire was fabricated by drawing 0.250-inch-diameter silver tubing packed with superconducting powder. Single core wires were drawn to 0.037-inch diameter. The best critical current performance (660 A/cm2) for leaded bismuth 2-2-2-3 material was achieved by flattening single-core wire before heat treatment.

  12. Effect of an Axial Wire on Conical Wire Array Z-Pinch Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Presura, R.; Martinez, D.; Wright, S.; Plechaty, C.; Neff, S.; Wanex, L.; Ampleford, D. J.

    2009-01-21

    Adding a wire on the axis of wire arrays significantly affects the x-ray emission of the conical arrays, and much less that of the cylindrical ones. The radiation of the conical wire arrays increases with the thickness of the central wire, surpassing that of the equivalent cylindrical arrays. Significant energy is emitted early on, around the time of the conical shock formation, before the pinch stagnation.

  13. Processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition

    DOEpatents

    Meltzer, Michael P.; Steffani, Christopher P.; Gonfiotti, Ray A.

    2010-12-07

    A method of processing a printed wiring board. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  14. Processing A Printed Wiring Board By Single Bath Electrodeposition

    DOEpatents

    Meltzer, Michael P.; Steffani, Christopher P.; Gonfiotti, Ray A.

    2003-04-15

    A method of processing a printed wiring board by single bath electrodeposition. Initial processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board. Copper is plated on the printed wiring board from a bath containing nickel and copper. Nickel is plated on the printed wiring board from the bath containing nickel and copper and final processing steps are implemented on the printed wiring board.

  15. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an...

  16. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an...

  17. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Disposition of home run wiring. 76.804 Section... MULTICHANNEL VIDEO AND CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Cable Inside Wiring § 76.804 Disposition of home run wiring. (a) Building-by-building disposition of home run wiring. (1) Where an MVPD owns the home run wiring in an...

  18. 29 CFR 1926.1413 - Wire rope-inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... Apparent deficiencies in this category are: (A) Visible broken wires, as follows: (1) In running wire ropes: Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope... around the rope. (2) In rotation resistant ropes: Two randomly distributed broken wires in six...

  19. 29 CFR 1926.1413 - Wire rope-inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    .... Apparent deficiencies in this category are: (A) Visible broken wires, as follows: (1) In running wire ropes: Six randomly distributed broken wires in one rope lay or three broken wires in one strand in one rope... around the rope. (2) In rotation resistant ropes: Two randomly distributed broken wires in six...

  20. Quantum computing

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Shen; Long, Gui-Lu; Bai, Feng-Shan; Feng, Song-Lin; Zheng, Hou-Zhi

    2001-01-01

    Quantum computing is a quickly growing research field. This article introduces the basic concepts of quantum computing, recent developments in quantum searching, and decoherence in a possible quantum dot realization. PMID:11562459

  1. Kirschner wire pin tract infection rates: a randomized controlled trial between percutaneous and buried wires.

    PubMed

    Hargreaves, D G; Drew, S J; Eckersley, R

    2004-08-01

    This prospective, randomized trial compares the infection rates of Kirschner wires left percutaneously and those buried deep to the skin in a group of patients with isolated distal radial fractures. Percutaneous wires had a significantly greater infection rate than wires which were buried deep to the skin.

  2. Synthesis of nano-scale silicon wires by excimer laser ablation at high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, D. P.; Lee, C. S.; Bello, I.; Sun, X. S.; Tang, Y. H.; Zhou, G. W.; Bai, Z. G.; Zhang, Z.; Feng, S. Q.

    1998-02-01

    We report below synthesis of nano-scale silicon wires by using laser ablation at high temperature. By this approach we have been able to produce silicon nano wires (SiNW's) with a very high yield, a uniform diameter distribution and a high purity. The structure, morphology and chemical composition of the SiNWs have been characterized by using high resolution X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution electron microscopy (HREM), as well as spectroscopy of energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDAX). Our results should be of great interest to researchers working on mesoscopic physical phenomena, such as quantum confinement effects related to materials of reduced dimensions and should lead to the development of new applications for nano-scale devices, together with providing a powerful method for synthesis of similar one-dimensional conducting and semi-conducting wire.

  3. Tuning a Tetrahertz Wire Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qin, Qi; Williams, Benjamin S.; Kumar, Sushil; Reno, John L.; Hu, Qing

    2009-01-01

    Tunable terahertz lasers are desirable in applications in sensing and spectroscopy because many biochemical species have strong spectral fingerprints at terahertz frequencies. Conventionally, the frequency of a laser is tuned in a similar manner to a stringed musical instrument, in which pitch is varied by changing the length of the string (the longitudinal component of the wave vector) and/ or its tension (the refractive index). However, such methods are difficult to implement in terahertz semiconductor lasers because of their poor outcoupling efficiencies. Here, we demonstrate a novel tuning mechanism based on a unique 'wire laser' device for which the transverse dimension w is much much less than lambda. Placing a movable object close to the wire laser manipulates a large fraction of the waveguided mode propagating outside the cavity, thereby tuning its resonant frequency. Continuous single-mode redshift and blueshift tuning is demonstrated for the same device by using either a dielectric or metallic movable object. In combination, this enables a frequency tuning of approximately equal to 137 GHz (3.6%) from a single laser device at approximately equal to 3.8 THz.

  4. Direct imaging of quantum wires nucleated at diatomic steps

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, S. I.; Varela, M.; Sales, D. L.; Ben, T.; Pizarro, J.; Galindo, P. L.; Fuster, D.; Gonzalez, Y.; Gonzalez, L.; Pennycook, S. J.

    2007-10-01

    Atomic steps at growth surfaces are important heterogeneous sources for nucleation of epitaxial nano-objects. In the presence of misfit strain, we show that the nucleation process takes place preferentially at the upper terrace of the step as a result of the local stress relaxation. Evidence for strain-induced nucleation comes from the direct observation by postgrowth, atomic resolution, Z-contrast imaging of an InAs-rich region in a nanowire located on the upper terrace surface of an interfacial diatomic step.

  5. Growth of Quantum Wires on Step-Bunched Substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Feng

    2005-02-01

    This proposal initiates a combined theoretical and experimental multidisciplinary research effort to explore a novel approach for growing metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched semiconductor and dielectric substrates, and to lay the groundwork for understanding the growth mechanisms and the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of metallic and magnetic nanowires. The research will focus on four topics: (1) fundamental studies of step bunching and self-organization in a strained thin film for creating step-bunched substrates. (2) Interaction between metal adatoms (Al,Cu, and Ni) and semiconductor (Si and SiGe) and dielectric (CaF2) surface steps. (3) growth and characterization of metallic and magnetic nanowires on step-bunched templates. (4) fabrication of superlattices of nanowires by growing multilayer films. We propose to attack these problems at both a microscopic and macroscopic level, using state-of-the-art theoretical and experimental techniques. Multiscale (electronic-atomic-continuum) theories will be applied to investigate growth mechanisms of nanowires: mesoscopic modeling and simulation of step flow growth of strained thin films, in particular, step bunching and self-organization will be carried out within the framework of continuum linear elastic theory; atomistic calculation of interaction between metal adatoms and semiconductor and dielectric surface steps will be done by large-scale computations using first-principles total-energy methods. In parallel, thin films and nanowires will be grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE), and the resultant structure and morphology will be characterized at the atomic level up to micrometer range, using a combination of different surface/interface probes, including scanning tunneling microscopy (STM, atomic resolution), atomic force microscopy (AFM, nanometer resolution), low-energy electron microscopy (LEEM, micrometer resolution), reflectance high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED), and x-ray diffraction. Finally, the electronic, electrical, and magnetic properties of the thin films and nanowires will be explored by both theory and experiment.

  6. Improved Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: Superconducting Wires for Direct-Drive Wind Generators

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Brookhaven National Laboratory will develop a low-cost superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. Brookhaven National Laboratory will develop a high-performance superconducting wire that can handle significantly more electrical current, and will demonstrate an advanced manufacturing process that has the potential to yield a several-fold reduction in wire costs while using a using negligible amount of rare earth material. This design has the potential to make a wind turbine generator lighter, more powerful, and more efficient, particularly for offshore applications.

  7. Twisted Pair Of Insulated Wires Senses Moisture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.; Stephens, James B.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of electronic moisture sensor to low levels of moisture increased by new electrode configuration. Moisture-sensing circuit described in "Low-Cost Humidity Sensor" (NPO-16544). New twisted pair of wires takes place of flat-plate capacitor in circuit. Configuration allows for thermal expansion and contraction of polymer while maintaining nearly constant area of contact between polymer and wires.

  8. Microfabricated wire arrays for Z-pinch.

    SciTech Connect

    Spahn, Olga Blum; Rowen, Adam M.; Cich, Michael Joseph; Peake, Gregory Merwin; Arrington, Christian L.; Nash, Thomas J.; Klem, John Frederick; Romero, Dustin Heinz

    2008-10-01

    Microfabrication methods have been applied to the fabrication of wire arrays suitable for use in Z. Self-curling GaAs/AlGaAs supports were fabricated as an initial route to make small wire arrays (4mm diameter). A strain relief structure that could be integrated with the wire was designed to allow displacements of the anode/cathode connections in Z. Electroplated gold wire arrays with integrated anode/cathode bus connections were found to be sufficiently robust to allow direct handling. Platinum and copper plating processes were also investigated. A process to fabricate wire arrays on any substrate with wire thickness up to 35 microns was developed. Methods to handle and mount these arrays were developed. Fabrication of wire arrays of 20mm diameter was demonstrated, and the path to 40mm array fabrication is clear. With some final investment to show array mounting into Z hardware, the entire process to produce a microfabricated wire array will have been demonstrated.

  9. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires....

  10. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires....

  11. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires....

  12. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires....

  13. 30 CFR 56.12047 - Guy wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Guy wires. 56.12047 Section 56.12047 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Electricity § 56.12047 Guy wires....

  14. 29 CFR 1919.79 - Wire rope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 7 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wire rope. 1919.79 Section 1919.79 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) GEAR CERTIFICATION Certification of Shore-Based Material Handling Devices § 1919.79 Wire rope. (a)...

  15. Welding torch and wire feed manipulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, R. T.

    1967-01-01

    Welding torch and wire feed manipulator increase capability for performing automatic welding operations. The manipulator rotates on its horizontal axis to avoid obstacles as they approach the torch. The initial individual attitudes of the torch and wire guide are set with respect to the general configuration of the part.

  16. Ultra-flexible biomedical electrodes and wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rositano, S. A.

    1970-01-01

    Soft, flexible electrode conforms to body contour during body motion. It is fabricated from an elastomer impregnated with a conductive powder which can be configured into any required shape, including a wire shape to connect the electrode directly to an electrical instrument or to a conventional metallic wire.

  17. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improves the strain characteristics of the wire.

  18. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, Thomas; Klamut, Carl J.; Suenaga, Masaki; Welch, David

    1982-01-01

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  19. Superconducting wire with improved strain characteristics

    DOEpatents

    Luhman, T.; Klamut, C.J.; Suenaga, M.; Welch, D.

    1979-12-19

    A superconducting wire comprising a superconducting filament and a beryllium strengthened bronze matrix in which the addition of beryllium to the matrix permits a low volume matrix to exhibit reduced elastic deformation after heat treating which increases the compression of the superconducting filament on cooling and thereby improve the strain characteristics of the wire.

  20. Flywheel system using wire-wound rotor

    DOEpatents

    Chiao, Edward Young; Bender, Donald Arthur; Means, Andrew E.; Snyder, Philip K.

    2016-06-07

    A flywheel is described having a rotor constructed of wire wound onto a central form. The wire is prestressed, thus mitigating stresses that occur during operation. In another aspect, the flywheel incorporates a low-loss motor using electrically non-conducting permanent magnets.

  1. LANSCE-R WIRE-SCANNER SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, Michael E.

    2011-01-01

    The National Instruments cRIO platform is used for the new LANSCE-R wire-scanner systems. All wire-scanner electronics are integrated into a single BiRa BiRIO 4U cRIO chassis specifically designed for the cRIO crate and all interface electronics. The BiRIO chassis, actuator and LabVIEW VIs provide a complete wire-scanner system integrated with EPICS. The new wire-scanner chassis includes an 8-slot cRIO crate with Virtex-5 LX 110 FPGA and Power-PC real-time controller, the LANL-developed cRIO 2-axis wire-sensor analog interface module (AFE), NI9222 cRIO 4-channel 16-bit digitizer, cRIO resolver demodulator, cRIO event receiver, front-panel touch panel display, motor driver, and all necessary software, interface wiring, connectors and ancillary components. This wirescanner system provides a complete, turn-key, 2-axis wire-scanner system including 2-channel low-noise sensewire interface with variable DC wire bias and wireintegrity monitor, 16-bit signal digitizers, actuator motor drive and control, actuator position sensing, limit-switch interfaces, event receiver, LabVIEW and EPICS interface, and both remote operation and full stand-alone operation using the touch panel.

  2. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire....

  3. 47 CFR 32.2431 - Aerial wire.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Aerial wire. 32.2431 Section 32.2431 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2431 Aerial wire....

  4. SpaceWire Architectures: Present and Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakow, Glen Parker

    2006-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on current and future spacewire architectures is shown. The topics include: 1) Current Spacewire Architectures: Swift Data Flow; 2) Current SpaceWire Architectures : LRO Data Flow; 3) Current Spacewire Architectures: JWST Data Flow; 4) Current SpaceWire Architectures; 5) Traditional Systems; 6) Future Systems; 7) Advantages; and 8) System Engineer Toolkit.

  5. Lansce Wire Scanning Diagnostics Device Mechanical Design

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio; Batygin, Yuri K.; Gilpatrick, John D.; Gruchalla, Michael E.; Maestas, Alfred J.; Pillai, Chandra; Raybun, Joseph L.; Sattler, F. D.; Sedillo, James Daniel; Smith, Brian G.

