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Sample records for quantum yield measurements

  1. Absolute quantum yield measurement of powder samples.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Luis A

    2012-05-12

    Measurement of fluorescence quantum yield has become an important tool in the search for new solutions in the development, evaluation, quality control and research of illumination, AV equipment, organic EL material, films, filters and fluorescent probes for bio-industry. Quantum yield is calculated as the ratio of the number of photons absorbed, to the number of photons emitted by a material. The higher the quantum yield, the better the efficiency of the fluorescent material. For the measurements featured in this video, we will use the Hitachi F-7000 fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with the Quantum Yield measuring accessory and Report Generator program. All the information provided applies to this system. Measurement of quantum yield in powder samples is performed following these steps: 1. Generation of instrument correction factors for the excitation and emission monochromators. This is an important requirement for the correct measurement of quantum yield. It has been performed in advance for the full measurement range of the instrument and will not be shown in this video due to time limitations. 2. Measurement of integrating sphere correction factors. The purpose of this step is to take into consideration reflectivity characteristics of the integrating sphere used for the measurements. 3. Reference and Sample measurement using direct excitation and indirect excitation. 4. Quantum Yield calculation using Direct and Indirect excitation. Direct excitation is when the sample is facing directly the excitation beam, which would be the normal measurement setup. However, because we use an integrating sphere, a portion of the emitted photons resulting from the sample fluorescence are reflected by the integrating sphere and will re-excite the sample, so we need to take into consideration indirect excitation. This is accomplished by measuring the sample placed in the port facing the emission monochromator, calculating indirect quantum yield and correcting the direct

  2. Measurement of the fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xue-Feng; Wen, Liang-Jian; Zhou, Xiang; Ding, Ya-Yun; Ye, Xing-Chen; Zhou, Li; Liu, Meng-Chao; Cai, Hao; Cao, Jun

    2015-12-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB, a widely used liquid scintillator wavelength shifter, was measured to study the photon absorption and re-emission processes in a liquid scintillator. The re-emission process affects the photoelectron yield and distribution, especially in a large liquid scintillator detector, thus must be understood to optimize the liquid scintillator for good energy resolution and to precisely simulate the detector with Monte Carlo. In this study, solutions of different bis-MSB concentration were prepared for absorption and fluorescence emission measurements to cover a broad range of wavelengths. Harmane was used as a standard reference to obtain the absolution fluorescence quantum yield. For the first time we measured the fluorescence quantum yield of bis-MSB up to 430 nm as inputs required by Monte Carlo simulation, which is 0.926±0.053 at λex=350 nm. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205183, 11225525, 11390381)

  3. Fluorescence quantum yield measurement in nanoparticle-fluorophore systems by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, M.; Piscitelli, V.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic nanoparticles have been used as a way to tailor the fluorescence properties like quantum yield, but regular fluorescence quantum yield measurements have to counter the reflection and dispersion of a sample for an accurate result. Thermal lens spectroscopy is a good alternative to resolve this problem because doesn't measure the fluorescence intensity but the heat generated by absorption. We studied the changes induced by silver nanoparticles, generated by laser ablation, in the fluorescence peak and quantum yield of Rhodamine B. We fund that the silver nanoparticles lowered the fluorescence peak and quenched the fluorescence of the Rhodamine B and how much is quenched also depends on its concentration.

  4. Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorophores in Lipid Bilayers Using a Plasmonic Nanocavity.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Falk; Ruhlandt, Daja; Gregor, Ingo; Enderlein, Jörg; Chizhik, Alexey I

    2017-03-20

    Precise knowledge of the quantum yield is important for many fluorescence-spectroscopic techniques, for example, for Förster resonance energy transfer. However, to measure it for emitters in a complex environment and at low concentrations is far from being trivial. Using a plasmonic nanocavity, we measure the absolute quantum yield value of lipid-conjugated dyes incorporated into a supported lipid bilayer. We show that for both hydrophobic and hydrophilic molecules the quantum yield of dyes inside the lipid bilayer strongly differs from its value in aqueous solution. This finding is of particular importance for all fluorescence-spectroscopic studies involving lipid bilayers, such as protein-protein or protein-lipid interactions in membranes or direct fluorescence-spectroscopic measurements of membrane physical properties.

  5. Sample-Averaged Biexciton Quantum Yield Measured by Solution-Phase Photon Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Beyler, Andrew P.; Bischof, Thomas S.; Cui, Jian; Coropceanu, Igor; Harris, Daniel K.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2015-01-01

    The brightness of nanoscale optical materials such as semiconductor nanocrystals is currently limited in high excitation flux applications by inefficient multiexciton fluorescence. We have devised a solution-phase photon correlation measurement that can conveniently and reliably measure the average biexciton-to-exciton quantum yield ratio of an entire sample without user selection bias. This technique can be used to investigate the multiexciton recombination dynamics of a broad scope of synthetically underdeveloped materials, including those with low exciton quantum yields and poor fluorescence stability. Here, we have applied this method to measure weak biexciton fluorescence in samples of visible-emitting InP/ZnS and InAs/ZnS core/shell nanocrystals, and to demonstrate that a rapid CdS shell growth procedure can markedly increase the biexciton fluorescence of CdSe nanocrystals. PMID:25409496

  6. Accuracy of quantum sensors measuring yield photon flux and photosynthetic photon flux

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, C.; Tibbitts, T.; Sager, J.; Deitzer, G.; Bubenheim, D.; Koerner, G.; Bugbee, B.; Knott, W. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    Photosynthesis is fundamentally driven by photon flux rather than energy flux, but not all absorbed photons yield equal amounts of photosynthesis. Thus, two measures of photosynthetically active radiation have emerged: photosynthetic photon flux (PPF), which values all photons from 400 to 700 nm equally, and yield photon flux (YPF), which weights photons in the range from 360 to 760 nm according to plant photosynthetic response. We selected seven common radiation sources and measured YPF and PPF from each source with a spectroradiometer. We then compared these measurements with measurements from three quantum sensors designed to measure YPF, and from six quantum sensors designed to measure PPF. There were few differences among sensors within a group (usually <5%), but YPF values from sensors were consistently lower (3% to 20%) than YPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements. Quantum sensor measurements of PPF also were consistently lower than PPF values calculated from spectroradiometric measurements, but the differences were <7% for all sources, except red-light-emitting diodes. The sensors were most accurate for broad-band sources and least accurate for narrow-band sources. According to spectroradiometric measurements, YPF sensors were significantly less accurate (>9% difference) than PPF sensors under metal halide, high-pressure sodium, and low-pressure sodium lamps. Both sensor types were inaccurate (>18% error) under red-light-emitting diodes. Because both YPF and PPF sensors are imperfect integrators, and because spectroradiometers can measure photosynthetically active radiation much more accurately, researchers should consider developing calibration factors from spectroradiometric data for some specific radiation sources to improve the accuracy of integrating sensors.

  7. Fluorescence quantum yield measurements of fluorescent proteins: a laboratory experiment for a biochemistry or molecular biophysics laboratory course.

    PubMed

    Wall, Kathryn P; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts absorbed photons into emitted photons and it is necessary to know for assessing what fluorescent protein is the most appropriate for a particular application. In this work, we have designed an upper-level, biochemistry laboratory experiment where students measure the fluorescence quantum yields of fluorescent proteins relative to a standard organic dye. Four fluorescent protein variants, enhanced cyan fluorescent protein (ECFP), enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP), mCitrine, and mCherry, were used, however the methods described are useful for the characterization of any fluorescent protein or could be expanded to fluorescent quantum yield measurements of organic dye molecules. The laboratory is designed as a guided inquiry project and takes two, 4 hr laboratory periods. During the first day students design the experiment by selecting the excitation wavelength, choosing the standard, and determining the concentration needed for the quantum yield experiment that takes place in the second laboratory period. Overall, this laboratory provides students with a guided inquiry learning experience and introduces concepts of fluorescence biophysics into a biochemistry laboratory curriculum.

  8. Quantum yield measurements of light-induced H₂ generation in a photosystem I-[FeFe]-H₂ase nanoconstruct.

    PubMed

    Applegate, Amanda M; Lubner, Carolyn E; Knörzer, Philipp; Happe, Thomas; Golbeck, John H

    2016-01-01

    The quantum yield for light-induced H2 generation was measured for a previously optimized bio-hybrid cytochrome c 6-crosslinked PSI(C13G)-1,8-octanedithiol-[FeFe]-H2ase(C97G) (PSI-H2ase) nanoconstruct. The theoretical quantum yield for the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct is 0.50 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to a requirement of two photons per H2 generated. Illumination of the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct with visible light between 400 and 700 nm resulted in an average quantum yield of 0.10-0.15 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to a requirement of 6.7-10 photons per H2 generated. A possible reason for the difference between the theoretical and experimental quantum yield is the occurrence of non-productive PSI(C13G)-1,8-octanedithiol-PSIC13G (PSI-PSI) conjugates, which would absorb light without generating H2. Assuming the thiol-Fe coupling is equally efficient at producing PSI-PSI conjugates as well as in producing PSI-H2ase nanoconstructs, the theoretical quantum yield would decrease to 0.167 molecules of H2 per photon absorbed, which equates to 6 photons per H2 generated. This value is close to the range of measured values in the current study. A strategy that purifies the PSI-H2ase nanoconstructs from the unproductive PSI-PSI conjugates or that incorporates different chemistries on the PSI and [FeFe]-H2ase enzyme sites could potentially allow the PSI-H2ase nanoconstruct to approach the expected theoretical quantum yield for light-induced H2 generation.

  9. Fluorescence Quantum Yield Measurements of Fluorescent Proteins: A Laboratory Experiment for a Biochemistry or Molecular Biophysics Laboratory Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Kathryn P.; Dillon, Rebecca; Knowles, Michelle K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent proteins are commonly used in cell biology to assess where proteins are within a cell as a function of time and provide insight into intracellular protein function. However, the usefulness of a fluorescent protein depends directly on the quantum yield. The quantum yield relates the efficiency at which a fluorescent molecule converts…

  10. Effects of Bleaching by Nitrogen Deficiency on the Quantum Yield of Photosystem II in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 Revealed by Chl Fluorescence Measurements.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Takako; Sonoike, Kintake

    2016-03-01

    Estimation of photosynthesis by Chl fluorescence measurement of cyanobacteria is always problematic due to the interference from respiratory electron transfer and from phycocyanin fluorescence. The interference from respiratory electron transfer could be avoided by the use of DCMU or background illumination by blue light, which oxidizes the plastoquinone pool that tends to be reduced by respiration. On the other hand, the precise estimation of photosynthesis in cells with a different phycobilisome content by Chl fluorescence measurement is difficult. By subtracting the basal fluorescence due to the phycobilisome and PSI, it becomes possible to estimate the precise maximum quantum yield of PSII in cyanobacteria. Estimated basal fluorescence accounted for 60% of the minimum fluorescence, resulting in a large difference between the 'apparent' yield and 'true' yield under high phycocyanin conditions. The calculated value of the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII was around 0.8, which was similar to the value observed in land plants. The results suggest that the cause of the apparent low yield reported in cyanobacteria is mainly ascribed to the interference from phycocyanin fluorescence. We also found that the 'true' maximum quantum yield of PSII decreased under nitrogen-deficient conditions, suggesting the impairment of the PSII reaction center, while the 'apparent' maximum quantum yield showed a marginal change under the same conditions. Due to the high contribution of phycocyanin fluorescence in cyanobacteria, it is essential to eliminate the influence of the change in phycocyanin content on Chl fluorescence measurement and to evaluate the 'true' photosynthetic condition.

  11. Measurement procedure for absolute broadband infrared up-conversion photoluminescent quantum yields: Correcting for absorption/re-emission

    SciTech Connect

    MacDougall, Sean K. W.; Ivaturi, Aruna; Marques-Hueso, Jose; Richards, Bryce S.

    2014-06-15

    The internal photoluminescent quantum yield (iPLQY) – defined as the ratio of emitted photons to those absorbed – is an important parameter in the evaluation and application of luminescent materials. The iPLQY is rarely reported due to the complexities in the calibration of such a measurement. Herein, an experimental method is proposed to correct for re-emission, which leads to an underestimation of the absorption under broadband excitation. Although traditionally the iPLQY is measured using monochromatic sources for linear materials, this advancement is necessary for nonlinear materials with wavelength dependent iPLQY, such as the application of up-conversion to solar energy harvesting. The method requires an additional measurement of the emission line shape that overlaps with the excitation and absorption spectra. Through scaling of the emission spectrum, at the long wavelength edge where an overlap of excitation does not occur, it is possible to better estimate the value of iPLQY. The method has been evaluated for a range of nonlinear material concentrations and under various irradiances to analyze the necessity and boundary conditions that favor the proposed method. Use of this refined method is important for a reliable measurement of iPLQY under a broad illumination source such as the Sun.

  12. Low cost 3D-printing used in an undergraduate project: an integrating sphere for measurement of photoluminescence quantum yield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomes, John J.; Finlayson, Chris E.

    2016-09-01

    We report upon the exploitation of the latest 3D printing technologies to provide low-cost instrumentation solutions, for use in an undergraduate level final-year project. The project addresses prescient research issues in optoelectronics, which would otherwise be inaccessible to such undergraduate student projects. The experimental use of an integrating sphere in conjunction with a desktop spectrometer presents opportunities to use easily handled, low cost materials as a means to illustrate many areas of physics such as spectroscopy, lasers, optics, simple circuits, black body radiation and data gathering. Presented here is a 3rd year undergraduate physics project which developed a low cost (£25) method to manufacture an experimentally accurate integrating sphere by 3D printing. Details are given of both a homemade internal reflectance coating formulated from readily available materials, and a robust instrument calibration method using a tungsten bulb. The instrument is demonstrated to give accurate and reproducible experimental measurements of luminescence quantum yield of various semiconducting fluorophores, in excellent agreement with literature values.

  13. Near-Unity Quantum Yields of Biexciton Emission from CdSe=CdS Nanocrystals Measured Using Single-Particle Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Young-Shin; Malko, Anton V.; Vela, Javier; Chen, Yongfen; Ghosh, Yagnaseni; Garcia-Santamaria, Florencio; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A.; Klimov, Victor I.; Htoon, Han

    2011-05-03

    Biexciton photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (Q2X) of individual CdSe/CdS core-shell nanocrystal quantum dots with various shell thicknesses are derived from independent PL saturation and two-photon correlation measurements. We observe a near-unity Q{sub 2X} for some nanocrystals with an ultrathick 19-monolayer shell. High Q2X’s are, however, not universal and vary widely among nominally identical nanocrystals indicating a significant dependence of Q2X upon subtle structural differences. Interestingly, our measurements indicate that high Q2X’s are not required to achieve complete suppression of PL intensity fluctuations in individual nanocrystals.

  14. Cloning of a quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, Alessandro; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Perinotti, Paolo; Sedlak, Michal

    2011-10-15

    We analyze quantum algorithms for cloning of a quantum measurement. Our aim is to mimic two uses of a device performing an unknown von Neumann measurement with a single use of the device. When the unknown device has to be used before the bipartite state to be measured is available we talk about 1{yields}2 learning of the measurement, otherwise the task is called 1{yields}2 cloning of a measurement. We perform the optimization for both learning and cloning for arbitrary dimension d of the Hilbert space. For 1{yields}2 cloning we also propose a simple quantum network that achieves the optimal fidelity. The optimal fidelity for 1{yields}2 learning just slightly outperforms the estimate and prepare strategy in which one first estimates the unknown measurement and depending on the result suitably prepares the duplicate.

  15. Fluorescence of tryptophan in designed hairpin and Trp-cage miniproteins: measurements of fluorescence yields and calculations by quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Andrew W; Kier, Brandon L; Shu, Irene; Byrne, Aimee; Andersen, Niels H; Parson, William W

    2013-02-14

    The quantum yield of tryptophan (Trp) fluorescence was measured in 30 designed miniproteins (17 β-hairpins and 13 Trp-cage peptides), each containing a single Trp residue. Measurements were made in D(2)O and H(2)O to distinguish between fluorescence quenching mechanisms involving electron and proton transfer in the hairpin peptides, and at two temperatures to check for effects of partial unfolding of the Trp-cage peptides. The extent of folding of all the peptides also was measured by NMR. The fluorescence yields ranged from 0.01 in some of the Trp-cage peptides to 0.27 in some hairpins. Fluorescence quenching was found to occur by electron transfer from the excited indole ring of the Trp to a backbone amide group or the protonated side chain of a nearby histidine, glutamate, aspartate, tyrosine, or cysteine residue. Ionized tyrosine side chains quenched strongly by resonance energy transfer or electron transfer to the excited indole ring. Hybrid classical/quantum mechanical molecular dynamics simulations were performed by a method that optimized induced electric dipoles separately for the ground and excited states in multiple π-π* and charge-transfer (CT) excitations. Twenty 0.5 ns trajectories in the tryptophan's lowest excited singlet π-π* state were run for each peptide, beginning by projections from trajectories in the ground state. Fluorescence quenching was correlated with the availability of a CT or exciton state that was strongly coupled to the π-π* state and that matched or fell below the π-π* state in energy. The fluorescence yields predicted by summing the calculated rates of charge and energy transfer are in good accord with the measured yields.

  16. Measurement of the triplet lifetime and the quantum yield of triplet formation of phthalazine by the time-resolved thermal lens method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terazima, Masahide; Azumi, Tohru

    1987-11-01

    The time-resolved thermal lens technique is used to determine the quantum yield of the triplet formation and the triplet lifetime of phthalazine in a polar and a non-polar solvent. The quantum yields of phthalazine in ethanol and benzene are 0.44 and 0.49, respectively. Very short triplet lifetimes of phthalazine (2.7 μ;s) in benzene at room temperature are reported.

  17. Measuring solid-state quantum yields: The conversion of a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG diode laser pointer module into a viable light source.

    PubMed

    Daglen, Bevin C; Harris, John D; Dax, Clifford D; Tyler, David R

    2007-07-01

    This article outlines the difficulties associated with measuring quantum yields for solid-state samples using a high-pressure mercury arc lamp as the irradiation source. Details are given for the conversion of an inexpensive frequency-doubled neodymium-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG) diode laser pointer module into a viable irradiation source. The modified Nd:YAG laser was incorporated into a computer-controlled system, which allowed for the simultaneous irradiation and spectroscopic monitoring of the sample. The data obtained with the Nd:YAG diode laser system show far less scatter than data obtained with a high-pressure Hg arc lamp, and consequently the degradation rates obtained with the laser system could be calculated with far greater accuracy.

  18. Light propagation and fluorescence quantum yields in liquid scintillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buck, C.; Gramlich, B.; Wagner, S.

    2015-09-01

    For the simulation of the scintillation and Cherenkov light propagation in large liquid scintillator detectors a detailed knowledge about the absorption and emission spectra of the scintillator molecules is mandatory. Furthermore reemission probabilities and quantum yields of the scintillator components influence the light propagation inside the liquid. Absorption and emission properties are presented for liquid scintillators using 2,5-Diphenyloxazole (PPO) and 4-bis-(2-Methylstyryl)benzene (bis-MSB) as primary and secondary wavelength shifter. New measurements of the quantum yields for various aromatic molecules are shown.

  19. Machine learning for precise quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Hentschel, Alexander; Sanders, Barry C

    2010-02-12

    Adaptive feedback schemes are promising for quantum-enhanced measurements yet are complicated to design. Machine learning can autonomously generate algorithms in a classical setting. Here we adapt machine learning for quantum information and use our framework to generate autonomous adaptive feedback schemes for quantum measurement. In particular, our approach replaces guesswork in quantum measurement by a logical, fully automatic, programable routine. We show that our method yields schemes that outperform the best known adaptive scheme for interferometric phase estimation.

  20. Biexciton quantum yield of single semiconductor nanocrystals from photon statistics

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Gautham; Zhao, Jing; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2012-01-01

    Biexciton properties strongly affect the usability of a light emitter in quantum photon sources and lasers but are difficult to measure for single fluorophores at room temperature due to luminescence intermittency and bleaching at the high excitation fluences usually required. Here, we observe the biexciton (BX) to exciton (X) to ground photoluminescence cascade of single colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) under weak excitation in a g(2) photon correlation measurement and show that the normalized amplitude of the cascade feature is equal to the ratio of the BX to X fluorescence quantum yields. This imposes a limit on the attainable depth of photon antibunching and provides a robust means to study single emitter biexciton physics. In NC samples, we show that the BX quantum yield is considerably inhomogeneous, consistent with the defect sensitivity expected of the Auger nonradiative recombination mechanism. The method can be extended to study X,BX spectral and polarization correlations. PMID:21288042

  1. Quantum teleportation with continuous measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greplova, Eliska; Mølmer, Klaus; Andersen, Christian Kraglund

    2016-10-01

    We propose a scheme for quantum teleportation between two qubits, coupled sequentially to a cavity field. An implementation of the scheme is analyzed with superconducting qubits and a transmission line resonator, where measurements are restricted to continuous probing of the field leaking from the resonator rather than instantaneous projective Bell state measurement. We show that the past quantum state formalism S. Gammelmark, B. Julsgaard, and K. Mølmer, Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 160401 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.111.160401 can be successfully applied to estimate what would have been the most likely Bell measurement outcome conditioned on our continuous signal record. This information determines which local operation on the target qubit yields the optimal teleportation fidelity. Our results emphasize the significance of applying a detailed analysis of quantum measurements in feedforward protocols in nonideal leaky quantum systems.

  2. Quantum Yield of Single Surface Plasmons Generated by a Quantum Dot Coupled with a Silver Nanowire.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wei, Hong; Xu, Hongxing

    2015-12-09

    The interactions between surface plasmons (SPs) in metal nanostructures and excitons in quantum emitters (QEs) lead to many interesting phenomena and potential applications that are strongly dependent on the quantum yield of SPs. The difficulty in distinguishing all the possible exciton recombination channels hinders the experimental determination of SP quantum yield. Here, we experimentally measured for the first time the quantum yield of single SPs generated by the exciton-plasmon coupling in a system composed of a single quantum dot and a silver nanowire (NW). By utilizing the SP guiding property of the NW, the decay rates of all the exciton recombination channels, i.e., direct free space radiation channel, SP generation channel, and nonradiative damping channel, are quantitatively obtained. It is determined that the optimum emitter-NW coupling distance for the largest SP quantum yield is about 10 nm, resulting from the different distance-dependent decay rates of the three channels. These results are important for manipulating the coupling between plasmonic nanostructures and QEs and developing on-chip quantum plasmonic devices for potential nanophotonic and quantum information applications.

  3. Photosynthetic quantum yield dynamics: from photosystems to leaves.

    PubMed

    Hogewoning, Sander W; Wientjes, Emilie; Douwstra, Peter; Trouwborst, Govert; van Ieperen, Wim; Croce, Roberta; Harbinson, Jeremy

    2012-05-01

    The mechanisms underlying the wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for CO(2) fixation (α) and its acclimation to the growth-light spectrum are quantitatively addressed, combining in vivo physiological and in vitro molecular methods. Cucumber (Cucumis sativus) was grown under an artificial sunlight spectrum, shade light spectrum, and blue light, and the quantum yield for photosystem I (PSI) and photosystem II (PSII) electron transport and α were simultaneously measured in vivo at 20 different wavelengths. The wavelength dependence of the photosystem excitation balance was calculated from both these in vivo data and in vitro from the photosystem composition and spectroscopic properties. Measuring wavelengths overexciting PSI produced a higher α for leaves grown under the shade light spectrum (i.e., PSI light), whereas wavelengths overexciting PSII produced a higher α for the sun and blue leaves. The shade spectrum produced the lowest PSI:PSII ratio. The photosystem excitation balance calculated from both in vivo and in vitro data was substantially similar and was shown to determine α at those wavelengths where absorption by carotenoids and nonphotosynthetic pigments is insignificant (i.e., >580 nm). We show quantitatively that leaves acclimate their photosystem composition to their growth light spectrum and how this changes the wavelength dependence of the photosystem excitation balance and quantum yield for CO(2) fixation. This also proves that combining different wavelengths can enhance quantum yields substantially.

  4. Fission yield measurements at IGISOL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, M.; Al-Adili, A.; Gorelov, D.; Jokinen, A.; Kolhinen, V. S.; Mattera, A.; Moore, I.; Penttilä, H.; Pomp, S.; Prokofiev, A. V.; Rakopoulos, V.; Rinta-Antila, S.; Simutkin, V.; Solders, A.

    2016-06-01

    The fission product yields are an important characteristic of the fission process. In fundamental physics, knowledge of the yield distributions is needed to better understand the fission process. For nuclear energy applications good knowledge of neutroninduced fission-product yields is important for the safe and efficient operation of nuclear power plants. With the Ion Guide Isotope Separator On-Line (IGISOL) technique, products of nuclear reactions are stopped in a buffer gas and then extracted and separated by mass. Thanks to the high resolving power of the JYFLTRAP Penning trap, at University of Jyväskylä, fission products can be isobarically separated, making it possible to measure relative independent fission yields. In some cases it is even possible to resolve isomeric states from the ground state, permitting measurements of isomeric yield ratios. So far the reactions U(p,f) and Th(p,f) have been studied using the IGISOL-JYFLTRAP facility. Recently, a neutron converter target has been developed utilizing the Be(p,xn) reaction. We here present the IGISOL-technique for fission yield measurements and some of the results from the measurements on proton induced fission. We also present the development of the neutron converter target, the characterization of the neutron field and the first tests with neutron-induced fission.

  5. Measurement of Quantum Yield and Upconversion Brightness in Red, Blue and Green on NIR Excited M2O2S:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm Phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beeks, Ivan; Kumar, Ajith G.; Sardar, Dhiraj K.

    2015-03-01

    A series of broadly color tunable upconversion phosphors were synthesized from M2O2S (M=Y,Gd,La) using a flux fusion method. We investigate their upconversion properties as a function of the dopant concentrations and excitation power density. The phosphor compositions were determined for their upconversion characteristics under 800, 980 and 1550 nm excitations. By measuring the quantum yield and luminous brightness, we investigate their potential applications in biomedical imaging as well as NIR display applications. Results are compared with the well-known upconversion phosphor NaYF4:Yb/Er/Ho/Tm and found that the M2O2S phosphor systems are more efficient compared to NaYF4. By adopting various synthesis protocols, we were able to examine M2O2S in the size range of 10 nm to 10 μm. This research is supported by the National Science Foundation Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (NSF-PREM) Grant N0-DMR-0934218.

  6. Retrocausality and Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, David T.

    2008-07-01

    A retrocausal interpretation of quantum mechanics is examined and is applied to the problem of measuring an optical qubit before the qubit is actually created. Although the predictions of the retrocausal interpretation are the same as for the conventional causal picture, it provides a new perspective which should give a useful way of understanding some quantum mechanical processes.

  7. Sensitivity of quantum yield for O(/sup 1/D) production from ozone photolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wuebbles, D.J.; Tarp, R.L.

    1980-06-01

    Recent laboratory studies have indicated that the quantum yield for O(/sup 1/D) production from photolysis of ozone may be less than unity at wavelengths shorter than 300 nm (below the fall off region). Previously it had been assumed that the quantum yield was unity at these wavelengths. Based on the recent work of Brock and Watson (who measured the quantum yield at 266 nm), the effect of assuming a quantum yield of 0.9 for O(/sup 1/D) production at wavelengths less than 300 nm in the LLL 1-d model was tested. Since measurements of the quantum yield fall off at longer wavelength also assume unity quantum yield below the fall off region, we also multiplied the O(/sup 1/D) quantum yield through this region by 0.9. The remaining quantum yield from the photolysis reaction is assumed to produce O(/sup 3/P) at all wavelengths so that the total quantum yield is unity.

  8. Consistent quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Robert B.

    2015-11-01

    In response to recent criticisms by Okon and Sudarsky, various aspects of the consistent histories (CH) resolution of the quantum measurement problem(s) are discussed using a simple Stern-Gerlach device, and compared with the alternative approaches to the measurement problem provided by spontaneous localization (GRW), Bohmian mechanics, many worlds, and standard (textbook) quantum mechanics. Among these CH is unique in solving the second measurement problem: inferring from the measurement outcome a property of the measured system at a time before the measurement took place, as is done routinely by experimental physicists. The main respect in which CH differs from other quantum interpretations is in allowing multiple stochastic descriptions of a given measurement situation, from which one (or more) can be selected on the basis of its utility. This requires abandoning a principle (termed unicity), central to classical physics, that at any instant of time there is only a single correct description of the world.

  9. Uncertainty under quantum measures and quantum memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Yunlong; Jing, Naihuan; Li-Jost, Xianqing

    2017-04-01

    The uncertainty principle restricts potential information one gains about physical properties of the measured particle. However, if the particle is prepared in entanglement with a quantum memory, the corresponding entropic uncertainty relation will vary. Based on the knowledge of correlations between the measured particle and quantum memory, we have investigated the entropic uncertainty relations for two and multiple measurements and generalized the lower bounds on the sum of Shannon entropies without quantum side information to those that allow quantum memory. In particular, we have obtained generalization of Kaniewski-Tomamichel-Wehner's bound for effective measures and majorization bounds for noneffective measures to allow quantum side information. Furthermore, we have derived several strong bounds for the entropic uncertainty relations in the presence of quantum memory for two and multiple measurements. Finally, potential applications of our results to entanglement witnesses are discussed via the entropic uncertainty relation in the absence of quantum memory.

  10. Kok Effect and the Quantum Yield of Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Sharp, Robert E.; Matthews, Mark A.; Boyer, John S.

    1984-01-01

    The linear response of photosynthesis to light at low photon flux densities is known to change abruptly in the vicinity of the light compensation point so that the quantum yield seems to decrease as radiation increases. We studied this `Kok effect' in attached sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. cv IS894) leaves using gas exchange techniques. The effect was present even though respiration was constant in the dark. It was observed at a similar photon flux density (7 to 11 micromole photons per square meter per second absorbed photosynthetically active radiation) despite a wide range of light compensation points as well as rates of photosynthesis. The effect was not apparent when photorespiration was inhibited at low pO2 (1 kilopascal), but this result was complicated because dark respiration was quite O2-sensitive and was partially suppressed under these conditions. The Kok effect was observed at saturating pCO2 and, therefore, could not be explained by a change in photorespiration. Instead, the magnitude of the effect varied as dark respiration varied in a single leaf, and was minimized when dark respiration was minimized, indicating that a partial suppression of dark respiration by light is responsible. Quantum yields measured at photon flux densities between 0 and 7 to 11 micromole photons per square meter per second, therefore, represent the combined yields of photosynthesis and of the suppression of a component of dark respiration by light. This leads to an overestimate of the quantum yield of photosynthesis. In view of these results, quantum yields of photosynthesis must be measured (a) when respiration is constant in the dark, and (b) when dark respiration has been inhibited either at low pO2 to eliminate most of the light-induced suppression of dark respiration or at photon flux densities above that required to saturate the light-induced suppression of dark respiration. Significant errors in quantum yields of photosynthesis can result in leaves exhibiting this

  11. Photoacoustic analysis of proteins: volumetric signals and fluorescence quantum yields.

    PubMed Central

    Kurian, E; Prendergast, F G; Small, J R

    1997-01-01

    A series of proteins has been examined using time-resolved, pulsed-laser volumetric photoacoustic spectroscopy. Photoacoustic waveforms were collected to measure heat release for calculation of fluorescence quantum yields, and to explore the possibility of photoinduced nonthermal volume changes occurring in these protein samples. The proteins studied were the green fluorescent protein (GFP); intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP), and adipocyte lipid-binding protein (ALBP), each labeled noncovalently with 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulfonate (1,8-ANS) and covalently with 6-acryloyl-2-(dimethylamino)naphthalene (acrylodan); and acrylodan-labeled IFABP and ALBP with added oleic acid. Of this group of proteins, only the ALBP labeled with 1,8-ANS showed significant nonthermal volume changes at the beta = 0 temperature (approximately 3.8 degrees C) for the buffer used (10 mM Tris-HCI, pH 7.5) (beta is the thermal cubic volumetric expansion coefficient). For all of the proteins except for acrylodan-labeled IFABP, the fluorescence quantum yields calculated assuming simple energy conservation were anomalously high, i.e., the apparent heat signals were lower than those predicted from independent fluorescence measurements. The consistent anomalies suggest that the low photoacoustic signals may be characteristic of fluorophores buried in proteins, and that photoacoustic signals derive in part from the microenvironment of the absorbing chromophore. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:9199809

  12. Influence of excitonic effects on luminescence quantum yield in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachenko, A. V.; Kostylyov, V. P.; Vlasiuk, V. M.; Sokolovskyi, I. O.; Evstigneev, M.

    2017-03-01

    Nonradiative exciton lifetime in silicon is determined by comparison of the experimental and theoretical curves of bulk minority charge carriers lifetime on doping and excitation levels. This value is used to analyze the influence of excitonic effects on internal luminescence quantum yield at room temperature, taking into account both nonradiative and radiative exciton lifetimes. A range of Shockley-Hall-Reed lifetimes is found, where excitonic effects lead to an increase of internal luminescence quantum yield.

  13. Nondisturbing quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Wolf, Michael M.

    2010-09-15

    We consider pairs of discrete quantum observables (POVMs) and analyze the relation between the notions of nondisturbance, joint measurability, and commutativity. We specify conditions under which these properties coincide or differ - depending, for instance, on the interplay between the number of outcomes and the Hilbert space dimension or on algebraic properties of the effect operators. We also show that (non-)disturbance is, in general, not a symmetric relation and that it can be decided and quantified by means of a semidefinite program.

  14. Absolute 1* quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain versus absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I* quantum yields were measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The temperature yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-versus-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 +/- 2% and it falls off to 53.4 +/- 2% and 44.0 +/- 4% at 284 and 248 respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I* quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I* yields. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I* yield results.

  15. Quantum Yield Heterogeneity among Single Nonblinking Quantum Dots Revealed by Atomic Structure-Quantum Optics Correlation.

    PubMed

    Orfield, Noah J; McBride, James R; Wang, Feng; Buck, Matthew R; Keene, Joseph D; Reid, Kemar R; Htoon, Han; Hollingsworth, Jennifer A; Rosenthal, Sandra J

    2016-02-23

    Physical variations in colloidal nanostructures give rise to heterogeneity in expressed optical behavior. This correlation between nanoscale structure and function demands interrogation of both atomic structure and photophysics at the level of single nanostructures to be fully understood. Herein, by conducting detailed analyses of fine atomic structure, chemical composition, and time-resolved single-photon photoluminescence data for the same individual nanocrystals, we reveal inhomogeneity in the quantum yields of single nonblinking "giant" CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots (g-QDs). We find that each g-QD possesses distinctive single exciton and biexciton quantum yields that result mainly from variations in the degree of charging, rather than from volume or structure inhomogeneity. We further establish that there is a very limited nonemissive "dark" fraction (<2%) among the studied g-QDs and present direct evidence that the g-QD core must lack inorganic passivation for the g-QD to be "dark". Therefore, in contrast to conventional QDs, ensemble photoluminescence quantum yield is principally defined by charging processes rather than the existence of dark g-QDs.

  16. Film quantum yields of EUV& ultra-high PAG photoresists

    SciTech Connect

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Greg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackery, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-01-10

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV-2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels ofPAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photo acids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQY s that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generatedlEUV photons absorbed.

  17. Work measurement as a generalized quantum measurement.

    PubMed

    Roncaglia, Augusto J; Cerisola, Federico; Paz, Juan Pablo

    2014-12-19

    We present a new method to measure the work w performed on a driven quantum system and to sample its probability distribution P(w). The method is based on a simple fact that remained unnoticed until now: Work on a quantum system can be measured by performing a generalized quantum measurement at a single time. Such measurement, which technically speaking is denoted as a positive operator valued measure reduces to an ordinary projective measurement on an enlarged system. This observation not only demystifies work measurement but also suggests a new quantum algorithm to efficiently sample the distribution P(w). This can be used, in combination with fluctuation theorems, to estimate free energies of quantum states on a quantum computer.

  18. On the photoelectric quantum yield of small dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Photoelectron emission is crucial to electric charging of dust particles around main-sequence stars and gas heating in various dusty environments. An estimate of the photoelectric processes contains an ill-defined parameter called the photoelectric quantum yield, which is the total number of electrons ejected from a dust particle per absorbed photon. Here we revisit the so-called small particle effect of photoelectron emission and provide an analytical model to estimate photoelectric quantum yields of small dust particles in sizes down to nanometers. We show that the small particle effect elevates the photoelectric quantum yields of nanoparticles up to by a factor of 103 for carbon, water ice, and organics, and a factor of 102 for silicate, silicon carbide, and iron. We conclude the surface curvature of the particles is a quantity of great importance to the small particle effect, unless the particles are submicrometers in radius or larger.

  19. Purification of noisy quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2010-10-15

    We consider the problem of improving noisy quantum measurements by suitable preprocessing strategies making many noisy detectors equivalent to a single ideal detector. For observables pertaining to finite-dimensional systems (e.g., qubits or spins) we consider preprocessing strategies that are reminiscent of quantum error correction procedures and allow one to perfectly measure an observable on a single quantum system for increasing number of inefficient detectors. For measurements of observables with an unbounded spectrum (e.g., photon number and homodyne and heterodyne detection), the purification of noisy quantum measurements can be achieved by preamplification as suggested by Yuen [Opt. Lett. 12, 789 (1987)].

  20. Unity quantum yield of photogenerated charges and band-like transport in quantum-dot solids.

    PubMed

    Talgorn, Elise; Gao, Yunan; Aerts, Michiel; Kunneman, Lucas T; Schins, Juleon M; Savenije, T J; van Huis, Marijn A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2011-09-25

    Solid films of colloidal quantum dots show promise in the manufacture of photodetectors and solar cells. These devices require high yields of photogenerated charges and high carrier mobilities, which are difficult to achieve in quantum-dot films owing to a strong electron-hole interaction and quantum confinement. Here, we show that the quantum yield of photogenerated charges in strongly coupled PbSe quantum-dot films is unity over a large temperature range. At high photoexcitation density, a transition takes place from hopping between localized states to band-like transport. These strongly coupled quantum-dot films have electrical properties that approach those of crystalline bulk semiconductors, while retaining the size tunability and cheap processing properties of colloidal quantum dots.

  1. Informational power of quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2011-06-15

    We introduce the informational power of a quantum measurement as the maximum amount of classical information that the measurement can extract from any ensemble of quantum states. We prove the additivity by showing that the informational power corresponds to the classical capacity of a quantum-classical channel. We restate the problem of evaluating the informational power as the maximization of the accessible information of a suitable ensemble. We provide a numerical algorithm to find an optimal ensemble and quantify the informational power.

  2. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    DOE PAGES

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; ...

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from themore » fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.« less

  3. Ensemble brightening and enhanced quantum yield in size-purified silicon nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Joseph B.; Van Sickle, Austin R.; Anthony, Rebecca J.; Kroll, Daniel M.; Kortshagen, Uwe R.; Hobbie, Erik K.

    2012-07-18

    Here, we report on the quantum yield, photoluminescence (PL) lifetime and ensemble photoluminescent stability of highly monodisperse plasma-synthesized silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) prepared though density-gradient ultracentrifugation in mixed organic solvents. Improved size uniformity leads to a reduction in PL line width and the emergence of entropic order in dry nanocrystal films. We find excellent agreement with the anticipated trends of quantum confinement in nanocrystalline silicon, with a solution quantum yield that is independent of nanocrystal size for the larger fractions but decreases dramatically with size for the smaller fractions. We also find a significant PL enhancement in films assembled from the fractions, and we use a combination of measurement, simulation and modeling to link this ‘brightening’ to a temporally enhanced quantum yield arising from SiNC interactions in ordered ensembles of monodisperse nanocrystals. Using an appropriate excitation scheme, we exploit this enhancement to achieve photostable emission.

  4. Measurement-based quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2016-03-01

    We review and discuss the potential of using measurement-based elements in quantum communication schemes, where certain tasks are realized with the help of entangled resource states that are processed by measurements. We consider long-range quantum communication based on the transmission of encoded quantum states, where encoding, decoding and syndrome readout are implemented using small-scale resource states. We also discuss entanglement-based schemes and consider measurement-based quantum repeaters. An important element in these schemes is entanglement purification, which can also be implemented in a measurement-based way. We analyze the influence of noise and imperfections in these schemes and show that measurement-based implementation allows for very large error thresholds of the order of 10 % noise per qubit and more. We show how to obtain optimal resource states for different tasks and discuss first experimental realizations of measurement-based quantum error correction using trapped ions and photons.

  5. High quantum yield ZnO quantum dots synthesizing via an ultrasonication microreactor method.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weimin; Yang, Huafang; Ding, Wenhao; Zhang, Bing; Zhang, Le; Wang, Lixi; Yu, Mingxun; Zhang, Qitu

    2016-11-01

    Green emission ZnO quantum dots were synthesized by an ultrasonic microreactor. Ultrasonic radiation brought bubbles through ultrasonic cavitation. These bubbles built microreactor inside the microreactor. The photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots synthesized with different flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature were discussed. Flow rate, ultrasonic power and temperature would influence the type and quantity of defects in ZnO quantum dots. The sizes of ZnO quantum dots would be controlled by those conditions as well. Flow rate affected the reaction time. With the increasing of flow rate, the sizes of ZnO quantum dots decreased and the quantum yields first increased then decreased. Ultrasonic power changed the ultrasonic cavitation intensity, which affected the reaction energy and the separation of the solution. With the increasing of ultrasonic power, sizes of ZnO quantum dots first decreased then increased, while the quantum yields kept increasing. The effect of ultrasonic temperature on the photoluminescence properties of ZnO quantum dots was influenced by the flow rate. Different flow rate related to opposite changing trend. Moreover, the quantum yields of ZnO QDs synthesized by ultrasonic microreactor could reach 64.7%, which is higher than those synthesized only under ultrasonic radiation or only by microreactor.

  6. Observable measure of quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems.

    PubMed

    Girolami, Davide

    2014-10-24

    Quantum coherence is the key resource for quantum technology, with applications in quantum optics, information processing, metrology, and cryptography. Yet, there is no universally efficient method for quantifying coherence either in theoretical or in experimental practice. I introduce a framework for measuring quantum coherence in finite dimensional systems. I define a theoretical measure which satisfies the reliability criteria established in the context of quantum resource theories. Then, I present an experimental scheme implementable with current technology which evaluates the quantum coherence of an unknown state of a d-dimensional system by performing two programmable measurements on an ancillary qubit, in place of the O(d2) direct measurements required by full state reconstruction. The result yields a benchmark for monitoring quantum effects in complex systems, e.g., certifying nonclassicality in quantum protocols and probing the quantum behavior of biological complexes.

  7. BOOK REVIEW Quantum Measurement and Control Quantum Measurement and Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2010-12-01

    In the last two decades there has been an enormous progress in the experimental investigation of single quantum systems. This progress covers fields such as quantum optics, quantum computation, quantum cryptography, and quantum metrology, which are sometimes summarized as `quantum technologies'. A key issue there is entanglement, which can be considered as the characteristic feature of quantum theory. As disparate as these various fields maybe, they all have to deal with a quantum mechanical treatment of the measurement process and, in particular, the control process. Quantum control is, according to the authors, `control for which the design requires knowledge of quantum mechanics'. Quantum control situations in which measurements occur at important steps are called feedback (or feedforward) control of quantum systems and play a central role here. This book presents a comprehensive and accessible treatment of the theoretical tools that are needed to cope with these situations. It also provides the reader with the necessary background information about the experimental developments. The authors are both experts in this field to which they have made significant contributions. After an introduction to quantum measurement theory and a chapter on quantum parameter estimation, the central topic of open quantum systems is treated at some length. This chapter includes a derivation of master equations, the discussion of the Lindblad form, and decoherence - the irreversible emergence of classical properties through interaction with the environment. A separate chapter is devoted to the description of open systems by the method of quantum trajectories. Two chapters then deal with the central topic of quantum feedback control, while the last chapter gives a concise introduction to one of the central applications - quantum information. All sections contain a bunch of exercises which serve as a useful tool in learning the material. Especially helpful are also various separate

  8. Tight informationally complete quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, A. J.

    2006-10-01

    We introduce a class of informationally complete positive-operator-valued measures which are, in analogy with a tight frame, 'as close as possible' to orthonormal bases for the space of quantum states. These measures are distinguished by an exceptionally simple state-reconstruction formula which allows 'painless' quantum state tomography. Complete sets of mutually unbiased bases and symmetric informationally complete positive-operator-valued measures are both members of this class, the latter being the unique minimal rank-one members. Recast as ensembles of pure quantum states, the rank-one members are in fact equivalent to weighted 2-designs in complex projective space. These measures are shown to be optimal for quantum cloning and linear quantum state tomography.

  9. The quantum measurement of time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1994-01-01

    Traditionally, in non-relativistic Quantum Mechanics, time is considered to be a parameter, rather than an observable quantity like space. In relativistic Quantum Field Theory, space and time are treated equally by reducing space to also be a parameter. Herein, after a brief review of other measurements, we describe a third possibility, which is to treat time as a directly observable quantity.

  10. Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields for the ICN A state by diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, Wayne P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1987-01-01

    Absolute I(asterisk) quantum yields have been measured as a function of wavelength for room temperature photodissociation of the ICN A state continuum. The yields are obtained by the technique of time-resolved diode laser gain-vs-absorption spectroscopy. Quantum yields are evaluated at seven wavelengths from 248 to 284 nm. The yield at 266 nm is 66.0 + or - 2 percent and it falls off to 53.4 + or - 2 percent and 44.0 + or - 4 percent at 284 and 248 nm, respectively. The latter values are significantly higher than those obtained by previous workers using infrared fluorescence. Estimates of I(asterisk) quantum yields obtained from analysis of CN photofragment rotational distributions, as discussed by other workers, are in good agreement with the I(asterisk) yields reported here. The results are considered in conjunction with recent theoretical and experimental work on the CN rotational distributions and with previous I(asterisk) quantum yield results.

  11. Variation in Quantum Yield for CO2 Uptake among C3 and C4 Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Ehleringer, James; Pearcy, Robert W.

    1983-01-01

    The quantum yield for CO2 uptake was measured on a number of C3 and C4 monocot and dicot species. Under normal atmospheric conditions (330 microliters per liter CO2, 21% O2) and a leaf temperature of 30°C, the average quantum yields (moles CO2 per einstein) were as follows: 0.052 for C3 dicots, 0.053 for C3 grasses, 0.053 for NAD-malic enzyme type C4 dicots, 0.060 for NAD-malic enzyme type C4 grasses, 0.064 for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase type C4 grasses, 0.061 for NADP-malic enzyme C4 dicots, and 0.065 for NADP-malic enzyme type C4 grasses. The quantum yield under normal atmospheric conditions was temperature dependent in C3 species, but apparently not in C4 species. Light and temperature conditions during growth appeared not to influence quantum yield. The significance of variation in the quantum yields of C4 plants was discussed in terms of CO2 leakage from the bundle sheath cells and suberization of apoplastic regions of the bundle sheath cells. PMID:16663257

  12. Optomechanical Control of Quantum Yield in Trans-Cis Ultrafast Photoisomerization of a Retinal Chromophore Model.

    PubMed

    Valentini, Alessio; Rivero, Daniel; Zapata, Felipe; García-Iriepa, Cristina; Marazzi, Marco; Palmeiro, Raúl; Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Sampedro, Diego; Olivucci, Massimo; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2017-03-27

    The quantum yield of a photochemical reaction is one of the most fundamental quantities in photochemistry, as it measures the efficiency of the transduction of light energy into chemical energy. Nature has evolved photoreceptors in which the reactivity of a chromophore is enhanced by its molecular environment to achieve high quantum yields. The retinal chromophore sterically constrained inside rhodopsin proteins represents an outstanding example of such a control. In a more general framework, mechanical forces acting on a molecular system can strongly modify its reactivity. Herein, we show that the exertion of tensile forces on a simplified retinal chromophore model provokes a substantial and regular increase in the trans-to-cis photoisomerization quantum yield in a counterintuitive way, as these extension forces facilitate the formation of the more compressed cis photoisomer. A rationale for the mechanochemical effect on this photoisomerization mechanism is also proposed.

  13. Optimum doping achieves high quantum yields in GaAs photoemitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenberg, H.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental data indicate that optimum doping exists. Measured quantum yield curves indicate optimum overall response is obtained in GaAs emitters with doping in high 10 to the 18th power per cu cm range. Doping for optimum response is not necessarily in this range.

  14. Control of the external photoluminescent quantum yield of emitters coupled to nanoantenna phased arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Ke; Verschuuren, Marc A.; Lozano, Gabriel

    2015-08-21

    Optical losses in metals represent the largest limitation to the external quantum yield of emitters coupled to plasmonic antennas. These losses can be at the emission wavelength, but they can be more important at shorter wavelengths, i.e., at the excitation wavelength of the emitters, where the conductivity of metals is usually lower. We present accurate measurements of the absolute external photoluminescent quantum yield of a thin layer of emitting material deposited over a periodic nanoantenna phased array. Emission and absorptance measurements of the sample are performed using a custom-made setup including an integrating sphere and variable angle excitation. The measurements reveal a strong dependence of the external quantum yield on the angle at which the optical field excites the sample. Such behavior is attributed to the coupling between far-field illumination and near-field excitation mediated by the collective resonances supported by the array. Numerical simulations confirm that the inherent losses associated with the metal can be greatly reduced by selecting an optimum angle of illumination, which boosts the light conversion efficiency in the emitting layer. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the emission from plasmonic arrays reveals the need to carefully design the illumination to achieve the maximum external quantum yield.

  15. Control of the external photoluminescent quantum yield of emitters coupled to nanoantenna phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Ke; Lozano, Gabriel; Verschuuren, Marc A.; Gómez Rivas, Jaime

    2015-08-01

    Optical losses in metals represent the largest limitation to the external quantum yield of emitters coupled to plasmonic antennas. These losses can be at the emission wavelength, but they can be more important at shorter wavelengths, i.e., at the excitation wavelength of the emitters, where the conductivity of metals is usually lower. We present accurate measurements of the absolute external photoluminescent quantum yield of a thin layer of emitting material deposited over a periodic nanoantenna phased array. Emission and absorptance measurements of the sample are performed using a custom-made setup including an integrating sphere and variable angle excitation. The measurements reveal a strong dependence of the external quantum yield on the angle at which the optical field excites the sample. Such behavior is attributed to the coupling between far-field illumination and near-field excitation mediated by the collective resonances supported by the array. Numerical simulations confirm that the inherent losses associated with the metal can be greatly reduced by selecting an optimum angle of illumination, which boosts the light conversion efficiency in the emitting layer. This combined experimental and numerical characterization of the emission from plasmonic arrays reveals the need to carefully design the illumination to achieve the maximum external quantum yield.

  16. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R. E.; Wine, P. H.

    1995-01-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well-known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl2CO2). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S((sup 3)P(sub J)) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S((sup 1)D(sub 2)) + OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N2 + N2O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought.

  17. Information Transfer During Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lashkari, Nima

    2004-03-01

    ``The progress in quantum measurement theory has increased the need for a physical theory of information transfer during quantum measurement. Using the RPI --Restricted Path Integrals- approach to quantum measurement, we discuss on equivalence of information transfer and measurement. It is possible to understand the nature of measurement process by working on the phenomenon of information transfer. I show that in contrary with today information theory, for a conscious observer the amount of information gained in a measurement is not an absolute amount but related to his or her previous knowledge of the system. The knowledge, the observer has about the history of the system interactions and entanglements with other systems. The more intelligent the observer is, the more information it gains in a measurement. This means that the difficulties in quantum measurement can have roots in consciousness -the intuitive belief of many physicists. And it directs our attention to work on a general theory of consciousness. At the end I will make a model for the amount of transferred information during an observation. ''

  18. Interpretation of quantum yields exceeding unity in photoelectrochemical systems

    SciTech Connect

    Szklarczyk, M.; Allen, R.E.

    1986-10-20

    In photoelectrochemical systems involving light shining on a semiconductor interfaced with an electrolyte, the quantum yield as a function of photon frequency ..nu.. is observed to exhibit a peak at h..nu..roughly-equal2E/sub g/, where E/sub g/ is the band gap of the semiconductor. The maximum in this peak is sometimes found to exceed unity. We provide an interpretation involving surface states and inelastic electron-electron scattering. The theory indicates that the effect should be observable for p-type semiconductors, but not n-type.

  19. Thermoelectric Corrections to Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin; Ratner, Mark; Stafford, Charles; di Ventra, Massimiliano

    The voltage and temperature measured by a floating probe of a nonequilibrium quantum system is shown to exhibit nontrivial thermoelectric corrections at finite temperature. Using a realistic model of a scanning thermal microscope to calculate the voltage and temperature distributions, we predict quantum temperature variations along graphene nanoribbons subject to a thermal bias which are not simply related to the local density of states. Experimentally, the wavelength of the oscillations can be tuned over several orders of magnitude by gating/doping, bringing quantum temperature oscillations within reach of the spatial resolution of existing measurement techniques. We also find that the Peltier cooling/heating which causes the temperature oscillations can lead to significant errors in voltage measurements for a wide range of system.

  20. Enhancing quantum coherence and quantum Fisher information by quantum partially collapsing measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Qiu, Liang; Pan, Fei

    2017-04-01

    We consider the enhancement effect of quantum partially collapsing measurements, i.e., weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal, on quantum coherence and quantum Fisher information, both of which are transmitted through a spin-chain channel. For the state parameter lying in the region (π /2, π ), weak measurement can enhance quantum coherence and quantum Fisher information. For the state parameter lying in the region (0, π /2), quantum coherence and quantum Fisher information can be enhanced by quantum measurement reversal combined with weak measurement. We assume the probabilistic nature of the method should be responsible for the enhancement.

  1. Convenient determination of luminescence quantum yield using a combined electronic absorption and emission spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, John; Mishra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-15

    It is possible to measure luminescence quantum yield in a facile way, by designing an optical spectrometer capable of obtaining electronic absorption as well as luminescence spectra, with a setup that uses the same light source and detector for both the spectral measurements. Employment of a single light source and single detector enables use of the same correction factor profile for spectral corrections. A suitable instrumental scaling factor is used for adjusting spectral losses.

  2. Nearly deterministic Bell measurement using quantum communication bus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jia-Ming; Zhu, Meng-zheng; Wang, Dong; Ye, Liu

    2017-03-01

    We present a scheme to implement Bell states measurement for an arbitrary number of photons by using robust continuous variable coherent modes, called as quantum communication bus (qubus) and weak cross-Kerr nonlinearities. Remarkably, the success probability of our scheme is close to unity, and our scheme does not require any ancillary resource entanglement. Our scheme is likely to yield versatile applications for quantum computation and quantum teleportation.

  3. Nonlocal Measurements via Quantum Erasure.

    PubMed

    Brodutch, Aharon; Cohen, Eliahu

    2016-02-19

    Nonlocal observables play an important role in quantum theory, from Bell inequalities and various postselection paradoxes to quantum error correction codes. Instantaneous measurement of these observables is known to be a difficult problem, especially when the measurements are projective. The standard von Neumann Hamiltonian used to model projective measurements cannot be implemented directly in a nonlocal scenario and can, in some cases, violate causality. We present a scheme for effectively generating the von Neumann Hamiltonian for nonlocal observables without the need to communicate and adapt. The protocol can be used to perform weak and strong (projective) measurements, as well as measurements at any intermediate strength. It can also be used in practical situations beyond nonlocal measurements. We show how the protocol can be used to probe a version of Hardy's paradox with both weak and strong measurements. The outcomes of these measurements provide a nonintuitive picture of the pre- and postselected system. Our results shed new light on the interplay between quantum measurements, uncertainty, nonlocality, causality, and determinism.

  4. Determination of the D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} coherence factors and average strong-phase differences using quantum-correlated measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Lowrey, N.; Mehrabyan, S.; Selen, M.; Wiss, J.; Mitchell, R. E.; Shepherd, M. R.; Besson, D.; Pedlar, T. K.; Cronin-Hennessy, D.; Gao, K. Y.; Hietala, J.; Kubota, Y.; Klein, T.; Poling, R.; Scott, A. W.; Zweber, P.; Dobbs, S.; Metreveli, Z.; Seth, K. K.; Tan, B. J. Y.

    2009-08-01

    The first measurements of the coherence factors (R{sub K{pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}} and R{sub K3{pi}}) and the average strong-phase differences ({delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}{sup {pi}{sup 0}} and {delta}{sub D}{sup K3{pi}}) for D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0} and D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} are presented. These parameters can be used to improve the determination of the unitarity triangle angle {gamma} in B{sup -}{yields}DK{sup -} decays, where D is a D{sup 0} or D{sup 0} meson decaying to the same final state. The measurements are made using quantum-correlated, fully reconstructed D{sup 0}D{sup 0} pairs produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions at the {psi}(3770) resonance. The measured values are: R{sub K{pi}}{sub {pi}{sup 0}}=0.84{+-}0.07, {delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}{sup {pi}{sup 0}}=(227{sub -17}{sup +14}) deg., R{sub K3{pi}}=0.33{sub -0.23}{sup +0.20}, and {delta}{sub D}{sup K3{pi}}=(114{sub -23}{sup +26}) deg. These results indicate significant coherence in the decay D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, whereas lower coherence is observed in the decay D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}. The analysis also results in a small improvement in the knowledge of other D-meson parameters, in particular, the strong-phase difference for D{sup 0}{yields}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {delta}{sub D}{sup K{pi}}, and the mixing parameter y.

  5. Thermodynamics of projective quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erez, Noam

    2012-11-01

    Quantum measurement of a system can change its mean energy as well as entropy. A selective measurement (classical or quantum) can be used as a ‘Maxwell's demon’ to power a single-temperature heat engine by decreasing the entropy. Quantum mechanically, so can a non-selective measurement, despite increasing the entropy of a thermal state. The maximal amount of work extractable following the measurement is given by the change in free energy: W(non-)selmax = ΔEmeas - TBathΔS(non-)selmeas. This follows from the ‘generalized 2nd law for nonequilibrium initial state’ (Hasegawa et al 2010 Phys. Lett. A 374 1001-4), an elementary reduction of which to the standard law is given here. It is shown that Wselmax - Wnon-selmax is equal to the work required for resetting the memory of the measuring device and that no such resetting is needed in the non-selective case. Consequently, a single-bath engine powered by either kind of measurement works at a net loss of TBathΔSnon-selmeas per cycle. By replacing the measurement by a reversible ‘pre-measurement’ and allowing a work source to couple to the system and memory, the cycle can be rendered completely reversible.

  6. Synthesis of Luminescent Graphene Quantum Dots with High Quantum Yield and Their Toxicity Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Dan; Chen, Yunping; Li, Na; Li, Wen; Wang, Zhenguo; Zhu, Jingli; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Bin; Xu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    High fluorescence quantum yield graphene quantum dots (GQDs) have showed up as a new generation for bioimaging. In this work, luminescent GQDs were prepared by an ameliorative photo-Fenton reaction and a subsequent hydrothermal process using graphene oxide sheets as the precursor. The as-prepared GQDs were nanomaterials with size ranging from 2.3 to 6.4 nm and emitted intense green luminescence in water. The fluorescence quantum yield was as high as 24.6% (excited at 340 nm) and the fluorescence was strongest at pH 7. Moreover, the influences of low-concentration (12.5, 25 μg/mL) GQDs on the morphology, viability, membrane integrity, internal cellular reactive oxygen species level and mortality of HeLa cells were relatively weak, and the in vitro imaging demonstrated GQDs were mainly in the cytoplasm region. More strikingly, zebrafish embryos were co-cultured with GQDs for in vivo imaging, and the results of heart rate test showed the intake of small amounts of GQDs brought little harm to the cardiovascular of zebrafish. GQDs with high quantum yield and strong photoluminescence show good biocompatibility, thus they show good promising for cell imaging, biolabeling and other biomedical applications. PMID:26709828

  7. Local, nonlocal quantumness and information theoretic measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Pankaj; Sazim, Sk; Chakrabarty, Indranil; Pati, Arun K.

    2016-08-01

    It has been suggested that there may exist quantum correlations that go beyond entanglement. The existence of such correlations can be revealed by information theoretic quantities such as quantum discord, but not by the conventional measures of entanglement. We argue that a state displays quantumness, that can be of local and nonlocal origin. Information theoretic measures not only characterize the nonlocal quantumness, but also the local quantumness, such as the “local superposition”. This can be a reason, why such measures are nonzero, when there is no entanglement. We consider a generalized version of the Werner state to demonstrate the interplay of local quantumness, nonlocal quantumness and classical mixedness of a state.

  8. Quantum Yield Enhancement of Cd/Se Colloidal Quantum Dots by Variation of Surface Ligands

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    a solvent and a ligand, and oleic acid , which also serves as a ligand. The second used more complex ligands, octadecylphosphonic acid , and oleyamine...outgassed for another 30 min. To prepare the Cd precursor 26 mg of cadmium oxide (CdO) powder was mixed with 1.2 ml of oleic acid (OA) and 9.0 ml ODE...Acronyms Ar argon Cd cadmium CdO cadmium oxide OA oleic acid ODE octadecene QD quantum dots QY quantum yield Rh6G rhodamine 6G Se selenium NO. OF

  9. Quantum yield and excitation rate of single molecules close to metallic nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Pibiri, Enrico; Schmied, Jürgen J; Sen, Tapasi; Acuna, Guillermo P; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-11-05

    The interaction of dyes and metallic nanostructures strongly affects the fluorescence and can lead to significant fluorescence enhancement at plasmonic hot spots, but also to quenching. Here we present a method to distinguish the individual contributions to the changes of the excitation, radiative and non-radiative rate and use this information to determine the quantum yields for single molecules. The method is validated by precisely placing single fluorescent dyes with respect to gold nanoparticles as well as with respect to the excitation polarization using DNA origami nanostructures. Following validation, measurements in zeromode waveguides reveal that suppression of the radiative rate and enhancement of the non-radiative rate lead to a reduced quantum yield. Because the method exploits the intrinsic blinking of dyes, it can generally be applied to fluorescence measurements in arbitrary nanophotonic environments.

  10. Quantum correlation cost of the weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jun; Wu, Shao-xiong; Yu, Chang-shui

    2014-12-15

    Quantum correlation cost (QCC) characterizing how much quantum correlation is used in a weak-measurement process is presented based on the trace norm. It is shown that the QCC is related to the trace-norm-based quantum discord (TQD) by only a factor that is determined by the strength of the weak measurement, so it only catches partial quantumness of a quantum system compared with the TQD. We also find that the residual quantumness can be ‘extracted’ not only by the further von Neumann measurement, but also by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. As an example, we demonstrate our outcomes by the Bell-diagonal state.

  11. Photodissociation of quantum state-selected diatomic molecules yields new insight into ultracold chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, Mickey; McGuyer, Bart H.; Lee, Chih-Hsi; Apfelbeck, Florian; Zelevinsky, Tanya

    2016-05-01

    When a molecule is subjected to a sufficiently energetic photon it can break apart into fragments through a process called ``photodissociation''. For over 70 years this simple chemical reaction has served as a vital experimental tool for acquiring information about molecular structure, since the character of the photodissociative transition can be inferred by measuring the 3D photofragment angular distribution (PAD). While theoretical understanding of this process has gradually evolved from classical considerations to a fully quantum approach, experiments to date have not yet revealed the full quantum nature of this process. In my talk I will describe recent experiments involving the photodissociation of ultracold, optical lattice-trapped, and fully quantum state-resolved 88Sr2 molecules. Optical absorption images of the PADs produced in these experiments reveal features which are inherently quantum mechanical in nature, such as matter-wave interference between output channels, and are sensitive to the quantum statistics of the molecular wavefunctions. The results of these experiments cannot be predicted using quasiclassical methods. Instead, we describe our results with a fully quantum mechanical model yielding new intuition about ultracold chemistry.

  12. A quantum yield determination of O/1D/ production from ozone via laser flash photolysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philen, D. L.; Davis, D. D.; Watson, R. T.

    1977-01-01

    The quantum yield of electronically excited atomic oxygen produced from ozone photolysis was measured at 298 K from wavelengths of 293.0 to 316.5 nm. The reaction of the atomic oxygen with N2O to form excited NO2 was used to monitor the O production; a frequency-doubled flashlamp-pumped dye laser which provided tunable ultraviolet in the desired spectral region with 0.1-nm linewidth served as the photolysis source. The atomic oxygen quantum yield was found to be constant below 300 nm, with a sharp decrease centered at 308 nm and a diminution to less than one tenth of the constant value by 313.5 nm.

  13. Geometric measure of quantum discord with weak measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Wang, Qing-Wen; Shen, Shu-Qian; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Super quantum discord based on weak measurements was introduced by Singh and Pati (Ann Phys 343:141-152, 2014). We propose a geometric way of quantifying quantum discord with weak measurements. It is shown that this geometric measure of quantum discord with weak measurements (GQDW) is linearly dependent on geometric measure of quantum discord (Dakic et al. in Phys Rev Lett 105:190502, 2010) and only captures partial quantumness of the states. It is found that the quantum correlation can be extracted by a sequence of infinitesimal weak measurements. Finally, the level surfaces of GQDW for Bell-diagonal states are depicted and the results are demonstrated by explicit example.

  14. How much a quantum measurement is informative?

    SciTech Connect

    Dall'Arno, Michele; D'Ariano, Giacomo Mauro; Sacchi, Massimiliano F.

    2014-12-04

    The informational power of a quantum measurement is the maximum amount of classical information that the measurement can extract from any ensemble of quantum states. We discuss its main properties. Informational power is an additive quantity, being equivalent to the classical capacity of a quantum-classical channel. The informational power of a quantum measurement is the maximum of the accessible information of a quantum ensemble that depends on the measurement. We present some examples where the symmetry of the measurement allows to analytically derive its informational power.

  15. Protective Measurement and Quantum Reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shan

    2015-01-01

    1. Protective measurements: an introduction Shan Gao; Part I. Fundamentals and Applications: 2. Protective measurements of the wave function of a single system Lev Vaidman; 3. Protective measurement, postselection and the Heisenberg representation Yakir Aharonov and Eliahu Cohen; 4. Protective and state measurement: a review Gennaro Auletta; 5. Determination of the stationary basis from protective measurement on a single system Lajos Diósi; 6. Weak measurements, the energy-momentum tensor and the Bohm approach Robert Flack and Basil J. Hiley; Part II. Meanings and Implications: 7. Measurement and metaphysics Peter J. Lewis; 8. Protective measurements and the explanatory gambit Michael Dickson; 9. Realism and instrumentalism about the wave function: how should we choose? Mauro Dorato and Frederico Laudisa; 10. Protective measurements and the PBR theorem Guy Hetzroni and Daniel Rohrlich; 11. The roads not taken: empty waves, waveform collapse and protective measurement in quantum theory Peter Holland; 12. Implications of protective measurements on de Broglie-Bohm trajectories Aurelien Drezet; 13. Entanglement, scaling, and the meaning of the wave function in protective measurement Maximilian Schlosshauer and Tangereen V. B. Claringbold; 14. Protective measurements and the nature of the wave function within the primitive ontology approach Vincent Lam; 15. Reality and meaning of the wave function Shan Gao; Index.

  16. Acetone photolysis at 248 nm revisited: pressure dependence of the CO and CO2 quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Somnitz, H; Ufer, T; Zellner, R

    2009-10-14

    Pressure dependent CO and CO2 quantum yields in the laser pulse photolysis of acetone at 248 nm and T = 298 K have been measured directly using quantitative infrared diode laser absorption. The experiments cover the pressure range from 50 to 900 mbar. It is found that the quantum yields show a significant dependence on total pressure, with Phi(CO) decreasing from around 0.5 at 20 mbar to approximately 0.3 at 900 mbar. The corresponding CO2 yields as observed when O2 exists in the reaction mixture, exhibit exactly the opposite behaviour. For the sum of both a value of 1.05(-0.05)(+0.02) independent of pressure is obtained, showing that the sum of (Phi(CO) + Phi(CO2)) is a measure for the primary quantum yield in the photolysis of acetone. In addition, CO quantum yields and corresponding pressure dependences were measured in experiments using different bath gases including He, Ar, Kr, SF6, and O2 as third body colliders. The theoretical framework in which we discuss these data is based on our previous findings that the pressure dependence of the CO yield is a consequence of a stepwise fragmentation mechanism during which acetone decomposes initially into methyl and a vibrationally 'hot' acetyl radical, with the latter being able to decompose promptly into methyl plus CO. The pressure dependence of the CO yield then originates from the second step and is modelled quantitatively via statistical dynamical calculations using a combination of RRKM theory with a time-dependent master equation (ME) approach. From a comparison of experiment with theory the amount of excess energy in the vibrationally hot acetyl radicals (E* approximately 65 kJ mol(-1)) as well as the characteristic collision parameters for interaction of acetyl with the different bath gases were derived. Values of 90, 280, 310, 545, 550 and 1800 cm(-1) for the average energy transferred per downward collision for the bath gases He, Ar, Kr, O2, N2, and SF6, respectively, are obtained. The calculations also

  17. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-10-24

    We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement. To reduce these difficulties, we have developed research-based learning tools such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) and peer instruction tools. A preliminary evaluation shows that these learning tools are effective in improving students' understanding of concepts related to quantum measurement.

  18. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-10-01

    We describe the difficulties advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement. To reduce these difficulties, we have developed research-based learning tools such as the Quantum Interactive Learning Tutorial (QuILT) and peer instruction tools. A preliminary evaluation shows that these learning tools are effective in improving students' understanding of concepts related to quantum measurement.

  19. Quantum theory of measurements as quantum decision theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, V. I.; Sornette, D.

    2015-03-01

    Theory of quantum measurements is often classified as decision theory. An event in decision theory corresponds to the measurement of an observable. This analogy looks clear for operationally testable simple events. However, the situation is essentially more complicated in the case of composite events. The most difficult point is the relation between decisions under uncertainty and measurements under uncertainty. We suggest a unified language for describing the processes of quantum decision making and quantum measurements. The notion of quantum measurements under uncertainty is introduced. We show that the correct mathematical foundation for the theory of measurements under uncertainty, as well as for quantum decision theory dealing with uncertain events, requires the use of positive operator-valued measure that is a generalization of projection-valued measure. The latter is appropriate for operationally testable events, while the former is necessary for characterizing operationally uncertain events. In both decision making and quantum measurements, one has to distinguish composite nonentangled events from composite entangled events. Quantum probability can be essentially different from classical probability only for entangled events. The necessary condition for the appearance of an interference term in the quantum probability is the occurrence of entangled prospects and the existence of an entangled strategic state of a decision maker or of an entangled statistical state of a measuring device.

  20. Local Quantum Measurement and No-Signaling Imply Quantum Correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnum, H.; Beigi, S.; Boixo, S.; Elliott, M. B.; Wehner, S.

    2010-04-01

    We show that, assuming that quantum mechanics holds locally, the finite speed of information is the principle that limits all possible correlations between distant parties to be quantum mechanical as well. Local quantum mechanics means that a Hilbert space is assigned to each party, and then all local positive-operator-valued measurements are (in principle) available; however, the joint system is not necessarily described by a Hilbert space. In particular, we do not assume the tensor product formalism between the joint systems. Our result shows that if any experiment would give nonlocal correlations beyond quantum mechanics, quantum theory would be invalidated even locally.

  1. Local quantum measurement and no-signaling imply quantum correlations.

    PubMed

    Barnum, H; Beigi, S; Boixo, S; Elliott, M B; Wehner, S

    2010-04-09

    We show that, assuming that quantum mechanics holds locally, the finite speed of information is the principle that limits all possible correlations between distant parties to be quantum mechanical as well. Local quantum mechanics means that a Hilbert space is assigned to each party, and then all local positive-operator-valued measurements are (in principle) available; however, the joint system is not necessarily described by a Hilbert space. In particular, we do not assume the tensor product formalism between the joint systems. Our result shows that if any experiment would give nonlocal correlations beyond quantum mechanics, quantum theory would be invalidated even locally.

  2. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  3. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  4. Near-unity photoluminescence quantum yield in MoS₂.

    PubMed

    Amani, Matin; Lien, Der-Hsien; Kiriya, Daisuke; Xiao, Jun; Azcatl, Angelica; Noh, Jiyoung; Madhvapathy, Surabhi R; Addou, Rafik; KC, Santosh; Dubey, Madan; Cho, Kyeongjae; Wallace, Robert M; Lee, Si-Chen; He, Jr-Hau; Ager, Joel W; Zhang, Xiang; Yablonovitch, Eli; Javey, Ali

    2015-11-27

    Two-dimensional (2D) transition metal dichalcogenides have emerged as a promising material system for optoelectronic applications, but their primary figure of merit, the room-temperature photoluminescence quantum yield (QY), is extremely low. The prototypical 2D material molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is reported to have a maximum QY of 0.6%, which indicates a considerable defect density. Here we report on an air-stable, solution-based chemical treatment by an organic superacid, which uniformly enhances the photoluminescence and minority carrier lifetime of MoS2 monolayers by more than two orders of magnitude. The treatment eliminates defect-mediated nonradiative recombination, thus resulting in a final QY of more than 95%, with a longest-observed lifetime of 10.8 ± 0.6 nanoseconds. Our ability to obtain optoelectronic monolayers with near-perfect properties opens the door for the development of highly efficient light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells based on 2D materials.

  5. Quantum variance: A measure of quantum coherence and quantum correlations for many-body systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frérot, Irénée; Roscilde, Tommaso

    2016-08-01

    Quantum coherence is a fundamental common trait of quantum phenomena, from the interference of matter waves to quantum degeneracy of identical particles. Despite its importance, estimating and measuring quantum coherence in generic, mixed many-body quantum states remains a formidable challenge, with fundamental implications in areas as broad as quantum condensed matter, quantum information, quantum metrology, and quantum biology. Here, we provide a quantitative definition of the variance of quantum coherent fluctuations (the quantum variance) of any observable on generic quantum states. The quantum variance generalizes the concept of thermal de Broglie wavelength (for the position of a free quantum particle) to the space of eigenvalues of any observable, quantifying the degree of coherent delocalization in that space. The quantum variance is generically measurable and computable as the difference between the static fluctuations and the static susceptibility of the observable; despite its simplicity, it is found to provide a tight lower bound to most widely accepted estimators of "quantumness" of observables (both as a feature as well as a resource), such as the Wigner-Yanase skew information and the quantum Fisher information. When considering bipartite fluctuations in an extended quantum system, the quantum variance expresses genuine quantum correlations among the two parts. In the case of many-body systems, it is found to obey an area law at finite temperature, extending therefore area laws of entanglement and quantum fluctuations of pure states to the mixed-state context. Hence the quantum variance paves the way to the measurement of macroscopic quantum coherence and quantum correlations in most complex quantum systems.

  6. Near-unity quantum yields from chloride treated CdTe colloidal quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Page, Robert C; Espinobarro-Velazquez, Daniel; Leontiadou, Marina A; Smith, Charles; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J; Li, Chen; Radtke, Hanna; Pengpad, Atip; Bondino, Federica; Magnano, Elena; Pis, Igor; Flavell, Wendy R; O'Brien, Paul; Binks, David J

    2015-04-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for novel light sources and solar energy conversion. However, trap states associated with the CQD surface can produce non-radiative charge recombination that significantly reduces device performance. Here a facile post-synthetic treatment of CdTe CQDs is demonstrated that uses chloride ions to achieve near-complete suppression of surface trapping, resulting in an increase of photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) from ca. 5% to up to 97.2 ± 2.5%. The effect of the treatment is characterised by absorption and PL spectroscopy, PL decay, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This process also dramatically improves the air-stability of the CQDs: before treatment the PL is largely quenched after 1 hour of air-exposure, whilst the treated samples showed a PL QY of nearly 50% after more than 12 hours.

  7. Near-Unity Quantum Yields from Chloride Treated CdTe Colloidal Quantum Dots

    PubMed Central

    Page, Robert C; Espinobarro-Velazquez, Daniel; Leontiadou, Marina A; Smith, Charles; Lewis, Edward A; Haigh, Sarah J; Li, Chen; Radtke, Hanna; Pengpad, Atip; Bondino, Federica; Magnano, Elena; Pis, Igor; Flavell, Wendy R; O'Brien, Paul; Binks, David J

    2015-01-01

    Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are promising materials for novel light sources and solar energy conversion. However, trap states associated with the CQD surface can produce non-radiative charge recombination that significantly reduces device performance. Here a facile post-synthetic treatment of CdTe CQDs is demonstrated that uses chloride ions to achieve near-complete suppression of surface trapping, resulting in an increase of photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) from ca. 5% to up to 97.2 ± 2.5%. The effect of the treatment is characterised by absorption and PL spectroscopy, PL decay, scanning transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. This process also dramatically improves the air-stability of the CQDs: before treatment the PL is largely quenched after 1 hour of air-exposure, whilst the treated samples showed a PL QY of nearly 50% after more than 12 hours. PMID:25348200

  8. Quantum Measurement and the Real World

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Aephraim M.

    2012-04-18

    While quantum measurement remains the central philosophical conundrum of quantum mechanics, it has recently grown into a respectable (read: experimental!) discipline as well. New perspectives on measurement have grown out of new technological possibilities, but also out of attempts to design systems for quantum information processing. I will present several examples of how our current ideas on quantum measurement go far beyond the usual textbook treatments, using examples from our entangled-photon and ultracold-atoms laboratories in Toronto. Topics will be drawn from weak measurement, 'interaction-free' measurement, Hardy's Paradox, measurement-induced quantum logic, and techniques for controlling and characterizing the coherence of quantum systems. The moral of the story will be that there are many different kinds of measurement strategies, with their own advantages and disadvantages; and that some things we have been taught not to even think about can actually be measured in a certain sense.

  9. Local Density Fluctuations Predict Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Azobenzene-Modified DNA.

    PubMed

    Kingsland, Addie; Samai, Soumyadyuti; Yan, Yunqi; Ginger, David S; Maibaum, Lutz

    2016-08-04

    Azobenzene incorporated into DNA has a photoisomerization quantum yield that depends on the DNA sequence near the azobenzene attachment site. We use Molecular Dynamics computer simulations to elucidate which physical properties of the modified DNA determine the quantum yield. We show for a wide range of DNA sequences that the photoisomerization quantum yield is strongly correlated with the variance of the number of atoms in close proximity to the outer phenyl ring of the azobenzene group. We infer that quantum yield is controlled by the availability of fluctuations that enable the conformational change. We demonstrate that these simulations can be used as a qualitative predictive tool by calculating the quantum yield for several novel DNA sequences, and confirming these predictions using UV-vis spectroscopy. Our results will be useful for the development of a wide range of applications of photoresponsive DNA nanotechnology.

  10. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2016-07-07

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derivemore » a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. Lastly, a comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements.« less

  11. Quantum work and the thermodynamic cost of quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Deffner, Sebastian; Paz, Juan Pablo; Zurek, Wojciech H.

    2016-07-07

    Quantum work is usually determined from two projective measurements of the energy at the beginning and at the end of a thermodynamic process. However, this paradigm cannot be considered thermodynamically consistent as it does not account for the thermodynamic cost of these measurements. To remedy this conceptual inconsistency we introduce a paradigm that relies only on the expected change of the average energy given the initial energy eigenbasis. In particular, we completely omit quantum measurements in the definition of quantum work, and hence quantum work is identified as a thermodynamic quantity of only the system. As main results we derive a modified quantum Jarzynski equality and a sharpened maximum work theorem in terms of the information free energy. Lastly, a comparison of our results with the standard approach allows one to quantify the informational cost of projective measurements.

  12. ``Haunted'' measurements in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenberger, Daniel M.; Yasin, Alaine

    1989-06-01

    Sometimes it is possible in quantum theory for a system to interact with another system in such a way that the information contained in the wave function becomes very scrambled and apparently incoherent. We produce an example which is exactly calculable, in which a macroscopic change is induced in the environment, and all phase information for the system is apparently lost, so that a measurement has seemingly been made. But actually, although the wave function has been badly scrambled, all the original information is still present. We call this situation one of “latent order.” Subsequently, the system interacts again with the environment, wiping out the macroscopic change, and the wave function once again becomes manifestly coherent. Thus the apparent measurement has been undone, and leaves no aftereffect. Thus, our “measurement” has disappeared without a trace. We call such a measurement a “haunted measurement,” and we believe that until the measurement process is rigorously understood, the concept of measurement is ambiguous. It is just not good enough to say that an amplification stage occurs “somewhere” in the process. We also point out the connection between the haunted measurement and delayed-choice experiments and discuss a haunted version of the “Schrödinger's Cat” experiment and of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen experiment.

  13. Classical and nonclassical randomness in quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farenick, Douglas; Plosker, Sarah; Smith, Jerrod

    2011-12-01

    The space POVM_H(X) of positive operator-valued probability measures on the Borel sets of a compact (or even locally compact) Hausdorff space X with values in B(H), the algebra of linear operators acting on a d-dimensional Hilbert space H, is studied from the perspectives of classical and nonclassical convexity through a transform Γ that associates any positive operator-valued measure ν with a certain completely positive linear map Γ(ν) of the homogeneous C*-algebra C(X)⊗ B(H) into B(H). This association is achieved by using an operator-valued integral in which nonclassical random variables (that is, operator-valued functions) are integrated with respect to positive operator-valued measures and which has the feature that the integral of a random quantum effect is itself a quantum effect. A left inverse Ω for Γ yields an integral representation, along the lines of the classical Riesz representation theorem for linear functionals on C(X), of certain (but not all) unital completely positive linear maps φ :C(X)⊗ B(H)rArr B(H). The extremal and C*-extremal points of POVM_H(X) are determined.

  14. Quantum yield for carbon monoxide production in the 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Z.; Stickel, R.E.; Wine, P.H.

    1995-03-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy has been coupled with excimer laser flash photolysis to measure the quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photodissociation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) relative to the well known quantum yield for CO production from 248 nm photolysis of phosgene (Cl{sub 2}CO). The temporal resolution of the experiments was sufficient to distinguish CO formed directly by photodissociation from that formed by subsequent S({sup 3}P{sub j}) reaction with OCS. Under the experimental conditions employed, CO formation via the fast S({sup 1}D{sub 2})+OCS reaction was minimal. Measurements at 297K and total pressures from 4 to 100 Torr N{sub 2}+N{sub 2}O show the CO yield to be greater than 0.95 and most likely unity. This result suggests that the contribution of OCS as a precursor to the lower stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is somewhat larger than previously thought. 25 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Global information balance in quantum measurements.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Francesco; Hayashi, Masahito; Horodecki, Michał

    2008-05-30

    We perform an information-theoretical analysis of quantum measurement processes and obtain the global information balance in quantum measurements, in the form of a closed chain equation for quantum mutual entropies. Our balance provides a tight and general entropic information-disturbance trade-off, and explains the physical mechanism underlying it. Finally, the single-outcome case, that is, the case of measurements with posts election, is briefly discussed.

  16. Improved quantum state transfer via quantum partially collapsing measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhong-Xiao; Ba An, Nguyen; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2014-10-15

    In this work, we present a general scheme to improve quantum state transfer (QST) by taking advantage of quantum partially collapsing measurements. The scheme consists of a weak measurement performed at the initial time on the qubit encoding the state of concern and a subsequent quantum reversal measurement at a desired time on the destined qubit. We determine the strength q{sub r} of the post quantum reversal measurement as a function of the strength p of the prior weak measurement and the evolution time t so that near-perfect QST can be achieved by choosing p close enough to 1, with a finite success probability, regardless of the evolution time and the distance over which the QST takes place. The merit of our scheme is twofold: it not only improves QST, but also suppresses the energy dissipation, if any. - Highlights: • A scheme using weak/reversal measurements is devised to improve quantum state transfer. • It can suppress dissipation allowing optimal quantum state transfer in open system. • Explicit condition for achieving near-perfect quantum state transfer is established. • Applications to spin chain and cavity array are considered in detail.

  17. Estimation on Geometric Measure of Quantum Coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Jun; Chen, Bin; Li, Ming; Fei, Shao-Ming; Long, Gui-Lu

    2017-02-01

    We study the geometric measure of quantum coherence recently proposed in [Phys. Rev. Lett. 115, 020403 (2015)]. Both lower and upper bounds of this measure are provided. These bounds are shown to be tight for a class of important coherent states -- maximally coherent mixed states. The trade-off relation between quantum coherence and mixedness for this measure is also discussed.

  18. Measures and applications of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adesso, Gerardo; Bromley, Thomas R.; Cianciaruso, Marco

    2016-11-01

    Quantum information theory is built upon the realisation that quantum resources like coherence and entanglement can be exploited for novel or enhanced ways of transmitting and manipulating information, such as quantum cryptography, teleportation, and quantum computing. We now know that there is potentially much more than entanglement behind the power of quantum information processing. There exist more general forms of non-classical correlations, stemming from fundamental principles such as the necessary disturbance induced by a local measurement, or the persistence of quantum coherence in all possible local bases. These signatures can be identified and are resilient in almost all quantum states, and have been linked to the enhanced performance of certain quantum protocols over classical ones in noisy conditions. Their presence represents, among other things, one of the most essential manifestations of quantumness in cooperative systems, from the subatomic to the macroscopic domain. In this work we give an overview of the current quest for a proper understanding and characterisation of the frontier between classical and quantum correlations (QCs) in composite states. We focus on various approaches to define and quantify general QCs, based on different yet interlinked physical perspectives, and comment on the operational significance of the ensuing measures for quantum technology tasks such as information encoding, distribution, discrimination and metrology. We then provide a broader outlook of a few applications in which quantumness beyond entanglement looks fit to play a key role.

  19. Biological measurement beyond the quantum limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Michael A.; Janousek, Jiri; Daria, Vincent; Knittel, Joachim; Hage, Boris; Bachor, Hans-A.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2013-03-01

    Dynamic biological measurements require low light levels to avoid damaging the specimen. With this constraint on optical power, quantum noise fundamentally limits the measurement sensitivity. This limit can only be surpassed by extracting more information per photon by using quantum correlations. Here, we experimentally demonstrate that the quantum shot noise limit can be overcome for measurements of living systems. Quantum-correlated light with amplitude noise squeezed 75% below the vacuum level is used to perform microrheology experiments within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. Naturally occurring lipid granules are tracked in real time as they diffuse through the cytoplasm, and the quantum noise limit is surpassed by 42%. The laser-based microparticle tracking technique used is compatible with non-classical light and is immune to low-frequency noise, leading the way to achieving a broad range of quantum-enhanced measurements in biology.

  20. Creating high yield water soluble luminescent graphene quantum dots via exfoliating and disintegrating carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Liangxu; Zhang, Shaowei

    2012-10-21

    We have developed an effective method to exfoliate and disintegrate multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphite flakes. With this technique, high yield production of luminescent graphene quantum dots with high quantum yield and low oxidization can be achieved.

  1. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  2. Thermodynamics of Weakly Measured Quantum Systems.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Jose Joaquin; Lutz, Eric; Romito, Alessandro

    2016-02-26

    We consider continuously monitored quantum systems and introduce definitions of work and heat along individual quantum trajectories that are valid for coherent superposition of energy eigenstates. We use these quantities to extend the first and second laws of stochastic thermodynamics to the quantum domain. We illustrate our results with the case of a weakly measured driven two-level system and show how to distinguish between quantum work and heat contributions. We finally employ quantum feedback control to suppress detector backaction and determine the work statistics.

  3. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    SciTech Connect

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-15

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom-the symplectic eigenvalues-which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  4. Invariant measures on multimode quantum Gaussian states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lupo, C.; Mancini, S.; De Pasquale, A.; Facchi, P.; Florio, G.; Pascazio, S.

    2012-12-01

    We derive the invariant measure on the manifold of multimode quantum Gaussian states, induced by the Haar measure on the group of Gaussian unitary transformations. To this end, by introducing a bipartition of the system in two disjoint subsystems, we use a parameterization highlighting the role of nonlocal degrees of freedom—the symplectic eigenvalues—which characterize quantum entanglement across the given bipartition. A finite measure is then obtained by imposing a physically motivated energy constraint. By averaging over the local degrees of freedom we finally derive the invariant distribution of the symplectic eigenvalues in some cases of particular interest for applications in quantum optics and quantum information.

  5. Amplifying and freezing of quantum coherence using weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lian-Wu; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2016-11-01

    We analyze universal conditions where the l 1 norm and relative entropy of coherence are amplified and frozen under identical bit-flip channels; that is, using pre-measurements (quantum weak measurements or quantum measurement reversals) on the systems before undergoing local bit-flip channels. With the option of quantum weak measurements or quantum measurement reversals, the measurement strength and the success probability are all determined by the initial state of the quantum system. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11204156, 61178012, 11304179, and 11247240) and the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20133705110001).

  6. Quantum states tomography with noisy measurement channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogdanov, Yu. I.; Bantysh, B. I.; Bogdanova, N. A.; Kvasnyy, A. B.; Lukichev, V. F.

    2016-12-01

    We consider realistic measurement systems, where measurements are accompanied by decoherence processes. The aim of this work is the construction of methods and algorithms for precise quantum measurements with fidelity close to the fundamental limit. In the present work the notions of ideal and non-ideal quantum measurements are strictly formalized. It is shown that non-ideal quantum measurements could be represented as a mixture of ideal measurements. Based on root approach the quantum state reconstruction method is developed. Informational accuracy theory of non-ideal quantum measurements is proposed. The monitoring of the amount of information about the quantum state parameters is examined, including the analysis of the information degradation under the noise influence. The study of achievable fidelity in non-ideal quantum measurements is performed. The results of simulation of fidelity characteristics of a wide class of quantum protocols based on polyhedrons geometry with high level of symmetry are presented. The impact of different decoherence mechanisms, including qubit amplitude and phase relaxation, bit-flip and phase-flip, is considered.

  7. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Measurement Problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namiki, Mikio; Pasaczio, Saverio

    1996-01-01

    Critically analyzing the so-called quantum Zeno effect in the measurement problem, we show that observation of this effect does not necessarily mean experimental evidence for the naive notion of wave-function collapse by measurement (the simple projection rule). We also examine what kind of limitation the uncertainty relation and others impose on the observation of the quantum Zeno effect.

  8. Colloidal Spherical Quantum Wells with Near-Unity Photoluminescence Quantum Yield and Suppressed Blinking.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Byeong Guk; Park, Young-Shin; Chang, Jun Hyuk; Cho, Ikjun; Kim, Jai Kyeong; Kim, Heesuk; Char, Kookheon; Cho, Jinhan; Klimov, Victor I; Park, Philip; Lee, Doh C; Bae, Wan Ki

    2016-10-02

    Thick inorganic shell endows colloidal nanocrystals (NCs) with enhanced photochemical stability and suppression of photoluminescence intermittency (also known as blinking). However, the progress of using thick-shell heterostructure NCs in applications has been limited, due to low photoluminescence quantum yield (PL QY  60%) at room temperature. Here, we demonstrate thick-shell NCs with CdS/CdSe/CdS seed/spherical quantum well/shell (SQW) geometry that exhibit near-unity PL QY at room temperature and suppression of blinking. In SQW NCs, the lattice mismatch is diminished between the emissive CdSe layer and the surrounding CdS layers as a result of coherent strain, which suppresses the formation of misfit defects and consequently permits ~ 100% PL QY for SQW NCs with thick CdS shell (≥ 5 nm). High PL QY of thick-shell SQW NCs are preserved even in concentrated dispersion and in film under thermal stress, which makes them promising candidates for applications in solid-state lightings and luminescent solar concentrators.

  9. Gradient CdSe/CdS Quantum Dots with Room Temperature Biexciton Unity Quantum Yield.

    PubMed

    Nasilowski, Michel; Spinicelli, Piernicola; Patriarche, Gilles; Dubertret, Benoît

    2015-06-10

    Auger recombination is a major limitation for the fluorescent emission of quantum dots (QDs). It is the main source of QDs fluorescence blinking at the single-particle level. At high-power excitation, when several charge carriers are formed inside a QD, Auger becomes more efficient and severely decreases the quantum yield (QY) of multiexcitons. This limits the efficiency and the use of colloidal QDs in applications where intense light output is required. Here, we present a new generation of thick-shell CdSe/CdS QDs with dimensions >40 nm and a composition gradient between the core and the shell that exhibits 100% QY for the emission of both the monoexciton and the biexciton in air and at room temperature for all the QDs we have observed. The fluorescence emission of these QDs is perfectly Poissonian at the single-particle level at different excitation levels and temperatures, from 30 to 300 K. In these QDs, the emission of high-order (>2) multiexcitons is quite efficient, and we observe white light emission at the single-QD level when high excitation power is used. These gradient thick shell QDs confirm the suppression of Auger recombination in gradient core/shell structures and help further establish the colloidal QDs with a gradient shell as a very stable source of light even under high excitation.

  10. Quantum dynamics of simultaneously measured non-commuting observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hacohen-Gourgy, Shay; Martin, Leigh S.; Flurin, Emmanuel; Ramasesh, Vinay V.; Whaley, K. Birgitta; Siddiqi, Irfan

    2016-10-01

    In quantum mechanics, measurements cause wavefunction collapse that yields precise outcomes, whereas for non-commuting observables such as position and momentum Heisenberg’s uncertainty principle limits the intrinsic precision of a state. Although theoretical work has demonstrated that it should be possible to perform simultaneous non-commuting measurements and has revealed the limits on measurement outcomes, only recently has the dynamics of the quantum state been discussed. To realize this unexplored regime, we simultaneously apply two continuous quantum non-demolition probes of non-commuting observables to a superconducting qubit. We implement multiple readout channels by coupling the qubit to multiple modes of a cavity. To control the measurement observables, we implement a ‘single quadrature’ measurement by driving the qubit and applying cavity sidebands with a relative phase that sets the observable. Here, we use this approach to show that the uncertainty principle governs the dynamics of the wavefunction by enforcing a lower bound on the measurement-induced disturbance. Consequently, as we transition from measuring identical to measuring non-commuting observables, the dynamics make a smooth transition from standard wavefunction collapse to localized persistent diffusion and then to isotropic persistent diffusion. Although the evolution of the state differs markedly from that of a conventional measurement, information about both non-commuting observables is extracted by keeping track of the time ordering of the measurement record, enabling quantum state tomography without alternating measurements. Our work creates novel capabilities for quantum control, including rapid state purification, adaptive measurement, measurement-based state steering and continuous quantum error correction. As physical systems often interact continuously with their environment via non-commuting degrees of freedom, our work offers a way to study how notions of contemporary

  11. DETERMINATION OF APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD SPECTRA FOR THE FORMATION OF BIOLOGICALLY LABILE PHOTOPRODUCTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantum yield spectra for the photochemical formation of biologically labile photoproducts from dissolved organic matter (DOM) have not been available previously, although they would greatly facilitate attempts to model photoproduct formation rates across latitudinal, seasonal, a...

  12. Action spectra of photosystems II and I and quantum yield of photosynthesis in leaves in State 1.

    PubMed

    Laisk, Agu; Oja, Vello; Eichelmann, Hillar; Dall'Osto, Luca

    2014-02-01

    The spectral global quantum yield (YII, electrons/photons absorbed) of photosystem II (PSII) was measured in sunflower leaves in State 1 using monochromatic light. The global quantum yield of PSI (YI) was measured using low-intensity monochromatic light flashes and the associated transmittance change at 810nm. The 810-nm signal change was calibrated based on the number of electrons generated by PSII during the flash (4·O2 evolution) which arrived at the PSI donor side after a delay of 2ms. The intrinsic quantum yield of PSI (yI, electrons per photon absorbed by PSI) was measured at 712nm, where photon absorption by PSII was small. The results were used to resolve the individual spectra of the excitation partitioning coefficients between PSI (aI) and PSII (aII) in leaves. For comparison, pigment-protein complexes for PSII and PSI were isolated, separated by sucrose density ultracentrifugation, and their optical density was measured. A good correlation was obtained for the spectral excitation partitioning coefficients measured by these different methods. The intrinsic yield of PSI was high (yI=0.88), but it absorbed only about 1/3 of quanta; consequently, about 2/3 of quanta were absorbed by PSII, but processed with the low intrinsic yield yII=0.63. In PSII, the quantum yield of charge separation was 0.89 as detected by variable fluorescence Fv/Fm, but 29% of separated charges recombined (Laisk A, Eichelmann H and Oja V, Photosynth. Res. 113, 145-155). At wavelengths less than 580nm about 30% of excitation is absorbed by pigments poorly connected to either photosystem, most likely carotenoids bound in pigment-protein complexes.

  13. [Theoretical analysis and experimental measurement for secondary electron yield of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet region].

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Ni, Qi-liang; Dong, Ning-ning; Chen, Bo

    2010-08-01

    Photon counting detectors based on microchannel plate have widespread applications in astronomy. The present paper deeply studies secondary electron of microchannel plate in extreme ultraviolet. A theoretical model describing extreme ultraviolet-excited secondary electron yield is presented, and the factor affecting on the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass which consist of microchannel plate is analyzed according to theoretical formula derived from the model. The result shows that the higher secondary electron yield is obtained under appropriate condition that the thickness of material is more than 20 nm and the grazing incidence angle is larger than the critical angle. Except for several wavelengths, the secondary electron yields of both electrode and lead glass decrease along with the increase in the wavelength And also the quantum efficiency of microchannel plate is measured using quantum efficiency test set-up with laser-produced plasmas source as an extreme ultraviolet radiation source, and the result of experiment agrees with theoretical analysis.

  14. Measurement-only topological quantum computation without forced measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Huaixiu; Dua, Arpit; Jiang, Liang

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the measurement-only topological quantum computation (MOTQC) approach proposed by Bonderson et al (2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 010501) where the braiding operation is shown to be equivalent to a series of topological charge ‘forced measurements’ of anyons. In a forced measurement, the charge measurement is forced to yield the desired outcome (e.g. charge 0) via repeatedly measuring charges in different bases. This is a probabilistic process with a certain success probability for each trial. In practice, the number of measurements needed will vary from run to run. We show that such an uncertainty associated with forced measurements can be removed by simulating the braiding operation using a fixed number of three measurements supplemented by a correction operator. Furthermore, we demonstrate that in practice we can avoid applying the correction operator in hardware by implementing it in software. Our findings greatly simplify the MOTQC proposal and only require the capability of performing charge measurements to implement topologically protected transformations generated by braiding exchanges without physically moving anyons.

  15. Investigation of the CO2 Dependence of Quantum Yield and Respiration in Eucalyptus pauciflora

    PubMed Central

    Kirschbaum, Miko U. F.; Farquhar, Graham D.

    1987-01-01

    In leaves of C3 plants, the rate of nonphotorespiratory respiration appears to be higher in darkness than in the light. This change from a high to a low rate of carbon loss with increasing photon flux density leads to an increase in the apparent quantum yield of photosynthetic CO2 assimilation at low photon flux densities (Kok effect). The mechanism of this suppression of nonphotorespiratory respiration is not understood, but biochemical evidence and the observation that a Kok effect is often not observed under low O2, has led to the suggestion that photorespiration might be involved in some way. This hypothesis was tested with snowgum (Eucalyptus pauciflora Sieb. ex Spreng.) using gas exchange methods. The test was based on the assumption that if photorespiration were involved, then it would be expected that the intercellular partial pressure of CO2 would also have an influence on the Kok effect. Under normal atmospheric levels of CO2 and O2, a Kok effect was found. Changing the intercellular partial pressure of CO2, however, did not affect the estimate of nonphotorespiratory respiraton, and it was concluded that its decrease with increasing photon flux density did not involve photorespiration. Concurrent measurements showed that the quantum yield of net assimilation of CO2 increased with increasing intercellular partial pressure of CO2, and this increase agreed closely with predictions based on recent models of photosynthesis. PMID:16665319

  16. Structure-guided evolution of cyan fluorescent proteins towards a quantum yield of 93%

    PubMed Central

    Goedhart, Joachim; von Stetten, David; Noirclerc-Savoye, Marjolaine; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Joosen, Linda; Hink, Mark A.; van Weeren, Laura; Gadella, Theodorus W.J.; Royant, Antoine

    2012-01-01

    Cyan variants of green fluorescent protein are widely used as donors in Förster resonance energy transfer experiments. The popular, but modestly bright, Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP) was sequentially improved into the brighter variants Super Cyan Fluorescent Protein 3A (SCFP3A) and mTurquoise, the latter exhibiting a high-fluorescence quantum yield and a long mono-exponential fluorescence lifetime. Here we combine X-ray crystallography and excited-state calculations to rationalize these stepwise improvements. The enhancement originates from stabilization of the seventh β-strand and the strengthening of the sole chromophore-stabilizing hydrogen bond. The structural analysis highlighted one suboptimal internal residue, which was subjected to saturation mutagenesis combined with fluorescence lifetime-based screening. This resulted in mTurquoise2, a brighter variant with faster maturation, high photostability, longer mono-exponential lifetime and the highest quantum yield measured for a monomeric fluorescent protein. Together, these properties make mTurquoise2 the preferable cyan variant of green fluorescent protein for long-term imaging and as donor for Förster resonance energy transfer to a yellow fluorescent protein. PMID:22434194

  17. Work measurement in a quantum heat engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bariani, Francesco; Zhang, Keye; Dong, Ying; Meystre, Pierre

    2015-05-01

    We consider an optomechanical quantum heat engine operating on an Otto cycle for photon-phonon polaritons, the working substance of the engine. We discuss both the average value and quantum fluctuations of its work output, concentrating in particular on the effects of quantum non-adiabaticity due to the finite duration of the cycle. We also determine the quantum back-action of both absorptive and dispersive continuous measurements of the work, and quantify their impact on the Curzon-Ahlborn engine efficiency at maximum power and its fluctuations. We ackowledge financial support from National Basic Research Program of China, NSF, ARO and the DARPA QuaSAR programs

  18. Simulation of n-qubit quantum systems. V. Quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radtke, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2010-02-01

    The FEYNMAN program has been developed during the last years to support case studies on the dynamics and entanglement of n-qubit quantum registers. Apart from basic transformations and (gate) operations, it currently supports a good number of separability criteria and entanglement measures, quantum channels as well as the parametrizations of various frequently applied objects in quantum information theory, such as (pure and mixed) quantum states, hermitian and unitary matrices or classical probability distributions. With the present update of the FEYNMAN program, we provide a simple access to (the simulation of) quantum measurements. This includes not only the widely-applied projective measurements upon the eigenspaces of some given operator but also single-qubit measurements in various pre- and user-defined bases as well as the support for two-qubit Bell measurements. In addition, we help perform generalized and POVM measurements. Knowing the importance of measurements for many quantum information protocols, e.g., one-way computing, we hope that this update makes the FEYNMAN code an attractive and versatile tool for both, research and education. New version program summaryProgram title: FEYNMAN Catalogue identifier: ADWE_v5_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADWE_v5_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 27 210 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1 960 471 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple 12 Computer: Any computer with Maple software installed Operating system: Any system that supports Maple; the program has been tested under Microsoft Windows XP and Linux Classification: 4.15 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADWE_v4_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Commun

  19. Measurement of Neutron Yields from UF4

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, Zane W; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Ohmes, Martin F; Xu, Yunlin; Downar, Thomas J; Pozzi, Sara A

    2010-01-01

    We have performed measurements of neutron production from UF{sub 4} samples using liquid scintillator as the detector material. Neutrons and gamma rays were separated by a multichannel digital pulse shape discriminator, and the neutron pulse-height spectra were unfolded using sequential least-squares optimization with an active set strategy. The unfolded spectra were compared to estimates calculated with the SOURCES 4C code.

  20. Conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, Shabnam; Erenso, Daniel; Vyas, Reeta; Singh, Surendra

    2003-06-01

    We discuss conditional measurements as probes of quantum dynamics and show that they provide different ways to characterize quantum fluctuations. We illustrate this by considering the light from a subthreshold degenerate parametric oscillator. Analytic results and curves are presented to illustrate the behavior.

  1. Acausal measurement-based quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-07-01

    In measurement-based quantum computing, there is a natural "causal cone" among qubits of the resource state, since the measurement angle on a qubit has to depend on previous measurement results in order to correct the effect of by-product operators. If we respect the no-signaling principle, by-product operators cannot be avoided. Here we study the possibility of acausal measurement-based quantum computing by using the process matrix framework [Oreshkov, Costa, and Brukner, Nat. Commun. 3, 1092 (2012), 10.1038/ncomms2076]. We construct a resource process matrix for acausal measurement-based quantum computing restricting local operations to projective measurements. The resource process matrix is an analog of the resource state of the standard causal measurement-based quantum computing. We find that if we restrict local operations to projective measurements the resource process matrix is (up to a normalization factor and trivial ancilla qubits) equivalent to the decorated graph state created from the graph state of the corresponding causal measurement-based quantum computing. We also show that it is possible to consider a causal game whose causal inequality is violated by acausal measurement-based quantum computing.

  2. Inconclusive quantum measurements and decisions under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yukalov, Vyacheslav; Sornette, Didier

    2016-04-01

    We give a mathematical definition for the notion of inconclusive quantum measurements. In physics, such measurements occur at intermediate stages of a complex measurement procedure, with the final measurement result being operationally testable. Since the mathematical structure of Quantum Decision Theory has been developed in analogy with the theory of quantum measurements, the inconclusive quantum measurements correspond, in Quantum Decision Theory, to intermediate stages of decision making in the process of taking decisions under uncertainty. The general form of the quantum probability for a composite event is the sum of a utility factor, describing a rational evaluation of the considered prospect, and of an attraction factor, characterizing irrational, subconscious attitudes of the decision maker. Despite the involved irrationality, the probability of prospects can be evaluated. This is equivalent to the possibility of calculating quantum probabilities without specifying hidden variables. We formulate a general way of evaluation, based on the use of non-informative priors. As an example, we suggest the explanation of the decoy effect. Our quantitative predictions are in very good agreement with experimental data.

  3. A quantum measure of the multiverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vilenkin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently suggested that probabilities of different events in the multiverse are given by the frequencies at which these events are encountered along the worldline of a geodesic observer (the ``watcher''). Here I discuss an extension of this probability measure to quantum theory. The proposed extension is gauge-invariant, as is the classical version of this measure. Observations of the watcher are described by a reduced density matrix, and the frequencies of events can be found using the decoherent histories formalism of Quantum Mechanics (adapted to open systems). The quantum watcher measure makes predictions in agreement with the standard Born rule of QM.

  4. Thermoelectric corrections to quantum voltage measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergfield, Justin P.; Stafford, Charles A.

    2014-12-01

    A generalization of Büttiker's voltage probe concept for nonzero temperatures is an open third terminal of a quantum thermoelectric circuit. An explicit analytic expression for the thermoelectric correction to an ideal quantum voltage measurement in linear response is derived and interpreted in terms of local Peltier cooling/heating within the nonequilibrium system. The thermoelectric correction is found to be large (up to ±24 % of the peak voltage) in a prototypical ballistic quantum conductor (graphene nanoribbon). The effects of measurement nonideality are also investigated. Our findings have important implications for precision local electrical measurements.

  5. A quantum measure of the multiverse

    SciTech Connect

    Vilenkin, Alexander

    2014-05-01

    It has been recently suggested that probabilities of different events in the multiverse are given by the frequencies at which these events are encountered along the worldline of a geodesic observer (the ''watcher''). Here I discuss an extension of this probability measure to quantum theory. The proposed extension is gauge-invariant, as is the classical version of this measure. Observations of the watcher are described by a reduced density matrix, and the frequencies of events can be found using the decoherent histories formalism of Quantum Mechanics (adapted to open systems). The quantum watcher measure makes predictions in agreement with the standard Born rule of QM.

  6. Quantum nondemolition measurements. [by gravitational wave antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginskii, V. B.; Vorontsov, Iu. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1980-01-01

    The article describes new electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements and the theory underlying them. Consideration is given to resonant-bar gravitational-wave antennas. Position measurements are discussed along with energy measurements and back-action-evading measurements. Thermal noise in oscillators and amplifiers is outlined. Prospects for stroboscopic measurements are emphasized.

  7. Quantum computing measurement and intelligence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezziane, Zoheir

    One of the grand challenges in the nanoscopic computing era is guarantees of robustness. Robust computing system design is confronted with quantum physical, probabilistic, and even biological phenomena, and guaranteeing high-reliability is much more difficult than ever before. Scaling devices down to the level of single electron operation will bring forth new challenges due to probabilistic effects and uncertainty in guaranteeing "zero-one" based computing. Minuscule devices imply billions of devices on a single chip, which may help mitigate the challenge of uncertainty by replication and redundancy. However, such device densities will create a design and validation nightmare with the sheer scale. The questions that confront computer engineers regarding the current status of nanocomputing material and the reliability of systems built from such minuscule devices are difficult to articulate and answer. This article illustrates and discusses two types of quantum algorithms as follows: (1) a simple quantum algorithm and (2) a quantum search algorithm. This article also presents a review of recent advances in quantum computing and intelligence and presents major achievements and obstacles for researchers in the near future.

  8. Wavelength dependence of the fluorescence and singlet oxygen quantum yields of new photosensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavi, Adina; Johnson, Fred M.; Ehrenberg, Benjamin

    1994-12-01

    The photophysical properties of Mg and Zn tetrabenzoporphyrins and Cd-texaphyrin are presented. These sensitizers have strong absorption bands in the red and near-IR regions that make them good candidates for biological photosensitization. Singlet oxygen quantum yields which were determined in an absolute manner, in several solvents, are reported. We show an unusual behavior regarding adherence to Kasha's and Vavilov's rules: upon excitation to different electronic states, different values of singlet oxygen quantum yields were obtained. We also show an unusual wavelength dependence of singlet oxygen and fluorescence yields upon excitation to different vibrational levels within the same electronic state.

  9. Calculated quantum yield of photosynthesis of phytoplankton in the Marine Light-Mixed Layers (59 deg N, 21 deg W)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carder, K. L.; Lee, Z. P.; Marra, John; Steward, R. G.; Perry, M. J.

    1995-01-01

    The quantum yield of photosynthesis (mol C/mol photons) was calculated at six depths for the waters of the Marine Light-Mixed Layer (MLML) cruise of May 1991. As there were photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) but no spectral irradiance measurements for the primary production incubations, three ways are presented here for the calculation of the absorbed photons (AP) by phytoplankton for the purpose of calculating phi. The first is based on a simple, nonspectral model; the second is based on a nonlinear regression using measured PAR values with depth; and the third is derived through remote sensing measurements. We show that the results of phi calculated using the nonlinear regreesion method and those using remote sensing are in good agreement with each other, and are consistent with the reported values of other studies. In deep waters, however, the simple nonspectral model may cause quantum yield values much higher than theoretically possible.

  10. Photobleaching of astaxanthin and canthaxanthin. Quantum-yields dependence of solvent, temperature, and wavelength of irradiation in relation to packaging and storage of carotenoid pigmented salmonoids.