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Operations & Technology Division at Los Alamos National Laboratory operates a linear particle accelerator which utilizes 110 wire scanning diagnostics devices to gain position and intensity information of the proton beam. In the upcoming LANSCE improvements, 51 of these wire scanners are to be replaced with a new design, up-to-date technology and off-the-shelf components. This document outlines the requirements for the mechanical design of the LANSCE wire scanner and presents the recently developed linac wire scanner prototype. Additionally, this document presents the design modifications that have been implemented into the fabrication and assembly of this first linac wire scanner prototype. Also, this document will present the design for the second, third, and fourth wire scanner prototypes being developed. Prototypes 2 and 3 belong to a different section of the particle accelerator and therefore have slightly different design specifications. Prototype 4 is a modification of a previously used wire scanner in our facility. Lastly, the paper concludes with a plan for future work on the wire scanner development.

  6. Wire ageing with the TEA photocathode

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1996-06-01

    Recently several RICH protypes successfully tested a gaseous TEA photocathode. However, its wire ageing behavior is unknown. In principle, TEA is a more strongly bonded molecule than TMAE, and, as a result, one would expect better wire ageing behavior. This paper explores this question.

  7. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... wiring. The incumbent provider that has elected to abandon its home run wiring may remove its amplifiers... amplifiers or other active devices used in the wiring if an equivalent replacement can easily be...

  8. 47 CFR 76.804 - Disposition of home run wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... wiring. The incumbent provider that has elected to abandon its home run wiring may remove its amplifiers... amplifiers or other active devices used in the wiring if an equivalent replacement can easily be...

  9. Wiring harnesses documented by punched-card technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, W. W.; Kloezeman, W. G.

    1970-01-01

    Cards representing a connector are punched, sorted, and then used to printout wiring documentation for that connector. When wiring changes are made, new cards are punched and the wiring documentation is reprinted to reflect the latest configuration.

  10. Long-Wearing Wire Guide For Welding Torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutow, David A.; Burley, Richard K.; Gilbert, Jeffrey L.; Fogel, Irving

    1992-01-01

    Insert for wire-guide tube on tungsten/inert-gas welding apparatus extends life of guide tube and increases accuracy of weld. Hardened insert resists wear by sliding tungsten wire. Chamfer guides wire into insert.

  11. Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

  12. Field Theory of the Quantum Kicked Rotor

    SciTech Connect

    Altland, A.; Zirnbauer, M.R.

    1996-11-01

    The quantum kicked rotor is investigated by field theoretical methods. It is shown that the effective theory describing the long wavelength physics of the system is precisely the supersymmetric nonlinear {sigma} model for quasi-one-dimensional metallic wires. This proves that the analogy between chaotic systems with dynamical localization and disordered metals can indeed be exact. The role of symmetries is discussed.

  13. Method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Finnemore, Douglas K.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schmidt, Frederick A.; Owen, Charles V.

    1985-08-06

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb.sub.3 Sn in a copper matrix which eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb.sub.3 Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  14. Improved method of preparing composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Gibson, E.D.; Finnemore, D.K.; Ostenson, J.E.; Schmidt, F.A.; Owen, C.V.

    1979-10-17

    An improved method of preparing composite multifilament superconducting wire of Nb/sub 3/Sn in a copper matrix eliminates the necessity of coating the drawn wire with tin. A generalized cylindrical billet of an alloy of copper containing at least 15 weight percent niobium, present in the copper as discrete, randomly distributed and oriented dendritic-shaped particles, is provided with at least one longitudinal opening which is filled with tin to form a composite drawing rod. The drawing rod is then drawn to form a ductile composite multifilament wire containing a filament of tin. The ductile wire containing the tin can then be wound into magnet coils or other devices before heating to diffuse the tin through the wire to react with the niobium forming Nb/sub 3/Sn. Also described is an improved method for making large billets of the copper-niobium alloy by consumable-arc casting.

  15. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  16. Wiring Damage Analyses for STS OV-103

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Walter, III

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated the Shuttle Program s belief that Space Transportation System (STS) wiring damage occurrences are random, that is, a constant occurrence rate. Using Problem Reporting and Corrective Action (PRACA)-derived data for STS Space Shuttle OV-103, wiring damage was observed to increase over the vehicle s life. Causal factors could include wiring physical deterioration, maintenance and inspection induced damage, and inspection process changes resulting in more damage events being reported. Induced damage effects cannot be resolved with existent data. Growth analysis (using Crow-AMSAA, or CA) resolved maintenance/inspection effects (e.g., heightened awareness) on all wire damages and indicated an overall increase since Challenger Return-to-Flight (RTF). An increasing failure or occurrence rate per flight cycle was seen for each wire damage mode; these (individual) rates were not affected by inspection process effects, within statistical error.

  17. On Wires Holding a Handful of Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beiu, Valeriu; Ibrahim, Walid; Makki, Rafic Z.

    When analyzing reliability, wires have in most cases been ignored, with gates (and devices) taking the lion’s share. With scaling, this “only computing fails” approach is not going to be accurate enough as communication (wires) will also start to err. Trying to do justice to wires, this paper details a statistical failure analysis of wires following on the few papers which have made wires’ reliability their concern. We will use a classical particle-like probabilistic approach to enhance on the accuracy of wires’ length-dependent probabilities of failure due to the discreetness of charge. Covering some of the intrinsic noises, such an approach leads to “lower bound”-like wire reliability estimates, as ignoring other intrinsic noises, as well as extrinsic noises, variations, and defects. These results should have implications for multi-/many-cores and networks-on-chip, as well as forward-looking investigations on emerging nano-architectures.

  18. Realization of a Strained Atomic Wire Superlattice.

    PubMed

    Song, Inkyung; Goh, Jung Suk; Lee, Sung-Hoon; Jung, Sung Won; Shin, Jin Sung; Yamane, Hiroyuki; Kosugi, Nobuhiro; Yeom, Han Woong

    2015-11-24

    A superlattice of strained Au-Si atomic wires is successfully fabricated on a Si surface. Au atoms are known to incorporate into the stepped Si(111) surface to form a Au-Si atomic wire array with both one-dimensional (1D) metallic and antiferromagnetic atomic chains. At a reduced density of Au, we find a regular array of Au-Si wires in alternation with pristine Si nanoterraces. Pristine Si nanoterraces impose a strain on the neighboring Au-Si wires, which modifies both the band structure of metallic chains and the magnetic property of spin chains. This is an ultimate 1D version of a strained-layer superlattice of semiconductors, defining a direction toward the fine engineering of self-assembled atomic-scale wires. PMID:26446292

  19. The aging of wire chambers filled with dimethyl ether: wire and construction materials and freon impurities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jibaly, Mohammed; Majewski, Stan; Chrusch, Peter; Wojcik, Randolph; Sauli, Fabio; Gaudaen, Jan

    1989-11-01

    This is a complete summary of our study of the aging of different types of wire chambers, with a variety of construction materials and wires, filled with dimethyl ether (DME) of varying degrees of purity. The resistive Nicotin and Stablohm wires were corroded by DME, producing fast aging. The moderately resistive stainless steel wires were able to withstand extended irradiation (up to 1 C/cm) in high-purity DME without any apparent damage; and gold-plated tungsten and molybdenum wires exhibited a comparable behavior. Many construction materials were tested and recommendations are thus reached as to what kinds of materials are safe in building DME-operated wire chambers. Among many different Freon and hydrocarbon impurities detected in DME by means of gas chromatography (GC), Freon-11 was found to be mostly responsible for the aging, even with noncorrosive stainless steel or gold-plated wires. The availability and feasibility of obtaining Freon-free DME is reported as well.

  20. Quantum Mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auletta, Gennaro; Fortunato, Mauro; Parisi, Giorgio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction; Part I. Basic Features of Quantum Mechanics: 1. From classical mechanics to quantum mechanics; 2. Quantum observable and states; 3. Quantum dynamics; 4. Examples of quantum dynamics; 5. Density matrix; Part II. More Advanced Topics: 6. Angular momentum and spin; 7. Identical particles; 8. Symmetries and conservation laws; 9. The measurement problem; Part III. Matter and Light: 10. Perturbations and approximation methods; 11. Hydrogen and helium atoms; 12. Hydrogen molecular ion; 13. Quantum optics; Part IV. Quantum Information: State and Correlations: 14. Quantum theory of open systems; 15. State measurement in quantum mechanics; 16. Entanglement: non-separability; 17. Entanglement: quantum information; References; Index.

  1. Strain tolerant microfilamentary superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Finnemore, Douglas K.; Miller, Theodore A.; Ostenson, Jerome E.; Schwartzkopf, Louis A.; Sanders, Steven C.

    1993-02-23

    A strain tolerant microfilamentary wire capable of carrying superconducting currents is provided comprising a plurality of discontinuous filaments formed from a high temperature superconducting material. The discontinuous filaments have a length at least several orders of magnitude greater than the filament diameter and are sufficiently strong while in an amorphous state to withstand compaction. A normal metal is interposed between and binds the discontinuous filaments to form a normal metal matrix capable of withstanding heat treatment for converting the filaments to a superconducting state. The geometry of the filaments within the normal metal matrix provides substantial filament-to-filament overlap, and the normal metal is sufficiently thin to allow supercurrent transfer between the overlapped discontinuous filaments but is also sufficiently thick to provide strain relief to the filaments.

  2. 49 CFR 236.76 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 236.76 Section 236.76 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or otherwise so... apparatus. Inspections and Tests; All Systems...

  3. 49 CFR 236.76 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 236.76 Section 236.76 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or otherwise so... apparatus. Inspections and Tests; All Systems...

  4. 47 CFR 32.2321 - Customer premises wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts § 32.2321... 232, Station Connections, inside wiring subclass. (b) Embedded Customer Premises Wiring is...

  5. In Situ Electrochemical Deposition of Microscopic Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yun, Minhee; Myung, Nosang; Vasquez, Richard

    2005-01-01

    A method of fabrication of wires having micron and submicron dimensions is built around electrochemical deposition of the wires in their final positions between electrodes in integrated circuits or other devices in which the wires are to be used. Heretofore, nanowires have been fabricated by a variety of techniques characterized by low degrees of controllability and low throughput rates, and it has been necessary to align and electrically connect the wires in their final positions by use of sophisticated equipment in expensive and tedious post-growth assembly processes. The present method is more economical, offers higher yields, enables control of wire widths, and eliminates the need for post-growth assembly. The wires fabricated by this method could be used as simple electrical conductors or as transducers in sensors. Depending upon electrodeposition conditions and the compositions of the electroplating solutions in specific applications, the wires could be made of metals, alloys, metal oxides, semiconductors, or electrically conductive polymers. In this method, one uses fabrication processes that are standard in the semiconductor industry. These include cleaning, dry etching, low-pressure chemical vapor deposition, lithography, dielectric deposition, electron-beam lithography, and metallization processes as well as the electrochemical deposition process used to form the wires. In a typical case of fabrication of a circuit that includes electrodes between which microscopic wires are to be formed on a silicon substrate, the fabrication processes follow a standard sequence until just before the fabrication of the microscopic wires. Then, by use of a thermal SiO-deposition technique, the electrodes and the substrate surface areas in the gaps between them are covered with SiO. Next, the SiO is electron-beam patterned, then reactive-ion etched to form channels having specified widths (typically about 1 m or less) that define the widths of the wires to be formed. Drops

  6. Development of a precision wire feeder for small-diameter wire

    SciTech Connect

    Brandon, E.D.

    1995-03-01

    At Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, the author designed and fabricated a precision wire feeder to be used with high energy density (electron beam and laser beam) welding for weld joints where filler wire might be needed to fill a gap or to adjust the chemical composition so that a crack-free weld could be made. The wire feeder incorporates a 25,000 step-per-revolution motor to power a urethane-coated drive roll. A microprocessor-based controller provides precise control of the motor and allows both continuous and pulsed feeding of the wire. A unidirectional 0.75-in.-dia ball bearing is used to press the wire against the drive roll. A slight constant backward tension is maintained on the wire spool by a Bodine torque motor. A Teflon tube is used to guide the wire from the drive roll to the vicinity of the weld, where a hypodermic needle is used to aim the wire into the weld pool. The operation of the wire feeder was demonstrated by feeding a 10-mil-dia, Type 304 stainless steel wire into a variety of CO{sub 2} laser beam welds. The resulting welds are smooth and continuous, and the welds are considered to be completely satisfactory for a variety of applications.

  7. Wire Crimp Termination Verification Using Ultrasonic Inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perey, Daniel F.; Cramer, K. Elliott; Yost, William T.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a new ultrasonic measurement technique to quantitatively assess wire crimp terminations is discussed. The amplitude change of a compressional ultrasonic wave propagating through the junction of a crimp termination and wire is shown to correlate with the results of a destructive pull test, which is a standard for assessing crimp wire junction quality. Various crimp junction pathologies such as undercrimping, missing wire strands, incomplete wire insertion, partial insulation removal, and incorrect wire gauge are ultrasonically tested, and their results are correlated with pull tests. Results show that the nondestructive ultrasonic measurement technique consistently (as evidenced with destructive testing) predicts good crimps when ultrasonic transmission is above a certain threshold amplitude level. A physics-based model, solved by finite element analysis, describes the compressional ultrasonic wave propagation through the junction during the crimping process. This model is in agreement within 6% of the ultrasonic measurements. A prototype instrument for applying this technique while wire crimps are installed is also presented. The instrument is based on a two-jaw type crimp tool suitable for butt-splice type connections. Finally, an approach for application to multipin indenter type crimps will be discussed.

  8. LANSCE wire scanning diagnostics device mechanical design

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez Esparza, Sergio

    2010-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is one of the major experimental science facilities at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The core of LANSCE's work lies in the operation of a powerful linear accelerator, which accelerates protons up to 84% the speed oflight. These protons are used for a variety of purposes, including materials testing, weapons research and isotopes production. To assist in guiding the proton beam, a series of over one hundred wire scanners are used to measure the beam profile at various locations along the half-mile length of the particle accelerator. A wire scanner is an electro-mechanical device that moves a set of wires through a particle beam and measures the secondary emissions from the resulting beam-wire interaction to obtain beam intensity information. When supplemented with data from a position sensor, this information is used to determine the cross-sectional profile of the beam. This measurement allows beam operators to adjust parameters such as acceleration, beam steering, and focus to ensure that the beam reaches its destination as effectively as possible. Some of the current wire scanners are nearly forty years old and are becoming obsolete. The problem with current wire scanners comes in the difficulty of maintenance and reliability. The designs of these wire scanners vary making it difficult to keep spare parts that would work on all designs. Also many of the components are custom built or out-dated technology and are no longer in production.