    PubMed

    Christophersen, A G; Jun, H; Jørgensen, K; Skibsted, L H

    1991-05-01

    The quantum yield for the photobleaching of astaxanthin (the carotenoid of wild salmonoids) and of canthaxanthin (the closely related carotenoid used as a feeding additive for farmed salmonoids) has been determined for monochromatic light at different wavelengths and in different solvents. Astaxanthin is less sensitive to light than canthaxanthin. The photobleaching is strongly wavelength dependent, and the quantum yield for astaxanthin dissolved in chloroform at 22 degrees C is 3.2 x 10(-1) mol.Einstein-1 at 254 nm, 3.1 x 10(-2) at 313 nm, and 1.6 x 10(-6) at 436 nm, respectively. The quantum yields are less dependent on the nature of the solvent and show no simple correlation with oxygen solubility, i.e. for 366 nm excitation of astaxanthin the quantum yields are 6.1 x 10(-5) mol.Einstein-1 in acetone, 1.2 x 10(-4) in saturated vegetable oil, 1.9 x 10(-4) in chloroform, and 3.4 x 10(-4) solubilized in water, respectively. The photobleaching quantum yield provides an objective measure of the light sensitivity of the carotenoids in relation to the discolouration of carotenoid-pigmented salmonoids. The quantum yield was also found to be independent of the carotenoid concentration and, in a homogenous solution, of light intensities. For astaxanthin solubilized in water, the quantum yield increases for low light intensities. Excitation of astaxanthin solubilized in water using visible light shows that the photobleaching quantum yield is independent of temperature, while excitation at 313 nm shows an increase in the quantum yield with increasing temperatures, corresponding to an energy of activation of 28 kJ.mol-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Quantum yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, A.; Nelson, D. D., Jr.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    1993-05-01

    Flash kinetic spectroscopy in a flow tube is used to measure at room temperature the absolute yields for OH production from 193 and 248 nm photolysis of HNO3 and H2O2. The OH radicals are produced by excimer laser photolysis and probed via direct absorption of high resolution tunable IR laser light. The results indicate quantum yields for both precursors at both wavelengths which are less than the maximum possible values of 1 for H2O2. The present measurements are discussed in light of contrasting results suggested from other work.

  12. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio; Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-01

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  13. On the measurability of quantum correlation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Lima Bernardo, Bertúlio de Azevedo, Sérgio; Rosas, Alexandre

    2015-05-15

    The concept of correlation function is widely used in classical statistical mechanics to characterize how two or more variables depend on each other. In quantum mechanics, on the other hand, there are observables that cannot be measured at the same time; the so-called incompatible observables. This prospect imposes a limitation on the definition of a quantum analog for the correlation function in terms of a sequence of measurements. Here, based on the notion of sequential weak measurements, we circumvent this limitation by introducing a framework to measure general quantum correlation functions, in principle, independently of the state of the system and the operators involved. To illustrate, we propose an experimental configuration to obtain explicitly the quantum correlation function between two Pauli operators, in which the input state is an arbitrary mixed qubit state encoded on the polarization of photons.

  14. Quantum nondemolition measurements of harmonic oscillators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorne, K. S.; Caves, C. M.; Zimmermann, M.; Sandberg, V. D.; Drever, R. W. P.

    1978-01-01

    Measuring systems to determine the real component of the complex amplitude of a harmonic oscillator are described. This amplitude is constant in the absence of driving forces, and the uncertainty principle accounts for the fact that only the real component can be measured precisely and continuously ('quantum nondemolition measurement'). Application of the measuring systems to the detection of gravitational waves is considered.

  15. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-03-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes.

  16. Tuning quantum measurements to control chaos

    PubMed Central

    Eastman, Jessica K.; Hope, Joseph J.; Carvalho, André R. R.

    2017-01-01

    Environment-induced decoherence has long been recognised as being of crucial importance in the study of chaos in quantum systems. In particular, the exact form and strength of the system-environment interaction play a major role in the quantum-to-classical transition of chaotic systems. In this work we focus on the effect of varying monitoring strategies, i.e. for a given decoherence model and a fixed environmental coupling, there is still freedom on how to monitor a quantum system. We show here that there is a region between the deep quantum regime and the classical limit where the choice of the monitoring parameter allows one to control the complex behaviour of the system, leading to either the emergence or suppression of chaos. Our work shows that this is a result from the interplay between quantum interference effects induced by the nonlinear dynamics and the effectiveness of the decoherence for different measurement schemes. PMID:28317933

  17. Compressing measurements in quantum dynamic parameter estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magesan, Easwar; Cooper, Alexandre; Cappellaro, Paola

    2013-12-01

    We present methods that can provide an exponential savings in the resources required to perform dynamic parameter estimation using quantum systems. The key idea is to merge classical compressive sensing techniques with quantum control methods to significantly reduce the number of signal coefficients that are required for reconstruction of time-varying parameters with high fidelity. We show that incoherent measurement bases and, more generally, suitable random measurement matrices can be created by performing simple control sequences on the quantum system. Random measurement matrices satisfying the restricted isometry property can be used efficiently to reconstruct signals that are sparse in any basis. Because many physical processes are approximately sparse in some basis, these methods can benefit a variety of applications such as quantum sensing and magnetometry with nitrogen-vacancy centers.

  18. Film quantum yields of EUV and ultra-high PAG photoresists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassanein, Elsayed; Higgins, Craig; Naulleau, Patrick; Matyi, Richard; Gallatin, Gregg; Denbeaux, Gregory; Antohe, Alin; Thackeray, Jim; Spear, Kathleen; Szmanda, Charles; Anderson, Christopher N.; Niakoula, Dimitra; Malloy, Matthew; Khurshid, Anwar; Montgomery, Cecilia; Piscani, Emil C.; Rudack, Andrew; Byers, Jeff; Ma, Andy; Dean, Kim; Brainard, Robert

    2008-03-01

    Base titration methods are used to determine C-parameters for three industrial EUV photoresist platforms (EUV- 2D, MET-2D, XP5496) and twenty academic EUV photoresist platforms. X-ray reflectometry is used to measure the density of these resists, and leads to the determination of absorbance and film quantum yields (FQY). Ultrahigh levels of PAG show divergent mechanisms for production of photoacids beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter. The FQY of sulfonium PAGs level off, whereas resists prepared with iodonium PAG show FQYs that increase beyond PAG concentrations of 0.35 moles/liter, reaching record highs of 8-13 acids generated/EUV photons absorbed.

  19. Who is afraid of POV measures? Unified approach to quantum phase observables

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, P. |; Grabowski, M.; Lahti, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    It is shown that introducing phase observables as shift-covariant positive-operator-valued measures yields a coherent unification of various conceptually different approaches to the phase in quantum theory. {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

  20. On the theory of quantum measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haus, Hermann A.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    1994-01-01

    Many so called paradoxes of quantum mechanics are clarified when the measurement equipment is treated as a quantized system. Every measurement involves nonlinear processes. Self consistent formulations of nonlinear quantum optics are relatively simple. Hence optical measurements, such as the quantum nondemolition (QND) measurement of photon number, are particularly well suited for such a treatment. It shows that the so called 'collapse of the wave function' is not needed for the interpretation of the measurement process. Coherence of the density matrix of the signal is progressively reduced with increasing accuracy of the photon number determination. If the QND measurement is incorporated into the double slit experiment, the contrast ratio of the fringes is found to decrease with increasing information on the photon number in one of the two paths.

  1. Classical field approach to quantum weak measurements.

    PubMed

    Dressel, Justin; Bliokh, Konstantin Y; Nori, Franco

    2014-03-21

    By generalizing the quantum weak measurement protocol to the case of quantum fields, we show that weak measurements probe an effective classical background field that describes the average field configuration in the spacetime region between pre- and postselection boundary conditions. The classical field is itself a weak value of the corresponding quantum field operator and satisfies equations of motion that extremize an effective action. Weak measurements perturb this effective action, producing measurable changes to the classical field dynamics. As such, weakly measured effects always correspond to an effective classical field. This general result explains why these effects appear to be robust for pre- and postselected ensembles, and why they can also be measured using classical field techniques that are not weak for individual excitations of the field.

  2. Ultraviolet photolysis of HCHO: absolute HCO quantum yields by direct detection of the HCO radical photoproduct.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Paula Gorrotxategi; Smith, Shona C; Holloway, Anne-Louise; Smith, Carina A; Pope, Francis D; Shallcross, Dudley E; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2008-12-04

    Absolute quantum yields for the radical (H + HCO) channel of HCHO photolysis, Phi(HCO), have been measured for the tropospherically relevant range of wavelengths (lambda) between 300 and 330 nm. The HCO photoproduct was directly detected by using a custom-built, combined ultra-violet (UV) absorption and cavity ring down (CRD) detection spectrometer. This instrument was previously employed for high-resolution (spectral resolution approximately 0.0035 nm) measurements of absorption cross-sections of HCHO, sigma(HCHO)(lambda), and relative HCO quantum yields. Absolute Phi(HCO) values were measured at seven wavelengths, lambda = 303.70, 305.13, 308.87, 314.31, 320.67, 325.59, and 329.51 nm, using an independent calibration technique based on the simultaneous UV photolysis of HCHO and Cl(2). These Phi(HCO) measurements display greater variability as a function of wavelength than the current NASA-JPL recommendations for Phi(HCO). The absolute Phi(HCO)(lambda) determinations and previously measured sigma(HCHO)(lambda) were used to scale an extensive set of relative HCO yield measurements. The outcome of this procedure is a full suite of data for the product of the absolute radical quantum yield and HCHO absorption cross-section, Phi(HCO)(lambda)sigma(HCHO)(lambda), at wavelengths from 302.6 to 331.0 nm with a wavelength resolution of 0.005 nm. This product of photochemical parameters is combined with high-resolution solar photon flux data to calculate the integrated photolysis rate of HCHO to the radical (H + HCO) channel, J(HCO). Comparison with the latest NASA-JPL recommendations, reported at 1 nm wavelength resolution, suggests an increased J(HCO) of 25% at 0 degrees solar zenith angle (SZA) increasing to 33% at high SZA (80 degrees). The differences in the calculated photolysis rate compared with the current HCHO data arise, in part, from the higher wavelength resolution of the current data set and highlight the importance of using high-resolution spectroscopic

  3. Emerging interpretations of quantum mechanics and recent progress in quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to provide a brief discussion on the quantum measurement process, by reviewing select examples highlighting recent progress towards its understanding. The areas explored include an outline of the measurement problem, the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, quantum to classical transition, types of measurement (including weak and projective measurements) and newly emerging interpretations of quantum mechanics (decoherence theory, objective reality, quantum Darwinism and quantum Bayesianism).

  4. Unified entropic measures of quantum correlations induced by local measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Bellomo, G.; Zozor, S.; Portesi, M.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2016-11-01

    We introduce quantum correlation measures based on the minimal change in unified entropies induced by local rank-one projective measurements, divided by a factor that depends on the generalized purity of the system in the case of nonadditive entropies. In this way, we overcome the issue of the artificial increasing of the value of quantum correlation measures based on nonadditive entropies when an uncorrelated ancilla is appended to the system, without changing the computability of our entropic correlation measures with respect to the previous ones. Moreover, we recover as limiting cases the quantum correlation measures based on von Neumann and Rényi entropies (i.e., additive entropies), for which the adjustment factor becomes trivial. In addition, we distinguish between total and semiquantum correlations and obtain some inequalities between them. Finally, we obtain analytical expressions of the entropic correlation measures for typical quantum bipartite systems.

  5. Fluorescence quantum yield of Yb3+-doped tellurite glasses determined by thermal lens spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, S. M.; Souza, A. K. R.; Langaro, A. P.; Silva, J. R.; Costa, F. B.; Moraes, J. C. S.; Figueiredo, M. S.; Santos, F. A.; Baesso, M. L.; Nunes, L. A. O.; Andrade, L. H. C.

    2017-01-01

    In this work, the combination of three different thermal lens spectroscopic methodologies was used to better determine the fluorescence quantum yield and to observe the concentration quenching in Yb3+-doped binary tellurite glasses (in mol%, 80TeO2 - 20Li2O and 80TeO2 - 20WO3). The samples were synthesized by the conventional melt-quenching method and then studied using optical spectroscopy and thermal lens spectroscopy (TLS). These characterizations enabled investigation of the radiative and nonradiative processes involved in the ytterbium doped systems. High fluorescence quantum yield was obtained for low Yb3+ doping (>90%), and in both glasses the Yb3+ presented concentration quenching mainly caused by impurities, host-ion interaction and OH- vibrations. The observations suggested that there is a possibility of doping the glasses with higher Yb concentration (>1.6 × 1021 ions/cm3) with low reduction of the quantum yield.

  6. Uniqueness of measures in loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Hanusch, Maximilian

    2015-09-15

    In Ashtekar and Campiglia [Classical Quantum Gravity 29, 242001 (2012)], residual diffeomorphisms have been used to single out the standard representation of the reduced holonomy-flux algebra in homogeneous loop quantum cosmology (LQC). We show that, in the homogeneous isotropic case, unitarity of the translations with respect to the extended ℝ-action (exponentiated reduced fluxes in the standard approach) singles out the Bohr measure on both the standard quantum configuration space ℝ{sub Bohr} as well as on the Fleischhack one (ℝ⊔ℝ{sub Bohr}). Thus, in both situations, the same condition singles out the standard kinematical Hilbert space of LQC.

  7. Measurements and mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, D. A.

    2007-03-01

    A scheme for constructing quantum mechanics is given that does not have Hilbert space and linear operators as its basic elements. Instead, a version of algebraic approach is considered. Elements of a noncommutative algebra (observables) and functionals on this algebra (elementary states) associated with results of single measurements are used as primary components of the scheme. On the one hand, it is possible to use within the scheme the formalism of the standard (Kolmogorov) probability theory, and, on the other hand, it is possible to reproduce the mathematical formalism of standard quantum mechanics, and to study the limits of its applicability. A short outline is given of the necessary material from the theory of algebras and probability theory. It is described how the mathematical scheme of the paper agrees with the theory of quantum measurements, and avoids quantum paradoxes.

  8. Operational meaning of quantum measures of recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooney, Tom; Hirche, Christoph; Morgan, Ciara; Olson, Jonathan P.; Seshadreesan, Kaushik P.; Watrous, John; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-08-01

    Several information measures have recently been defined that capture the notion of recoverability. In particular, the fidelity of recovery quantifies how well one can recover a system A of a tripartite quantum state, defined on systems A B C , by acting on system C alone. The relative entropy of recovery is an associated measure in which the fidelity is replaced by relative entropy. In this paper we provide concrete operational interpretations of the aforementioned recovery measures in terms of a computational decision problem and a hypothesis testing scenario. Specifically, we show that the fidelity of recovery is equal to the maximum probability with which a computationally unbounded quantum prover can convince a computationally bounded quantum verifier that a given quantum state is recoverable. The quantum interactive proof system giving this operational meaning requires four messages exchanged between the prover and verifier, but by forcing the prover to perform actions in superposition, we construct a different proof system that requires only two messages. The result is that the associated decision problem is in QIP(2) and another argument establishes it as hard for QSZK (both classes contain problems believed to be difficult to solve for a quantum computer). We finally prove that the regularized relative entropy of recovery is equal to the optimal type II error exponent when trying to distinguish many copies of a tripartite state from a recovered version of this state, such that the type I error is constrained to be no larger than a constant.

  9. Alternating layer addition approach to CdSe/CdS core/shell quantum dots with near-unity quantum yield and high on-time fractions

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter M.; Liu, Wenhao; Zhao, Jing; Young, Elizabeth R.; Popović, Zoran; Walker, Brian

    2014-01-01

    We report single-particle photoluminescence (PL) intermittency (blinking) with high on-time fractions in colloidal CdSe quantum dots (QD) with conformal CdS shells of 1.4 nm thickness, equivalent to approximately 4 CdS monolayers. All QDs observed displayed on-time fractions > 60% with the majority > 80%. The high-on-time-fraction blinking is accompanied by fluorescence quantum yields (QY) close to unity (up to 98% in an absolute QY measurement) when dispersed in organic solvents and a monoexponential ensemble photoluminescence (PL) decay lifetime. The CdS shell is formed in high synthetic yield using a modified selective ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) technique that employs a silylated sulfur precursor. The CdS shell provides sufficient chemical and electronic passivation of the QD excited state to permit water solubilization with greater than 60% QY via ligand exchange with an imidazole-bearing hydrophilic polymer. PMID:24932403

  10. The Determination of Quantum Yield in the Fluoresence Spectra of Porphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ćati, Odeta; Kristo, Kejda; Spiro, Marenglen; Xhuvani, Emil; Babani, Fatbardha; Tafa, Dentila

    2010-01-01

    The porphyrins, natural macromolecules, and especially the glycosylated ones, are recently used in the photodynamic therapy of different kinds of tumor cells. The porphyrins are injected through intravenous way in the human body. Under appropriate radiation of tumor zone with light in UV region, oxidation processes of the porphyrins occur through different mechanizms. As a result, inside the tumor, is producing oxygen in singlet state which is lethal for the tumor cells. The spectroscopic study of the porphyrins, both the absorbtion and the fluoresence spectroscopy, reveals some properties of the porphyrins which are ralated with their eventual application in the photodynamic therapy. So, from the value of the quantum yield, which is an important quantity that derives from the measurement of fluoresence of porphyrins, one can judge, through which mechanizm, the oxidation process does occurs. This suggest how the porphyrin should be used in the therapy, as monomers or as aggregates. The porphyrins are sinthetised in the Laboratory of Chemistry of Natural Compaunds, in the University of Limoges. The spectra has been taken by means of a photospectrometer, in the University of Tirana. The fluoresence spectra of the "protected" and "unprotected" porphyrins are studied. The determination of the quantum yield has been done through the comparison of porphyrins spectra, with them of Rhodamine B, which has a large fluoresence, in the same region of spectrum where does occurr the fluoresence of porphyrins. In order to do that, the calculations of the surface under the fluoresence spectra and under the Rhodamine one, is necessary. Also, the extintion of the fluoresence of some "protected" porphyrins, in polar solution, has been detected. These extintion of fluoresence has to do with the formation of agregates, of dimers, which can be confirmed from the absorbtion spectra.

  11. Quantum yield variation across the three pathways of photosynthesis: not yet out of the dark.

    PubMed

    Skillman, John B

    2008-01-01

    The convergent quantum yield hypothesis (CQY) assumes that thermodynamics and natural selection jointly limit variation in the maximum energetic efficiency of photosynthesis in low light under otherwise specified conditions (e.g. temperature and CO(2) concentration). A literature survey of photosynthetic quantum yield (phi) studies in terrestrial plants from C(3), C(4), and CAM photosynthetic types was conducted to test the CQY hypothesis. Broad variation in phi values from C(3) plants could partially be explained by accounting for whether the measuring conditions were permissive or restrictive for photorespiration. Assimilatory quotients (AQ), calculated from the CO(2) phi:O(2) phi ratios, indicated that 49% and 29% of absorbed light energy was allocated to carbon fixation and photorespiration in C(3) plants, respectively. The unexplained remainder (22%) may represent diversion to various other energy-demanding processes (e.g. starch synthesis, nitrogen assimilation). Individual and cumulative effects of these other processes on photosynthetic efficiency are poorly quantified. In C(4) plants, little variation in phi values was observed, consistent with the fact that C(4) plants exhibit little photorespiration. As before, AQ values indicate that 22% of absorbed light energy cannot be accounted for by carbon fixation in C(4) plants. Among all three photosynthetic types, the phi of photosynthesis in CAM plants is the least studied, appears to be highly variable, and may present the greatest challenge to the CQY hypothesis. The high amount of energy diverted to processes other than carbon fixation in C(3) and C(4) plants and the poor characterization of photosynthetic efficiency in CAM plants are significant deficiencies in our otherwise robust understanding of the energetics of terrestrial photoautotrophy.

  12. Do upland conservation measures reduce watershed sediment yield?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Implementation of conservation measures do not always result in an immediate and measurable sediment yield reduction at the outlet of large watersheds. In this study, instantaneous suspended sediment and discharge measurements, taken in 1943-1948 and again in 2004-2008, in the Fort Cobb Reservoir wa...

  13. Quantum Measurement Act as a Speech Act

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Jean

    2005-10-01

    I show that the quantum measurement problem can be understood if the measurement is seen as a "speech act" in the sense of modern language theory. The reduction of the state vector is in this perspective an intersubjective -- or, better, a-subjective -- symbolic process. I then give some perspectives on applications to the "Mind-Body Problem".

  14. Asphaltenes yield curve measurements on a microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Sieben, Vincent J; Tharanivasan, Asok Kumar; Ratulowski, John; Mostowfi, Farshid

    2015-10-21

    We describe a microfluidic apparatus and method for performing asphaltene yield measurements on crude oil samples. Optical spectroscopy measurements are combined with a microfluidic fluid handling platform to create an automated microfluidic apparatus to measure the asphaltene yield. The microfluidic measurements show good agreement with conventional wet chemistry measurements as well as available models. The initial absorbance of the oil is measured, and asphaltenes are removed from the oil by the gradual addition of n-alkane, which leads to flocculation and subsequent filtration. The absorbance of the de-asphalted oil (maltenes) is then measured and the initial asphaltene content is determined by the change in absorbance. The solubility of asphaltene is evaluated by varying the titrant-to-oil ratio (e.g., n-heptane-oil), which induces no, partial, or full precipitation of asphaltenes depending on the chosen ratio. The absorbance of the filtrate is measured and normalized to the maximum content to determine the fractional precipitation at each ratio. Traditionally, a yield curve comprised of 20 such ratios would require weeks to months to generate, while consuming over 6 L of solvent and more than 100 g of crude oil sample. Using the microfluidic approach described here, the same measurement can be performed in 1 day, with 0.5 L of solvent and 10 g of crude oil sample. The substantial reduction in time and consumables will enable more frequent asphaltene yield measurements and reduce its environmental impact significantly.

  15. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Meusinger, Carl; Johnson, Matthew S.; Berhanu, Tesfaye A.; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude – apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix – constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NO{sub x} emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NO{sub x} emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  16. Laboratory study of nitrate photolysis in Antarctic snow. I. Observed quantum yield, domain of photolysis, and secondary chemistry.

    PubMed

    Meusinger, Carl; Berhanu, Tesfaye A; Erbland, Joseph; Savarino, Joel; Johnson, Matthew S

    2014-06-28

    Post-depositional processes alter nitrate concentration and nitrate isotopic composition in the top layers of snow at sites with low snow accumulation rates, such as Dome C, Antarctica. Available nitrate ice core records can provide input for studying past atmospheres and climate if such processes are understood. It has been shown that photolysis of nitrate in the snowpack plays a major role in nitrate loss and that the photolysis products have a significant influence on the local troposphere as well as on other species in the snow. Reported quantum yields for the main reaction spans orders of magnitude - apparently a result of whether nitrate is located at the air-ice interface or in the ice matrix - constituting the largest uncertainty in models of snowpack NOx emissions. Here, a laboratory study is presented that uses snow from Dome C and minimizes effects of desorption and recombination by flushing the snow during irradiation with UV light. A selection of UV filters allowed examination of the effects of the 200 and 305 nm absorption bands of nitrate. Nitrate concentration and photon flux were measured in the snow. The quantum yield for loss of nitrate was observed to decrease from 0.44 to 0.003 within what corresponds to days of UV exposure in Antarctica. The superposition of photolysis in two photochemical domains of nitrate in snow is proposed: one of photolabile nitrate, and one of buried nitrate. The difference lies in the ability of reaction products to escape the snow crystal, versus undergoing secondary (recombination) chemistry. Modeled NOx emissions may increase significantly above measured values due to the observed quantum yield in this study. The apparent quantum yield in the 200 nm band was found to be ∼1%, much lower than reported for aqueous chemistry. A companion paper presents an analysis of the change in isotopic composition of snowpack nitrate based on the same samples as in this study.

  17. Quantum yields of OH, HO2 and NO3 in the UV photolysis of HO2NO2.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Elena; Gierczak, Tomasz; Stark, Harald; Burkholder, James B; Ravishankara, A R

    2005-01-21

    Quantum yields, phi, of OH and HO2 in the ultraviolet photolysis of HO2NO2 (peroxynitric acid, PNA) at 193 and 248 nm and that of NO3 at 193, 248 and 308 nm are reported. Quantum yields were measured using pulsed excimer laser photolysis combined with pulsed laser induced fluorescence (PLIF) detection of OH radicals and cavity ring-down (CRD) detection of NO3 radicals. HO2 radicals were quantified by converting them to OH via the HO2 + NO --> OH + NO2 reaction and detecting OH. The quantum yields obtained at 296 K are: phi193 nm(OH) = 0.21 +/- 0.12, phi248 nm(OH) = 0.085 +/- 0.08, phi193 nm(HO2) = 0.56 +/- 0.09, phi248 nm(HO2) = 0.89 +/- 0.26, phi193 nm(NO3) = 0.35 +/- 0.09, phi248 nm(NO3) = 0.08 +/- 0.04 and phi308 nm(NO3) = 0.05 +/- 0.02. The quoted uncertainties are 2sigma (95% confidence level) and include estimated systematic errors. Our results are compared with the previous quantum yield measurements of OH (MacLeod et al., J. Geophys. Res., 1988, 93, 3813) and NO2 (Roehl et al., 2001, J. Phys. Chem., 105, 1592) at 248 nm and the discrepancies are discussed. The rate coefficients at 298 K for reactions of OH with HO2NO2, H2O2, HNO3 and NO are also reported.

  18. Quantum measurement of a mesoscopic spin ensemble

    SciTech Connect

    Giedke, G.; Taylor, J. M.; Lukin, M. D.; D'Alessandro, D.; Imamoglu, A.

    2006-09-15

    We describe a method for precise estimation of the polarization of a mesoscopic spin ensemble by using its coupling to a single two-level system. Our approach requires a minimal number of measurements on the two-level system for a given measurement precision. We consider the application of this method to the case of nuclear-spin ensemble defined by a single electron-charged quantum dot: we show that decreasing the electron spin dephasing due to nuclei and increasing the fidelity of nuclear-spin-based quantum memory could be within the reach of present day experiments.

  19. THE QUANTUM YIELD OF OXYGEN PRODUCTION BY CHLOROPLASTS SUSPENDED IN SOLUTIONS CONTAINING FERRIC OXALATE

    PubMed Central

    French, C. S.; Rabideau, G. S.

    1945-01-01

    1. The quantum yield of oxygen liberation by spinach and Tradescantia chloroplasts suspended in solutions containing ferric oxalate and potassium ferricyanide varied from 0.013 to 0.080. 2. It was concluded that the nature of this oxygen liberation reaction is not fundamentally different from the formation of oxygen in normal photosynthesis, with respect to its light efficiency. PMID:19873423

  20. Variations in fluorescence quantum yield of basic fuchsin with silver nanoparticles prepared by femtosecond laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Pathrose, Bini; Sahira, H; Nampoori, V P N; Radhakrishnan, P; Mujeeb, A

    2014-07-15

    Nano structured noble metals have very important applications in diverse fields such as photovoltaics, catalysis, electronic and magnetic devices, etc. In the present work, the application of dual beam thermal lens technique is employed for the determination of the absolute fluorescence quantum yield of the triaminotriphenylmethane dye, basic fuchsin in the presence of silver sol is studied. Silver sol is prepared by femtosecond laser ablation. It is observed that the presence of silver sol decreases the fluorescence quantum efficiency. The observed results are in line with the conclusion that the reduction in quantum yield in the quenching region is essentially due to the non-radiative relaxation of the absorbed energy. It is also observed that the presence of silver sol enhances the thermal lens signal which makes its detection easier at any concentration.

  1. Picosecond Lifetimes with High Quantum Yields from Single-Photon-Emitting Colloidal Nanostructures at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Bidault, Sébastien; Devilez, Alexis; Maillard, Vincent; Lermusiaux, Laurent; Guigner, Jean-Michel; Bonod, Nicolas; Wenger, Jérôme

    2016-04-26

    Minimizing the luminescence lifetime while maintaining a high emission quantum yield is paramount in optimizing the excitation cross-section, radiative decay rate, and brightness of quantum solid-state light sources, particularly at room temperature, where nonradiative processes can dominate. We demonstrate here that DNA-templated 60 and 80 nm diameter gold nanoparticle dimers, featuring one fluorescent molecule, provide single-photon emission with lifetimes that can fall below 10 ps and typical quantum yields in a 45-70% range. Since these colloidal nanostructures are obtained as a purified aqueous suspension, fluorescence spectroscopy can be performed on both fixed and freely diffusing nanostructures to quantitatively estimate the distributions of decay rate and fluorescence intensity enhancements. These data are in excellent agreement with theoretical calculations and demonstrate that millions of bright fluorescent nanostructures, with radiative lifetimes below 100 ps, can be produced in parallel.

  2. A new technique for measuring sputtering yields at high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Qiu, Y.; Griffith, J. E.; Tombrello, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    The use of thin, self-supporting carbon catcher foils allows one to measure sputtering yields in a broad range of materials with high sensitivity. Analyzing the foils with Rutherford forward scattering, sputtered Al, Si and P surface densities down to 5 x 10 to the 13th per sq cm with uncertainties of about 20 percent have been measured.

  3. Quantum yield regeneration: influence of neutral ligand binding on photophysical properties in colloidal core/shell quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Tan, Rui; Gee, Megan Y; Greytak, Andrew B

    2015-03-24

    This article describes an experiment designed to identify the role of specific molecular ligands in maintaining the high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) observed in as-synthesized CdSe/CdZnS and CdSe/CdS quantum dots (QDs). Although it has been possible for many years to prepare core/shell quantum dots with near-unity quantum yield through high-temperature colloidal synthesis, purification of such colloidal particles is frequently accompanied by a reduction in quantum yield. Here, a recently established gel permeation chromatography (GPC) technique is used to remove weakly associated ligands without a change in solvent: a decrease in ensemble QY and average PL lifetime is observed. Minor components of the initial mixture that were removed by GPC are then added separately to purified QD samples to determine whether reintroduction of these components can restore the photophysical properties of the initial sample. We show that among these putative ligands trioctylphosphine and cadmium oleate can regenerate the initial high QY of all samples, but only the "L-type" ligands (trioctyphosphine and oleylamine) can restore the QY without changing the shapes of the optical spectra. On the basis of the PL decay analysis, we confirm that quenching in GPC-purified samples and regeneration in ligand-introduced samples are associated chiefly with changes in the relative population fraction of QDs with different decay rates. The reversibility of the QY regeneration process has also been studied; the introduction and removal of trioctylphosphine and oleylamine tend to be reversible, while cadmium oleate is not. Finally, isothermal titration calorimetry has been used to study the relationship between the binding strength of the neutral ligands to the surface and photophysical property changes in QD samples to which they are added.

  4. ICF Gamma-Ray Yield Measurements on the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. H.; Hoffman, N. M.; Stoeffl, W. S.; Watts, P. W.; Carpenter, A. C.; Church, J. A.; Liebman, J.; Grafil, E.

    2011-10-01

    The primary objective of the NIF Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic is to provide bang time and burn width information in order to constrain implosion simulation parameters such as shell velocity and confinement time. This is accomplished by measuring DT fusion γ-rays with energy-thresholded Gas Cherenkov detectors that convert MeV γ-rays into UV/visible photons for high-bandwidth optical detection. For yield determination, absolute uncertainties associated with the d(t,n) α/d(t,γ)5He branching ratio and detector response are removed by cross-calibrating the GRH signal against independent neutron yield measurements of directly-driven DT exploding pushers with negligible neutron downscatter. The GRH signal can then be used to make Total DTn Yield inferences on indirectly-driven, cryogenically-layered DT implosions which achieve high areal density and hence scatter a significant fraction of DTn out of the 14 MeV primary peak. By comparing the Total DTn Yield from γ-ray measurements with the Primary DTn Yield (13-15 MeV) from neutron measurements, the Total Downscatter Fraction (TDSF) can be inferred. Results of recent measurements will be presented. This work supported by US DOE under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396.

  5. Preliminary work on the quantum defect measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutcherson, Lindsay; Sanders, Justin; Han, Jianing

    2016-05-01

    Van der Waals interactions are generally studied in physics, chemistry, biology, and other fields of science. In order to fine-tune van der Waals interactions, the atomic energy levels need to be known very accurately. That is, we must accurately determine the quantum defects. Quantum defects of 85Rb have been recently measured, and the quantum defects of 87Rb have also been measured for nS and nD states with the resolution of 1 MHz. this experiment will focus on the P, F, and G states, which are higher angular momentum states and more sensitive to electric fields. These states are crucial for collisions, which may lead to some of the interesting phenomena in ultracold atoms, such as ultracold plasma. In this presentation, a progress report will be given on this project. The authors would like to acknowledge the travel Grants from DDOE and the University of South Alabama.

  6. Entropic uncertainties for joint quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brougham, Thomas; Andersson, Erika; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2009-10-15

    We investigate the uncertainty associated with a joint quantum measurement of two spin components of a spin-(1/2) particle and quantify this in terms of entropy. We consider two entropic quantities, the joint entropy and the sum of the marginal entropies, and obtain lower bounds for each of these quantities. For the case of joint measurements where we measure each spin observable equally well, these lower bounds are tight.

  7. Quantum control by von Neumann measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechen, Alexander; Il'in, Nikolai; Shuang, Feng; Rabitz, Herschel

    2006-11-01

    A general scheme is presented for controlling quantum systems using evolution driven by nonselective von Neumann measurements, with or without an additional tailored electromagnetic field. As an example, a two-level quantum system controlled by nonselective quantum measurements is considered. The control goal is to find optimal system observables such that consecutive nonselective measurement of these observables transforms the system from a given initial state into a state which maximizes the expected value of a target operator (the objective). A complete analytical solution is found including explicit expressions for the optimal measured observables and for the maximal objective value given any target operator, any initial system density matrix, and any number of measurements. As an illustration, upper bounds on measurement-induced population transfer between the ground and the excited states for any number of measurements are found. The anti-Zeno effect is recovered in the limit of an infinite number of measurements. In this limit the system becomes completely controllable. The results establish the degree of control attainable by a finite number of measurements.

  8. Measurement-device-independent quantum digital signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puthoor, Ittoop Vergheese; Amiri, Ryan; Wallden, Petros; Curty, Marcos; Andersson, Erika

    2016-08-01

    Digital signatures play an important role in software distribution, modern communication, and financial transactions, where it is important to detect forgery and tampering. Signatures are a cryptographic technique for validating the authenticity and integrity of messages, software, or digital documents. The security of currently used classical schemes relies on computational assumptions. Quantum digital signatures (QDS), on the other hand, provide information-theoretic security based on the laws of quantum physics. Recent work on QDS Amiri et al., Phys. Rev. A 93, 032325 (2016);, 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032325 Yin, Fu, and Zeng-Bing, Phys. Rev. A 93, 032316 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevA.93.032316 shows that such schemes do not require trusted quantum channels and are unconditionally secure against general coherent attacks. However, in practical QDS, just as in quantum key distribution (QKD), the detectors can be subjected to side-channel attacks, which can make the actual implementations insecure. Motivated by the idea of measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD), we present a measurement-device-independent QDS (MDI-QDS) scheme, which is secure against all detector side-channel attacks. Based on the rapid development of practical MDI-QKD, our MDI-QDS protocol could also be experimentally implemented, since it requires a similar experimental setup.

  9. Derivation of quantum probability from measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbut, Fedor

    2016-05-01

    To begin with, it is pointed out that the form of the quantum probability formula originates in the very initial state of the object system as seen when the state is expanded with the eigenprojectors of the measured observable. Making use of the probability reproducibility condition, which is a key concept in unitary measurement theory, one obtains the relevant coherent distribution of the complete-measurement results in the final unitary-measurement state in agreement with the mentioned probability formula. Treating the transition from the final unitary, or premeasurement, state, where all possible results are present, to one complete-measurement result sketchily in the usual way, the well-known probability formula is derived. In conclusion it is pointed out that the entire argument is only formal unless one makes it physical assuming that the quantum probability law is valid in the extreme case of probability-one (certain) events (projectors).

  10. Measurements in the Levy quantum walk

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, A.

    2007-11-15

    We study the quantum walk subjected to measurements with a Levy waiting-time distribution. We find that the system has a sub-ballistic behavior instead of a diffusive one. We obtain an analytical expression for the exponent of the power law of the variance as a function of the characteristic parameter of the Levy distribution.

  11. Quantum Hamiltonian Identification from Measurement Time Traces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Sarovar, Mohan

    2014-08-01

    Precise identification of parameters governing quantum processes is a critical task for quantum information and communication technologies. In this Letter, we consider a setting where system evolution is determined by a parametrized Hamiltonian, and the task is to estimate these parameters from temporal records of a restricted set of system observables (time traces). Based on the notion of system realization from linear systems theory, we develop a constructive algorithm that provides estimates of the unknown parameters directly from these time traces. We illustrate the algorithm and its robustness to measurement noise by applying it to a one-dimensional spin chain model with variable couplings.

  12. Quantum nondemolition measurement of the Werner state

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Jiasen; Yu Changshui; Pei Pei; Song Heshan

    2010-10-15

    We propose a theoretical scheme of quantum nondemolition measurement of two-qubit Werner state. We discuss our scheme with the two qubits restricted in a local place and then extend the scheme to the case in which two qubits are separated. We also consider the experimental realization of our scheme based on cavity quantum electrodynamics. It is very interesting that our scheme is robust against the dissipative effects introduced by the probe process. We also give a brief interpretation of our scheme finally.

  13. Xenon Sputter Yield Measurements for Ion Thruster Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, John D.; Gardner, Michael M.; Johnson, Mark L.; Wilbur, Paul J.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe a technique that was used to measure total and differential sputter yields of materials important to high specific impulse ion thrusters. The heart of the technique is a quartz crystal monitor that is swept at constant radial distance from a small target region where a high current density xenon ion beam is aimed. Differential sputtering yields were generally measured over a full 180 deg arc in a plane that included the beam centerline and the normal vector to the target surface. Sputter yield results are presented for a xenon ion energy range from 0.5 to 10 keV and an angle of incidence range from 0 deg to 70 deg from the target surface normal direction for targets consisting of molybdenum, titanium, solid (Poco) graphite, and flexible graphite (grafoil). Total sputter yields are calculated using a simple integration procedure and comparisons are made to sputter yields obtained from the literature. In general, the agreement between the available data is good. As expected for heavy xenon ions, the differential and total sputter yields are found to be strong functions of angle of incidence. Significant under- and over-cosine behavior is observed at low- and high-ion energies, respectively. In addition, strong differences in differential yield behavior are observed between low-Z targets (C and Ti) and high-Z targets (Mo). Curve fits to the differential sputter yield data are provided. They should prove useful to analysts interested in predicting the erosion profiles of ion thruster components and determining where the erosion products re-deposit.

  14. Incompatible measurements on quantum causal networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlák, Michal; Reitzner, Daniel; Chiribella, Giulio; Ziman, Mário

    2016-05-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements, epitomized by Heisenberg's uncertainty principle, is one of the distinctive features of quantum theory. So far, quantum incompatibility has been studied for measurements that test the preparation of physical systems. Here we extend the notion to measurements that test dynamical processes, possibly consisting of multiple time steps. Such measurements are known as testers and are implemented by interacting with the tested process through a sequence of state preparations, interactions, and measurements. Our first result is a characterization of the incompatibility of quantum testers, for which we provide necessary and sufficient conditions. Then we propose a quantitative measure of incompatibility. We call this measure the robustness of incompatibility and define it as the minimum amount of noise that has to be added to a set of testers in order to make them compatible. We show that (i) the robustness is lower bounded by the distinguishability of the sequence of interactions used by the tester and (ii) maximum robustness is attained when the interactions are perfectly distinguishable. The general results are illustrated in the concrete example of binary testers probing the time evolution of a single-photon polarization.

  15. Photophysical investigation of (D-π-A) DMHP dye: Dipole moments, photochemical quantum yield and fluorescence quantum yield, by solvatochromic shift methods and DFT studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asiri, Abdullah M.; Sobahi, Tariq R.; Osman, Osman I.; Khan, Salman A.

    2017-01-01

    (2E)-3-(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyphenyl)prop-2-en-1-one (DMHP) was synthesized by the reaction of 3,4-dimethoxy benzaldehyde with 1-(2-hydroxyphenyl) ethanone under microwave irradiation. The structure of DMHP was established experimentally by EI-MS, FT-IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectral studies and elemental analysis and theoretically. Electronic absorption and emission spectra of DMHP were studied in different solvents on the basis of polarities, and the obtain data were used to determine the solvatochromic properties such as extinction coefficient, oscillator strength, transition dipole moment, stokes shift, fluorescence quantum yield and photochemical quantum yield. The absorption and emission maxima were red-shifted when the polarity of the solvent was increased from dioxan to DMSO; in excellent agreement the DFT findings. The DMHP experimental intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) was complemented by a natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis. Fluorescence intensities of DMHP were increase and decrease in presence of CTAB and SDS, so DMHP was used to find out the critical micelle concentration (CMC) of CTAB and SDS.

  16. Structural Basis for Near Unity Quantum Yield Core/Shell Nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    McBride, James; Treadway, Joe; Pennycook, Stephen J; Rosenthal, Sandra

    2006-01-01

    Aberration-corrected Z-contrast scanning transmission electron microscopy of core/shell nanocrystals shows clear correlations between structure and quantum efficiency. Uniform shell coverage is obtained only for a graded CdS/ZnS shell material and is found to be critical to achieving near 100% quantum yield. The sublattice sensitivity of the images confirms that preferential growth takes place on the anion-terminated surfaces. This explains the three-dimensional "nanobullet" shape observed in the case of core/shell nanorods.

  17. Excitation of biomolecules with incoherent light: quantum yield for the photoisomerization of model retinal.

    PubMed

    Tscherbul, T V; Brumer, P

    2014-05-01

    Cis-trans isomerization in retinal, the first step in vision, is often computationally studied from a time-dependent viewpoint. Motivation for such studies lies in coherent pulsed laser experiments that explore the isomerization dynamics. However, such biological processes take place naturally in the presence of incoherent light, which is expected to excite a nonevolving mixture of stationary states. Here the isomerization problem is considered from the latter viewpoint and applied to a standard two-state, two-mode linear vibronic coupling model of retinal that explicitly includes a conical intersection between the ground and first excited electronic states. The calculated quantum yield at 500 nm agrees well with both the previous time-dependent calculations of Hahn and Stock (0.63) [ J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 1146-1149 ] and with experiment (0.65 ± 0.01), as does its wavelength dependence. Significantly, the effects of environmental relaxation on the quantum yield in this well-established model are found to be negligible. The results make clear the connection of the photoisomerization quantum yield to properties of stationary eigenstates, providing alternate insights into conditions for yield optimization.

  18. Enhancing robustness of multiparty quantum correlations using weak measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Uttam; Mishra, Utkarsh; Dhar, Himadri Shekhar

    2014-11-15

    Multipartite quantum correlations are important resources for the development of quantum information and computation protocols. However, the resourcefulness of multipartite quantum correlations in practical settings is limited by its fragility under decoherence due to environmental interactions. Though there exist protocols to protect bipartite entanglement under decoherence, the implementation of such protocols for multipartite quantum correlations has not been sufficiently explored. Here, we study the effect of local amplitude damping channel on the generalized Greenberger–Horne–Zeilinger state, and use a protocol of optimal reversal quantum weak measurement to protect the multipartite quantum correlations. We observe that the weak measurement reversal protocol enhances the robustness of multipartite quantum correlations. Further it increases the critical damping value that corresponds to entanglement sudden death. To emphasize the efficacy of the technique in protection of multipartite quantum correlation, we investigate two proximately related quantum communication tasks, namely, quantum teleportation in a one sender, many receivers setting and multiparty quantum information splitting, through a local amplitude damping channel. We observe an increase in the average fidelity of both the quantum communication tasks under the weak measurement reversal protocol. The method may prove beneficial, for combating external interactions, in other quantum information tasks using multipartite resources. - Highlights: • Extension of weak measurement reversal scheme to protect multiparty quantum correlations. • Protection of multiparty quantum correlation under local amplitude damping noise. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum teleportation in one sender and many receivers setting. • Enhanced fidelity of quantum information splitting protocol.

  19. Coarsening Measurement References and the Quantum-to-Classical Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunseok; Lim, Youngrong; Kim, M. S.

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the role of inefficiency in quantum measurements in the quantum-to-classical transition, and consistently observe the quantum-to-classical transition by coarsening the references of the measurements (e.g., when and where to measure). Our result suggests that the definition of measurement precision in quantum theory should include the degree of the observer's ability to precisely control the measurement references.

  20. Quantum Correlations and the Measurement Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bub, Jeffrey

    2014-10-01

    The transition from classical to quantum mechanics rests on the recognition that the structure of information is not what we thought it was: there are operational, i.e., phenomenal, probabilistic correlations that lie outside the polytope of local correlations. Such correlations cannot be simulated with classical resources, which generate classical correlations represented by the points in a simplex, where the vertices of the simplex represent joint deterministic states that are the common causes of the correlations. The `no go' hidden variable theorems tell us that we can't shoe-horn phenomenal correlations outside the local polytope into a classical simplex by supposing that something has been left out of the story. The replacement of the classical simplex by the quantum convex set as the structure representing probabilistic correlations is the analogue for quantum mechanics of the replacement of Newton's Euclidean space and time by Minkowski spacetime in special relativity. The nonclassical features of quantum mechanics, including the irreducible information loss on measurement, are generic features of correlations that lie outside the classical simplex. This paper is an elaboration of these ideas, which have their source in work by Pitowsky (J. Math. Phys. 27:1556, 1986; Math. Program. 50:395, 1991; Phys. Rev. A 77:062109, 2008), Garg and Mermin (Found. Phys. 14:1-39, 1984), Barrett (Phys. Rev. A 75:032304, 2007; Phys. Rev. A 7:022101, 2005) and others, e.g., Brunner et al. (arXiv:1303.2849, 2013), but the literature goes back to Boole (An Investigation of the Laws of Thought, Dover, New York, 1951). The final section looks at the measurement problem of quantum mechanics in this context. A large part of the problem is removed by seeing that the inconsistency in reconciling the entangled state at the end of a quantum measurement process with the definiteness of the macroscopic pointer reading and the definiteness of the correlated value of the measured micro

  1. Preparation of carbon quantum dots with a high quantum yield and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Pengpeng; Zhang, Changchang; Liu, Xiang; Cui, Ping

    2016-04-01

    An economic and green approach of manufacturing carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with a high quantum yield (denoted with HQY-CQDs) and the application in labeling bovine serum albumin (BSA) were described in detail in this work. Firstly, the cheap resources of citric acid and glycine were pyrolysed in drying oven for preparing the CQDs. Then the product was immersed in tetrahydrofuran for 8 h. HQY-CQDs were obtained by removing tetrahydrofuran from the supernate and were evaluated that they possessed a much higher quantum yield compared with that without dealing with tetrahydrofuran and a wonderful photo-bleaching resistance. Such HQY-CQDs could be functionalized by N-hydroxysuccinimide and successively combined with BSA covalently. Thus fluorescent labeling on BSA was realized. The HQY-CQDs were demonstrated with transmission electron microscopy and the chemical modification with N-hydroxysuccinimide was proved by infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectra. Labeling BSA with the HQY-CQDs was confirmed by gel electrophoresis and fluorescence imaging.

  2. Field Measurements of Black Carbon Yields from Gas Flaring.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Bradley M; Johnson, Matthew R

    2017-02-07

    Black carbon (BC) emissions from gas flaring in the oil and gas industry are postulated to have critical impacts on climate and public health, but actual emission rates remain poorly characterized. This paper presents in situ field measurements of BC emission rates and flare gas volume-specific BC yields for a diverse range of flares. Measurements were performed during a series of field campaigns in Mexico and Ecuador using the sky-LOSA optical measurement technique, in concert with comprehensive Monte Carlo-based uncertainty analyses. Parallel on-site measurements of flare gas flow rate and composition were successfully performed at a subset of locations enabling direct measurements of fuel-specific BC yields from flares under field conditions. Quantified BC emission rates from individual flares spanned more than 4 orders of magnitude (up to 53.7 g/s). In addition, emissions during one notable ∼24-h flaring event (during which the plume transmissivity dropped to zero) would have been even larger than this maximum rate, which was measured as this event was ending. This highlights the likely importance of superemitters to global emission inventories. Flare gas volume-specific BC yields were shown to be strongly correlated with flare gas heating value. A newly derived correlation fitting current field data and previous lab data suggests that, in the context of recent studies investigating transport of flare-generated BC in the Arctic and globally, impacts of flaring in the energy industry may in fact be underestimated.

  3. In cellulo evaluation of phototransformation quantum yields in fluorescent proteins used as markers for single-molecule localization microscopy.

    PubMed

    Avilov, Sergiy; Berardozzi, Romain; Gunewardene, Mudalige S; Adam, Virgile; Hess, Samuel T; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy of biological samples requires a precise knowledge of the employed fluorescent labels. Photoactivation, photoblinking and photobleaching of phototransformable fluorescent proteins influence the data acquisition and data processing strategies to be used in (Fluorescence) Photoactivation Localization Microscopy ((F)-PALM), notably for reliable molecular counting. As these parameters might depend on the local environment, they should be measured in cellulo in biologically relevant experimental conditions. Here, we measured phototransformation quantum yields for Dendra2 fused to actin in fixed mammalian cells in typical (F)-PALM experiments. To this aim, we developed a data processing strategy based on the clustering optimization procedure proposed by Lee et al (PNAS 109, 17436-17441, 2012). Using simulations, we estimated the range of experimental parameters (molecular density, molecular orientation, background level, laser power, frametime) adequate for an accurate determination of the phototransformation yields. Under illumination at 561 nm in PBS buffer at pH 7.4, the photobleaching yield of Dendra2 fused to actin was measured to be (2.5 ± 0.4) × 10(-5), whereas the blinking-off yield and thermally-activated blinking-on rate were measured to be (2.3 ± 0.2) × 10(-5) and 11.7 ± 0.5 s-1, respectively. These phototransformation yields differed from those measured in poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and were strongly affected by addition of the antifading agent 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). In the presence of DABCO, the photobleaching yield was reduced 2-fold, the blinking-off yield was decreased more than 3-fold, and the blinking-on rate was increased 2-fold. Therefore, DABCO largely improved Dendra2 photostability in fixed mammalian cells. These findings are consistent with redox-based bleaching and blinking mechanisms under (F)-PALM experimental conditions. Finally, the green-to-red photoconversion quantum yield of Dendra

  4. In cellulo Evaluation of Phototransformation Quantum Yields in Fluorescent Proteins Used As Markers for Single-Molecule Localization Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Avilov, Sergiy; Berardozzi, Romain; Gunewardene, Mudalige S.; Adam, Virgile; Hess, Samuel T.; Bourgeois, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule localization microscopy of biological samples requires a precise knowledge of the employed fluorescent labels. Photoactivation, photoblinking and photobleaching of phototransformable fluorescent proteins influence the data acquisition and data processing strategies to be used in (Fluorescence) Photoactivation Localization Microscopy ((F)-PALM), notably for reliable molecular counting. As these parameters might depend on the local environment, they should be measured in cellulo in biologically relevant experimental conditions. Here, we measured phototransformation quantum yields for Dendra2 fused to actin in fixed mammalian cells in typical (F)-PALM experiments. To this aim, we developed a data processing strategy based on the clustering optimization procedure proposed by Lee et al (PNAS 109, 17436–17441, 2012). Using simulations, we estimated the range of experimental parameters (molecular density, molecular orientation, background level, laser power, frametime) adequate for an accurate determination of the phototransformation yields. Under illumination at 561 nm in PBS buffer at pH 7.4, the photobleaching yield of Dendra2 fused to actin was measured to be (2.5±0.4)×10−5, whereas the blinking-off yield and thermally-activated blinking-on rate were measured to be (2.3±0.2)×10−5 and 11.7±0.5 s−1, respectively. These phototransformation yields differed from those measured in poly-vinyl alcohol (PVA) and were strongly affected by addition of the antifading agent 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane (DABCO). In the presence of DABCO, the photobleaching yield was reduced 2-fold, the blinking-off yield was decreased more than 3-fold, and the blinking-on rate was increased 2-fold. Therefore, DABCO largely improved Dendra2 photostability in fixed mammalian cells. These findings are consistent with redox-based bleaching and blinking mechanisms under (F)-PALM experimental conditions. Finally, the green-to-red photoconversion quantum yield of Dendra2 was

  5. Quantum Yields and Rate Constants of Photochemical and Nonphotochemical Excitation Quenching (Experiment and Model).

    PubMed Central

    Laisk, A.; Oja, V.; Rasulov, B.; Eichelmann, H.; Sumberg, A.

    1997-01-01

    Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor Moench.), amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus L.), and cytochrome b6f complex-deficient transgenic tobacco leaves were used to test the response of plants exposed to differnt light intensities and CO2 concentrations before and after photoinhibition at 4000 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1 and to thermoinhibition up to 45[deg]C. Quantum yields of photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching (YP and YN) and the corresponding relative rate constants for excitation capture from the antenna-primary radical pair equilibrium system (k[prime]P and k[prime]N) were calculated from measured fluorescence parameters. The above treatments resulted in decreases in YP and K[prime]P and in approximately complementary increases in YN and K[prime]N under normal and inhibitory conditions. The results were reproduced by a mathematical model of electron/proton transport and O2 evolution/CO2 assimilation in photosynthesis based on budget equations for the intermediates of photosynthesis. Quantitative differences between model predictions and experiments are explainable, assuming that electron transport is organized into domains that contain relatively complete electron and proton transport chains (e.g. thylakoids). With the complementation that occurs between the photochemical and nonphotochemical excitation quenching, the regulatory system can constantly maintain the shortest lifetime of excitation necessary to avoid the formation of chlorophyll triplet states and singlet oxygen. PMID:12223845

  6. Excitation power dependent population pathways and absolute quantum yields of upconversion nanoparticles in different solvents.

    PubMed

    Würth, C; Kaiser, M; Wilhelm, S; Grauel, B; Hirsch, T; Resch-Genger, U

    2017-03-23

    The rational design of brighter upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) requires a better understanding of the radiationless deactivation pathways in these materials. Here, we demonstrate the potential of excitation power density (P)-dependent studies of upconversion (UC) luminescence intensities, slope factors, and absolute quantum yields (ΦUC) of popular β-NaYF4:20% Yb(3+),2% Er(3+) UCNPs of different surface chemistries in organic solvents, D2O, and water as a tool to gain deeper insight into the UC mechanism including population and deactivation pathways particularly of the red emission. Our measurements, covering a P regime of three orders of magnitude, reveal a strong difference of the P-dependence of the ratio of the green and red luminescence bands (Ig/r) in water and organic solvents and P-dependent population pathways of the different emissive energy levels of Er(3+). In summary, we provide experimental evidence for three photon processes in UCNPs, particularly for the red emission. Moreover, we demonstrate changes in the excited population dynamics via bi- and triphotonic processes dependent on the environment, surface chemistry, and P, and validate our findings theoretically.

  7. Fluorescence lifetimes and quantum yields of rhodamine derivatives: new insights from theory and experiment.

    PubMed

    Savarese, Marika; Aliberti, Anna; De Santo, Ilaria; Battista, Edmondo; Causa, Filippo; Netti, Paolo A; Rega, Nadia

    2012-07-19

    Although lifetimes and quantum yields of widely used fluorophores are often largely characterized, a systematic approach providing a rationale of their photophysical behavior on a quantitative basis is still a challenging goal. Here we combine methods rooted in the time-dependent density functional theory and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to accurately determine and analyze fluorescence signatures (lifetime, quantum yield, and band peaks) of several commonly used rhodamine and pyronin dyes. We show that the radiative lifetime of rhodamines can be correlated to the charge transfer from the phenyl toward the xanthene moiety occurring upon the S(0) ← S(1) de-excitation, and to the xanthene/phenyl relative orientation assumed in the S(1) minimum structure, which in turn is variable upon the amino and the phenyl substituents. These findings encourage the synergy of experiment and theory as unique tool to design finely tuned fluorescent probes, such those conceived for modern optical sensors.

  8. Determining the Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Photoswitchable Molecules in Solution and in the Solid State

    PubMed Central

    Stranius, K.; Börjesson, K.

    2017-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules are able to isomerize between two metastable forms through light stimuli. Originally being studied by photochemists, this type of molecule has now found a wide range of applications within physics, chemistry and biology. The extensive usage of photochromic molecules is due to the two isomers having fundamentally different physical and chemical properties. The most important attribute of a photoswitch is the photoisomerization quantum yield, which defines the efficiency of the photoisomerization event. Here we show how to determine the photoisomerization quantum yield in the solid state and in solution when taking thermal processes into account. The described method together with provided software allows for rapid and accurate determination of the isomerization process for this important class of molecules. PMID:28117426

  9. Determining the Photoisomerization Quantum Yield of Photoswitchable Molecules in Solution and in the Solid State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stranius, K.; Börjesson, K.