  9. In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Roberson, Luke; Tate, Lanetra; Smith, Trent; Gibson, Tracy; Medelius, Pedro; Jolley, Scott

    2012-01-01

    An In-Situ Wire Damage Detection System (ISWDDS) has been developed that is capable of detecting damage to a wire insulation, or a wire conductor, or to both. The system will allow for realtime, continuous monitoring of wiring health/integrity and reduce the number of false negatives and false positives while being smaller, lighter in weight, and more robust than current systems. The technology allows for improved safety and significant reduction in maintenance hours for aircraft, space vehicles, satellites, and other critical high-performance wiring systems for industries such as energy production and mining. The integrated ISWDDS is comprised of two main components: (1) a wire with an innermost core conductor, an inner insulation film, a conductive layer or inherently conductive polymer (ICP) covering the inner insulation film, an outermost insulation jacket; and (2) smart connectors and electronics capable of producing and detecting electronic signals, and a central processing unit (CPU) for data collection and analysis. The wire is constructed by applying the inner insulation films to the conductor, followed by the outer insulation jacket. The conductive layer or ICP is on the outer surface of the inner insulation film. One or more wires are connected to the CPU using the smart connectors, and up to 64 wires can be monitored in real-time. The ISWDDS uses time domain reflectometry for damage detection. A fast-risetime pulse is injected into either the core conductor or conductive layer and referenced against the other conductor, producing transmission line behavior. If either conductor is damaged, then the signal is reflected. By knowing the speed of propagation of the pulse, and the time it takes to reflect, one can calculate the distance to and location of the damage.

  10. Length dependence of electron transport through molecular wires--a first principles perspective.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Khoong Hong; Chen, Yifeng; Li, Suchun; Quek, Su Ying

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional wires constitute a fundamental building block in nanoscale electronics. However, truly one-dimensional metallic wires do not exist due to Peierls distortion. Molecular wires come close to being stable one-dimensional wires, but are typically semiconductors, with charge transport occurring via tunneling or thermally-activated hopping. In this review, we discuss electron transport through molecular wires, from a theoretical, quantum mechanical perspective based on first principles. We focus specifically on the off-resonant tunneling regime, applicable to shorter molecular wires (<∼4-5 nm) where quantum mechanics dictates electron transport. Here, conductance decays exponentially with the wire length, with an exponential decay constant, beta, that is independent of temperature. Different levels of first principles theory are discussed, starting with the computational workhorse - density functional theory (DFT), and moving on to many-electron GW methods as well as GW-inspired DFT + Sigma calculations. These different levels of theory are applied in two major computational frameworks - complex band structure (CBS) calculations to estimate the tunneling decay constant, beta, and Landauer-Buttiker transport calculations that consider explicitly the effects of contact geometry, and compute the transmission spectra directly. In general, for the same level of theory, the Landauer-Buttiker calculations give more quantitative values of beta than the CBS calculations. However, the CBS calculations have a long history and are particularly useful for quick estimates of beta. Comparing different levels of theory, it is clear that GW and DFT + Sigma calculations give significantly improved agreement with experiment compared to DFT, especially for the conductance values. Quantitative agreement can also be obtained for the Seebeck coefficient - another independent probe of electron transport. This excellent agreement provides confirmative evidence of off

  11. Colloidally deposited nanoparticle wires for biophysical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Sophie C.; Liu, Wen-Tao; Diao, Jia-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Among the techniques developed to prepare nanoparticle wires for multiple applications, the colloidal deposition method at interface has been regarded as cost-efficient and eco-friendly, and hence has attracted an increasing amount of research attention. In this report, the recent developments in preparing nanoparticle wires and integrated nanoparticle wire arrays using this technique have been reviewed. Furthermore, we have also discussed the application of these nanoparticle structures in detecting chemical and biological molecules. Project supported by the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities through Xi’an Jiaotong University and the National Key Basic Research Program of China (Grant No. 2015CB856304).

  12. Pulse speed on a plucked wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odekirk, Tristan; Slaton, William V.

    2012-04-01

    This paper serves to update an elegant experiment published in The Physics Teacher to measure the speed of a pulse on a taut metal wire. Unfortunately, commercially available units2 that serve the same purpose are priced outside the range of most high school or college physics teaching laboratories. Wakeland et al. show how an affordable adaptation of the traditional standing wave apparatus using taut metal wire and horseshoe magnets can be used to measure the speed of a pulse by using an oscilloscope to measure an induced voltage in the wire as the pulse transverses the middle of the magnets, which are a known distance apart.

  13. Detectors Ensure Function, Safety of Aircraft Wiring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2013-01-01

    Pedro Medelius waited patiently in his lab at Kennedy Space Center. He had just received word that a colleague was bringing over a cable from a Space Shuttle solid rocket booster to test Medelius new invention. Medelius was calm until his colleague arrived, with about 30 other people. "Talk about testing under pressure," says Medelius. "There were people there from the Navy, the Air Force, and the Federal Aviation Administration." After the group s arrival, Medelius took a deep breath and connected his Standing Wave Reflectometer (SWR) to the cable. He wiggled the cable around, and the display showed a fault (a short or open circuit in wire) about an inch and a half inside the connector on the cable. His colleague questioned the results, because he had already checked that area on the cable. Medelius used the SWR to check again but got the same result. "That is when we took the cable apart and looked inside," Medelius says. "Lo and behold, that was exactly where the fault was." The impetus for Medelius new wire inspection technology came about in 1999 when one of the space shuttles lost power due to a fault somewhere in its more than 200 miles of electrical wiring. "The backup circuit was activated and prevented a major dysfunction, but nevertheless, there was a problem with the wiring," Medelius describes. Even though technicians used a device called a multimeter to measure the electrical current to find which wire had a fault, it could not pinpoint exactly where on the wire the fault was located. For that, technicians had to visually inspect the wire. "Sometimes they would have to remove the whole wire assembly and visually inspect every single wire. It was a very tedious operation because the wires are behind cabinets. They go all over the place in the shuttle," says Medelius. "NASA needed an instrument capable of telling them exactly where the faults were occurring." To meet NASA s needs for a highly precise device to inspect electrical power bundles, wires

  14. Copper Wire Bonding Concerns and Best Practices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauhan, Preeti; Zhong, Z. W.; Pecht, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Copper wire bonding of microelectronic parts has developed as a means to cut the costs of using the more mature technology of gold wire bonding. However, with this new technology, changes in the bonding processes as well as bonding metallurgy can affect product reliability. This paper discusses the challenges associated with copper wire bonding and the solutions that the industry has been implementing. The paper also provides information to enable customers to conduct qualification and reliability tests on microelectronic packages to facilitate adoption in their target applications.

  15. Resonant Anderson localization in segmented wires.

    PubMed

    Estarellas, Cristian; Serra, Llorenç

    2016-03-01

    We discuss a model of random segmented wire, with linear segments of two-dimensional wires joined by circular bends. The joining vertices act as scatterers on the propagating electron waves. The model leads to resonant Anderson localization when all segments are of similar length. The resonant behavior is present with one and also with several propagating modes. The probability distributions evolve from diffusive to localized regimes when increasing the number of segments in a similar way for long and short localization lengths. As a function of the energy, a finite segmented wire typically evolves from localized to diffusive to ballistic behavior in each conductance plateau.

  16. Fabrication of FFTF fuel pin wire wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Lateral spacing between FFTF fuel pins is required to provide a passageway for the sodium coolant to flow over each pin to remove heat generated by the fission process. This spacing is provided by wrapping each fuel pin with type 316 stainless steel wire. This wire has a 1.435mm (0.0565 in.) to 1.448mm (0.0570 in.) diameter, contains 17 +- 2% cold work and was fabricated and tested to exacting RDT Standards. About 500 kg (1100 lbs) or 39 Km (24 miles) of fuel pin wrap wire is used in each core loading. Fabrication procedures and quality assurance tests are described.

  17. Telephone wire is backbone of security system

    SciTech Connect

    Brede, K.; Rackson, L.T.

    1995-09-01

    Video provides a variety of low-cost, high-quality solutions in today`s security environment. Cost-conscious managers of power generation stations, casinos, prison facilities, military bases and office buildings are considering using regular telephone wire (unshielded twisted pair-UTP) within their existing systems as the backbone of a video to the PC, personal and video-conferencing and training are other areas where phone wire in a building can save money and provide an alternative to coax or fiber for video. More and more, businesses and government agencies are meeting their needs efficiently by using telephone wires for more than just telephones.

  18. Total recall: an update on orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Jyothikiran, H; Shantharaj, Ravi; Batra, Panchali; Subbiah, Pradeep; Lakshmi, Bhagya; Kudagi, Vishal

    2014-01-01

    Orthodontic therapy is a force management procedure largely based on use of arch wires for storing and distributing biologically tolerable forces by means of which position of teeth is altered. Advances in material science and technology has resulted in an array of newer arch wire materials, opening new vistas, in orthodontic treatment. Materials with widely diverging properties are in the market today and their usage has profound implications on appliance mechanics, and are very much different from stainless steel which is popular even today. The dentists who practise orthodontics have to therefore clearly outline the phases of treatment and select the arch wire most suited for attaining specific treatment goals.

  19. Quantum memory Quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Gouët, Jean-Louis; Moiseev, Sergey

    2012-06-01

    Interaction of quantum radiation with multi-particle ensembles has sparked off intense research efforts during the past decade. Emblematic of this field is the quantum memory scheme, where a quantum state of light is mapped onto an ensemble of atoms and then recovered in its original shape. While opening new access to the basics of light-atom interaction, quantum memory also appears as a key element for information processing applications, such as linear optics quantum computation and long-distance quantum communication via quantum repeaters. Not surprisingly, it is far from trivial to practically recover a stored quantum state of light and, although impressive progress has already been accomplished, researchers are still struggling to reach this ambitious objective. This special issue provides an account of the state-of-the-art in a fast-moving research area that makes physicists, engineers and chemists work together at the forefront of their discipline, involving quantum fields and atoms in different media, magnetic resonance techniques and material science. Various strategies have been considered to store and retrieve quantum light. The explored designs belong to three main—while still overlapping—classes. In architectures derived from photon echo, information is mapped over the spectral components of inhomogeneously broadened absorption bands, such as those encountered in rare earth ion doped crystals and atomic gases in external gradient magnetic field. Protocols based on electromagnetic induced transparency also rely on resonant excitation and are ideally suited to the homogeneous absorption lines offered by laser cooled atomic clouds or ion Coulomb crystals. Finally off-resonance approaches are illustrated by Faraday and Raman processes. Coupling with an optical cavity may enhance the storage process, even for negligibly small atom number. Multiple scattering is also proposed as a way to enlarge the quantum interaction distance of light with matter. The

  20. Categorical quantum mechanics II: Classical-quantum interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coecke, Bob; Kissinger, Aleks

    2016-08-01

    This is the second part of a three-part overview, in which we derive the category-theoretic backbone of quantum theory from a process ontology, treating quantum theory as a theory of systems, processes and their interactions. In this part, we focus on classical-quantum interaction. Classical and quantum systems are treated as distinct types, of which the respective behavioral properties are specified in terms of processes and their compositions. In particular, classicality is witnessed by ‘spiders’ which fuse together whenever they connect. We define mixedness and show that pure processes are extremal in the space of all processes, and we define entanglement and show that quantum theory indeed exhibits entanglement. We discuss the classification of tripartite qubit entanglement and show that both the GHZ-state and the W-state come from spider-like families of processes, which differ only in how they behave when they are connected by two or more wires. We define measurements and provide fully comprehensive descriptions of several quantum protocols involving classical data flow. Finally, we give a notion of ‘genuine quantumness’, from which special processes called ‘phase spiders’ arise, and get a first glimpse of quantum nonlocality.

  1. Chemically etched modulation in wire radius for wire array Z-pinch perturbation studies

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, B.; Deeney, C.; McKenney, J.L.; Garrity, J.E.; Lobley, D.K.; Martin, K.L.; Griego, A.E.; Ramacciotti, J.P.; Bland, S.N.; Lebedev, S.V.; Bott, S.C.; Ampleford, D.J.; Palmer, J.B.A.; Rapley, J.; Hall, G.

    2004-11-01

    A technique for manufacturing wires with imposed modulation in radius with axial wavelengths as short as 1 mm is presented. Extruded aluminum 5056 with 15 {mu}m diameter was masked and chemically etched to reduce the radius by {approx}20% in selected regions. Characterized by scanning electron microscopy, the modulation in radius is a step function with a {approx}10 {mu}m wide conical transition between thick and thin segments, with some pitting in etched regions. Techniques for mounting and aligning these wires in arrays for fast z-pinch experiments will be discussed. Axially mass-modulated wire arrays of this type will allow the study of seeded Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities in z pinches, corona formation, wire initiation with varying current density in the wire core, and correlation of perturbations between adjacent wires. This tool will support magnetohydrodynamics code validation in complex three-dimensional geometries, and perhaps x-ray pulse shaping.

  2. Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weinfurter, Harald; Zeilinger, Anton

    Quantum entanglement lies at the heart of the new field of quantum communication and computation. For a long time, entanglement was seen just as one of those fancy features which make quantum mechanics so counterintuitive. But recently, quantum information theory has shown the tremendous importance of quantum correlations for the formulation of new methods of information transfer and for algorithms exploiting the capabilities of quantum computers.This chapter describes the first experimental realizations of quantum communication schemes using entangled photon pairs. We show how to make communication secure against eavesdropping using entanglement-based quantum cryptography, how to increase the information capacity of a quantum channel by quantum dense coding and, finally, how to communicate quantum information itself in the process of quantum teleportation.