    2017-01-01

    Photoswitchable molecules are able to isomerize between two metastable forms through light stimuli. Originally being studied by photochemists, this type of molecule has now found a wide range of applications within physics, chemistry and biology. The extensive usage of photochromic molecules is due to the two isomers having fundamentally different physical and chemical properties. The most important attribute of a photoswitch is the photoisomerization quantum yield, which defines the efficiency of the photoisomerization event. Here we show how to determine the photoisomerization quantum yield in the solid state and in solution when taking thermal processes into account. The described method together with provided software allows for rapid and accurate determination of the isomerization process for this important class of molecules.

  10. Photo-dissociation quantum yields of mammalian oxyhemoglobin investigated by a nanosecond laser technique

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Ningli; Zhang Shuyi . E-mail: zhangsy@nju.edu.cn; Kuo Paokuang; Qu Min; Fang Jianwen; Li Jiahuang; Hua Zichun

    2007-02-23

    The photo-dissociations of oxyhemoglobin of several mammals, such as human, bovine, pig, horse, and rabbit, have been studied. By means of optical pump-probe technique, the quantum yields for photo-dissociation of these oxyhemoglobin have been determined at pH 7 and 20 {sup o}C. A nanosecond laser at 532 nm is used as the pumping source, and a xenon lamp through a monochrometer provides a probe light at 432 nm. The experimental results show that the quantum yields of these mammalian oxyhemoglobin are different from each other, especially for that of rabbit. By analyzing the amino acid sequences and tetramer structures as well as the flexibility and hydrophobicity of the different hemoglobin, possible explanations for the differences are proposed.

  11. The effect of axial ligands on the quantum yield of singlet oxygen of new silicon phthalocyanine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Huafei; Zhang, Xuemei; Yu, Xinxin; Pan, Sujuan; Xie, Shusen; Yang, Hongqin; Peng, Yiru

    2016-10-01

    The singlet oxygen (1O2) production abilitity is an important factor to assess their potential as effective of photosensitizers. In this paper, the 1O2 production rate, production rate constant and quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine axially bearing 1-3 generation dendritic substituents were evaluated by a high performance liquid chromatographic method. The results show that the 1O2 production rate and production rate constant of these compounds increase gradually with dendritic generations increase. And the 1O2 quantum yield of silicon(IV) phthalocyanine with first generation dendritic ligand was the highest. This may be due to the isolation effect of the dendritic ligands on the phthalocyanine core. The parameters of the observed 1O2 production properties will provide valuable data for these dendrimer phthalocyanines as promising photosensitizer in PDT application.

  12. Boolean approach to dichotomic quantum measurement theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, K.; Nakamura, T.; Batle, J.; Abdalla, S.; Farouk, A.

    2017-02-01

    Recently, a new measurement theory based on truth values was proposed by Nagata and Nakamura [Int. J. Theor. Phys. 55, 3616 (2016)], that is, a theory where the results of measurements are either 0 or 1. The standard measurement theory accepts a hidden variable model for a single Pauli observable. Hence, we can introduce a classical probability space for the measurement theory in this particular case. Additionally, we discuss in the present contribution the fact that projective measurement theories (the results of which are either +1 or -1) imply the Bell, Kochen, and Specker (BKS) paradox for a single Pauli observable. To justify our assertion, we present the BKS theorem in almost all the two-dimensional states by using a projective measurement theory. As an example, we present the BKS theorem in two-dimensions with white noise. Our discussion provides new insight into the quantum measurement problem by using this measurement theory based on the truth values.

  13. Secondary-neutron-yield measurements by current-mode detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    Secondary deuterium--tritium (DT) neutrons from pure-deuterium inertial confinement fusion targets can be used to diagnose the fuel areal density. Single-hit detectors like LaNSA at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory or MEDUSA at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) saturate for fairly low secondary DT- and primary DD-neutron yields. These detectors are not suitable for the high-yield, direct-drive implosion experiments currently carried out on the 30 kJ, 60 beam OMEGA laser system or for future cryogenic-capsule experiments on OMEGA. The status of several current-mode detectors (e.g., a single scintillator and a photomultiplier tube) now being developed at LLE for secondary-neutron-yield measurements is described.

  14. Sources of Variability in the Measurement of Fungal Spore Yields

    PubMed Central

    Smith, C. S.; Slade, S. J.; Nordheim, E. V.; Cascino, J. J.; Harris, R. F.; Andrews, J. H.

    1988-01-01

    Variability in the production of fungal spores and in the measurement of spore yields was investigated in four species of fungi: Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Colletotrichum coccodes, Colletotrichum phomoides, and Acremonium strictum. When the fungi were grown on solid medium in microplates and spore yields were measured by counting the subsamples with a hemacytometer, the variability among hemacytometer squares was always the largest source of variation, accounting for 51 to 91% of the total variation. Variability among replicate cultures and results of repeat experiments were generally also significant. The effect of square-to-square variability on the precision of spore yield measurement was minimized by counting a moderate number (ca. 30) of squares per culture. Culture-to-culture variability limited the practical precision of spore production measurements to a 95% confidence interval of approximately the mean ± 25%. We provide guidelines for determining the number of replicate cultures required to attain this or other degrees of precision. Particle counter-derived spore counts and counts based on spore weights were much less variable than were hemacytometer counts, but they did not improve spore production estimates very much because of culture-to-culture variability. Results obtained by both of these methods differed from those obtained with a hemacytometer; particle counter measurements required a correction for spore pairs, while the relationship between spore weights and spore counts changed as the cultures aged. PMID:16347653

  15. Analysis of wavelength-dependent photoisomerization quantum yields in bilirubins by fitting two exciton absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, M.; Agati, G.; Troup, G. J.; Pratesi, R.

    2003-09-01

    The absorption spectra of bilirubins were deconvoluted by two Gaussian curves of equal width representing the exciton bands of the non-degenerate molecular system. The two bands were used to study the wavelength dependence of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) configurational photoisomerization quantum yield of the bichromophoric bilirubin-IXalpha (BR-IX), the intrinsically asymmetric bile pigment associated with jaundice and the symmetrically substituted bilirubins (bilirubin-IIIalpha and mesobilirubin-XIIIalpha), when they are irradiated in aqueous solution bound to human serum albumin (HSA). The same study was performed for BR-IX in ammoniacal methanol solution (NH4OH/MeOH). The quantum yields of the configurational photoprocesses were fitted with a combination function of the two Gaussian bands normalized to the total absorption, using the proportionality coefficients and a scaling factor as parameters. The decrease of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) quantum yield with increasing wavelength, which occurs for wavelengths longer than the most probable Franck-Condon transition of the molecule, did not result in a unique function of the exciton absorptions. In particular we found two ranges corresponding to different exciton interactions with different proportionality coefficients and scaling factors. The wavelength-dependent photoisomerization of bilirubins was described as an abrupt change in quantum yield as soon as the resulting excitation was strongly localized in each chromophore. The change was correlated to a variation of the interaction between the two chromophores when the short-wavelength exciton absorption became vanishingly small. With the help of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of BR-IX in HSA, a small band was resolved in the bilirubin absorption spectrum, delivering part of the energy required for the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) photoisomerization of the molecule.

  16. Luminescent carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as a single white converter for white light emitting diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, X. T.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, X. G.; Zhang, F.; Wang, Y. L.; Yang, Y. Z.

    2015-11-23

    Carbon quantum dots (CQDs) with high quantum yield (51.4%) were synthesized by a one-step hydrothermal method using thiosalicylic acid and ethylenediamine as precursor. The CQDs have the average diameter of 2.3 nm and possess excitation-independent emission wavelength in the range from 320 to 440 nm excitation. Under an ultraviolet (UV) excitation, the CQDs aqueous solutions emit bright blue fluorescence directly and exhibit broad emission with a high spectral component ratio of 67.4% (blue to red intensity to total intensity). We applied the CQDs as a single white-light converter for white light emitting diodes (WLEDs) using a UV-LED chip as the excitation light source. The resulted WLED shows superior performance with corresponding color temperature of 5227 K and the color coordinates of (0.34, 0.38) belonging to the white gamut.

  17. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; Lo, Hoi-Kwong

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD, together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.

  18. Measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    DOE PAGES

    Xu, Feihu; Curty, Marcos; Qi, Bing; ...

    2014-12-18

    In theory, quantum key distribution (QKD) provides information-theoretic security based on the laws of physics. Owing to the imperfections of real-life implementations, however, there is a big gap between the theory and practice of QKD, which has been recently exploited by several quantum hacking activities. To fill this gap, a novel approach, called measurement-device-independent QKD (mdiQKD), has been proposed. In addition, it can remove all side-channels from the measurement unit, arguably the most vulnerable part in QKD systems, thus offering a clear avenue toward secure QKD realisations. In this study, we review the latest developments in the framework of mdiQKD,more » together with its assumptions, strengths, and weaknesses.« less

  19. Relativistic quantum metrology: exploiting relativity to improve quantum measurement technologies.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Mehdi; Bruschi, David Edward; Sabín, Carlos; Adesso, Gerardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2014-05-22

    We present a framework for relativistic quantum metrology that is useful for both Earth-based and space-based technologies. Quantum metrology has been so far successfully applied to design precision instruments such as clocks and sensors which outperform classical devices by exploiting quantum properties. There are advanced plans to implement these and other quantum technologies in space, for instance Space-QUEST and Space Optical Clock projects intend to implement quantum communications and quantum clocks at regimes where relativity starts to kick in. However, typical setups do not take into account the effects of relativity on quantum properties. To include and exploit these effects, we introduce techniques for the application of metrology to quantum field theory. Quantum field theory properly incorporates quantum theory and relativity, in particular, at regimes where space-based experiments take place. This framework allows for high precision estimation of parameters that appear in quantum field theory including proper times and accelerations. Indeed, the techniques can be applied to develop a novel generation of relativistic quantum technologies for gravimeters, clocks and sensors. As an example, we present a high precision device which in principle improves the state-of-the-art in quantum accelerometers by exploiting relativistic effects.

  20. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; ...

    2015-04-01

    We developed the SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). Moreover, the SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission productsmore » from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Finally, these mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.« less

  1. The SPIDER fission fragment spectrometer for fission product yield measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Meierbachtol, K.; Tovesson, F.; Shields, D.; Arnold, C.; Blakeley, R.; Bredeweg, T.; Devlin, M.; Hecht, A. A.; Heffern, L. E.; Jorgenson, J.; Laptev, A.; Mader, D.; O׳Donnell, J. M.; Sierk, A.; White, M.

    2015-04-01

    We developed the SPectrometer for Ion DEtermination in fission Research (SPIDER) for measuring mass yield distributions of fission products from spontaneous and neutron-induced fission. The 2E–2v method of measuring the kinetic energy (E) and velocity (v) of both outgoing fission products has been utilized, with the goal of measuring the mass of the fission products with an average resolution of 1 atomic mass unit (amu). Moreover, the SPIDER instrument, consisting of detector components for time-of-flight, trajectory, and energy measurements, has been assembled and tested using 229Th and 252Cf radioactive decay sources. For commissioning, the fully assembled system measured fission products from spontaneous fission of 252Cf. Individual measurement resolutions were met for time-of-flight (250 ps FWHM), spacial resolution (2 mm FHWM), and energy (92 keV FWHM for 8.376 MeV). Finally, these mass yield results measured from 252Cf spontaneous fission products are reported from an E–v measurement.

  2. Cosmological inflation and the quantum measurement problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Jérôme; Vennin, Vincent; Peter, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    According to cosmological inflation, the inhomogeneities in our Universe are of quantum-mechanical origin. This scenario is phenomenologically very appealing as it solves the puzzles of the standard hot big bang model and naturally explains why the spectrum of cosmological perturbations is almost scale invariant. It is also an ideal playground to discuss deep questions among which is the quantum measurement problem in a cosmological context. Although the large squeezing of the quantum state of the perturbations and the phenomenon of decoherence explain many aspects of the quantum-to-classical transition, it remains to understand how a specific outcome can be produced in the early Universe, in the absence of any observer. The continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) approach to quantum mechanics attempts to solve the quantum measurement question in a general context. In this framework, the wave function collapse is caused by adding new nonlinear and stochastic terms to the Schrödinger equation. In this paper, we apply this theory to inflation, which amounts to solving the CSL parametric oscillator case. We choose the wave function collapse to occur on an eigenstate of the Mukhanov-Sasaki variable and discuss the corresponding modified Schrödinger equation. Then, we compute the power spectrum of the perturbations and show that it acquires a universal shape with two branches, one which remains scale invariant and one with nS=4, a spectral index in obvious contradiction with the cosmic microwave background anisotropy observations. The requirement that the non-scale-invariant part be outside the observational window puts stringent constraints on the parameter controlling the deviations from ordinary quantum mechanics. Due to the absence of a CSL amplification mechanism in field theory, this also has the consequence that the collapse mechanism of the inflationary fluctuations is not efficient. Then, we determine the collapse time. On small scales the collapse is

  3. Quantum nondemolition measurement by pulsed oscillation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gui-Ying; Zhao, Kai-Feng

    2016-03-01

    Paramagnetic Faraday rotation is a quantum nondemolition measurement method that can generate spin squeezing and improve the measurement precision of a collective spin component beyond the standard quantum limit. In practice, a constant bias magnetic field is used to drive the spin precessing at sufficiently high frequency in order to lift the signal out of low-frequency technical noises. However, continuous measurement of precessing spins introduces back-action noise (BAN) due to the light-shift effect. Two types of back-action-evading (BAE) measurement of collective spin components have been demonstrated recently: continuous measurement of a two-ensemble system and stroboscopic measurement of a single ensemble. Here we propose another single ensemble BAE measurement by periodically modulating the bias field with π pulses. Our theoretical calculation shows that under experimental settings where pulse-field modulation does not introduce significant decoherences, the proposed method can suppress the BAN and generate spin squeezing faster than the stroboscopic one at the same probe light power. Moreover, if it is combined with synchronous stroboscopic probing, light-shift BAN can be completely eliminated.

  4. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rispoli, Matthew; Preiss, Philipp; Tai, Eric; Lukin, Alex; Schittko, Robert; Kaufman, Adam; Ma, Ruichao; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    The presence of large-scale entanglement is a defining characteristic of exotic quantum phases of matter. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially true in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. We demonstrate a novel approach to the measurement of entanglement entropy of any bosonic system, using a quantum gas microscope with tailored potential landscapes. This protocol enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. In general, these experiments exemplify a method enabling the measurement and characterization of quantum phase transitions and in particular would be apt for studying systems such as magnetic ordering within the quantum Ising model.

  5. Cu(2+) inhibits photosystem II activities but enhances photosystem I quantum yield of Microcystis aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Deng, Chunnuan; Pan, Xiangliang; Wang, Shuzhi; Zhang, Daoyong

    2014-08-01

    Responses of photosystem I and II activities of Microcystis aeruginosa to various concentrations of Cu(2+) were simultaneously examined using a Dual-PAM-100 fluorometer. Cell growth and contents of chlorophyll a were significantly inhibited by Cu(2+). Photosystem II activity [Y(II)] and electron transport [rETRmax(II)] were significantly altered by Cu(2+). The quantum yield of photosystem II [Y(II)] decreased by 29 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. On the contrary, photosystem I was stable under Cu(2+) stress and showed an obvious increase of quantum yield [Y(I)] and electron transport [rETRmax(I)] due to activation of cyclic electron flow (CEF). Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was enhanced by 17 % at 100 μg L(-1) Cu(2+) compared to control. The contribution of linear electron flow to photosystem I [Y(II)/Y(I)] decreased with increasing Cu(2+) concentration. Yield of cyclic electron flow [Y(CEF)] was negatively correlated with the maximal photosystem II photochemical efficiency (F v/F m). In summary, photosystem II was the major target sites of toxicity of Cu(2+), while photosystem I activity was enhanced under Cu(2+) stress.

  6. Correlations between dissolved organic matter optical properties and quantum yields of singlet oxygen and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, Renée M; Carfagno, Amy K; Sharpless, Charles M

    2010-08-01

    Various aquatic dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples produce singlet oxygen (1O2) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) with quantum yields of 0.59 to 4.5% (1O2 at 365 nm) and 0.017 to 0.053% (H2O2, 300-400 nm integrated). The two species' yields have opposite pH dependencies and strong, but opposite, correlations with the E2/E3 ratio (A254 divided by A365). Linear regressions allow prediction of both quantum yields from E2/E3 in natural water samples with errors ranging from -3% to 60%. Experimental evidence and kinetic calculations indicate that less than six percent of the H2O2 is produced by reaction between 1O2 and DOM. The inverse relationship between the 1O2 and H2O2 yields is thus best explained by a model in which precursors to these species are populated competitively. A model is presented, which proposes that important precursors to H2O2 may be either charge-transfer or triplet states of DOM.

  7. Measurement theory in local quantum physics

    SciTech Connect

    Okamura, Kazuya Ozawa, Masanao

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, we aim to establish foundations of measurement theory in local quantum physics. For this purpose, we discuss a representation theory of completely positive (CP) instruments on arbitrary von Neumann algebras. We introduce a condition called the normal extension property (NEP) and establish a one-to-one correspondence between CP instruments with the NEP and statistical equivalence classes of measuring processes. We show that every CP instrument on an atomic von Neumann algebra has the NEP, extending the well-known result for type I factors. Moreover, we show that every CP instrument on an injective von Neumann algebra is approximated by CP instruments with the NEP. The concept of posterior states is also discussed to show that the NEP is equivalent to the existence of a strongly measurable family of posterior states for every normal state. Two examples of CP instruments without the NEP are obtained from this result. It is thus concluded that in local quantum physics not every CP instrument represents a measuring process, but in most of physically relevant cases every CP instrument can be realized by a measuring process within arbitrary error limits, as every approximately finite dimensional von Neumann algebra on a separable Hilbert space is injective. To conclude the paper, the concept of local measurement in algebraic quantum field theory is examined in our framework. In the setting of the Doplicher-Haag-Roberts and Doplicher-Roberts theory describing local excitations, we show that an instrument on a local algebra can be extended to a local instrument on the global algebra if and only if it is a CP instrument with the NEP, provided that the split property holds for the net of local algebras.

  8. Quantum state measurement in double quantum dots with a radio-frequency quantum point contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Lei; Wang, Hai-Xia; Yin, Wen; Wang, Fang-Wei

    2014-02-01

    We study the dynamics of two electron spins in coupled quantum dots (CQDs) monitored by a quantum point contact (QPC) detector. Their quantum state can be measured by embedding the QPC in an LC circuit. We derive the Bloch-type rate equations of the reduced density matrix for CQDs. Special attention is paid to the numerical results for the weak measurement condintion under a strong Coulomb interaction. It is shown that the evolution of QPC current always follows that of electron occupation in the right dot. In addition, we find that the output voltage of the circuit can reflect the evolution of QPC current when the circuit and QPC are approximately equal in frequency. In particular, the wave shape of the output voltage can be improved by adjusting the circuit resonance frequency and bandwidth.

  9. Measurement-Based and Universal Blind Quantum Computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broadbent, Anne; Fitzsimons, Joseph; Kashefi, Elham

    Measurement-based quantum computation (MBQC) is a novel approach to quantum computation where the notion of measurement is the main driving force of computation. This is in contrast with the more traditional circuit model which is based on unitary operation. We review here the mathematical model underlying MBQC and the first quantum cryptographic protocol designed using the unique features of MBQC.

  10. Spectroscopy of colloidal semiconductor core/shell nanoplatelets with high quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Tessier, M D; Mahler, B; Nadal, B; Heuclin, H; Pedetti, S; Dubertret, B

    2013-07-10

    Free standing two-dimensional materials appear as a novel class of structures. Recently, the first colloidal two-dimensional heterostructures have been synthesized. These core/shell nanoplatelets are the first step toward colloidal quantum wells. Here, we study in detail the spectroscopic properties of this novel generation of colloidal nanoparticles. We show that core/shell CdSe/CdZnS nanoplatelets with 80% quantum yield can be obtained. The emission time trace of single core/shell nanoplatelets exhibits reduced blinking compared to core nanoplatelets with a two level emission time trace. At cryogenic temperatures, these nanoplatelets have a quantum yield close to 100% and a stable emission time trace. A solution of core/shell nanoplatelets has emission spectra with a full width half-maximum close to 20 nm, a value much lower than corresponding spherical or rod-shaped heterostructures. Using single particle spectroscopy, we show that the broadening of the emission spectra upon the shell deposition is not due to dispersity between particles but is related to an intrinsic increased exciton-phonon coupling in the shell. We also demonstrate that optical spectroscopy is a relevant tool to investigate the presence of traps induced by shell deposition. The spectroscopic properties of the core/shell nanoplatelets presented here strongly suggest that this new generation of objects will be an interesting alternative to spherical or rod-shaped nanocrystals.

  11. Implementation of generalized quantum measurements: Superadditive quantum coding, accessible information extraction, and classical capacity limit

    SciTech Connect

    Takeoka, Masahiro; Fujiwara, Mikio; Mizuno, Jun; Sasaki, Masahide

    2004-05-01

    Quantum-information theory predicts that when the transmission resource is doubled in quantum channels, the amount of information transmitted can be increased more than twice by quantum-channel coding technique, whereas the increase is at most twice in classical information theory. This remarkable feature, the superadditive quantum-coding gain, can be implemented by appropriate choices of code words and corresponding quantum decoding which requires a collective quantum measurement. Recently, an experimental demonstration was reported [M. Fujiwara et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 167906 (2003)]. The purpose of this paper is to describe our experiment in detail. Particularly, a design strategy of quantum-collective decoding in physical quantum circuits is emphasized. We also address the practical implication of the gain on communication performance by introducing the quantum-classical hybrid coding scheme. We show how the superadditive quantum-coding gain, even in a small code length, can boost the communication performance of conventional coding techniques.

  12. Robust state transfer in the quantum spin channel via weak measurement and quantum measurement reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi; Yao, Chunmei; Zou, Jian

    2013-10-01

    Using the weak measurement (WM) and quantum measurement reversal (QMR) approach, robust state transfer and entanglement distribution can be realized in the spin-(1)/(2) Heisenberg chain. We find that the ultrahigh fidelity and long distance of quantum state transfer with certain success probability can be obtained using proper WM and QMR, i.e., the average fidelity of a general pure state from 80% to almost 100%, which is almost size independent. We also find that the distance and quality of entanglement distribution for the Bell state and the general Werner mixed state can be obviously improved by the WM and QMR approach.

  13. Photoluminescence quantum yield of PbS nanocrystals in colloidal suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Greben, M.; Fucikova, A.; Valenta, J.

    2015-04-14

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of oleic acid-capped colloidal PbS quantum dots (QDs) in toluene is thoroughly investigated as function of QD size, concentration, excitation photon energy, and conditions of storage. We observed anomalous decrease of QY with decreasing concentration for highly diluted suspensions. The ligand desorption and QD-oxidation are demonstrated to be responsible for this phenomenon. Excess of oleic acid in suspensions makes the QY values concentration-independent over the entire reabsorption-free range. The PL emission is shown to be dominated by surface-related recombinations with some contribution from QD-core transitions. We demonstrate that QD colloidal suspension stability improves with increasing the concentration and size of PbS QDs.

  14. Quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation.

    PubMed

    D'Ariano, G M; Lo Presti, P

    2001-05-07

    Quantum operations describe any state change allowed in quantum mechanics, including the evolution of an open system or the state change due to a measurement. We present a general method based on quantum tomography for measuring experimentally the matrix elements of an arbitrary quantum operation. As input the method needs only a single entangled state. The feasibility of the technique for the electromagnetic field is shown, and the experimental setup is illustrated based on homodyne tomography of a twin beam.

  15. A Gaussian measure of quantum phase noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schleich, Wolfgang P.; Dowling, Jonathan P.

    1992-01-01

    We study the width of the semiclassical phase distribution of a quantum state in its dependence on the average number of photons (m) in this state. As a measure of phase noise, we choose the width, delta phi, of the best Gaussian approximation to the dominant peak of this probability curve. For a coherent state, this width decreases with the square root of (m), whereas for a truncated phase state it decreases linearly with increasing (m). For an optimal phase state, delta phi decreases exponentially but so does the area caught underneath the peak: all the probability is stored in the broad wings of the distribution.

  16. Measurement of Fission Product Yields from Fast-Neutron Fission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, C. W.; Bond, E. M.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Fowler, M. M.; Moody, W. A.; Rusev, G.; Vieira, D. J.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Becker, J. A.; Henderson, R.; Kenneally, J.; Macri, R.; McNabb, D.; Ryan, C.; Sheets, S.; Stoyer, M. A.; Tonchev, A. P.; Bhatia, C.; Bhike, M.; Fallin, B.; Gooden, M. E.; Howell, C. R.; Kelley, J. H.; Tornow, W.

    2014-09-01

    One of the aims of the Stockpile Stewardship Program is a reduction of the uncertainties on fission data used for analyzing nuclear test data [1,2]. Fission products such as 147Nd are convenient for determining fission yields because of their relatively high yield per fission (about 2%) and long half-life (10.98 days). A scientific program for measuring fission product yields from 235U,238U and 239Pu targets as a function of bombarding neutron energy (0.1 to 15 MeV) is currently underway using monoenergetic neutron beams produced at the 10 MV Tandem Accelerator at TUNL. Dual-fission chambers are used to determine the rate of fission in targets during activation. Activated targets are counted in highly shielded HPGe detectors over a period of several weeks to identify decaying fission products. To date, data have been collected at neutron bombarding energies 4.6, 9.0, 14.5 and 14.8 MeV. Experimental methods and data reduction techniques are discussed, and some preliminary results are presented.

  17. A general quantitative pH sensor developed with dicyandiamide N-doped high quantum yield graphene quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhu Lian; Gao, Ming Xuan; Wang, Ting Ting; Wan, Xiao Yan; Zheng, Lin Ling; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-03-01

    A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water to intracellular contents.A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water

  18. Quantum metrology in coarsened measurement reference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Dong; Xu, Chunling; Wang, An Min

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the role of coarsened measurement reference, which originates from the coarsened reference time and basis, in quantum metrology. When the measurement is based on one common reference basis, the disadvantage of coarsened measurement can be removed by symmetry. Owing to the coarsened reference basis, the entangled state cannot perform better than the product state for a large number of probe particles in estimating the phase. Given a finite uncertainty of the coarsened reference basis, the optimal number of probe particles is obtained. Finally, we prove that the maximally entangled state always achieves better frequency precision in the case of non-Markovian dephasing than that in the case of Markovian dephasing. The product state is more resistant to the interference of the coarsened reference time than the entangled state.

  19. Quantum dissipation theory and applications to quantum transport and quantum measurement in mesoscopic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ping

    The thesis comprises two major themes of quantum statistical dynamics. One is the development of quantum dissipation theory (QDT). It covers the establishment of some basic relations of quantum statistical dynamics, the construction of several nonequivalent complete second-order formulations, and the development of exact QDT. Another is related to the applications of quantum statistical dynamics to a variety of research fields. In particular, unconventional but novel theories of the electron transfer in Debye solvents, quantum transport, and quantum measurement are developed on the basis of QDT formulations. The thesis is organized as follows. In Chapter 1, we present some background knowledge in relation to the aforementioned two themes of this thesis. The key quantity in QDT is the reduced density operator rho(t) ≡ trBrho T(t); i.e., the partial trace of the total system and bath composite rhoT(t) over the bath degrees of freedom. QDT governs the evolution of reduced density operator, where the effects of bath are treated in a quantum statistical manner. In principle, the reduced density operator contains all dynamics information of interest. However, the conventional quantum transport theory is formulated in terms of nonequilibrium Green's function. The newly emerging field of quantum measurement in relation to quantum information and quantum computing does exploit a sort of QDT formalism. Besides the background of the relevant theoretical development, some representative experiments on molecular nanojunctions are also briefly discussed. In chapter 2, we outline some basic (including new) relations that highlight several important issues on QDT. The content includes the background of nonequilibrium quantum statistical mechanics, the general description of the total composite Hamiltonian with stochastic system-bath interaction, a novel parameterization scheme for bath correlation functions, a newly developed exact theory of driven Brownian oscillator (DBO

  20. Measurement-only topological quantum computation via anyonic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Bonderson, Parsa Freedman, Michael Nayak, Chetan

    2009-04-15

    We describe measurement-only topological quantum computation using both projective and interferometrical measurement of topological charge. We demonstrate how anyonic teleportation can be achieved using 'forced measurement' protocols for both types of measurement. Using this, it is shown how topological charge measurements can be used to generate the braiding transformations used in topological quantum computation, and hence that the physical transportation of computational anyons is unnecessary. We give a detailed discussion of the anyonics for implementation of topological quantum computation (particularly, using the measurement-only approach) in fractional quantum Hall systems.

  1. Entanglement Measure and Quantum Violation of Bell-Type Inequality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Dong; He, Ying-Qiu; Yan, Feng-Li; Gao, Ting

    2016-10-01

    By calculating entanglement measures and quantum violation of Bell-type inequality, we reveal the relationship between entanglement measure and the amount of quantum violation for a family of four-qubit entangled states. It has been demonstrated that the Bell-type inequality is completely violated by these four-qubit entangled states. The plot of entanglement measure as a function of the expectation value of Bell operator shows that entanglement measure first decreases and then increases smoothly with increasing quantum violation.

  2. The relationship between photooxidation defects and quantum yield loss in a liquid crystalline oligofluorene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesely, E. Jane; Rothberg, Lewis; Geng, Yanhou; Chen, Shaw

    2004-03-01

    We have studied the photophysics of a liquid crystalline oligofluorene which emits blue light with a quantum efficiency of forty-nine percent.( Y. Geng, S. Culligan, A. Trajkovska, J. Wallace and S. Chen, Chem. Mater; 2003, 15, 542-549.) The fluorescent yield is reduced when the film has been exposed to ultra-violet light and air. The resulting photooxidation creates luminescent defects that have previously been observed in some polyfluorenes.( E. J. W. List, R. Guentner, P. Scanducci de Freitas, and U. Scherf, Adv Mater., 2002, 14, 374-378.) The defects decrease the overall fluorescent yield because they divert energy away from the blue-emitting chromophores and emit at longer wavelengths with low efficiency. In contrast with previous studies of photooxidized polyfluorenes, we observe two emission peaks associated with defects that have distinct intensity dependence and decay dynamics.

  3. Measuring entanglement entropy in a quantum many-body system.

    PubMed

    Islam, Rajibul; Ma, Ruichao; Preiss, Philipp M; Tai, M Eric; Lukin, Alexander; Rispoli, Matthew; Greiner, Markus

    2015-12-03

    Entanglement is one of the most intriguing features of quantum mechanics. It describes non-local correlations between quantum objects, and is at the heart of quantum information sciences. Entanglement is now being studied in diverse fields ranging from condensed matter to quantum gravity. However, measuring entanglement remains a challenge. This is especially so in systems of interacting delocalized particles, for which a direct experimental measurement of spatial entanglement has been elusive. Here, we measure entanglement in such a system of itinerant particles using quantum interference of many-body twins. Making use of our single-site-resolved control of ultracold bosonic atoms in optical lattices, we prepare two identical copies of a many-body state and interfere them. This enables us to directly measure quantum purity, Rényi entanglement entropy, and mutual information. These experiments pave the way for using entanglement to characterize quantum phases and dynamics of strongly correlated many-body systems.

  4. A general quantitative pH sensor developed with dicyandiamide N-doped high quantum yield graphene quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhu Lian; Gao, Ming Xuan; Wang, Ting Ting; Wan, Xiao Yan; Zheng, Lin Ling; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-04-07

    A general quantitative pH sensor for environmental and intracellular applications was developed by the facile hydrothermal preparation of dicyandiamide (DCD) N-doped high quantum yield (QY) graphene quantum dots (GQDs) using citric acid (CA) as the carbon source. The obtained N-doped GQDs have excellent photoluminesence (PL) properties with a relatively high QY of 36.5%, suggesting that N-doped chemistry could promote the QY of carbon nanomaterials. The possible mechanism for the formation of the GQDs involves the CA self-assembling into a nanosheet structure through intermolecular H-bonding at the initial stage of the reaction, and then the pure graphene core with many function groups formed through the dehydration between the carboxyl and hydroxyl of the intermolecules under hydrothermal conditions. These N-doped GQDs have low toxicity, and are photostable and pH-sensitive between 1.81 to 8.96, giving a general pH sensor with a wide range of applications from real water to intracellular contents.

  5. Measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing with quantum input verification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2016-10-01

    Verifiable blind quantum computing is a secure delegated quantum computing where a client with a limited quantum technology delegates her quantum computing to a server who has a universal quantum computer. The client's privacy is protected (blindness), and the correctness of the computation is verifiable by the client despite her limited quantum technology (verifiability). There are mainly two types of protocols for verifiable blind quantum computing: the protocol where the client has only to generate single-qubit states and the protocol where the client needs only the ability of single-qubit measurements. The latter is called the measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing. If the input of the client's quantum computing is a quantum state, whose classical efficient description is not known to the client, there was no way for the measurement-only client to verify the correctness of the input. Here we introduce a protocol of measurement-only verifiable blind quantum computing where the correctness of the quantum input is also verifiable.

  6. Quantum imaging beyond the diffraction limit by optical centroid measurements.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Mankei

    2009-06-26

    I propose a quantum imaging method that can beat the Rayleigh-Abbe diffraction limit and achieve de Broglie resolution without requiring a multiphoton absorber or coincidence detection. Using the same nonclassical states of light as those for quantum lithography, the proposed method requires only optical intensity measurements, followed by image postprocessing, to produce the same complex quantum interference patterns as those in quantum lithography. The method is expected to be experimentally realizable using current technology.

  7. Doubling the success of quantum walk search using internal-state measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prūsis, Krišjānis; Vihrovs, Jevgēnijs; Wong, Thomas G.

    2016-11-01

    In typical discrete-time quantum walk algorithms, one measures the position of the walker while ignoring its internal spin/coin state. Rather than neglecting the information in this internal state, we show that additionally measuring it doubles the success probability of many quantum spatial search algorithms. For example, this allows Grover's unstructured search problem to be solved with certainty, rather than with probability 1/2 if only the walker's position is measured, so the additional measurement yields a search algorithm that is twice as fast as without it, on average. Thus the internal state of discrete-time quantum walks holds valuable information that can be utilized to improve algorithms. Furthermore, we determine conditions for which spatial search problems on regular graphs are amenable to this doubling of the success probability, and this involves diagrammatically analyzing search using degenerate perturbation theory and deriving a useful formula for how the quantum walk acts in its reduced subspace.

  8. Functionalization of quinoxalines by using TMP bases: preparation of tetracyclic heterocycles with high photoluminescene quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Nafe, Julia; Herbert, Simon; Auras, Florian; Karaghiosoff, Konstantin; Bein, Thomas; Knochel, Paul

    2015-01-12

    Tetracyclic heterocycles that exhibit high photoluminescence quantum yields were synthesized by anellation reactions of mono-, di-, and trifunctionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. Thus, treatment of 2,3-dichloroquinoxaline with TMPLi (TMP = 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidyl) allows a regioselective lithiation in position 5. Quenching with various electrophiles (iodine, (BrCl2 C)2 , allylic bromide, acid chloride, aryl iodide) leads to 5-functionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. Further functionalization in positions 6 and 8 can be achieved by using TMPLi or TMPMgCl⋅LiCl furnishing a range of new di- and tri-functionalized 2,3-dichloroquinoxalines. The chlorine atoms are readily substituted by anellation with 1,2-diphenols or 1,2-dithiophenols leading to a series of new tetracyclic compounds. These materials exhibit strong, tunable optical absorption and emission in the blue and green spectral region. The substituted O-heterocyclic compounds exhibit particularly high photoluminescence quantum yields of up to 90%, which renders them interesting candidates for fluorescence imaging applications.

  9. Mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Mirai; Yamashita, Takashi; Sano, Natsuki; Ishigaki, Aya; Suzuki, Tomomichi

    2017-01-01

    The convolution of a series of events is often observed for a variety of phenomena such as the oscillation of a string. A photochemical reaction of a molecule is characterized by a time constant, but materials in the real world contain several molecules with different time constants. Therefore, the kinetics of photochemical reactions of the materials are usually observed with a complexity comparable with those of theoretical kinetic equations. Analysis of the components of the kinetics is quite important for the development of advanced materials. However, with a limited number of exceptions, deconvolution of the observed kinetics has not yet been mathematically solved. In this study, we propose a mathematical optimization approach for estimating the quantum yield distribution of a photochromic reaction in a polymer. In the proposed approach, time-series data of absorbances are acquired and an estimate of the quantum yield distribution is obtained. To estimate the distribution, we solve a mathematical optimization problem to minimize the difference between the input data and a model. This optimization problem involves a differential equation constrained on a functional space as the variable lies in the space of probability distribution functions and the constraints arise from reaction rate equations. This problem can be reformulated as a convex quadratic optimization problem and can be efficiently solved by discretization. Numerical results are also reported here, and they verify the effectiveness of our approach.

  10. Carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yield: the fluorescence originates from organic fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Lei; Yang, Jian Hai; Zeng, Hai Bo; Chen, Yong Mei; Yang, Sheng Chun; Wu, Chao; Zeng, Hao; Yoshihito, Osada; Zhang, Qiqing

    2016-07-01

    In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications.In this contribution, we have shown that the organic fluorophores, 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-3,7-dicarboxylic acid (TPDCA) and 5-oxo-3,5-dihydro-2H-thiazolo [3,2-a] pyridine-7-carboxylic acid (TPCA), are the main ingredients and fluorescence origins of N,S-CDs via systematic analyses. It inspires us to deeply analyze and understand the fluorescence origins of carbon dots with high fluorescence quantum yields, which will expand their applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00451b

  11. Solvent effect on the relative quantum yield and fluorescence quenching of 2DAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagaraja, D.; Melavanki, R. M.; Patil, N. R.; Kusanur, R. A.

    2014-09-01

    The relative quantum yield of diethyl 2-acetamido-2-((3-oxo-3H-benzo[f]chromen-1-yl)methyl) malonate [2DAM] is estimated using single point method with quinine sulfate as standard reference. The quantum yield varies between 0.1161 and 0.3181 depending on the nature of the solvent. The rates of radiative and non radiative decay constants are also calculated. The fluorescence quenching of [2DAM] by aniline is studied at room temperature, by steady state, in five different solvents namely acetonitrile (AN), 1,4 dioxane (DX), 1,2 dichloroethane (DCE), tetrahydrofuran (THF) and toluene (TOL), in order to explore various possible quenching mechanisms. The experimental results show a positive deviation in Stern Volmer plots for all solvents. Various parameters for the quenching process are determined by ground state complex, sphere of action static quenching model and finite sink approximation model. The magnitudes of these rate parameters indicate that positive deviation in the Stern Volmer (SV) plot is due to both static and dynamic processes. Further, finite sink approximation model is used to check whether these bimolecular reactions were diffusion limited or not. The values of distance parameter R‧ and diffusion co efficient D are determined and then compared with the values of encounter distance R and diffusion coefficient D calculated using Stokes-Einstein equation.

  12. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Roland; Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li

    2015-03-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-Methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al. We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C =C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China; Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities; Robert A. Welch Foundation; National Natural Science Foundation of China.

  13. Photoisomerization dynamics of a rhodopsin-based molecule (potential molecular switch) with high quantum yields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Chen-Wei; Zhang, Xiu-Xing; Fang, Ai-Ping; Li, Hong-Rong; Xie, Rui-Hua; Li, Fu-Li; Allen, Roland E.

    2015-02-01

    It is worthwhile to explore the detailed reaction dynamics of various candidates for molecular switches, in order to understand, e.g., the differences in quantum yields and switching times. Here we report density-functional-based simulations for the rhodopsin-based molecule 4-[4-methylbenzylidene]-5-p-tolyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-pyrrole (MDP), synthesized by Sampedro et al We find that the photoisomerization quantum yields are remarkably high: 82% for cis-to-trans, and 68% for trans-to-cis. The lifetimes of the S1 excited state in cis-MDP in our calculations are in the range of 900-1800 fs, with a mean value of 1270 fs, while the range of times required for full cis-to-trans isomerization are 1100-2000 fs, with a mean value of 1530 fs. In trans-MDP, the calculated S1 excited state lifetimes are 860-2140 fs, with a mean value of 1330 fs, and with the full trans-to-cis isomerization completed about 200 fs later. In both cases, the dominant reaction mechanism is rotation around the central C=C bond (connected to the pyrroline ring), and de-excitation occurs at an avoided crossing between the ground state and the lowest singlet state, near the midpoint of the rotational pathway. Perhaps remarkably, but apparently because of electrostatic repulsion, the direction of rotation is the same for both reactions.

  14. Quantum-yield-optimized fluorophores for site-specific labeling and super-resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Grunwald, Christian; Schulze, Katrin; Giannone, Gregory; Cognet, Laurent; Lounis, Brahim; Choquet, Daniel; Tampé, Robert

    2011-06-01

    Single-molecule applications, saturated pattern excitation microscopy, and stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy demand bright as well as highly stable fluorescent dyes. Here we describe the synthesis of quantum-yield-optimized fluorophores for reversible, site-specific labeling of proteins or macromolecular complexes. We used polyproline-II (PPII) helices as sufficiently rigid spacers with various lengths to improve the fluorescence signals of a set of different trisNTA-fluorophores. The improved quantum yields were demonstrated by steady-state and fluorescence lifetime analyses. As a proof of principle, we characterized the trisNTA-PPII-fluorophores with respect to in vivo protein labeling and super-resolution imaging at synapses of living neurons. The distribution of His-tagged AMPA receptors (GluA1) in spatially restricted synaptic clefts was imaged by confocal and STED microscopy. The comparison of fluorescence intensity profiles revealed the superior resolution of STED microscopy. These results highlight the advantages of biocompatible and, in particular, small and photostable trisNTA-PPII-fluorophores in super-resolution microscopy.

  15. Intrinsic randomness as a measure of quantum coherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao; Zhou, Hongyi; Cao, Zhu; Ma, Xiongfeng

    2015-08-01

    Based on the theory of quantum mechanics, intrinsic randomness in measurement distinguishes quantum effects from classical ones. From the perspective of states, this quantum feature can be summarized as coherence or superposition in a specific (classical) computational basis. Recently, by regarding coherence as a physical resource, Baumgratz et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 113, 140401 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.113.140401] presented a comprehensive framework for coherence measures. Here, we propose a quantum coherence measure essentially using the intrinsic randomness of measurement. The proposed coherence measure provides an answer to the open question in completing the resource theory of coherence. Meanwhile, we show that the coherence distillation process can be treated as quantum extraction, which can be regarded as an equivalent process of classical random number extraction. From this viewpoint, the proposed coherence measure also clarifies the operational aspect of quantum coherence. Finally, our results indicate a strong similarity between two types of quantumness—coherence and entanglement.

  16. Hybrid architecture for encoded measurement-based quantum computation

    PubMed Central

    Zwerger, M.; Briegel, H. J.; Dür, W.

    2014-01-01

    We present a hybrid scheme for quantum computation that combines the modular structure of elementary building blocks used in the circuit model with the advantages of a measurement-based approach to quantum computation. We show how to construct optimal resource states of minimal size to implement elementary building blocks for encoded quantum computation in a measurement-based way, including states for error correction and encoded gates. The performance of the scheme is determined by the quality of the resource states, where within the considered error model a threshold of the order of 10% local noise per particle for fault-tolerant quantum computation and quantum communication. PMID:24946906

  17. SU-E-T-191: First Principle Calculation of Quantum Yield in Photodynamic Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Abolfath, R; Guo, F; Chen, Z; Nath, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: We present a first-principle method to calculate the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen induced by any photon fields especially in MeV energy range. The optical pumping is mediated through photosensitizers, e.g., porphyrin and/or ensemble of quantum dots. Methods: Under normal conditions, oxygen molecules are in the relatively non-reactive triplet state. In the presence of certain photosensitizer compounds such as porphyrins, electromagnetic radiation of specific wavelengths can excite oxygen to highly reactive singlet state. With selective uptake of photosensitizers by certain malignant cells, photon irradiation of phosensitized tumors can lead to selective killing of cancer cells. This is the basis of photodynamic therapy (PDT). Despite several attempts, PDT has not been clinically successful except in limited superficial cancers. Many parameters such as photon energy, conjugation with quantum dots etc. can be potentially combined with PDT in order to extend the role of PDT in cancer management. The key quantity for this optimization is the spin transfer efficiency in oxygen by any photon field. The first principle calculation model presented here, is an attempt to fill this need. We employ stochastic density matrix description of the quantum jumps and the rate equation methods in quantum optics based on Markov/Poisson processes and calculate time evolution of the population of the optically pumped singlet oxygen. Results: The results demonstrate the feasibility of our model in showing the dependence of the optical yield in generating spin-singlet oxygen on the experimental conditions. The adjustable variables can be tuned to maximize the population of the singlet oxygen hence the efficacy of the photodynamic therapy. Conclusion: The present model can be employed to fit and analyze the experimental data and possibly to assist researchers in optimizing the experimental conditions in photodynamic therapy.

  18. Effect of capsid proteins to ICG mass ratio on fluorescent quantum yield of virus-resembling optical nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sharad; Ico, Gerardo; Matsumura, Paul; Rao, A. L. N.; Vullev, Valentine; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-03-01

    We recently reported construction of a new type of optical nano-construct composed of genome-depleted plant infecting brome mosaic virus (BMV) doped with Indocyanine green (ICG), an FDA-approved chromophore. We refer to these constructs as optical viral ghosts (OVGs) since only the capsid protein (CP) subunits of BMV remain to encapsulate ICG. To utilize OVGs as effective nano-probes in fluorescence imaging applications, their fluorescence quantum yield needs to be maximized. In this study, we investigate the effect of altering the CP to ICG mass ratio on the fluorescent quantum yield of OVGs. Results of this study provide the basis for construction of OVGs with optimal amounts of CP and ICG to yield maximal fluorescence quantum yield.

  19. Sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum measure algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Zafiris, Elias

    2006-09-15

    We construct a sheaf-theoretic representation of quantum probabilistic structures, in terms of covering systems of Boolean measure algebras. These systems coordinatize quantum states by means of Boolean coefficients, interpreted as Boolean localization measures. The representation is based on the existence of a pair of adjoint functors between the category of presheaves of Boolean measure algebras and the category of quantum measure algebras. The sheaf-theoretic semantic transition of quantum structures shifts their physical significance from the orthoposet axiomatization at the level of events, to the sheaf-theoretic gluing conditions at the level of Boolean localization systems.

  20. Quantum filtering for multiple diffusive and Poissonian measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emzir, Muhammad F.; Woolley, Matthew J.; Petersen, Ian R.

    2015-09-01

    We provide a rigorous derivation of a quantum filter for the case of multiple measurements being made on a quantum system. We consider a class of measurement processes which are functions of bosonic field operators, including combinations of diffusive and Poissonian processes. This covers the standard cases from quantum optics, where homodyne detection may be described as a diffusive process and photon counting may be described as a Poissonian process. We obtain a necessary and sufficient condition for any pair of such measurements taken at different output channels to satisfy a commutation relationship. Then, we derive a general, multiple-measurement quantum filter as an extension of a single-measurement quantum filter. As an application we explicitly obtain the quantum filter corresponding to homodyne detection and photon counting at the output ports of a beam splitter.

  1. NANONIS TRAMEA - A Quantum Transport Measurement System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampen, Thorsten; Thissen, Andreas; Schaff, Oliver; Pioda, Alessandro

    Nanonis Tramea is a quantum leap with respect to increased speed for transport measurements taking research onto a new level. Measurements which took several hours in the past can now be done in minutes without compromising signal quality. Tramea uses its fast, high-resolution, high-precision and ultra-low-noise outputs and inputs to generate and acquire up to 20000 data points per second on 24 channels in parallel. This is not only up to 1000 x faster than typical measurement systems but it is also time deterministic with highest precision. Here, the time separation between points is constant so that artefacts caused by unequal point spacings in non-deterministic measurement systems are avoided. The emphasis here is the real-time relation. Tramea comes with a built-in interface which allows for control of the instruments' basic functions from any programming environment. For users requiring more functionality and higher speeds a full-featured LabVIEW-based programming interface or scripting module are available as add-on modules. Due to the modularity and flexibility of the hardware and software architecture of Tramea upgrades with standardized add-on modules are possible. Non-standard requests can still be handled by the various programming options.

  2. Photosensitized electron transfer processes in SiO2 colloids and sodium lauryl sulfate micellar systems: Correlation of quantum yields with interfacial surface potentials

    PubMed Central

    Laane, Colja; Willner, Itamar; Otvos, John W.; Calvin, Melvin

    1981-01-01

    The effectiveness of negatively charged colloidal SiO2 particles in controlling photosensitized electron transfer reactions has been studied and compared with that of the negatively charged sodium lauryl sulfate (NaLauSO4) micellar system. In particular, the photosensitized reduction of the zwitterionic electron acceptor propylviologen sulfonate (PVS0) with tris(2,2′-bipyridinium)ruthenium(II) [Ru(bipy)32+] as the sensitizer and triethanolamine as the electron donor is found to have a quantum yield of 0.033 for formation of the radical anion (PVS[unk]) in the SiO2 colloid compared with 0.005 in the homogeneous system and 0.0086 in a NaLauSO4 micellar solution. The higher quantum yields obtained with the SiO2 colloidal system are attributed to substantial stabilization against back reaction of the intermediate photoproducts—i.e., Ru(bipy)33+ and PVS[unk]—by electrostatic repulsion of the reduced electron acceptor from the negatively charged particle surface. The binding properties of the SiO2 particles and NaLauSO4 micelles were investigated by flow dialysis. The results show that the sensitizer binds to both interfaces and that the SiO2 interface is characterized by a much higher surface potential than the micellar interface (≈-170 mV vs. -85 mV). The effect of ionic strength on the surface potential was estimated from the Gouy-Chapman theory, and the measured quantum yields of photosensitized electron transfer were correlated with surface potential at different ionic strengths. This correlation shows that the quantum yield is not affected by surface potentials smaller than ≈-40 mV. At larger potentials, the quantum yield increases rapidly. The quantum yield obtained in the micellar system at different strengths fits nicely on the correlation curve for the colloid SiO2 system. These results indicate that the surface potential is the dominant factor in the quantum yield improvement for PVS0 reduction. PMID:16593095

  3. Multipartite entanglement accumulation in quantum states: Localizable generalized geometric measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Debasis; Roy, Sudipto Singha; Pal, Amit Kumar; Rakshit, Debraj; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2017-02-01

    Multiparty quantum states are useful for a variety of quantum information and computation protocols. We define a multiparty entanglement measure based on local measurements on a multiparty quantum state and an entanglement measure averaged on the postmeasurement ensemble. Using the generalized geometric measure as the measure of multipartite entanglement for the ensemble, we demonstrate, in the case of several well-known classes of multipartite pure states, that the localized multipartite entanglement can exceed the entanglement present in the original state. We also show that measurement over multiple parties may be beneficial in enhancing localizable multipartite entanglement. We point out that localizable generalized geometric measure faithfully signals quantum critical phenomena in well-known quantum spin models even when considerable finite-size effect is present in the system.

  4. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    PubMed Central

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed. PMID:26916503

  5. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics.

    PubMed

    Kammerlander, P; Anders, J

    2016-02-26

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  6. Blind topological measurement-based quantum computation.

    PubMed

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2012-01-01

    Blind quantum computation is a novel secure quantum-computing protocol that enables Alice, who does not have sufficient quantum technology at her disposal, to delegate her quantum computation to Bob, who has a fully fledged quantum computer, in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output and algorithm. A recent proof-of-principle experiment demonstrating blind quantum computation in an optical system has raised new challenges regarding the scalability of blind quantum computation in realistic noisy conditions. Here we show that fault-tolerant blind quantum computation is possible in a topologically protected manner using the Raussendorf-Harrington-Goyal scheme. The error threshold of our scheme is 4.3 × 10(-3), which is comparable to that (7.5 × 10(-3)) of non-blind topological quantum computation. As the error per gate of the order 10(-3) was already achieved in some experimental systems, our result implies that secure cloud quantum computation is within reach.

  7. Coherence and measurement in quantum thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kammerlander, P.; Anders, J.

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a highly successful macroscopic theory widely used across the natural sciences and for the construction of everyday devices, from car engines to solar cells. With thermodynamics predating quantum theory, research now aims to uncover the thermodynamic laws that govern finite size systems which may in addition host quantum effects. Recent theoretical breakthroughs include the characterisation of the efficiency of quantum thermal engines, the extension of classical non-equilibrium fluctuation theorems to the quantum regime and a new thermodynamic resource theory has led to the discovery of a set of second laws for finite size systems. These results have substantially advanced our understanding of nanoscale thermodynamics, however putting a finger on what is genuinely quantum in quantum thermodynamics has remained a challenge. Here we identify information processing tasks, the so-called projections, that can only be formulated within the framework of quantum mechanics. We show that the physical realisation of such projections can come with a non-trivial thermodynamic work only for quantum states with coherences. This contrasts with information erasure, first investigated by Landauer, for which a thermodynamic work cost applies for classical and quantum erasure alike. Repercussions on quantum work fluctuation relations and thermodynamic single-shot approaches are also discussed.

  8. Photolysis of CH₃CHO at 248 nm: evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH₃ and HCO radicals and H atoms.

    PubMed

    Morajkar, Pranay; Bossolasco, Adriana; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH3CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO2 radicals by reaction with O2. The CH3 radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH3O2. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO2 profiles, obtained under various O2 concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH3 yield has been determined relative to the CH3 yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH3I. Time resolved HO2 profiles under very low O2 concentrations suggest that another unknown HO2 forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O2. HO2 profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH3CHO + hν(248nm) → CH3CHO*, CH3CHO* → CH3 + HCO ϕ(1a) = 0.125 ± 0.03, CH3CHO* → CH3 + H + CO ϕ(1e) = 0.205 ± 0.04, CH3CHO*[Formula: see text]CH3CO + HO2 ϕ(1f) = 0.07 ± 0.01. The CH3O2 quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ϕ(CH₃) = 0.33 ± 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH3 yields derived from the HO2 measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH3CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO2 and CH3 measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH3CHO* → CH4 + CO ϕ(1b) = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered pathway: CH3CHO* → CH3CO + H ϕ(1c) = 0.

  9. Measurement of quantum fluctuations in geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, Craig J.

    2008-05-15

    A particular form for the quantum indeterminacy of relative spacetime position of events is derived from the context of a holographic geometry with a minimum length at the Planck scale. The indeterminacy predicts fluctuations from a classically defined geometry in the form of ''holographic noise'' whose spatial character, absolute normalization, and spectrum are predicted with no parameters. The noise has a distinctive transverse spatial shear signature and a flat power spectral density given by the Planck time. An interferometer signal displays noise due to the uncertainty of relative positions of reflection events. The noise corresponds to an accumulation of phase offset with time that mimics a random walk of those optical elements that change the orientation of a wavefront. It only appears in measurements that compare transverse positions and does not appear at all in purely radial position measurements. A lower bound on holographic noise follows from a covariant upper bound on gravitational entropy. The predicted holographic noise spectrum is estimated to be comparable to measured noise in the currently operating interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO600. Because of its transverse character, holographic noise is reduced relative to gravitational wave effects in other interferometer designs, such as the LIGO observatories, where beam power is much less in the beam splitter than in the arms.

  10. Surface structures for enhancement of quantum yield in broad spectrum emission nanocrystals

    DOEpatents

    Schreuder, Michael A.; McBride, James R.; Rosenthal, Sandra J.

    2014-07-22

    Disclosed are inorganic nanoparticles comprising a body comprising cadmium and/or zinc crystallized with selenium, sulfur, and/or tellurium; a multiplicity of phosphonic acid ligands comprising at least about 20% of the total surface ligand coverage; wherein the nanocrystal is capable of absorbing energy from a first electromagnetic region and capable of emitting light in a second electromagnetic region, wherein the maximum absorbance wavelength of the first electromagnetic region is different from the maximum emission wavelength of the second electromagnetic region, thereby providing a Stokes shift of at least about 20 nm, wherein the second electromagnetic region comprises an at least about 100 nm wide band of wavelengths, and wherein the nanoparticle exhibits has a quantum yield of at least about 10%. This abstract is intended as a scanning tool for purposes of searching in the particular art and is not intended to be limiting of the present invention.

  11. Yield Enhancement of a Double-Quantum Filter Sequence Designed for the Edited Detection of GABA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilman, Alan H.; Allen, Peter S.

    1995-11-01

    To overcome limitations in the signal to noise ratio (S/N) of previously proposed multiple-quantum filters (MQFs), designed for editing the GABA A2multiplet from the creatine (Cr) singlet in proton spectroscopy of brain, a new double-quantum filter is proposed which significantly enhancesS/N(thereby making it comparable with the spin-echo difference editing technique) while maintaining the superior Cr suppression and zero vulnerability to subtraction errors of previously proposed MQFs. TheS/Nenhancement results primarily from a significant reduction in transverse-relaxation losses, achieved by shortening the filter sequence by ∼70%, first by altering the criterion that determines the initial evolution period and, second, by effectively eliminating the refocusing time prior to the start of acquisition. The altered evolution time criterion also leads to an increase in the intrinsic yield of the filter from 25 to 39%. The analysis of the filter design was verifiedin vitroon phantoms of GABA in D2O, and the maintenance of editing capability, i.e., Cr suppression by more than 1600, was demonstrated on rat brain extracts.

  12. Quantum yield in blue-emitting anthracene derivatives: vibronic coupling density and transition dipole moment density.

    PubMed

    Uejima, Motoyuki; Sato, Tohru; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Tanaka, Kazuyoshi; Park, Jong-Wook

    2014-07-21

    A theoretical design principle for enhancement of the quantum yield of light-emitting molecules is desired. For the establishment of the principle, we focused on the S1 states of blue-emitting anthracene derivatives: 2-methyl-9,10-di(2'-naphthyl)anthracene (MADN), 4,9,10-bis(3',5'-diphenylphenyl)anthracene (MAM), 9-(3',5'-diphenylphenyl)-10-(3'',5''-diphenylbiphenyl-4''-yl) anthracene (MAT), and 9,10-bis(3''',5'''-diphenylbiphenyl-4'-yl) anthracene (TAT) [Kim et al., J. Mater. Chem., 2008, 18, 3376]. The vibronic coupling constants and transition dipole moments were calculated and analyzed by using the concepts of vibronic coupling density (VCD) and transition dipole moment density (TDMD), respectively. It is found that the driving force of the internal conversions and vibrational relaxations originate mainly from the anthracenylene group. On the other hand, fluorescence enhancement results from the large torsional distortion of the side groups in the S1 state. The torsional distortion is caused by the diagonal vibronic coupling for the lowest-frequency mode in the Franck-Condon (FC) S1 state, which originates from a small portion of the electron density difference on the side groups. These findings lead to the following design principles for anthracene derivatives with a high quantum yield: (1) reduction in the electron density difference and overlap density between the S0 and S1 states in the anthracenylene group to suppress vibrational relaxation and radiationless transitions, respectively; (2) increase in the overlap density in the side group to enhance the fluorescence.

  13. Quantum yields for the photolysis of glyoxal below 350 nm and parameterisations for its photolysis rate in the troposphere.

    PubMed

    Salter, Robert J; Blitz, Mark A; Heard, Dwayne E; Kovács, Tamás; Pilling, Michael J; Rickard, Andrew R; Seakins, Paul W

    2013-04-14

    The formation of HCO and of H in the photolysis of glyoxal have been investigated over the wavelength ranges 310-335 nm for HCO and 193-340 nm for H. Dye laser photolysis was coupled with cavity ring-down spectroscopy for HCO, and with laser induced fluorescence spectroscopy for H. Absolute quantum yields were determined using actinometers based on (a) Cl2 photolysis and the Cl + HCHO reaction for HCO and (b) N2O photolysis (and O(1)D + H2) and CH2CO photolysis (and CH2 + O2) for H. The quantum yields were found to be pressure independent in this wavelength region. Quantum yields for all product channels under atmospheric conditions were calculated and compared with literature values. Differences between this work and previously published work and their atmospheric implications are discussed.

  14. Nicotine yield and measures of cigarette smoke exposure in a large population: are lower-yield cigarettes safer?

    PubMed Central

    Maron, D J; Fortmann, S P

    1987-01-01

    We examined the relationship of machine-estimated nicotine yield by cigarette brand with the level of cigarette consumption and two biochemical measures of smoke exposure (expired-air carbon monoxide and plasma thiocyanate) in a large, population-based sample of smokers (N = 713). The lower the nicotine yield of the cigarette, the greater the number of cigarettes smoked per day. Prior to adjusting for number of cigarettes smoked per day, nicotine yield was not related to the actual measures of smoke exposure. Smokers of ultralow-yield cigarettes had laboratory tests of smoke exposure which were not significantly different from those of smokers of higher-yield brands. Only after adjustment for number of cigarettes smoked per day did nicotine yield become significantly related to expired-air carbon monoxide and to plasma thiocyanate. In multivariate analysis, the number of cigarettes smoked per day accounted for 28 per cent and 22 per cent of the variance in observed expired-air carbon monoxide and plasma thiocyanate levels, respectively, whereas nicotine yield accounted for only 1 per cent and 2 per cent of the variance, respectively. The relative lack of an effect of nicotine yield on the biochemical measure appears to be due to the fact that smokers of lower nicotine brands smoked more cigarettes per day, thereby compensating for reduced delivery of smoke products. Our data do not support the concept that ultralow-yield cigarettes are less hazardous than others. Machine estimates suggesting low nicotine yield underrepresent actual human consumption of harmful cigarette constituents. PMID:3565645

  15. Enhancing teleportation of quantum Fisher information by partial measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhong, Wo-Jun; Li, Yan-Ling; Xie, Ying-Mao

    2016-01-01

    The purport of quantum teleportation is to completely transfer information from one party to another distant partner. However, from the perspective of parameter estimation, it is the information carried by a particular parameter, not the information of total quantum state that needs to be teleported. Due to the inevitable noise in environments, we propose two schemes to enhance quantum Fisher information (QFI) teleportation under amplitude damping noise with the technique of partial measurements. We find that post-partial measurement can greatly enhance the teleported QFI, while the combination of prior partial measurement and post-partial measurement reversal could completely eliminate the effect of decoherence. We show that, somewhat consequentially, enhancing QFI teleportation is more economic than that of improving fidelity teleportation. Our work extends the ability of partial measurements as a quantum technique to battle decoherence in quantum information processing.

  16. Demonstration of measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greganti, Chiara; Roehsner, Marie-Christine; Barz, Stefanie; Morimae, Tomoyuki; Walther, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Blind quantum computing allows for secure cloud networks of quasi-classical clients and a fully fledged quantum server. Recently, a new protocol has been proposed, which requires a client to perform only measurements. We demonstrate a proof-of-principle implementation of this measurement-only blind quantum computing, exploiting a photonic setup to generate four-qubit cluster states for computation and verification. Feasible technological requirements for the client and the device-independent blindness make this scheme very applicable for future secure quantum networks.

  17. The effect of varying short-chain alkyl substitution on the molar absorptivity and quantum yield of cyanine dyes.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Gala; Henary, Maged; Patonay, Gabor

    2011-01-01

    The effect of varying short-chain alkyl substitution of the indole nitrogens on the spectroscopic properties of cyanine dyes was examined. Molar absorptivities and fluorescence quantum yields were determined for a set of pentamethine dyes and a set of heptamethine dyes for which the substitution of the indole nitrogen was varied. For both sets of dyes, increasing alkyl chain length resulted in no significant change in quantum yield or molar absorptivity. These results may be useful in designing new cyanine dyes for analytical applications and predicting their spectroscopic properties.

  18. Verification for measurement-only blind quantum computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2014-06-01

    Blind quantum computing is a new secure quantum computing protocol where a client who does not have any sophisticated quantum technology can delegate her quantum computing to a server without leaking any privacy. It is known that a client who has only a measurement device can perform blind quantum computing [T. Morimae and K. Fujii, Phys. Rev. A 87, 050301(R) (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevA.87.050301]. It has been an open problem whether the protocol can enjoy the verification, i.e., the ability of the client to check the correctness of the computing. In this paper, we propose a protocol of verification for the measurement-only blind quantum computing.

  19. Developing a diagnostic model for estimating terrestrial vegetation gross primary productivity using the photosynthetic quantum yield and Earth Observation data.

    PubMed

    Ogutu, Booker O; Dash, Jadunandan; Dawson, Terence P

    2013-09-01

    This article develops a new carbon exchange diagnostic model [i.e. Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model] for estimating daily gross primary productivity (GPP). The model exploits the maximum quantum yields of two key photosynthetic pathways (i.e. C3 and C4 ) to estimate the conversion of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation into GPP. Furthermore, this is the first model to use only the fraction of photosynthetically active radiation absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (i.e. FAPARps ) rather than total canopy, to predict GPP. The GPP predicted by the SCARF model was comparable to in situ GPP measurements (R(2)  > 0.7) in most of the evaluated biomes. Overall, the SCARF model predicted high GPP in regions dominated by forests and croplands, and low GPP in shrublands and dry-grasslands across USA and Europe. The spatial distribution of GPP from the SCARF model over Europe and conterminous USA was comparable to those from the MOD17 GPP product except in regions dominated by croplands. The SCARF model GPP predictions were positively correlated (R(2)  > 0.5) to climatic and biophysical input variables indicating its sensitivity to factors controlling vegetation productivity. The new model has three advantages, first, it prescribes only two quantum yield terms rather than species specific light use efficiency terms; second, it uses only the fraction of PAR absorbed by photosynthetic elements of the canopy (FAPARps ) hence capturing the actual PAR used in photosynthesis; and third, it does not need a detailed land cover map that is a major source of uncertainty in most remote sensing based GPP models. The Sentinel satellites planned for launch in 2014 by the European Space Agency have adequate spectral channels to derive FAPARps at relatively high spatial resolution (20 m). This provides a unique opportunity to produce global GPP operationally using the Southampton CARbon Flux (SCARF) model at high spatial resolution.

  20. On measures of quantum entanglement — A brief review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Debasis

    2016-08-01

    Entanglement is one of the most useful resources in quantum information processing. It is effectively the quantum correlation between different subsystems of a composite system. Mathematically, one of the most hard tasks in quantum mechanics is to quantify entanglement. However, progress in this field is remarkable but not complete yet. There are many things to do with quantification of entanglement. In this review, we will discuss some of the important measures of bipartite entanglement.

  1. Accurate quantum yields by laser gain vs absorption spectroscopy - Investigation of Br/Br(asterisk) channels in photofragmentation of Br2 and IBr

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haugen, H. K.; Weitz, E.; Leone, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    Various techniques have been used to study photodissociation dynamics of the halogens and interhalogens. The quantum yields obtained by these techniques differ widely. The present investigation is concerned with a qualitatively new approach for obtaining highly accurate quantum yields for electronically excited states. This approach makes it possible to obtain an accuracy of 1 percent to 3 percent. It is shown that measurement of the initial transient gain/absorption vs the final absorption in a single time-resolved signal is a very accurate technique in the study of absolute branching fractions in photodissociation. The new technique is found to be insensitive to pulse and probe laser characteristics, molecular absorption cross sections, and absolute precursor density.

  2. Testing sequential quantum measurements: how can maximal knowledge be extracted?

    PubMed Central

    Nagali, Eleonora; Felicetti, Simone; de Assis, Pierre-Louis; D'Ambrosio, Vincenzo; Filip, Radim; Sciarrino, Fabio

    2012-01-01

    The extraction of information from a quantum system unavoidably implies a modification of the measured system itself. In this framework partial measurements can be carried out in order to extract only a portion of the information encoded in a quantum system, at the cost of inducing a limited amount of disturbance. Here we analyze experimentally the dynamics of sequential partial measurements carried out on a quantum system, focusing on the trade-off between the maximal information extractable and the disturbance. In particular we implement two sequential measurements observing that, by exploiting an adaptive strategy, is possible to find an optimal trade-off between the two quantities. PMID:22720131

  3. Exact quantum Bayesian rule for qubit measurements in circuit QED.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Liang, Pengfei; Qin, Lupei; Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-02-04

    Developing efficient framework for quantum measurements is of essential importance to quantum science and technology. In this work, for the important superconducting circuit-QED setup, we present a rigorous and analytic solution for the effective quantum trajectory equation (QTE) after polaron transformation and converted to the form of Stratonovich calculus. We find that the solution is a generalization of the elegant quantum Bayesian approach developed in arXiv:1111.4016 by Korotokov and currently applied to circuit-QED measurements. The new result improves both the diagonal and off-diagonal elements of the qubit density matrix, via amending the distribution probabilities of the output currents and several important phase factors. Compared to numerical integration of the QTE, the resultant quantum Bayesian rule promises higher efficiency to update the measured state, and allows more efficient and analytical studies for some interesting problems such as quantum weak values, past quantum state, and quantum state smoothing. The method of this work opens also a new way to obtain quantum Bayesian formulas for other systems and in more complicated cases.

  4. KEYNOTE SPEECH: Quantum noise, quantum measurement, and squeezing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haus, Herman A.

    2004-08-01

    This is the edited text of the Keynote Speech that Professor Haus had been invited to give at the Conference on Fluctuations and Noise in Photonics and Quantum Optics, held at Santa Fe, NM, on 1-4 June 2003. He introduces it as partly an overview, partly a retrospective, finishing with some remarks about the future, addressing the topics as he knew them best, from his own perspective. Sadly, Professor Haus died shortly before he was due to present this speech to conference delegates.

  5. Measuring the heat exchange of a quantum process.

    PubMed

    Goold, John; Poschinger, Ulrich; Modi, Kavan

    2014-08-01

    Very recently, interferometric methods have been proposed to measure the full statistics of work performed on a driven quantum system [Dorner et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230601 (2013) and Mazzola et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 230602 (2013)]. The advantage of such schemes is that they replace the necessity to make projective measurements by performing phase estimation on an appropriately coupled ancilla qubit. These proposals are one possible route to the tangible experimental exploration of quantum thermodynamics, a subject which is the center of much current attention due to the current control of mesoscopic quantum systems. In this Rapid Communication we demonstrate that a modification of the phase estimation protocols can be used in order to measure the heat distribution of a quantum process. In addition, we demonstrate how our scheme maybe implemented using ion trap technology. Our scheme should pave the way for experimental explorations of the Landauer principle and hence the intricate energy to information conversion in mesoscopic quantum systems.

  6. Long-Distance Measurement-Device-Independent Multiparty Quantum Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yao; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Teng-Yun; Chen, Zeng-Bing

    2015-03-01

    The Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) entanglement, originally introduced to uncover the extreme violation of local realism against quantum mechanics, is an important resource for multiparty quantum communication tasks. But the low intensity and fragility of the GHZ entanglement source in current conditions have made the practical applications of these multiparty tasks an experimental challenge. Here we propose a feasible scheme for practically distributing the postselected GHZ entanglement over a distance of more than 100 km for experimentally accessible parameter regimes. Combining the decoy-state and measurement-device-independent protocols for quantum key distribution, we anticipate that our proposal suggests an important avenue for practical multiparty quantum communication.

  7. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-01-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance. PMID:27558009

  8. Improving Students' Understanding of Quantum Measurement. I. Investigation of Difficulties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Guangtian; Singh, Chandralekha

    2012-01-01

    We describe the difficulties that advanced undergraduate and graduate students have with quantum measurement within the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics. We explore the possible origins of these difficulties by analyzing student responses to questions from both surveys and interviews. Results from this research are applied to develop…

  9. Frobenius-norm-based measures of quantum coherence and asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Xiao, Xing; Sun, C. P.

    2016-08-01

    We formulate the Frobenius-norm-based measures for quantum coherence and asymmetry respectively. In contrast to the resource theory of coherence and asymmetry, we construct a natural measure of quantum coherence inspired from optical coherence theory while the group theoretical approach is employed to quantify the asymmetry of quantum states. Besides their simple structures and explicit physical meanings, we observe that these quantities are intimately related to the purity (or linear entropy) of the corresponding quantum states. Remarkably, we demonstrate that the proposed coherence quantifier is not only a measure of mixedness, but also an intrinsic (basis-independent) quantification of quantum coherence contained in quantum states, which can also be viewed as a normalized version of Brukner-Zeilinger invariant information. In our context, the asymmetry of N-qubit quantum systems is considered under local independent and collective transformations. In- triguingly, it is illustrated that the collective effect has a significant impact on the asymmetry measure, and quantum correlation between subsystems plays a non-negligible role in this circumstance.

  10. Direct measurement of large-scale quantum states via expectation values of non-Hermitian matrices

    PubMed Central

    Bolduc, Eliot; Gariepy, Genevieve; Leach, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    In quantum mechanics, predictions are made by way of calculating expectation values of observables, which take the form of Hermitian operators. Non-Hermitian operators, however, are not necessarily devoid of physical significance, and they can play a crucial role in the characterization of quantum states. Here we show that the expectation values of a particular set of non-Hermitian matrices, which we call column operators, directly yield the complex coefficients of a quantum state vector. We provide a definition of the state vector in terms of measurable quantities by decomposing these column operators into observables. The technique we propose renders very-large-scale quantum states significantly more accessible in the laboratory, as we demonstrate by experimentally characterizing a 100,000-dimensional entangled state. This represents an improvement of two orders of magnitude with respect to previous phase-and-amplitude characterizations of discrete entangled states. PMID:26780858

  11. Semi-loss-tolerant strong quantum coin-flipping protocol using quantum non-demolition measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Ma, Jia-Jun; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present a semi-loss-tolerant strong quantum coin-flipping (QCF) protocol with the best bias of 0.3536. Our manuscript applies quantum non-demolition measurement to quantum coin-flipping protocol. Furthermore, a single photon as a single qubit is used to avoid the difficult implementation of EPR resources. We also analyze the security of our protocol obtaining the best result among all coin-flipping protocols considering loss. A semi-loss-tolerant quantum dice rolling (QDR) protocol is first proposed, and the security of corresponding three-party QDR is analyzed to better demonstrate the security of our QCF.

  12. ABSORBANCE, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENT, AND APPARENT QUANTUM YIELD: A COMMENT ON AMBIGUITY IN THE USE OF THESE OPTICAL CONCEPTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Several important optical terms such as "absorbance" and "absorption coefficient" are frequently used ambiguously in the current peer-reviewed literature. Since they are important terms that are required to derive other quantities such as the "apparent quantum yield" of photoprod...

  13. High-efficiency tomographic reconstruction of quantum states by quantum nondemolition measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J. S.; Wei, L. F.; Oh, C. H.

    2011-03-15

    We propose a high-efficiency scheme to tomographically reconstruct an unknown quantum state by using a series of quantum nondemolition (QND) measurements. The proposed QND measurements of the qubits are implemented by probing the stationary transmissions through a driven dispersively coupled resonator. It is shown that only one kind of QND measurement is sufficient to determine all the diagonal elements of the density matrix of the detected quantum state. The remaining nondiagonal elements can be similarly determined by transferring them to the diagonal locations after a series of unitary operations. Compared with the tomographic reconstructions based on the usual destructive projective measurements (wherein one such measurement can determine only one diagonal element of the density matrix), the present reconstructive approach exhibits significantly high efficiency. Specifically, our generic proposal is demonstrated by the experimental circuit quantum electrodynamics systems with a few Josephson charge qubits.

  14. Effects of inter-nanocrystal distance on luminescence quantum yield in ensembles of Si nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect

    Valenta, J. Greben, M.; Gutsch, S.; Hiller, D.; Zacharias, M.

    2014-12-15

    The absolute photoluminescence (PL) quantum yield (QY) of multilayers of Silicon nanocrystals (SiNCs) separated by SiO{sub 2} barriers were thoroughly studied as function of the barrier thickness, excitation wavelength, and temperature. By mastering the plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition growth, we produce a series of samples with the same size-distribution of SiNCs but variable interlayer barrier distance. These samples enable us to clearly demonstrate that the increase of barrier thickness from ∼1 to larger than 2 nm induces doubling of the PL QY value, which corresponds to the change of number of close neighbors in the hcp structure. The temperature dependence of PL QY suggests that the PL QY changes are due to a thermally activated transport of excitation into non-radiative centers in dark NCs or in the matrix. We estimate that dark NCs represent about 68% of the ensemble of NCs. The PL QY excitation spectra show no significant changes upon changing the barrier thickness and no clear carrier multiplication effects. The dominant effect is the gradual decrease of the PL QY with increasing excitation photon energy.

  15. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst. PMID:27334409

  16. Determination of Dacarbazine Φ-Order Photokinetics, Quantum Yields, and Potential for Actinometry.

    PubMed

    Maafi, Mounir; Lee, Lok-Yan

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of drugs' photodegradation kinetics is more accurately achieved by means of the recently developed Φ-order kinetics than by the zero-, first-, and/or second-order classical treatments. The photodegradation of anti-cancer dacarbazine (DBZ) in ethanol has been investigated and found to obey Φ-order kinetics when subjected to continuous and monochromatic irradiation of various wavelengths. Its photochemical efficiency was proven to be wavelength dependent in the 220-350 nm range, undergoing a 50-fold increase. Albeit this variation was well defined by a sigmoid pattern, the overall photoreactivity of DBZ was proven to depend also on the contributions of reactants and experimental attributes. The usefulness of DBZ to serve as a drug-actinometer has been investigated using the mathematical framework of Φ-order kinetics. It has been shown that DBZ in ethanol can represent a good candidate for reliable actinometry in the range 270-350 nm. A detailed and easy-to-implement procedure has been proposed for DBZ actinometry. This procedure could advantageously be implemented prior to the determination of the photodegradation quantum yields. This approach might be found useful for the development of many drug actinometers as alternatives to quinine hydrochloride.

  17. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    SciTech Connect

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; Murat, Pavel

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductor scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.

  18. Integrated semiconductor quantum dot scintillation detector: Ultimate limit for speed and light yield

    DOE PAGES

    Oktyabrsky, Serge; Yakimov, Michael; Tokranov, Vadim; ...

    2016-03-30

    Here, a picosecond-range timing of charged particles and photons is a long-standing challenge for many high-energy physics, biophysics, medical and security applications. We present a design, technological pathway and challenges, and some properties important for realization of an ultrafast high-efficient room-temperature semiconductor scintillator based on self-assembled InAs quantum dots (QD) embedded in a GaAs matrix. Low QD density (<; 1015 cm-3), fast (~5 ps) electron capture, luminescence peak redshifted by 0.2-0.3 eV from GaAs absorption edge with fast decay time (0.5-1 ns) along with the efficient energy transfer in the GaAs matrix (4.2 eV/pair) allows for fabrication of a semiconductormore » scintillator with the unsurpassed performance parameters. The major technological challenge is fabrication of a large volume (> 1 cm3 ) of epitaxial QD medium. This requires multiple film separation and bonding, likely using separate epitaxial films as waveguides for improved light coupling. Compared to traditional inorganic scintillators, the semiconductor-QD based scintillators could have about 5x higher light yield and 20x faster decay time, opening a way to gamma detectors with the energy resolution better than 1% and sustaining counting rates MHz. Picosecond-scale timing requires segmented low-capacitance photodiodes integrated with the scintillator. For photons, the proposed detector inherently provides the depth-of-interaction information.« less

  19. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meiling, Till T.; Cywiński, Piotr J.; Bald, Ilko

    2016-06-01

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.

  20. White carbon: Fluorescent carbon nanoparticles with tunable quantum yield in a reproducible green synthesis.

    PubMed

    Meiling, Till T; Cywiński, Piotr J; Bald, Ilko

    2016-06-23

    In this study, a new reliable, economic, and environmentally-friendly one-step synthesis is established to obtain carbon nanodots (CNDs) with well-defined and reproducible photoluminescence (PL) properties via the microwave-assisted hydrothermal treatment of starch and Tris-acetate-EDTA (TAE) buffer as carbon sources. Three kinds of CNDs are prepared using different sets of above mentioned starting materials. The as-synthesized CNDs: C-CND (starch only), N-CND 1 (starch in TAE) and N-CND 2 (TAE only) exhibit highly homogenous PL and are ready to use without need for further purification. The CNDs are stable over a long period of time (>1 year) either in solution or as freeze-dried powder. Depending on starting material, CNDs with PL quantum yield (PLQY) ranging from less than 1% up to 28% are obtained. The influence of the precursor concentration, reaction time and type of additives on the optical properties (UV-Vis absorption, PL emission spectrum and PLQY) is carefully investigated, providing insight into the chemical processes that occur during CND formation. Remarkably, upon freeze-drying the initially brown CND-solution turns into a non-fluorescent white/slightly brown powder which recovers PL in aqueous solution and can potentially be applied as fluorescent marker in bio-imaging, as a reduction agent or as a photocatalyst.

  1. CDOM Sources and Photobleaching Control Quantum Yields for Oceanic DMS Photolysis.

    PubMed

    Galí, Martí; Kieber, David J; Romera-Castillo, Cristina; Kinsey, Joanna D; Devred, Emmanuel; Pérez, Gonzalo L; Westby, George R; Marrasé, Cèlia; Babin, Marcel; Levasseur, Maurice; Duarte, Carlos M; Agustí, Susana; Simó, Rafel

    2016-12-20

    Photolysis is a major removal pathway for the biogenic gas dimethylsulfide (DMS) in the surface ocean. Here we tested the hypothesis that apparent quantum yields (AQY) for DMS photolysis varied according to the quantity and quality of its photosensitizers, chiefly chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and nitrate. AQY compiled from the literature and unpublished studies ranged across 3 orders of magnitude at the 330 nm reference wavelength. The smallest AQY(330) were observed in coastal waters receiving major riverine inputs of terrestrial CDOM (0.06-0.5 m(3) (mol quanta)(-1)). In open-ocean waters, AQY(330) generally ranged between 1 and 10 m(3) (mol quanta)(-1). The largest AQY(330), up to 34 m(3) (mol quanta)(-1)), were seen in the Southern Ocean potentially associated with upwelling. Despite the large AQY variability, daily photolysis rate constants at the sea surface spanned a smaller range (0.04-3.7 d(-1)), mainly because of the inverse relationship between CDOM absorption and AQY. Comparison of AQY(330) with CDOM spectral signatures suggests there is an interplay between CDOM origin (terrestrial versus marine) and photobleaching that controls variations in AQYs, with a secondary role for nitrate. Our results can be used for regional or large-scale assessment of DMS photolysis rates in future studies.

  2. Measure of the Quantum Speedup in Closed and Open systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhen-Yu

    We construct a general measure for detecting the quantum speedup in both closed and open systems. This speed measure is based on the changing rate of the position of quantum states on a manifold with appropriate monotone Riemannian metrics. Any increase in speed is a clear signature of real dynamical speedup. To clarify the mechanisms of quantum speedup, we first introduce the concept of longitudinal and transverse types of speedup, and then apply the proposed measure to several typical closed and open quantum systems, illustrating that entanglement and the memory effect of the environment together can become resources for longitudinally or transversely accelerating dynamical evolution under certain conditions. Remarkably, a direct measurement of such speedup is feasible without the need for a tomographic reconstruction of the density matrix, which greatly enhances the feasibility of practical experimental tests. This work was supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11204196).

  3. Adaptive Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of a Photon Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peaudecerf, B.; Rybarczyk, T.; Gerlich, S.; Gleyzes, S.; Raimond, J. M.; Haroche, S.; Dotsenko, I.; Brune, M.

    2014-02-01

    In many quantum measurements, information is acquired incrementally by the successive interaction of meters with the measured system. Adaptive measurements minimize the use of resources (meters) by adjusting the measurement settings according to available information. We demonstrate an adaptive measurement for nondestructive photon counting in a cavity, based on Ramsey interferometry for Rydberg atoms interacting with the field. Tuning the interferometer in real time, we speed up the measurement by up to 45%. Such adaptive methods are promising for quantum metrology, state preparation, and feedback.

  4. Lithium: Measurement of Young's Modulus and Yield Strength

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan P Schultz

    2002-11-07

    The Lithium Collection Lens is used for anti-proton collection. In analyzing the structural behavior during operation, various material properties of lithium are often needed. properties such as density, coefficient of thermal expansion, thermal conductivity, specific heat, compressability, etc.; are well known. However, to the authors knowledge there is only one published source for Young's Modulus. This paper reviews the results from the testing of Young's Modulus and the yield strength of lithium at room temperature.

  5. Blind quantum computation protocol in which Alice only makes measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Fujii, Keisuke

    2013-05-01

    Blind quantum computation is a new secure quantum computing protocol which enables Alice (who does not have sufficient quantum technology) to delegate her quantum computation to Bob (who has a full-fledged quantum computer) in such a way that Bob cannot learn anything about Alice's input, output, and algorithm. In previous protocols, Alice needs to have a device which generates quantum states, such as single-photon states. Here we propose another type of blind computing protocol where Alice does only measurements, such as the polarization measurements with a threshold detector. In several experimental setups, such as optical systems, the measurement of a state is much easier than the generation of a single-qubit state. Therefore our protocols ease Alice's burden. Furthermore, the security of our protocol is based on the no-signaling principle, which is more fundamental than quantum physics. Finally, our protocols are device independent in the sense that Alice does not need to trust her measurement device in order to guarantee the security.

  6. Measurements satisfying the quantum Cramer-Rao equality

    SciTech Connect

    Luczak, Andrzej

    2009-07-15

    The situation where the quantum Cramer-Rao inequality for a general measurement becomes equality is analyzed in some detail in the case of a family of pure states. In particular, it turns out that under some natural assumptions, the measurement in question is simple, and the states must have a special form. This fact in turn allows us to obtain in the two-dimensional case a characterization of the pure states for which the quantum Cramer-Rao equality holds.

  7. Quantum state tomography with noninstantaneous measurements, imperfections, and decoherence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Six, P.; Campagne-Ibarcq, Ph.; Dotsenko, I.; Sarlette, A.; Huard, B.; Rouchon, P.

    2016-01-01

    Tomography of a quantum state is usually based on a positive-operator-valued measure (POVM) and on their experimental statistics. Among the available reconstructions, the maximum-likelihood (MaxLike) technique is an efficient one. We propose an extension of this technique when the measurement process cannot be simply described by an instantaneous POVM. Instead, the tomography relies on a set of quantum trajectories and their measurement records. This model includes the fact that, in practice, each measurement could be corrupted by imperfections and decoherence, and could also be associated with the record of continuous-time signals over a finite amount of time. The goal is then to retrieve the quantum state that was present at the start of this measurement process. The proposed extension relies on an explicit expression of the likelihood function via the effective matrices appearing in quantum smoothing and solutions of the adjoint quantum filter. It allows us to retrieve the initial quantum state as in standard MaxLike tomography, but where the traditional POVM operators are replaced by more general ones that depend on the measurement record of each trajectory. It also provides, aside from the MaxLike estimate of the quantum state, confidence intervals for any observable. Such confidence intervals are derived, as the MaxLike estimate, from an asymptotic expansion of multidimensional Laplace integrals appearing in Bayesian mean estimation. A validation is performed on two sets of experimental data: photon(s) trapped in a microwave cavity subject to quantum nondemolition measurements relying on Rydberg atoms, and heterodyne fluorescence measurements of a superconducting qubit.

  8. On the measurement of time for the quantum harmonic oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, Scott R.

    1992-01-01

    A generalization of previous treatments of quantum phase is presented. Restrictions on the class of realizable phase statistics are thereby removed; thus, permitting 'phase wavefunction collapse' (and other advantages). This is accomplished by exciting the auxiliary mode of the measurement apparatus in a time-reversed fashion. The mathematical properties of this auxiliary mode are studied in the hope that they will lead to an identification of a physical apparatus which can realize the quantum phase measurement.

  9. Accounting for the decrease of photosystem photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance to estimate quantum yield of leaf photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xinyou; Belay, Daniel W; van der Putten, Peter E L; Struik, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    Maximum quantum yield for leaf CO2 assimilation under limiting light conditions (Φ CO2LL) is commonly estimated as the slope of the linear regression of net photosynthetic rate against absorbed irradiance over a range of low-irradiance conditions. Methodological errors associated with this estimation have often been attributed either to light absorptance by non-photosynthetic pigments or to some data points being beyond the linear range of the irradiance response, both causing an underestimation of Φ CO2LL. We demonstrate here that a decrease in photosystem (PS) photochemical efficiency with increasing irradiance, even at very low levels, is another source of error that causes a systematic underestimation of Φ CO2LL. A model method accounting for this error was developed, and was used to estimate Φ CO2LL from simultaneous measurements of gas exchange and chlorophyll fluorescence on leaves using various combinations of species, CO2, O2, or leaf temperature levels. The conventional linear regression method under-estimated Φ CO2LL by ca. 10-15%. Differences in the estimated Φ CO2LL among measurement conditions were generally accounted for by different levels of photorespiration as described by the Farquhar-von Caemmerer-Berry model. However, our data revealed that the temperature dependence of PSII photochemical efficiency under low light was an additional factor that should be accounted for in the model.

  10. A model of the measurement process in quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diel, H. H.

    2015-07-01

    The so-called measurement problem of quantum theory (QT) is still lacking a satisfactory, or at least widely agreed upon, solution. A number of theories, known as interpretations of quantum theory, have been proposed and found differing acceptance among physicists. Most of the proposed theories try to explain what happens during a QT measurement using a modification of the declarative equations that define the possible results of a measurement of QT observables or by making assumptions outside the scope of falsifiable physics. This paper proposes a solution to the QT measurement problem in terms of a model of the process for the evolution of two QT systems that interact in a way that represents a measurement. The model assumes that the interactions between the measured QT object and the measurement apparatus are ’’normal” interactions which adhere to the laws of quantum field theory.

  11. Optical measurements for excitation of CdTe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladescu, Marian; Feies, Valentin; Schiopu, Paul; Craciun, Alexandru; Grosu, Neculai; Manea, Adrian

    2016-12-01

    The paper presents the experimental results obtained using a laboratory setup installation for fluorescence excitation of CdTe QDs used as biomarkers for clinical diagnostics. Quantum Dots (QDs) made of Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), are highly fluorescent and they are used as robust biomarkers. Generally, QDs are referred to as the zero-dimensional colloidal crystals that possess strong size dependence and multi-colored luminescence properties. Along with its intrinsic features, such as sharp and symmetric emission, photo-stability and high quantum yields, QDs play a vital role in various applications, namely the identification of the chemical moieties, clinical diagnostics, optoelectronics, bio-imaging and bio-sensing1.

  12. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    PubMed

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-06

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  13. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilishin, Stefan L.; Khalili, Farid Ya.

    2012-12-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  14. Quantum Measurement Theory in Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    PubMed

    Danilishin, Stefan L; Khalili, Farid Ya

    2012-01-01

    The fast progress in improving the sensitivity of the gravitational-wave detectors, we all have witnessed in the recent years, has propelled the scientific community to the point at which quantum behavior of such immense measurement devices as kilometer-long interferometers starts to matter. The time when their sensitivity will be mainly limited by the quantum noise of light is around the corner, and finding ways to reduce it will become a necessity. Therefore, the primary goal we pursued in this review was to familiarize a broad spectrum of readers with the theory of quantum measurements in the very form it finds application in the area of gravitational-wave detection. We focus on how quantum noise arises in gravitational-wave interferometers and what limitations it imposes on the achievable sensitivity. We start from the very basic concepts and gradually advance to the general linear quantum measurement theory and its application to the calculation of quantum noise in the contemporary and planned interferometric detectors of gravitational radiation of the first and second generation. Special attention is paid to the concept of the Standard Quantum Limit and the methods of its surmounting.

  15. Statistical measures of complexity for quantum systems with continuous variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzano, D.

    2012-12-01

    The Fisher-Shannon statistical measure of complexity is analyzed for a continuous manifold of quantum observables. It is shown that evaluating this measure only in the configuration or in the momentum spaces does not provide an adequate characterization of the complexity of some quantum systems. In order to obtain a more complete description of complexity two new measures, respectively based on the minimization and the integration of the usual Fisher-Shannon measure over all the parameter space, are proposed and compared. Finally, these measures are applied to the concrete case of a free particle in a box.

  16. Quantum homomorphic signature based on Bell-state measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Qing-bin; Yang, Guo-wu; She, Kun; Li, Xiao-yu; Fang, Jun-bin

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel quantum homomorphic signature scheme based solely on Bell-state measurement is proposed. It allows an aggregator to merge two signature nodes' signatures of their classical messages into one signature, which is an effective approach to identity authentication for multiple streams to enhance the security of quantum networks. And it is easy to generalize this scheme to multiple nodes. Bell-state measurement has been realized by using only linear optical elements in many experimental measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution schemes, which makes us believe that our scheme can be realized in the near future. It is shown that our scheme is a quantum group homomorphic signature scheme and is secure by the scheme analysis.

  17. Five Measurement Bases Determine Pure Quantum States on Any Dimension.

    PubMed

    Goyeneche, D; Cañas, G; Etcheverry, S; Gómez, E S; Xavier, G B; Lima, G; Delgado, A

    2015-08-28

    A long-standing problem in quantum mechanics is the minimum number of observables required for the characterization of unknown pure quantum states. The solution to this problem is especially important for the developing field of high-dimensional quantum information processing. In this work we demonstrate that any pure d-dimensional state is unambiguously reconstructed by measuring five observables, that is, via projective measurements onto the states of five orthonormal bases. Thus, in our method the total number of different measurement outcomes (5d) scales linearly with d. The state reconstruction is robust against experimental errors and requires simple postprocessing, regardless of d. We experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of our scheme through the reconstruction of eight-dimensional quantum states, encoded in the momentum of single photons.

  18. Adaptation to high CO2 concentration in an optimal environment: radiation capture, canopy quantum yield and carbon use efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, O.; Bugbee, B.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of elevated [CO2] on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Veery 10) productivity was examined by analysing radiation capture, canopy quantum yield, canopy carbon use efficiency, harvest index and daily C gain. Canopies were grown at either 330 or 1200 micromoles mol-1 [CO2] in controlled environments, where root and shoot C fluxes were monitored continuously from emergence to harvest. A rapidly circulating hydroponic solution supplied nutrients, water and root zone oxygen. At harvest, dry mass predicted from gas exchange data was 102.8 +/- 4.7% of the observed dry mass in six trials. Neither radiation capture efficiency nor carbon use efficiency were affected by elevated [CO2], but yield increased by 13% due to a sustained increase in canopy quantum yield. CO2 enrichment increased root mass, tiller number and seed mass. Harvest index and chlorophyll concentration were unchanged, but CO2 enrichment increased average life cycle net photosynthesis (13%, P < 0.05) and root respiration (24%, P < 0.05). These data indicate that plant communities adapt to CO2 enrichment through changes in C allocation. Elevated [CO2] increases sink strength in optimal environments, resulting in sustained increases in photosynthetic capacity, canopy quantum yield and daily C gain throughout the life cycle.

  19. Time-symmetric electrodynamics and quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pegg, D. T.

    The application of the Wheeler-Feynman theory of time-symmetric electrodynamics to obtain definite answers to questions concerning the objective existence of quantum states in an optical EPR type of experiment is discussed. This theory allows the influence of the detector on the system being studied to be taken into account. The result is an entirely fresh understanding of experiments of the Kocher-Commins type.

  20. The challenge of detecting gravitational radiation is creating a new chapter in quantum electronics: Quantum nondemolition measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braginsky, V. B.; Vorontsov, Y. I.; Thorne, K. S.

    1979-01-01

    Future gravitational wave antennas will be approximately 100 kilogram cylinders, whose end-to-end vibrations must be measured so accurately (10 to the -19th power centimeters) that they behave quantum mechanically. Moreover, the vibration amplitude must be measured over and over again without perturbing it (quantum nondemolition measurement). This contrasts with quantum chemistry, quantum optics, or atomic, nuclear, and elementary particle physics where measurements are usually made on an ensemble of identical objects, and care is not given to whether any single object is perturbed or destroyed by the measurement. Electronic techniques required for quantum nondemolition measurements are described as well as the theory underlying them.

  1. General quantum constraints on detector noise in continuous linear measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Haixing

    2017-01-01

    In quantum sensing and metrology, an important class of measurement is the continuous linear measurement, in which the detector is coupled to the system of interest linearly and continuously in time. One key aspect involved is the quantum noise of the detector, arising from quantum fluctuations in the detector input and output. It determines how fast we acquire information about the system and also influences the system evolution in terms of measurement backaction. We therefore often categorize it as the so-called imprecision noise and quantum backaction noise. There is a general Heisenberg-like uncertainty relation that constrains the magnitude of and the correlation between these two types of quantum noise. The main result of this paper is to show that, when the detector becomes ideal, i.e., at the quantum limit with minimum uncertainty, not only does the uncertainty relation takes the equal sign as expected, but also there are two new equalities. This general result is illustrated by using the typical cavity QED setup with the system being either a qubit or a mechanical oscillator. Particularly, the dispersive readout of a qubit state, and the measurement of mechanical motional sideband asymmetry are considered.

  2. Exploring Quantum Dynamics of Continuous Measurement with a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jadbabaie, Arian; Forouzani, Neda; Tan, Dian; Murch, Kater

    Weak measurements obtain partial information about a quantum state with minimal backaction. This enables state tracking without immediate collapse to eigenstates, of interest to both experimental and theoretical physics. State tomography and continuous weak measurements may be used to reconstruct the evolution of a single system, known as a quantum trajectory. We examine experimental trajectories of a two-level system at varied measurement strengths with constant unitary drive. Our analysis is applied to a transmon qubit dispersively coupled to a 3D microwave cavity in the circuit QED architecture. The weakly coupled cavity acts as pointer system for QND measurements in the qubit's energy basis. Our results indicate a marked difference in state purity between two approaches for trajectory reconstruction: the Bayesian and Stochastic Master Equation (SME) formalisms. Further, we observe the transition from diffusive to jump-like trajectories, state purity evolution, and a novel, tilted form of the Quantum Zeno effect. This work provides new insight into quantum behavior and prompts further comparison of SME and Bayesian formalisms to understand the nature of quantum systems. Our results are applicable to a variety of fields, from stochastic thermodynamics to quantum control.

  3. Informationally complete joint measurements on finite quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinosaari, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We show that there are informationally complete joint measurements of two conjugated observables on a finite quantum system, meaning that they enable the identification of all quantum states from their measurement outcome statistics. We further demonstrate that it is possible to implement a joint observable as a sequential measurement. If we require minimal noise in the joint measurement, then the joint observable is unique. If d is odd, then this observable is informationally complete. But if d is even, then the joint observable is not informationally complete, and one has to allow more noise in order to obtain informational completeness.

  4. Josephson directional amplifier for quantum measurement of superconducting circuits.

    PubMed

    Abdo, Baleegh; Sliwa, Katrina; Shankar, S; Hatridge, Michael; Frunzio, Luigi; Schoelkopf, Robert; Devoret, Michel

    2014-04-25

    We realize a microwave quantum-limited amplifier that is directional and can therefore function without the front circulator needed in many quantum measurements. The amplification takes place in only one direction between the input and output ports. Directionality is achieved by multipump parametric amplification combined with wave interference. We have verified the device noise performances by using it to read out a superconducting qubit and observed quantum jumps. With an improved version of this device, the qubit and preamplifer could be integrated on the same chip.

  5. Quantum and concept combination, entangled measurements, and prototype theory.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Diederik

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the meaning of the violation of the marginal probability law for situations of correlation measurements where entanglement is identified. We show that for quantum theory applied to the cognitive realm such a violation does not lead to the type of problems commonly believed to occur in situations of quantum theory applied to the physical realm. We briefly situate our quantum approach for modeling concepts and their combinations with respect to the notions of "extension" and "intension" in theories of meaning, and in existing concept theories.

  6. Minimal classical communication and measurement complexity for quantum information splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhan-jun; Cheung, Chi-Yee

    2008-01-01

    We present two quantum information splitting schemes using respectively tripartite GHZ and asymmetric W states as quantum channels. We show that if the secret state is chosen from a special ensemble and known to the sender (Alice), then she can split and distribute it to the receivers Bob and Charlie by performing only a single-qubit measurement and broadcasting a one-cbit message. It is clear that no other schemes could possibly achieve the same goal with simpler measurement and less classical communication. In comparison, existing schemes work for arbitrary quantum states which need not be known to Alice; however she is required to perform a two-qubit Bell measurement and communicate a two-cbit message. Hence there is a trade-off between flexibility and measurement complexity plus classical resource. In situations where our schemes are applicable, they will greatly reduce the measurement complexity and at the same time cut the communication overhead by one half.

  7. Model-independent Higgs coupling measurements at the LHC using the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape

    SciTech Connect

    Logan, Heather E.; Salvail, Jeff Z.

    2011-10-01

    We show that combining a direct measurement of the Higgs total width from the H{yields}ZZ{yields}4l lineshape with Higgs signal rate measurements allows Higgs couplings to be extracted in a model-independent way from CERN LHC data. Using existing experimental studies with 30 fb{sup -1} at one detector of the 14 TeV LHC, we show that the couplings squared of a 190 GeV Higgs to WW, ZZ, and gg can be extracted with statistical precisions of about 10%, and a 95% confidence level upper limit on an unobserved component of the Higgs decay width of about 22% of the standard model Higgs width can be set. The method can also be applied for heavier Higgs masses.

  8. Quantum-orbit analysis for yield and ellipticity of high order harmonic generation with elliptically polarized laser field.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Zhu, Xiaosong; Zhang, Qingbin; Qin, Meiyan; Lu, Peixiang

    2013-02-25

    We perform a quantum-orbit analysis for the dependence of high-order-harmonic yield on the driving field ellipticity and the polarization properties of the generated high harmonics. The electron trajectories responsible for the emission of particular harmonics are identified. It is found that, in elliptically polarized driving field, the electrons have ellipticity-dependent initial velocities, which lead to the decrease of the ionization rate. Thus the harmonic yield steeply decreases with laser ellipticity. Besides, we show that the polarization properties of the harmonics are related to the complex momenta of the electron. The physical origin of the harmonic ellipticity is interpreted as the consequence of quantum-mechanical uncertainty of the electron momentum. Our results are verified with the experimental results as well as the numerical solutions of the time dependent Schrödinger equation from the literature.

  9. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal-Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, ZW; Gu, ZY; Arvapally, RK; Chen, YP; McDougald, RN; Ivy, JF; Yakovenko, AA; Feng, DW; Omary, MA; Zhou, HC

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 +/- 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm(-1) blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  10. Rigidifying Fluorescent Linkers by Metal–Organic Framework Formation for Fluorescence Blue Shift and Quantum Yield Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Zhangwen; Gu, Zhi-Yuan; Arvapally, Ravi K.; Chen, Ying-Pin; Ivy, Joshua F.; Yakovenko, Andrey A.; Feng, Dawei; Omary, Mohammad A.; Zhou, Hong-Cai

    2014-06-11

    We demonstrate that rigidifying the structure of fluorescent linkers by structurally constraining them in metal–organic frameworks (MOFs) to control their conformation effectively tunes the fluorescence energy and enhances the quantum yield. Thus, a new tetraphenylethylene-based zirconium MOF exhibits a deep-blue fluorescent emission at 470 nm with a unity quantum yield (99.9 ± 0.5%) under Ar, representing ca. 3600 cm⁻¹ blue shift and doubled radiative decay efficiency vs the linker precursor. An anomalous increase in the fluorescence lifetime and relative intensity takes place upon heating the solid MOF from cryogenic to ambient temperatures. The origin of these unusual photoluminescence properties is attributed to twisted linker conformation, intramolecular hindrance, and framework rigidity.

  11. Laser flash photolysis of ozone - O/1D/ quantum yields in the fall-off region 297-325 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, J. C.; Watson, R. T.

    1980-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of the quantum yield for O(1D) production from ozone photolysis has been determined between 297.5 nm and 325 nm in order to resolve serious discrepancies among previous studies. The results of this investigation are compared to earlier work by calculating atmospheric production rate constants for O(1D). It is found that for the purpose of calculating this rate constant, there is now good agreement among three studies at 298 K. Furthermore, it appears that previous data on the temperature dependence of the O(1D) quantum yield fall-off is adequate for determining the vertical profile of the O(1D) production rate constant. Several experimental difficulties associated with using NO2(asterisk) chemiluminescence to monitor O(1D) have been identified.

  12. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2010-04-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10∶1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  13. Challenge to the Charging Model of Semiconductor-Nanocrystal Fluorescence Intermittency from Off-State Quantum Yields and Multiexciton Blinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R.; Bawendi, Moungi G.

    2012-01-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they “blink,” under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core (shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model. PMID:20482016

  14. Challenge to the charging model of semiconductor-nanocrystal fluorescence intermittency from off-state quantum yields and multiexciton blinking.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Nair, Gautham; Fisher, Brent R; Bawendi, Moungi G

    2010-04-16

    Semiconductor nanocrystals emit light intermittently; i.e., they "blink," under steady illumination. The dark periods have been widely assumed to be due to photoluminescence (PL) quenching by an Auger-like process involving a single additional charge present in the nanocrystal. Our results challenge this long-standing assumption. Close examination of exciton PL intensity time traces of single CdSe(CdZnS) core(shell) nanocrystals reveals that the dark state PL quantum yield can be 10 times less than the biexciton PL quantum yield. In addition, we observe spectrally resolved multiexciton emission and find that it also blinks with an on/off ratio greater than 10:1. These results directly contradict the predictions of the charging model.

  15. Energy-Time Uncertainty Relations in Quantum Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki

    2016-11-01

    Quantum measurement is a physical process. A system and an apparatus interact for a certain time period (measurement time), and during this interaction, information about an observable is transferred from the system to the apparatus. In this study, we quantify the energy fluctuation of the quantum apparatus required for this physical process to occur autonomously. We first examine the so-called standard model of measurement, which is free from any non-trivial energy-time uncertainty relation, to find that it needs an external system that switches on the interaction between the system and the apparatus. In such a sense this model is not closed. Therefore to treat a measurement process in a fully quantum manner we need to consider a "larger" quantum apparatus which works also as a timing device switching on the interaction. In this setting we prove that a trade-off relation (energy-time uncertainty relation), τ \\cdot Δ H_A ≥ π /4, holds between the energy fluctuation Δ H_A of the quantum apparatus and the measurement time τ . We use this trade-off relation to discuss the spacetime uncertainty relation concerning the operational meaning of the microscopic structure of spacetime. In addition, we derive another trade-off inequality between the measurement time and the strength of interaction between the system and the apparatus.

  16. Quantum yield of chlorine-atom formation in the photodissociation of chlorine peroxide (ClOOCl) at 308 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, M. J.; Colussi, A. J.; Molina, L. T.; Schindler, R. N.; Tso, T.-L.

    1990-01-01

    The production of Cl atoms in the laser flash photolysis of ClOOCl at 308 nm has been investigated by time-resolved atomic resonance fluorescence at 235 K. A value of phi = 1.03 +/-0.12 has been obtained for the primary quantum yield based on an absorption cross section ratio sigma(245)/phi(308) = 22 for ClOOCl at 245 and 308 nm.

  17. Enhanced Hypsochromic Shifts, Quantum Yield, and π-π Interactions in a meso,β-Heteroaryl-Fused BODIPY.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ning; Xuan, Sunting; Fronczek, Frank R; Smith, Kevin M; Vicente, M Graça H

    2017-03-10

    We report the synthesis and investigation of an unprecedented 8-heteroaryl-fused BODIPY 4. This compound exhibits enhanced π-π stacking in the solid state, unusually large blue-shifts in the absorbance and emission spectra, and higher fluorescence quantum yield than its unfused precursor; DFT calculations suggest a small energy gap for 4 and strong electronic communication between the 8-OPh and the BODIPY core.

  18. Characterization of measurements in quantum communication. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, V. W. S.

    1975-01-01

    A characterization of quantum measurements by operator valued measures is presented. The generalized measurements include simultaneous approximate measurement of noncommuting observables. This characterization is suitable for solving problems in quantum communication. Two realizations of such measurements are discussed. The first is by adjoining an apparatus to the system under observation and performing a measurement corresponding to a self-adjoint operator in the tensor-product Hilbert space of the system and apparatus spaces. The second realization is by performing, on the system alone, sequential measurements that correspond to self-adjoint operators, basing the choice of each measurement on the outcomes of previous measurements. Simultaneous generalized measurements are found to be equivalent to a single finer grain generalized measurement, and hence it is sufficient to consider the set of single measurements. An alternative characterization of generalized measurement is proposed. It is shown to be equivalent to the characterization by operator-values measures, but it is potentially more suitable for the treatment of estimation problems. Finally, a study of the interaction between the information-carrying system and a measurement apparatus provides clues for the physical realizations of abstractly characterized quantum measurements.

  19. Cl2O photochemistry: ultraviolet/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and O(3P) quantum yield at 193 and 248 nm.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Feierabend, Karl J; Burkholder, James B

    2011-05-28

    The photochemistry of Cl(2)O (dichlorine monoxide) was studied using measurements of its UV/vis absorption spectrum temperature dependence and the O((3)P) atom quantum yield, Φ(Cl(2)O)(O)(λ), in its photolysis at 193 and 248 nm. The Cl(2)O UV/vis absorption spectrum was measured over the temperature range 201-296 K between 200 and 500 nm using diode array spectroscopy. Cl(2)O absorption cross sections, σ(Cl(2)O)(λ,T), at temperatures <296 K were determined relative to its well established room temperature values. A wavelength and temperature dependent parameterization of the Cl(2)O spectrum using the sum of six Gaussian functions, which empirically represent transitions from the ground (1)A(1) electronic state to excited states, is presented. The Gaussian functions are found to correlate well with published theoretically calculated vertical excitation energies. O((3)P) quantum yields in the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 193 and 248 nm were measured using pulsed laser photolysis combined with atomic resonance fluorescence detection of O((3)P) atoms. O((3)P) quantum yields were measured to be 0.85 ± 0.15 for 193 nm photolysis at 296 K and 0.20 ± 0.03 at 248 nm, which was also found to be independent of temperature (220-352 K) and pressure (17 and 28 Torr, N(2)). The quoted uncertainties are at the 2σ (95% confidence) level and include estimated systematic errors. ClO radical temporal profiles obtained following the photolysis of Cl(2)O at 248 nm, as reported previously in Feierabend et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 12052, (2010)], were interpreted to establish a <5% upper-limit for the O + Cl(2) photodissociation channel, which indicates that O((3)P) is primarily formed in the three-body, O + 2Cl, photodissociation channel at 248 nm. The analysis also indirectly provided a Cl atom quantum yield of 1.2 ± 0.1 at 248 nm. The results from this work are compared with previous studies where possible.

  20. Quantum yields lower than unity in photo- induced dissociative electron transfers: the reductive cleavage of carbon tetrachloride.

    PubMed

    Pause, L; Robert, M; Savéant, J M

    2000-12-15

    It has been shown recently that the electrochemical reduction of carbon tetrachloride in N,N'-dimethylformamide follows a mechanism in which electron transfer and bond cleavage are concerted. We report here results concerning photoinduced electron transfer from the singlet excited state of two aromatic molecules, 2-ethyl-9,10-dimethoxyanthracene and perylene, to CCl4 , which is characterised by a quantum yield of complete quenching fragmentation ranging from 0.7 to 0.8. It is shown that a quantum yield below unity is compatible with a dissociative mechanism and arises from partitioning of the system at the intersection of the product- and ground-state potential energy surfaces. This phenomenon predominates over back electron transfer from the clustered fragments state. The photoinduced reductive cleavage of CCl4 thus provides a clear illustration of the recent theoretical prediction, that photoinduced dissociative electron transfers are not necessarily endowed with a unity quantum yield. This offers an opportunity to estimate the magnitude of the electronic matrix element that couples the fragmented product state and the ground reactant state.