  3. Power and Energy of Exploding Wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valancius, Cole

    2015-06-01

    Exploding wires are used in many high-energy applications, such as initiating explosives. Analysis of gold wire burst in detonator applications has shown Burst Current and Action metrics to be incapable of explaining burst phenomenon as the inductance of a firing circuit is changed. Energy Density better captures the correlation between different wire geometries, different electrical inputs, and explosive initiation. This idea has been expanded upon, to analyze the burst properties in Power-Energy space. Further inconsistencies in the understanding of wire burst and its relation to peak voltage have been found. An argument will be made for redefining the definition of burst. The result is a more broad understanding of rapid metal phase transition and the physical applications of the released shock wave.

  4. Force-controlled lifting of molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, N.; Wagner, C.; Weiss, C.; Temirov, R.; Tautz, F. S.

    2011-07-01

    Lifting a single molecular wire off the surface with a combined frequency-modulated atomic force and tunneling microscope it is possible to monitor the evolution of both the wire configuration and the contacts simultaneously with the transport conductance experiment. In particular, critical points where individual bonds to the surface are broken and instabilities where the wire is prone to change its contact configuration can be identified in the force gradient and dissipation responses of the junction. This additional mechanical information can be used to unambiguously determine the conductance of a true molecular wire, that is, of a molecule that is contacted via a pointlike “crocodile clip” to each of the electrodes but is otherwise free.

  5. Printed wiring board system programmer's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brinkerhoff, C. D.

    1973-01-01

    The printed wiring board system provides automated techniques for the design of printed circuit boards and hybrid circuit boards. The system consists of four programs: (1) the preprocessor program combines user supplied data and pre-defined library data to produce the detailed circuit description data; (2) the placement program assigns circuit components to specific areas of the board in a manner that optimizes the total interconnection length of the circuit; (3) the organizer program assigns pin interconnections to specific board levels and determines the optimal order in which the router program should attempt to layout the paths connecting the pins; and (4) the router program determines the wire paths which are to be used to connect each input pin pair on the circuit board. This document is intended to serve as a programmer's reference manual for the printed wiring board system. A detailed description of the internal logic and flow of the printed wiring board programs is included.

  6. t matrix of metallic wire structures

    SciTech Connect

    Zhan, T. R. Chui, S. T.

    2014-04-14

    To study the electromagnetic resonance and scattering properties of complex structures of which metallic wire structures are constituents within multiple scattering theory, the t matrix of individual structures is needed. We have recently developed a rigorous and numerically efficient equivalent circuit theory in which retardation effects are taken into account for metallic wire structures. Here, we show how the t matrix can be calculated analytically within this theory. We illustrate our method with the example of split ring resonators. The density of states and cross sections for scattering and absorption are calculated, which are shown to be remarkably enhanced at resonant frequencies. The t matrix serves as the basic building block to evaluate the interaction of wire structures within the framework of multiple scattering theory. This will open the door to efficient design and optimization of assembly of wire structures.

  7. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-11-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  8. An advanced arc track resistant airframe wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beatty, J.

    1995-01-01

    Tensolite, a custom cable manufacturer specializing in high temperature materials as the dielectric medium, develops an advance arc track resistant airframe wire called Tufflite 2000. Tufflite 2000 has the following advantages over the other traditional wires: lighter weight and smaller in diameter; excellent wet and dry arc track resistance; superior dynamic cut-through performance even at elevated temperatures; flight proven performance on Boeing 737 and 757 airplanes; and true 260 C performance by utilizing Nickel plated copper conductors. This paper reports the different tests performed on Tufflite 2000: accelerated aging, arc resistance (wet and dry), dynamic cut through, humidity resistance, wire-to-wire abrasion, flammability, smoke, weight, notch sensitivity, flexibility, and markability. It particularly focuses on the BSI (British Standards Institute) dry arc resistance test and BSI wet arc tracking.

  9. 49 CFR 393.28 - Wiring systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    .... Electrical wiring shall be installed and maintained to conform to SAE J1292—Automobile, Truck, Truck-Tractor... conform to SAE J560. The reference to SAE J1292 shall not be construed to require circuit protection...

  10. Improvements to Existing Jefferson Lab Wire Scanners

    SciTech Connect

    McCaughan, Michael D.; Tiefenback, Michael G.; Turner, Dennis L.

    2013-06-01

    This poster will detail the augmentation of selected existing CEBAF wire scanners with commercially available hardware, PMTs, and self created software in order to improve the scanners both in function and utility.

  11. Evaluation of Wiring Constructions for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammoud, Ahmad N.; Stavnes, Mark W.; Dickman, John E.; Burkhardt, Linda A.; Woodford, Lynn M.; Ide, James R.; Muegge, ED

    1994-01-01

    A NASA Office of Safety and Mission Assurance (OS&MA) program to develop lightweight, reliable, and safe wiring insulations for aerospace applications is being performed by the NASA Lewis Research Center (LeRC). As part of this effort, a new wiring construction utilizing high strength PTFE (poly tetrafluoroethylene) as the insulation has been tested and compared with the existing military standard polyimide-based MIL-W-81381 wire construction. Electrical properties which were investigated included ac corona inception and extinction voltages (sea level and 60,000 feet), time/current to smoke, and wire fusing time. The two constructions were also characterized in terms of their mechanical properties of flexural strength, abrasion resistance (23 C and 150 C), and dynamic cut-through (23 C and 200 C). The results obtained in this testing effort are presented and discussed in this paper.

  12. What's in the Walls: Copper, Fiber, or Coaxial Wiring?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Andrew M.

    1995-01-01

    Presents planning guidelines for wiring specifications for K-12 schools by reviewing advantages and disadvantages of using copper, fiber-optic, and coaxial wire. Addresses the future of network wiring and educational technology, and makes recommendations. A sidebar describes the physical appearance of different types of wire and a table compares…

  13. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... alternative video programming service provider connects its wiring to the home wiring before the incumbent... ensure that an alternative service provider has access to the home wiring at the demarcation point. Cable... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring....

  14. 47 CFR 76.802 - Disposition of cable home wiring.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... alternative video programming service provider connects its wiring to the home wiring before the incumbent... ensure that an alternative service provider has access to the home wiring at the demarcation point. Cable... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Disposition of cable home wiring....

  15. 49 CFR 236.57 - Shunt and fouling wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Shunt and fouling wires. 236.57 Section 236.57...: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.57 Shunt and fouling wires. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, shunt wires and fouling wires hereafter installed or replaced shall consist of...

  16. 30 CFR 57.12053 - Circuits powered from trolley wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Circuits powered from trolley wires. 57.12053... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12053 Circuits powered from trolley wires. Ground wires for lighting circuits powered from trolley wires shall be connected securely to the ground return circuit. Surface Only...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12053 - Circuits powered from trolley wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Circuits powered from trolley wires. 57.12053... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12053 Circuits powered from trolley wires. Ground wires for lighting circuits powered from trolley wires shall be connected securely to the ground return circuit. Surface Only...

  18. 30 CFR 57.12053 - Circuits powered from trolley wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Circuits powered from trolley wires. 57.12053... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12053 Circuits powered from trolley wires. Ground wires for lighting circuits powered from trolley wires shall be connected securely to the ground return circuit. Surface Only...

  19. 30 CFR 57.12053 - Circuits powered from trolley wires.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Circuits powered from trolley wires. 57.12053... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12053 Circuits powered from trolley wires. Ground wires for lighting circuits powered from trolley wires shall be connected securely to the ground return circuit. Surface Only...

  20. Realizing Controllable Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takayanagi, Hideaki; Nitta, Junsaku

    1. Entanglement in solid states. Orbital entanglement and violation of bell inequalities in mesoscopic conductors / M. Büttiker, P. Samuelsson and E. V. Sukhoruk. Teleportation of electron spins with normal and superconducting dots / O. Sauret, D. Feinberg and T. Martin. Entangled state analysis for one-dimensional quantum spin system: singularity at critical point / A. Kawaguchi and K. Shimizu. Detecting crossed Andreev reflection by cross-current correlations / G. Bignon et al. Current correlations and transmission probabilities for a Y-shaped diffusive conductor / S. K. Yip -- 2. Mesoscopic electronics. Quantum bistability, structural transformation, and spontaneous persistent currents in mesoscopic Aharonov-Bohm loops / I. O. Kulik. Many-body effects on tunneling of electrons in magnetic-field-induced quasi one-dimensional systems in quantum wells / T. Kubo and Y. Tokura. Electron transport in 2DEG narrow channel under gradient magnetic field / M. Hara et al. Transport properties of a quantum wire with a side-coupled quantum dot / M. Yamaguchi et al. Photoconductivity- and magneto-transport studies of single InAs quantum wires / A. Wirthmann et al. Thermoelectric transports in charge-density-wave systems / H. Yoshimoto and S. Kurihara -- 3. Mesoscopic superconductivity. Parity-restricted persistent currents in SNS nanorings / A. D. Zaikin and S. V. Sharov. Large energy dependence of current noise in superconductingh/normal metal junctions / F. Pistolesi and M. Houzet. Generation of photon number states and their superpositions using a superconducting qubit in a microcavity / Yu-Xi Liu, L. F. Wei and F. Nori. Andreev interferometry for pumped currents / F. Taddei, M. Governale and R. Fazio. Suppression of Cooper-pair breaking against high magnetic fields in carbon nanotubes / J. Haruyama et al. Impact of the transport supercurrent on the Josephson effect / S. N. Shevchenko. Josephson current through spin-polarized Luttinger liquid / N. Yokoshi and S. Kurihara

  1. Tracking with wire chambers at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Gundy, M.C.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-07-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tacking systems that meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 13 refs., 11 fig., 1 tab.

  2. A Magnetic Sensor with Amorphous Wire

    PubMed Central

    He, Dongfeng; Shiwa, Mitsuharu

    2014-01-01

    Using a FeCoSiB amorphous wire and a coil wrapped around it, we have developed a sensitive magnetic sensor. When a 5 mm long amorphous wire with the diameter of 0.1 mm was used, the magnetic field noise spectrum of the sensor was about 30 pT/√Hz above 30 Hz. To show the sensitivity and the spatial resolution, the magnetic field of a thousand Japanese yen was scanned with the magnetic sensor. PMID:24940865

  3. Energetic additive manufacturing process with feed wire

    DOEpatents

    Harwell, Lane D.; Griffith, Michelle L.; Greene, Donald L.; Pressly, Gary A.

    2000-11-07

    A process for additive manufacture by energetic wire deposition is described. A source wire is fed into a energy beam generated melt-pool on a growth surface as the melt-pool moves over the growth surface. This process enables the rapid prototyping and manufacture of fully dense, near-net shape components, as well as cladding and welding processes. Alloys, graded materials, and other inhomogeneous materials can be grown using this process.

  4. 'Chrysanthemum petal' arrangements of silver nano wires.

    PubMed

    Cui, Hui-Wang; Jiu, Jin-Ting; Sugahara, Tohru; Nagao, Shijo; Suganuma, Katsuaki; Uchida, Hiroshi

    2014-12-01

    Highly ordered 'Chrysanthemum petal' arrangements of silver nano wires were fabricated in a biodegradable polymer of polyvinyl alcohol using a simple one-step blending method without any template. The degree of the arrangement increased with the decreasing content of polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanism for the formation of these 'Chrysanthemum petal' arrangements was discussed specifically. These 'Chrysanthemum petal' arrangements will be helpful to increase the electrical conductivity of silver nano wires films. PMID:25397618

  5. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA )

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  6. Problems with aging wiring in Naval aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Frank J.

    1994-01-01

    The Navy is experiencing a severe aircraft electrical wiring maintenance problem as a result of the extensive use of an aromatic polyimide insulation that is deteriorating at a rate that was unexpected when this wire was initially selected. This problem has significantly affected readiness, reliability, and safety and has greatly increased the cost of ownership of Naval aircraft. Failures in wire harnesses have exhibited arcing and burning that will propagate drastically, to the interruption of many electrical circuits from a fault initiated by the failure of deteriorating wires. There is an urgent need for a capability to schedule aircraft rewiring in an orderly manner with a logically derived determination of which aircraft have aged to the point of absolute necessity. Excessive maintenance was demonstrated to result from the accelerated aging due to the parameters of moisture, temperature, and strain that exist in the Naval Aircraft environment. Laboratory studies have demonstrated that MIL-W-81381 wire insulation when aged at high humidities followed the classical Arrhenius thermal aging relationship. In an extension of the project a multifactor formula was developed that is now capable of predicting life under varying conditions of these service parameters. An automated test system has also been developed to analyze the degree of deterioration that has occurred in wires taken from an aircraft in order to obtain an assessment of remaining life. Since it is both physically and financially impossible to replace the wiring in all the Navy's aircraft at once, this system will permit expedient scheduling so that those aircraft that are most probable to have wiring failure problems can be overhauled first.

  7. Endstates in multichannel spinless p-wave superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rieder, M.-T.; Kells, G.; Duckheim, M.; Meidan, D.; Brouwer, P. W.

    2012-09-01

    Multimode spinless p-wave superconducting wires with a width W much smaller than the superconducting coherence length ξ are known to have multiple low-energy subgap states localized near the wire's ends. Here we compare the typical energies of such endstates for various terminations of the wire: A superconducting wire coupled to a normal-metal stub, a weakly disordered superconductor wire and a wire with smooth confinement. Depending on the termination, we find that the energies of the subgap states can be higher or lower than for the case of a rectangular wire with hard-wall boundaries.