  1. Long-distance measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution with coherent-state superpositions.

    PubMed

    Yin, H-L; Cao, W-F; Fu, Y; Tang, Y-L; Liu, Y; Chen, T-Y; Chen, Z-B

    2014-09-15

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) with decoy-state method is believed to be securely applied to defeat various hacking attacks in practical quantum key distribution systems. Recently, the coherent-state superpositions (CSS) have emerged as an alternative to single-photon qubits for quantum information processing and metrology. Here, in this Letter, CSS are exploited as the source in MDI-QKD. We present an analytical method that gives two tight formulas to estimate the lower bound of yield and the upper bound of bit error rate. We exploit the standard statistical analysis and Chernoff bound to perform the parameter estimation. Chernoff bound can provide good bounds in the long-distance MDI-QKD. Our results show that with CSS, both the security transmission distance and secure key rate are significantly improved compared with those of the weak coherent states in the finite-data case.

  2. Coherent versus Measurement Feedback: Linear Systems Theory for Quantum Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-10-01

    To control a quantum system via feedback, we generally have two options in choosing a control scheme. One is the coherent feedback, which feeds the output field of the system, through a fully quantum device, back to manipulate the system without involving any measurement process. The other one is measurement-based feedback, which measures the output field and performs a real-time manipulation on the system based on the measurement results. Both schemes have advantages and disadvantages, depending on the system and the control goal; hence, their comparison in several situations is important. This paper considers a general open linear quantum system with the following specific control goals: backaction evasion, generation of a quantum nondemolished variable, and generation of a decoherence-free subsystem, all of which have important roles in quantum information science. Some no-go theorems are proven, clarifying that those goals cannot be achieved by any measurement-based feedback control. On the other hand, it is shown that, for each control goal there exists a coherent feedback controller accomplishing the task. The key idea to obtain all the results is system theoretic characterizations of the above three notions in terms of controllability and observability properties or transfer functions of linear systems, which are consistent with their standard definitions.

  3. The theory research of multi-user quantum access network with Measurement Device Independent quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yi-Ming; Li, Yun-Xia; Shi, Lei; Meng, Wen; Cui, Shu-Min; Xu, Zhen-Yu

    2015-10-01

    Quantum access network can't guarantee the absolute security of multi-user detector and eavesdropper can get access to key information through time-shift attack and other ways. Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is immune from all the detection attacks, and accomplishes the safe sharing of quantum key. In this paper, that Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution is used in the application of multi-user quantum access to the network is on the research. By adopting time-division multiplexing technology to achieve the sharing of multiuser detector, the system structure is simplified and the security of quantum key sharing is acquired.

  4. Photophysics of a new photosensitizer with high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation and its application to stereo-selective synthesis of (+)-deoxoartemisinin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Kang-Kyun; Choi, Kyoung-Hoon; Shin, Hee-Won; Kim, Bong-Jin; Im, Ji-Eun; Oh, Seung-Lim; Park, Nam-Soo; Jung, Mankil; Oh, Jae-Buem; Lee, Myung-Jun; Kim, Hwan-Kyu; Kim, Yong-Rok

    2009-11-01

    A new photo-catalyst of [5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-porphyrin] platinum was synthesized and its photophysical study revealed that it had a high quantum yield of singlet oxygen generation. As an application study, a stereo-specific synthesis of (+)-deoxoartemisinin was performed. The induced high triplet quantum yield (0.96 ± 0.03) of [5,10,15-triphenyl-20-(4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-porphyrin] resulted the high singlet oxygen quantum yield of 0.90 ± 0.04. The photo-catalytic effect was compared with that of methylene blue (MB) which was generally used as a photo-catalyst for these types of stereo-specific syntheses of organic compounds. The yield of synthesized (+)-deoxoartemisinin was correlated with singlet oxygen quantum yield.

  5. 2,5-disubstituted oxazole research: fluorescence quantum yields and laser conversion efficiencies of 2-(p-italic-biphenyl)-5-phenyl oxazole and its 5-p-italic-substituted derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Peifeng

    1986-03-01

    The fluorescence quantum yield and laser conversion efficiency of 2-(p-italic-biphenyl)-5-phenyl-oxazole and thirteen 5-substituted phenyl derivatives are measured. A brief discussion is also given on the relation between the subtituent effects and spectral properties of the compounds.

  6. Intrinsic unsharpness and approximate repeatability of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Heinonen, Teiko; Toigo, Alessandro

    2007-02-01

    The intrinsic unsharpness of a quantum observable is studied by introducing the notion of resolution width. This quantification of accuracy is shown to be closely connected with the possibility of making approximately repeatable measurements. As a case study, the intrinsic unsharpness and approximate repeatability of position and momentum measurements are examined in detail.

  7. Measures of correlations in infinite-dimensional quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, M. E.

    2016-05-01

    Several important measures of correlations of the state of a finite-dimensional composite quantum system are defined as linear combinations of marginal entropies of this state. This paper is devoted to infinite-dimensional generalizations of such quantities and to an analysis of their properties. We introduce the notion of faithful extension of a linear combination of marginal entropies and consider several concrete examples, the simplest of which are quantum mutual information and quantum conditional entropy. Then we show that quantum conditional mutual information can be defined uniquely as a lower semicontinuous function on the set of all states of a tripartite infinite-dimensional system possessing all the basic properties valid in finite dimensions. Infinite-dimensional generalizations of some other measures of correlations in multipartite quantum systems are also considered. Applications of the results to the theory of infinite-dimensional quantum channels and their capacities are considered. The existence of a Fawzi-Renner recovery channel reproducing marginal states for all tripartite states (including states with infinite marginal entropies) is shown. Bibliography: 47 titles.

  8. Measurement-device-independent quantum communication with an untrusted source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Feihu

    2015-07-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDI-QKD) can provide enhanced security compared to traditional QKD, and it constitutes an important framework for a quantum network with an untrusted network server. Still, a key assumption in MDI-QKD is that the sources are trusted. We propose here a MDI quantum network with a single untrusted source. We have derived a complete proof of the unconditional security of MDI-QKD with an untrusted source. Using simulations, we have considered various real-life imperfections in its implementation, and the simulation results show that MDI-QKD with an untrusted source provides a key generation rate that is close to the rate of initial MDI-QKD in the asymptotic setting. Our work proves the feasibility of the realization of a quantum network. The network users need only low-cost modulation devices, and they can share both an expensive detector and a complicated laser provided by an untrusted network server.

  9. Repeatable measurements in quantum theory: Their role and feasibility

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, P.; Grabowski, M.; Lahti, P.J.

    1995-09-01

    Recent advantages in experimental quantum physics call for a careful reconsideration of the measurements process in quantum mechanics. In this paper we describe the structure of the ideal measurements and their status among the repeatable measurements. Then we provide an exhaustive account of the interrelations between repeatability and the apparently weaker notions of value reproducible or first-kind measurements. We demonstrate the close link between repeatable measurements and discrete observables and show how the ensuing measurement limitations for continuous observables can be lifted in a way that is in full accordance with actual experimental practice. We present examples of almost repeatable measurements of continuous observables and some realistic models of weakly disturbing measurements.

  10. Direct Measurement of the Density Matrix of a Quantum System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thekkadath, G. S.; Giner, L.; Chalich, Y.; Horton, M. J.; Banker, J.; Lundeen, J. S.

    2016-09-01

    One drawback of conventional quantum state tomography is that it does not readily provide access to single density matrix elements since it requires a global reconstruction. Here, we experimentally demonstrate a scheme that can be used to directly measure individual density matrix elements of general quantum states. The scheme relies on measuring a sequence of three observables, each complementary to the last. The first two measurements are made weak to minimize the disturbance they cause to the state, while the final measurement is strong. We perform this joint measurement on polarized photons in pure and mixed states to directly measure their density matrix. The weak measurements are achieved using two walk-off crystals, each inducing a polarization-dependent spatial shift that couples the spatial and polarization degrees of freedom of the photons. This direct measurement method provides an operational meaning to the density matrix and promises to be especially useful for large dimensional states.

  11. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield

    PubMed Central

    Purchase, R. L.; de Groot, H. J. M.

    2015-01-01

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m−2 d−1 for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum–classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics

  12. Electrical derivative measurement of quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Dingkai; Cheng, Liwei; Chen, Xing; Choa, Fow-Sen; Fan, Jenyu; Worchesky, Terry

    2011-02-01

    The electrical derivative characteristics of quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) are investigated to test the QCL threshold, leakage current, and possibly explore carrier transport. QCL thresholds can be identified by searching for the slope peak of the first derivative of the I-V curves and can be further confirmed with its alignment to the peak of the second derivative of the I-V curves. Leakage current in QCLs with oxide-blocked ridge waveguides and buried heterostructure (BH) waveguides are studied and compared. The oxide-blocking structures provide the lowest leakage current although the capped-mesa-BH (CMBH) QCLs provide the toughest durability under highly stressful operations. The leakage current of CMBH QCLs are also compared at different temperatures.

  13. Number-resolved master equation approach to quantum measurement and quantum transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xin-Qi

    2016-08-01

    In addition to the well-known Landauer-Büttiker scattering theory and the nonequilibrium Green's function technique for mesoscopic transports, an alternative (and very useful) scheme is quantum master equation approach. In this article, we review the particle-number ( n)-resolved master equation ( n-ME) approach and its systematic applications in quantum measurement and quantum transport problems. The n-ME contains rich dynamical information, allowing efficient study of topics such as shot noise and full counting statistics analysis. Moreover, we also review a newly developed master equation approach (and its n-resolved version) under self-consistent Born approximation. The application potential of this new approach is critically examined via its ability to recover the exact results for noninteracting systems under arbitrary voltage and in presence of strong quantum interference, and the challenging non-equilibrium Kondo effect.

  14. Conservation laws, uncertainty relations, and quantum limits of measurements.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Masanao

    2002-02-04

    The uncertainty relation between the noise operator and the conserved quantity leads to a bound on the accuracy of general measurements. The bound extends the assertion by Wigner, Araki, and Yanase that conservation laws limit the accuracy of "repeatable," or "nondisturbing," measurements to general measurements, and improves the one previously obtained by Yanase for spin measurements. The bound represents an obstacle to making a small quantum computer.

  15. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology.

    PubMed

    Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-10-28

    Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

  16. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, Helen M.; Walk, Nathan; Assad, Syed M.; Janousek, Jiri; Hosseini, Sara; Ralph, Timothy C.; Symul, Thomas; Lam, Ping Koy

    2014-04-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require advanced experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. Recently, it was shown that the benefits of noiseless amplification could be extracted by performing a post-selective filtering of the measurement record to improve the performance of quantum key distribution. We apply this protocol to entanglement degraded by transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100 km of optical fibre. We measure an effective entangled resource stronger than that achievable by even a maximally entangled resource passively transmitted through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime. The measurement-based noiseless linear amplifier offers two advantages over its physical counterpart: ease of implementation and near-optimal probability of success. It should provide an effective and versatile tool for a broad class of entanglement-based quantum communication protocols.

  17. Measurement-device-independent entanglement-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiuqing; Wei, Kejin; Ma, Haiqiang; Sun, Shihai; Liu, Hongwei; Yin, Zhenqiang; Li, Zuohan; Lian, Shibin; Du, Yungang; Wu, Lingan

    2016-05-01

    We present a quantum key distribution protocol in a model in which the legitimate users gather statistics as in the measurement-device-independent entanglement witness to certify the sources and the measurement devices. We show that the task of measurement-device-independent quantum communication can be accomplished based on monogamy of entanglement, and it is fairly loss tolerate including source and detector flaws. We derive a tight bound for collective attacks on the Holevo information between the authorized parties and the eavesdropper. Then with this bound, the final secret key rate with the source flaws can be obtained. The results show that long-distance quantum cryptography over 144 km can be made secure using only standard threshold detectors.

  18. Reduction of Classical Measurement Noise via Quantum-Dense Metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ast, Melanie; Steinlechner, Sebastian; Schnabel, Roman

    2016-10-01

    Quantum-dense metrology constitutes a special case of quantum metrology in which two orthogonal phase space projections of a signal are simultaneously sensed beyond the shot-noise limit. Previously, it was shown that the additional sensing channel that is provided by quantum-dense metrology contains information that can be used to identify and to discard corrupted segments from the measurement data. Here, we propose and demonstrate a new method in which this information is used for improving the sensitivity without discarding any measurement segments. Our measurement reached sub-shot-noise performance, although initially strong classical noise polluted the data. The new method has high potential for improving the noise spectral density of gravitational-wave detectors at signal frequencies of high astrophysical relevance.

  19. Upconverting core-shell nanocrystals with high quantum yield under low irradiance: On the role of isotropic and thick shells

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Stefan; Goldschmidt, Jan Christoph; Johnson, Noah J. J.; Pichaandi, Jothirmayanantham; Veggel, Frank C. J. M. van

    2015-11-21

    Colloidal upconverter nanocrystals (UCNCs) that convert near-infrared photons to higher energies are promising for applications ranging from life sciences to solar energy harvesting. However, practical applications of UCNCs are hindered by their low upconversion quantum yield (UCQY) and the high irradiances necessary to produce relevant upconversion luminescence. Achieving high UCQY under practically relevant irradiance remains a major challenge. The UCQY is severely limited due to non-radiative surface quenching processes. We present a rate equation model for migration of the excitation energy to show that surface quenching does not only affect the lanthanide ions directly at the surface but also many other lanthanide ions quite far away from the surface. The average migration path length is on the order of several nanometers and depends on the doping as well as the irradiance of the excitation. Using Er{sup 3+}-doped β-NaYF{sub 4} UCNCs, we show that very isotropic and thick (∼10 nm) β-NaLuF{sub 4} inert shells dramatically reduce the surface-related quenching processes, resulting in much brighter upconversion luminescence at simultaneously considerably lower irradiances. For these UCNCs embedded in poly(methyl methacrylate), we determined an internal UCQY of 2.0% ± 0.2% using an irradiance of only 0.43 ± 0.03 W/cm{sup 2} at 1523 nm. Normalized to the irradiance, this UCQY is 120× higher than the highest values of comparable nanomaterials in the literature. Our findings demonstrate the important role of isotropic and thick shells in achieving high UCQY at low irradiances from UCNCs. Additionally, we measured the additional short-circuit current due to upconversion in silicon solar cell devices as a proof of concept and to support our findings determined using optical measurements.

  20. Absorption and Quantum Yield of Single Conjugated Polymer Poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) Molecules

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    We simultaneously measured the absorption and emission of single conjugated polymer poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV) molecules in a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) matrix using near-critical xenon to enhance the photothermal contrast for direct absorption measurements. We directly measured the number of monomers and the quantum yield of single conjugated polymer molecules. Simultaneous absorption and emission measurements provided new insight into the photophysics of single conjugated polymers under optical excitation: quenching in larger molecules is more efficient than in smaller ones. Photoinduced traps and defects formed under prolonged illumination lead to decrease of both polymer fluorescence and absorption signals with the latter declining slower. PMID:28221806

  1. Quantum measurement of an electron in a disordered potential: Delocalization versus measurement voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xue-Ning; Li, Xin-Qi

    2006-01-01

    Quantum point contact (QPC), one of the typical mesoscopic transport devices, has been suggested to be an efficient detector for quantum measurement. In the context of two-state charge qubit, our previous studies showed that the QPC’s measurement back-action cannot be described by the conventional Lindblad quantum master equation. In this work, we study the measurement problem of a multistate system, say, an electron in disordered potential, subject to the quantum measurement of the mesoscopic detector QPC. The effect of measurement back-action and the detector’s readout current are analyzed, where particular attention is focused on some new features and the underlying physics associated with the measurement-induced delocalization versus the measurement voltages.

  2. Short-time-interaction quantum measurement through an incoherent mediator

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, J.; Romero, G.; Lizuain, I.; Muga, J. G.; Retamal, J. C.; Roos, C. F.; Solano, E.

    2010-06-15

    We propose a method of indirect measurements where a probe is able to read, in short interaction times, the quantum state of a remote system through an incoherent third party, hereafter called a mediator. The probe and system can interact briefly with the mediator in an incoherent state but not directly among themselves and, nevertheless, the transfer of quantum information can be achieved with robustness. We exemplify our measurement scheme with a paradigmatic example of this tripartite problem--a qubit-oscillator-qubit setup--and discuss different physical scenarios, pointing out the associated advantages and limitations.

  3. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K.; Burkholder, James B.

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO){sub 2}, has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO){sub 2} and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV/vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, {Phi}({lambda}), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl){sub 2}+ hv{yields} ClCO*+ Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO*{yields} Cl + CO (3a), {yields} ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M {yields} Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2}. {Phi}(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 {+-} 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N{sub 2}), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO){sub 2} is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 {+-} 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 {+-} 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N{sub 2}). {Phi}(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N{sub 2}). The low

  4. Quantum analysis of the direct measurement of light waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saldanha, Pablo L.

    2014-01-01

    In a beautiful experiment performed about a decade ago, Goulielmakis et al (2004 Science 305 1267-69) made a direct measurement of the electric field of light waves. However, they used a laser source to produce the light field, whose quantum state has a null expectation value for the electric field operator, so how was it possible to measure this electric field? Here we present a quantum treatment for the f:2f interferometer used to calibrate the carrier-envelope phase of the light pulses in the experiment. We show how the special nonlinear features of the f:2f interferometer can change the quantum state of the electromagnetic field inside the laser cavity to a state with a definite oscillating electric field, explaining how the ‘classical’ electromagnetic field emerges in the experiment. We discuss that this experiment was, to our knowledge, the first demonstration of an absolute coherent superposition of different photon number states in the optical regime.

  5. Controlling quantum flux through measurement: An idealised example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilloy, A.; Bauer, M.; Bernard, D.

    2014-07-01

    Classically, no transfer occurs between two equally filled reservoirs, no matter how one looks at them, but the situation can be different quantum-mechanically. This paradoxically surprising phenomenon rests on the distinctive property of the quantum world that one cannot stare at a system without disturbing it. It was recently discovered that this seemingly annoying feature could be harnessed to control small quantum systems using weak measurements. Here we present one of the simplest models —an idealised double quantum dot—where by toying with the dot measurement strength, i.e. the intensity of the look, it is possible to create a particle flux in an otherwise completely symmetric system. The basic property underlying this phenomena is that measurement disturbances are very different on a system evolving unitarily and a system evolving dissipatively. This effect shows that adaptive measurements can have dramatic effects enabling transport control but possibly inducing biases in the measurement of macroscopic quantities if not handled with care.

  6. Copper activation deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements at the National Ignition Facility.

    PubMed

    Cooper, G W; Ruiz, C L; Leeper, R J; Chandler, G A; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Torres, J A; Smelser, R M; McWatters, B R; Bleuel, D L; Yeamans, C B; Knittel, K M; Casey, D T; Frenje, J A; Gatu Johnson, M; Petrasso, R D; Styron, J D

    2012-10-01

    A DT neutron yield diagnostic based on the reactions, (63)Cu(n,2n)(62)Cu(β(+)) and (65)Cu(n,2n)( 64) Cu(β(+)), has been fielded at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The induced copper activity is measured using a NaI γ-γ coincidence system. Uncertainties in the 14-MeV DT yield measurements are on the order of 7% to 8%. In addition to measuring yield, the ratio of activities induced in two, well-separated copper samples are used to measure the relative anisotropy of the fuel ρR to uncertainties as low as 5%.

  7. Free-Space Quantum Signatures Using Heterodyne Measurements.

    PubMed

    Croal, Callum; Peuntinger, Christian; Heim, Bettina; Khan, Imran; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd; Wallden, Petros; Andersson, Erika; Korolkova, Natalia

    2016-09-02

    Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics to sign a classical message. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6 km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes. For transmission values ranging from 100% to 10%, but otherwise assuming an ideal implementation with no other imperfections, the signature length is shorter by a factor of 2 to 10. As compared with previous relevant experimental realizations, the signature length in this implementation is several orders of magnitude shorter.

  8. Single-shot adaptive measurement for quantum-enhanced metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palittpongarnpim, Pantita; Wittek, Peter; Sanders, Barry C.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum-enhanced metrology aims to estimate an unknown parameter such that the precision scales better than the shot-noise bound. Single-shot adaptive quantum-enhanced metrology (AQEM) is a promising approach that uses feedback to tweak the quantum process according to previous measurement outcomes. Techniques and formalism for the adaptive case are quite different from the usual non-adaptive quantum metrology approach due to the causal relationship between measurements and outcomes. We construct a formal framework for AQEM by modeling the procedure as a decision-making process, and we derive the imprecision and the Craḿer- Rao lower bound with explicit dependence on the feedback policy. We also explain the reinforcement learning approach for generating quantum control policies, which is adopted due to the optimal policy being non-trivial to devise. Applying a learning algorithm based on differential evolution enables us to attain imprecision for adaptive interferometric phase estimation, which turns out to be SQL when non-entangled particles are used in the scheme.

  9. Free-Space Quantum Signatures Using Heterodyne Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croal, Callum; Peuntinger, Christian; Heim, Bettina; Khan, Imran; Marquardt, Christoph; Leuchs, Gerd; Wallden, Petros; Andersson, Erika; Korolkova, Natalia

    2016-09-01

    Digital signatures guarantee the authorship of electronic communications. Currently used "classical" signature schemes rely on unproven computational assumptions for security, while quantum signatures rely only on the laws of quantum mechanics to sign a classical message. Previous quantum signature schemes have used unambiguous quantum measurements. Such measurements, however, sometimes give no result, reducing the efficiency of the protocol. Here, we instead use heterodyne detection, which always gives a result, although there is always some uncertainty. We experimentally demonstrate feasibility in a real environment by distributing signature states through a noisy 1.6 km free-space channel. Our results show that continuous-variable heterodyne detection improves the signature rate for this type of scheme and therefore represents an interesting direction in the search for practical quantum signature schemes. For transmission values ranging from 100% to 10%, but otherwise assuming an ideal implementation with no other imperfections, the signature length is shorter by a factor of 2 to 10. As compared with previous relevant experimental realizations, the signature length in this implementation is several orders of magnitude shorter.

  10. Quantum critical behavior influenced by measurement backaction in ultracold gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashida, Yuto; Furukawa, Shunsuke; Ueda, Masahito

    2016-11-01

    Recent realizations of quantum gas microscopy offer the possibility of continuous monitoring of the dynamics of a quantum many-body system at the single-particle level. By analyzing effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonians for interacting bosons in an optical lattice and continuum, we demonstrate that the backaction of quantum measurement shifts the quantum critical point and gives rise to a unique critical phase beyond the terrain of the standard universality class. We perform mean-field and strong-coupling-expansion analyses and show that non-Hermitian contributions shift the superfluid-Mott-insulator transition point. Using a low-energy effective field theory, we discuss critical behavior of the one-dimensional interacting Bose gas subject to the measurement backaction. We derive an exact ground state of the effective non-Hermitian Hamiltonian and find a unique critical behavior beyond the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid universality class. We propose experimental implementations of postselections using a quantum gas microscope to simulate the non-Hermitian dynamics and argue that our results can be investigated with current experimental techniques in ultracold atoms.

  11. The enhancement of fluorescence quantum yields of anilino naphthalene sulfonic acids by inclusion of various cyclodextrins and cucurbit[7]uril.

    PubMed

    Sueishi, Yoshimi; Fujita, Tomonori; Nakatani, Shinichiro; Inazumi, Naoya; Osawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-10-01

    The association constants (K) for the inclusion complexation of four kinds of cyclodextrins (CDs (β- and γ-), 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD, and 2,3,6-tri-O-methylated β-CD) and cucurbit[7]uril (CB[7]) with 1,8- and 2,6-anilinonaphthalene sulfonic acids (ANSs) were determined from fluorescence spectra enhanced by inclusion. Various CDs and CB[7] form stable 1:1 inclusion complexes with 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs: K=80-11700 M(-1) for 2,6-ANS and 50-195 M(-1) for 1,8-ANS. The high stability of the inclusion complexes of 2,6-ANS with CB[7] and 2,6-di-O-methylated β-CD is shown. Further, we determined the fluorescence quantum yields (Φ values) for the inclusion complexes of ANSs by using a fluorescence spectrophotometer equipped with a half-moon unit. The Φ values of 1,8- and 2,6-ANSs were largely enhanced by the inclusion of methylated β-CDs and did not correlate with the degree of stability (K) of the inclusion complexes. We characterized the structures of the inclusion complexes by 2D ROESY-NMR measurements. In addition, the microenvironmental polarity inside the hydrophobic CD and CB[7] cavities was evaluated using the fluorescence probe 2,6-ANS. Based on the emission mechanism and the aspect of inclusion in a hydrophobic cavity, we have suggested that the microenvironmental polarity and viscosity for the excited state of ANS plays an important role for the Φ values of inclusion complexes.

  12. Directly Measuring the Degree of Quantum Coherence using Interference Fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Tao; Tang, Jian-Shun; Wei, Zhi-Yuan; Yu, Shang; Ke, Zhi-Jin; Xu, Xiao-Ye; Li, Chuan-Feng; Guo, Guang-Can

    2017-01-01

    Quantum coherence is the most distinguished feature of quantum mechanics. It lies at the heart of the quantum-information technologies as the fundamental resource and is also related to other quantum resources, including entanglement. It plays a critical role in various fields, even in biology. Nevertheless, the rigorous and systematic resource-theoretic framework of coherence has just been developed recently, and several coherence measures are proposed. Experimentally, the usual method to measure coherence is to perform state tomography and use mathematical expressions. Here, we alternatively develop a method to measure coherence directly using its most essential behavior—the interference fringes. The ancilla states are mixed into the target state with various ratios, and the minimal ratio that makes the interference fringes of the "mixed state" vanish is taken as the quantity of coherence. We also use the witness observable to witness coherence, and the optimal witness constitutes another direct method to measure coherence. For comparison, we perform tomography and calculate l1 norm of coherence, which coincides with the results of the other two methods in our situation. Our methods are explicit and robust, providing a nice alternative to the tomographic technique.

  13. On the Interpretation of Measurement Within the Quantum Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Leon N.; Van Vechten, Deborah

    1969-01-01

    In interpretation of the process of measurement is proposed which can be placed wholly within the quantum theory. The entire system including the apparatus and even the mind of the observer can be considered to develop according to the Schrodinger equation. (RR)

  14. Nature and measure of entanglement in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando; Ortiz, Gerardo; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Viola, Lorenza

    2004-10-01

    Characterizing and quantifying quantum correlations in states of many-particle systems is at the core of a full understanding of phase transitions in matter. In this work, we continue our investigation of the notion of generalized entanglement [Barnum , Phys. Rev. A 68, 032308 (2003)] by focusing on a simple Lie-algebraic measure of purity of a quantum state relative to an observable set. For the algebra of local observables on multi-qubit systems, the resulting local purity measure is equivalent to a recently introduced global entanglement measure [Meyer and Wallach, J. Math. Phys. 43, 4273 (2002)]. In the condensed-matter setting, the notion of Lie-algebraic purity is exploited to identify and characterize the quantum phase transitions present in two exactly solvable models, namely the Lipkin-Meshkov-Glick model and the spin- (1)/(2) anisotropic XY model in a transverse magnetic field. For the latter, we argue that a natural fermionic observable set arising after the Jordan-Wigner transformation better characterizes the transition than alternative measures based on qubits. This illustrates the usefulness of going beyond the standard subsystem-based framework while providing a global disorder parameter for this model. Our results show how generalized entanglement leads to useful tools for distinguishing between the ordered and disordered phases in the case of broken symmetry quantum phase transitions. Additional implications and possible extensions of concepts to other systems of interest in condensed-matter physics are also discussed.

  15. Quantum efficiency measurements of Tektronix backside thinned CCDs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delamere, Alan; Atkinson, Mike; Rice, James P.; Blouke, Morley; Reed, Richard

    1990-01-01

    Results are presented of a program in progress to produce CCDs with high stable quantum efficiency (QE). Measurements made at 253.7 nm over a six-month period showed no significant QE difference between two CCDs manufactured in 1989 and one manufactured in 1988. QE improvement by the addition of a two-layer antireflection coating is about threefold at 400 nm.

  16. Measurement of gravitation-induced quantum interference for neutrons in a spin-echo spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Haan, Victor-O.; Plomp, Jeroen; van Well, Ad A.; Rekveldt, M. Theo; Hasegawa, Yuji H.; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Steinke, Nina-Juliane

    2014-06-01

    With a neutron spin-echo reflectometer (OffSpec at ISIS, UK) it is possible to measure the gravitation-induced quantum phase difference between the two spin states of the neutron wave function in a magnetic field. In the small-angle approximation, this phase depends linearly on the inclination angle of the neutron beam with respect to the horizontal. This also holds for the Bonse-Hart interferometer used in the Colella-Overhauser-Werner experiments and should be taken into account. Neglecting this term could yield deviations up to 1% per degree inclination angle. The gravitation-induced quantum phase as measured with OffSpec with an accuracy of 0.1% agrees with the theoretically expected results.

  17. Efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood quantum state from measurements with additive Gaussian noise.

    PubMed

    Smolin, John A; Gambetta, Jay M; Smith, Graeme

    2012-02-17

    We provide an efficient method for computing the maximum-likelihood mixed quantum state (with density matrix ρ) given a set of measurement outcomes in a complete orthonormal operator basis subject to Gaussian noise. Our method works by first changing basis yielding a candidate density matrix μ which may have nonphysical (negative) eigenvalues, and then finding the nearest physical state under the 2-norm. Our algorithm takes at worst O(d(4)) for the basis change plus O(d(3)) for finding ρ where d is the dimension of the quantum state. In the special case where the measurement basis is strings of Pauli operators, the basis change takes only O(d(3)) as well. The workhorse of the algorithm is a new linear-time method for finding the closest probability distribution (in Euclidean distance) to a set of real numbers summing to one.

  18. Closed timelike curves in measurement-based quantum computation

    SciTech Connect

    Dias da Silva, Raphael; Galvao, Ernesto F.; Kashefi, Elham

    2011-01-15

    Many results have been recently obtained regarding the power of hypothetical closed timelike curves (CTCs) in quantum computation. Here we show that the one-way model of measurement-based quantum computation encompasses in a natural way the CTC model proposed by Bennett, Schumacher, and Svetlichny. We identify a class of CTCs in this model that can be simulated deterministically and point to a fundamental limitation of Deutsch's CTC model which leads to predictions conflicting with those of the one-way model.

  19. Measuring and Suppressing Quantum State Leakage in a Superconducting Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zijun; Kelly, Julian; Quintana, Chris; Barends, R.; Campbell, B.; Chen, Yu; Chiaro, B.; Dunsworth, A.; Fowler, A. G.; Lucero, E.; Jeffrey, E.; Megrant, A.; Mutus, J.; Neeley, M.; Neill, C.; O'Malley, P. J. J.; Roushan, P.; Sank, D.; Vainsencher, A.; Wenner, J.; White, T. C.; Korotkov, A. N.; Martinis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Leakage errors occur when a quantum system leaves the two-level qubit subspace. Reducing these errors is critically important for quantum error correction to be viable. To quantify leakage errors, we use randomized benchmarking in conjunction with measurement of the leakage population. We characterize single qubit gates in a superconducting qubit, and by refining our use of derivative reduction by adiabatic gate pulse shaping along with detuning of the pulses, we obtain gate errors consistently below 1 0-3 and leakage rates at the 1 0-5 level. With the control optimized, we find that a significant portion of the remaining leakage is due to incoherent heating of the qubit.

  20. Measurement of Pressure Dependent Fluorescence Yield of Air: Calibration Factor for UHECR Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Belz, J.W.; Burt, G.W.; Cao, Z.; Chang, F.Y.; Chen, C.C.; Chen, C.W.; Chen, P.; Field, C.; Findlay, J.; Huntemeyer, Petra; Huang, M.A.; Hwang, W.-Y.P.; Iverson, R.; Jones, B.F.; Jui, C.C.H.; Kirn, M.; Lin, G.-L.; Loh, E.C.; Maestas, M.M.; Manago, N.; Martens, K.; /Montana U. /Utah U. /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /SLAC /Rutgers U., Piscataway

    2005-07-06

    In a test experiment at the Final Focus Test Beam of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, the fluorescence yield of 28.5 GeV electrons in air and nitrogen was measured. The measured photon yields between 300 and 400 nm at 1 atm and 29 C are Y(760 Torr){sup air} = 4.42 {+-} 0.73 and Y(760 Torr){sup N{sub 2}} = 29.2 {+-} 4.8 photons per electron per meter. Assuming that the fluorescence yield is proportional to the energy deposition of a charged particle traveling through air, good agreement with measurements at lower particle energies is observed.

  1. Solvent dependence of laser-synthesized blue-emitting Si nanoparticles: Size, quantum yield, and aging performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yunzi; Kitasako, Takumi; Maeda, Makoto; Saitow, Ken-ichi

    2017-04-01

    Pulsed-laser ablation of silicon (Si) was conducted in six different organic solvents using a nanosecond laser. Si nanoparticles (Si-NPs) that exhibited blue photoluminescence (PL) were generated in all the solvents, but a significant solvent dependence emerged: particle size, PL spectra, and PL quantum yield (QY). The results of solvent dependence were well characterized using an atomic ratio in a solvent molecule. The highest QY was observed for the smallest Si-NPs (ca. 2 nm) synthesized in 1-octyne. The QY was enhanced by aging in 1-octyne, and its mechanism was attributed to alkyl passivation of dangling bonds on the Si-NPs.

  2. Quantum evolution in the stroboscopic limit of repeated measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luchnikov, I. A.; Filippov, S. N.

    2017-02-01

    We consider a quantum system dynamics caused by successive selective and nonselective measurements of the probe coupled to the system. For the finite measurement rate τ-1 and the system-probe interaction strength γ we derive analytical evolution equations in the stroboscopic limit τ →0 and γ2τ =const , which can be considered as a deviation from the Zeno subspace dynamics on a longer time scale T ˜(γ2τ) -1≫γ-1 . Nonlinear quantum dynamics is analyzed for selective stroboscopic projective measurements of an arbitrary rank. Nonselective measurements are shown to induce the semigroup dynamics of the system-probe aggregate. Both nonlinear and decoherent effects become significant at the time scale T ˜(γ2τ) -1 , which is illustrated by a number of examples.

  3. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-27

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  4. Verifiable Measurement-Only Blind Quantum Computing with Stabilizer Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Masahito; Morimae, Tomoyuki

    2015-11-01

    We introduce a simple protocol for verifiable measurement-only blind quantum computing. Alice, a client, can perform only single-qubit measurements, whereas Bob, a server, can generate and store entangled many-qubit states. Bob generates copies of a graph state, which is a universal resource state for measurement-based quantum computing, and sends Alice each qubit of them one by one. Alice adaptively measures each qubit according to her program. If Bob is honest, he generates the correct graph state, and, therefore, Alice can obtain the correct computation result. Regarding the security, whatever Bob does, Bob cannot get any information about Alice's computation because of the no-signaling principle. Furthermore, malicious Bob does not necessarily send the copies of the correct graph state, but Alice can check the correctness of Bob's state by directly verifying the stabilizers of some copies.

  5. Quantum key distribution with prepare-and-measure Bell test.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yong-Gang

    2016-10-13

    The prepare-and-measure quantum key distribution (QKD) has the merits of fast speed, high key generation rate, and easy implementation. However, the detector side channel attacks greatly undermine the security of the key bits. The eavesdropper, Eve, exploits the flaws of the detectors to obtain illegal information without violating quantum principles. It means that she can intervene in the communication without being detected. A prepare-and-measure Bell test protocol will be proposed. By randomly carrying out Bell test at the side of the information receiver, Bob, Eve's illegal information gain within the detector side channel attack can be well bounded. This protocol does not require any improvement on the detectors used in available prepare-and-measure QKD. Though we only illustrate its application in the BB84 protocol, it is applicable for any prepare-and-measure QKD.

  6. Quantum key distribution with prepare-and-measure Bell test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yong-Gang

    2016-10-01

    The prepare-and-measure quantum key distribution (QKD) has the merits of fast speed, high key generation rate, and easy implementation. However, the detector side channel attacks greatly undermine the security of the key bits. The eavesdropper, Eve, exploits the flaws of the detectors to obtain illegal information without violating quantum principles. It means that she can intervene in the communication without being detected. A prepare-and-measure Bell test protocol will be proposed. By randomly carrying out Bell test at the side of the information receiver, Bob, Eve’s illegal information gain within the detector side channel attack can be well bounded. This protocol does not require any improvement on the detectors used in available prepare-and-measure QKD. Though we only illustrate its application in the BB84 protocol, it is applicable for any prepare-and-measure QKD.

  7. Quantum key distribution with prepare-and-measure Bell test

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yong-gang

    2016-01-01

    The prepare-and-measure quantum key distribution (QKD) has the merits of fast speed, high key generation rate, and easy implementation. However, the detector side channel attacks greatly undermine the security of the key bits. The eavesdropper, Eve, exploits the flaws of the detectors to obtain illegal information without violating quantum principles. It means that she can intervene in the communication without being detected. A prepare-and-measure Bell test protocol will be proposed. By randomly carrying out Bell test at the side of the information receiver, Bob, Eve’s illegal information gain within the detector side channel attack can be well bounded. This protocol does not require any improvement on the detectors used in available prepare-and-measure QKD. Though we only illustrate its application in the BB84 protocol, it is applicable for any prepare-and-measure QKD. PMID:27733771

  8. Measurements-based Moving Target Detection in Quantum Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Fei; Iliyasu, Abdullah M.; Khan, Asif R.; Yang, Huamin

    2016-04-01

    A method to detect a moving target in multi-channel quantum video is proposed based on multiple measurements on the video strip. The proposed method is capable of detecting the location of the moving target in each frame of the quantum video thereby ensuring that the motion trail of the object is easily and efficiently retrieved. Three experiments, i.e. moving target detection (MTD) of a pixel, MTD of an object in complex shape, and MTD of a pixel whose color is conterminous with that of its background, are implemented to demonstrate the feasibility of the proposal. This study presents a modest attempt to focus on the moving target detection and its applications in quantum video.

  9. Measure problem in slow roll inflation and loop quantum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Corichi, Alejandro; Karami, Asieh

    2011-05-15

    We consider the measure problem in standard slow-roll inflationary models from the perspective of loop quantum cosmology (LQC). Following recent results by Ashtekar and Sloan, we study the probability of having enough e-foldings and focus on its dependence on the quantum gravity scale, including the transition of the theory to the limit where general relativity (GR) is recovered. Contrary to the standard expectation, the probability of having enough inflation, that is close to 1 in LQC, grows and tends to 1 as one approaches the GR limit. We study the origin of the tension between these results with those by Gibbons and Turok, and offer an explanation that brings these apparent contradictory results into a coherent picture. As we show, the conflicting results stem from different choices of initial conditions for the computation of probability. The singularity-free scenario of loop quantum cosmology offers a natural choice of initial conditions, and suggests that enough inflation is generic.

  10. Experimental measurement-device-independent quantum random-number generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, You-Qi; Guan, Jian-Yu; Zhou, Hongyi; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Jun; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The randomness from a quantum random-number generator (QRNG) relies on the accurate characterization of its devices. However, device imperfections and inaccurate characterizations can result in wrong entropy estimation and bias in practice, which highly affects the genuine randomness generation and may even induce the disappearance of quantum randomness in an extreme case. Here we experimentally demonstrate a measurement-device-independent (MDI) QRNG based on time-bin encoding to achieve certified quantum randomness even when the measurement devices are uncharacterized and untrusted. The MDI-QRNG is randomly switched between the regular randomness generation mode and a test mode, in which four quantum states are randomly prepared to perform measurement tomography in real time. With a clock rate of 25 MHz, the MDI-QRNG generates a final random bit rate of 5.7 kbps. Such implementation with an all-fiber setup provides an approach to construct a fully integrated MDI-QRNG with trusted but error-prone devices in practice.

  11. Continuous Measurement Quantum State Tomography of Atomic Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riofrio Almeida, Carlos A.

    Quantum state tomography is a fundamental tool in quantum information processing tasks. It allows us to estimate the state of a quantum system by measuring different observables on many identically prepared copies of the system. Usually, one makes projective measurements of an "informationally complete" set of observables and repeats them enough times so that good estimates of their expectation values are obtained. This is, in general, a very time-consuming task that requires a large number of measurements. There are, however, systems in which the data acquisition can be done more efficiently. In fact, an ensemble of quantum systems can be prepared and manipulated by external fields while being continuously probed collectively, producing enough information to estimate its state. This provides a basis for continuous measurement quantum tomography, and is the main topic of this dissertation. This method, based on weak continuous measurement, has the advantage of being fast, accurate, and almost nonperturbative. In this work, we present a extensive discussion and a generalization of the protocol proposed in [1], which was experimentally achieved in [2] using cold cesium atoms. In this protocol, an ensemble of identically prepared systems is collectively probed and controlled in a time-dependent manner so as to create an informationally complete continuous measurement record. The measurement history is then inverted to determine the state at the initial time. To achieve this, we use two different estimation methods: the widely used maximum likelihood and the novel compressed sensing algorithms. The general formalism is applied to the case of reconstruction of the quantum state encoded in the magnetic sub-levels of a large-spin alkali atom, 133Cs. We extend the applicability of the protocol in [1] to the more ambitious case of reconstruction of states in the full 16-dimensional electronic-ground subspace ( F = 3, F = 4), controlled by microwaves and radio

  12. Measuring nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics with quantum fidelity and with its efficient semiclassical approximation.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Tomáš; Vaníček, Jiří

    2012-03-07

    We propose to measure nonadiabaticity of molecular quantum dynamics rigorously with the quantum fidelity between the Born-Oppenheimer and fully nonadiabatic dynamics. It is shown that this measure of nonadiabaticity applies in situations where other criteria, such as the energy gap criterion or the extent of population transfer, fail. We further propose to estimate this quantum fidelity efficiently with a generalization of the dephasing representation to multiple surfaces. Two variants of the multiple-surface dephasing representation (MSDR) are introduced, in which the nuclei are propagated either with the fewest-switches surface hopping or with the locally mean field dynamics (LMFD). The LMFD can be interpreted as the Ehrenfest dynamics of an ensemble of nuclear trajectories, and has been used previously in the nonadiabatic semiclassical initial value representation. In addition to propagating an ensemble of classical trajectories, the MSDR requires evaluating nonadiabatic couplings and solving the Schrödinger (or more generally, the quantum Liouville-von Neumann) equation for a single discrete degree of freedom. The MSDR can be also used in the diabatic basis to measure the importance of the diabatic couplings. The method is tested on three model problems introduced by Tully and on a two-surface model of dissociation of NaI.

  13. A sub-ensemble theory of ideal quantum measurement processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Balian, Roger; Nieuwenhuizen, Theo M.

    2017-01-01

    In order to elucidate the properties currently attributed to ideal measurements, one must explain how the concept of an individual event with a well-defined outcome may emerge from quantum theory which deals with statistical ensembles, and how different runs issued from the same initial state may end up with different final states. This so-called "measurement problem" is tackled with two guidelines. On the one hand, the dynamics of the macroscopic apparatus A coupled to the tested system S is described mathematically within a standard quantum formalism, where " q-probabilities" remain devoid of interpretation. On the other hand, interpretative principles, aimed to be minimal, are introduced to account for the expected features of ideal measurements. Most of the five principles stated here, which relate the quantum formalism to physical reality, are straightforward and refer to macroscopic variables. The process can be identified with a relaxation of S + A to thermodynamic equilibrium, not only for a large ensemble E of runs but even for its sub-ensembles. The different mechanisms of quantum statistical dynamics that ensure these types of relaxation are exhibited, and the required properties of the Hamiltonian of S + A are indicated. The additional theoretical information provided by the study of sub-ensembles remove Schrödinger's quantum ambiguity of the final density operator for E which hinders its direct interpretation, and bring out a commutative behaviour of the pointer observable at the final time. The latter property supports the introduction of a last interpretative principle, needed to switch from the statistical ensembles and sub-ensembles described by quantum theory to individual experimental events. It amounts to identify some formal " q-probabilities" with ordinary frequencies, but only those which refer to the final indications of the pointer. The desired properties of ideal measurements, in particular the uniqueness of the result for each individual

  14. Generating quantum-measurement probabilities from an optimality principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suykens, Johan A. K.

    2013-05-01

    An alternative formulation to the (generalized) Born rule is presented. It involves estimating an unknown model from a finite set of measurement operators on the state. An optimality principle is given that relates to achieving bounded solutions by regularizing the unknown parameters in the model. The objective function maximizes a lower bound on the quadratic Renyi classical entropy. The unknowns of the model in the primal are interpreted as transition witnesses. An interpretation of the Born rule in terms of fidelity is given with respect to transition witnesses for the pure state and the case of positive operator-valued measures (POVMs). The models for generating quantum-measurement probabilities apply to orthogonal projective measurements and POVM measurements, and to isolated and open systems with Kraus maps. A straightforward and constructive method is proposed for deriving the probability rule, which is based on Lagrange duality. An analogy is made with a kernel-based method for probability mass function estimation, for which similarities and differences are discussed. These combined insights from quantum mechanics, statistical modeling, and machine learning provide an alternative way of generating quantum-measurement probabilities.

  15. Biexciton quantum yield heterogeneities in single CdSe(CdS) core(shell) nanocrystals and its correlation to exciton blinking

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Chen, Ou; Strasfeld, David B.

    2012-01-01

    We explore biexciton (BX) non-radiative recombination processes in single semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) using confocal fluorescence microscopy and second-order photon intensity correlation. More specifically, we measure the photoluminescence blinking and BX quantum yields (QYs), and study the correlation between these two measurements for single core(shell) CdSe(CdS) nanocrystals (NCs). We find that NCs with a high “on” time fraction are significantly more likely to have a high BX QY than NCs with a low “on” fraction, even though the BX QYs of NCs with a high “on” fraction vary dramatically. The BX QYs of single NCs are also weakly dependent upon excitation wavelength. The weak correlation between exciton “on” fractions and BX QYs suggests that multiple recombination processes are involved in the BX recombination. To explain our results, we propose a model that combines both trapping and an Auger mechanism for BX recombination. PMID:22871126

  16. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchmann, L. F.; Schreppler, S.; Kohler, J.; Spethmann, N.; Stamper-Kurn, D. M.

    2016-07-01

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  17. Complex Squeezing and Force Measurement Beyond the Standard Quantum Limit.

    PubMed

    Buchmann, L F; Schreppler, S; Kohler, J; Spethmann, N; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2016-07-15

    A continuous quantum field, such as a propagating beam of light, may be characterized by a squeezing spectrum that is inhomogeneous in frequency. We point out that homodyne detectors, which are commonly employed to detect quantum squeezing, are blind to squeezing spectra in which the correlation between amplitude and phase fluctuations is complex. We find theoretically that such complex squeezing is a component of ponderomotive squeezing of light through cavity optomechanics. We propose a detection scheme called synodyne detection, which reveals complex squeezing and allows the accounting of measurement backaction. Even with the optomechanical system subject to continuous measurement, such detection allows the measurement of one component of an external force with sensitivity only limited by the mechanical oscillator's thermal occupation.

  18. Optimal two-copy discrimination of quantum measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Fiurasek, Jaromir; Micuda, Michal

    2009-10-15

    We investigate optimal discrimination between two projective quantum measurements on a single qubit. We consider a scenario where the measurement that should be identified can be performed twice and we show that adaptive discrimination strategy, entangled probe states, and feed forward all help to increase the probability of correct identification of the measurement. We also experimentally demonstrate the studied discrimination strategies and test their performance. The employed experimental setup involves projective measurements on polarization states of single photons and preparation of required probe two-photon polarization states by the process of spontaneous parametric downconversion and passive linear optics.

  19. Approaching infinite temperature upon repeated measurements of a quantum system

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Juyeon; Talkner, Peter; Ingold, Gert-Ludwig

    2011-09-15

    The influence of repeated projective measurements on the dynamics of the state of a quantum system is studied as a function of the time lag {tau} between successive measurements. In the limit of infinitely many measurements of the occupancy of a single state the total system approaches a uniform state. The asymptotic approach to this state is exponential in the case of finite Hilbert space dimension. The rate characterizing this approach undergoes a sharp transition from a monotonically increasing to an erratically varying function of the time between subsequent measurements.

  20. Finite-time measurement of quantum particle's mean position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Sokolovski, D.

    2001-01-01

    We analyze nonrelativistic quantum measurement of the time average of the particle's coordinate, X≡t- 1∫t0x(t')dt'. The measurement amplitude is constructed by restricting the Feynman path integral to paths with the required value of X. The resulting decomposition of the Schrödinger wave function determines the type of meter needed to measure X. We show that such meter can be realized as a magnetic moment traveling with the particle in a magnetic field whose magnitude linearly changes with x. Weak and strong measurement regimes are discussed.

  1. Many-Hilbert-spaces theory of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namiki, Mikio

    1988-01-01

    The many-Hilbert-spaces theory of quantum measurements, which was originally proposed by S. Machida and the present author, is reviewed and developed. Dividing a typical quantum measurement in two successive steps, the first being responsible for spectral decomposition and the second for detection, we point out that the wave packet reduction by measurement takes place at the latter step, through interaction of an object system with one of the local systems of detectors. First we discuss the physics of the detection process, using numerical simulations for a simple detector model, and then formulate a general theory of quantum measurements to give the wave packet reduction in an explicit form as a sort of phase transition. The derivation is based on the macroscopic nature of the local system, to be represented in a continuous direct sum of many Hilbert spaces, and on the finite-size effect of the local system, to give phase shifts proportional to size parameters. We give a definite criterion for examining any instrument as to whether it works well as a detector or not. Finally, we compare the present theory with famous measurement theories and propose a possible experimental test to discriminate it from others. A few solvable detector models are also discussed.

  2. Diffusion-enhanced Förster resonance energy transfer and the effects of external quenchers and the donor quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Maik H; Dsouza, Roy N; Ghosh, Indrajit; Norouzy, Amir; Schwarzlose, Thomas; Nau, Werner M

    2013-01-10

    effective FRET rate and the recovered donor-acceptor distance depend on the quantum yield, most strongly in the absence of diffusion, which has to be accounted for in the interpretation of distance trends monitored by FRET.

  3. Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

    2012-05-03

    A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

  4. Nature and measure of entanglement in quantum phase transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somma, Rolando; Ortiz, Gerardo; Barnum, Howard; Knill, Emanuel; Viola, Lorenza

    2003-03-01

    Characterizing and quantifying entanglement of quantum states in many-particle systems is at the core of a full understanding of the nature of quantum phase transitions in matter. Entanglement is a relative notion and, although many measures of entanglement have been defined in the literature, assessing the utility of those measures to characterize quantum phase transitions is still an open problem. We introduce a new measure, based on a different concept of entanglement, which allows us to identify the transition. The traditional concept of entanglement refers to the property of many-parties states which cannot be expressed as a product of states of each party. We have recently [1] introduced a different concept of entanglement which makes no reference to the subsystem decomposition of the total Hilbert space and which reduces to the traditional concept in the case of two parties. In our framework an extremal (pure) quantum state is unentangled with respect to an algebra of observables if it induces an extremal state (set of expectation values) on that algebra. This identifies pure unentangled states with generalized coherent states of the algebra (mixed states will be unentangled if they are convex combinations of pure unentangled states). For example, a Slater determinant, i.e., a state of free spinless fermions (Fermi liquid), is unentangled with respect to the algebra generated by the bilinear fermionic operators c^i cj (algebra U(N)) but it is, in general, entangled with respect to the Pauli (spin 1/2) algebra. This concept leads to the definition of a "Purity" relative to a given subalgebra as a measure of entanglement. We will show how this measure applies to the study of different types of phase transitions. In particular, we will apply this concept to Ising-like and Kosterlitz-Thouless transitions in models of interest in condensed matter physics. [1] H. Barnum, E. Knill, G. Ortiz, and L. Viola (2002), quant-ph/0207149.

  5. Measurements are the only reality, say quantum tests

    SciTech Connect

    Glanz, J.

    1995-12-01

    Hamlet would run a few lines short in a quantum-mechanical theater, where {open_quotes}to be or not to be{close_quotes} is not the question at all. The usual interpretation of quantum mechanics holds that a physical quantity-such as an electron`s position or a photon`s polarization direction-has no reality, or {open_quotes}being,{close_quotes} until an experimenter measures its value. {open_quotes}To measure or not to measure,{close_quotes} that is the question. Einstein insisted that unmeasure quantities must exist in some definite state, even though we might not know what the state is. Two new experiments are coming closer that ever to showing that Quantum `reality` is every bit as bizarre as Einstine feared. This article describes the two experiments. One shows that if the polarizations have any reality apart from the properties that are directly measured, the observed correlations imply yet another correlation that is ever observed. The other demonstrates the strongest violation of local realism ever in mathematical terms. Also discussed in the article is the background and development of the experiments and the future possibilities.

  6. Super quantum measures on effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, Yongjian Ren, Fang; Yang, Aili

    2015-10-15

    We give one basis of the space of super quantum measures on finite effect algebras with the Riesz decomposition properties (RDP for short). Then we prove that the super quantum measures and quantum interference functions on finite effect algebras with the RDP are determined each other. At last, we investigate the relationships between the super quantum measures and the diagonally positive signed measures on finite effect algebras with the RDP in detail.

  7. Noise robustness of the incompatibility of quantum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinosaari, Teiko; Kiukas, Jukka; Reitzner, Daniel

    2015-08-01

    The existence of incompatible measurements is a fundamental phenomenon having no explanation in classical physics. Intuitively, one considers given measurements to be incompatible within a framework of a physical theory, if their simultaneous implementation on a single physical device is prohibited by the theory itself. In the mathematical language of quantum theory, measurements are described by POVMs (positive operator valued measures), and given POVMs are by definition incompatible if they cannot be obtained via coarse-graining from a single common POVM; this notion generalizes noncommutativity of projective measurements. In quantum theory, incompatibility can be regarded as a resource necessary for manifesting phenomena such as Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) Bell inequality violations or Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering which do not have classical explanation. We define operational ways of quantifying this resource via the amount of added classical noise needed to render the measurements compatible, i.e., useless as a resource. In analogy to entanglement measures, we generalize this idea by introducing the concept of incompatibility measure, which is monotone in local operations. In this paper, we restrict our consideration to binary measurements, which are already sufficient to explicitly demonstrate nontrivial features of the theory. In particular, we construct a family of incompatibility monotones operationally quantifying violations of certain scaled versions of the CHSH Bell inequality, prove that they can be computed via a semidefinite program, and show how the noise-based quantities arise as special cases. We also determine maximal violations of the new inequalities, demonstrating how Tsirelson's bound appears as a special case. The resource aspect is further motivated by simple quantum protocols where our incompatibility monotones appear as relevant figures of merit.

  8. Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution over 200 km

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yan-Lin; Yin, Hua-Lei; Chen, Si-Jing; Liu, Yang; Zhang, Wei-Jun; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Lu; Wang, Jian; You, Li-Xing; Guan, Jian-Yu; Yang, Dong-Xu; Wang, Zhen; Liang, Hao; Zhang, Zhen; Zhou, Nan; Ma, Xiongfeng; Chen, Teng-Yun; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2014-11-01

    Measurement-device-independent quantum key distribution (MDIQKD) protocol is immune to all attacks on detection and guarantees the information-theoretical security even with imperfect single-photon detectors. Recently, several proof-of-principle demonstrations of MDIQKD have been achieved. Those experiments, although novel, are implemented through limited distance with a key rate less than 0.1 bit /s . Here, by developing a 75 MHz clock rate fully automatic and highly stable system and superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with detection efficiencies of more than 40%, we extend the secure transmission distance of MDIQKD to 200 km and achieve a secure key rate 3 orders of magnitude higher. These results pave the way towards a quantum network with measurement-device-independent security.

  9. Reply to "Comment on 'Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement' ".

    PubMed

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-08-01

    We rely on our proof of the nondecreasing character of quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], and we put it into perspective with the results of Bosyk et al. [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016)10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our method, adopted for the proof that Kaniadakis entropy does not decrease under a projective measurement, is based on Jensen's inequalities, while the method proposed by the authors of the Comment represents another alternative and clearly correct method to prove the same thing. Furthermore, we clarify that our interest in Kaniadakis entropy is due to the fact that this entropy has a transparent physical significance, emerging within the special relativity.

  10. Reply to "Comment on `Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement' "

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourabah, Kamel; Tribeche, Mouloud

    2016-08-01

    We rely on our proof of the nondecreasing character of quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], and we put it into perspective with the results of Bosyk et al. [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016), 10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our method, adopted for the proof that Kaniadakis entropy does not decrease under a projective measurement, is based on Jensen's inequalities, while the method proposed by the authors of the Comment represents another alternative and clearly correct method to prove the same thing. Furthermore, we clarify that our interest in Kaniadakis entropy is due to the fact that this entropy has a transparent physical significance, emerging within the special relativity.

  11. A Transactional Analysis of Quantum Interaction-Free Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cramer, John G.

    2000-04-01

    In 1993 Elitzur and Vaidmann(A. C. Elitzur and L. Vaidman, Found. Physics 23), 987-997 (1993). (EV) demonstrated that quantum mechanics permits the use of light quanta to examine an object without a single photon having actually interacted with the object, requiring only the possibility of such an interaction. The EV scenario has recently been carried out in the laboratory and its predictions verified. EV discussed their scenario in terms of the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, in which the interaction-free result is rather mysterious, using a ``knowledge'' not available classically. They also used the Everett-Wheeler interpretation and suggested that the information indicating the presence of the opaque object comes from an interaction in a separate Everett-Wheeler universe, with the information communicated to our universe through the absence of interference. In the present work, we will examine the EV interaction-free scenario in terms of the transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics(J. G. Cramer, Reviews of Modern Physics 58), 647-687 (1986); see http://www.npl.washington.edu/ti and will provide a more plausible account of the physical processes that make possible quantum interaction-free measurements.

  12. The Retrocausal Nature of Quantum Measurement Revealed by Partial and Weak Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2011-11-29

    Quantum measurement is sometimes more effective when its result is not definite. Partial measurement turns the initial superposition not into a certain state but to a greater probability for it, enabling probing the quantum state in cases where complete measurement makes the noncommuting variables inaccessible. It also enables full quantum erasure that, unlike prevailing method, can be carried out even on recorded results. Aharonov's weak measurement is another method of imprecisely measuring quantum variables, outsmarting the uncertainty principle in even subtler ways. Happily, the two methods complement and corroborate one another in several interesting ways. We gedankenly apply these measurements to the EPR case. A pair of entangled particles undergoes more than one pair of partial and weak measurements, which, unlike complete measurements, leave them partially correlated. Their erasure is then shown to be as nonlocal as measurement itself. Surprisingly, the temporal relations between such measurements in the EPR setting do not follow the temporal sequence perceived by an external observer. For each particle, the measurements performed on the other operate as if they occurred (with signs reversed) in its own past, and in reversed order. This fully accords with Cramer's transactional interpretation and Aharonov's two state-vector formalism.

  13. The Retrocausal Nature of Quantum Measurement Revealed by Partial and Weak Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elitzur, Avshalom C.; Cohen, Eliahu

    2011-11-01

    Quantum measurement is sometimes more effective when its result is not definite. Partial measurement turns the initial superposition not into a certain state but to a greater probability for it, enabling probing the quantum state in cases where complete measurement makes the noncommuting variables inaccessible. It also enables full quantum erasure that, unlike prevailing method, can be carried out even on recorded results. Aharonov's weak measurement is another method of imprecisely measuring quantum variables, outsmarting the uncertainty principle in even subtler ways. Happily, the two methods complement and corroborate one another in several interesting ways. We gedankenly apply these measurements to the EPR case. A pair of entangled particles undergoes more than one pair of partial and weak measurements, which, unlike complete measurements, leave them partially correlated. Their erasure is then shown to be as nonlocal as measurement itself. Surprisingly, the temporal relations between such measurements in the EPR setting do not follow the temporal sequence perceived by an external observer. For each particle, the measurements performed on the other operate as if they occurred (with signs reversed) in its own past, and in reversed order. This fully accords with Cramer's transactional interpretation and Aharonov's two state-vector formalism.

  14. The measurement problem in quantum mechanics: A phenomenological investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Joel Brooks

    2008-10-01

    This dissertation is a phenomenological investigation of the measurement problem in quantum mechanics. The primary subject matter for description and analysis is scientific instruments and their use in experiments which elicit the measurement problem. A methodological critique is mounted against the ontological commitments taken for granted in the canonical interpretations of quantum theory and the scientific activity of measurement as the necessary interface between theoretical interest and perceptual results. I argue that an aesthetic dimension of reality functions as aproto-scientific establishment of sense-making that constantly operates to set integratively all other cognitively neat determinations, including scientifically rendered objects that are intrinsically non-visualizable. The way in which data "key in" to the original and originative register of the sensible in observation is clarified by examining prostheses, measuring apparatuses and instruments that are sense-conveying and -integrative with the human sensorium. Experiments, technology and instrumentation are examined in order to understand how knowing and that which is known is bonded by praxis-aisthesis. Quantum measurement is a praxic-dynamie activity and homologically structured and structur ing functional engagement in terms of instantiation, quantifiability, and spatiotemporal differentiation. The distinctions between a beauty-aesthetic and praxis-aisthesis are delineated. It is argued that a beauty-aesthetic is a construal of the economic dimension of scientific objects and work, and is not the primary manner in which the aesthetic dimension is disclosed. The economic dimension of abstractions reduces to an austere aesthetic of calculative economy. Nature itself, however, is not stingy; it is intrinsically capacious, extravagant, full of surprise, nuance, ambiguity and allusiveness. The capaciousness of Nature and the way in which we are integratively set within Nature in a materiality

  15. Quantum Zeno Effect in the Strong Measurement Regime of Circuit Quantum Electrodynamics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-17

    New J. Phys. 18 (2016) 053031 doi:10.1088/1367-2630/18/5/053031 PAPER Quantum Zeno effect in the strongmeasurement regime of circuit quantum ...Keywords: quantumZeno effect, quantum jumps, superconducting qubit, circuit QED, random telegraph signals Abstract Weobserve the quantumZeno effect...where the act ofmeasurement slows the rate of quantum state transitions—in a superconducting qubit using linear circuit quantum electrodynamics readout

  16. Measuring peptide mass spectrum correlation using the quantum Grover algorithm.

    PubMed

    Choo, Keng Wah

    2007-03-01

    We investigated the use of the quantum Grover algorithm in the mass-spectrometry-based protein identification process. The approach coded the mass spectra on a quantum register and uses the Grover search algorithm for searching multiple solutions to find matches from a database. Measurement of the fidelity between the input and final states was used to quantify the similarity between the experimental and theoretical spectra. The optimal number of iteration is proven to be pi/4sqrt[N/k] , where k refers to the number of marked states. We found that one iteration is sufficient for the search if we let more that 62% of the N states be marked states. By measuring the fidelity after only one iteration of Grover search, we discovered that it resembles that of the correlation-based measurement used in the existing protein identification software. We concluded that the quantum Grover algorithm can be adapted for a correlation-based mass spectra database search, provided that decoherence can be kept to a minimum.

  17. Oxalyl chloride, ClC(O)C(O)Cl: UV/vis spectrum and Cl atom photolysis quantum yields at 193, 248, and 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Buddhadeb; Papanastasiou, Dimitrios K; Burkholder, James B

    2012-10-28

    Oxalyl chloride, (ClCO)(2), has been used as a Cl atom photolytic precursor in numerous laboratory kinetic and photochemical studies. In this study, the UV/vis absorption spectrum of (ClCO)(2) and the Cl atom quantum yields in its photolysis at 193, 248, and 351 nm are reported. The UV∕vis spectrum was measured between 200 and 450 nm at 296 K using diode array spectroscopy in conjunction with an absolute cross section obtained at 213.9 nm. Our results are in agreement with the spectrum reported by Baklanov and Krasnoperov [J. Phys. Chem. A 105, 97-103 (2001)], which was obtained at 11 discrete wavelengths between 193.3 and 390 nm. Cl atom quantum yields, Φ(λ), were measured using pulsed laser photolysis coupled with time resolved atomic resonance fluorescence detection of Cl. The UV photolysis of (ClCO)(2) has been shown in previous studies to occur via an impulsive three-body dissociation mechanism, (COCl)(2) + hv → ClCO* + Cl + CO (2), where the excited ClCO radical, ClCO*, either dissociates or stabilizes ClCO* → Cl + CO (3a), → ClCO (3b). ClCO is thermally unstable at the temperatures (253-298 K) and total pressures (13-128 Torr) used in our experiments ClCO + M → Cl + CO + M (4) leading to the formation of a secondary Cl atom that was resolvable in the Cl atom temporal profiles obtained in the 248 and 351 nm photolysis of (ClCO)(2). Φ(193 nm) was found to be 2.07 ± 0.37 independent of bath gas pressure (25.8-105.7 Torr, N(2)), i.e., the branching ratio for channel 2a or the direct formation of 2Cl + 2CO in the photolysis of (ClCO)(2) is >0.95. At 248 nm, the branching ratio for channel 2a was determined to be 0.79 ± 0.15, while the total Cl atom yield, i.e., following the completion of reaction (4), was found to be 1.98 ± 0.26 independent of bath gas pressure (15-70 Torr, N(2)). Φ(351 nm) was found to be pressure dependent between 7.8 and 122.4 Torr (He, N(2)). The low-pressure limit of the total Cl atom quantum yield, Φ(0)(351 nm), was 2

  18. Note: A simple charge neutralization method for measuring the secondary electron yield of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, Ming Cao, Meng; Zhao, Hong-Juan; Zhang, Hai-Bo

    2014-03-15

    We report on a simple and effective charge neutralization method for measuring the total electron-induced secondary electron yield of insulators in a measurement system with a single pulsed electron gun. In this method, the secondary electron collector is negatively biased with respect to the sample to force some emitted secondary electrons to return to the sample surface and therefore to neutralize positive charges accumulated in the sample during the previous measurement. The adequate negative bias is determined and the equilibrium state of negative charging is discussed. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated by the measured electron yields in the cases with and without charge neutralization and by comparison with existing electron yield data of polyimide.

  19. The SOFIA experiment: Measurement of 236U fission fragment yields in inverse kinematics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grente, L.; Taïeb, J.; Chatillon, A.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, É.; Boutoux, G.; Gorbinet, T.; Bélier, G.; Laurent, B.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Caamaño, M.; Audouin, L.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Farget, F.; Fernández-Domínguez, B.; Heinz, A.; Jurado, B.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Kurz, N.; Lindberg, S.; Löher, B.; Nociforo, C.; Paradela, C.; Pietri, S.; Ramos, D.; Rodriguez-Sanchez, J.-L.; Rodríguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Schmidt, K.-H.; Simon, H.; Tassan-Got, L.; Törnqvist, H.; Vargas, J.; Voss, B.; Weick, H.; Yan, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The SOFIA (Studies On FIssion with Aladin) experiment aims at measuring fission-fragments isotopic yields with high accuracy using inverse kinematics at relativistic energies. This experimental technique allows to fully identify the fission fragments in nuclear charge and mass number, thus providing very accurate isotopic yields for low energy fission of a large variety of fissioning systems. This report focuses on the latest results obtained with this set-up concerning electromagnetic-induced fission of 236U.

  20. Open Quantum Systems with Applications to Precision Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tieri, David

    A spectrally pure coherent light source is an important component in precision measurement applications, such as an atomic clock. The more spectrally pure the coherent light source, or the narrower the linewidth of its power spectrum, the better for atomic clock experiments. A coherent light light source, such as a laser, is intrinsically an open quantum system, meaning that it gains and loses energy from an external environment. The aim of this thesis is to study various open quantum systems in an attempt to discover a scheme in which an extremely spectrally pure coherent light source might be realized. Therefore, this thesis begins by introducing the two main approaches to treating open quantum systems, the quantum master equation approach, and the quantum Langevin equation approach. In addition to deriving these from first principles, many of the solution methods to these approaches are given and then demonstrated using computer simulations. These include the quantum jump algorithm, the quantum state diffusion algorithm, the cumulant expansion method, and the method of c-number Langevin equations. Using these methods, the theory of the crossover between lasing and steady state superradiance is presented. It is shown that lasing and steady state superradiance might be demonstrated in the same physical system, but in different parameter regimes. The parameter space between these two extreme limits is explored, and the benefits and drawbacks of operating a system at a given set of parameters, i.e. to achieve the most spectrally pure light source, are discussed. We also consider the phase stability of a laser that is locked to a cavity QED system comprised of atoms with an ultra-narrow optical transition. Although the atomic motion introduces Doppler broadening, the standing wave nature of the cavity causes saturated absorption, which can be used to achieve an extremely high degree of phase stabilization. The inhomogeneity introduced by finite atomic velocities can

  1. ANNUS MIRABILIS. PHYSICS OF OUR DAYS: Development of quantum measurement methods (Methodological notes on part of Einstein's scientific legacy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braginsky, Vladimir B.

    2005-06-01

    Historical development of indirect quantum measurements is briefly reviewed. Using several examples, considerable resources are shown to exist for increasing the sensitivity of various types of quantum measurements.

  2. Single-photon quantum nonlocality: Violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt inequality using feasible measurement setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Su-Yong; Park, Jiyong; Kim, Jaewan; Noh, Changsuk

    2017-01-01

    We investigate quantum nonlocality of a single-photon entangled state under feasible measurement techniques consisting of on-off and homodyne detections along with unitary operations of displacement and squeezing. We test for a potential violation of the Clauser-Horne-Shimony-Holt (CHSH) inequality, in which each of the bipartite party has a freedom to choose between two measurement settings, with each measurement yielding a binary outcome. We find that single-photon quantum nonlocality can be detected when two or less of the four total measurements are carried out by homodyne detection. The largest violation of the CHSH inequality is obtained when all four measurements are squeezed-and-displaced on-off detections. We test the robustness of violations against imperfections in on-off detectors and single-photon sources, finding that the squeezed-and-displaced measurement schemes perform better than the displacement-only measurement schemes.

  3. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish.

  4. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish. PMID:27886267

  5. Measurement of many-body chaos using a quantum clock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanyu; Hafezi, Mohammad; Grover, Tarun

    2016-12-01

    There has been recent progress in understanding chaotic features in many-body quantum systems. Motivated by the scrambling of information in black holes, it has been suggested that the time dependence of out-of-time-ordered (OTO) correlation functions such as is a faithful measure of quantum chaos. Experimentally, these correlators are challenging to access since they apparently require access to both forward and backward time evolution with the system Hamiltonian. Here we propose a protocol to measure such OTO correlators using an ancilla that controls the direction of time. Specifically, by coupling the state of the ancilla to the system Hamiltonian of interest, we can emulate the forward and backward time propagation, where the ancilla plays the role of a quantum clock. Within this scheme, the continuous evolution of the entire system (the system of interest and the ancilla) is governed by a time-independent Hamiltonian. We discuss the implementation of our protocol with current circuit-QED technology for a class of interacting Hamiltonians. Our protocol is immune to errors that could occur when the direction of time evolution is externally controlled by a classical switch.

  6. The ultimate quantum limits on the accuracy of measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuen, Horace P.

    1992-01-01

    A quantum generalization of rate-distortion theory from standard communication and information theory is developed for application to determining the ultimate performance limit of measurement systems in physics. For the estimation of a real or a phase parameter, it is shown that the root-mean-square error obtained in a measurement with a single-mode photon level N cannot do better than approximately N exp -1, while approximately exp(-N) may be obtained for multi-mode fields with the same photon level N. Possible ways to achieve the remarkable exponential performance are indicated.

  7. Delayed choice experiments, the arrow of time, and quantum measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Schulman, L. S.

    2011-11-29

    By a radical modification of statistical mechanics the measurement process of quantum mechanics can be described in terms of pure, unitary time evolution, with no wave function collapse or many-world ideas. The key notion is 'special states', rare microscopic states of a complex system. Recovering the standard probabilities requires of this theory the appearance of Cauchy-distributed noise in some measurement processes. This article treats experimental situations where such noise might be detected and correlated with the need or absence of need for special states. Included in this possibility are 'delayed choice' experiments, in which the correlation contravenes conventional ideas on causality. Background material on all topics is provided.

  8. Secure quantum weak oblivious transfer against individual measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Guang Ping

    2015-06-01

    In quantum weak oblivious transfer, Alice sends Bob two bits and Bob can learn one of the bits at his choice. It was found that the security of such a protocol is bounded by , where is the probability with which Alice can guess Bob's choice, and is the probability with which Bob can guess both of Alice's bits given that he learns one of the bits with certainty. Here we propose a protocol and show that as long as Alice is restricted to individual measurements, then both and can be made arbitrarily close to , so that maximal violation of the security bound can be reached. Even with some limited collective attacks, the security bound can still be violated. Therefore, although our protocol still cannot break the bound in principle when Alice has unlimited cheating power, it is sufficient for achieving secure quantum weak oblivious transfer in practice.

  9. Measurement-based teleportation along quantum spin chains.

    PubMed

    Barjaktarevic, J P; McKenzie, R H; Links, J; Milburn, G J

    2005-12-02

    We examine the teleportation of an unknown spin-1/2 quantum state along a quantum spin chain with an even number of sites. Our protocol, using a sequence of Bell measurements, may be viewed as an iterated version of the 2-qubit protocol of C. H. Bennett et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 70, 1895 (1993)]. A decomposition of the Hilbert space of the spin chain into 4 vector spaces, called Bell subspaces, is given. It is established that any state from a Bell subspace may be used as a channel to perform unit fidelity teleportation. The space of all spin-0 many-body states, which includes the ground states of many known antiferromagnetic systems, belongs to a common Bell subspace. A channel-dependent teleportation parameter [symbol: see text] is introduced, and a bound on the teleportation fidelity is given in terms of [symbol: see text].

  10. Efficient measurement of quantum gate error by interleaved randomized benchmarking.

    PubMed

    Magesan, Easwar; Gambetta, Jay M; Johnson, B R; Ryan, Colm A; Chow, Jerry M; Merkel, Seth T; da Silva, Marcus P; Keefe, George A; Rothwell, Mary B; Ohki, Thomas A; Ketchen, Mark B; Steffen, M

    2012-08-24

    We describe a scalable experimental protocol for estimating the average error of individual quantum computational gates. This protocol consists of interleaving random Clifford gates between the gate of interest and provides an estimate as well as theoretical bounds for the average error of the gate under test, so long as the average noise variation over all Clifford gates is small. This technique takes into account both state preparation and measurement errors and is scalable in the number of qubits. We apply this protocol to a superconducting qubit system and find a bounded average error of 0.003 [0,0.016] for the single-qubit gates X(π/2) and Y(π/2). These bounded values provide better estimates of the average error than those extracted via quantum process tomography.

  11. Experimental Measurement-Device-Independent Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Chen, Teng-Yun; Wang, Liu-Jun; Liang, Hao; Shentu, Guo-Liang; Wang, Jian; Cui, Ke; Yin, Hua-Lei; Liu, Nai-Le; Li, Li; Ma, Xiongfeng; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Quantum key distribution is proven to offer unconditional security in communication between two remote users with ideal source and detection. Unfortunately, ideal devices never exist in practice and device imperfections have become the targets of various attacks. By developing up-conversion single-photon detectors with high efficiency and low noise, we faithfully demonstrate the measurement-device-independent quantum-key-distribution protocol, which is immune to all hacking strategies on detection. Meanwhile, we employ the decoy-state method to defend attacks on a nonideal source. By assuming a trusted source scenario, our practical system, which generates more than a 25 kbit secure key over a 50 km fiber link, serves as a stepping stone in the quest for unconditionally secure communications with realistic devices.

  12. Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of a Quantum Squeezed State Beyond the 3 dB Limit.

    PubMed

    Lei, C U; Weinstein, A J; Suh, J; Wollman, E E; Kronwald, A; Marquardt, F; Clerk, A A; Schwab, K C

    2016-09-02

    We use a reservoir engineering technique based on two-tone driving to generate and stabilize a quantum squeezed state of a micron-scale mechanical oscillator in a microwave optomechanical system. Using an independent backaction-evading measurement to directly quantify the squeezing, we observe 4.7±0.9  dB of squeezing below the zero-point level surpassing the 3 dB limit of standard parametric squeezing techniques. Our measurements also reveal evidence for an additional mechanical parametric effect. The interplay between this effect and the optomechanical interaction enhances the amount of squeezing obtained in the experiment.

  13. Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of a Quantum Squeezed State Beyond the 3 dB Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, C. U.; Weinstein, A. J.; Suh, J.; Wollman, E. E.; Kronwald, A.; Marquardt, F.; Clerk, A. A.; Schwab, K. C.

    2016-09-01

    We use a reservoir engineering technique based on two-tone driving to generate and stabilize a quantum squeezed state of a micron-scale mechanical oscillator in a microwave optomechanical system. Using an independent backaction-evading measurement to directly quantify the squeezing, we observe 4.7 ±0.9 dB of squeezing below the zero-point level surpassing the 3 dB limit of standard parametric squeezing techniques. Our measurements also reveal evidence for an additional mechanical parametric effect. The interplay between this effect and the optomechanical interaction enhances the amount of squeezing obtained in the experiment.

  14. Freestanding carbon nanodots/poly (vinyl alcohol) films with high photoluminescent quantum yield realized by inverted-pyramid structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Linna; Ba, Lixiang; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) have attracted great attention for their biocompatibility and strong tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, aggregation-induced PL quenching blocks their practical application in solid-state optoelectronics. Here, we report a luminescent C-dots freestanding film with a substantially enhanced high quantum yield (QY) of 72.3%. A facile template method, rather than complicate lithography and etching technique is proposed to fabricate the C-dots composite films with large-area (8 inch × 8 inch) ordered micro-scale inverted-pyramid patterns on the surface. The control experiment and theoretical analysis demonstrate the key success to QY enhancement lies in the separation of C-dots and the pattern of surface inverted-pyramid structure. This work realizes the QY enhancement simply by geometrical optics, not the chemical treatment of luminescent particles. It provides a general approach to fabricate large-area freestanding luminescent composite film with high QY.

  15. Hydrogen quantum yields in the 360 nm photolysis of Eu/2+/ solutions and their relationship to photochemical fuel formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryason, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    Water decomposition by a cyclic photoredox process is discussed in general terms. Thermodynamics determines the wavelength of the charge-transfer band corresponding to electron transfer to or from water of hydration of a cation. These relationships indicate that it is unlikely that a photoreduction reaction resulting in water decomposition will occur in the sea-level solar range of wavelengths. Such is not the case for photooxidation, and an example is known: the photolysis of Eu(2+) in aqueous solution. Hydrogen quantum yields have been determined for this reaction. They are sufficiently high (about 0.3) as to offer encourangement for the further exploration of photoredox reactions as a means of solar energy conversion.

  16. Freestanding carbon nanodots/poly (vinyl alcohol) films with high photoluminescent quantum yield realized by inverted-pyramid structure.

    PubMed

    Pang, Linna; Ba, Lixiang; Pan, Wei; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-02-24

    Carbon nanodots (C-dots) have attracted great attention for their biocompatibility and strong tunable photoluminescence (PL). However, aggregation-induced PL quenching blocks their practical application in solid-state optoelectronics. Here, we report a luminescent C-dots freestanding film with a substantially enhanced high quantum yield (QY) of 72.3%. A facile template method, rather than complicate lithography and etching technique is proposed to fabricate the C-dots composite films with large-area (8 inch × 8 inch) ordered micro-scale inverted-pyramid patterns on the surface. The control experiment and theoretical analysis demonstrate the key success to QY enhancement lies in the separation of C-dots and the pattern of surface inverted-pyramid structure. This work realizes the QY enhancement simply by geometrical optics, not the chemical treatment of luminescent particles. It provides a general approach to fabricate large-area freestanding luminescent composite film with high QY.

  17. Kinetically Stable Lanthanide Complexes Displaying Exceptionally High Quantum Yields upon Long-Wavelength Excitation: Synthesis, Photophysical Properties, and Solution Speciation.

    PubMed

    Routledge, Jack D; Jones, Michael W; Faulkner, Stephen; Tropiano, Manuel

    2015-04-06

    We demonstrate how highly emissive, kinetically stable complexes can be prepared using the macrocyclic scaffold of DO3A bearing coordinating aryl ketones as highly effective sensitizing chromophores. In the europium complexes, high quantum yields (up to 18% in water) can be combined with long-wavelength excitation (370 nm). The behavior in solution upon variation of pH, studied by means of UV-vis absorption, emission, and NMR spectroscopies, reveals that the nature of the chromophore can give rise to pH-dependent behavior as a consequence of deprotonation adjacent to the carbonyl group. Knowledge of the molecular speciation in solution is therefore critical when assessing the luminescence properties of such complexes.

  18. Diurnal changes of photosynthetic quantum yield in the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii under simulated tidal emersion conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yong Qiang; Zhang, Quan Sheng; Tang, Yong Zheng; Li, Xue Meng; Liu, Hong Liang; Li, Li Xia

    2013-07-01

    In this study, a three-way factorial experimental design was used to investigate the diurnal changes of photosynthetic activity of the intertidal macroalga Sargassum thunbergii in response to temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation during a simulated diurnal light cycle. The maximum (Fv/Fm) and effective (ΦPSII) quantum yields of photosystem II (PSII) were estimated by chlorophyll fluorescence using a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer. Results showed that this species exhibited sun-adapted characteristics, as evidenced by the daily variation of Fv/Fm and ΦPSII. Both yield values decreased with increasing irradiance towards noon and recovered rapidly in the afternoon suggesting a dynamic photoinhibition. The photosynthetic quantum yield of S. thunbergii thalli varied significantly with temperature, tidal pattern and desiccation. Thalli were more susceptible to light-induced damage at high temperature of 25 °C and showed complete recovery of photosynthetic activity only when exposed to 8 °C. In contrast with the mid-morning low tide period, although there was an initial increase in photosynthetic yield during emersion, thalli showed a greater degree of decline at the end of emersion and remained less able to recover when low tide occurred at mid-afternoon. Short-term air exposure of 2 h did not significantly influence the photosynthesis. However, when exposed to moderate conditions (4 h desiccation at 15 °C or 6 h desiccation at 8 °C), a significant inhibition of photosynthesis was followed by partial or complete recovery upon re-immersion in late afternoon. Only extreme conditions (4 h desiccation at 25 °C or 6 h desiccation at 15 °C or 25 °C) resulted in the complete inhibition, with little indication of recovery until the following morning, implying the occurrence of chronic PSII damage. Based on the magnitude of effect, desiccation was the predominant negative factor affecting the photosynthesis under the simulated daytime irradiance period. These

  19. Experimental evaluation of nonclassical correlations between measurement outcomes and target observable in a quantum measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Suzuki, Yutaro; Nii, Taiki; Kinoshita, Ryuji; Hofmann, Holger F.

    2016-03-01

    In general, it is difficult to evaluate measurement errors when the initial and final conditions of the measurement make it impossible to identify the correct value of the target observable. Ozawa proposed a solution based on the operator algebra of observables which has recently been used in experiments investigating the error-disturbance trade-off of quantum measurements. Importantly, this solution makes surprisingly detailed statements about the relations between measurement outcomes and the unknown target observable. In the present paper, we investigate this relation by performing a sequence of two measurements on the polarization of a photon, so that the first measurement commutes with the target observable and the second measurement is sensitive to a complementary observable. While the initial measurement can be evaluated using classical statistics, the second measurement introduces the effects of quantum correlations between the noncommuting physical properties. By varying the resolution of the initial measurement, we can change the relative contribution of the nonclassical correlations and identify their role in the evaluation of the quantum measurement. It is shown that the most striking deviation from classical expectations is obtained at the transition between weak and strong measurements, where the competition between different statistical effects results in measurement values well outside the range of possible eigenvalues.

  20. Measuring the Process Variability in Triboluminescence Emission Yield for EuD4TEA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hollerman, William A.; Fontenot, Ross S.; Bhat, Kamala N.; Aggarwal, Mohan D.

    2012-11-01

    Europium dibenzoylmethide triethylammonium (EuD4TEA) is one of the brightest known triboluminescent materials. Emission from EuD4TEA can be seen in daylight and has been found to be more than twice as bright compared to inorganic ZnS compounds. Using a custom-built drop tower, the triboluminescent emission yield for five batches of EuD4TEA was measured. Results show that the measurement variance for the drop tower is less than 9 pct. In addition, no statistically significant batch-to-batch variations in the triboluminescent emission yield were observed for the synthesized EuD4TEA. It can be inferred that the measurement uncertainty for the triboluminescent emission yield between batches is, at most, on the order of a few percent.

  1. Phosphorescent Iridium(III) Complexes Bearing Fluorinated Aromatic Sulfonyl Group with Nearly Unity Phosphorescent Quantum Yields and Outstanding Electroluminescent Properties.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiang; Yu, Yue; Yang, Xiaolong; Yan, Xiaogang; Zhang, Huiming; Xu, Xianbin; Zhou, Guijiang; Wu, Zhaoxin; Ren, Yixia; Wong, Wai-Yeung

    2015-11-11

    A series of heteroleptic functional Ir(III) complexes bearing different fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl groups has been synthesized. Their photophysical features, electrochemical behaviors, and electroluminescent (EL) properties have been characterized in detail. These complexes emit intense yellow phosphorescence with exceptionally high quantum yields (ΦP > 0.9) at room temperature, and the emission maxima of these complexes can be finely tuned depending upon the number of the fluorine substituents on the pendant phenyl ring of the sulfonyl group. Furthermore, the electrochemical properties and electron injection/transporting (EI/ET) abilities of these Ir(III) phosphors can also be effectively tuned by the fluorinated aromatic sulfonyl group to furnish some desired characters for enhancing the EL performance. Hence, the maximum luminance efficiency (ηL) of 81.2 cd A(-1), corresponding to power efficiency (ηP) of 64.5 lm W(-1) and external quantum efficiency (ηext) of 19.3%, has been achieved, indicating the great potential of these novel phosphors in the field of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Furthermore, a clear picture has been drawn for the relationship between their optoelectronic properties and chemical structures. These results should provide important information for developing highly efficient phosphors.

  2. Rapid estimation of drifting parameters in continuously measured quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Luis; Chantasri, Areeya; García-Pintos, Luis Pedro; Dressel, Justin; Jordan, Andrew N.

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the determination of a Hamiltonian parameter in a quantum system undergoing continuous measurement. We demonstrate a computationally rapid method to estimate an unknown and possibly time-dependent parameter, where we maximize the likelihood of the observed stochastic readout. By dealing directly with the raw measurement record rather than the quantum-state trajectories, the estimation can be performed while the data are being acquired, permitting continuous tracking of the parameter during slow drifts in real time. Furthermore, we incorporate realistic nonidealities, such as decoherence processes and measurement inefficiency. As an example, we focus on estimating the value of the Rabi frequency of a continuously measured qubit and compare maximum likelihood estimation to a simpler fast Fourier transform. Using this example, we discuss how the quality of the estimation depends on both the strength and the duration of the measurement; we also discuss the trade-off between the accuracy of the estimate and the sensitivity to drift as the estimation duration is varied.

  3. A new method for measuring the yield stress in thin layers of sedimenting blood.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, C L; Smith, C M; Blackshear, P L

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented to describe the low shear rate behavior of blood. We observed the response of a thin layer of sedimenting blood to a graded shear stress in a wedge-shaped chamber. The method allows quantitation of the degree of phase separation between red cells and plasma, and extracts the yield stress of the cell phase as a function of hematocrit. Our studies showed that the behavior of normal human blood underwent a transition from a solid-like gel to a Casson fluid. This transition began at the Casson predicted yield stress. The viscoelastic properties of blood were examined at shear stresses below the yield stress. The measured Young's elastic moduli were in good agreement with published data. The yield stress of blood showed a linear dependence on hematocrit up to 60%, and increased more rapidly at higher hematocrit. PMID:3663830

  4. Luminescent pincer platinum(II) complexes with emission quantum yields up to almost unity: photophysics, photoreductive C-C bond formation, and materials applications.

    PubMed

    Chow, Pui-Keong; Cheng, Gang; Tong, Glenna So Ming; To, Wai-Pong; Kwong, Wai-Lun; Low, Kam-Hung; Kwok, Chi-Chung; Ma, Chensheng; Che, Chi-Ming

    2015-02-09

    Luminescent pincer-type Pt(II)  complexes supported by C-deprotonated π-extended tridentate RC^N^NR' ligands and pentafluorophenylacetylide ligands show emission quantum yields up to almost unity. Femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence measurements and time-dependent DFT calculations together reveal the dependence of excited-state structural distortions of [Pt(RC^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] on the positional isomers of the tridentate ligand. Pt complexes [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-Ar)] are efficient photocatalysts for visible-light-induced reductive CC bond formation. The [Pt(R-C^N^NR')(CC-C6 F5 )] complexes perform strongly as phosphorescent dopants for green- and red-emitting organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) with external quantum efficiency values over 22.1 %. These complexes are also applied in two-photon cellular imaging when incorporated into mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs).

  5. Total integral reactive cross sections for F + H2 yielding HF + H - Comparison of converged quantum, quasiclassical trajectory and experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhauser, Daniel; Judson, Richard S.; Jaffe, Richard L.; Baer, Michael; Kouri, Donald J.

    1991-01-01

    The paper reports converged quantum total integral reactive cross sections for the reaction F + H2 yielding HF + H, for initial rotational states j sub i = 0 and 1, using a time-dependent method. The results are compared to classical results and to the experimental results of Neumark et al. (1985). Strong quantum effects are found in the threshold region for both initial states (i.e., in the dependence of the reaction on initial state for low energies). The classical results agree better with experiment than do the quantum results; this appears to be due to errors in the potential used.

  6. Probability distributions of continuous measurement results for conditioned quantum evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquet, A.; Nazarov, Yuli V.

    2017-02-01

    We address the statistics of continuous weak linear measurement on a few-state quantum system that is subject to a conditioned quantum evolution. For a conditioned evolution, both the initial and final states of the system are fixed: the latter is achieved by the postselection in the end of the evolution. The statistics may drastically differ from the nonconditioned case, and the interference between initial and final states can be observed in the probability distributions of measurement outcomes as well as in the average values exceeding the conventional range of nonconditioned averages. We develop a proper formalism to compute the distributions of measurement outcomes, and evaluate and discuss the distributions in experimentally relevant setups. We demonstrate the manifestations of the interference between initial and final states in various regimes. We consider analytically simple examples of nontrivial probability distributions. We reveal peaks (or dips) at half-quantized values of the measurement outputs. We discuss in detail the case of zero overlap between initial and final states demonstrating anomalously big average outputs and sudden jump in time-integrated output. We present and discuss the numerical evaluation of the probability distribution aiming at extending the analytical results and describing a realistic experimental situation of a qubit in the regime of resonant fluorescence.

  7. Quantum measurement and the mind-brain connection

    SciTech Connect

    Stapp, H.P.

    1990-10-17

    It is argued that quantum measurements do pose a problem, within the context created by the fundamental aim of science, which is identified as the construction of a cohesive, comprehensive, and rationally coherent idea of the nature of the world in which we live. Models of nature are divided into two classes: (1), those in which there is a selection process that, for any possible measurement, would, if that measurement were to be performed, pick out one single outcome, and, (2), all others. It is proved that any model of class that reproduces the predictions of quantum theory must violate the condition that there be no faster-than-light influences of any kind. This result is used to motivate the study of models in which unitary evolution is maintained and there is no selection of unique outcomes. A consideration of ontic probabilities, historical records, and the form of the mind-brain connection leads to an elaboration of the Everett many-worlds interpretation that appears to provide the basis of satisfactory solution of the measurement problem. 18 refs.

  8. Partially Ordered Sets of Quantum Measurements and the Dirac Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2012-02-01

    Events can be ordered according to whether one event influences another. This results in a partially ordered set (poset) of events often referred to as a causal set. In this framework, an observer can be represented by a chain of events. Quantification of events and pairs of events, referred to as intervals, can be performed by projecting them onto an observer chain, or even a pair of observer chains, which in specific situations leads to a Minkowski metric replete with Lorentz transformations (Bahreyni & Knuth, 2011. APS B21.00007). In this work, we unify this picture with the Process Calculus, which coincides with the Feynman rules of quantum mechanics (Goyal, Knuth, Skilling, 2010, arXiv:0907.0909; Goyal & Knuth, Symmetry 2011, 3(2), 171), by considering quantum measurements to be events. This is performed by quantifying pairs of events, which represent transitions, with a pair of numbers, or a quantum amplitude. In the 1+1D case this results in the Feynman checkerboard model of the Dirac equation (Feynman & Hibbs, 1965). We further demonstrate that in the case of 3+1 dimensions, we recover Bialnycki-Birula's (1994, Phys. Rev. D, 49(12), 6920) body-centered cubic cellular automata model of the Dirac equation studied more recently by Earle (2011, arXiv:1102.1200v1).

  9. Ion traps, quantum computing, and the measurement problem^

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wineland, D. J.

    2006-05-01

    The basic requirements for quantum computing and quantum simulation (single- and multi-qubit gates, long memory times, etc.) have been demonstrated in separate experiments on trapped ions. Construction of a useful information processor will require synthesis of these elements and implementation of high- fidelity operations on a very large number of qubits. NIST and other groups are addressing this scaling issue by trying to fabricate multi-zone arrays of traps that would allow highly- parallel processing. As the number of qubits increases, the measurement problem in quantum mechanics becomes more glaring; with luck, trapped ion systems might be able to shed light on this fundamental issue. Recent NIST work in collaboration with D. Leibfried, J. C. Bergquist, R. B. Blakestad, J. J. Bollinger, J. Britton, J. Chiaverini, R. E. Drullinger, R. Epstein, D. Hume, W. M. Itano, J. D. Jost, J. Koelemeij, E. Knill, C. Langer, R. Ozeri, R. Reichle, T. Rosenband, P. O. Schmidt, S. Seidelin, N. Shiga, and J. Wesenberg, and supported by DTO, ONR, and NIST.

  10. Acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids with strong two-photon absorption and high singlet oxygen quantum yield.

    PubMed

    Ke, Hanzhong; Li, Wenbin; Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Xunjin; Tam, Hoi-Lam; Hou, Anxin; Kwong, Daniel W J; Wong, Wai-Kwok

    2012-04-21

    Several acetylene bridged porphyrin-monophthalocyaninato ytterbium(III) hybrids, PZn-PcYb, PH(2)-PcYb and PPd-PcYb, have been prepared and characterized by (1)H and (31)P NMR, mass spectrometry, and UV-vis spectroscopy. Their photophysical and photochemical properties, especially the relative singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)) quantum yields and the two-photon absorption cross-section (σ(2)), were investigated. These three newly synthesized compounds exhibited very large σ(2) values and substantial (1)O(2) quantum yields upon photo-excitation, making them potential candidates as one- and two-photon photodynamic therapeutic agents.

  11. Bi-photon spectral correlation measurements from a silicon nanowire in the quantum and classical regimes

    PubMed Central

    Jizan, Iman; Helt, L. G.; Xiong, Chunle; Collins, Matthew J.; Choi, Duk-Yong; Joon Chae, Chang; Liscidini, Marco; Steel, M. J.; Eggleton, Benjamin J.; Clark, Alex S.

    2015-01-01

    The growing requirement for photon pairs with specific spectral correlations in quantum optics experiments has created a demand for fast, high resolution and accurate source characterisation. A promising tool for such characterisation uses classical stimulated processes, in which an additional seed laser stimulates photon generation yielding much higher count rates, as recently demonstrated for a χ(2) integrated source in A. Eckstein et al. Laser Photon. Rev. 8, L76 (2014). In this work we extend these results to χ(3) integrated sources, directly measuring for the first time the relation between spectral correlation measurements via stimulated and spontaneous four wave mixing in an integrated optical waveguide, a silicon nanowire. We directly confirm the speed-up due to higher count rates and demonstrate that this allows additional resolution to be gained when compared to traditional coincidence measurements without any increase in measurement time. As the pump pulse duration can influence the degree of spectral correlation, all of our measurements are taken for two different pump pulse widths. This allows us to confirm that the classical stimulated process correctly captures the degree of spectral correlation regardless of pump pulse duration, and cements its place as an essential characterisation method for the development of future quantum integrated devices. PMID:26218609

  12. A phenomenological solution to the measurement problem? Husserl and the foundations of quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    French, Steven

    The London and Bauer monograph occupies a central place in the debate concerning the quantum measurement problem. Gavroglu has previously noted the influence of Husserlian phenomenology on London's scientific work. However, he has not explored the full extent of this influence in the monograph itself. I begin this paper by outlining the important role played by the monograph in the debate. In effect, it acted as a kind of 'lens' through which the standard, or Copenhagen, 'solution' to the measurement problem came to be perceived and, as such, it was robustly criticized, most notably by Putnam and Shimony. I then spell out the Husserlian understanding of consciousness in order to illuminate the traces of this understanding within the London and Bauer text. This, in turn, yields a new perspective on this 'solution' to the measurement problem, one that I believe has not been articulated before and, furthermore, which is immune to the criticisms of Putnam and Shimony.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis ameliorates the optimum quantum yield of photosystem II and reduces non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Redondo-Gómez, Susana; Mateos-Naranjo, Enrique; Aroca, Ricardo; Garcia, Rosalva; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2015-08-01

    Rice is the most important food crop in the world and is a primary source of food for more than half of the world population. However, salinity is considered the most common abiotic stress reducing its productivity. Soil salinity inhibits photosynthetic processes, which can induce an over-reduction of the reaction centres in photosystem II (PSII), damaging the photosynthetic machinery. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis may improve host plant tolerance to salinity, but it is not clear how the AM symbiosis affects the plant photosynthetic capacity, particularly the efficiency of PSII. This study aimed at determining the influence of the AM symbiosis on the performance of PSII in rice plants subjected to salinity. Photosynthetic activity, plant gas-exchange parameters, accumulation of photosynthetic pigments and rubisco activity and gene expression were also measured in order to analyse comprehensively the response of the photosynthetic processes to AM symbiosis and salinity. Results showed that the AM symbiosis enhanced the actual quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and reduced the quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching in rice plants subjected to salinity. AM rice plants maintained higher net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate than nonAM plants. Thus, we propose that AM rice plants had a higher photochemical efficiency for CO2 fixation and solar energy utilization and this increases plant salt tolerance by preventing the injury to the photosystems reaction centres and by allowing a better utilization of light energy in photochemical processes. All these processes translated into higher photosynthetic and rubisco activities in AM rice plants and improved plant biomass production under salinity.

  14. Photoluminescence quantum yields of PbSe and PbS QDs in the range of 1000 nm to 2000 nm (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beard, Matthew C.; Semonin, Octavi E.; Johnson, Justin C.; Marshall, Ashley; Zhang, Jianbing; Chernomordik, Boris D.

    2016-03-01

    PbS and PbSe quantum dots (QDs) are promising strong infrared emitters. We have developed several synthetic routes to producing PbS and PbSe QDs with a variety of sizes such that the bandgap can be continuously tuned from 2000 to 1000 nm. We provide a simple and accurate synthetic route to reproducibly produce PbS QDs with a narrow size-distribution and high chemical yield. The different synthetic routes lead to differences in their surface chemistry and to differences in their air stability and photoluminescence quantum yields (PLQY). To characterize the PLQY we directly measured the PLQY IR-26 (a standard IR emitting organic dye) at a range of concentrations as well as the PLQY of PbS and PbSe QDs for a range of sizes. We find that the PLQY of IR-26 has a weak concentration dependence due to reabsorption, with a PLQY of 0:048_0:002% for low concentrations, lower than previous reports by a full order of magnitude. We also find a dramatic size dependence for both PbS and PbSe QDs, with the smallest dots exhibiting a PLQY in excess of 60% while larger dots fall below 3%. A model, including nonradiative transition between electronic states and energy transfer to ligand vibrations, appears to explain this size dependence. These findings provide both a better characterization of photoluminescence for near infrared emitters. Halogen surface passivation provides both a larger PLQY (~ 30% improvement) as well as increased air stability.

  15. Measurements of aquifer-storage change and specific yield using gravity surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pool, D.R.; Eychaner, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    Pinal Creek is an intermittent stream that drains a 200-square-mile alluvial basin in central Arizona. Large changes in water levels and aquifer storage occur in an alluvial aquifer near the stream in response to periodic recharge and ground-water withdrawals. Outflow components of the ground-water budget and hydraulic properties of the alluvium are well-defined by field measurements; however, data are insufficient to adequately describe recharge, aquifer-storage change, and specific-yield values. An investigation was begun to assess the utility of temporal-gravity surveys to directly measure aquifer-storage change and estimate values of specific yield.The temporal-gravity surveys measured changes in the differences in gravity between two reference stations on bedrock and six stations at wells; changes are caused by variations in aquifer storage. Specific yield was estimated by dividing storage change by water-level change. Four surveys were done between February 21, 1991, and March 31, 1993. Gravity increased as much as 158 microGal ± 1 to 6 microGal, and water levels rose as much as 58 feet. Average specific yield at wells ranged from 0.16 to 0.21, and variations in specific yield with depth correlate with lithologic variations. Results indicate that temporal-gravity surveys can be used to estimate aquifer-storage change and specific yield of water-table aquifers where significant variations in water levels occur. Direct measurement of aquifer-storage change can eliminate a major unknown from the ground-water budget of arid basins and improve residual estimates of recharge.

  16. Quantum algorithm for universal implementation of the projective measurement of energy.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shojun; Soeda, Akihito; Murao, Mio

    2015-05-15

    A projective measurement of energy (PME) on a quantum system is a quantum measurement determined by the Hamiltonian of the system. PME protocols exist when the Hamiltonian is given in advance. Unknown Hamiltonians can be identified by quantum tomography, but the time cost to achieve a given accuracy increases exponentially with the size of the quantum system. In this Letter, we improve the time cost by adapting quantum phase estimation, an algorithm designed for computational problems, to measurements on physical systems. We present a PME protocol without quantum tomography for Hamiltonians whose dimension and energy scale are given but which are otherwise unknown. Our protocol implements a PME to arbitrary accuracy without any dimension dependence on its time cost. We also show that another computational quantum algorithm may be used for efficient estimation of the energy scale. These algorithms show that computational quantum algorithms, with suitable modifications, have applications beyond their original context.

  17. Quantum Algorithm for Universal Implementation of the Projective Measurement of Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Shojun; Soeda, Akihito; Murao, Mio

    2015-05-01

    A projective measurement of energy (PME) on a quantum system is a quantum measurement determined by the Hamiltonian of the system. PME protocols exist when the Hamiltonian is given in advance. Unknown Hamiltonians can be identified by quantum tomography, but the time cost to achieve a given accuracy increases exponentially with the size of the quantum system. In this Letter, we improve the time cost by adapting quantum phase estimation, an algorithm designed for computational problems, to measurements on physical systems. We present a PME protocol without quantum tomography for Hamiltonians whose dimension and energy scale are given but which are otherwise unknown. Our protocol implements a PME to arbitrary accuracy without any dimension dependence on its time cost. We also show that another computational quantum algorithm may be used for efficient estimation of the energy scale. These algorithms show that computational quantum algorithms, with suitable modifications, have applications beyond their original context.

  18. Measuring {alpha} in B(t){yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}

    SciTech Connect

    Gronau, M.; Zupan, J.

    2004-10-01

    Defining a most economical parametrization of time-dependent B{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} decays, including a measurable phase {alpha}{sub eff} which equals the weak phase {alpha} in the limit of vanishing penguin amplitudes, we propose two ways for determining {alpha} in this processes. We explain the limitation of one method, assuming only that two relevant tree amplitudes factorize and that their relative strong phase {delta}{sub t} is negligible. The other method, based on broken flavor SU(3), permits a determination of {alpha} in B{sup 0}{yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}} in an over constrained system using also rate measurements of B{sup 0,+}{yields}K*{pi} and B{sup 0,+}{yields}{rho}K. Current data are shown to restrict two ratios of penguin and tree amplitudes r{sub {+-}} to a narrow range around 0.2 and to imply an upper bound |{alpha}{sub eff}-{alpha}|<15 deg. . Assuming that {delta}{sub t} is much smaller than 90 deg. , we find {alpha}=(93{+-}16) deg. and (102{+-}20) deg. using BABAR and BELLE results for B(t){yields}{rho}{sup {+-}}{pi}{sup {+-}}. Avoiding this assumption for completeness, we demonstrate the reduction of discrete ambiguities in {alpha} with increased statistics and show that SU(3) breaking effects are effectively second order in r{sub {+-}}.

  19. Measuring the Yield of Singlet Oxygen in a Chemical Oxygen Iodine Laser (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-08-01

    release; distribution is unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES *Los Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Ave., Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518...Kirtland AFB, NM 87117-5776 bLos Gatos Research, 67 East Evelyn Avenue, Suite 3, Mountain View, CA 94041-1518 ABSTRACT A critical parameter...oxygen to be measured. Ongoing work will enable researchers at AFRL and Los Gatos Research to more accurately measure the yield as additional

  20. Continuous Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of the Transverse Component of a Qubit.

    PubMed

    Vool, U; Shankar, S; Mundhada, S O; Ofek, N; Narla, A; Sliwa, K; Zalys-Geller, E; Liu, Y; Frunzio, L; Schoelkopf, R J; Girvin, S M; Devoret, M H

    2016-09-23

    Quantum jumps of a qubit are usually observed between its energy eigenstates, also known as its longitudinal pseudospin component. Is it possible, instead, to observe quantum jumps between the transverse superpositions of these eigenstates? We answer positively by presenting the first continuous quantum nondemolition measurement of the transverse component of an individual qubit. In a circuit QED system irradiated by two pump tones, we engineer an effective Hamiltonian whose eigenstates are the transverse qubit states, and a dispersive measurement of the corresponding operator. Such transverse component measurements are a useful tool in the driven-dissipative operation engineering toolbox, which is central to quantum simulation and quantum error correction.

  1. Continuous Quantum Nondemolition Measurement of the Transverse Component of a Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vool, U.; Shankar, S.; Mundhada, S. O.; Ofek, N.; Narla, A.; Sliwa, K.; Zalys-Geller, E.; Liu, Y.; Frunzio, L.; Schoelkopf, R. J.; Girvin, S. M.; Devoret, M. H.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum jumps of a qubit are usually observed between its energy eigenstates, also known as its longitudinal pseudospin component. Is it possible, instead, to observe quantum jumps between the transverse superpositions of these eigenstates? We answer positively by presenting the first continuous quantum nondemolition measurement of the transverse component of an individual qubit. In a circuit QED system irradiated by two pump tones, we engineer an effective Hamiltonian whose eigenstates are the transverse qubit states, and a dispersive measurement of the corresponding operator. Such transverse component measurements are a useful tool in the driven-dissipative operation engineering toolbox, which is central to quantum simulation and quantum error correction.

  2. Procedure for direct measurement of general quantum states using weak measurement.

    PubMed

    Lundeen, Jeff S; Bamber, Charles

    2012-02-17

    Recent work by Lundeen et al. [Nature (London) 474, 188 (2011)] directly measured the wave function by weakly measuring a variable followed by a normal (i.e., "strong") measurement of the complementary variable. We generalize this method to mixed states by considering the weak measurement of various products of these observables, thereby providing the density matrix an operational definition in terms of a procedure for its direct measurement. The method only requires measurements in two bases and can be performed in situ, determining the quantum state without destroying it.

  3. Entanglement entropy after selective measurements in quantum chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Najafi, Khadijeh; Rajabpour, M. A.

    2016-12-01

    We study bipartite post measurement entanglement entropy after selective measurements in quantum chains. We first study the quantity for the critical systems that can be described by conformal field theories. We find a connection between post measurement entanglement entropy and the Casimir energy of floating objects. Then we provide formulas for the post measurement entanglement entropy for open and finite temperature systems. We also comment on the Affleck-Ludwig boundary entropy in the context of the post measurement entanglement entropy. Finally, we also provide some formulas regarding modular hamiltonians and entanglement spectrum in the after measurement systems. After through discussion regarding CFT systems we also provide some predictions regarding massive field theories. We then discuss a generic method to calculate the post measurement entanglement entropy in the free fermion systems. Using the method we study the post measurement entanglement entropy in the XY spin chain. We check numerically the CFT and the massive field theory results in the transverse field Ising chain and the XX model. In particular, we study the post meaurement entanglement entropy in the infinite, periodic and open critical transverse field Ising chain and the critical XX model. The effect of the temperature and the gap is also discussed in these models.

  4. The classical-quantum boundary for correlations: Discord and related measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modi, Kavan; Brodutch, Aharon; Cable, Hugo; Paterek, Tomasz; Vedral, Vlatko

    2012-10-01

    One of the best signatures of nonclassicality in a quantum system is the existence of correlations that have no classical counterpart. Different methods for quantifying the quantum and classical parts of correlations are among the more actively studied topics of quantum-information theory over the past decade. Entanglement is the most prominent of these correlations, but in many cases unentangled states exhibit nonclassical behavior too. Thus distinguishing quantum correlations other than entanglement provides a better division between the quantum and classical worlds, especially when considering mixed states. Here different notions of classical and quantum correlations quantified by quantum discord and other related measures are reviewed. In the first half, the mathematical properties of the measures of quantum correlations are reviewed, related to each other, and the classical-quantum division that is common among them is discussed. In the second half, it is shown that the measures identify and quantify the deviation from classicality in various quantum-information-processing tasks, quantum thermodynamics, open-system dynamics, and many-body physics. It is shown that in many cases quantum correlations indicate an advantage of quantum methods over classical ones.

  5. Origin of the Photoluminescence Quantum Yields Enhanced by Alkane-Termination of Freestanding Silicon Nanocrystals: Temperature-Dependence of Optical Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Batu; Takeguchi, Masaki; Nakamura, Jin; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Hamaoka, Takumi; Chandra, Sourov; Shirahata, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    On the basis of the systematic study on temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) properties along with relaxation dynamics we revise a long-accepted mechanism for enhancing absolute PL quantum yields (QYs) of freestanding silicon nanocrystals (ncSi). A hydrogen-terminated ncSi (ncSi:H) of 2.1 nm was prepared by thermal disproportination of (HSiO1.5)n, followed by hydrofluoric etching. Room-temperature PL QY of the ncSi:H increased twentyfold only by hydrosilylation of 1-octadecene (ncSi-OD). A combination of PL spectroscopic measurement from cryogenic to room temperature with structural characterization allows us to link the enhanced PL QYs with the notable difference in surface structure between the ncSi:H and the ncSi-OD. The hydride-terminated surface suffers from the presence of a large amount of nonradiative relaxation channels whereas the passivation with alkyl monolayers suppresses the creation of the nonradiative relaxation channels to yield the high PL QY. PMID:27830771

  6. Origin of the Photoluminescence Quantum Yields Enhanced by Alkane-Termination of Freestanding Silicon Nanocrystals: Temperature-Dependence of Optical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Batu; Takeguchi, Masaki; Nakamura, Jin; Nemoto, Yoshihiro; Hamaoka, Takumi; Chandra, Sourov; Shirahata, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    On the basis of the systematic study on temperature dependence of photoluminescence (PL) properties along with relaxation dynamics we revise a long-accepted mechanism for enhancing absolute PL quantum yields (QYs) of freestanding silicon nanocrystals (ncSi). A hydrogen-terminated ncSi (ncSi:H) of 2.1 nm was prepared by thermal disproportination of (HSiO1.5)n, followed by hydrofluoric etching. Room-temperature PL QY of the ncSi:H increased twentyfold only by hydrosilylation of 1-octadecene (ncSi-OD). A combination of PL spectroscopic measurement from cryogenic to room temperature with structural characterization allows us to link the enhanced PL QYs with the notable difference in surface structure between the ncSi:H and the ncSi-OD. The hydride-terminated surface suffers from the presence of a large amount of nonradiative relaxation channels whereas the passivation with alkyl monolayers suppresses the creation of the nonradiative relaxation channels to yield the high PL QY.