  8. Electronic properties of one-dimensional conductors: A study of molybdenum selenide molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Latha

    Quantum wires, such as nanowires and nanotubes, are ideal systems for exploring fundamental physics concepts in one-dimension. In this thesis, we present a new system of metallic one-dimensional conductors---molybdenum selenide molecular wires---that is well suited for such a study, along with experimental evidence of its one-dimensional character. We describe the synthesis of molybdenum selenide (Mo6Se 6) molecular wires from the dissolution of quasi-one-dimensional Li 2Mo6Se6 crystals in polar solvents. We then present atomically-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images of these nanowires, ranging from 8.5 A wide individual molecular chains to bundles of chains over 5 nm in diameter. The electronic properties of these molecular wires, characterized by spatially resolved tunneling spectroscopy, reveal sharp peaks in the conductance. These peaks suggest the existence of van Hove singularities, as expected for one-dimensional systems, and as also predicted by tight binding calculations. Low-temperature tunneling spectroscopy measurements show no evidence of a band gap down to 5 K, implying that at these temperatures the wires remain metallic, and they do not undergo a Peierls distortion. We also present electron transport studies on Mo6Se6 nanowires. The measured two-terminal tunneling conductance of these wires is shown to scale as a power of temperature and bias voltage, consistent with the Luttinger liquid theory of interacting electrons in one-dimension. In addition, the exponents governing the power-law dependence of the conductance with temperature are found to vary inversely with wire diameter. From these data, we determine the Luttinger liquid interaction parameter to be g = 0.06, implying a strongly repulsive electron-electron interaction in this system. This finding is in contrast with measurements on micron-sized Mo6Se6 wires, where the conductance increases linearly with decreasing temperature, showing typical three-dimensional metallic behavior

  9. Automated wire tension measurement system for LHCb muon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; Dumps, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Felici, G.; Forti, C.; Frenkel, A.; Graulich, J.-S.; Kachtchouk, A.; Kulikov, V. V.; Martellotti, G.; Medvedkov, A.; Nedosekin, A. A.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Pirozzi, G.; Schmidt, B.; Shubin, V.

    2005-06-01

    A wire tension meter has been developed for the multi-wire proportional chambers of the LHCb muon detector. The wire tension is deduced from its mechanical resonance frequency. In the LHCb muon chambers, the wires are 2 mm apart and electrically connected in groups of 3-32, so that the wire excitation system must be precisely positioned with respect to the wire to be tested. This wire is forced to oscillate by a periodic high voltage applied between that wire and a non-oscillating "sense wire" placed parallel and close to it. This oscillation produces a variation of the capacitance between these two wires which is measured by a high precision digital electronic circuit. At the resonance frequency this capacitance variation is maximum. The system has been systematically investigated and its parameters were optimized. In the range 0.4-1 N a good agreement is found between the mechanical tension measured by this system and by a dynamometer.

  10. Chemistry of radiation damage to wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1992-08-01

    Proportional counters are used to study aspects of radiation damage to wire chambers (wire aging). Principles of low-pressure, rf plasma chemistry are used to predict the plasma chemistry in electron avalanches (1 atm, dc). (1) Aging is studied in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gas mixtures. Wire deposits are analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy. An apparent cathode aging process resulting in loss of gain rather than in a self-sustained current is observed in CF{sub 4}-rich gases. A four-part model considering plasma polymerization of the hydrocarbon, etching of wire deposits by CF{sub 4}, acceleration of deposition processes in strongly etching environments, and reactivity of the wire surface is developed to understand anode wire aging in CF{sub 4}/iC{sub 4}H{sub 10} gases. Practical guidelines suggested by the model are discussed. (2) Data are presented to suggest that trace amounts of Freons do not affect aging rates in either dimethyl ether or Ar/C{sub 2}H{sub 6}. Apparent loss of gain is explained by attachment of primary electrons to a continuously increasing concentration of Freon 11 (CCl{sub 3}F) in the counter gas. An increase in the concentration of Freon 11 in dimethyl ether is caused by a distillation process in the gas supply bottle and is a natural consequence of the unequal volatilities of the two compounds.

  11. Si Wire-Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Shannon

    2010-03-01

    Micron-scale Si wire arrays are three-dimensional photovoltaic absorbers that enable orthogonalization of light absorption and carrier collection and hence allow for the utilization of relatively impure Si in efficient solar cell designs. The wire arrays are grown by a vapor-liquid-solid-catalyzed process on a crystalline (111) Si wafer lithographically patterned with an array of metal catalyst particles. Following growth, such arrays can be embedded in polymethyldisiloxane (PDMS) and then peeled from the template growth substrate. The result is an unusual photovoltaic material: a flexible, bendable, wafer-thickness crystalline Si absorber. In this paper I will describe: 1. the growth of high-quality Si wires with controllable doping and the evaluation of their photovoltaic energy-conversion performance using a test electrolyte that forms a rectifying conformal semiconductor-liquid contact 2. the observation of enhanced absorption in wire arrays exceeding the conventional light trapping limits for planar Si cells of equivalent material thickness and 3. single-wire and large-area solid-state Si wire-array solar cell results obtained to date with directions for future cell designs based on optical and device physics. In collaboration with Michael Kelzenberg, Morgan Putnam, Joshua Spurgeon, Daniel Turner-Evans, Emily Warren, Nathan Lewis, and Harry Atwater, California Institute of Technology.

  12. Needleless electrospinning with twisted wire spinneret

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holopainen, Jani; Penttinen, Toni; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko

    2015-01-01

    A needleless electrospinning setup named ‘Needleless Twisted Wire Electrospinning’ was developed. The polymer solution is electrospun from the surface of a twisted wire set to a high voltage and collected on a cylindrical collector around the wire. Multiple Taylor cones are simultaneously self-formed on the downward flowing solution. The system is robust and simple with no moving parts aside from the syringe pump used to transport the solution to the top of the wire. The structure and process parameters of the setup and the results on the preparation of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass fibers with the setup are presented. PVP fiber sheets with areas of 40 × 120 cm2 and masses up to 1.15 g were prepared. High production rates of 5.23 g h-1 and 1.40 g h-1 were achieved for PVP and HA respectively. The major limiting factor of the setup is drying of the polymer solution on the wire during the electrospinning process which will eventually force to interrupt the process for cleaning of the wire. Possible solutions to this problem and other ways to develop the setup are discussed. The presented system provides a simple way to increase the production rate and area of fiber sheet as compared with the conventional needle electrospinning.

  13. Wire-bond inspection in IC assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajeswari, Mandava; Rodd, Mike G.

    1996-02-01

    Wire-bonding in IC assembly process involves making a physical connection between the IC 'die' and the 'lead' by bonding wires between the two. Inspection of wire-bond quality is a' highly labor-intensive process and currently efforts are being made to automate it. This paper presents the results of a research conducted into developing a comprehensive automated wire- bond visual inspection system that is capable of performing final accept/reject inspection, providing on-line process feedback, and assisting in process validation. The proposed inspection system consists of the inspection of the bond on a bond pad, the bond on a lead and the inter-connecting wire between a bond pad and its corresponding lead. The algorithms are based on simple and easily extractable features that ensure achieving the desired accuracy and speed. A novel but simple illumination system is proposed to obtain the images of the inter- connecting wires. The proposed system is validated using several state-of-the-art IC samples. This work is sponsored by the Ministry of Science Technology and Environment, Malaysia and Intel Technology Pvt. Ltd., Malaysia.

  14. Needleless electrospinning with twisted wire spinneret.

    PubMed

    Holopainen, Jani; Penttinen, Toni; Santala, Eero; Ritala, Mikko

    2015-01-16

    A needleless electrospinning setup named 'Needleless Twisted Wire Electrospinning' was developed. The polymer solution is electrospun from the surface of a twisted wire set to a high voltage and collected on a cylindrical collector around the wire. Multiple Taylor cones are simultaneously self-formed on the downward flowing solution. The system is robust and simple with no moving parts aside from the syringe pump used to transport the solution to the top of the wire. The structure and process parameters of the setup and the results on the preparation of polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP), hydroxyapatite (HA) and bioglass fibers with the setup are presented. PVP fiber sheets with areas of 40 × 120 cm(2) and masses up to 1.15 g were prepared. High production rates of 5.23 g h(-1) and 1.40 g h(-1) were achieved for PVP and HA respectively. The major limiting factor of the setup is drying of the polymer solution on the wire during the electrospinning process which will eventually force to interrupt the process for cleaning of the wire. Possible solutions to this problem and other ways to develop the setup are discussed. The presented system provides a simple way to increase the production rate and area of fiber sheet as compared with the conventional needle electrospinning.

  15. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 234.239 Section 234.239 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or... of the apparatus. This requirement applies to each wire at each terminal in all housings...

  16. 49 CFR 234.239 - Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... with signal apparatus. 234.239 Section 234.239 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to... Tagging of wires and interference of wires or tags with signal apparatus. Each wire shall be tagged or... of the apparatus. This requirement applies to each wire at each terminal in all housings...

  17. Wiring design for the control of electromagnetic interference (EMI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopasakis, George

    1995-01-01

    Wiring design is only one important aspect of EMI control. Other important areas for EMI are: circuit design, filtering, grounding, bonding, shielding, lighting, electrostatic discharge (ESD), transient suppression, and electromagnetic pulse (EMP). Topics covered include: wire magnetic field emissions at low frequencies; wire radiated magnetic field emissions at frequencies; wire design guidelines for EMI control; wire design guidelines for EMI control; high frequency emissions from cables; and pulse frequency spectra.

  18. Quantum simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, I. M.; Ashhab, S.; Nori, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Simulating quantum mechanics is known to be a difficult computational problem, especially when dealing with large systems. However, this difficulty may be overcome by using some controllable quantum system to study another less controllable or accessible quantum system, i.e., quantum simulation. Quantum simulation promises to have applications in the study of many problems in, e.g., condensed-matter physics, high-energy physics, atomic physics, quantum chemistry, and cosmology. Quantum simulation could be implemented using quantum computers, but also with simpler, analog devices that would require less control, and therefore, would be easier to construct. A number of quantum systems such as neutral atoms, ions, polar molecules, electrons in semiconductors, superconducting circuits, nuclear spins, and photons have been proposed as quantum simulators. This review outlines the main theoretical and experimental aspects of quantum simulation and emphasizes some of the challenges and promises of this fast-growing field.

  19. STRS SpaceWire FPGA Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lux, James P.; Taylor, Gregory H.; Lang, Minh; Stern, Ryan A.

    2011-01-01

    An FPGA module leverages the previous work from Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) relating to NASA s Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) project. The STRS SpaceWire FPGA Module is written in the Verilog Register Transfer Level (RTL) language, and it encapsulates an unmodified GSFC core (which is written in VHDL). The module has the necessary inputs/outputs (I/Os) and parameters to integrate seamlessly with the SPARC I/O FPGA Interface module (also developed for the STRS operating environment, OE). Software running on the SPARC processor can access the configuration and status registers within the SpaceWire module. This allows software to control and monitor the SpaceWire functions, but it is also used to give software direct access to what is transmitted and received through the link. SpaceWire data characters can be sent/received through the software interface, as well as through the dedicated interface on the GSFC core. Similarly, SpaceWire time codes can be sent/received through the software interface or through a dedicated interface on the core. This innovation is designed for plug-and-play integration in the STRS OE. The SpaceWire module simplifies the interfaces to the GSFC core, and synchronizes all I/O to a single clock. An interrupt output (with optional masking) identifies time-sensitive events within the module. Test modes were added to allow internal loopback of the SpaceWire link and internal loopback of the client-side data interface.

  20. Studies of friction and wear characteristics of various wires for wire-brush skids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dreher, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    The friction and wear characteristics of 22 types and sizes of wires for potential use in wire-brush skids were studied. These characteristics were determined by placing brushes made from candidate wires on a belt sander whose moving belt simulated landing roll-out distance. At the same time, the drag force and wear behavior were monitored. Data were obtained over distances up to 3048 m (10,000 ft) at preselected bearing pressures of 172 to 1034 kPa (25 to 150 psi). In general, the friction coefficient developed by the candidate wires was found to be independent of bearing pressure and ranged between 0.4 and 0.6 under the test conditions of this investigation. The friction coefficient was not degraded when the surface was wetted and appears to be independent of wire diameter except perhaps when wire size is relatively large compared with the surface asperities. Generally, the high friction demonstrated by the soft materials was accompanied by high wear rates; conversely, the hard materials provided greater wear resistance but offered lower friction. For all test wires, the wear was shown to increase with increasing bearing pressure, in general, for the same bearing pressure, wear increased with increasing wire diameter and decreased when the surface was wetted.

  1. Investigation of factors affecting the heater wire method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keshock, E. G.

    1972-01-01

    An analytical investigation was made of a transient method of calibrating fine wire thermocouples. The system consisted of a 10 mil diameter standard thermocouple (Pt, Pt-13% Rh) and an 0.8 mil diameter chromel-alumel thermocouple attached to a 20 mil diameter electrically heated platinum wire. The calibration procedure consisted of electrically heating the wire to approximately 2500 F within about a seven-second period in an environment approximating atmospheric conditions at 120,000 feet. Rapid periodic readout of the standard and fine wire thermocouple signals permitted a comparison of the two temperature indications. An analysis was performed which indicated that the temperature distortion at the heater wire produced by the thermocouple junctions appears to be of negligible magnitude. Consequently, the calibration technique appears to be basically sound, although several practical changes which appear desirable are presented and discussed. Additional investigation is warranted to evaluate radiation effects and transient response characteristics.

  2. Selected developments in laser wire stripping. [cutting insulation from aerospace-type wires and cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The operation of mechanical and thermal strippers and the early development of laser wire strippers are reviewed. NASA sponsored development of laser wire stripping for space shuttle includes bench-type strippers as well as an advanced portable hand-held stripper which incorporates a miniaturized carbon dioxide laser and a rotating optics unit with a gas-jet assist and debris exhaust. Drives and controls girdle the wire and slit the remaining slug without manual assistance. This unit can strip wire sizes 26 through 12 gage. A larger-capacity hand-held unit for wire sizes through 1/0 gage was built using a neodynium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) laser. The hand-held units have a flexible umbilical cable to an accompanying cart that carries the power supply, gas supply, cooling unit, and the controls.

  3. Distortions of the coulomb blockade conductance line in scanning gate measurements of inas nanowire based quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Zhukov, A. A.; Volk, Ch.; Winden, A.; Hardtdegen, H.; Schaepers, Th.

    2013-01-15

    We performed measurements at helium temperatures of the electronic transport in the linear regime in an InAs quantum wire in the presence of a charged tip of an atomic force microscope (AFM) at low electron concentration. We show that at certain concentration of electrons, only two closely placed quantum dots, both in the Coulomb blockade regime, govern conductance of the whole wire. Under this condition, two types of peculiarities-wobbling and splitting-arise in the behavior of the lines of the conductance peaks of Coulomb blockade. These peculiarities are measured in quantum-wire-based structures for the first time. We explain both peculiarities as an interplay of the conductance of two quantum dots present in the wire. Detailed modeling of wobbling behavior made in the framework of the orthodox theory of Coulomb blockade demonstrates good agreement with the obtained experimental data.

  4. Quantum levitation using metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappakrishnan, Venkatesh K.

    required to achieve quantum levitation with the air as an intermediate medium. To achieve magnetism at high frequencies, we have considered three potential metamaterial designs based on the split ring resonators (SRRs), the parallel-wires, and the Ni-polystyrene nanocomposites. The SRRs and the parallel-wires composites are "diamagnetic", whereas the Ni-polystyrene nanocomposites are paramagnetic in nature. By combining the above para- and diamagnetic metamaterial plates, we have demonstrated practically feasible designs of a quantum levitation system. If successfully implemented, the proposed designs could find applications in the frictionless bio-fluid transport devices, the micro and nano-accelerators, and as the coatings for an ultra-clean room environment.

  5. Quantum ontologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1988-12-01

    Quantum ontologies are conceptions of the constitution of the universe that are compatible with quantum theory. The ontological orientation is contrasted to the pragmatic orientation of science, and reasons are given for considering quantum ontologies both within science, and in broader contexts. The principal quantum ontologies are described and evaluated. Invited paper at conference: Bell's Theorem, Quantum Theory, and Conceptions of the Universe, George Mason University, October 20-21, 1988. 16 refs.

  6. Frequency response of a thermocouple wire: Effects of axial conduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1990-01-01

    Theoretical expressions are derived for the steady-state frequency response of a thermocouple wire. In particular, the effects of axial heat conduction are demonstrated for both a uniform thermocouple wire and a nonuniform wire with unequal material properties and wire diameters across the junction. For the case of a uniform wire, the amplitude ratio and phase angle compare favorably with the series solution of Scadron and Warshawsky (1952) except near the ends of the wire. For the case of a non-uniform wire, the amplitude ratio at low frequency omega yields 0 agrees with the results of Scadron and Warshawsky for a steady-state temperature distribution. Moreover, the frequency response for a non-uniform wire in the limit of infinite length l yields infinity is shown to reduce to a simple expression that is analogous to the classic first order solution for a thermocouple wire with uniform properties.

  7. [A study of mechanical properties of orthodontic wires in tension].

    PubMed

    Konstantellos, B; Lagoudakis, M; Toutountzakis, N

    1990-12-01

    Orthodontic forces are applied to the teeth basically by means of different types of orthodontic wires. Knowledge of the mechanical properties of such wires are very helpful to the clinician in design and application of optimal force systems during orthodontic treatment. The basic mechanical properties were studied for 17 types of orthodontic wires (all rectangular and of the same size), in tension. Modulus of elasticity (E), yield strength (YS) and maximum elastic strain (Springback) (YS/E) were calculated for each type of wires. Stainless steel wires have demonstrated higher modulus of elasticity (and yield strength) in comparison with wires of nickel-titanium and beta titanium alloys. B-titanium wires showed higher modulus of elasticity than nickel-titanium ones. In addition stainless steel wires were found to have higher values for springback than cobalt-chromium ones and lower values (for the same variable) than nickel-titanium and B-titanium wires. PMID:2129597

  8. Vibration measurements of a wire scanner - Experimental setup and models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herranz, Juan; Barjau, Ana; Dehning, Bernd

    2016-03-01

    In the next years the luminosity of the LHC will be significantly increased. This will require a much higher accuracy of beam profile measurement than actually achievable by the current wire scanner. The new performance demands a wire travelling speed up to 20 m s-1 and a position measurement accuracy of the order of 1 μm. The vibrations of the mechanical parts of the system and particularly the vibrations of the thin carbon wire have been identified as the major error sources of wire position uncertainty. Therefore the understanding of the wire vibrations has been given high priority for the design and operation of the new device. This article presents a new strategy to measure the wire vibrations based on the piezoresistive effect of the wire itself. An electronic readout system based on a Wheatstone bridge is used to measure the variation of the carbon wire resistance, which is directly proportional to the wire elongation caused by the oscillations.

  9. Sensitive and simple method for measuring wire tensions

    SciTech Connect

    Atac, M.; Mishina, M.

    1982-08-01

    Measuring tension of wires in drift chambers and multiwire proportional chambers after construction is an important process because sometimes wires get loose after soldering, crimping or glueing. One needs to sort out wires which have tensions below a required minimum value to prevent electrostatic instabilities. There have been several methods reported on this subject in which the wires were excited either with sinusoidal current under magnetic field or with sinusoidal voltage electrostatically coupled to the wire, searching for a resonating frequency with which the wires vibrate mechanically. Then the vibration is detected either visually, optically or with magnetic pick-up directly touching the wires. Any of these is only applicable to the usual multiwire chamber which has open access to the wire plane. They also need fairly large excitation currents to induce a detectable vibration to the wires. Here we report a very simple method that can be used for any type of wire chamber or proportional tube system for measuring wire tension. Only a very small current is required for the wire excitation to obtain a large enough signal because it detects the induced emf voltage across a wire. A sine-wave oscillator and a digital voltmeter are sufficient devices aside from a permanent magnet to provide the magnetic field around the wire. A useful application of this method to a large system is suggested.

  10. Chinese NiTi wire--a new orthodontic alloy.

    PubMed

    Burstone, C J; Qin, B; Morton, J Y

    1985-06-01

    Chinese NiTi wire was studied by means of a bending test to determine wire stiffness, springback, and maximum bending moments. Chinese NiTi wire has an unusual deactivation curve (unlike steel and nitinol wires) in which relatively constant forces are produced over a long range of action. The characteristic flexural stiffness of NiTi wire is determined by the amount of activation. At large activations NiTi wires has a stiffness of only 7% that of a comparable stainless steel wire, and at small activations 28% of steel wire. For the same activation at large deflections, the forces produced are 36% that of a comparable nitinol wire. Chinese NiTi wire demonstrates phenomenal springback. It can be deflected 1.6 times as far as nitinol wire or 4.4 times as far as stainless steel wire without appreciable permanent deformation. NiTi wire is highly useful in clinical situations that require a low-stiffness wire with an extremely large springback. PMID:3890554

  11. Optimal welding of beta titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Nelson, K R; Burstone, C J; Goldberg, A J

    1987-09-01

    Today the orthodontist is confronted by an array of new orthodontic wire materials that, when applied to appliance design, can vastly increase the flexibility and versatility of therapy. Welded joints, especially for the newer titanium alloy wires, provide a means to extend the useful applications of these materials. The purpose of this study was to determine the optimum settings for electrical resistance welding of various configurations of titanium-molybdenum (TMA) wires. Specimens were of a t-joint configuration and were mechanically tested in torsion to simulate the failure mode most often observed in clinical practice. Variables included wire size, wire orientation, and welding voltage. Results indicated that excellent welds can be obtained with very little loss of strength and ductility in the area of the weld joint. Torsional loads at failure were at least 90% of the unwelded base material. Although a wide range of voltage settings resulted in high-strength welds, typically a narrow range of voltages yielded optimal ductility.

  12. Wire scanner software and firmware issues

    SciTech Connect

    Gilpatrick, John Doug

    2008-01-01

    The Los Alamos Neutron Science Center facility presently has 110 slow wire scanning profile measurement instruments located along its various beam lines. These wire scanners were developed and have been operating for at least 30 years. While the wire scanners solved many problems to operate and have served the facility well they have increasingly suffered from several problems or limitations, such as maintenance and reliability problems, antiquated components, slow data acquisition, and etc. In order to refurbish these devices, these wire scanners will be replaced with newer versions. The replacement will consist of a completely new beam line actuator, new cables, new electronics and brand new software and firmware. This note describes the functions and modes of operation that LabVIEW VI software on the real time controller and FPGA LabVIEW firmware will be required. It will be especially interesting to understand the overall architecture of these LabVIEW VIs. While this note will endeavor to describe all of the requirements and issues for the wire scanners, undoubtedly, there will be missing details that will be added as time progresses.

  13. Forgotten Kirschner Wire Causing Severe Hematuria

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shrawan Kumar; Jayant, Kumar; Agrawal, Swati; Parmar, Kalpesh Mahesh; Ajjoor Shankargowda, Sriharsha

    2014-01-01

    Kirschner wire (K-wire) is commonly used in the treatment of hip fracture and its migration into pelvis leading to bladder injury is a very rare complication. Nonremoval of these devices either because of lack of followup or because of prolonged requirement due to disease process is associated with this complication. We report a case of a patient who presented with acute onset severe hematuria with clot retention secondary to perforation of bladder by a migrated K-wire placed earlier, for the treatment of hip fracture. Initial imaging showed its presence in the soft tissues of the pelvis away from the major vascular structures. Patient was taken for emergency laparotomy and wire was removed after cystotomy. Postoperative period was uneventful and patient was discharged in satisfactory condition. K-wires are commonly used in the management of fracture bones and their migration has been reported in the literature although such migration in the intrapelvic region involving bladder is very rare. Early diagnosis and prompt removal of such foreign bodies are required to avert potentially fatal involvement of major structures. PMID:25136472

  14. Integrated Electrical Wire Insulation Repair System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Martha; Jolley, Scott; Gibson, Tracy; Parks, Steven

    2013-01-01

    An integrated system tool will allow a technician to easily and quickly repair damaged high-performance electrical wire insulation in the field. Low-melt polyimides have been developed that can be processed into thin films that work well in the repair of damaged polyimide or fluoropolymer insulated electrical wiring. Such thin films can be used in wire insulation repairs by affixing a film of this low-melt polyimide to the damaged wire, and heating the film to effect melting, flow, and cure of the film. The resulting repair is robust, lightweight, and small in volume. The heating of this repair film is accomplished with the use of a common electrical soldering tool that has been modified with a special head or tip that can accommodate the size of wire being repaired. This repair method can furthermore be simplified for the repair technician by providing replaceable or disposable soldering tool heads that have repair film already "loaded" and ready for use. The soldering tool heating device can also be equipped with a battery power supply that will allow its use in areas where plug-in current is not available

  15. Quantum Computer Games: Quantum Minesweeper

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michal; Gordon, Goren

    2010-01-01

    The computer game of quantum minesweeper is introduced as a quantum extension of the well-known classical minesweeper. Its main objective is to teach the unique concepts of quantum mechanics in a fun way. Quantum minesweeper demonstrates the effects of superposition, entanglement and their non-local characteristics. While in the classical…

  16. Rapid Real-Time SpaceWire Emulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mudie, Stephen; Parkes, Steve; Dunstan, Martin

    2015-09-01

    The SpaceWire Electronic Ground Support Equipment (EGSE) test and development unit from STAR-Dundee can be used to very rapidly emulate real-time behaviour of SpaceWire equipment. The behaviour of the equipment to emulate is described in a script using a SpaceWire specific scripting language. Once configured the SpaceWire EGSE unit operates independent of software. This paper describes three camera emulation scripts to demonstrate the rapid real-time SpaceWire emulation possible using the SpaceWire EGSE.

  17. Three-wire Thermocouple: Frequency Response in Constant Flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forney, L. J.; Fralick, G. C.

    1995-01-01

    Theory and experimental measurements are compared with a novel three-wire thermocouple. Signals from three wires of unequal diameters arc recorded from the thermocouple suspended in constant flow with a periodic temperature fluctuation. It is demonstrated that the reconstructed signal from the three-wire thermocouple requires no compensation for omega less than or equal to 5(sub omega1), where omega, is the natural frequency of the smaller wire. The latter result represents a significant improvement compared to previous work with two-wire thermocouples. A correction factor has also been derived to account for wires of arbitrary diameter.

  18. Dispersion interaction between crossed conducting wires

    SciTech Connect

    Dobson, John F.; Gould, Timothy; Klich, Israel

    2009-07-15

    We compute the T=0 K Van der Waals (nonretarded Casimir) interaction energy E between two infinitely long, crossed conducting wires separated by a minimum distance D much greater than their radius. We find that, up to a logarithmic correction factor, E{proportional_to}-D{sup -1}|sin {theta}|{sup -1}f({theta}), where f({theta}) is a smooth bounded function of the angle {theta} between the wires. We recover a conventional result of the form E{proportional_to}-D{sup -4}|sin {theta}|{sup -1}g({theta}) when we include an electronic energy gap in our calculation. Our prediction of gap-dependent energetics may be observable experimentally for carbon nanotubes either via atomic force microscopy detection of the Van der Waals force or torque or indirectly via observation of mechanical oscillations. This shows that strictly parallel wires, as assumed in previous predictions, are not needed to see a unique effect of this type.

  19. Reusable Hot-Wire Cable Cutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauken, Michael T.; Steinkraus, Joel M.

    2010-01-01

    During the early development stage of balloon deployment systems for missions, nichrome wire cable cutters were often used in place of pyro-actuated cutters. Typically, a nichrome wire is wrapped around a bundle of polymer cables with a low melting point and connected to a relay-actuated electric circuit. The heat from the nichrome reduces the strength of the cable bundle, which quickly breaks under a mechanical load and can thus be used as a release mechanism for a deployment system. However, the use of hand-made heated nichrome wire for cutters is not very reliable. Often, the wrapped nichrome wire does not cut through the cable because it either pulls away from its power source or does not stay in contact with the cable being cut. Because nichrome is not readily soldered to copper wire, unreliable mechanical crimps are often made to connect the nichrome to an electric circuit. A self-contained device that is reusable and reliable was developed to sever cables for device release or deployment. The nichrome wire in this new device is housed within an enclosure to prevent it from being damaged by handling. The electric power leads are internally connected within the unit to the nichrome wire using a screw terminal connection. A bayonet plug, a quick and secure method of connecting the cutter to the power source, is used to connect the cutter to the power leads similar to those used in pyro-cutter devices. A small ceramic tube [0.25-in. wide 0.5-in. long (.6.4-mm wide 13-mm long)] houses a spiraled nichrome wire that is heated when a cable release action is required. The wire is formed into a spiral coil by wrapping it around a mandrel. It is then laid inside the ceramic tube so that it fits closely to the inner surface of the tube. The ceramic tube provides some thermal and electrical insulation so that most of the heat generated by the wire is directed toward the cable bundle in the center of the spiral. The ceramic tube is cemented into an aluminum block, which

  20. Method of fabricating composite superconducting wire

    DOEpatents

    Strauss, Bruce P.; Reardon, Paul J.; Remsbottom, Robert H.