  7. Geometric measure of pairwise quantum discord for superpositions of multipartite generalized coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daoud, M.; Ahl Laamara, R.

    2012-07-01

    We give the explicit expressions of the pairwise quantum correlations present in superpositions of multipartite coherent states. A special attention is devoted to the evaluation of the geometric quantum discord. The dynamics of quantum correlations under a dephasing channel is analyzed. A comparison of geometric measure of quantum discord with that of concurrence shows that quantum discord in multipartite coherent states is more resilient to dissipative environments than is quantum entanglement. To illustrate our results, we consider some special superpositions of Weyl-Heisenberg, SU(2) and SU(1,1) coherent states which interpolate between Werner and Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger states.

  8. Surface studies and implanted helium measurements following NOVA high-yield DT experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Stoyer, M.A.; Hudson, G.B.

    1997-02-18

    This paper presents the results of three March 6, 1996 direct-drive high-yield DT NOVA experiments and provides `proof-of-principal` results for the quantitative measurement of energetic He ions. Semiconductor quality Si wafers and an amorphous carbon wafer were exposed to NOVA high-yield implosions. Surface damage was sub-micron in general, although the surface ablation was slightly greater for the carbon wafer than for the Si wafers. Melting of a thin ({approx} 0.1{mu}) layer of Si was evident from microscopic investigation. Electron microscopy indicated melted blobs of many different metals (e.g. Al, Au, Ta, Fe alloys, Cu and even Cd) on the surfaces. The yield measured by determining the numbers of atoms of implanted {sup 4}He and {sup 3}He indicate the number of DT fusions to be 9.1({plus_minus}2.3) X 10{sup 12} and DD fusions to be 4.8({plus_minus}1.0) x 10{sup 10}, respectively. The helium DT fusion yield is slightly lower than that of the Cu activation measurement, which was 1.3({plus_minus}0.l) x 10{sup 13} DT fusions.

  9. Measurement of Quantum Phase-Slips in Josephson Junction Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guichard, Wiebke

    2011-03-01

    Quantum phase-slip dynamics in Josephson junction chains could provide the basis for the realization of a new type of topologically protected qubit or for the implementation of a new current standard. I will present measurements of the effect of quantum phase-slips on the ground state of a Josephson junction chain. We can tune in situ the strength of the phase-slips. These phase-slips are the result of fluctuations induced by the finite charging energy of each junction in the chain. Our measurements demonstrate that a Josephson junction chain under phase bias constraint behaves in a collective way. I will also show evidence of coherent phase-slip interference, the so called Aharonov-Casher effect. This phenomenon is the dual of the well known Aharonov-Bohm interference. In collaboration with I.M. Pop, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier, BP 166, 38042 Grenoble, France; I. Protopopov, L. D. Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kosygin str. 2, Moscow 119334, Russia and Institut fuer Nanotechnologie, Karlsruher Institut fuer Technologie, 76021 Karlsruhe, Germany; and F. Lecocq, Z. Peng, B. Pannetier, O. Buisson, Institut Neel, C.N.R.S. and Universite Joseph Fourier. European STREP MIDAS, ANR QUANTJO.

  10. Comment on "Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement".

    PubMed

    Bosyk, G M; Zozor, S; Holik, F; Portesi, M; Lamberti, P W

    2016-08-01

    We comment on the main result given by Ourabah et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015)PLEEE81539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], noting that it can be derived as a special case of the more general study that we have provided in [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016)10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our proof of the nondecreasing character under projective measurements of so-called generalized (h,ϕ) entropies (that comprise the Kaniadakis family as a particular case) has been based on majorization and Schur-concavity arguments. As a consequence, we have obtained that this property is obviously satisfied by Kaniadakis entropy but at the same time is fulfilled by all entropies preserving majorization. In addition, we have seen that our result holds for any bistochastic map, being a projective measurement a particular case. We argue here that looking at these facts from the point of view given in [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016)10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5] not only simplifies the demonstrations but allows for a deeper understanding of the entropic properties involved.

  11. Analytical examples, measurement models, and classical limit of quantum backflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yearsley, J. M.; Halliwell, J. J.; Hartshorn, R.; Whitby, A.

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the backflow effect in elementary quantum mechanics—the phenomenon in which a state consisting entirely of positive momenta may have negative current and the probability flows in the opposite direction to the momentum. We compute the current and flux for states consisting of superpositions of Gaussian wave packets. These are experimentally realizable but the amount of backflow is small. Inspired by the numerical results of Penz [Penz, Grübl, Kreidl, and Wagner, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/39/2/012 39, 423 (2006)], we find two nontrivial wave functions whose current at any time may be computed analytically and which have periods of significant backflow, in one case with a backward flux equal to about 70% of the maximum possible backflow, a dimensionless number cbm≈0.04, discovered by Bracken and Melloy [Bracken and Melloy, J. Phys. AJPHAC50305-447010.1088/0305-4470/27/6/040 27, 2197 (1994)]. This number has the unusual property of being independent of ℏ (and also of all other parameters of the model), despite corresponding to an obviously quantum-mechanical effect, and we shed some light on this surprising property by considering the classical limit of backflow. We discuss some specific measurement models in which backflow may be identified in certain measurable probabilities.

  12. Comment on "Quantum Kaniadakis entropy under projective measurement"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosyk, G. M.; Zozor, S.; Holik, F.; Portesi, M.; Lamberti, P. W.

    2016-08-01

    We comment on the main result given by Ourabah et al. [Phys. Rev. E 92, 032114 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevE.92.032114], noting that it can be derived as a special case of the more general study that we have provided in [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016), 10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5]. Our proof of the nondecreasing character under projective measurements of so-called generalized (h ,ϕ ) entropies (that comprise the Kaniadakis family as a particular case) has been based on majorization and Schur-concavity arguments. As a consequence, we have obtained that this property is obviously satisfied by Kaniadakis entropy but at the same time is fulfilled by all entropies preserving majorization. In addition, we have seen that our result holds for any bistochastic map, being a projective measurement a particular case. We argue here that looking at these facts from the point of view given in [Quantum Inf Process 15, 3393 (2016), 10.1007/s11128-016-1329-5] not only simplifies the demonstrations but allows for a deeper understanding of the entropic properties involved.

  13. Weak measurement and quantum steering of spin qubits in silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morello, Andrea; Muhonen, Juha; Simmons, Stephanie; Freer, Solomon; Dehollain, Juan; McCallum, Jeffrey; Jamieson, David; Itoh, Kohei; Dzurak, Andrew

    Single-shot, projective measurements have been demonstrated with very high fidelities on both the electron and the nuclear spin of single implanted phosphorus (31P) donors in silicon. Here we present a series of experiments where the measurement strength is continousuly reduced, giving access to the regime of weak measurement of single spins.For the electron qubit, the measurement strength is set by the measurement time compared to the spin-dependent tunneling time between the 31P donor and a charge reservoir. For the nuclear qubit, the measurement strength is set by the rotation angle of an ESR pulse.We have demonstrated quantum steering of the spin states, with curious and useful applications. We can improve the fidelity of electron qubit initialization by steering it towards the ground state, thus bypassing thermal effects on the initialization process. We can also accurately measure the electron-reservoir tunnel coupling, without the electron ever tunneling away from the 31P atom. Finally, these techniques allow the study of weak values and Leggett-Garg inequalities. Present address: AMOLF, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.

  14. Calibration methodology for proportional counters applied to yield measurements of a neutron burst.

    PubMed

    Tarifeño-Saldivia, Ariel; Mayer, Roberto E; Pavez, Cristian; Soto, Leopoldo

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a methodology for the yield measurement of a neutron burst using neutron proportional counters. This methodology is to be applied when single neutron events cannot be resolved in time by nuclear standard electronics, or when a continuous current cannot be measured at the output of the counter. The methodology is based on the calibration of the counter in pulse mode, and the use of a statistical model to estimate the number of detected events from the accumulated charge resulting from the detection of the burst of neutrons. The model is developed and presented in full detail. For the measurement of fast neutron yields generated from plasma focus experiments using a moderated proportional counter, the implementation of the methodology is herein discussed. An experimental verification of the accuracy of the methodology is presented. An improvement of more than one order of magnitude in the accuracy of the detection system is obtained by using this methodology with respect to previous calibration methods.

  15. Quantum proofs can be verified using only single-qubit measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morimae, Tomoyuki; Nagaj, Daniel; Schuch, Norbert

    2016-02-01

    Quantum Merlin Arthur (QMA) is the class of problems which, though potentially hard to solve, have a quantum solution that can be verified efficiently using a quantum computer. It thus forms a natural quantum version of the classical complexity class NP (and its probabilistic variant MA, Merlin-Arthur games), where the verifier has only classical computational resources. In this paper, we study what happens when we restrict the quantum resources of the verifier to the bare minimum: individual measurements on single qubits received as they come, one by one. We find that despite this grave restriction, it is still possible to soundly verify any problem in QMA for the verifier with the minimum quantum resources possible, without using any quantum memory or multiqubit operations. We provide two independent proofs of this fact, based on measurement-based quantum computation and the local Hamiltonian problem. The former construction also applies to QMA1, i.e., QMA with one-sided error.

  16. Quantum wave packet study of nonadiabatic effects in O({sup 1}D) + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, S.K.; Petrongolo, C.; Drukker, K.; Schatz, G.C.

    1999-11-25

    The authors develop a wave packet approach to treating the electronically nonadiabatic reaction dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + H{sub 2} {yields} OH + H, allowing for the 1{sup 1}A{prime} and 2{sup 1}A{prime} potential energy surfaces and couplings, as well as the three internal nuclear coordinates. Two different systems of coupled potential energy surfaces are considered, a semiempirical diatomics-in-molecules (DIM) system due to Kuntz, Niefer, and Sloan, and a recently developed ab initio system due to Dobbyn and Knowles (DK). Nonadiabatic quantum results, with total angular momentum J = 0, are obtained and discussed. Several single surface calculations are carried out for comparison with the nonadiabatic results. Comparisons with trajectory surface hopping (TSH) calculations, and with approximate quantum calculations, are also included. The electrostatic coupling produces strong interactions between the 1{sup 1}A{prime} and 2{sup 1}A{prime} states at short range (where these states have a conical intersection) and weak but, interestingly, nonnegligible interactions between these states at longer range. The wave packet results show that if the initial state is chosen to be effectively the 1A{prime} state (for which insertion to form products occurs on the adiabatic surface), then there is very little difference between the adiabatic and coupled surface results. In either case the reaction probability is a relatively flat function of energy, except for resonant oscillations. However, the 2A{prime} reaction, dynamics (which involves a collinear transition state) is strongly perturbed by nonadiabatic effects in two distinct ways. At energies above the transition state barrier, the diabatic limit is dominant, and the 2A{prime} reaction probability is similar to that for 1A{double{underscore}prime}, which has no coupling with the other surfaces. At energies below the barrier, the authors find a significant component of the reaction probability from long range electronic

  17. Room-temperature and gram-scale synthesis of CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite nanocrystals with 50-85% photoluminescence quantum yields.

    PubMed

    Wei, Song; Yang, Yanchun; Kang, Xiaojiao; Wang, Lan; Huang, Lijian; Pan, Daocheng

    2016-05-26

    All inorganic CsPbX3 (X = Cl, Br, I) perovskite nanocrystals (PNCs) with 50-85% photoluminescence quantum yields and tunable emission in the range of 440-682 nm have been successfully synthesized at room temperature in open air. This facile strategy enables us to prepare gram-scale CsPbBr3 NCs with a PLQY approaching 80%.

  18. Molar Absorptivity and Concentration-Dependent Quantum Yield of Fe(II) Photo-Formation for the Aqueous Solutions of Fe(III)-Dicarboxylate Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitomi, Y.; Arakaki, T.

    2009-12-01

    Redox cycles of iron in the aquatic environment affect formation of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals, which in turn determines lifetimes of many organic compounds. Although aqueous Fe(III)-dicarboxylate complexes are considered to be important sources of photo-formed Fe(II), molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) formation for individual species are not well understood. We initiated a study to characterize Fe(II) photo-formation from Fe(III)-dicarboxylates with the concentration ranges that are relevant to the natural aquatic environment. The Visual MINTEQ computer program was used to calculate the equilibrium concentrations of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. The molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species was obtained by UV-VIS spectrophotometer, and the product of the quantum yield and the molar absorptivity of Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species were obtained from photochemical experiments. These experimental data were combined with the calculated equilibrium Fe(III)-dicarboxylate concentrations to determine individual molar absorptivity and quantum yield of Fe(II) photo-formation for a specific Fe(III)-dicarboxylate species. We used initial concentrations of less than 10 micromolar Fe(III) to study the photochemical formation of Fe(II). Dicarboxylate compounds studied include oxalate, malonate, succinate, malate, and phthalate. We report molar absorptivity and concentration-dependent quantum yields of Fe(II) photo-formation of individual Fe(III)-dicarboxylates.

  19. Measurement of the Helicity Difference in {gamma}{sup {yields}p{yields}{yields}p{pi}+{pi}-} with the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sungkyun

    2010-08-05

    The study of the properties of baryon resonances can provide us with hints to help us understand the structure of non-perturbative QCD and the effect of a particular resonance on polarization observables. The investigation of double-pion photoproduction data is needed to discover higher-lying states and their properties at and above W {approx_equal} 1.8 GeV. Therefore, the analysis of the helicity difference in gp {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will help us in our understanding of QCD.The CLAS g9a (FROST) experiment, as part of the N* spectroscopy program at Jefferson Laboratory, has accumulated photoproduction data using linearly and circularly polarized photons incident on a longitudinally-polarized butanol target in the photon energy range 0.3 to 2.4 GeV. The FROST experiment provides an important step toward a ''complete'' experiment for the reaction {gamma}N{yields}KY.In this contribution, the method to calculate the helicity difference for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{pi}{sup +{pi}-} will be described and preliminary results will be discussed.

  20. Synthesis and formation mechanistic investigation of nitrogen-doped carbon dots with high quantum yields and yellowish-green fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Juan; Wang, Wei; Zhou, Tianyu; Wang, Bo; Li, Huiyu; Ding, Lan

    2016-05-01

    Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A possible formation mechanism has thus been proposed including dehydration, polymerization and carbonization. Furthermore, the N-CDs could serve as a facile and label-free probe for the detection of iron and fluorine ions with detection limits of 50 nmol L-1 and 75 nmol L-1, respectively.Heteroatom doped carbon dots (CDs) have received increasing attention due to their unique properties and related applications. However, previously reported CDs generally show strong emission only in the blue-light region, thus restricting their further applications. And the fundamental investigation on the preparation process is always neglected. Herein, we have developed a simple and solvent-free synthetic strategy to fabricate nitrogen-doped CDs (N-CDs) from citric acid and dicyandiamide. The as-prepared N-CDs exhibited a uniform size distribution, strong yellowish-green fluorescence emission and a high quantum yield of 73.2%. The products obtained at different formation stages were detailedly characterized by transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction spectrometer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and UV absorbance spectroscopy. A

  1. Neutron interferometer crystallographic imperfections and gravitationally induced quantum interference measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heacock, B.; Arif, M.; Haun, R.; Huber, M. G.; Pushin, D. A.; Young, A. R.

    2017-01-01

    Dynamical diffraction leads to an interesting, unavoidable set of interference effects for neutron interferometers. This experiment studies the interference signal from two and three successive Bragg diffractions in the Laue geometry. We find that intrinsic Bragg-plane misalignment in monolithic, "perfect" silicon neutron interferometers is relevant between successive diffracting crystals, as well as within the Borrmann fan for typical interferometer geometries. We show that the dynamical phase correction employed in the Colella, Overhauser, and Werner gravitationally induced quantum interference experiments is attenuated by slight, intrinsic misalignments between diffracting crystals, potentially explaining the long-standing 1% discrepancy between theory and experiment. This systematic may also impact precision measurements of the silicon structure factor, affecting previous and future measurements of the Debye-Waller factor and neutron-electron scattering length as well as potential fifth-force searches. For the interferometers used in this experiment, Bragg planes of different diffracting crystals were found to be misaligned by 10 to 40 nrad.

  2. Measurement-based noiseless linear amplification for quantum communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chrzanowski, H. M.; Walk, N.; Haw, J. Y.; Thearle, O.; Assad, S. M.; Janousek, J.; Hosseini, S.; Ralph, T. C.; Symul, T.; Lam, P. K.

    2014-11-01

    Entanglement distillation is an indispensable ingredient in extended quantum communication networks. Distillation protocols are necessarily non-deterministic and require non-trivial experimental techniques such as noiseless amplification. We show that noiseless amplification could be achieved by performing a post-selective filtering of measurement outcomes. We termed this protocol measurement-based noiseless linear amplification (MBNLA). We apply this protocol to entanglement that suffers transmission loss of up to the equivalent of 100km of optical fibre and show that it is capable of distilling entanglement to a level stronger than that achievable by transmitting a maximally entangled state through the same channel. We also provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of secret key extraction from an otherwise insecure regime via MBNLA. Compared to its physical counterpart, MBNLA not only is easier in term of implementation, but also allows one to achieve near optimal probability of success.

  3. Reality, measurement and locality in Quantum Field Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasini, Daniele

    2002-07-01

    It is currently believed that the local causality of Quantum Field Theory (QFT) is destroyed by the measurement process. This belief is also based on the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) paradox and on the so-called Bell's theorem, that are thought to prove the existence of a mysterious, instantaneous action between distant measurements. However, I have shown recently that the EPR argument is removed, in an interpretation-independent way, by taking into account the fact that the Standard Model of Particle Physics prevents the production of entangled states with a definite number of particles. This result is used here to argue in favor of a statistical interpretation of QFT and to show that it allows for a full reconciliation with locality and causality. Within such an interpretation, as Ballentine and Jarret pointed out long ago, Bell's theorem does not demonstrate any nonlocality.

  4. Purification-based metric to measure the distance between quantum states and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osán, Tristán M.; Lamberti, Pedro W.

    2013-06-01

    In this work we study the properties of a purification-based entropic metric for measuring the distance between both quantum states and quantum processes. This metric is defined as the square root of the entropy of the average of two purifications of mixed quantum states which maximize the overlap between the purified states. We analyze this metric and show that it satisfies many appealing properties, which suggest this metric is an interesting proposal for theoretical and experimental applications of quantum information.

  5. Microwave Transmission Measurements in Gated GaAs/AlGaAs Quantum Wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Kristjan; Knez, Ivan; Du, Rui-Rui; Manfra, Michael; Pfeiffer, Loren; West, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Microwave transmission measurements across a 2D electron system have been previously demonstrated in quantum Hall effect and electronic solids regime [1]. We have developed a co-planar waveguide (CPW) system for experiments in microwave-induced resistance oscillations and zero resistance states. Microwaves from a tunable source (2 - 40 GHz) were fed into our system and coupled to a CPW meander line at 300mK to measure cyclotron resonance peaks from a carbon-doped (100) GaAs/AlxGa1-xAs quantum well 2D hole system. Our samples are Hall bars with mobility μ= 0.7-1 x10^6 cm^2/Vs and carrier density ranging from 2.02 - 2.26x10^11cm-2. Each sample has been gated with AuPd using a Si3N4 dielectric. A differential power measurement δP = Pout -Pout^gate is taken with the signal from the power sensor triggered from a modulated gate to remove the background microwave signal, yielding a cyclotron resonance peak from the transmission signal. We are able to fit our cyclotron transmission signal using the Drude model and determine the hole mass and the cyclotron scattering time. Experimental data as well as a brief discussion will be presented. The work at Rice was funded by NSF DMR-0706634. [1] L. W. Engel et al, Phys. Rev. Lett. 71, 2638 (1993).

  6. Measuring neutron yield and ρR anisotropies with activation foils at the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bionta, R. M.; Cooper, G. W.; Drury, O. B.; Hagmann, C. A.; Knittel, K. M.; Leeper, R. J.; Ruiz, C. L.; Schneider, D. H. G.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2013-11-01

    Neutron yields at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are measured with a suite of diagnostics, including activation of ˜20-200 g samples of materials undergoing a variety of energy-dependent neutron reactions. Indium samples were mounted on the end of a Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM), 25-50 cm from the implosion, to measure 2.45 MeV D-D fusion neutron yield. The 336.2 keV gamma rays from the 4.5 hour isomer of 115mIn produced by (n,n') reactions are counted in high-purity germanium detectors. For capsules producing D-T fusion reactions, zirconium and copper are activated via (n,2n) reactions at various locations around the target chamber and bay, measuring the 14 MeV neutron yield to accuracies on order of 7%. By mounting zirconium samples on ports at nine locations around the NIF chamber, anisotropies in the primary neutron emission due to fuel areal density asymmetries can be measured to a relative precision of 3%.

  7. Loss-tolerant measurement-device-independent quantum private queries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang-Yuan; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Qian, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Quantum private queries (QPQ) is an important cryptography protocol aiming to protect both the user’s and database’s privacy when the database is queried privately. Recently, a variety of practical QPQ protocols based on quantum key distribution (QKD) have been proposed. However, for QKD-based QPQ the user’s imperfect detectors can be subjected to some detector- side-channel attacks launched by the dishonest owner of the database. Here, we present a simple example that shows how the detector-blinding attack can damage the security of QKD-based QPQ completely. To remove all the known and unknown detector side channels, we propose a solution of measurement-device-independent QPQ (MDI-QPQ) with single- photon sources. The security of the proposed protocol has been analyzed under some typical attacks. Moreover, we prove that its security is completely loss independent. The results show that practical QPQ will remain the same degree of privacy as before even with seriously uncharacterized detectors.

  8. Loss-tolerant measurement-device-independent quantum private queries

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liang-Yuan; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Chen, Wei; Qian, Yong-Jun; Zhang, Chun-Mei; Guo, Guang-Can; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Quantum private queries (QPQ) is an important cryptography protocol aiming to protect both the user’s and database’s privacy when the database is queried privately. Recently, a variety of practical QPQ protocols based on quantum key distribution (QKD) have been proposed. However, for QKD-based QPQ the user’s imperfect detectors can be subjected to some detector- side-channel attacks launched by the dishonest owner of the database. Here, we present a simple example that shows how the detector-blinding attack can damage the security of QKD-based QPQ completely. To remove all the known and unknown detector side channels, we propose a solution of measurement-device-independent QPQ (MDI-QPQ) with single- photon sources. The security of the proposed protocol has been analyzed under some typical attacks. Moreover, we prove that its security is completely loss independent. The results show that practical QPQ will remain the same degree of privacy as before even with seriously uncharacterized detectors. PMID:28051101

  9. Quantum Models for Psychological Measurements: An Unsolved Problem

    PubMed Central

    Khrennikov, Andrei; Basieva, Irina; Dzhafarov, Ehtibar N.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2014-01-01

    There has been a strong recent interest in applying quantum theory (QT) outside physics, including in cognitive science. We analyze the applicability of QT to two basic properties in opinion polling. The first property (response replicability) is that, for a large class of questions, a response to a given question is expected to be repeated if the question is posed again, irrespective of whether another question is asked and answered in between. The second property (question order effect) is that the response probabilities frequently depend on the order in which the questions are asked. Whenever these two properties occur together, it poses a problem for QT. The conventional QT with Hermitian operators can handle response replicability, but only in the way incompatible with the question order effect. In the generalization of QT known as theory of positive-operator-valued measures (POVMs), in order to account for response replicability, the POVMs involved must be conventional operators. Although these problems are not unique to QT and also challenge conventional cognitive theories, they stand out as important unresolved problems for the application of QT to cognition. Either some new principles are needed to determine the bounds of applicability of QT to cognition, or quantum formalisms more general than POVMs are needed. PMID:25343581

  10. A New Quantum Sensor for Measuring Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D.; Thomas, T.; Heinicke, D.; Peterson, R.; Morgan, P.; McDermitt, D. K.; Burba, G. G.

    2015-12-01

    A quantum sensor measures photosynthetically active radiation (PAR, in μmol of photons m-2 s-1) in the 400 nm to 700 nm waveband. Plants utilize this radiation to drive photosynthesis, though individual plant responses to incident radiation may vary within this range. The new quantum sensor (model LI-190R, LI-COR Biosciences, Lincoln, NE), with an optical filter and silicon photodiode detector housed in a cosine-corrected head, is designed to provide a better response to incident radiation across the 400-700 nm range. The new design is expected to significantly improve spectral response due to uniformity across the PAR waveband, but particularly in the wavebands from 520 nm to 600 nm and 665 nm to 680 nm, and sharp cutoffs in the regions below and above the PAR waveband. Special care was taken to make sure that PAR sensor would not substantially respond to incident radiation above the 700 nm threshold because this can lead to errors when performing measurements in environments with a large proportion of near-infrared radiation, such as canopy understory. The physical housing of the sensor is designed to be weather-resistant, to effectively shed precipitation, provide protection at high temperature and high humidity conditions, and has a cosine-corrected response to 82° zenith angle. The latter is particularly important when measuring incident radiation at low elevation angles, diffuse light, or low light conditions. This presentation describes the principles of the new design, and shows the performance results from field experiments and laboratory tests.

  11. A comparative study of maximal quantum yield of photosystem II to determine nitrogen and phosphorus limitation on two marine algae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Hongju; Wang, Jiangtao; Wang, Zhaoyu

    2013-07-01

    We studied the effects of nitrogen and phosphorus supply on Fv/Fm (maximal quantum yield of photosystem II) in the diatom Chaetoceros debilis and dinoflagellate Scrippsiella trochoidea in nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) depleted cultures to determine whether this parameter could be used to monitor N or P limitation. In the nutrient depleted experiments, no obvious decrease of cell density and chlorophyll concentration was observed except in N-depleted incubation of S. trochoidea. For C. debilis, Fv/Fm decreased quickly in periods of N- and P-depletion and re-supply of N and P induced a quick recovery of Fv/Fm. However, in S. trochoidea culture, Fv/Fm remained unchanged in N- and P-depleted conditions and addition of sufficient N and P to N- and P-depleted cultures did not affect Fv/Fm. Therefore, Fv/Fm is insensitive to N and/or P limitation in growth of S. trochoidea. The results suggested that Fv/Fm was not a robust diagnostic for nutrient limitation in dinoflagellates. The differences in the sensitivity of Fv/Fm to nutrient limitation may result from different nutrient storage abilities among algal species.

  12. Controls of the quantum yield and saturation light of isoprene emission in different-aged aspen leaves.

    PubMed

    Niinemets, Ülo; Sun, Zhihong; Talts, Eero

    2015-12-01

    Leaf age alters the balance between the use of end-product of plastidic isoprenoid synthesis pathway, dimethylallyl diphosphate (DMADP), in prenyltransferase reactions leading to synthesis of pigments of photosynthetic machinery and in isoprene synthesis, but the implications of such changes on environmental responses of isoprene emission have not been studied. Because under light-limited conditions, isoprene emission rate is controlled by DMADP pool size (SDMADP ), shifts in the share of different processes are expected to particularly strongly alter the light dependency of isoprene emission. We examined light responses of isoprene emission in young fully expanded, mature and old non-senescent leaves of hybrid aspen (Populus tremula x P. tremuloides) and estimated in vivo SDMADP and isoprene synthase activity from post-illumination isoprene release. Isoprene emission capacity was 1.5-fold larger in mature than in young and old leaves. The initial quantum yield of isoprene emission (αI ) increased by 2.5-fold with increasing leaf age primarily as the result of increasing SDMADP . The saturating light intensity (QI90 ) decreased by 2.3-fold with increasing leaf age, and this mainly reflected limited light-dependent increase of SDMADP possibly due to feedback inhibition by DMADP. These major age-dependent changes in the shape of the light response need consideration in modelling canopy isoprene emission.

  13. Facile Synthesis of pH-sensitive Germanium Nanocrystals with High Quantum Yield for Intracellular Acidic Compartment Imaging.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wang, Jing; Sun, Shuqing; Wang, Hai; Tang, Zhiyong; Nie, Guangjun

    2015-04-24

    A green-light emitting germanium nanocrystal-based biosensor to monitor lysosomal pH changes is developed. The Ge nanocrystals are synthesized in an aqueous solution with a significantly enhanced photoluminescence quantum yield of 26%. This synthesis involves a facile solution based route which avoided the use of toxic or environmentally unfriendly agents. Importantly, the photoluminescence intensity of the synthesized Ge nanocrystals is particularly sensitive to changes in pH between 5 and 6. When incubated with cultured cells, the nanocrystals are internalized and subsequently translocated via the lysosomal pathway, and the Ge nanocrystals' fluorescence are greatly enhanced, even when the lysosomal pH is only slightly increased. These results reveal that the Ge nanocrystals possess high pH sensitivity compared to a commercially available dye, LysoSensor Green DND-189. The fluorescent properties of the Ge nanocrystals are demonstrated to be dependent on both the crystal form and their surface chemistry. The superior fluorescence properties and bioapplicability of the Ge nanocrystals makes them a promising intracellular bioimaging probe for monitoring various pH-sensitive processes in cells.

  14. Molecular imprinting sensor based on quantum weak measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Dongmei; He, Qinghua; He, Yonghong; Xin, Meiguo; Zhang, Yilong; Shen, Zhiyuan

    2017-03-10

    A new type of sensing protocol, based on a high precision metrology of quantum weak measurement, was first proposed for molecularly imprinted polymers (MIP) sensor. The feasibility, sensitivity and selectivity of weak measurement based MIP (WMMIP) sensor were experimentally demonstrated with bovine serum albumin (BSA). Weak measurement system exhibits high sensitivity to the optical phase shift corresponding to the refractive index change, which is induced by the specific capture of target protein molecules with its recognition sites. The recognition process can be finally characterized by the central wavelength shift of output spectra through weak value amplification. In our experiment, we prepared BSA@MIP with modified reversed-phase microemulsion method, and coated it on the internal surface of measuring channels assembled into the Mach-Zehnder (MZ) interferometer based optical weak measurement system. The design of this home-built optical system makes it possible to detect analyte in real time. The dynamic process of the specific adsorption and concentration response to BSA from 5×10(-4) to 5×10(-1)μg/L was achieved with a limit of detection (LOD) of 8.01×10(-12)g/L. This WMMIP shows superiority in accuracy, fast response and low cost. Furthermore, real-time monitoring system can creatively promote the performance of MIP in molecular analysis.

  15. Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum non-demolition parity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Petrenko, A; Leghtas, Z; Vlastakis, B; Kirchmair, G; Sliwa, K M; Narla, A; Hatridge, M; Shankar, S; Blumoff, J; Frunzio, L; Mirrahimi, M; Devoret, M H; Schoelkopf, R J

    2014-07-24

    Quantum error correction is required for a practical quantum computer because of the fragile nature of quantum information. In quantum error correction, information is redundantly stored in a large quantum state space and one or more observables must be monitored to reveal the occurrence of an error, without disturbing the information encoded in an unknown quantum state. Such observables, typically multi-quantum-bit parities, must correspond to a special symmetry property inherent in the encoding scheme. Measurements of these observables, or error syndromes, must also be performed in a quantum non-demolition way (projecting without further perturbing the state) and more quickly than errors occur. Previously, quantum non-demolition measurements of quantum jumps between states of well-defined energy have been performed in systems such as trapped ions, electrons, cavity quantum electrodynamics, nitrogen-vacancy centres and superconducting quantum bits. So far, however, no fast and repeated monitoring of an error syndrome has been achieved. Here we track the quantum jumps of a possible error syndrome, namely the photon number parity of a microwave cavity, by mapping this property onto an ancilla quantum bit, whose only role is to facilitate quantum state manipulation and measurement. This quantity is just the error syndrome required in a recently proposed scheme for a hardware-efficient protected quantum memory using Schrödinger cat states (quantum superpositions of different coherent states of light) in a harmonic oscillator. We demonstrate the projective nature of this measurement onto a region of state space with well-defined parity by observing the collapse of a coherent state onto even or odd cat states. The measurement is fast compared with the cavity lifetime, has a high single-shot fidelity and has a 99.8 per cent probability per single measurement of leaving the parity unchanged. In combination with the deterministic encoding of quantum information in cat

  16. YieldStar based reticle 3D measurements and its application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaenkatesan, Vidya; Finders, Jo; ten Berge, Peter; Plug, Reinder; Sijben, Anko; Schellekens, Twan; Dillen, Harm; Pocobiej, Wojciech; Jorge, Vasco G.; van Dijck, Jurgen

    2016-09-01

    YieldStar (YS) is an established ASML-built scatterometer that is capable of measuring wafer Critical Dimension (CD), Overlay and Focus. In a recent work, the application range of YS was extended to measure 3D CD patterns on a reticle (pattern CD, height, Side Wall Angle-SWA). The primary motivation for this study came from imaging studies that indicated a need for measuring and controlling reticle 3D topography. CD scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM), Atomic force microscope (AFM), 3D multiple detector SEM (3D-SEM) are the preferred tools for reticle metrology. While these tools serve the industry well, the current research to the impact of reticle 3D involves extensive costs, logistic challenges and increased reticle lead time. YS provides an attractive alternative as it can measure pattern CD, SWA and height in a single measurement and at high throughput. This work demonstrates the capability of YS as a reticle metrology tool.

  17. Measuring Renyi entanglement entropy in quantum Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Matthew B; González, Iván; Kallin, Ann B; Melko, Roger G

    2010-04-16

    We develop a quantum Monte Carlo procedure, in the valence bond basis, to measure the Renyi entanglement entropy of a many-body ground state as the expectation value of a unitary Swap operator acting on two copies of the system. An improved estimator involving the ratio of Swap operators for different subregions enables convergence of the entropy in a simulation time polynomial in the system size. We demonstrate convergence of the Renyi entropy to exact results for a Heisenberg chain. Finally, we calculate the scaling of the Renyi entropy in the two-dimensional Heisenberg model and confirm that the Néel ground state obeys the expected area law for systems up to linear size L=32.

  18. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    DOE PAGES

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0more » to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.« less

  19. Measurement of scintillation and ionization yield and scintillation pulse shape from nuclear recoils in liquid argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, H.; Alexander, T.; Aprahamian, A.; Avetisyan, R.; Back, H. O.; Cocco, A. G.; Dejongh, F.; Fiorillo, G.; Galbiati, C.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, Y.; Kendziora, C.; Lippincott, W. H.; Love, C.; Lyons, S.; Manenti, L.; Martoff, C. J.; Meng, Y.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Olvitt, D.; Pordes, S.; Qian, H.; Rossi, B.; Saldanha, R.; Sangiorgio, S.; Siegl, K.; Strauss, S. Y.; Tan, W.; Tatarowicz, J.; Walker, S.; Wang, H.; Watson, A. W.; Westerdale, S.; Yoo, J.; Scene Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V /cm . For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V /cm . We also report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from Krm83 internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni ) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  20. Measurement of Scintillation and Ionization Yield and Scintillation Pulse Shape from Nuclear Recoils in Liquid Argon

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, H.

    2015-05-26

    We have measured the scintillation and ionization yield of recoiling nuclei in liquid argon as a function of applied electric field by exposing a dual-phase liquid argon time projection chamber (LAr-TPC) to a low energy pulsed narrow band neutron beam produced at the Notre Dame Institute for Structure and Nuclear Astrophysics. Liquid scintillation counters were arranged to detect and identify neutrons scattered in the TPC and to select the energy of the recoiling nuclei. We also report measurements of the scintillation yields for nuclear recoils with energies from 10.3 to 57.3 keV and for median applied electric fields from 0 to 970 V/cm. For the ionization yields, we report measurements from 16.9 to 57.3 keV and for electric fields from 96.4 to 486 V/cm. Furthermore, we report the observation of an anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from nuclear recoils, which is similar to the anticorrelation between scintillation and ionization from electron recoils. Assuming that the energy loss partitions into excitons and ion pairs from 83mKr internal conversion electrons is comparable to that from 207Bi conversion electrons, we obtained the numbers of excitons (Nex) and ion pairs (Ni) and their ratio (Nex/Ni) produced by nuclear recoils from 16.9 to 57.3 keV. Motivated by arguments suggesting direction sensitivity in LAr-TPC signals due to columnar recombination, a comparison of the light and charge yield of recoils parallel and perpendicular to the applied electric field is presented for the first time.

  1. Collapsing a perfect superposition to a chosen quantum state without measurement.

    PubMed

    Younes, Ahmed; Abdel-Aty, Mahmoud

    2014-01-01

    Given a perfect superposition of [Formula: see text] states on a quantum system of [Formula: see text] qubits. We propose a fast quantum algorithm for collapsing the perfect superposition to a chosen quantum state [Formula: see text] without applying any measurements. The basic idea is to use a phase destruction mechanism. Two operators are used, the first operator applies a phase shift and a temporary entanglement to mark [Formula: see text] in the superposition, and the second operator applies selective phase shifts on the states in the superposition according to their Hamming distance with [Formula: see text]. The generated state can be used as an excellent input state for testing quantum memories and linear optics quantum computers. We make no assumptions about the used operators and applied quantum gates, but our result implies that for this purpose the number of qubits in the quantum register offers no advantage, in principle, over the obvious measurement-based feedback protocol.

  2. Quantum-limited mechanical resonator measurement and back-action cooling to near the quantum ground state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rocheleau, Tristan Orion

    For decades, quantum mechanics has been a hugely successful theory for understanding the microscopic world. Despite its seemingly non-physical predictions, such as superposition or cat states, the accuracy of the theory has been verified time and again for microscopic systems composed of single atoms or other quantum particles. Up till now, however, our understanding of how and if these quantum predictions scale to larger systems closer to our everyday perceptions, where we do not see quantum "weirdness", is an open question. One platform to pursue observation of quantum effects in a system composed of large ensembles of atoms rather than single particles is that of nanomechanical resonators. Several schemes have been proposed to observe quantum effects in these systems, eg [1],[41], but a common feature is the requirement that the mechanical resonator be at or near its quantum ground state, which has proved challenging to achieve. In this dissertation, a novel mechanical motion readout scheme using superconducting resonators is presented and shown to allow near quantum limited detection. In any strong measurement of a system, quantum mechanics dictates that the measurement will inherently produce some "back-action" on the measured system. It will be shown that for the measurement system presented, back-action forces can additionally be used to cool a single mode of a mechanical resonator to near its quantum ground state, with the lowest observed occupation factor at 3.8 +/- 1.3 quanta. This is a low enough occupation level that the nanoresonator is in its ground state statistically 21% of the time and opens up the possibility of preforming further quantum experiments. The system investigated in this dissertation is composed of a nanoscale mechanical resonator capacitively coupled to a superconducting coplanar waveguide resonator. The resonators were nanofabricated on a silicon substrate and cooled to low temperature in a dilution refrigerator system. Applying

  3. Isotopic yield measurement in the heavy mass region for {sup 239}Pu thermal neutron induced fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bail, A.; Serot, O.; Mathieu, L.; Litaize, O.; Materna, T.; Koester, U.; Faust, H.; Letourneau, A.; Panebianco, S.

    2011-09-15

    Despite the huge number of fission yield data available in the different evaluated nuclear data libraries, such as JEFF-3.1.1, ENDF/B-VII.0, and JENDL-4.0, more accurate data are still needed both for nuclear energy applications and for our understanding of the fission process itself. It is within the framework of this that measurements on the recoil mass spectrometer Lohengrin (at the Institut Laue-Langevin, Grenoble, France) was undertaken, to determine isotopic yields for the heavy fission products from the {sup 239}Pu(n{sub th},f) reaction. In order to do this, a new experimental method based on {gamma}-ray spectrometry was developed and validated by comparing our results with those performed in the light mass region with completely different setups. Hence, about 65 fission product yields were measured with an uncertainty that has been reduced on average by a factor of 2 compared to that previously available in the nuclear data libraries. In addition, for some fission products, a strongly deformed ionic charge distribution compared to a normal Gaussian shape was found, which was interpreted as being caused by the presence of a nanosecond isomeric state. Finally, a nuclear charge polarization has been observed in agreement, with the one described on other close fissioning systems.

  4. Robustness of Coherence: An Operational and Observable Measure of Quantum Coherence.

    PubMed

    Napoli, Carmine; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Piani, Marco; Johnston, Nathaniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2016-04-15

    Quantifying coherence is an essential endeavor for both quantum foundations and quantum technologies. Here, the robustness of coherence is defined and proven to be a full monotone in the context of the recently introduced resource theories of quantum coherence. The measure is shown to be observable, as it can be recast as the expectation value of a coherence witness operator for any quantum state. The robustness of coherence is evaluated analytically on relevant classes of states, and an efficient semidefinite program that computes it on general states is given. An operational interpretation is finally provided: the robustness of coherence quantifies the advantage enabled by a quantum state in a phase discrimination task.

  5. HiFi-MBQC High Fidelitiy Measurement-Based Quantum Computing using Superconducting Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-04

    server. Various blind delegated computations, including one- and two-qubit gates and the Deutsch and Grover quantum algorithms , are demonstrated...we implemented various instances of the quantum algorithm for solving of systems of linear equations. Reference: S. Barz, I. Kassal, M. Ringbauer... quantum computing an algorithm is performed by measurements on highly entangled resource states. Within the EOARD project we could consider measurement

  6. von Neumann measurement-related matrices and the nullity condition for quantum correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, MingJing; Ma, Teng; Zhang, TingGui; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2016-12-01

    We study von Neumann measurement-related matrices, and the nullity condition of quantum correlation. We investigate the properties of these matrices that are related to a von Neumann measurement. It is shown that these ( m 2 - 1) × ( m 2 - 1) matrices are idempotent, and have rank m - 1. These properties give rise to necessary conditions for the nullity of quantum correlations in bipartite systems. Finally, as an example we discuss quantum correlation in Bell diagonal states.

  7. Quantum discord with weak measurement operators of quasi-Werner states based on bipartite entangled coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, E.; Gómez, R.; Ladera, C. L.; Zambrano, A.

    2013-11-01

    Among many applications quantum weak measurements have been shown to be important in exploring fundamental physics issues, such as the experimental violation of the Heisenberg uncertainty relation and the Hardy paradox, and have also technological implications in quantum optics, quantum metrology and quantum communications, where the precision of the measurement is as important as the precision of quantum state preparation. The theory of weak measurement can be formulated using the pre-and post-selected quantum systems, as well as using the weak measurement operator formalism. In this work, we study the quantum discord (QD) of quasi-Werner mixed states based on bipartite entangled coherent states using the weak measurements operator, instead of the projective measurement operators. We then compare the quantum discord for both kinds of measurement operators, in terms of the entanglement quality, the latter being measured using the concept of concurrence. It's found greater quantum correlations using the weak measurement operators.

  8. The von Neumann model of measurement in quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Mello, Pier A.

    2014-01-08

    We describe how to obtain information on a quantum-mechanical system by coupling it to a probe and detecting some property of the latter, using a model introduced by von Neumann, which describes the interaction of the system proper with the probe in a dynamical way. We first discuss single measurements, where the system proper is coupled to one probe with arbitrary coupling strength. The goal is to obtain information on the system detecting the probe position. We find the reduced density operator of the system, and show how Lüders rule emerges as the limiting case of strong coupling. The von Neumann model is then generalized to two probes that interact successively with the system proper. Now we find information on the system by detecting the position-position and momentum-position correlations of the two probes. The so-called 'Wigner's formula' emerges in the strong-coupling limit, while 'Kirkwood's quasi-probability distribution' is found as the weak-coupling limit of the above formalism. We show that successive measurements can be used to develop a state-reconstruction scheme. Finally, we find a generalized transform of the state and the observables based on the notion of successive measurements.

  9. Ultrafast Quantum Process Tomography via Continuous Measurement and Convex Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, Charles; Riofrio, Carlos; Deutsch, Ivan

    2013-03-01

    Quantum process tomography (QPT) is an essential tool to diagnose the implementation of a dynamical map. However, the standard protocol is extremely resource intensive. For a Hilbert space of dimension d, it requires d2 different input preparations followed by state tomography via the estimation of the expectation values of d2 - 1 orthogonal observables. We show that when the process is nearly unitary, we can dramatically improve the efficiency and robustness of QPT through a collective continuous measurement protocol on an ensemble of identically prepared systems. Given the measurement history we obtain the process matrix via a convex program that optimizes a desired cost function. We study two estimators: least-squares and compressive sensing. Both allow rapid QPT due to the condition of complete positivity of the map; this is a powerful constraint to force the process to be physical and consistent with the data. We apply the method to a real experimental implementation, where optimal control is used to perform a unitary map on a d = 8 dimensional system of hyperfine levels in cesium atoms, and obtain the measurement record via Faraday spectroscopy of a laser probe. Supported by the NSF

  10. Measurement of the B{yields}D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K branching fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Amo Sanchez, P. del; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Tisserand, V.; Martinelli, M.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Hooberman, B.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.

    2011-02-01

    We present a measurement of the branching fractions of the 22 decay channels of the B{sup 0} and B{sup +} mesons to D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K, where the D{sup (*)} and D{sup (*)} mesons are fully reconstructed. Summing the 10 neutral modes and the 12 charged modes, the branching fractions are found to be B(B{sup 0}{yields}D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K)=(3.68{+-}0.10{+-}0.24)% and B(B{sup +}{yields}D{sup (*)}D{sup (*)}K)=(4.05{+-}0.11{+-}0.28)%, where the first uncertainties are statistical and the second systematic. The results are based on 429 fb{sup -1} of data containing 471x10{sup 6}BB pairs collected at the {Upsilon}(4S) resonance with the BABAR detector at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory.

  11. Improved InGaN epitaxy yield by precise temperature measurement :yearly report 1.

    SciTech Connect

    Koleske, Daniel David; Creighton, James Randall; Russell, Michael J.; Fischer, Arthur Joseph

    2006-08-01

    This Report summarizes the first year progress (October 1, 2004 to September 30, 2005) made under a NETL funded project entitled ''Improved InGaN Epitaxy Yield by Precise Temperature Measurement''. This Project addresses the production of efficient green LEDs, which are currently the least efficient of the primary colors. The Project Goals are to advance IR and UV-violet pyrometry to include real time corrections for surface emissivity on multiwafer MOCVD reactors. Increasing wafer yield would dramatically reduce high brightness LED costs and accelerate the commercial manufacture of inexpensive white light LEDs with very high color quality. This work draws upon and extends our previous research (funded by DOE) that developed emissivity correcting pyrometers (ECP) based on the high-temperature GaN opacity near 400 nm (the ultraviolet-violet range, or UVV), and the sapphire opacity in the mid-IR (MIR) near 7.5 microns.

  12. Measurement of delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gundorin, N. A.; Zhdanova, K. V.; Zhuchko, V. E.; Pikelner, L. B. Rebrova, N. V.; Salamatin, I. M.; Smirnov, V. I.; Furman, V. I.

    2007-06-15

    The delayed-neutron yield from thermal-neutron-induced fission of the {sup 237}Np nucleus was measured using a sample periodically exposed to a pulsed neutron beam with subsequent detection of neutrons during the time intervals between pulses. The experiment was realized on an Isomer-M setup mounted in the IBR-2 pulsed reactor channel equipped with a mirror neutron guide. The setup and the experimental procedure are described, the background sources are thoroughly analyzed, and the experimental data are presented. The total delayed-neutron yield from {sup 237}Np fission induced by thermal neutrons is {nu}{sub d} = 0.0110 {+-} 0.0009. This study was performed at the Frank Laboratory of Neutron Physics (JINR, Dubna)

  13. Neutron spectroscopy by thermalization light yield measurement in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, T.; Nattress, J.; Mayer, Michael F.; Lin, M-W; Jovanovic, Igor

    2016-12-11

    An exothermic neutron capture reaction can be used to uniquely identify neutrons in particle detectors. With the use of a capture-gated coincidence technique, the sequence of scatter events that lead to neutron thermalization prior to the neutron capture can also be used to measure neutron energy. We report on the measurement of thermalization light yield via a time-of-flight technique in a polyvinyl toluene-based scintillator EJ-290 within a heterogeneous composite detector that also includes 6Li-doped glass scintillator. The thermalization light output exhibits a strong correlation with neutron energy because of the preference for near-complete energy deposition prior to the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron capture reaction. The nonproportionality of the light yield from nuclear recoils contributes to the observed broadening of the distribution of thermalization light output. The nonproportional dependence of the scintillation light output in the EJ-290 scintillator as a function of proton recoil energy has been characterized in the range of 0.3–14.1 MeV via the Birks parametrization through a combination of time-of-flight measurement and previously conducted measurements with Monoenergetic neutron sources.

  14. Neutron spectroscopy by thermalization light yield measurement in a composite heterogeneous scintillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, T.; Nattress, J.; Mayer, M.; Lin, M.-W.; Jovanovic, I.

    2016-12-01

    An exothermic neutron capture reaction can be used to uniquely identify neutrons in particle detectors. With the use of a capture-gated coincidence technique, the sequence of scatter events that lead to neutron thermalization prior to the neutron capture can also be used to measure neutron energy. We report on the measurement of thermalization light yield via a time-of-flight technique in a polyvinyl toluene-based scintillator EJ-290 within a heterogeneous composite detector that also includes 6Li-doped glass scintillator. The thermalization light output exhibits a strong correlation with neutron energy because of the preference for near-complete energy deposition prior to the 6Li(n,t)4He neutron capture reaction. The nonproportionality of the light yield from nuclear recoils contributes to the observed broadening of the distribution of thermalization light output. The nonproportional dependence of the scintillation light output in the EJ-290 scintillator as a function of proton recoil energy has been characterized in the range of 0.3-14.1 MeV via the Birks parametrization through a combination of time-of-flight measurement and previously conducted measurements with monoenergetic neutron sources.

  15. Geometric Measure of Quantum Discord for Entanglement of Total Dirac Fields in Noninertial Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, Wen-Chao; Zhang, Lei

    2017-04-01

    We study the geometric measure of quantum discord of total Dirac fields in noninertial frames. As a comparison, we also calculate the corresponding geometric measure of entanglement of the same system. We discuss the properties of geometric measure of quantum discord and geometric measure of entanglement for this system with acceleration parameter and the parameter describing the entangle degree of the system in detail. Our results show that from an overall perspective, two geometric measures have similar behavior with the variation of the entangle parameter and the acceleration parameter. We find that this tripartite system is monogamous for the geometric measure of quantum discord.

  16. Photosynthetic maximum quantum yield increases are an essential component of the Southern Ocean phytoplankton response to iron.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Michael R; Lance, Veronica P; Apprill, Amy M; Bidigare, Robert R; Johnson, Zackary I; Mitchell, B Greg; Smith, Walker O; Barber, Richard T

    2008-03-25

    It is well established that an increase in iron supply causes an increase in total oceanic primary production in many regions, but the physiological mechanism driving the observed increases has not been clearly identified. The Southern Ocean iron enrichment experiment, an iron fertilization experiment in the waters closest to Antarctica, resulted in a 9-fold increase in chlorophyll (Chl) concentration and a 5-fold increase in integrated primary production. Upon iron addition, the maximum quantum yield of photosynthesis (phi(m)) rapidly doubled, from 0.011 to 0.025 mol C.mol quanta(-1). Paradoxically, this increase in light-limited productivity was not accompanied by a significant increase in light-saturated productivity (P(max)(b)). P(max)(b), maximum Chl normalized productivity, was 1.34 mg C.mg Chl(-1).h(-1) outside and 1.49 mg C.mg Chl(-1).h(-1) inside the iron-enriched patch. The importance of phi(m) as compared with P(max)(b) in controlling the biological response to iron addition has vast implications for understanding the ecological response to iron. We show that an iron-driven increase in phi(m) is the proximate physiological mechanism affected by iron addition and can account for most of the increases in primary production. The relative importance of phi(m) over P(max)(b) in this iron-fertilized bloom highlights the limitations of often-used primary productivity algorithms that are driven by estimates of P(max)(b) but largely ignore variability in phi(m) and light-limited productivity. To use primary productivity models that include variability in iron supply in prediction or forecasting, the variability of light-limited productivity must be resolved.

  17. Quantum structures due to fluctuations of the measurement situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aerts, Diederik

    1993-12-01

    We analyze the meaning of the nonclassical aspects of quantum structures. We proceed by introducing a simple mechanistic macroscopic experimental situation that gives rise to quantum-like structures. We use this situation as a guiding example for our attempts to explain the origin of the nonclassical aspects of quantum structures. We see that the quantum probabilities can be introduced as a consequence of the presence of fluctuations on the experimental apparatuses, and show that the full quantum structure can be obtained in this way. We define the classical limit as the physical situation that arises when the fluctuations on the experiment apparatuses disappear. In the limit case we come to a classical structure, but in between we find structures that are neither quantum nor classical. In this sense, our approach not only gives an explanation for the nonclassical structure of quantum theory, but also makes it possible to define and study the structure describing the intermediate new situations. By investigating how the nonlocal quantum behavior disappears during the limiting process, we can explain the“apparent”locality of the classical macroscopic world. We come to the conclusion that quantum structures are the ordinary structures of reality, and that our difficulties of becoming aware of this fact are due to prescientific prejudices, some of which we point out.

  18. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. "Batavia" (green) and cv. "Lollo Rossa" (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m(-2) s(-1) for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m(-2) s(-1) from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent.

  19. Predawn and high intensity application of supplemental blue light decreases the quantum yield of PSII and enhances the amount of phenolic acids, flavonoids, and pigments in Lactuca sativa

    PubMed Central

    Ouzounis, Theoharis; Razi Parjikolaei, Behnaz; Fretté, Xavier; Rosenqvist, Eva; Ottosen, Carl-Otto

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of blue light intensity and timing, two cultivars of lettuce [Lactuca sativa cv. “Batavia” (green) and cv. “Lollo Rossa” (red)] were grown in a greenhouse compartment in late winter under natural light and supplemental high pressure sodium (SON-T) lamps yielding 90 (±10) μmol m−2 s−1 for up to 20 h, but never between 17:00 and 21:00. The temperature in the greenhouse compartments was 22/11°C day/night, respectively. The five light-emitting diode (LED) light treatments were Control (no blue addition), 1B 06-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 06:00 to 08:00), 1B 21-08 (Blue light at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 21:00 to 08:00), 2B 17-19 (Blue at 80 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00), and 1B 17-19 (Blue at 45 μmol m−2 s−1 from 17:00 to 19:00). Total fresh and dry weight was not affected with additional blue light; however, plants treated with additional blue light were more compact. The stomatal conductance in the green lettuce cultivar was higher for all treatments with blue light compared to the Control. Photosynthetic yields measured with chlorophyll fluorescence showed different response between the cultivars; in red lettuce, the quantum yield of PSII decreased and the yield of non-photochemical quenching increased with increasing blue light, whereas in green lettuce no difference was observed. Quantification of secondary metabolites showed that all four treatments with additional blue light had higher amount of pigments, phenolic acids, and flavonoids compared to the Control. The effect was more prominent in red lettuce, highlighting that the results vary among treatments and compounds. Our results indicate that not only high light level triggers photoprotective heat dissipation in the plant, but also the specific spectral composition of the light itself at low intensities. However, these plant responses to light are cultivar dependent. PMID:25767473

  20. Measurement of gas yields and flow rates using a custom flowmeter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Circone, S.; Kirby, S.H.; Pinkston, J.C.; Stern, L.A.

    2001-01-01

    A simple gas collection apparatus based on the principles of a Torricelli tube has been designed and built to measure gas volume yields and flow rates. This instrument is routinely used to monitor and collect methane gas released during methane hydrate dissociation experiments. It is easily and inexpensively built, operates at ambient pressures and temperatures, and measures gas volumes of up to 7 L to a precision of about 15 ml (about 0.0025 mol). It is capable of measuring gas flow rates varying from more than 103 to less than 10-1 ml/min during gas evolution events that span minutes to several days. We have obtained a highly reproducible hydrate number of n=5.891 with a propagated uncertainty of ??0.020 for synthetic methane hydrate. ?? 2001 American Institute of Physics.