    1977-01-01

    An improvement in the method for preparing composite rods of superconducting alloy and normal metal from which multifilament composite superconducting wire is fabricated by bending longitudinally a strip of normal metal around a rod of superconductor alloy and welding the edges to form the composite rod. After the rods have preferably been provided with a hexagonal cross-sectional shape, a plurality of the rods are stacked into a normal metal extrusion can, sealed and worked to reduce the cross-sectional size and form multifilament wire. Diffusion barriers and high-electrical resistance barriers can easily be introduced into the wire by plating or otherwise coating the faces of the normal metal strip with appropriate materials.

  1. Ultrasonic Welding of Wires and Cables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinz, Stefan; Wagner, Guntram; Eifler, Dietmar

    2012-03-01

    In the automobile industry, ultrasonic metal welding is an established method. At the Institute of Materials Science and Engineering (WKK) at the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany, systematic investigations of the weldability of Al-wires and flat flexible copper cables were carried out. In the case of Al-wires, joints with cross-sectional area of up to 80 mm2 and tensile shear load of about 3500 N were finally realized. Furthermore, methods to reduce unintentional adherence between the sonotrode coupling face and the Al-wires were developed. To realize FFC joints, ultrasonic spot welding systems and ultrasonic torsion welding systems were used. A central purpose of these investigations is the development of a system to enable welding through the insulation of the FFC without weakening the base material.

  2. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography.

    PubMed

    Shi, Q; Sontheimer, B; Nikolay, N; Schell, A W; Fischer, J; Naber, A; Benson, O; Wegener, M

    2016-01-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time. PMID:27507165

  3. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Q.; Sontheimer, B.; Nikolay, N.; Schell, A. W.; Fischer, J.; Naber, A.; Benson, O.; Wegener, M.

    2016-08-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time.

  4. Wiring up pre-characterized single-photon emitters by laser lithography

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Q.; Sontheimer, B.; Nikolay, N.; Schell, A. W.; Fischer, J.; Naber, A.; Benson, O.; Wegener, M.

    2016-01-01

    Future quantum optical chips will likely be hybrid in nature and include many single-photon emitters, waveguides, filters, as well as single-photon detectors. Here, we introduce a scalable optical localization-selection-lithography procedure for wiring up a large number of single-photon emitters via polymeric photonic wire bonds in three dimensions. First, we localize and characterize nitrogen vacancies in nanodiamonds inside a solid photoresist exhibiting low background fluorescence. Next, without intermediate steps and using the same optical instrument, we perform aligned three-dimensional laser lithography. As a proof of concept, we design, fabricate, and characterize three-dimensional functional waveguide elements on an optical chip. Each element consists of one single-photon emitter centered in a crossed-arc waveguide configuration, allowing for integrated optical excitation and efficient background suppression at the same time. PMID:27507165

  5. Quantum memristors

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  6. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-01-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems. PMID:27381511

  7. Quantum memristors.

    PubMed

    Pfeiffer, P; Egusquiza, I L; Di Ventra, M; Sanz, M; Solano, E

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  8. Quantum memristors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-01

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantum regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. The proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.

  9. Temperature effect on DNA molecular wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Christopher Minh

    The demand of technology and information today has further pushed the fabrication process of nanotechnology, yet there are limits and obstacles set by the primary laws of physics. Therefore, researchers are pursuing alternative technologies. Deoxyribonucleic acids (DNA) molecular wire is one advantageous option due to its unique characteristics including self-assembly and naturally small; size. This thesis reports the temperature effect on the electrical properties of a double-stranded ?-DNA molecular wire. The data will help expand the DNA wire application and functionality. Thus, the data supports the charge hopping theory on DNA electrical conductivity. Diverse amount of literatures has demonstrated that DNA experiences a biochemical alteration when exposed under different temperature conditions. This change will also cause a change in the electrical properties. In this research, DNA will hang between two gold covered microelectrodes with a distance of 10 to 12 microns. The microelectrodes are fabricated through negative lithography techniques. Then, the samples were exposed to a numerous range of temperature from 25°C to 180°C and went through varying cycles of heating and cooling. The experimental results revealed that the DNA experienced a hysteresis like behavior where the impedance differed between the heating and cooling phase. The impedance of the DNA molecular wire increased when exposed to higher temperature. Furthermore, the impedance stops increasing after a certain amount of heat cycles before the DNA structure failed. The biology and thermodynamics of the DNA wire was analyzed due to the temperature hysteresis effect. The melting temperature and the bond dissociation temperature were evaluated to determine the cause of the impedance trends. The studies and analysis of the temperature effect provided certain insights towards the charge hopping transport mechanism. The thesis concludes with possible applications relating to the temperature effect of

  10. Development of the Axial Instability in Low Wire Number Wire Array Z-Pinches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapp, P. F.; Bell, K. S.; Blesener, I. C.; Chalenski, D. A.; Greenly, J. B.; Martin, M. R.; McBride, R. D.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Hammer, D. A.; Kusse, B. R.

    2008-11-01

    We are investigating the development of the axial instability that occurs on wires in wire-array Z-pinches, which manifests itself as a modulation of the size of the coronal plasma. The modulation is evidently a result of non-uniform ablation of material from the wire core. It is known that the wavelength of this modulation reaches a constant as the pinch develops that is a strong function of the material and little else, thus it is known as the fundamental mode. In these experiments we have been imaging individual wires with laser shadowgraphy primarily in low wire number, large wire diameter arrays made with Al, Cu, Ag and other wires. We document the development of this modulation from the beginning of plasma formation and show the wavelength and amplitude growth as a function of time. The magnetic field is also measured using B-dot probes inside the array. The change from a closed to an open field topology and its relation to the instability growth will be discussed.This research was supported by the Stewardship Sciences Academic Alliances program of the National Nuclear Security Administration under DOE Cooperative agreement DE-FC03-02NA00057 and by Sandia National Laboratories contract AO258.

  11. A FLYING WIRE SYSTEM IN THE AGS.

    SciTech Connect

    HUANG,H.; BUXTON,W.; MAHLER,G.; MARUSIC,A.; ROSER,T.; SMITH,G.; SYPHERS,M.; WILLIAMS,N.; WITKOVER,R.

    1999-03-29

    As the AGS prepares to serve as the injector for RHIC, monitoring and control of the beam transverse emittance become a major and important topic. Before the installation of the flying wire system, the emittance was measured with ionization profile monitors in the AGS, which require correction for space charge effects. It is desirable to have a second means of measuring profile that is less depend on intensity. A flying wire system has been installed in the AGS recently to perform this task. This paper discusses the hardware and software setup and the capabilities of the system.

  12. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  13. LANSCE Wire Scanner System Prototype: Switchyard Test

    SciTech Connect

    Sedillo, James D

    2012-04-11

    On November 19, 2011, the beam diagnostics team of Los Alamos National Laboratory's LANSCE accelerator facility conducted a test of a prototype wire scanner system for future deployment within the accelerator's switchyard area. The primary focus of this test was to demonstrate the wire scanner control system's ability to extend its functionality beyond acquiring lower energy linac beam profile measurements to acquiring data in the switchyard. This study summarizes the features and performance characteristics of the electronic and mechanical implementation of this system with details focusing on the test results.

  14. EDITORIAL More than a wire More than a wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demming, Anna

    2010-10-01

    Nanowires are the natural evolution of the connections in circuits when scaled down to nanometre sizes. On closer inspection, of course, the role of nanowires in developing new technologies is much more than just a current-bearing medium. By sizing the diameters of these objects down to the nanoscale, their properties become increasingly sensitive to factors such as the gas composition, temperature and incident light of their surrounding environment, as well as defects and variations in diameter. What becomes important in modern electronics innovations is not just what is connected, but how. Nanowires had already begun to attract the attention of researchers in the early 1990s as advances in imaging and measurement devices invited researchers to investigate the properties of these one-dimensional structures [1, 2]. This interest has sparked ingenious ways of fabricating nanowires such as the use of a DNA template. A collaboration of researchers at Louisiana Tech University in the US hs provided an overview of various methods to assemble conductive nanowires on a DNA template, including a summary of different approaches to stretching and positioning the templates [3]. Work in this area demonstrates a neat parallel for the role of DNA molecules as the building blocks of life and the foundations of nanoscale device architectures. Scientists at HP Labs in California are using nanowires to shrink the size of logic arrays [4]. One aspect of electronic interconnects that requires particular attention at nanoscale sizes is the effect of defects. The researchers at HP Labs demonstrate that their approach, which they name FPNI (field-programmable nanowire interconnect), is extremely tolerant of the high defect rates likely to be found in these nanoscale structures, and allows reduction in size and power without significantly sacrificing the clock rate. Another issue in scaling down electronics is the trend for an increasing resistivity with decreasing wire width. Researchers

  15. Metal organic vapour-phase epitaxy growth of GaN wires on Si (111) for light-emitting diode applications

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    GaN wires are grown on a Si (111) substrate by metal organic vapour-phase epitaxy on a thin deposited AlN blanket and through a thin SiNx layer formed spontaneously at the AlN/Si interface. N-doped wires are used as templates for the growth of core-shell InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells coated by a p-doped shell. Standing single-wire heterostructures are connected using a metallic tip and a Si substrate backside contact, and the electroluminescence at room temperature and forward bias is demonstrated at 420 nm. This result points out the feasibility of lower cost nitride-based wires for light-emitting diode applications. PMID:23391377

  16. Mechanical properties and clinical applications of orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Kapila, S; Sachdeva, R

    1989-08-01

    This review article describes the mechanical properties and clinical applications of stainless steel, cobalt-chromium, nickel-titanium, beta-titanium, and multistranded wires. The consolidation of this literature will provide the clinician with the basic working knowledge on orthodontic wire characteristics and usage. Mechanical properties of these wires are generally assessed by tensile, bending, and torsional tests. Although wire characteristics determined by these tests do not necessarily reflect the behavior of the wires under clinical conditions, they provide a basis for comparison of these wires. The characteristics desirable in an orthodontic wire are a large springback, low stiffness, good formability, high stored energy, biocompatibility and environmental stability, low surface friction, and the capability to be welded or soldered to auxiliaries. Stainless steel wires have remained popular since their introduction to orthodontics because of their formability, biocompatibility and environmental stability, stiffness, resilience, and low cost. Cobalt-chromium (Co-Cr) wires can be manipulated in a softened state and then subjected to heat treatment. Heat treatment of Co-Cr wires results in a wire with properties similar to those of stainless steel. Nitinol wires have a good springback and low stiffness. This alloy, however, has poor formability and joinability. Beta-titanium wires provide a combination of adequate springback, average stiffness, good formability, and can be welded to auxiliaries. Multistranded wires have a high springback and low stiffness when compared with solid stainless steel wires. Optimal use of these orthodontic wires can be made by carefully selecting the appropriate wire type and size to meet the demands of a particular clinical situation. PMID:2667330

  17. Quantum Conductance in Metal Nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, Daniel

    2004-03-01

    Quantum Conductance in Metal Nanowires D. Ugarte Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory C.P. 6192, 13084-971 Campinas SP, Brazil. Electrical transport properties of metallic nanowires (NWs) have received great attention due to their quantum conductance behavior. Atomic scale wires can be generated by stretching metal contacts; during the elongation and just before rupture, the NW conductance shows flat plateaus and abrupt jumps of approximately a conductance quantum. In this experiments, both the NW atomic arrangement and conductance change simultaneously, making difficult to discriminate electronic and structural effects. In this work, the atomic structure of NWs was studied by time-resolved in situ experiments in a high resolution transmission electron microscope, while their electrical properties using an UHV mechanically controllable break junction (MCBJ). From the analysis of numerous HRTEM images and videos, we have deduced that metal (Au, Ag, Pt, etc.) junctions generated by tensile deformation are crystalline and free of defects. The neck structure is strongly dependent on the surface properties of the analyzed metal, this was verified by comparing different metal NWs (Au, Ag, Cu), which have similar atomic structure (FCC), but show very different faceting patterns. The correlation between the observed structural and transport properties of NW points out that the quantum conductance behavior is defined by preferred atomic arrangement at the narrowest constriction. In the case of magnetic (ex. Fe,Co,Ni) or quasi-magnetic (ex. Pd) wires, we have observed that one-atom-thick structures show a conductance of half the quantum as expected for a fully spin polarized current. This phenomenon seems to occur spontaneously for magnetic suspended atom-chains in zero magnetic field and at room temperature. These results open new opportunities for spin control in nanostructures. Funded by FAPESP, LNLS and CNPq.

  18. Compact quantum circuits from one-way quantum computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias da Silva, Raphael; Galvão, Ernesto F.

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we address the problem of translating one-way quantum computation (1WQC) into the circuit model. We start by giving a straightforward circuit representation of any 1WQC, at the cost of introducing many ancilla wires. We then propose a set of simple circuit identities that explore the relationship between the entanglement resource and correction structure of a 1WQC, allowing one to obtain equivalent circuits acting on fewer qubits. We conclude with some examples and a discussion of open problems.

  19. Quantum Teardrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brzeziński, Tomasz; Fairfax, Simon A.

    2012-11-01

    Algebras of functions on quantum weighted projective spaces are introduced, and the structure of quantum weighted projective lines or quantum teardrops is described in detail. In particular the presentation of the coordinate algebra of the quantum teardrop in terms of generators and relations and classification of irreducible *-representations are derived. The algebras are then analysed from the point of view of Hopf-Galois theory or the theory of quantum principal bundles. Fredholm modules and associated traces are constructed. C*-algebras of continuous functions on quantum weighted projective lines are described and their K-groups computed.

  20. Thermal noise informatics: totally secure communication via a wire, zero-power communication, and thermal noise driven computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kish, Laszlo B.; Mingesz, Robert; Gingl, Zoltan

    2007-06-01

    Very recently, it has been shown that Gaussian thermal noise and its artificial versions (Johnson-like noises) can be utilized as an information carrier with peculiar properties therefore it may be proper to call this topic Thermal Noise Informatics. Zero Power (Stealth) Communication, Thermal Noise Driven Computing, and Totally Secure Classical Communication are relevant examples. In this paper, while we will briefly describe the first and the second subjects, we shall focus on the third subject, the secure classical communication via wire. This way of secure telecommunication utilizes the properties of Johnson(-like) noise and those of a simple Kirchhoff's loop. The communicator is unconditionally secure at the conceptual (circuit theoretical) level and this property is (so far) unique in communication systems based on classical physics. The communicator is superior to quantum alternatives in all known aspects, except the need of using a wire. In the idealized system, the eavesdropper can extract zero bit of information without getting uncovered. The scheme is naturally protected against the man-in-the-middle attack. The communication can take place also via currently used power lines or phone (wire) lines and it is not only a point-to-point communication like quantum channels but network-ready. We report that a pair of Kirchhoff-Loop-Johnson(-like)-Noise communicators, which is able to work over variable ranges, was designed and built. Tests have been carried out on a model-line with ranges beyond the ranges of any known direct quantum communication channel and they indicate unrivalled signal fidelity and security performance. This simple device has single-wire secure key generation/sharing rates of 0.1, 1, 10, and 100 bit/second for copper wires with diameters/ranges of 21 mm / 2000 km, 7 mm / 200 km, 2.3 mm / 20 km, and 0.7 mm / 2 km, respectively and it performs with 0.02% raw-bit error rate (99.98 % fidelity). The raw-bit security of this practical system

  1. Comparison of Analysis, Simulation, and Measurement of Wire-to-Wire Crosstalk. Part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Yavoich, Brian James; Hodson, Shame M.; Godley, Richard Franklin

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation, we compare crosstalk analysis, simulation, and measurement results for electrically short configurations. Methods include hand calculations, PSPICE simulations, Microstripes transient field solver, and empirical measurement. In total, four representative physical configurations are examined, including a single wire over a ground plane, a twisted pair over a ground plane, generator plus receptor wires inside a cylindrical conduit, and a single receptor wire inside a cylindrical conduit. Part 1 addresses the first two cases, and Part 2 addresses the final two. Agreement between the analysis, simulation, and test data is shown to be very good.

  2. Comparison of Analysis, Simulation, and Measurement of Wire-to-Wire Crosstalk. Part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Yavoich, Brian James; Hodson, Shane M.; Godley, Franklin

    2010-01-01

    In this investigation, we compare crosstalk analysis, simulation, and measurement results for electrically short configurations. Methods include hand calculations, PSPICE simulations, Microstripes transient field solver, and empirical measurement. In total, four representative physical configurations are examined, including a single wire over a ground plane, a twisted pair over a ground plane, generator plus receptor wires inside a cylindrical conduit, and a single receptor wire inside a cylindrical conduit. Part 1 addresses the first two cases, and Part 2 addresses the final two. Agreement between the analysis methods and test data is shown to be very good.

  3. Large aperture vibrating wire monitor with two mechanically coupled wires for beam halo measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Arutunian, S. G.; Avetisyan, A. E.; Davtyan, M. M.; Harutyunyan, G. S.; Vasiniuk, I. E.; Chung, M.; Scarpine, V.

    2014-03-01

    Development of a new type of Vibrating Wire Monitor (VWM), which has two mechanically coupled wires (vibrating and target), is presented. The new monitor has a much larger aperture size than the previous model of the VWM, and thus allows us to measure transverse beam halos more effectively. A prototype of such a large aperture VWM with a target wire length of 60 mm was designed, manufactured, and bench-tested. Initial beam measurements have been performed at the Fermilab High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS) facility, and key results are presented.

  4. Wire grid polarizers for visible wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Joshua Hans

    Detailed analysis of wire-grid (WG) polarizers for visible wavelengths is presented. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) is used to model their performance. The optimum choice of metal for the wires is identified, and the effects of different substrate indices of refraction are considered. The polarization properties are considered with changes in the physical parameters, including period, duty cycle, and wire thickness. It is shown that the performance of WG polarizers improves with increasing angle of incidence. The effect of non-square wire profiles is considered, as is the effect of adding additional dielectric layers between the wires and the substrate. The effect of metal oxide layers forming on the wires is also modeled. While most of this work concerns WG polarizers used in transmission, the performance in reflection is also discussed. Several visible-wavelength WG polarizers were fabricated at the Cornell Nanofabrication Facility (CNF) in Ithaca, NY. Electron-beam lithography was used to write the patterns for these devices, and two different methods of pattern transfer were compared. These were the lift-off method and reactive-ion etching (RIE). We found that lift-off could not produce wires thick enough for good polarization properties. RIE could produce much thicker wires with good profiles and was used for all of the experimental work presented here. Two different methods for metal film deposition, evaporation and sputtering were also compared. Films deposited by sputtering were found to have much lower indices of refraction and to not respond to etching as well. Thermally evaporated films performed much better in WG polarizers. Alternative methods for the mass-production of visible-wavelength WG polarizers are also discussed. The performance of the fabricated WG polarizers is compared to theory. When the measured physical parameters are used in RCWA to predict the performance, the measured extinction ratio is found to be much lower than the

  5. Milestones Toward Majorana-Based Quantum Computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aasen, David; Hell, Michael; Mishmash, Ryan V.; Higginbotham, Andrew; Danon, Jeroen; Leijnse, Martin; Jespersen, Thomas S.; Folk, Joshua A.; Marcus, Charles M.; Flensberg, Karsten; Alicea, Jason

    2016-07-01

    We introduce a scheme for preparation, manipulation, and read out of Majorana zero modes in semiconducting wires with mesoscopic superconducting islands. Our approach synthesizes recent advances in materials growth with tools commonly used in quantum-dot experiments, including gate control of tunnel barriers and Coulomb effects, charge sensing, and charge pumping. We outline a sequence of milestones interpolating between zero-mode detection and quantum computing that includes (1) detection of fusion rules for non-Abelian anyons using either proximal charge sensors or pumped current, (2) validation of a prototype topological qubit, and (3) demonstration of non-Abelian statistics by braiding in a branched geometry. The first two milestones require only a single wire with two islands, and additionally enable sensitive measurements of the system's excitation gap, quasiparticle poisoning rates, residual Majorana zero-mode splittings, and topological-qubit coherence times. These pre-braiding experiments can be adapted to other manipulation and read out schemes as well.

  6. Topological Quantum Buses: Coherent Quantum Information Transfer between Topological and Conventional Qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonderson, Parsa; Lutchyn, Roman M.

    2011-04-01

    We propose computing bus devices that enable quantum information to be coherently transferred between topological and conventional qubits. We describe a concrete realization of such a topological quantum bus acting between a topological qubit in a Majorana wire network and a conventional semiconductor double quantum dot qubit. Specifically, this device measures the joint (fermion) parity of these two different qubits by using the Aharonov-Casher effect in conjunction with an ancilliary superconducting flux qubit that facilitates the measurement. Such a parity measurement, together with the ability to apply Hadamard gates to the two qubits, allows one to produce states in which the topological and conventional qubits are maximally entangled and to teleport quantum states between the topological and conventional quantum systems.

  7. Topological quantum buses: coherent quantum information transfer between topological and conventional qubits.

    PubMed

    Bonderson, Parsa; Lutchyn, Roman M

    2011-04-01

    We propose computing bus devices that enable quantum information to be coherently transferred between topological and conventional qubits. We describe a concrete realization of such a topological quantum bus acting between a topological qubit in a Majorana wire network and a conventional semiconductor double quantum dot qubit. Specifically, this device measures the joint (fermion) parity of these two different qubits by using the Aharonov-Casher effect in conjunction with an ancilliary superconducting flux qubit that facilitates the measurement. Such a parity measurement, together with the ability to apply Hadamard gates to the two qubits, allows one to produce states in which the topological and conventional qubits are maximally entangled and to teleport quantum states between the topological and conventional quantum systems. PMID:21517366

  8. 34. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. ENGINE HOUSE, WIRES FROM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. William E. Barrett, Photographer, 1973. ENGINE HOUSE, WIRES FROM IT, AND COMPLETE WELL DERAIL, WHEELS. - West Oil Company Endless Wire Pumping Station, U.S. Route 50 (Volcano vicinity), Petroleum, Ritchie County, WV

  9. 30 CFR 75.516 - Power wires; support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.516 Power wires; support... wires) shall be supported on well-insulated insulators and shall not contact combustible material,...

  10. 30 CFR 75.516 - Power wires; support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.516 Power wires; support... wires) shall be supported on well-insulated insulators and shall not contact combustible material,...

  11. 30 CFR 75.516 - Power wires; support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.516 Power wires; support... wires) shall be supported on well-insulated insulators and shall not contact combustible material,...

  12. 30 CFR 75.516 - Power wires; support.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.516 Power wires; support... wires) shall be supported on well-insulated insulators and shall not contact combustible material,...

  13. Analysis of coils of wire rope arranged for passive damping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cutchins, M. A.; Cochran, J. E., Jr.; Kumar, K.; Fitz-Coy, N. G.; Tinker, M. L.

    1988-01-01

    Vibration dampers constructed with multiple loops of wire rope are studied. The literature on such devices is reviewed briefly, and dynamic and static models of them are examined. Fundamental and advanced NASTRAN models for wire rope damping are considered.

  14. Electric and Magnetic Forces between Parallel-Wire Conductors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morton, N.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses electric and magnetic forces between parallel-wire conductors and derives, in a simple fashion, order of magnitude estimates of the ratio of the likely electrostatic and electromagnetic forces for a simple parallel-wire balance. (Author/HM)

  15. Accuracy of Reduced and Extended Thin-Wire Kernels

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G J

    2008-11-24

    Some results are presented comparing the accuracy of the reduced thin-wire kernel and an extended kernel with exact integration of the 1/R term of the Green's function and results are shown for simple wire structures.

  16. Temperature characteristics analysis of HIV partial disconnection wire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dae-Dong; Shim, Jae-Myung; Lee, Yu-Sung; Jeong, Yun-Mi; Kim, Young-Dal

    2015-09-01

    Electric fires are caused mainly due to short circuits, overloads, and electric leakage. Of the causes, short circuits are caused by deteriorated insulation, poor contacts, and pressure damage. A partially disconnected wire refers to the status in which the wire section is partially cut, thus reducing the contact area compared to the normal state. Causes of partially disconnected wires, e.g., poor wire contacts and pressure damage, occur mostly in the wiring and in the device's contact area, and they locally increase the resistance, thus triggering thermal changes. Thus, this study simulated damage to a 450/750 V heat-resistant polyvinyl-chloride-insulated (HIV) wire used for preventing electric fires and analyzed the temperature characteristics of normal wires and partially disconnected wires.

  17. Quantum Darwinism

    SciTech Connect

    Zurek, Wojciech H

    2008-01-01

    Quantum Darwinism - proliferation, in the environment, of multiple records of selected states of the system (its information-theoretic progeny) - explains how quantum fragility of individual state can lead to classical robustness of their multitude.

  18. Quantum memristors

    DOE PAGES

    Pfeiffer, P.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Ventra, M.; Sanz, M.; Solano, E.

    2016-07-06

    Technology based on memristors, resistors with memory whose resistance depends on the history of the crossing charges, has lately enhanced the classical paradigm of computation with neuromorphic architectures. However, in contrast to the known quantized models of passive circuit elements, such as inductors, capacitors or resistors, the design and realization of a quantum memristor is still missing. Here, we introduce the concept of a quantum memristor as a quantum dissipative device, whose decoherence mechanism is controlled by a continuous-measurement feedback scheme, which accounts for the memory. Indeed, we provide numerical simulations showing that memory effects actually persist in the quantummore » regime. Our quantization method, specifically designed for superconducting circuits, may be extended to other quantum platforms, allowing for memristor-type constructions in different quantum technologies. As a result, the proposed quantum memristor is then a building block for neuromorphic quantum computation and quantum simulations of non-Markovian systems.« less

  19. Application of a submillimetre HCN laser for determining the electrodynamic parameters of one-dimensional wire gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kamenev, Yu E; Masalov, S A; Filimonova, A A

    2005-04-30

    A method is proposed and a device is described for determining the electrodynamic parameters of one-dimensional wire gratings in the submillimetre range. The grating under study was used as the output mirror of the laser. The transmission coefficient and the phase shift are determined experimentally for several gratings with different parameters at a wavelength of 337 {mu}m. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. The wire and urban health education.

    PubMed

    Buttress, Amelia; German, Danielle; Holtgrave, David; Sherman, Susan G

    2013-06-01

    As urban health has emerged as a distinct field, experts have collaborated to develop models for interdisciplinary education to train health professionals. Interdisciplinary learning is an important yet challenging imperative for urban health education. This paper explores lessons learned from a 2010 speaker series at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. The television show, The Wire, was used as a teaching tool to illustrate the context of health disparities in American cities and to explore the complex factors perpetuating urban health outcomes. We suggest that individuals interested in developing interdisciplinary teaching models can learn from both the form and the content of The Wire. As a popular televised serial narrative, The Wire prompts an investigation into the forms and circulation of academic research in a fractured and specialized media landscape. The formal narrative structure of the show provides mental scaffolding from which epidemiological, historical, geographical, anthropological, and other relevant disciplinary learning can build. The Wire encourages critical reflection among public health professionals about the forces that shape public health training, research, and practice and offers creative expansions to existing urban health educational efforts. PMID:22956267